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Sample records for caffeine markedly enhanced

  1. Caffeine Consumption, Expectancies of Caffeine-Enhanced Performance, and Caffeinism Symptoms among University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, John R.; Petree, Allen

    1990-01-01

    Gathered self-report data on college students' (n=797) expectations of caffeine-enhanced performance, level of beverage caffeine consumed daily, and caffeinism signs experienced after consumption of caffeinated beverages. Results supported extending the expectancies model of substance use motivation from alcohol to caffeine. (Author/ABL)

  2. Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    ... mood. Caffeine is in tea, coffee, chocolate, many soft drinks, and pain relievers and other over-the-counter ... Teens usually get most of their caffeine from soft drinks and energy drinks. (In addition to caffeine, these ...

  3. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  4. Caffeine use by children: the quest for enhancement.

    PubMed

    Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2007-01-01

    Fair play, both in academics and sports, is a concept that is challenged by the notion of performance enhancement. Both cognitive and physical performance can be viewed as potentially enhanceable, and arguments can be made that enhancement can serve two purposes: gaining an edge or keeping up with others (who may or may not have used performance-enhancing substances). Caffeine, a central nervous system and cardiac stimulant, is frequently used by children for both academic and athletic performance enhancement. In fact, the marketplace contains a plethora of caffeinated products marketed directly to children. This article examines safety and ethical issues associated with the use of caffeine by children and explores the question: Can cognitive performance enhancement be ethically permissible if sports performance enhancement is not? PMID:17674233

  5. Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, kola nuts, and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. ...

  6. Caffeine: cognitive and physical performance enhancer or psychoactive drug?

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Simone; Piacentino, Daria; Daria, Piacentino; Sani, Gabriele; Aromatario, Mariarosaria

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine use is increasing worldwide. The underlying motivations are mainly concentration and memory enhancement and physical performance improvement. Coffee and caffeine-containing products affect the cardiovascular system, with their positive inotropic and chronotropic effects, and the central nervous system, with their locomotor activity stimulation and anxiogenic-like effects. Thus, it is of interest to examine whether these effects could be detrimental for health. Furthermore, caffeine abuse and dependence are becoming more and more common and can lead to caffeine intoxication, which puts individuals at risk for premature and unnatural death. The present review summarizes the main findings concerning caffeine's mechanisms of action (focusing on adenosine antagonism, intracellular calcium mobilization, and phosphodiesterases inhibition), use, abuse, dependence, intoxication, and lethal effects. It also suggests that the concepts of toxic and lethal doses are relative, since doses below the toxic and/or lethal range may play a causal role in intoxication or death. This could be due to caffeine's interaction with other substances or to the individuals' preexisting metabolism alterations or diseases. PMID:26074744

  7. Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, kola nuts, and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy. For most people, the amount of caffeine in ...

  8. Caffeine: Cognitive and Physical Performance Enhancer or Psychoactive Drug?

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Simone; Daria, Piacentino; Sani, Gabriele; Aromatario, Mariarosaria

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine use is increasing worldwide. The underlying motivations are mainly concentration and memory enhancement and physical performance improvement. Coffee and caffeine-containing products affect the cardiovascular system, with their positive inotropic and chronotropic effects, and the central nervous system, with their locomotor activity stimulation and anxiogenic-like effects. Thus, it is of interest to examine whether these effects could be detrimental for health. Furthermore, caffeine abuse and dependence are becoming more and more common and can lead to caffeine intoxication, which puts individuals at risk for premature and unnatural death. The present review summarizes the main findings concerning caffeine’s mechanisms of action (focusing on adenosine antagonism, intracellular calcium mobilization, and phosphodiesterases inhibition), use, abuse, dependence, intoxication, and lethal effects. It also suggests that the concepts of toxic and lethal doses are relative, since doses below the toxic and/or lethal range may play a causal role in intoxication or death. This could be due to caffeine’s interaction with other substances or to the individuals' preexisting metabolism alterations or diseases. PMID:26074744

  9. Acute Caffeine Consumption Enhances the Executive Control of Visual Attention in Habitual Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Giles, Grace E.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a dose of 200-400mg caffeine can enhance both vigilance and the executive control of visual attention in individuals with low caffeine consumption profiles. The present study seeks to determine whether individuals with relatively high caffeine consumption profiles would show similar advantages. To this end, we examined…

  10. Chronic caffeine treatment enhances the resilience to social defeat stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yong-Qin; Zhang, Chun; Wang, Jian-Xin; Hou, Jia; Yang, Xu; Qin, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Strong evidence has shown that caffeine exerts antidepressant-like effects in chronic stress situations by increasing dopamine levels. However, whether caffeine mediates the dopaminergic system and interferes with the resilience to social defeat stress in mice is unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of caffeine in the behavioral responses to social defeat stress and the possible regulatory role of the dopaminergic system. Mice experienced chronic social defeat stress for 10 days. Caffeine was administered intraperitoneally before, during and after social defeat stress. The time spent in interaction zone, social interaction ratio and sucrose preference test was used to measure the social avoidance and anhedonia in mice. The results showed that chronic pretreatment with caffeine for 14 days and for 10 days during stress reversed the avoidance of social behavior and anhedonia induced by social defeat stress in mice, suggesting the enhancement of the resilience to social defeat stress induced by caffeine. However, neither the treatment with caffeine only during the social defeat stress for 10 days nor the treatment with acute caffeine after defeat stress altered the resilience to stress. Furthermore, chronic caffeine treatment did not affect the normal locomotor activity and the desperate behavior in naïve mice. Moreover, the antagonism of dopamine D1 receptor and not D2 receptor reversed the effect of caffeine on the social avoidance and depressive-like behavior. Finally, pretreatment with higher doses of caffeine did not affect the behavioral response to social defeat stress. Taken together, our findings provide new insight into the effects of caffeine on social avoidance and anhedonia in mice. In addition, our results illustrated the value of measuring changes in depressive-like behavior before and after social defeat stress to determine the potential treatment of caffeine on depression through the regulation of dopaminergic system. PMID

  11. Acute stress blocks the caffeine-induced enhancement of contextual memory retrieval in mice.

    PubMed

    Pierard, Chistophe; Krazem, Ali; Henkous, Nadia; Decorte, Laurence; Béracochéa, Daniel

    2015-08-15

    This study investigated in mice the dose-effect of caffeine on memory retrieval in non-stress and stress conditions. C57 Bl/6 Jico mice learned two consecutive discriminations (D1 and D2) in a four-hole board which involved either distinct contextual (CSD) or similar contextual (SSD) cues. All mice received an i.p. injection of vehicle or caffeine (8, 16 or 32mg/kg) 30min before the test session. Results showed that in non-stress conditions, the 16mg/kg caffeine dose induced a significant enhancement of D1 performance in CSD but not in SSD. Hence, we studied the effect of an acute stress (electric footshocks) administered 15min before the test session on D1 performance in caffeine-treated mice. Results showed that stress significantly decreased D1 performance in vehicle-treated controls and the memory-enhancing effect induced by the 16mg/kg caffeine dose in non-stress condition is no longer observed. Interestingly, whereas caffeine-treated mice exhibited weaker concentrations of plasma corticosterone as compared to vehicles in non-stress condition, stress significantly increased plasma corticosterone concentrations in caffeine-treated mice which reached similar level to that of controls. Overall, the acute stress blocked both the endocrinological and memory retrieval enhancing effects of caffeine. PMID:25934571

  12. Synergistic Skin Penetration Enhancer and Nanoemulsion Formulations Promote the Human Epidermal Permeation of Caffeine and Naproxen.

    PubMed

    Abd, Eman; Namjoshi, Sarika; Mohammed, Yousuf H; Roberts, Michael S; Grice, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    We examined the extent of skin permeation enhancement of the hydrophilic drug caffeine and lipophilic drug naproxen applied in nanoemulsions incorporating skin penetration enhancers. Infinite doses of fully characterized oil-in-water nanoemulsions containing the skin penetration enhancers oleic acid or eucalyptol as oil phases and caffeine (3%) or naproxen (2%) were applied to human epidermal membranes in Franz diffusion cells, along with aqueous control solutions. Caffeine and naproxen fluxes were determined over 8 h. Solute solubility in the formulations and in the stratum corneum (SC), as well as the uptake of product components into the SC were measured. The nanoemulsions significantly enhanced the skin penetration of caffeine and naproxen, compared to aqueous control solutions. Caffeine maximum flux enhancement was associated with a synergistic increase in both caffeine SC solubility and skin diffusivity, whereas a formulation-increased solubility in the SC was the dominant determinant for increased naproxen fluxes. Enhancements in SC solubility were related to the uptake of the formulation excipients containing the active compounds into the SC. Enhanced skin penetration in these systems is largely driven by uptake of formulation excipients containing the active compounds into the SC with impacts on SC solubility and diffusivity. PMID:26554868

  13. Spectroscopic study of surface enhanced Raman scattering of caffeine on borohydride-reduced silver colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomin; Gu, Huaimin; Shen, Gaoshan; Dong, Xiao; Kang, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of caffeine on borohydride-reduced silver colloids system under different aqueous solution environment has been studied in this paper. The relative intensity of SERS of caffeine significantly varies with different concentrations of sodium chloride and silver particles. However, at too high or too low concentration of sodium chloride and silver particle, the enhancement of SERS spectra is not evident. The SERS spectra of caffeine suggest that the contribution of the charge transfer mechanism to SERS may be dominant. The chloride ions can significantly enhance the efficiency of SERS, while the enhancement is selective, as the efficiency in charge transfer enhancement is higher than in electromagnetic enhancement. Therefore, it can be concluded that the active site of chloride ion locates on the bond between the caffeine and the silver surface. In addition, the SERS spectra of caffeine on borohydride-reduced and citrate-reduced silver colloids are different, which may be due to different states caffeine adsorbed on silver surface under different silver colloids.

  14. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. VII. Evidence that caffeine enhances expression of potentially lethal radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Beetham, K.L.; Tolmach, L.J.

    1984-12-01

    HeLa cells irradiated with 2 Gy of 220-kV X rays suffer a 60-70% loss of colony-forming ability which is increased to 90% by postirradiation treatment with 10 mM caffeine for 6 hr. The detailed postirradiation patterns of cell death and sister-cell fusion in such cultures and in cultures in which the colony-forming ability was brought to about the same level by treatment with a larger (4 Gy) X-ray dose alone or by longer (48 hr) treatment with 10 mM caffeine alone were recorded by time-lapse cinemicrography. Because the patterns of cell death and fusion differ radically in irradiated and in caffeine-treated cultures, the response of the additional cells killed by the combined treatment can be identified as X-ray induced rather than caffeine induced. The appearance of cultures after several days of incubation confirms the similarity of the post-treatment patterns of proliferation in cultures suffering enhanced killing to those occurring in cultures treated with larger doses of X rays alone. It is concluded that x rays do not sensitize cells to caffeine, but rather that caffeine enhanced the expression of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage.

  15. What Users Think about the Differences between Caffeine and Illicit/Prescription Stimulants for Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Andreas G.

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological cognitive enhancement (CE) is a topic of increasing public awareness. In the scientific literature on student use of CE as a study aid for academic performance enhancement, there are high prevalence rates regarding the use of caffeinated substances (coffee, caffeinated drinks, caffeine tablets) but remarkably lower prevalence rates regarding the use of illicit/prescription stimulants such as amphetamines or methylphenidate. While the literature considers the reasons and mechanisms for these different prevalence rates from a theoretical standpoint, it lacks empirical data to account for healthy students who use both, caffeine and illicit/prescription stimulants, exclusively for the purpose of CE. Therefore, we extensively interviewed a sample of 18 healthy university students reporting non-medical use of caffeine as well as illicit/prescription stimulants for the purpose of CE in a face-to-face setting about their opinions regarding differences in general and morally-relevant differences between caffeine and stimulant use for CE. 44% of all participants answered that there is a general difference between the use of caffeine and illicit/prescription stimulants for CE, 28% did not differentiate, 28% could not decide. Furthermore, 39% stated that there is a moral difference, 56% answered that there is no moral difference and one participant was not able to comment on moral aspects. Participants came to their judgements by applying three dimensions: medical, ethical and legal. Weighing the medical, ethical and legal aspects corresponded to the students' individual preferences of substances used for CE. However, their views only partly depicted evidence-based medical aspects and the ethical issues involved. This result shows the need for well-directed and differentiated information to prevent the potentially harmful use of illicit or prescription stimulants for CE. PMID:22768218

  16. Removal of caffeine from green tea by microwave-enhanced vacuum ice water extraction.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zaixiang; Er, Chaojuan; Li, Jing; Wang, Hongxin; Zhu, Song; Sun, Juntao

    2012-02-24

    In order to selectively remove caffeine from green tea, a microwave-enhanced vacuum ice water extraction (MVIE) method was proposed. The effects of MVIE variables including extraction time, microwave power, and solvent to solid radio on the removal yield of caffeine and the loss of total phenolics (TP) from green tea were investigated. The optimized conditions were as follows: solvent (mL) to solid (g) ratio was 10:1, microwave extraction time was 6 min, microwave power was 350 W and 2.5 h of vacuum ice water extraction. The removal yield of caffeine by MVIE was 87.6%, which was significantly higher than that by hot water extraction, indicating a significant improvement of removal efficiency. Moreover, the loss of TP of green tea in the proposed method was much lower than that in the hot water extraction. After decaffeination by MVIE, the removal yield of TP tea was 36.2%, and the content of TP in green tea was still higher than 170 mg g(-1). Therefore, the proposed microwave-enhanced vacuum ice water extraction was selective, more efficient for the removal of caffeine. The main phenolic compounds of green tea were also determined, and the results indicated that the contents of several catechins were almost not changed in MVIE. This study suggests that MVIE is a new and good alternative for the removal of caffeine from green tea, with a great potential for industrial application. PMID:22284877

  17. Caffeine-enhanced survival of radiation-sensitive, repair-deficient Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1983-11-01

    A clone of V79 Chinese hamster cells (V79-AL162/S-10) with unique properties has been isolated after a challenge of parental cells (V79-AL162) with 1 mM ouabain. Compared with parental cells, or with other clones isolated after the ouabain challenge, these cells form smaller colonies, are more sensitive to both x rays and fission-spectrum neutrons, and respond atypically to a postirradiation treatment with caffeine. Their enhanced response to x rays results mainly from a large reduction in the shoulder of their survival curve, probably because in late S phase, the most resistant phase in the cell cycle, the survival curve of these cells has a reduced shoulder width. Caffeine, and to a lesser extent theophylline, added to the colony-forming medium immediately after exposure appreciably increases the width of the shoulder of these sensitive cells, whereas caffeine has the opposite effect on the response of normal V79 cells. Thus the unique response of the V79-AL162/S-10 cells to a radiation posttreatment with caffeine (increased survival) results from a net increase in their ability to repair damage that is otherwise lethal; caffeine treatment ordinarly prevents normal V79 cells from repairing damage that is only potentially lethal.

  18. Extraction and removal of caffeine from green tea by ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei-Qiang; Li, Di-Cai; Lv, Yang-Xiao; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2010-05-01

    Low-caffeine or caffeine-removed tea and its products are widely welcomed on market in recent years. In the present study, we adopt ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid extraction process to remove caffeine from green tea. An orthogonal experiment (L16 (4(5))) was applied to optimize the best removal conditions. Extraction pressure, extraction time, power of ultrasound, moisture content, and temperature were the main factors to influence the removal rate of caffeine from green tea. The 5 factors chosen for the present investigation were based on the results of a single-factor test. The optimum removal conditions were determined as follows: extraction pressure of 30 MPa, temperature at 55 degrees C, time of 4 h, 30% moisture content, and ultrasound power of 100 W. Chromatogram and ultraviolet analysis of raw material and decaffeinates suggests that under optimized conditions, the caffeine of green tea was effectively removed and minished without damaging the structure of active ingredients in green tea. PMID:20546396

  19. Enhancing physical performance in elite junior tennis players with a caffeinated energy drink.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Portillo, Javier; Muñoz, Victor; Juarez, Daniel; Del Coso, Juan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeinated energy drink to enhance physical performance in elite junior tennis players. In 2 different sessions separated by 1 wk, 14 young (16 ± 1 y) elite-level tennis players ingested 3 mg caffeine per kg body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed a handgrip-strength test, a maximal-velocity serving test, and an 8 × 15-m sprint test and then played a simulated singles match (best of 3 sets). Instantaneous running speed during the matches was assessed using global positioning (GPS) devices. Furthermore, the matches were videotaped and notated afterward. In comparison with the placebo drink, the ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased handgrip force by ~4.2% ± 7.2% (P = .03) in both hands, the running pace at high intensity (46.7 ± 28.5 vs 63.3 ± 27.7 m/h, P = .02), and the number of sprints (12.1 ± 1.7 vs 13.2 ± 1.7, P = .05) during the simulated match. There was a tendency for increased maximal running velocity during the sprint test (22.3 ± 2.0 vs 22.9 ± 2.1 km/h, P = .07) and higher percentage of points won on service with the caffeinated energy drink (49.7% ± 9.8% vs 56.4% ± 10.0%, P = .07) in comparison with the placebo drink. The energy drink did not improve ball velocity during the serving test (42.6 ± 4.8 vs 42.7 ± 5.0 m/s, P = .49). The preexercise ingestion of caffeinated energy drinks was effective to enhance some aspects of physical performance of elite junior tennis players. PMID:25158287

  20. Caffeine ingestion enhances perceptual responses during intermittent exercise in female team-game players.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ajmol; O'Donnell, Jemma; Von Hurst, Pamela; Foskett, Andrew; Holland, Sherina; Starck, Carlene; Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay

    2016-01-01

    We examined the influence of caffeine supplementation on cognitive performance and perceptual responses in female team-game players taking low-dose monophasic oral contraceptives of the same hormonal composition. Ten females (24 ± 4 years; 59.7 ± 3.5 kg body mass; 2-6 training sessions per week) took part in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover-design trial. A 90-min intermittent treadmill-running protocol was completed 60 min following ingestion of a capsule containing either 6 mg • kg(-1) anhydrous caffeine or artificial sweetener (placebo). Perceptual responses (ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), feeling scale (FS), felt arousal scale (FAS)), mood (profile of mood states (POMS)) and cognitive performance (Stroop test, choice reaction time (CRT)) were completed before, during and after the exercise protocol, as well as after ~12 h post exercise. Caffeine ingestion significantly enhanced the ratings of pleasure (P = 0.008) and arousal (P = 0.002) during the exercise protocol, as well as increased vigour (POMS; P = 0.007), while there was a tendency for reduced fatigue (POMS; P = 0.068). Caffeine ingestion showed a tendency to decrease RPE (P = 0.068) and improve reaction times in the Stroop (P = 0.072) and CRT (P = 0.087) tests. Caffeine supplementation showed a positive effect on perceptual parameters by increasing vigour and a tendency to decrease fatigue during intermittent running activity in female games players taking low-dose monophasic oral contraceptive steroids (OCS). PMID:26045170

  1. Caffeine Use and Extroversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, R. Eric; Meliska, Charles J.

    Some research on the stimulant effect of caffeine suggests that the amount of behavioral enhancement produced by caffeine may depend on subjects' prior experience with the task and the drug. A study was undertaken to test whether prior experience with a task while under the influence of caffeine would facilitate performance of that task. Male…

  2. Caffeinated Energy Drinks -- A Growing Problem

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Chad J.; Strain, Eric C.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of Red Bull in Austria in 1987 and in the United States in 1997, the energy drink market has grown exponentially. Hundreds of different brands are now marketed, with caffeine content ranging from a modest 50 mg to an alarming 505 mg per can or bottle. Regulation of energy drinks, including content labeling and health warnings differs across countries, with some of the most lax regulatory requirements in the U.S. The absence of regulatory oversight has resulted in aggressive marketing of energy drinks, targeted primarily toward young males, for psychoactive, performance-enhancing and stimulant drug effects. There are increasing reports of caffeine intoxication from energy drinks, and it seems likely that problems with caffeine dependence and withdrawal will also increase. In children and adolescents who are not habitual caffeine users, vulnerability to caffeine intoxication may be markedly increased due to an absence of pharmacological tolerance. Genetic factors may also contribute to an individual’s vulnerability to caffeine related disorders including caffeine intoxication, dependence, and withdrawal. The combined use of caffeine and alcohol is increasing sharply, and studies suggest that such combined use may increase the rate of alcohol-related injury. Several studies suggest that energy drinks may serve as a gateway to other forms of drug dependence. Regulatory implications concerning labeling and advertising, and the clinical implications for children and adolescents are discussed. PMID:18809264

  3. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. IV. Progression delays and enhanced cell killing at high caffeine concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmach, L.J.; Busse, P.M.

    1980-05-01

    The response of x-irradiated and unirradiated HeLa S3 cells to treatment with caffeine at concentrations between 1 and 10 nM has been examined with respect to both delay in progression through the cell generation cycle and enhancement of the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage. Progression is delayed in a concentration-dependent fashion: the generation time is doubled at about 4 mM. The duration of G/sub 1/ is lengthened, and the rate of DNA synthesis is reduced, although the kinetics are different in the two phases; the rate of DNA synthesis is usually unaffected at 1 or 2 mM, while there is no concentration threshold for the slowing of progression through G/sub 1/. Progression through G/sub 2/ appears to be unaffected by concentrations up to at least 10 mM. Killing of irradiated cells in G/sub 2/ is somewhat greater after treatment with the higher caffeine concentrations than reported previously for 1 mM. Moreover, an additional mode of killing is observed in irradiated G/sub 1/ cells which had been found previously to be only slightly affected by 1 mM caffeine; they suffer extensive killing at concentrations above 5 mM. The time-survival curves for irradiated, caffeine-treated G/sub 1/ and G/sub 2/ cells have characteristically different shapes. The dose-survival curves for cells treated with the higher caffeine concentrations display steeper terminal slopes and narrower shoulders.

  4. Caffeine and exercise.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2003-08-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world, and athletes frequently use it as an ergogenic aid. It improves performance and endurance during prolonged, exhaustive exercise. To a lesser degree it also enhances short-term, high-intensity athletic performance. Caffeine improves concentration, reduces fatigue, and enhances alertness. Habitual intake does not diminish caffeine's ergogenic properties. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiologic effects of caffeine, but adenosine receptor antagonism most likely accounts for the primary mode of action. It is relatively safe and has no known negative performance effects, nor does it cause significant dehydration or electrolyte imbalance during exercise. Routine caffeine consumption may cause tolerance or dependence, and abrupt discontinuation produces irritability, mood shifts, headache, drowsiness, or fatigue. Major sport governing bodies ban excessive use of caffeine, but current monitoring techniques are inadequate, and ethical dilemmas persist regarding caffeine intake by athletes. PMID:12834577

  5. Make caffeine visible: a fluorescent caffeine "traffic light" detector.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated. PMID:23877095

  6. Investigation of the binding sites and orientation of caffeine on human serum albumin by surface-enhanced Raman scattering and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weinan; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Yaokai; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Liangren; Zhao, Bing; Tu, Pengfei

    2013-11-01

    Fluorescence, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) were introduced to explore the absorptive geometry of caffeine on Human Serum Albumin (HSA) at physiological condition. The molecular docking was also employed to make a better understanding of the interaction between caffeine and HSA as well as to elucidate the detailed information of the major binding site. The results showed that caffeine could bind to HSA via the hydrophobic force of aromatic stacking and the main binding group on caffeine could be the pyrimidine ring. In addition, a consecutive set of changes in the orientation of caffeine molecule had been demonstrated during the process of caffeine binding to HSA, and the primary binding site was considered to be a hydrophobic cavity formed by Leu198, Lys199, Ser202, Phe211, Trp214, Val344, Ser454 and Leu481 in domain II.

  7. Caffeine Enhances Real-World Language Processing: Evidence from a Proofreading Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Rapp, David N.; Ditman, Tali; Taylor, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine has become the most prevalently consumed psychostimulant in the world, but its influences on daily real-world functioning are relatively unknown. The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a commonplace language task that required readers to identify and correct 4 error types in extended…

  8. Using Caffeine Pills for Performance Enhancement. An Experimental Study on University Students' Willingness and Their Intention to Try Neuroenhancements.

    PubMed

    Brand, Ralf; Koch, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that university students sometimes use caffeine pills for neuroenhancement (NE; non-medical use of psychoactive substances or technology to produce a subjective enhancement in psychological functioning and experience), especially during exam preparation. In our factorial survey experiment, we manipulated the evidence participants were given about the prevalence of NE amongst peers and measured the resulting effects on the psychological predictors included in the Prototype-Willingness Model of risk behavior. Two hundred and thirty-one university students were randomized to a high prevalence condition (read faked research results overstating usage of caffeine pills amongst peers by a factor of 5; 50%), low prevalence condition (half the estimated prevalence; 5%) or control condition (no information about peer prevalence). Structural equation modeling confirmed that our participants' willingness and intention to use caffeine pills in the next exam period could be explained by their past use of neuroenhancers, attitude to NE and subjective norm about use of caffeine pills whilst image of the typical user was a much less important factor. Provision of inaccurate information about prevalence reduced the predictive power of attitude with respect to willingness by 40-45%. This may be because receiving information about peer prevalence which does not fit with their perception of the social norm causes people to question their attitude. Prevalence information might exert a deterrent effect on NE via the attitude-willingness association. We argue that research into NE and deterrence of associated risk behaviors should be informed by psychological theory. PMID:26903909

  9. Using Caffeine Pills for Performance Enhancement. An Experimental Study on University Students’ Willingness and Their Intention to Try Neuroenhancements

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Ralf; Koch, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that university students sometimes use caffeine pills for neuroenhancement (NE; non-medical use of psychoactive substances or technology to produce a subjective enhancement in psychological functioning and experience), especially during exam preparation. In our factorial survey experiment, we manipulated the evidence participants were given about the prevalence of NE amongst peers and measured the resulting effects on the psychological predictors included in the Prototype-Willingness Model of risk behavior. Two hundred and thirty-one university students were randomized to a high prevalence condition (read faked research results overstating usage of caffeine pills amongst peers by a factor of 5; 50%), low prevalence condition (half the estimated prevalence; 5%) or control condition (no information about peer prevalence). Structural equation modeling confirmed that our participants’ willingness and intention to use caffeine pills in the next exam period could be explained by their past use of neuroenhancers, attitude to NE and subjective norm about use of caffeine pills whilst image of the typical user was a much less important factor. Provision of inaccurate information about prevalence reduced the predictive power of attitude with respect to willingness by 40-45%. This may be because receiving information about peer prevalence which does not fit with their perception of the social norm causes people to question their attitude. Prevalence information might exert a deterrent effect on NE via the attitude-willingness association. We argue that research into NE and deterrence of associated risk behaviors should be informed by psychological theory. PMID:26903909

  10. Caffeine and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Soft Drink Association previous continue What's Caffeine Sensitivity? Caffeine sensitivity refers to the amount of caffeine that will ... caffeine necessary to produce side effects. However, caffeine sensitivity is most affected by daily caffeine intake. People ...

  11. A Combination of Amino Acids and Caffeine Enhances Sprint Running Capacity in a Hot, Hypoxic Environment.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Tom R; Potter, Aaron; Billaut, François; Panchuk, Derek; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J; Chen, Ting-Ting; McQuade, Leon; Stepto, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Heat and hypoxia exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) fatigue. We therefore investigated whether essential amino acid (EAA) and caffeine ingestion attenuates CNS fatigue in a simulated team sport-specific running protocol in a hot, hypoxic environment. Subelite male team sport athletes (n = 8) performed a repeat sprint running protocol on a nonmotorized treadmill in an extreme environment on 4 separate occasions. Participants ingested one of four supplements: a double placebo, 3 mg.kg-1 body mass of caffeine + placebo, 2 x 7 g EAA (Musashi Create)+placebo, or caffeine + EAA before each exercise session using a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Electromyography (EMG) activity and quadriceps evoked responses to magnetic stimulation were assessed from the dominant leg at preexercise, halftime, and postexercise. Central activation ratio (CAR) was used to quantify completeness of quadriceps activation. Oxygenation of the prefrontal cortex was measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. Mean sprint work was higher (M = 174 J, 95% CI [23, 324], p < .05, d = 0.30; effect size, likely beneficial) in the caffeine + EAA condition versus EAAs alone. The decline in EMG activity was less (M = 13%, 95% CI [0, 26]; p < .01, d = 0.58, likely beneficial) in caffeine + EAA versus EAA alone. Similarly, the pre- to postexercise decrement in CAR was significantly less (M = -2.7%, 95% CI [0.4, 5.4]; p < .05, d = 0.50, likely beneficial) when caffeine + EAA were ingested compared with placebo. Cerebral oxygenation was lower (M = -5.6%, 95% CI [1.0, 10.1]; p < .01, d = 0.60, very likely beneficial) in the caffeine + EAA condition compared with LNAA alone. Co-ingestion of caffeine and EAA appears to maintain muscle activation and central drive, with a small improvement in running performance. PMID:26248498

  12. Caffeine overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002579.htm Caffeine overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Caffeine is a substance that exists naturally in certain ...

  13. Caffeine overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Caffeine is a substance that exists naturally in certain plants. It can also be man-made and ... is a diuretic, which means it increases urination. Caffeine overdose occurs when someone takes in more than ...

  14. Acute consumption of a caffeinated energy drink enhances aspects of performance in sprint swimmers.

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Areces, Francisco; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Gallo-Salazar, César; Del Coso, Juan

    2015-09-28

    This study investigated the effect of a caffeinated energy drink on various aspects of performance in sprint swimmers. In a randomised and counterbalanced order, fourteen male sprint swimmers performed two acute experimental trials after the ingestion of a caffeinated energy drink (3 mg/kg) or after the ingestion of the same energy drink without caffeine (0 mg/kg; placebo). After 60 min of ingestion of the beverages, the swimmers performed a countermovement jump, a maximal handgrip test, a 50 m simulated competition and a 45 s swim at maximal intensity in a swim ergometer. A blood sample was withdrawn 1 min after the completion of the ergometer test. In comparison with the placebo drink, the intake of the caffeinated energy drink increased the height in the countermovement jump (49.4 (SD 5.3) v. 50.9 (SD 5.2) cm, respectively; P<0.05) and maximal force during the handgrip test with the right hand (481 (SD 49) v. 498 (SD 43) N; P<0.05). Furthermore, the caffeinated energy drink reduced the time needed to complete the 50 m simulated swimming competition (27.8 (SD 3.4) v. 27.5 (SD 3.2) s; P<0.05), and it increased peak power (273 (SD 55) v. 303 (SD 49) W; P <0.05) and blood lactate concentration (11.0 (SD 2.0) v. 11.7 (SD 2.1) mM; P<0.05) during the ergometer test. The caffeinated energy drink did not modify the prevalence of insomnia (7 v. 7%), muscle pain (36 v. 36%) or headache (0 v. 7%) during the hours following its ingestion (P>0.05). A caffeinated energy drink increased some aspects of swimming performance in competitive sprinters, whereas the side effects derived from the intake of this beverage were marginal at this dosage. PMID:26279580

  15. Caffeine enhances astroglia and microglia reactivity induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy') in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Amit; Plumitallo, Antonio; Frau, Lucia; Schintu, Nicoletta; Morelli, Micaela

    2010-05-01

    Several reports suggest that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) induces neurotoxic effects and gliosis. Since recreational use of MDMA is often associated with caffeinated beverages, we investigated whether caffeine interferes with MDMA-induced astroglia and microglia activation, thus facilitating its neurotoxicity. MDMA (4 x 20 mg/kg) was acutely administered to mice alone or in combination with caffeine (10 mg/kg). CD11b and GFAP immunoreactivity were evaluated as markers of microglia and astroglia activation in the substantia nigra pars-compacta (SNc) and striatum. MDMA was associated with significantly higher CD11b and GFAP immunoreactivity in striatum, whereas only CD11b was significantly higher than vehicle in SNc. Caffeine potentiated the increase in CD11b and GFAP in the striatum but not in the SNc of MDMA-treated mice. The abuse of MDMA is a growing worldwide problem; the results of this study suggest that combination of MDMA plus caffeine by increasing glial activation might have harmful health consequences. PMID:19882200

  16. Enhanced killing effects of caffein post-treatment in ultraviolet-light irradiated mouse lymphoma cells: is cAMP a mediator of the effects?

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, Y; Miyachi, Y; Okada, S; Iio, M; Nakamura, N

    1983-01-01

    Effects of post-treatment with caffein, cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and N6, O2-dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) were investigated in ultraviolet light (UV)-irradiated mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells. Under conditions where UV or each chemical alone caused only slight cytotoxic effects, caffein post-treatment showed clear synergistic effects in cell killing but not for cAMP or dbcAMP. Subsequently, a mutant clone resistant to cAMP was isolated. This mutant was supposed to be deficient in cAMP-mediated cellular functions. Using the mutant cells, it was found that these cells were also sensitive to caffein post-treatment as wild cells after UV-irradiation. The results imply that the enhanced killing effects by caffein post-treatment in UV irradiated cells is not mediated by cAMP. PMID:6093199

  17. Caffeine content of brewed teas.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jenna M; Merves, Michele L; Goldberger, Bruce A; Sampson-Cone, Angela; Cone, Edward J

    2008-10-01

    Caffeine is the world's most popular drug and can be found in many beverages including tea. It is a psychostimulant that is widely used to enhance alertness and improve performance. This study was conducted to determine the concentration of caffeine in 20 assorted commercial tea products. The teas were brewed under a variety of conditions including different serving sizes and steep-times. Caffeine was isolated from the teas with liquid-liquid extraction and quantitated by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. Caffeine concentrations in white, green, and black teas ranged from 14 to 61 mg per serving (6 or 8 oz) with no observable trend in caffeine concentration due to the variety of tea. The decaffeinated teas contained less than 12 mg of caffeine per serving, and caffeine was not detected in the herbal tea varieties. In most instances, the 6- and 8-oz serving sizes contained similar caffeine concentrations per ounce, but the steep-time affected the caffeine concentration of the tea. These findings indicate that most brewed teas contain less caffeine per serving than brewed coffee. PMID:19007524

  18. Caffeine addiction? Caffeine for youth? Time to act!

    PubMed

    Budney, Alan J; Emond, Jennifer A

    2014-11-01

    While data accumulate and discussion evolves on the clinical importance of caffeine addiction and its classification, the growing practices of (i) adding increasing amounts of caffeine to drinks and other consumables, (ii) promoting these as performance enhancers and (iii) targeting youth as the consumer raise concerns that require immediate action. PMID:24984891

  19. Development and Characterization of Polyphenon 60 and Caffeine Microemulsion for Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonal; Bansal, Rakhi; Ali, Javed; Gabrani, Reema; Dang, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    Green tea catechins and caffeine have exhibited antibacterial activity; however, their use is limited by lack of stability and effective delivery systems. Polyphenon 60 (P60) and caffeine were encapsulated in a single microemulsion (ME) formulation with an objective to lower the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the individual agents against selected pathogens (S. epidermidis and E. coli). Combination of two natural compounds would advocate two different mechanisms on the bacterial growth thereby providing for better antibacterial activity. Thermodynamically stable ME was developed and characterized with an average particle size of 17.58 nm, further confirmed by TEM analysis. Antibacterial studies included chequerboard microdilution assay to determine the MIC and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) of both the natural compounds individually and in combination. MIC and FIC results indicated that the combination of the above two natural compounds was proficient in lowering the MICs of individual agents. Results of DPPH assay indicated that ME system preserved the long term antioxidative potential of P60 and caffeine. The cytotoxicity of the optimized formulation on Vero cell line by MTT assay was found to be nontoxic to mammalian cells. PMID:25050379

  20. Caffeine enhanced measurement of mutagenesis by low levels of [gamma]-irradiation in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, T.P.; Johnson, R.; Waldren, C.A. ); Morse, H. )

    1993-09-01

    The well-known action of caffeine in synergizing mutagenesis (including chromosome aberrations) of agents like ionizing radiation by inhibition of cellular repair processes has been incorporated into a rapid procedure for detection of mutagenicity with high sensitivity. Effects of 5-10 rads of [gamma]-irradiation, which approximate the human lifetime dose accumulation from background radiation, can be detected in a two-day procedure using an immortalized human WBC culture. Chromosomally visible lesions are scored on cells incubated for 2 h after irradiation in the presence and absence of 1.0 mg/ml of caffeine. An eightfold amplification of scorable lesions is achieved over the action of radiation alone. This approach provides a closer approximation to absolute mutagenicity unmitigated by repair processes, which can vary in different situations. It is proposed that mutagenesis testing of this kind, using caffiene or other repair-inhibitory agents, be employed to identify mutagens in their effective concentrations to which human populations may be exposed; to detect agents such as caffeine that may synergize mutagenic actions and pose epidemiologic threats; and to discover effective anti-mutagens. Information derived from the use of such procedures may help prevent cancer and newly acquired genetic disease.

  1. Development and characterization of polyphenon 60 and caffeine microemulsion for enhanced antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonal; Bansal, Rakhi; Ali, Javed; Gabrani, Reema; Dang, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    Green tea catechins and caffeine have exhibited antibacterial activity; however, their use is limited by lack of stability and effective delivery systems. Polyphenon 60 (P60) and caffeine were encapsulated in a single microemulsion (ME) formulation with an objective to lower the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the individual agents against selected pathogens (S. epidermidis and E. coli). Combination of two natural compounds would advocate two different mechanisms on the bacterial growth thereby providing for better antibacterial activity. Thermodynamically stable ME was developed and characterized with an average particle size of 17.58 nm, further confirmed by TEM analysis. Antibacterial studies included chequerboard microdilution assay to determine the MIC and fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) of both the natural compounds individually and in combination. MIC and FIC results indicated that the combination of the above two natural compounds was proficient in lowering the MICs of individual agents. Results of DPPH assay indicated that ME system preserved the long term antioxidative potential of P60 and caffeine. The cytotoxicity of the optimized formulation on Vero cell line by MTT assay was found to be nontoxic to mammalian cells. PMID:25050379

  2. Caffeine renal clearance and urine caffeine concentrations during steady state dosing. Implications for monitoring caffeine intake during sports events.

    PubMed Central

    Birkett, D J; Miners, J O

    1991-01-01

    1. Relationships between the plasma and urine concentrations and clearances of caffeine over successive dosage intervals at steady-state were investigated in six healthy volunteers administered caffeine, 150 mg 8 hourly for 6 days. 2. There was marked inter-individual variability in the urine (15.9-fold range) and steady-state plasma (8.1-fold range) concentrations of caffeine. 3. Urine caffeine concentrations were similar to those in plasma, with mean ratios (plasma:urine) ranging from 1.10 to 1.74. There was a good correlation (r = 0.93, P less than 0.01) between caffeine urine and plasma concentrations. 4. There was a good correlation between caffeine renal clearance and urine flow rate (r = 0.89, P less than 0.01). Caffeine renal clearance was not significantly different from the product of fu and urine flow rate, where fu is the fraction of caffeine unbound in plasma. Urine caffeine concentration and urine flow rate were not correlated (r = 0.14, P greater than 0.05). 5. The results indicate that caffeine is reabsorbed from the renal tubule to equilibrium with unbound caffeine in plasma. 6. A regulatory urine caffeine concentration limit of 12 mg 1(-1) may be exceeded by some individuals with coffee intake in the range 3 to 6 cups per day. PMID:2049248

  3. Caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Barone, J J; Roberts, H R

    1996-01-01

    Scientific literature cites a wide range of values for caffeine content in food products. The authors suggest the following standard values for the United States: coffee (5 oz) 85 mg for ground roasted coffee, 60 mg for instant and 3 mg for decaffeinated; tea (5 oz): 30 mg for leaf/bag and 20 mg for instant; colas: 18 mg/6 oz serving; cocoa/hot chocolate: 4 mg/5 oz; chocolate milk: 4 mg/6 oz; chocolate candy: 1.5-6.0 mg/oz. Some products from the United Kingdom and Denmark have higher caffeine content. Caffeine consumption survey data are limited. Based on product usage and available consumption data, the authors suggest a mean daily caffeine intake for US consumers of 4 mg/kg. Among children younger than 18 years of age who are consumers of caffeine-containing foods, the mean daily caffeine intake is about 1 mg/kg. Both adults and children in Denmark and UK have higher levels of caffeine intake. PMID:8603790

  4. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated.

  5. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated. PMID:23877095

  6. Caffeine in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... much caffeine they contain. Is caffeine safe during breastfeeding? The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says it’s ... much caffeine they contain. Is caffeine safe during breastfeeding? The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says it’s ...

  7. Caffeine in the diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - caffeine ... Caffeine is absorbed and passes quickly into the brain. It does not collect in the bloodstream or ... been consumed. There is no nutritional need for caffeine. It can be avoided in the diet. Caffeine ...

  8. The best defense against hypoglycemia is to recognize it: is caffeine useful?

    PubMed

    Watson, J; Kerr, D

    1999-01-01

    Caffeine, 1,3,7trimethylxanthine, is used by 80% of the adult population of the world in its various forms. Even the simple pleasure of consuming this socially acceptable drug has implications for the person with diabetes mellitus. Caffeine may increase an individual's sensitivity to hypoglycemia through the combined effects of reducing substrate delivery to the brain via constriction of the cerebral arteries, whilst simultaneously increasing brain glucose metabolism and augmenting catecholamine production. This article summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that caffeine influences the perception of and physiological response to hypoglycemia. Under laboratory conditions, acute ingestion of caffeine markedly enhances the symptomatic and sympathoadrenal responses to hypoglycemia in both healthy volunteers and patients with type 1 diabetes. Recently a study of free-living people with type 1 diabetes showed that caffeine consumption increased the awareness of hypoglycemia. Caffeine has been associated with a number of negative effects and addiction. Most serious of these associations are ischemic heart disease and hypertension, the relationships have not been clearly established and the evidence to date is controversial. Thus we conclude that in modest doses, caffeine may be a useful adjuvant therapy for patients with hypoglycemia unawareness. For once here is a therapy which is inexpensive, safe, and remarkably popular with its consumers. PMID:11475292

  9. Dietary Caffeine and Polyphenol Supplementation Enhances Overall Metabolic Rate and Lipid Oxidation at Rest and After a Bout of Sprint Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Jo, Edward; Lewis, Kiana L; Higuera, Daniel; Hernandez, Joshua; Osmond, Adam D; Directo, Dean J; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Jo, E, Lewis, KL, Higuera, D, Hernandez, J, Osmond, AD, Directo, DJ, and Wong, M. Dietary caffeine and polyphenol supplementation enhances overall metabolic rate and lipid oxidation at rest and after a bout of sprint interval exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1871-1879, 2016-The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a caffeine-polyphenolic supplement on (a) metabolic rate and fat oxidation at rest and after a bout of sprint interval exercise (SIE) and (b) SIE performance. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study and after an initial familiarization visit, 12 subjects (male: n = 11; female: n = 1) (body mass = 76.1 ± 2.2 kg; height = 169.8 ± 1.6 cm; body mass index = 22.7 ± 3.0 kg·m; body fat % = 21.6 ± 2.0%) underwent 2 testing sessions during which time they consumed either a caffeine-polyphenol supplement or placebo. After supplementation, resting energy expenditure, heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) were assessed. Subsequently, subjects performed 30 minutes of SIE while researchers collected performance data. Subjects were then tested for post-SIE energy expenditure, HR, and BP. The caffeine-polyphenol treatment resulted in significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater energy expenditure (+7.99% rest; +10.16% post-SIE), V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (+9.64% rest; +12.10% post-SIE), and fat oxidation rate (+10.60% rest; +9.76% post-SIE) vs. placebo at rest and post-SIE. No significant differences were detected for peak and average power at all sprint intervals between treatments. Post-SIE HR was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater with caffeine-polyphenol supplementation vs. placebo (90.8 ± 3.5 vs. 85.1 ± 3.6 b·min). There were no significant between-treatment differences for BP. It may be concluded that the observed thermogenic response after SIE was directly attributable to caffeine-polyphenol supplementation as opposed to an indirect manifestation of enhanced performance and work output. Collectively, these results

  10. Caffeine tolerance: behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.T.; Khan, S.; Forde, J.; Hirsh, K.R.

    1985-06-17

    The development of tolerance to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon mesencephalic reticular neurons and upon spontaneous locomotor activity was evaluated in rats after two weeks of chronic exposure to low doses of caffeine (5-10 mg/kg/day via their drinking water). These doses are achievable through dietary intake of caffeine-containing beverages in man. Concomitant measurement of (/sup 3/H)-CHA binding in the mesencephalic reticular formation was also carried out in order to explore the neurochemical basis of the development of tolerance. Caffeine, 2.5 mg/kg i.v., markedly increased the firing rate of reticular neurons in caffeine naive rats but failed to modify the neuronal activity in a group exposed chronically to low doses of caffeine. In addition, in spontaneous locomotor activity studies, the data show a distinct shift to the right of the caffeine dose-response curve in caffeine pretreated rats. These results clearly indicate that tolerance develops to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon the reticular formation at the single neuronal activity level as well as upon spontaneous locomotor activity. Furthermore, in chronically caffeine exposed rats, an increase in the number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H)-CHA was observed in reticular formation membranes without any change in receptor affinity. 28 references, 4 figures.

  11. Caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used behaviorally active drug in the world which exerts its activity on central nervous system through adenosine receptors. Worrying data indicate that excessive caffeine intake applies to patients suffering from mental disorders, including depression. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of caffeine on animals' behavior in forced swim test (FST) as well as the effect of caffeine (5 mg/kg) on the activity of six typical antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), desipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), paroxetine (0.5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg), and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was estimated to verify and exclude false-positive/negative results. In order to assess the influence of caffeine on the levels of antidepressant drugs studied, their concentrations were determined in murine serum and brains using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that caffeine at a dose of 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST, and it was not related to changes in locomotor activity in the animals. Caffeine at a dose of 5 mg/kg potentiated the activity of all antidepressants, and the observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity in the animals. The interactions between caffeine and desipramine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and reboxetine were exclusively of pharmacodynamic character, because caffeine did not cause any changes in the concentrations of these drugs neither in blood serum nor in brain tissue. As a result of joint administration of caffeine and paroxetine, an increase in the antidepressant drug concentrations in serum was observed. No such change was noticed in the brain tissue. A decrease in the antidepressant drug concentrations in brain was observed in the case of imipramine administered together with caffeine. Therefore, it can be assumed that the interactions caffeine-paroxetine and caffeine-imipramine occur at least in

  12. Enhancing the IMS QTI to Better Support Computer Assisted Marking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Damien; Baillie-de Byl, Penny

    2007-01-01

    Computer aided assessment is a common approach used by educational institutions. The benefits range into the design of teaching, learning, and instructional materials. While some such systems implement fully automated marking for multiple choice questions and fill-in-the-blanks, they are insufficient when human critiquing is required. Current…

  13. Marked point processes for enhancing seismic fault patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Keresztes; Szirányi, Tamás; Borda, Monica; Lavialle, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a new method for fault extraction in seismic blocks, using marked point processes. Our goal is to increase the detection accuracy of the state of the art fault attributes by computing them on a system of objects based on an a priori knowledge about the faults. An original curved support has been developed to describe the faults in vertical sections of the seismic blocks. The results are compared with the previous models used for linear network extraction, such as the Candy model. Synthetic blocks were used to compare the results obtained thanks to the point processes with the classical attributes. To segment the whole blocks, a multi-2D approach was used. Several modifications of the algorithm were necessary in order to make the results easier to interpret for geologists. One interest of the high-level approach offered by the marked point processes is the possibility of using the objects as a common support for various fault detection operators. A whole detection framework can be proposed which acts like a decision fusion process.

  14. Caffeine and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabling headaches . Home > Caffeine and Migraine Print Email Caffeine and Migraine ACHE Newsletter Sign up for our newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Caffeine and Migraine Robert E. Shapiro, MD, PhD and ...

  15. Ancillary therapies to enhance success of non-invasive modes of respiratory support - Approaches to delivery room use of surfactant and caffeine?

    PubMed

    Kribs, Angela; Hummler, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    During recent decades, non-invasive respiratory support has become popular for treating neonates with respiratory failure. Several prospective randomized controlled trials have been performed to compare use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) to endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation and surfactant therapy. Systematic reviews of these studies suggest that routine CPAP at delivery is efficacious in decreasing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), death, or both. This led to the recommendation to consider CPAP to avoid endotracheal intubation. As surfactant therapy is known to reduce BPD and death, several ways to combine CPAP with surfactant have been described. With the increasing use of CPAP immediately after birth, the early use of caffeine to stimulate respiration has become a point of discussion. This review focuses on different modes of surfactant application during CPAP and on the early use of caffeine as ancillary therapies to enhance CPAP success. PMID:26936187

  16. Dynamic hydroxymethylation of deoxyribonucleic acid marks differentiation-associated enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Sérandour, Aurélien A.; Avner, Stéphane; Oger, Frédérik; Bizot, Maud; Percevault, Frédéric; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Palierne, Gaëlle; Gheeraert, Céline; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Péron, Christine Le; Madigou, Thierry; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Métivier, Raphaël; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Salbert, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers are developmentally controlled transcriptional regulatory regions whose activities are modulated through histone modifications or histone variant deposition. In this study, we show by genome-wide mapping that the newly discovered deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is dynamically associated with transcription factor binding to distal regulatory sites during neural differentiation of mouse P19 cells and during adipocyte differentiation of mouse 3T3-L1 cells. Functional annotation reveals that regions gaining 5hmC are associated with genes expressed either in neural tissues when P19 cells undergo neural differentiation or in adipose tissue when 3T3-L1 cells undergo adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, distal regions gaining 5hmC together with H3K4me2 and H3K27ac in P19 cells behave as differentiation-dependent transcriptional enhancers. Identified regions are enriched in motifs for transcription factors regulating specific cell fates such as Meis1 in P19 cells and PPARγ in 3T3-L1 cells. Accordingly, a fraction of hydroxymethylated Meis1 sites were associated with a dynamic engagement of the 5-methylcytosine hydroxylase Tet1. In addition, kinetic studies of cytosine hydroxymethylation of selected enhancers indicated that DNA hydroxymethylation is an early event of enhancer activation. Hence, acquisition of 5hmC in cell-specific distal regulatory regions may represent a major event of enhancer progression toward an active state and participate in selective activation of tissue-specific genes. PMID:22730288

  17. Caffeine, exercise and the brain.

    PubMed

    Meeusen, Romain; Roelands, Bart; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine can improve exercise performance when it is ingested at moderate doses (3-6 mg/kg body mass). Caffeine also has an effect on the central nervous system (CNS), and it is now recognized that most of the performance-enhancing effect of caffeine is accomplished through the antagonism of the adenosine receptors, influencing the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. Adenosine and dopamine interact in the brain, and this might be one mechanism to explain how the important components of motivation (i.e. vigor, persistence and work output) and higher-order brain processes are involved in motor control. Caffeine maintains a higher dopamine concentration especially in those brain areas linked with 'attention'. Through this neurochemical interaction, caffeine improves sustained attention, vigilance, and reduces symptoms of fatigue. Other aspects that are localized in the CNS are a reduction in skeletal muscle pain and force sensation, leading to a reduction in perception of effort during exercise and therefore influencing the motivational factors to sustain effort during exercise. Because not all CNS aspects have been examined in detail, one should consider that a placebo effect may also be present. Overall, it appears that the performance-enhancing effects of caffeine reside in the brain, although more research is necessary to reveal the exact mechanisms through which the CNS effect is established. PMID:23899750

  18. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes. PMID:23764265

  19. Topical and transdermal delivery of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lin; Lane, Majella E

    2015-07-25

    Caffeine is administered topically and transdermally for a variety of pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications and it is also used as a model hydrophilic compound in dermal risk assessment studies. This review considers the physicochemical and permeation properties of caffeine with reference to its delivery to and through the skin. Since it has been used as a model compound the findings have implications for the delivery of many hydrophilic compounds having similar properties. Various passive and active formulation strategies to promote enhanced skin permeation of caffeine are considered. Models to study percutaneous caffeine penetration are also discussed in detail. PMID:26004004

  20. Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ): construction, psychometric properties, and associations with caffeine use, caffeine dependence, and other related variables.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Edward D; Juliano, Laura M

    2012-09-01

    Expectancies for drug effects predict drug initiation, use, cessation, and relapse, and may play a causal role in drug effects (i.e., placebo effects). Surprisingly little is known about expectancies for caffeine even though it is the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. In a series of independent studies, the nature and scope of caffeine expectancies among caffeine consumers and nonconsumers were assessed, and a comprehensive and psychometrically sound Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ) was developed. After 2 preliminary studies, the CaffEQ was administered to 1,046 individuals from the general population along with other measures of interest (e.g., caffeine use history, anxiety). Exploratory factor analysis of the CaffEQ yielded a 7-factor solution. Subsequently, an independent sample of 665 individuals completed the CaffEQ and other measures, and a subset (n = 440) completed the CaffEQ again approximately 2 weeks later. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed good model fit, and test-retest reliability was very good. The frequency and quantity of caffeine use were associated with greater expectancies for withdrawal/dependence, energy/work enhancement, appetite suppression, social/mood enhancement, and physical performance enhancement and lower expectancies for anxiety/negative physical effects and sleep disturbance. Caffeine expectancies predicted various caffeine- associated features of substance dependence (e.g., use despite harm, withdrawal incidence and severity, perceived difficulty stopping use, tolerance). Expectancies for caffeine consumed via coffee were stronger than for caffeine consumed via soft drinks or tea. The CaffEQ should facilitate the advancement of our knowledge of caffeine and drug use in general. PMID:22149323

  1. A hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programmed alteration in offspring rats of IUGR induced by prenatal caffeine ingestion

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, D.; Wu, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, Y.S.; Shen, L.; Lei, Y.Y.; Liu, J.; Ping, J.; Qin, J.; Zhang, C.; Chen, L.B.; Magdalou, J.; Wang, H.

    2012-11-01

    Caffeine is a definite factor of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Previously, we have confirmed that prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits the development of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, and alters the glucose and lipid metabolism in IUGR fetal rats. In this study, we aimed to verify a programmed alteration of neuroendocrine metabolism in prenatal caffeine ingested-offspring rats. The results showed that prenatal caffeine (120 mg/kg.day) ingestion caused low body weight and high IUGR rate of pups; the concentrations of blood adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone in caffeine group were significantly increased in the early postnatal period followed by falling in late stage; the level of blood glucose was unchanged, while blood total cholesterol (TCH) and triglyceride (TG) were markedly enhanced in adult. After chronic stress, the concentrations and the gain rates of blood ACTH and corticosterone were obviously increased, meanwhile, the blood glucose increased while the TCH and TG decreased in caffeine group. Further, the hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) expression in caffeine group was initially decreased and subsequently increased after birth. After chronic stress, the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), MR as well as the MR/GR ratio were all significantly decreased. These results suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion induced the dysfunction of HPA axis and associated neuroendocrine metabolic programmed alteration in IUGR offspring rats, which might be related with the functional injury of hippocampus. These observations provide a valuable experimental basis for explaining the susceptibility of IUGR offspring to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion induced HPA axis dysfunction in IUGR offspring rats. ► Caffeine induced a neuroendocrine metabolic programmed alteration in offspring rats. ► Caffeine induced a functional injury

  2. Human Erythropoietin Dimers with Markedly Enhanced in vivo Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.; Dotimas Lunn, Elizabeth; Davis, Kerry Lynn; Feldman, Laurie; Siekman, Suvia

    1998-02-01

    Human erythropoietin, a widely used and important therapeutic glycoprotein, has a relatively short plasma half-life due to clearance by glomerular filtration as well as by other mechanisms. We hypothesized that an erythropoietin species with a larger molecular size would exhibit an increased plasma half-life and, potentially, an enhanced biological activity. We now report the production of biologically active erythropoietin dimers and trimers by chemical crosslinking of the conventional monomeric form. We imparted free sulfhydryl residues to a pool of erythropoietin monomer by chemical modification. A second pool was reacted with another modifying reagent to yield monomer with male-imido groups. Upon mixing these two pools, covalently linked dimers and trimers were formed that were biologically active in vitro. The plasma half-life of erythropoietin dimers in rabbits was >24 h compared with 4 h for the monomers. Importantly, erythropoietin dimers were biologically active in vivo as shown by their ability to increase the hematocrits of mice when injected subcutaneously. In addition, the dimers exhibited >26-fold higher activity in vivo than did the monomers and were very effective after only one dose. Dimeric and other oligomeric forms of Epo may have an important role in therapy.

  3. Wet powder suspensions as an additional technique for the enhancement of bloodied marks.

    PubMed

    Au, Catherine; Jackson-Smith, Hayley; Quinones, Ignacio; Jones, B J; Daniel, Barbara

    2011-01-30

    The enhancement of marks in blood on dark surfaces poses significant challenges to the forensic scientist. Current methods of enhancement include the sequential use of acid dyes (acid yellow, acid violet and acid black). Acid yellow is used to greatest effect on lighter deposits of blood on a non-porous background, and is visualised using a light source which causes it to fluoresce [1]. However, further enhancement with acid violet and acid black produces a dark product which may fail to improve the contrast of the mark against a dark background. The use of wet powder suspensions (WPSs) has been proposed as a complementary procedure for use in fingermark enhancement, beyond its typical use in the enhancement of marks on adhesive surfaces. In this investigation, the use of WPS was tested in conjunction with conventional acid dye treatments on marks in blood deposited on a selection of substrates. The results demonstrated that white WPS alone or together with acid dyes results in an overall enhancement of mark quality (p<0.005) on marks deposited on smooth non-porous surfaces. The technique was shown to not interfere with subsequent presumptive tests on blood. However WPS treatments were shown to reduce the amount of DNA recoverable from the marks, resulting on an average decrease of 91% compared to untreated controls. The decline in DNA yields was shown to result in a decrease in the quality of the DNA profiles obtained. The enhancement properties of WPS were evaluated by electron microscopy. It was shown that the titanium dioxide particles in the WPS primarily interact with the non-bloodied part of the mark, thus producing a contrasting effect with the background and acid dyes. PMID:20494531

  4. Caffeine Toxicity Due to Supplement Use in Caffeine--Naïve Individual: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Lystrup, Robert M; Leggit, Jeffery C

    2015-08-01

    Thousands of military members self-medicate with dietary supplements containing unknown quantities of pharmacologically active compounds. These poorly regulated substances can cause real harm to the military population, especially when they contain stimulants such as caffeine. When taken regularly, caffeine has several performance-enhancing benefits. However, when used excessively or in vulnerable populations, caffeine can cause several unwanted side effects such as nervousness, sensory disturbances, insomnia, arrhythmia, excitability, inattentiveness, restlessness, mood changes, gastrointestinal disturbances, and even psychosis. Vulnerable patients include the caffeine-naïve, physiologically stressed, young, and mentally ill patients. One such case describes a caffeine-naïve service member who suffered an adverse reaction after taking an allegedly moderate dose of caffeine from a pill he obtained from a teammate. This case highlights the importance of supplement awareness among service members, increased provider vigilance, third party verification, and enhanced regulation on the approval and marketing of dietary supplements. PMID:26226540

  5. Caffeine fostering of mycoparasitic fungi against phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sano, Cecile M; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Sano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethixanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid produced in more than 80 plant species. Its biological role is considered to strengthen plant's defense capabilities, directly as a toxicant to biotic attackers (allelopathy) and indirectly as an activator of defense system (priming). Caffeine is actively secreted into rhizosphere through primary root, and possibly affects the structure of microbe community nearby. The fungal community in coffee plant rhizosphere is enriched with particular species, including Trichoderma family, a mycoparasite that attacks and kills phytopathogens by coiling and destroying their hyphae. In the present study, the caffeine response of 8 filamentous fungi, 4 mycoparasitic Trichoderma, and 4 prey phytopathogens, was examined. Results showed that allelopathic effect of caffeine on fungal growth and development was differential, being stronger on pathogens than on Trichoderma species. Upon confronting, the prey immediately ceased the growth, whereas the predator continued to grow, indicating active mycoparasitism to have occurred. Caffeine enhanced mycoparasitism up to 1.7-fold. Caffeine thus functions in a double-track manner against fungal pathogens: first by direct suppression of growth and development, and second by assisting their natural enemy. These observations suggest that caffeine is a powerful weapon in the arms race between plants and pathogens by fostering enemy's enemy, and we propose the idea of "caffeine fostering" as the third role of caffeine. PMID:26529400

  6. Caffeine fostering of mycoparasitic fungi against phytopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sano, Cecile M.; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Sano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethixanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid produced in more than 80 plant species. Its biological role is considered to strengthen plant's defense capabilities, directly as a toxicant to biotic attackers (allelopathy) and indirectly as an activator of defense system (priming). Caffeine is actively secreted into rhizosphere through primary root, and possibly affects the structure of microbe community nearby. The fungal community in coffee plant rhizosphere is enriched with particular species, including Trichoderma family, a mycoparasite that attacks and kills phytopathogens by coiling and destroying their hyphae. In the present study, the caffeine response of 8 filamentous fungi, 4 mycoparasitic Trichoderma, and 4 prey phytopathogens, was examined. Results showed that allelopathic effect of caffeine on fungal growth and development was differential, being stronger on pathogens than on Trichoderma species. Upon confronting, the prey immediately ceased the growth, whereas the predator continued to grow, indicating active mycoparasitism to have occurred. Caffeine enhanced mycoparasitism up to 1.7-fold. Caffeine thus functions in a double-track manner against fungal pathogens: first by direct suppression of growth and development, and second by assisting their natural enemy. These observations suggest that caffeine is a powerful weapon in the arms race between plants and pathogens by fostering enemy's enemy, and we propose the idea of "caffeine fostering" as the third role of caffeine. PMID:26529400

  7. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, O.; Sugahara, T.

    1981-08-01

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells.

  8. Caffeine and exercise: metabolism, endurance and performance.

    PubMed

    Graham, T E

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine is a common substance in the diets of most athletes and it is now appearing in many new products, including energy drinks, sport gels, alcoholic beverages and diet aids. It can be a powerful ergogenic aid at levels that are considerably lower than the acceptable limit of the International Olympic Committee and could be beneficial in training and in competition. Caffeine does not improve maximal oxygen capacity directly, but could permit the athlete to train at a greater power output and/or to train longer. It has also been shown to increase speed and/or power output in simulated race conditions. These effects have been found in activities that last as little as 60 seconds or as long as 2 hours. There is less information about the effects of caffeine on strength; however, recent work suggests no effect on maximal ability, but enhanced endurance or resistance to fatigue. There is no evidence that caffeine ingestion before exercise leads to dehydration, ion imbalance, or any other adverse effects. The ingestion of caffeine as coffee appears to be ineffective compared to doping with pure caffeine. Related compounds such as theophylline are also potent ergogenic aids. Caffeine may act synergistically with other drugs including ephedrine and anti-inflammatory agents. It appears that male and female athletes have similar caffeine pharmacokinetics, i.e., for a given dose of caffeine, the time course and absolute plasma concentrations of caffeine and its metabolites are the same. In addition, exercise or dehydration does not affect caffeine pharmacokinetics. The limited information available suggests that caffeine non-users and users respond similarly and that withdrawal from caffeine may not be important. The mechanism(s) by which caffeine elicits its ergogenic effects are unknown, but the popular theory that it enhances fat oxidation and spares muscle glycogen has very little support and is an incomplete explanation at best. Caffeine may work, in part, by

  9. Caffeine Promotes Global Spatial Processing in Habitual and Non-Habitual Caffeine Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Grace E.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Brunyé, Tad T.; Taylor, Holly A.; Kanarek, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    Information processing is generally biased toward global cues, often at the expense of local information. Equivocal extant data suggests that arousal states may accentuate either a local or global processing bias, at least partially dependent on the nature of the manipulation, task, and stimuli. To further differentiate the conditions responsible for such equivocal results we varied caffeine doses to alter physiological arousal states and measured their effect on tasks requiring the retrieval of local versus global spatial knowledge. In a double-blind, repeated-measures design, non-habitual (Experiment 1; N = 36, M = 42.5 ± 28.7 mg/day caffeine) and habitual (Experiment 2; N = 34, M = 579.5 ± 311.5 mg/day caffeine) caffeine consumers completed four test sessions corresponding to each of four caffeine doses (0, 100, 200, 400 mg). During each test session, participants consumed a capsule containing one of the three doses of caffeine or placebo, waited 60 min, and then completed two spatial tasks, one involving memorizing maps and one spatial descriptions. A spatial statement verification task tested local versus global spatial knowledge by differentially probing memory for proximal versus distal landmark relationships. On the map learning task, results indicated that caffeine enhanced memory for distal (i.e., global) compared to proximal (i.e., local) comparisons at 100 (marginal), 200, and 400 mg caffeine in non-habitual consumers, and marginally beginning at 200 mg caffeine in habitual consumers. On the spatial descriptions task, caffeine enhanced memory for distal compared to proximal comparisons beginning at 100 mg in non-habitual but not habitual consumers. We thus provide evidence that caffeine-induced physiological arousal amplifies global spatial processing biases, and these effects are at least partially driven by habitual caffeine consumption. PMID:24146646

  10. Acetaminophen, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 hours ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine exactly as directed. Do not take ...

  11. Adolescent Caffeine Consumption and Self-Reported Violence and Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Frost, Stephanie S.; James, Jack E.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and currently the only one legally available to children and adolescents. The sale and use of caffeinated beverages has increased markedly among adolescents during the last decade. However, research on caffeine use and behaviors among adolescents is scarce. We investigate the…

  12. Caffeine Content Labeling: A Missed Opportunity for Promoting Personal and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Current regulation of caffeine-containing products is incoherent, fails to protect consumers' interests, and should be modified in multiple ways. We make the case for one of the regulatory reforms that are needed: all consumable products containing added caffeine should be required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to include caffeine quantity on their labels. Currently, no foods or beverages that contain caffeine are required to include caffeine content on their labels. Strengthening these lax labeling requirements could prevent direct caffeine-induced harm, protect those most vulnerable to caffeine-related side effects, and enhance consumer autonomy and effective caffeine use. Consumers have an interest in regulating their intake of caffeine and thus, ought to know how much caffeine their foods and beverages contain. PMID:24761278

  13. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  14. Regular caffeine consumption: a balance of adverse and beneficial effects for mood and psychomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P J; Dernoncourt, C

    1998-04-01

    It has often been pointed out that caffeine is the most widely "used" psychoactive substance in the world, and accordingly, there is a very large amount of research available on the effects of caffeine on body and mind. In particular, a psychostimulant action of caffeine is generally accepted as well established; for example, caffeine has been found to quicken reaction time and enhance vigilance performance, and to increase self-rated alertness and improve mood. There is, however, a real difficulty in determining the net effects of caffeine. In a typical experiment the subjects have a history of regular caffeine consumption, and they are tested on caffeine and a placebo after a period of caffeine deprivation (often overnight). The problem with relying solely on this approach is that it leaves open the question as to whether the results obtained are due to beneficial effects of caffeine or to deleterious effects of caffeine deprivation. The present article briefly reviews this evidence on the psychostimulant effects of caffeine, and presents some new data testing the hypothesis that caffeine may enhance cognitive performance to a greater extent in older adults than in young adults. No age-related differences in the effects of caffeine on psychomotor performance were found. We conclude that overall there is little unequivocal evidence to show that regular caffeine use is likely to substantially benefit mood or performance. Indeed, one of the significant factors motivating caffeine consumption appears to be "withdrawal relief." PMID:9586865

  15. Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Doepker, Candace; Lieberman, Harris R; Smith, Andrew Paul; Peck, Jennifer D; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Welsh, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The debate on the safety of and regulatory approaches for caffeine continues among various stakeholders and regulatory authorities. This decision-making process comes with significant challenges, particularly when considering the complexities of the available scientific data, making the formulation of clear science-based regulatory guidance more difficult. To allow for discussions of a number of key issues, the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) convened a panel of subject matter experts for a caffeine-focused session entitled "Caffeine: Friend or Foe?," which was held during the 2015 ILSI Annual Meeting. The panelists' expertise covered topics ranging from the natural occurrence of caffeine in plants and interindividual metabolism of caffeine in humans to specific behavioral, reproductive, and cardiovascular effects related to caffeine consumption. Each presentation highlighted the potential risks, benefits, and challenges that inform whether caffeine exposure warrants concern. This paper aims to summarize the key topics discussed during the session. PMID:26735800

  16. Caffeine Consumption by College Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loke, Wing Hong

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 542 undergraduates concerning their caffeine consumption. Found that subjects consumed less caffeine than average caffeine-drinking population. Coffee was main beverage used. Subjects reported drinking more caffeine when preparing for examinations. Suggests that caffeine may have some beneficial effects on learning. (Author/NB)

  17. Comparative percutaneous permeation study using caffeine-loaded microemulsion showing low reliability of the frozen/thawed skin models.

    PubMed

    Sintov, Amnon C; Greenberg, Igor

    2014-08-25

    The aim of this study was to explore the transdermal delivery potential of a new caffeine-containing microemulsion system. The skin permeability of caffeine (CAF) was measured in vitro using skin excised from three different animal species: rat, rabbit and pig. As shown, microemulsion containing 20% aqueous phase enhanced CAF permeation across fresh rat skin by one order of magnitude (Papp=8.2×10(-3) vs. 0.86×10(-3) cm/h; enhancement ratio=9.6). The permeability coefficient value, the cumulative permeation amount, and the percent of dose permeated after 24 h, decreased with the increase of water content from 60% to 80% in microemulsions due to the apparent increase in the droplet size. Importantly, differences were noted between caffeine transport rates across fresh and frozen/thawed pig skin whereas microemulsions delivered caffeine at similar rates across rat and rabbit skin, either fresh or frozen/thawed. It has been shown that the permeability of caffeine through frozen/thawed pig skin was abnormally high and was independent of its vehicle properties, i.e., its hydrophilic or lipophilic nature. It has been hypothesized that the reason for this abnormality is that porcine stratum corneum has a higher ceramide-to-cholesterol ratio compared to rat and rabbit skin. This unusual phenomenon observed in a non-freshly used porcine skin places a question mark on its suitability to in vitro evaluation of transdermal drug delivery systems. PMID:24866271

  18. Caffeine and anaerobic performance: ergogenic value and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Davis, J K; Green, J Matt

    2009-01-01

    The effect caffeine elicits on endurance performance is well founded. However, comparatively less research has been conducted on the ergogenic potential of anaerobic performance. Some studies showing no effect of caffeine on performance used untrained subjects and designs often not conducive to observing an ergogenic effect. Recent studies incorporating trained subjects and paradigms specific to intermittent sports activity support the notion that caffeine is ergogenic to an extent with anaerobic exercise. Caffeine seems highly ergogenic for speed endurance exercise ranging in duration from 60 to 180 seconds. However, other traditional models examining power output (i.e. 30-second Wingate test) have shown minimal effect of caffeine on performance. Conversely, studies employing sport-specific methodologies (i.e. hockey, rugby, soccer) with shorter duration (i.e. 4-6 seconds) show caffeine to be ergogenic during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Recent studies show caffeine affects isometric maximal force and offers introductory evidence for enhanced muscle endurance for lower body musculature. However, isokinetic peak torque, one-repetition maximum and muscular endurance for upper body musculature are less clear. Since relatively few studies exist with resistance training, a definite conclusion cannot be reached on the extent caffeine affects performance. It was previously thought that caffeine mechanisms were associated with adrenaline (epinephrine)-induced enhanced free-fatty acid oxidation and consequent glycogen sparing, which is the leading hypothesis for the ergogenic effect. It would seem unlikely that the proposed theory would result in improved anaerobic performance, since exercise is dominated by oxygen-independent metabolic pathways. Other mechanisms for caffeine have been suggested, such as enhanced calcium mobilization and phosphodiesterase inhibition. However, a normal physiological dose of caffeine in vivo does not indicate this mechanism plays a

  19. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Bhawani, Showkat; Fong, Sim Siong; Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad Nasir

    2015-01-01

    The nature of caffeine reveals that it is a bitter white crystalline alkaloid. It is a common ingredient in a variety of drinks (soft and energy drinks) and is also used in combination with various medicines. In order to maintain the optimum level of caffeine, various spectrophotometric methods have been developed. The monitoring of caffeine is very important aspect because of its consumption in higher doses that can lead to various physiological disorders. This paper incorporates various spectrophotometric methods used in the analysis of caffeine in various environmental samples such as pharmaceuticals, soft and energy drinks, tea, and coffee. A range of spectrophotometric methodologies including chemometric techniques and derivatization of spectra have been used to analyse the caffeine. PMID:26604926

  20. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Bhawani, Showkat; Fong, Sim Siong; Mohamad Ibrahim, Mohamad Nasir

    2015-01-01

    The nature of caffeine reveals that it is a bitter white crystalline alkaloid. It is a common ingredient in a variety of drinks (soft and energy drinks) and is also used in combination with various medicines. In order to maintain the optimum level of caffeine, various spectrophotometric methods have been developed. The monitoring of caffeine is very important aspect because of its consumption in higher doses that can lead to various physiological disorders. This paper incorporates various spectrophotometric methods used in the analysis of caffeine in various environmental samples such as pharmaceuticals, soft and energy drinks, tea, and coffee. A range of spectrophotometric methodologies including chemometric techniques and derivatization of spectra have been used to analyse the caffeine. PMID:26604926

  1. [Caffeine-induced contraction of guinea pig taenia coli (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Chujyo, N

    1978-01-01

    Caffeine (10 or 20 mM)-induced isometric contraction of guinea pig taenia coli showed two successively occurring phasic contractions (I and II) followed by a low sustained tension. Half-time of tension decay in II was 4 approximately 6 times longer than in I. The contraction occasionally showed only a single phasic contraction, of which tension, however, decayed showing two half-times as in two phasic contractions. In the presence of procaine 0.1 approximately 0.5 mM, DNP 0.03 approximately 0.1 mM or Mn2+ 0.5 approximately 1.0 mM, II was entirely abolished whereas I was partially inhibited and such were confirmed by analyzing the time course of tension decay. Maximal tension of I decreased in parallel with lowering the external Na while II was enhanced with 50 approximately 100 mM Na and inhibited by further withdrawal of Na. I and II showed the same Ca-dependecy with respect to the inhibition by Ca deficiency and to the time course of recovery from Ca-free state. Refractoriness to caffeine after preceding caffeine-contraction also showed little difference between I and II. Sustained tension by caffeine was dependent on Ca in the same manner as tonic K-contracture. Increase in 45Ca uptake with 40 mM K was completely inhibited by 10 mM caffeine while cellular Ca content in the presence of high K markedly increased with caffeine indicating the decrease in Ca exchangeability. The above results indicate that caffeine induced contraction consists of two phasic contractions of which EC-coupling Ca is released from two different cellular sites, and that the phasic contractions are followed by a sustained low tension caused by an increased Ca influx. In the presence of high K, caffeine abolishes the increase in Ca influx by high K and sequesters the sarcoplasmic free Ca resulting in the relaxation of K-contracture. PMID:640536

  2. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (<3 mg/kg body mass, ~200 mg) are also ergogenic in some exercise and sport situations, although this has been less well studied. Lower caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis. PMID:25355191

  3. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1.) Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg) and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (≥ 9 mg/kg). 2.) Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3.) It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4.) Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5.) Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6.) The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7.) The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance. PMID:20205813

  4. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Erica R; Ziegenfuss, Tim; Kalman, Doug; Kreider, Richard; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin; Taylor, Lem; Willoughby, Darryn; Stout, Jeff; Graves, B Sue; Wildman, Robert; Ivy, John L; Spano, Marie; Smith, Abbie E; Antonio, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1.) Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg) and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (>/= 9 mg/kg). 2.) Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3.) It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4.) Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5.) Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6.) The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7.) The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance. PMID:20205813

  5. Caffeine in the diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... although many people still believe a cup of coffee will help a person "sober-up." Caffeine may ... than 60 plants, including: Tea leaves Kola nuts Coffee Cocoa beans It is also found in processed ...

  6. Mechanisms of Caffeine-Induced Inhibition of UVB Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Conney, Allan H; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Kawasumi, Masaoki; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Sunlight-induced non-melanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with more than two million cases per year. Several studies have shown an inhibitory effect of caffeine administration on UVB-induced skin cancer in mice, and these studies are paralleled by epidemiology studies that indicate an inhibitory effect of coffee drinking on non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Strikingly, decaffeinated coffee consumption had no such inhibitory effect. Mechanism studies indicate that caffeine has a sunscreen effect that inhibits UVB-induced formation of thymine dimers and sunburn lesions in the epidermis of mice. In addition, caffeine administration has a biological effect that enhances UVB-induced apoptosis thereby enhancing the elimination of damaged precancerous cells, and caffeine administration also enhances apoptosis in tumors. Caffeine administration enhances UVB-induced apoptosis by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Exploration of the p53-independent effect indicated that caffeine administration enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the UVB-induced increase in ATR-mediated formation of phospho-Chk1 (Ser345) and abolishing the UVB-induced decrease in cyclin B1 which resulted in caffeine-induced premature and lethal mitosis in mouse skin. In studies with cultured primary human keratinocytes, inhibition of ATR with siRNA against ATR inhibited Chk1 phosphorylation and enhanced UVB-induced apoptosis. Transgenic mice with decreased epidermal ATR function that were irradiated chronically with UVB had 69% fewer tumors at the end of the study compared with irradiated littermate controls with normal ATR function. These results, which indicate that genetic inhibition of ATR (like pharmacologic inhibition of ATR via caffeine) inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis support the concept that ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1 is an important target for caffeine's inhibitory effect on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23785666

  7. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms and self-administration following caffeine deprivation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S H; de Wit, H; Zacny, J P

    1995-08-01

    This study examined the effects of complete or partial caffeine deprivation on withdrawal symptomatology and self-administration of coffee in caffeine-dependent coffee drinkers. Nine habitual coffee drinkers abstained from dietary sources of caffeine for 33.5 h. Caffeine deprivation was manipulated by administering capsules containing 0%, 50%, or 100% of each subject's daily caffeine intake (complete, partial, and no deprivation conditions). Caffeine withdrawal symptomatology was measured using self-report questionnaires. Caffeine self-administration was measured using: i) the amount of coffee subjects earned on a series of concurrent random-ratio schedules that yielded coffee and money reinforcers; ii) the amount of earned coffee they consumed. Saliva samples revealed that subjects complied with the caffeine abstinence instructions. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms occurred reliably following complete caffeine deprivation, though not in the partial deprivation condition. Caffeine self-administration was not related to deprivation condition. We conclude that caffeine withdrawal symptomatology is not necessarily associated with increased caffeine consumption. PMID:7675881

  8. Luminescence characteristics of caffeine and theophylline1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andino, M. M.; De Lima, C. G.; Winefordner, J. D.

    The luminescence properties of solutions of caffeine and theophylline in methanol are observed. The effects of the solvent pH, the presence of a heavy atom and the matrix or substrate on the fluorescence and phosphorescence properties of the compounds are evaluated. Caffeine and theophylline fluorescence can be observed at room temperature from dilute methanolic solutions and strong phosphorescence is observed at low temperature when the matrix is in a polycrystalline state. Acidic and basic media cause spectral changes and reduce the intensity of the low temperature phosphorescence. Iodide is a good heavy-atom enhancer of both the low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence of caffeine and theophylline. The intensity of the phosphorescence at room temperature and when spotted on filter paper depends on the type of filter paper and the pH of the spotting solution and/or the pH of the wet surface at the moment of spotting. Theophylline is more sensitive than caffeine to the microenvironment. Under the appropriate experimental conditions, both low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence could be used as analytical tools for the determination of caffeine and theophylline.

  9. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee. PMID:17132260

  10. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Liow, Hien-haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Brent, Michael; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA Adenine Methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried Interaction or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome, and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  11. SpDamID: Marking DNA Bound by Protein Complexes Identifies Notch-Dimer Responsive Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Hass, Matthew R; Liow, Hien-Haw; Chen, Xiaoting; Sharma, Ankur; Inoue, Yukiko U; Inoue, Takayoshi; Reeb, Ashley; Martens, Andrew; Fulbright, Mary; Raju, Saravanan; Stevens, Michael; Boyle, Scott; Park, Joo-Seop; Weirauch, Matthew T; Brent, Michael R; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-08-20

    We developed Split DamID (SpDamID), a protein complementation version of DamID, to mark genomic DNA bound in vivo by interacting or juxtapositioned transcription factors. Inactive halves of DAM (DNA adenine methyltransferase) were fused to protein pairs to be queried. Either direct interaction between proteins or proximity enabled DAM reconstitution and methylation of adenine in GATC. Inducible SpDamID was used to analyze Notch-mediated transcriptional activation. We demonstrate that Notch complexes label RBP sites broadly across the genome and show that a subset of these complexes that recruit MAML and p300 undergo changes in chromatin accessibility in response to Notch signaling. SpDamID differentiates between monomeric and dimeric binding, thereby allowing for identification of half-site motifs used by Notch dimers. Motif enrichment of Notch enhancers coupled with SpDamID reveals co-targeting of regulatory sequences by Notch and Runx1. SpDamID represents a sensitive and powerful tool that enables dynamic analysis of combinatorial protein-DNA transactions at a genome-wide level. PMID:26257285

  12. Retinoic Acid Specifically Enhances Embryonic Stem Cell Metastate Marked by Zscan4.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Daniela; De Angelis, Maria Teresa; Russo, Nicola Antonino; Marotta, Maria; Ceccarelli, Michele; Del Vecchio, Luigi; De Felice, Mario; Falco, Geppino

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency confers Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives, producing the majority of cell types. Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing pluripotency, it has become evident that ESCs culture consists of multiple cell populations with different degrees of potency that are spontaneously induced in regular ESC culture conditions. Zscan4, a key pluripotency factor, marks ESC subpopulation that is referred to as high-level of pluripotency metastate. Here, we report that in ESC cultures treated with retinoic acid (RA), Zscan4 ESCs metastate is strongly enhanced. In particular, we found that induction of Zscan4 metastate is mediated via RA receptors (RAR-alpha, RAR-beta, and RAR-gamma), and it is dependent on phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Remarkably, Zscan4 metastate induced by RA lacks canonical pluripotency genes Oct3/4 and Nanog but retained both self-renewal and pluripotency capabilities. Finally we demonstrated that the conditional ablation of Zscan4 subpopulation is dispensable for both endoderm and mesoderm but is required for ectoderm lineage. In conclusion, our research provides new insights about the role of RA signaling during ESCs high pluripotency metastate fluctuation. PMID:26840068

  13. Retinoic Acid Specifically Enhances Embryonic Stem Cell Metastate Marked by Zscan4

    PubMed Central

    Tagliaferri, Daniela; De Angelis, Maria Teresa; Russo, Nicola Antonino; Marotta, Maria; Ceccarelli, Michele; Del Vecchio, Luigi; De Felice, Mario; Falco, Geppino

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency confers Embryonic Stem Cells (ESCs) the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives, producing the majority of cell types. Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing pluripotency, it has become evident that ESCs culture consists of multiple cell populations with different degrees of potency that are spontaneously induced in regular ESC culture conditions. Zscan4, a key pluripotency factor, marks ESC subpopulation that is referred to as high-level of pluripotency metastate. Here, we report that in ESC cultures treated with retinoic acid (RA), Zscan4 ESCs metastate is strongly enhanced. In particular, we found that induction of Zscan4 metastate is mediated via RA receptors (RAR-alpha, RAR-beta, and RAR-gamma), and it is dependent on phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Remarkably, Zscan4 metastate induced by RA lacks canonical pluripotency genes Oct3/4 and Nanog but retained both self-renewal and pluripotency capabilities. Finally we demonstrated that the conditional ablation of Zscan4 subpopulation is dispensable for both endoderm and mesoderm but is required for ectoderm lineage. In conclusion, our research provides new insights about the role of RA signaling during ESCs high pluripotency metastate fluctuation. PMID:26840068

  14. Development of tumor-specific caffeine-potentiated chemotherapy using a novel drug delivery system with Span 80 nano-vesicles

    PubMed Central

    NAKATA, HIROSHI; MIYAZAKI, TATSUHIKO; IWASAKI, TOMOYUKI; NAKAMURA, ATSUSHI; KIDANI, TERUKI; SAKAYAMA, KENSHI; MASUMOTO, JUNYA; MIURA, HIROMASA

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, chemotherapy with caffeine has manifested potently high efficacy against osteosarcoma, although adverse effects have been observed. Recently, we developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) with nonionic vesicles prepared from Span 80 which have promising physicochemical properties as an attractive possible alternative to commonly used liposomes. Herein, we demonstrated that tumor-specific caffeine-potentiated chemotherapy for murine osteosarcoma administered by a novel DDS with Span 80 nano-vesicles showed significant antitumor effects as well as limited adverse effects. The osteosarcoma cell line, LM8, was transplanted into C3H/HeJ mice which then were administered therapeutic agents. Ifosfamide (IFO) was employed as well as caffeine as an enhancer. Span 80 vesicles containing IFO and/or caffeine were freshly prepared. On days 0, 2 and 4, different combinations of the agents were administered to mice: IFO alone (direct i.v.), IFO vesicles (IV), IV + caffeine, IV + caffeine vesicles (CV), PBS alone vesicles (PV), and PBS alone as negative control (PBS i.v.). Then, the mice were sacrificed on day 7. Antitumor effects of the reagents were also analyzed in vitro. Moreover, fertility examination was performed. In vitro, a combination of IV+CV showed significant induction of apoptosis in the early phase. Tumor volumes in the IV+CV group were significantly reduced compared with the other groups. Histological analyses showed that the IV and IV+CV groups had significantly lower viable tumor areas. The IFO direct i.v. group showed a certain grade of renal injury as well as marked suppression of spermatogenesis, while the IV or IV+CV group showed no marked changes. The fertility test revealed that the male mice with IV+CV administration had normal fertility, and no malformations were detected in their progeny. This DDS model is of potential importance for clinical application in the therapy of metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25633802

  15. Development of tumor-specific caffeine-potentiated chemotherapy using a novel drug delivery system with Span 80 nano-vesicles.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Iwasaki, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kidani, Teruki; Sakayama, Kenshi; Masumoto, Junya; Miura, Hiromasa

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, chemotherapy with caffeine has manifested potently high efficacy against osteosarcoma, although adverse effects have been observed. Recently, we developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) with nonionic vesicles prepared from Span 80 which have promising physicochemical properties as an attractive possible alternative to commonly used liposomes. Herein, we demonstrated that tumor-specific caffeine-potentiated chemotherapy for murine osteosarcoma administered by a novel DDS with Span 80 nano-vesicles showed significant antitumor effects as well as limited adverse effects. The osteosarcoma cell line, LM8, was transplanted into C3H/HeJ mice which then were administered therapeutic agents. Ifosfamide (IFO) was employed as well as caffeine as an enhancer. Span 80 vesicles containing IFO and/or caffeine were freshly prepared. On days 0, 2 and 4, different combinations of the agents were administered to mice: IFO alone (direct i.v.), IFO vesicles (IV), IV+caffeine, IV+caffeine vesicles (CV), PBS alone vesicles (PV), and PBS alone as negative control (PBS i.v.). Then, the mice were sacrificed on day 7. Antitumor effects of the reagents were also analyzed in vitro. Moreover, fertility examination was performed. In vitro, a combination of IV+CV showed significant induction of apoptosis in the early phase. Tumor volumes in the IV+CV group were significantly reduced compared with the other groups. Histological analyses showed that the IV and IV+CV groups had significantly lower viable tumor areas. The IFO direct i.v. group showed a certain grade of renal injury as well as marked suppression of spermatogenesis, while the IV or IV+CV group showed no marked changes. The fertility test revealed that the male mice with IV+CV administration had normal fertility, and no malformations were detected in their progeny. This DDS model is of potential importance for clinical application in the therapy of metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25633802

  16. Evaluation of the Reproductive and Developmental Risks of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Robert L; Christian, Mildred S; Diener, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    A risk analysis of in utero caffeine exposure is presented utilizing epidemiological studies and animal studies dealing with congenital malformation, pregnancy loss, and weight reduction. These effects are of interest to teratologists, because animal studies are useful in their evaluation. Many of the epidemiology studies did not evaluate the impact of the “pregnancy signal,” which identifies healthy pregnancies and permits investigators to identify subjects with low pregnancy risks. The spontaneous abortion epidemiology studies were inconsistent and the majority did not consider the confounding introduced by not considering the pregnancy signal. The animal studies do not support the concept that caffeine is an abortafacient for the wide range of human caffeine exposures. Almost all the congenital malformation epidemiology studies were negative. Animal pharmacokinetic studies indicate that the teratogenic plasma level of caffeine has to reach or exceed 60 µg/ml, which is not attainable from ingesting large amounts of caffeine in foods and beverages. No epidemiological study described the “caffeine teratogenic syndrome.” Six of the 17 recent epidemiology studies dealing with the risk of caffeine and fetal weight reduction were negative. Seven of the positive studies had growth reductions that were clinically insignificant and none of the studies cited the animal literature. Analysis of caffeine's reproductive toxicity considers reproducibility and plausibility of clinical, epidemiological, and animal data. Moderate or even high amounts of beverages and foods containing caffeine do not increase the risks of congenital malformations, miscarriage or growth retardation. Pharmacokinetic studies markedly improve the ability to perform the risk analyses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:152–187, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21370398

  17. Effect of caffeine on oxidative stress during maximum incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Olcina, Guillermo J; Muñoz, Diego; Timón, Rafael; Caballero, M Jesús; Maynar, Juan I; Córdova, Alfredo; Maynar, Marcos

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is an habitual substance present in a wide variety of beverages and in chocolate-based foods and it is also used as adjuvant in some drugs. The antioxidant ability of caffeine has been reported in contrast with its pro- oxidant effects derived from its action mechanism such as the systemic release of catecholamines. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of caffeine on exercise oxidative stress, measuring plasma vitamins A, E, C and malonaldehyde (MDA) as markers of non enzymatic antioxidant status and lipid peroxidation respectively. Twenty young males participated in a double blind (caffeine 5mg·kg- 1 body weight or placebo) cycling test until exhaustion. In the exercise test, where caffeine was ingested prior to the test, exercise time to exhaustion, maximum heart rate, and oxygen uptake significantly increased, whereas respiratory exchange ratio (RER) decreased. Vitamins A and E decreased with exercise and vitamin C and MDA increased after both the caffeine and placebo tests but, regarding these particular variables, there were no significant differences between the two test conditions. The results obtained support the conclusion that this dose of caffeine enhances the ergospirometric response to cycling and has no effect on lipid peroxidation or on the antioxidant vitamins A, E and C. Key PointsCaffeine ingestion may improve maximal aerobic performance in non trained men.Cellular oxidative damage is not altered by caffeine ingestion in maximal aerobic exercises.Antioxidant response to exercise, vitamins A, E and C, is not modified by caffeine action in maximal aerobic efforts. PMID:24357958

  18. Factors associated with caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Brice, Carolyn F; Smith, Andrew P

    2002-01-01

    The main aim of this research was to identify factors that were related to caffeine consumption. From this investigation it can be concluded that coffee is the main source of caffeine and that consumption varies with time of day. Individuals may be utilising the arousing effects of caffeine by consuming it at times when arousal is low for instance to counteract sleep inertia or a post-lunch dip in alertness. There is, however, very little evidence to suggest that psychological characteristics such as personality traits or psychosocial factors are important in influencing caffeine consumption, although smoking was found to be related to the amount of caffeine consumed. PMID:11820098

  19. Hidden in Plain Sight: How Ventral Line Markings in Chameleons May Enhance Camouflage.

    PubMed

    Resetarits, Emlyn J; Raxworthy, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Chameleons, lizards often synonymous with camouflage for their color-changing abilities, possess a variety of permanent coloration patterns whose evolutionary significance remains largely unknown. In this study, we explore the potential for white ventral line markings in species across the genus Chamaeleonidae to function as a camouflage pattern against diurnal predators. Diurnal behavioral field studies of the white-lined chameleon Furcifer viridis showed that individuals typically exposed ventral line markings during the characteristic ring-flip antipredator behavior in response to a predatory threat. These ventral line markings are largely inconspicuous in other postures. Comparative morphological analyses of 86 species found that there was a significant positive correlation between ventral line markings with arboreal habitat type, even when accounting for phylogeny. These results suggest that ventral line markings (and the ring-flip behavior) could act as a disruptive or mimetic coloration marking for arboreal chameleons against visual diurnal predators. Further work testing differential predation rates is necessary in order to verify the proposed function of these line markings. PMID:26807752

  20. Caffeine and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Google+ Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Follow us on YouTube Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Caffeine and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their Relationship to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache ...

  1. Caffeine Reinforces Flavor Preference and Behavior in Moderate Users but Not in Low Caffeine Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the role of caffeine consumption in caffeine reinforcement. Previous findings have shown that caffeine reinforced flavor preference in moderate caffeine consumers who are caffeine deprived. However, most of these studies have employed rating procedures only, and have not shown the effectiveness of caffeine to reinforce behaviors…

  2. Direct effects of caffeine on osteoblastic cells metabolism: the possible causal effect of caffeine on the formation of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chen, Li-Ting; Sun, Samuel Chung-Kai; Chen, San-Chi

    2006-01-01

    Background Caffeine consumption has been reported to decrease bone mineral density (BMD), increase the risk of hip fracture, and negatively influence calcium retention. In this study, we investigated the influence of caffeine on the osteoblasts behaviour. Method Osteoblasts derived from newborn Wistar-rat calvaria was used in this study. The effects of various concentrations of caffeine on bone cell activities were evaluated by using MTT assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, von Kossa staining and biochemical parameters including ALP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total protein were performed at day 1, 3, and 7. DNA degradation analysis under the caffeine influence was also performed. Results and discussion The results showed that the viability of the osteoblasts, the formation of ALP positive staining colonies and mineralization nodules formation in the osteoblasts cultures decreased significantly in the presence of 10 mM caffeine. The intracellular LDH, ALP and PGE2 content decreased significantly, the LDH and PGE2 secreted into the medium increased significantly. The activation of an irreversible commitment to cell death by caffeine was clearly demonstrated by DNA ladder staining. Conclusion In summary, our results suggest that caffeine has potential deleterious effect on the osteoblasts viability, which may enhance the rate of osteoblasts apoptosis. PMID:17150127

  3. Pioneer factor interactions and unmethylated CpG dinucleotides mark silent tissue-specific enhancers in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Pope, Scott D; Jazirehi, Ali R; Attema, Joanne L; Papathanasiou, Peter; Watts, Jason A; Zaret, Kenneth S; Weissman, Irving L; Smale, Stephen T

    2007-07-24

    Recent studies have suggested that, in ES cells, inactive genes encoding early developmental regulators possess bivalent histone modification domains and are therefore poised for activation. However, bivalent domains were not observed at typical tissue-specific genes. Here, we show that windows of unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and putative pioneer factor interactions mark enhancers for at least some tissue-specific genes in ES cells. The unmethylated windows expand in cells that express the gene and contract, disappear, or remain unchanged in nonexpressing tissues. However, in ES cells, they do not always coincide with common histone modifications. Genomic footprinting and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that transcription factor binding underlies the unmethylated windows at enhancers for the Ptcra and Alb1 genes. After stable integration of premethylated Ptcra enhancer constructs into the ES cell genome, the unmethylated windows readily appeared. In contrast, the premethylated constructs remained fully methylated and silent after introduction into Ptcra-expressing thymocytes. These findings provide initial functional support for a model in which pioneer factor interactions in ES cells promote the assembly of a chromatin structure that is permissive for subsequent activation, and in which differentiated tissues lack the machinery required for gene activation when these ES cell marks are absent. The enhancer marks may therefore represent important features of the pluripotent state. PMID:17640912

  4. The perspective of caffeine and caffeine derived compounds in therapy.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, M

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a plant secondary metabolite with a significant impact on multiple processes and regulatory pathways in the body. Though major part of the population meets caffeine via coffee, tea or chocolate, it has also an important role in pharmacology and it is used as a supplementary substance in medicaments. Currently, the ability of caffeine to ameliorate some neurodegenerative disorders is proved in some studies. This review describes basic data about caffeine including toxicity, pharmacokinetics, biological mechanism of the action, and metabolism. Beside this, promising applications of caffeine, new medicaments and derivatives are discussed. Relevant papers and inventions are depicted in the manuscript. Caffeine is a pharmacologically promising substance that deserves big consideration in the current research and development. The compound has several reasons to be an object of scientific interest and to be used for pharmacology purposes. Despite an extensive research for a long time, no significantly negative effects on human health were proved hence caffeine can be considered as a completely safe compound. The recent data about amelioration of neurodegenerative and other disorders are promising and deserving more work on the issue. ARTICLE HIGHLIGHTS: Caffeine is a purine alkaloid from plants and it has a broad use in current pharmacology. Caffeine is a competitive antagonist of neurotransmitter adenosine on adenosine receptors. The substance is added as a supplementary to drugs and food.Besides interfering on adenosine receptors, caffeine interacts with acetylcholinesterase, monoamine oxidase, phosphodiesterase, ryanodine receptors and others.Current research is devoted to the role of caffeine in neurodegenerative diseases and immunity alteration. New chemical compounds based on caffeine moiety are prepared (Tab. 4, Fig. 6, Ref. 149). PMID:26435014

  5. Caffeinated forage tricks honeybees into increasing foraging and recruitment behaviors.

    PubMed

    Couvillon, Margaret J; Al Toufailia, Hasan; Butterfield, Thomas M; Schrell, Felix; Ratnieks, Francis L W; Schürch, Roger

    2015-11-01

    In pollination, plants provide food reward to pollinators who in turn enhance plant reproduction by transferring pollen, making the relationship largely cooperative; however, because the interests of plants and pollinators do not always align, there exists the potential for conflict, where it may benefit both to cheat the other [1, 2]. Plants may even resort to chemistry: caffeine, a naturally occurring, bitter-tasting, pharmacologically active secondary compound whose main purpose is to detract herbivores, is also found in lower concentrations in the nectar of some plants, even though nectar, unlike leaves, is made to be consumed by pollinators. [corrected]. A recent laboratory study showed that caffeine may lead to efficient and effective foraging by aiding honeybee memory of a learned olfactory association [4], suggesting that caffeine may enhance bee reward perception. However, without field data, the wider ecological significance of caffeinated nectar remains difficult to interpret. Here we demonstrate in the field that caffeine generates significant individual- and colony-level effects in free-flying worker honeybees. Compared to a control, a sucrose solution with field-realistic doses of caffeine caused honeybees to significantly increase their foraging frequency, waggle dancing probability and frequency, and persistency and specificity to the forage location, resulting in a quadrupling of colony-level recruitment. An agent-based model also demonstrates how caffeine-enhanced foraging may reduce honey storage. Overall, caffeine causes bees to overestimate forage quality, tempting the colony into sub-optimal foraging strategies, which makes the relationship between pollinator and plant less mutualistic and more exploitative. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26480843

  6. Effect of caffeine on physiological sleep tendency and ability to sustain wakefulness at night.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J K; Muehlbach, M J; Humm, T M; Dickins, Q S; Sugerman, J L; Schweitzer, P K

    1990-01-01

    Marked sleepiness occurs during typical night shift work hours and this reduced alertness is associated with marked performance deficits. The effect of caffeine (versus placebo) upon sleepiness at night was studied using objective measures of physiological sleep tendency and ability to sustain wakefulness. Both measures show caffeine to reduce sleepiness at a single dose roughly the equivalent of two to four cups of coffee. Despite impressive objective differences in alertness with caffeine, subjects did not consistently differentiate between drug conditions on subjective alertness assessments. The use of CNS stimulants to promote alertness during night shift hours should be considered, particularly for occupations for which alertness is critical. PMID:2349369

  7. Adolescent caffeine consumption and self-reported violence and conduct disorder.

    PubMed

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir L; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Frost, Stephanie S; James, Jack E

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and currently the only one legally available to children and adolescents. The sale and use of caffeinated beverages has increased markedly among adolescents during the last decade. However, research on caffeine use and behaviors among adolescents is scarce. We investigate the relationship between adolescent caffeine use and self-reported violent behaviors and conduct disorders in a population-based cross-sectional sample of 3,747 10th grade students (15-16 years of age, 50.2 % girls) who were enrolled in the Icelandic national education system during February 2012. Through a series of multiple regression models, while controlling for background factors, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder symptoms and current medication and peer delinquency, and including measures on substance use, our findings show robust additive explanatory power of caffeine for both violent behaviors and conduct disorders. In addition, the association of caffeine to the outcomes is significantly stronger for girls than boys for both violent behaviors and conduct disorders. Future studies are needed to examine to what extent, if at all, these relationships are causal. Indication of causal connections between caffeine consumption and negative outcomes such as those reported here would call into question the acceptability of current policies concerning the availability of caffeine to adolescents and the targeting of adolescence in the marketing of caffeine products. PMID:23358888

  8. Adolescent caffeine consumption increases adulthood anxiety-related behavior and modifies neuroendocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Casey E; Newsom, Ryan J; Stafford, Jacob; Scott, Talia; Archuleta, Solana; Levis, Sophia C; Spencer, Robert L; Campeau, Serge; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is a commonly used psychoactive substance and consumption by children and adolescents continues to rise. Here, we examine the lasting effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on anxiety-related behaviors and several neuroendocrine measures in adulthood. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3g/L) for 28 consecutive days from postnatal day 28 (P28) to P55. Age-matched control rats consumed water. Behavioral testing for anxiety-related behavior began in adulthood (P62) 7 days after removal of caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption enhanced anxiety-related behavior in an open field, social interaction test, and elevated plus maze. Similar caffeine consumption in adult rats did not alter anxiety-related behavior after caffeine removal. Characterization of neuroendocrine measures was next assessed to determine whether the changes in anxiety were associated with modifications in the HPA axis. Blood plasma levels of corticosterone (CORT) were assessed throughout the caffeine consumption procedure in adolescent rats. Adolescent caffeine consumption elevated plasma CORT 24h after initiation of caffeine consumption that normalized over the course of the 28-day consumption procedure. CORT levels were also elevated 24h after caffeine removal and remained elevated for 7 days. Despite elevated basal CORT in adult rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence, the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and CORT response to placement on an elevated pedestal (a mild stressor) was significantly blunted. Lastly, we assessed changes in basal and stress-induced c-fos and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf) mRNA expression in brain tissue collected at 7 days withdrawal from adolescent caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption increased basal c-fos mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Adolescent caffeine consumption had no other effects on the basal or stress-induced c-fos mRNA changes. Caffeine consumption during adolescence increased

  9. Acute caffeine treatment increases extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis from rat striatal and hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2003-08-01

    The psychostimulant caffeine promotes behavioral effects such as hyperlocomotion, anxiety, and disruption of sleep by blockade of adenosine receptors. The availability of extracellular adenosine depends on its release by transporters or by the extracellular ATP catabolism performed by the ecto-nucleotidase pathway. This study verified the effect of caffeine on NTPDase 1 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) and 5'-nucleotidase of synaptosomes from hippocampus and striatum of rats. Caffeine and theophylline tested in vitro were unable to modify nucleotide hydrolysis. Caffeine chronically administered in the drinking water at 0.3 g/L or 1 g/L for 14 days failed to affect nucleotide hydrolysis. However, acute administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an enhancement of ATP (50%) and ADP (32%) hydrolysis in synaptosomes of hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This activation of ATP and ADP hydrolysis after acute treatment suggests a compensatory effect to increase adenosine levels and counteract the antagonist action of caffeine. PMID:12834266

  10. Evaluating Dependence Criteria for Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Striley, Catherine L W; Griffiths, Roland R; Cottler, Linda B

    2011-12-01

    Background: Although caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world, few studies have operationalized and characterized Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV) substance dependence criteria applied to caffeine. Methods: As a part of a nosological study of substance use disorders funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, we assessed caffeine use and dependence symptoms among high school and college students, drug treatment patients, and pain clinic patients who reported caffeine use in the last 7 days and also reported use of alcohol, nicotine, or illicit drugs within the past year (n=167). Results: Thirty-five percent met the criteria for dependence when all seven of the adopted DSM dependence criteria were used. Rates of endorsement of several of the most applicable diagnostic criteria were as follows: 26% withdrawal, 23% desire to cut down or control use, and 44% continued use despite harm. In addition, 34% endorsed craving, 26% said they needed caffeine to function, and 10% indicated that they talked to a physician or counselor about problems experienced with caffeine. There was a trend towards increased caffeine dependence among those dependent on nicotine or alcohol. Within a subgroup that had used caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine in the past year, 28% fulfilled criteria for caffeine dependence compared to 50% for alcohol and 80% for nicotine. Conclusion: The present study adds to a growing literature suggesting the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the caffeine dependence diagnosis. Recognition of caffeine dependence in the DSM-V may be clinically useful. PMID:24761264

  11. Two Enhanced Heuristic Algorithms for the Minimum Initial Marking Problem of Petri Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiiwa, Satoru; Taoka, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Toshimasa

    The minimum initial marking problem of Petri nets (MIM) is defined as follows: “Given a Petri net and a firing count vector X, find an initial marking M0, with the minimum total token number, for which there is a sequence δ of transitions such that each transition t appears exactly X(t) times in δ, the first transition is enabled at M0 and the rest can be fired one by one subsequently.” In a production system like factory automation, economical distribution of initial resources, from which a schedule of job-processings is executable, can be formulated as MIM. AAD is known to produce best solutions among existing algorithms. Although solutions by AMIM+ is worse than those by AAD, it is known that AMIM+ is very fast. This paper proposes new heuristic algorithms AADO and AMDLO, improved versions of existing algorithms AAD and AMIM+, respectively. Sharpness of solutions or short CPU time is the main target of AADO or AMDLO, respectively. It is shown, based on computing experiment, that the average total number of tokens in initial markings by AADO is about 5.15% less than that by AAD, and the average CPU time by AADO is about 17.3% of that by AAD. AMDLO produces solutions that are slightly worse than those by AAD, while they are about 10.4% better than those by AMIM+. Although CPU time of AMDLO is about 180 times that of AMIM+, it is still fast: average CPU time of AMDLO is about 2.33% of that of AAD. Generally it is observed that solutions get worse as the sizes of input instances increase, and this is the case with AAD and AMIM+. This undesirable tendency is greatly improved in AADO and AMDLO.

  12. A benefit-risk assessment of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Y

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine has been an additive in analgesics for many years. However, the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine have not been seriously investigated since a pooled analysis conducted in 1984 showed that caffeine reduces the amount of paracetamol (acetaminophen) necessary for the same effect by approximately 40%. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological research has provided some evidence that caffeine can have anti-nociceptive actions through blockade of adenosine receptors, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme synthesis, or by changes in emotion state. Nevertheless, these actions are only considered in some cases. It is suggested that the actual doses of analgesics and caffeine used can influence the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine, and doses that are either too low or too high lead to no analgesic enhancement. Clinical trials suggest that caffeine in doses of more than 65 mg may be useful for enhancement of analgesia. However, except for in headache pain, the benefits are equivocal. While adding caffeine to analgesics increases the number of patients who become free from headache [rate ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17 to 1.58], it also leads to more patients with nervousness and dizziness (relative risk = 1.60, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.03). It is suggested that long-term use or overuse of analgesic medications is associated with rebound headache. However, there is no robust evidence that headache after use or withdrawal of caffeine-containing analgesics is more frequent than after other analgesics. Case-control studies have shown that caffeine-containing analgesics are associated with analgesic nephropathy (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.3 to 10.3). However, no specific contribution of caffeine to analgesic nephropathy can be identified from these studies. Whether caffeine produces nephrotoxicity on its own, or increases nephrotoxicity due to analgesics, is yet to be established. PMID:11772146

  13. The Effects of Caffeine on Athletic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry W.; McIntire, Kyle; Streitz, Carmyn; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Athletes who use caffeine before exercising or competition may be upgrading themselves more than they realize. Caffeine is classified as a stimulant and is the most commonly used drug in the world. Caffeine has the same affects that amphetamines and cocaine have, just to a lesser degree. Caffeine crosses the membranes of all the body's tissues. It…

  14. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors. PMID:25871974

  15. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  16. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G/sub 2/ arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.; Zorch, M.; Leeper, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G/sub 2/ cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G/sub 2/. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G/sub 2/ arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G/sub 2/ phases.

  17. Effect of caffeine supplementation on haematological and biochemical variables in elite soccer players under physical stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bassini‐Cameron, Adriana; Sweet, Eric; Bottino, Altamiro; Bittar, Christina; Veiga, Carlos; Cameron, Luiz‐Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of caffeine on white cell distribution and muscle injury markers in professional soccer players during exercise. Methods 22 male athletes completed a placebo controlled double blind test protocol to simulate a soccer match, followed by a Yo‐Yo intermittent recovery test. Results Exercise caused an increase in packed cell volume that was enhanced by caffeine. Caffeine and exercise had a synergistic effect on the blood lymphocyte count, which increased by about 38% after exercise, and by an additional 35% when combined with caffeine. Caffeine promoted an exercise independent rise in circulating monocytes, and a synergistic action of exercise and caffeine was observed on segmented neutrophils. Caffeine promoted thrombocytosis. Plasma adenosine deaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase concentrations were enhanced by exercise, and alanine transaminase concentration was enhanced in both groups, with a synergistic effect of caffeine. Conclusions The pronounced increase in the white cell count in the group receiving caffeine appeared to be caused by greater muscle stress and consequently more intense endothelial and muscle cell injury. The use of caffeine may augment the risk of muscle damage in athletes. PMID:17473001

  18. Caffeine provokes adverse interactions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') and related psychostimulants: mechanisms and mediators.

    PubMed

    Vanattou-Saïfoudine, N; McNamara, R; Harkin, A

    2012-11-01

    Concomitant consumption of caffeine with recreational psychostimulant drugs of abuse can provoke severe acute adverse reactions in addition to longer term consequences. The mechanisms by which caffeine increases the toxicity of psychostimulants include changes in body temperature regulation, cardiotoxicity and lowering of the seizure threshold. Caffeine also influences the stimulatory, discriminative and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs. In this review, we consider our current understanding of such caffeine-related drug interactions, placing a particular emphasis on an adverse interaction between caffeine and the substituted amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy'), which has been most recently described and characterized. Co-administration of caffeine profoundly enhances the acute toxicity of MDMA in rats, as manifested by high core body temperature, tachycardia and increased mortality. In addition, co-administration of caffeine enhances the long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. Observations to date support an interactive model of drug-induced toxicity comprising MDMA-related enhancement of dopamine release coupled to a caffeine-mediated antagonism of adenosine receptors in addition to inhibition of PDE. These experiments are reviewed together with reports of caffeine-related drug interactions with cocaine, d-amphetamine and ephedrine where similar mechanisms are implicated. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will guide appropriate intervention strategies for the management of severe reactions and potential for increased drug-related toxicity, resulting from concomitant caffeine consumption. PMID:22671762

  19. Caffeine provokes adverse interactions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’) and related psychostimulants: mechanisms and mediators

    PubMed Central

    Vanattou-Saïfoudine, N; McNamara, R; Harkin, A

    2012-01-01

    Concomitant consumption of caffeine with recreational psychostimulant drugs of abuse can provoke severe acute adverse reactions in addition to longer term consequences. The mechanisms by which caffeine increases the toxicity of psychostimulants include changes in body temperature regulation, cardiotoxicity and lowering of the seizure threshold. Caffeine also influences the stimulatory, discriminative and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs. In this review, we consider our current understanding of such caffeine-related drug interactions, placing a particular emphasis on an adverse interaction between caffeine and the substituted amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’), which has been most recently described and characterized. Co-administration of caffeine profoundly enhances the acute toxicity of MDMA in rats, as manifested by high core body temperature, tachycardia and increased mortality. In addition, co-administration of caffeine enhances the long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. Observations to date support an interactive model of drug-induced toxicity comprising MDMA-related enhancement of dopamine release coupled to a caffeine-mediated antagonism of adenosine receptors in addition to inhibition of PDE. These experiments are reviewed together with reports of caffeine-related drug interactions with cocaine, d-amphetamine and ephedrine where similar mechanisms are implicated. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will guide appropriate intervention strategies for the management of severe reactions and potential for increased drug-related toxicity, resulting from concomitant caffeine consumption. PMID:22671762

  20. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the lost data many destructive or non-destructive techniques have been endeavoured so far, which however present several restrictions. In this paper, active infrared thermography has been exploited for the first time in order to assess its effectiveness in restoring paint covered and abraded labels made by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced readability. In particular, for deeply abraded marks, good outcomes have been obtained by application of logarithmic transformation to raw PT images and block guided filtering to raw phase LT images. With PT and LT it was relatively easy to recover labels covered by paint, with the latter one providing better thermal contrast for all the examined targets. Step heating thermography never led to adequate label identification instead.

  1. Consumption of dietary caffeine and coffee in physically active populations: physiological interactions.

    PubMed

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Erdman, Kelly Anne; Reimer, Raylene A; Lun, Victor; Shearer, Jane

    2008-12-01

    Caffeine is a proven ergogenic aid, increasing athletic performance, endurance, and mental chronometry at doses as low as 1-3 mg.kg-1. As coffee is a readily available and commonly ingested form of caffeine, the two are often equated. However, coffee also contains hundreds of other biologically active compounds, many of which are metabolically distinct from caffeine. The purpose of this review was to examine the prevalence of coffee and (or) caffeine consumption among elite Canadian athletes, and to delineate the effects of coffee and caffeine on physical activity, weight maintenance, performance, and metabolism. A total of 270 self-reported 3-day food records were examined for caffeine intake from athletes registered with Canadian Sport Centres in 2005 and 2006. Athletes ranged in age from 16-45 years, and competed in 38 different sports. Results showed that 30% of athletes ingested >1 mg.kg-1.day-1 from a variety of sources. Average daily intake was 0.85 +/- 13 mg.kg-1. Caffeine intake was not correlated with any 1 sport; the 10 highest caffeine users were athletes from 9 different sports, including skill, endurance, and power sports. No differences were noted for average caffeine ingestion between summer and winter sports. High caffeine intakes corresponded to coffee ingestion, with the 25 highest individual intakes (193-895 mg.day-1) from coffee drinkers. In summary, it can be concluded that the majority of high-level Canadian athletes consume dietary caffeine primarily in the form of coffee. However, levels consumed are insufficient to elicit performance enhancement. Potential detrimental effects of caffeine consumption on exercise performance include gastric upset, withdrawal, sleep disturbance, and interactions with other dietary supplements. PMID:19088792

  2. Efficacy of acute caffeine ingestion for short-term high-intensity exercise performance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd A; Roberson, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used drug in the world, commonly ingested in coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks. Its ability to enhance muscular work has been apparent since the early 1900s. Caffeine typically increases endurance performance; however, efficacy of caffeine ingestion for short-term high-intensity exercise is equivocal, which may be explained by discrepancies in exercise protocols, dosing, and subjects' training status and habitual caffeine intake found across studies. The primary aim of this review is to critically examine studies that have tested caffeine's ability to augment performance during exercise dependent on nonoxidative metabolism such as sprinting, team sports, and resistance training. A review of the literature revealed 29 studies that measured alterations in short-term performance after caffeine ingestion. Each study was critically analyzed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. The mean PEDro score was 7.76 +/- 0.87. Eleven of 17 studies revealed significant improvements in team sports exercise and power-based sports with caffeine ingestion, yet these effects were more common in elite athletes who do not regularly ingest caffeine. Six of 11 studies revealed significant benefits of caffeine for resistance training. Some studies show decreased performance with caffeine ingestion when repeated bouts are completed. The exact mechanism explaining the ergogenic effect of caffeine for short-term exercise is unknown. PMID:19924012

  3. Do energy drinks contain active components other than caffeine?

    PubMed

    McLellan, Tom M; Lieberman, Harris R

    2012-12-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) contain caffeine and are a new, popular category of beverage. It has been suggested that EDs enhance physical and cognitive performance; however, it is unclear whether the claimed benefits are attributable to components other than caffeine. A typical 235 mL ED provides between 40 and 250 mg of caffeine, equating to doses that improve cognitive and, at the higher levels, physical performance. EDs often contain taurine, guaraná, ginseng, glucuronolactone, B-vitamins, and other compounds. A literature search using PubMed, Psych Info, and Google Scholar identified 32 articles that examined the effects of ED ingredients alone and/or in combination with caffeine on physical or cognitive performance. A systematic evaluation of the evidence-based findings in these articles was then conducted. With the exception of some weak evidence for glucose and guaraná extract, there is an overwhelming lack of evidence to substantiate claims that components of EDs, other than caffeine, contribute to the enhancement of physical or cognitive performance. Additional well-designed, randomized, placebo-controlled studies replicated across laboratories are needed in order to assess claims made for these products. PMID:23206286

  4. Markedly enhanced absorption and direct radiative forcing of black carbon under polluted urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Levy Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Glen, Crystal R.; Collins, Donald R.; Molina, Mario J.

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) exerts profound impacts on air quality and climate because of its high absorption cross-section over a broad range of electromagnetic spectra, but the current results on absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging remain conflicting. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China, and Houston, United States, using a novel environmental chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages, i.e., initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a large absorption enhancement. The timescales to achieve complete morphology modification and an absorption amplification factor of 2.4 for BC particles are estimated to be 2.3 h and 4.6 h, respectively, in Beijing, compared with 9 h and 18 h, respectively, in Houston. Our findings indicate that BC under polluted urban environments could play an essential role in pollution development and contribute importantly to large positive radiative forcing. The variation in direct radiative forcing is dependent on the rate and timescale of BC aging, with a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries, i.e., a higher climatic impact in more polluted environments. We suggest that mediation in BC emissions achieves a cobenefit in simultaneously controlling air pollution and protecting climate, especially for developing countries.

  5. Markedly enhanced absorption and direct radiative forcing of black carbon under polluted urban environments.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Levy Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Glen, Crystal R; Collins, Donald R; Molina, Mario J; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-19

    Black carbon (BC) exerts profound impacts on air quality and climate because of its high absorption cross-section over a broad range of electromagnetic spectra, but the current results on absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging remain conflicting. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China, and Houston, United States, using a novel environmental chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages, i.e., initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a large absorption enhancement. The timescales to achieve complete morphology modification and an absorption amplification factor of 2.4 for BC particles are estimated to be 2.3 h and 4.6 h, respectively, in Beijing, compared with 9 h and 18 h, respectively, in Houston. Our findings indicate that BC under polluted urban environments could play an essential role in pollution development and contribute importantly to large positive radiative forcing. The variation in direct radiative forcing is dependent on the rate and timescale of BC aging, with a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries, i.e., a higher climatic impact in more polluted environments. We suggest that mediation in BC emissions achieves a cobenefit in simultaneously controlling air pollution and protecting climate, especially for developing countries. PMID:27035993

  6. Markedly enhanced absorption and direct radiative forcing of black carbon under polluted urban environments

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Levy Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Glen, Crystal R.; Collins, Donald R.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) exerts profound impacts on air quality and climate because of its high absorption cross-section over a broad range of electromagnetic spectra, but the current results on absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging remain conflicting. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China, and Houston, United States, using a novel environmental chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages, i.e., initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a large absorption enhancement. The timescales to achieve complete morphology modification and an absorption amplification factor of 2.4 for BC particles are estimated to be 2.3 h and 4.6 h, respectively, in Beijing, compared with 9 h and 18 h, respectively, in Houston. Our findings indicate that BC under polluted urban environments could play an essential role in pollution development and contribute importantly to large positive radiative forcing. The variation in direct radiative forcing is dependent on the rate and timescale of BC aging, with a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries, i.e., a higher climatic impact in more polluted environments. We suggest that mediation in BC emissions achieves a cobenefit in simultaneously controlling air pollution and protecting climate, especially for developing countries. PMID:27035993

  7. Markedly enhanced direct radiative forcing of black carbon particles under polluted urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Liming; Shao, Min; Wu, Yusheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Collins, Don; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles, produced from incomplete fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and have profound impacts on air quality, human health, weather, and climate. For example, in areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many urban centers and megacities worldwide, solar heating by BC particles has been shown to be comparable to warming due to the greenhouse gases2. Although BC represents a key short-lived climate forcer, its direct radiative forcing remains highly uncertain. In particular, the available results of absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging are conflicting from the previous studies, leading to a large uncertainty in global radiative transfer calculation. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China and Houston, US, using a novel chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages - initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and the subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a maximum absorption enhancement factor of 2.4. The variation in BC direct radiative forcing is highly dependent of the rate and timescale of aging, with an estimated increase of 0.45 (0.21 - 0.80) W m-2 from fresh to fully aged particles. Our results reveal a high climatic impact in polluted environments due to rapid aging and a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries for BC particles, highlighting a larger than recognized co-benefit in air quality improvement and climate protection by BC mediation.

  8. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  9. Maleimide conjugation markedly enhances the immunogenicity of both human and murine idiotype-KLH vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kafi, Kamran; Betting, David J.; Yamada, Reiko E.; Bacica, Michael; Steward, Kristopher K.; Timmerman, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The collection of epitopes present within the variable regions of the tumor-specific clonal immunoglobulin expressed by B cell lymphomas (idiotype, Id) can serve as a target for active immunotherapy. Traditionally, tumor-derived Id protein is chemically-conjugated to the immunogenic foreign carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) using glutaraldehyde to serve as a therapeutic vaccine. While this approach offered promising results for some patients treated in early clinical trials, glutaraldehyde Id-KLH vaccines have failed to induce immune and clinical responses in many vaccinated subjects. We recently described an alternative conjugation method employing maleimide-sulfhydryl chemistry that significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Id-KLH vaccines in three different murine B cell lymphoma models, with protection mediated by either CD8+ T cells or antibodies. We now define in detail the methods and parameters critical for enhancing the in vivo immunogenicity of human as well as murine Id-KLH conjugate vaccines. Optimal conditions for Id sulfhydryl pre-reduction were determined, and maleimide Id-KLH conjugates maintained stability and potency even after prolonged storage. Field flow fractionation analysis of Id-KLH particle size revealed that maleimide conjugates were far more uniform in size than glutaraldehyde conjugates. Under increasingly stringent conditions, maleimide Id-KLH vaccines maintained superior efficacy over glutaraldehyde Id-KLH in treating established, disseminated murine lymphoma. More importantly, human maleimide Id-KLH conjugates were consistently superior to glutaraldehyde Id-KLH conjugates in inducing Id-specific antibody and T cell responses. The described methods should be easily adaptable to the production of clinical grade vaccines for human trials in B cell malignancies. PMID:19046770

  10. Maleimide conjugation markedly enhances the immunogenicity of both human and murine idiotype-KLH vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kafi, Kamran; Betting, David J; Yamada, Reiko E; Bacica, Michael; Steward, Kristopher K; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    The collection of epitopes present within the variable regions of the tumor-specific clonal immunoglobulin expressed by B cell lymphomas (idiotype, Id) can serve as a target for active immunotherapy. Traditionally, tumor-derived Id protein is chemically conjugated to the immunogenic foreign carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) using glutaraldehyde to serve as a therapeutic vaccine. While this approach offered promising results for some patients treated in early clinical trials, glutaraldehyde Id-KLH vaccines have failed to induce immune and clinical responses in many vaccinated subjects. We recently described an alternative conjugation method employing maleimide-sulfhydryl chemistry that significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Id-KLH vaccines in three different murine B cell lymphoma models, with protection mediated by either CD8(+) T cells or antibodies. We now define in detail the methods and parameters critical for enhancing the in vivo immunogenicity of human as well as murine Id-KLH conjugate vaccines. Optimal conditions for Id sulfhydryl pre-reduction were determined, and maleimide Id-KLH conjugates maintained stability and potency even after prolonged storage. Field flow fractionation analysis of Id-KLH particle size revealed that maleimide conjugates were far more uniform in size than glutaraldehyde conjugates. Under increasingly stringent conditions, maleimide Id-KLH vaccines maintained superior efficacy over glutaraldehyde Id-KLH in treating established, disseminated murine lymphoma. More importantly, human maleimide Id-KLH conjugates were consistently superior to glutaraldehyde Id-KLH conjugates in inducing Id-specific antibody and T cell responses. The described methods should be easily adaptable to the production of clinical grade vaccines for human trials in B cell malignancies. PMID:19046770

  11. Configuring retroreflective markings to enhance the night-time conspicuity of road workers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Marszalek, Ralph; Lacherez, Philippe; Tyrrell, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated whether the night-time conspicuity of road workers can be enhanced by positioning retroreflective strips on the moveable joints in patterns that convey varying degrees of biological motion. Participants were 24 visually normal adults (12 young M=26.8 years; 12 older M=72.9 years). Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and glare sensitivity were recorded for each participant. Experimenters acting as road workers walked in place on a closed road circuit within simulated road work sites, facing either the oncoming driver or the roadway (presenting sideways to the driver) and wearing one of four clothing conditions: (i) standard road worker vest; (ii) standard vest plus thigh-mounted retroreflective strips; (iii) standard vest plus retroreflective strips on ankles and knees; (iv) standard vest plus retroreflective strips positioned on the extremities in a configuration that conveyed biological motion ("biomotion"). As they drove along the closed road participants were instructed to press a button to indicate when they first recognized that a road worker was present. The results demonstrated that regardless of the direction of walking, road workers wearing biomotion clothing were recognized at significantly (p<0.05) longer distances (3×), relative to the standard vest alone. Response distances were significantly shorter for the older drivers. Contrast sensitivity was a better predictor of the ability to recognize road workers than was visual acuity or glare sensitivity. We conclude that adding retroreflective strips in the biomotion configuration can significantly improve road worker conspicuity regardless of the road worker's orientation and the age of the driver. PMID:24816151

  12. Nicotine Deprivation Produces Deficits in Pain Perception that are Moderately Attenuated by Caffeine Consumption.

    PubMed

    Baiamonte, Brandon A; Stickley, Sarah C; Ford, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    During withdrawal, nicotine users experience aversive withdrawal symptoms, such as increased nociceptive processing, which may be responsible for subsequent use. Smokers often consume more caffeine than non-smokers and the combined effects of these two psychoactive drugs result in an enhanced analgesic effect of nicotine. We examined the effects of caffeine (via coffee consumption) and nicotine withdrawal on pain perception in minimally deprived smokers and non-smokers. Pain threshold and pain tolerance were assessed using a radiant heat stimulus before and 30 minutes after caffeine consumption. Nicotine deprivation (2 hrs) produced increases in pain threshold and decreases in pain tolerance representative of hyperalgesia. When smokers are nicotine deprived, caffeine consumption diminished baseline elevations in pain threshold, but had no effect on pain tolerance. These data suggest that caffeine consumption can dampen deficits in sensory discrimination related to pain during nicotine deprivation by reducing pain threshold to levels representative of non-smoking controls. PMID:27120004

  13. Markedly Enhanced Skeletal Muscle Transfection Achieved by the Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery of Non-Viral Gene Nanocarriers with Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Caitlin W.; Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Hsiang, Yu-Han J.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to enhance ultrasound (US)-targeted skeletal muscle transfection through the use of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/polyethylenimine (PEI) nanocomplex gene carriers and adjustments to US and microbubble (MB) parameters. C57BL/6 mice received an intravenous infusion of MBs and either “naked” luciferase plasmid or luciferase plasmid condensed in PEG/PEI nanocomplexes. Pulsed ultrasound (1MHz; 0.6 MPa or 0.8 MPa) was applied to the right hindlimb for 12 mins. Luciferase activity in both hindlimbs was assessed at 3, 5, 7, and 10 days post-treatment by bioluminescent imaging. When targeted to hindlimb using unsorted MBs and 0.6 MPa US, 7 days after treatment, we observed a >60-fold increase in luciferase activity in PEG/PEI nanocomplex treated muscles over muscles treated with “naked” plasmid DNA. Luciferase activity was consistently greater after treatment with PEG/PEI nanocomplexes at 0.6 MPa as compared to 0.8 MPa. The combination of small diameter MBs and 0.6 MPa US also resulted in significantly greater gene expression when compared to concentration matched intramuscular injections, a control condition in which considerably more PEG/PEI nanocomplexes were present in tissue. This result suggests that, in addition to facilitating PEG/PEI nanocomplex delivery from the bloodstream to tissue, US enhances transfection via one or more secondary mechanisms, including increased cellular uptake and/or trafficking to the nucleus of PEG/PEI nanocomplexes. We conclude that PEG/PEI nanocomplexes may be used to markedly enhance the amplitude of US-MB-targeted skeletal muscle transfection and that activating “small” MBs with a moderate level (0.6 MPa) of acoustic pressure can further enhance these effects. PMID:22800583

  14. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2013-11-21

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl.

  15. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2013-11-01

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl.

  16. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Binary Drug Mixtures: Studies with Cocaine, MDPV, and Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gregory T; Abbott, Megan; Galindo, Kayla; Rush, Elise L; Rice, Kenner C; France, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Illicit drug preparations often include more than one pharmacologically active compound. For example, cocaine and synthetic cathinones [e.g., 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)] are often mixed with caffeine before sale. Caffeine is likely added to these preparations because it is inexpensive and legal; however, caffeine might also mimic or enhance some of the effects of cocaine or MDPV. In these studies, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, caffeine, and MDPV were evaluated alone and as binary mixtures (cocaine and caffeine, MDPV and caffeine, and cocaine and MDPV) at fixed-dose ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 relative to the dose of each drug that produced 50% cocaine-appropriate responding. Dose-addition analyses were used to determine the nature of the drug-drug interactions for each mixture (e.g., additive, supra-additive, or subadditive). Although additive interactions were observed for most mixtures, supra-additive interactions were observed at the 50% effect level for the 1:1 mixture of cocaine and caffeine and at the 80% effect level for all three mixtures of cocaine and caffeine, as well as for the 3:1 and 1:3 mixtures of cocaine and MDPV. These results demonstrate that with respect to cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, caffeine can function as a substitute in drug preparations containing either cocaine or MDPV, with enhancements of cocaine-like effects possible under certain conditions. Further research is needed to determine whether similar interactions exist for other abuse-related or toxic effects of drug preparations, including cocaine, synthetic cathinones, and caffeine. PMID:27493274

  17. Caffeine Intake Among Adolescents in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gera, Mridul; Kalra, Swati; Gupta, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Availability and advertising of caffeinated drinks is on the rise in Indian market. Excess caffeine intake may have deleterious effects on health. Objective: To estimate the daily consumption of caffeine among urban school-going adolescents from Delhi. Materials and Methods: A school-based survey was conducted to determine the amount and pattern of caffeine consumption among students of classes 9-12, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Of 300 participants (median age 15 year, 174 boys), 291 (97%) were consuming caffeine [mean (SD): 121.0 (98.2) mg/day]. Nineteen (6%) students were consuming more than 300 mg of caffeine per day. Tea/coffee contributed to more than 50% of the caffeine intake. The rest was derived from cola beverages, chocolates, and energy drinks. Conclusion: Average caffeine consumption among school-going adolescents from Delhi is high. The findings of this preliminary survey need to be confirmed in larger data sets. PMID:27051091

  18. Caffeine content of beverages as consumed.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, R. M.; Marshman, J. A.; Schwieder, M.; Berg, R.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of beverages prepared at home by staff of the Addiction Research Foundation revealed a lower and much more variable caffeine content of both tea and coffee than had been reported in earlier studies, most of which were based on analysis of laboratory-prepared beverages. Median caffeine concentration of 37 home-prepared samples of tea was 27 mg per cup (range, 8 to 91 mg); for 46 coffee samples the median concentration was 74 mg per cup (range, 29 to 176 mg). If tea and coffee as drunk contain less caffeine than generally supposed, the potency of caffeine may be greater than commonly realized, as may the relative caffeine content of certain commercial preparations, including chocolate and colas. The substantial variation in caffeine content emphasizes the need to establish actual caffeine intake in clinical, epidemiologic and experimental investigations of caffeine effects. PMID:1032351

  19. Effects of acute caffeine administration on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jennifer L; Dewey, Amber M; Briatico, Laura N

    2010-12-01

    Acute caffeine administration has physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects. Despite its widespread use, few studies have described the impact of caffeine consumption in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute caffeine administration in adolescents. We measured cardiovascular responses and snack food intake after acute administration of 0 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, and 200 mg of caffeine. We also compared usual food intake and subjective effects of caffeine between high- and low-caffeine consumers. Finally, we conducted a detailed analysis of caffeine sources and consumption levels. We found main effects of caffeine dose on heart rate (HR) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), with HR decreasing and DBP increasing with increasing caffeine dose. There were significant interactions among gender, caffeine use, and time on DBP. High caffeine consumers (>50 mg/day) reported using caffeine to stay awake and drinking coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks more than low consumers (<50 mg/day). Boys were more likely than girls to report using getting a rush, more energy, or improved athletic performance from caffeine. Finally, when we examined energy and macronutrient intake, we found that caffeine consumption was positively associated with laboratory energy intake, specifically from high-sugar, low-fat foods and also positively associated with protein and fat consumption outside of the laboratory. When taken together, these data suggest that acute caffeine administration has a broad range of effects in adolescents and that the magnitude of these effects is moderated by gender and chronic caffeine consumption. PMID:21186925

  20. Development of a biosensor for caffeine.

    PubMed

    Babu, V R Sarath; Patra, S; Karanth, N G; Kumar, M A; Thakur, M S

    2007-01-23

    We have utilized a microbe, which can degrade caffeine to develop an Amperometric biosensor for determination of caffeine in solutions. Whole cells of Pseudomonas alcaligenes MTCC 5264 having the capability to degrade caffeine were immobilized on a cellophane membrane with a molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 3000-6000 by covalent crosslinking method using glutaraledhyde as the bifunctional crosslinking agent and gelatin as the protein based stabilizing agent (PBSA). The biosensor system was able to detect caffeine in solution over a concentration range of 0.1 to 1 mg mL(-1). With read-times as short as 3 min, this caffeine biosensor acts as a rapid analysis system for caffeine in solutions. Interestingly, successful isolation and immobilization of caffeine degrading bacteria for the analysis of caffeine described here was enabled by a novel selection strategy that incorporated isolation of caffeine degrading bacteria capable of utilizing caffeine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen from soils and induction of caffeine degrading capacity in bacteria for the development of the biosensor. This biosensor is highly specific for caffeine and response to interfering compounds such as theophylline, theobromine, paraxanthine, other methyl xanthines and sugars was found to be negligible. Although a few biosensing methods for caffeine are reported, they have limitations in application for commercial samples. The development and application of new caffeine detection methods remains an active area of investigation, particularly in food and clinical chemistry. The optimum pH and temperature of measurement were 6.8 and 30+/-2 degrees C, respectively. Interference in analysis of caffeine due to different substrates was observed but was not considerable. Caffeine content of commercial samples of instant tea and coffee was analyzed by the biosensor and the results compared well with HPLC analysis. PMID:17386510

  1. Caffeine Use and Young Adult Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vener, Arthur M.; Krupka, Lawrence R.

    1982-01-01

    Surveyed college women and men and found that caffeine was consumed by a large proportion of the respondents. Women consumed a larger amount of caffeine and used more substances containing this drug. An increase in caffeine usage with increased psychic stress was observed for women only. (Author)

  2. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  4. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine....

  7. A Comparison of Blue Light and Caffeine Effects on Cognitive Function and Alertness in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Beaven, C. Martyn; Ekström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The alerting effects of both caffeine and short wavelength (blue) light have been consistently reported. The ability of blue light to enhance alertness and cognitive function via non-image forming neuropathways have been suggested as a non-pharmacological countermeasure for drowsiness across a range of occupational settings. Here we compare and contrast the alerting and psychomotor effects of 240 mg of caffeine and a 1-h dose of ~40 lx blue light in a non-athletic population. Twenty-one healthy subjects performed a computer-based psychomotor vigilance test before and after each of four randomly assigned trial conditions performed on different days: white light/placebo; white light/240 mg caffeine; blue light/placebo; blue light/240 mg caffeine. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale was used to assess subjective measures of alertness. Both the caffeine only and blue light only conditions enhanced accuracy in a visual reaction test requiring a decision and an additive effect was observed with respect to the fastest reaction times. However, in a test of executive function, where a distraction was included, caffeine exerted a negative effect on accuracy. Furthermore, the blue light only condition consistently outperformed caffeine when both congruent and incongruent distractions were presented. The visual reactions in the absence of a decision or distraction were also enhanced in the blue light only condition and this effect was most prominent in the blue-eyed participants. Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important. Specifically, despite the widespread use of caffeine in competitive sporting environments, the possible impact of blue light has received no research attention. PMID:24282477

  8. The Effects of Caffeine on Vertical Jump Height and Execution in Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Bloms, Lucas P; Fitzgerald, John S; Short, Martin W; Whitehead, James R

    2016-07-01

    Bloms, LP, Fitzgerald, JS, Short, MW, and Whitehead, JR. The effects of caffeine on vertical jump height and execution in collegiate athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1855-1861, 2016-Caffeine ingestion elicits a variety of physiological effects that may be beneficial to maximal-intensity exercise performance, although its effectiveness and physical mechanism of action enhancing ballistic task performance are unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine ingestion on vertical jump height and jump execution in Division I collegiate athletes. The study used a single-blind, randomized, crossover design. Athletes (n = 25) consumed either caffeine (5 mg·kg) or placebo. After a 60-minute waiting period, athletes performed 3 squat jumps (SJ) and 3 countermovement jumps (CMJ) while standing on a force platform. Jump height and execution variables were calculated from mechanography data. In comparison with placebo, caffeine increased SJ height (32.8 ± 6.2 vs. 34.5 ± 6.7 cm; p = 0.001) and CMJ height (36.4 ± 6.9 vs. 37.9 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.001). Peak force (p = 0.032) and average rate of force development (p = 0.037) were increased during the CMJ in the caffeine trail compared with the control. Time to half peak force was the only execution variable improved with caffeine (p = 0.019) during the SJ. It seems that caffeine affects both height and execution of jumping. Our data indicate that the physical mechanism of jump enhancement is increased peak force production or rate of force development during jumping depending on technique. The physical mechanism of jump enhancement suggests that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may transfer to other ballistic tasks involving the lower-body musculature in collegiate athletes. PMID:26626028

  9. The Effects of Preexercise Caffeinated Coffee Ingestion on Endurance Performance: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Simon; Straight, Chad R; Lewis, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    Endurance athletes commonly ingest caffeine as a means to enhance training intensity and competitive performance. A widely-used source of caffeine is coffee, however conflicting evidence exists regarding the efficacy of coffee in improving endurance performance. In this context, the aims of this evidence-based review were threefold: 1) to evaluate the effects of preexercise coffee on endurance performance, 2) to evaluate the effects of coffee on perceived exertion during endurance performance, and 3) to translate the research into usable information for athletes to make an informed decision regarding the intake of caffeine via coffee as a potential ergogenic aid. Searches of three major databases were performed using terms caffeine and coffee, or coffee-caffeine, and endurance, or aerobic. Included studies (n = 9) evaluated the effects of caffeinated coffee on human subjects, provided the caffeine dose administered, administered caffeine ≥ 45 min before testing, and included a measure of endurance performance (e.g., time trial). Significant improvements in endurance performance were observed in five of nine studies, which were on average 24.2% over controls for time to exhaustion trials, and 3.1% for time to completion trials. Three of six studies found that coffee reduced perceived exertion during performance measures significantly more than control conditions (p < .05). Based on the reviewed studies there is moderate evidence supporting the use of coffee as an ergogenic aid to improve performance in endurance cycling and running. Coffee providing 3-8.1 mg/kg (1.36-3.68 mg/lb) of caffeine may be used as a safe alternative to anhydrous caffeine to improve endurance performance. PMID:26568580

  10. Modulatory effects of caffeine on oxidative stress and anxiety-like behavior in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Caravan, Ionut; Sevastre Berghian, Alexandra; Moldovan, Remus; Decea, Nicoleta; Orasan, Remus; Filip, Gabriela Adriana

    2016-09-01

    Menopause is accompanied by enhanced oxidative stress and behavioral changes, effects attenuated by antioxidants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on behavior and oxidative stress in an experimental model of menopause. Female rats were divided into the following groups: sham-operated (CON), sham-operated and caffeine-treated (CAF), ovariectomized (OVX), ovariectomized and caffeine-treated (OVX+CAF). Caffeine (6 mg/kg) and vehicle were administered for 21 days (subchronic) and 42 days (chronic), using 2 experimental subsets. Behavioral tests and oxidative stress parameters in the blood, whole brain, and hippocampus were assessed. The subchronic administration of caffeine decreased the lipid peroxidation and improved the antioxidant defense in the blood and brain. The GSH/GGSG ratio in the brain was improved by chronic administration, with reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced nitric oxide and malondialdehyde levels. In particular, the lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus decreased in both experiments. The rats became hyperactive after 21 days of treatment, but no effect was observed after chronic administration. In both experimental subsets, caffeine had anxiolytic effects as tested in elevated plus maze. The administration of low doses of caffeine, for a short period of time, may be a new therapeutic approach to modulating the oxidative stress and anxiety in menopause. PMID:27333093

  11. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Jensen, Pia S; Gebuhr, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing an enhanced, multidisciplinary recovery program would reduce the mortality rates. We also determined factors that influenced mortality rates. Patients and methods - 129 patients with a LEA were consecutively included over a 2-year period, and followed after admission to an acute orthopedic ward. Mortality was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results - The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25-0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86), respectively, in the intervention group. The risk of death was increased for patients living in a nursing home, for patients with a bilateral LEA, and for patients with low health status. Interpretation - With similarly frail patient groups and instituting an enhanced program for patients after LEA, the risks of death by 30 days and by 1 year after LEA were markedly reduced after allocating staff with expertise. PMID:27088484

  12. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Jensen, Pia S; Gebuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing an enhanced, multidisciplinary recovery program would reduce the mortality rates. We also determined factors that influenced mortality rates. Patients and methods 129 patients with a LEA were consecutively included over a 2-year period, and followed after admission to an acute orthopedic ward. Mortality was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25–0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35–0.86), respectively, in the intervention group. The risk of death was increased for patients living in a nursing home, for patients with a bilateral LEA, and for patients with low health status. Interpretation With similarly frail patient groups and instituting an enhanced program for patients after LEA, the risks of death by 30 days and by 1 year after LEA were markedly reduced after allocating staff with expertise. PMID:27088484

  13. Caffeine therapy in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hady, Hesham; Nasef, Nehad; Shabaan, Abd Elazeez; Nour, Islam

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used medication for treatment of apnea of prematurity. Its effect has been well established in reducing the frequency of apnea, intermittent hypoxemia, and extubation failure in mechanically ventilated preterm infants. Evidence for additional short-term benefits on reducing the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and patent ductus arteriosus has also been suggested. Controversies exist among various neonatal intensive care units in terms of drug efficacy compared to other methylxanthines, dosage regimen, time of initiation, duration of therapy, drug safety and value of therapeutic drug monitoring. In the current review, we will summarize the available evidence for the best practice in using caffeine therapy in preterm infants. PMID:26566480

  14. Caffeine therapy in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hady, Hesham; Nasef, Nehad; Shabaan, Abd Elazeez; Nour, Islam

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used medication for treatment of apnea of prematurity. Its effect has been well established in reducing the frequency of apnea, intermittent hypoxemia, and extubation failure in mechanically ventilated preterm infants. Evidence for additional short-term benefits on reducing the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and patent ductus arteriosus has also been suggested. Controversies exist among various neonatal intensive care units in terms of drug efficacy compared to other methylxanthines, dosage regimen, time of initiation, duration of therapy, drug safety and value of therapeutic drug monitoring. In the current review, we will summarize the available evidence for the best practice in using caffeine therapy in preterm infants. PMID:26566480

  15. Antibody-enhanced dengue disease generates a marked CNS inflammatory response in the black-tufted marmoset Callithrix penicillata.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Barbara Cristina Baldez; Vieira, Juliana Almeida; Silva, Geane Oliveira; Fernandes, Taiany Nogueira; Rocha, Luciano Chaves; Viana, André Pereira; Serique, Cássio Diego Sá; Filho, Carlos Santos; Bringel, Raissa Aires Ribeiro; Teixeira, Francisco Fernando Dacier Lobato; Ferreira, Milene Silveira; Casseb, Samir Mansour Moraes; Carvalho, Valéria Lima; de Melo, Karla Fabiane Lopes; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes; Araújo, Sanderson Corrêa; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Demachki, Samia; Anaissi, Ana Karyssa Mendes; Sosthenes, Marcia Consentino Kronka; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Anthony, Daniel Clive; Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley Picanço; Diniz, Daniel Guerreiro

    2016-02-01

    Severe dengue disease is often associated with long-term neurological impairments, but it is unclear what mechanisms are associated with neurological sequelae. Previously, we demonstrated antibody-enhanced dengue disease (ADE) dengue in an immunocompetent mouse model with a dengue virus 2 (DENV2) antibody injection followed by DENV3 virus infection. Here we migrated this ADE model to Callithrix penicillata. To mimic human multiple infections of endemic zones where abundant vectors and multiple serotypes co-exist, three animals received weekly subcutaneous injections of DENV3 (genotype III)-infected supernatant of C6/36 cell cultures, followed 24 h later by anti-DENV2 antibody for 12 weeks. There were six control animals, two of which received weekly anti-DENV2 antibodies, and four further animals received no injections. After multiple infections, brain, liver, and spleen samples were collected and tissue was immunolabeled for DENV3 antigens, ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1, Ki-67, TNFα. There were marked morphological changes in the microglial population of ADE monkeys characterized by more highly ramified microglial processes, higher numbers of trees and larger surface areas. These changes were associated with intense TNFα-positive immunolabeling. It is unclear why ADE should generate such microglial activation given that IgG does not cross the blood-brain barrier, but this study reveals that in ADE dengue therapy targeting the CNS host response is likely to be important. PMID:26303046

  16. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  17. [Mechanisms of caffeine-induced diuresis].

    PubMed

    Marx, Barbara; Scuvée, Éléonore; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline; Seutin, Vincent; Jouret, François

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is an alkaloid which belongs to the family of methylxanthines and is present in beverages, food and drugs. Caffeine competitively antagonizes the adenosine receptors (AR), which are G protein-coupled receptors largely distributed throughout the body, including brain, heart, vessels and kidneys. Caffeine consumption has a well-known diuretic effect. The homeostasis of salt and water involves different segments of the nephron, in which adenosine plays complex roles depending on the differential expression of AR. Hence, caffeine increases glomerular filtration rate by opposing the vasoconstriction of renal afferent arteriole mediated by adenosine via type 1 AR during the tubuloglomerular feedback. Caffeine also inhibits Na(+) reabsorption at the level of renal proximal tubules. In addition, caffeine perturbs the hepatorenal reflex via sensory nerves in Mall's intrahepatic spaces. Here, we review the physiology of caffeine-induced natriuresis and diuresis, as well as the putative pathological implications. PMID:27225921

  18. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng; Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan; Ma, Lu; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine

  19. Induction of sister chromatid exchange in preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro by /sup 3/H-thymidine or ultraviolet light in combination with caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, W.U.S.; Spindle, A.

    1986-01-01

    Preimplantation mouse embryos were exposed in vitro to /sup 3/H-thymidine (25, 100, or 250 Bq/ml) or ultraviolet (UV) light (1.35 or 4.05 J/m2), either alone or in combination with caffeine (1 mM with /sup 3/H-thymidine and 0.5 mM with UV light). Exposure to /sup 3/H-thymidine lasted for 2 days, from the two-cell stage to the late morula/early blastocyst stage, and UV radiation was applied acutely at the late morula/early blastocyst stage. The effects were quantified by the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay. All three agents induced SCEs when used singly. /sup 3/H-thymidine was effective in inducing SCEs only at 250 Bq/ml, whereas UV light was effective at both fluences. Although caffeine did not induce SCEs when it was added before exposure to bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), which is used to visualize SCEs, it did induce SCEs when present during the entire culture period (/sup 3/H-thymidine experiments) or during incubation in BrdUrd (UV experiments). Caffeine markedly enhanced the SCE-inducing effect of UV light but did not influence the effect of /sup 3/H-thymidine.

  20. Caffeine Use Affects Pregnancy Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Vera, Yanexy; Gil, Karla; Gonzalez-Garcia, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 750 women were interviewed during pregnancy on their depression and anxiety symptoms, substance use and demographic variables. A subsample was seen again at the neonatal stage (n = 152), and their infants were observed for sleep-wake behavior. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were related to caffeine use. Mothers who consumed more…

  1. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  2. Caffeine and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Thomas, M; Perry, K; Whitney, H

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine whether caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee removed the malaise (reduced alertness, slower psychomotor performance) associated with having a common cold. One hundred volunteers were tested when healthy and 46 returned to the laboratory when they developed colds. Those subjects who remained healthy were then recalled as a control group. On the second visit subjects carried out two sessions, one pre-drink and another an hour after the drink. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following three conditions, caffeinated coffee (1.5 mg/kg caffeine/body weight), decaffeinated coffee or fruit juice. Subjects with colds reported decreased alertness and were slower at performing psychomotor tasks. Caffeine increased the alertness and performance of the colds subjects to the same level as the healthy group and decaffeinated coffee also led to an improvement. These results suggest that drugs which increase alertness can remove the malaise associated with the common cold, and that increased stimulation of the sensory afferent nerves may also be beneficial. PMID:9443519

  3. What can isolated skeletal muscle experiments tell us about the effects of caffeine on exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Tallis, Jason; Duncan, Michael J; James, Rob S

    2015-08-01

    Caffeine is an increasingly popular nutritional supplement due to the legal, significant improvements in sporting performance that it has been documented to elicit, with minimal side effects. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on human performance continue to be a popular area of research as we strive to improve our understanding of this drug and make more precise recommendations for its use in sport. Although variations in exercise intensity seems to affect its ergogenic benefits, it is largely thought that caffeine can induce significant improvements in endurance, power and strength-based activities. There are a number of limitations to testing caffeine-induced effects on human performance that can be better controlled when investigating its effects on isolated muscles under in vitro conditions. The hydrophobic nature of caffeine results in a post-digestion distribution to all tissues of the body making it difficult to accurately quantify its key mechanism of action. This review considers the contribution of evidence from isolated muscle studies to our understating of the direct effects of caffeine on muscle during human performance. The body of in vitro evidence presented suggests that caffeine can directly potentiate skeletal muscle force, work and power, which may be important contributors to the performance-enhancing effects seen in humans. PMID:25988508

  4. What can isolated skeletal muscle experiments tell us about the effects of caffeine on exercise performance?

    PubMed Central

    Tallis, Jason; Duncan, Michael J; James, Rob S

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is an increasingly popular nutritional supplement due to the legal, significant improvements in sporting performance that it has been documented to elicit, with minimal side effects. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on human performance continue to be a popular area of research as we strive to improve our understanding of this drug and make more precise recommendations for its use in sport. Although variations in exercise intensity seems to affect its ergogenic benefits, it is largely thought that caffeine can induce significant improvements in endurance, power and strength-based activities. There are a number of limitations to testing caffeine-induced effects on human performance that can be better controlled when investigating its effects on isolated muscles under in vitro conditions. The hydrophobic nature of caffeine results in a post-digestion distribution to all tissues of the body making it difficult to accurately quantify its key mechanism of action. This review considers the contribution of evidence from isolated muscle studies to our understating of the direct effects of caffeine on muscle during human performance. The body of in vitro evidence presented suggests that caffeine can directly potentiate skeletal muscle force, work and power, which may be important contributors to the performance-enhancing effects seen in humans. PMID:25988508

  5. Consumption of caffeinated beverages and the awareness of their caffeine content among Dutch students.

    PubMed

    Mackus, Marlou; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew; Verster, Joris C

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the knowledge of caffeine content of a variety of caffeinated beverages among Dutch university students. A pencil-and-paper survey was conducted among N = 800 Dutch students. Most participants (87.8%) reported consuming caffeinated beverages during the past 24 h. Their mean ± SD past 24-h caffeine intake from beverages was 144.2 ± 169.5 mg (2.2 ± 3.0 mg/kg bw). Most prevalent sources of caffeine were coffee beverages (50.8%) and tea (34.8%), followed by energy drink (9.2%), cola (4.7%), and chocolate milk (0.5%). Participants had poor knowledge on the relative caffeine content of caffeinated beverages. That is, they overestimated the caffeine content of energy drinks and cola, and underestimated the caffeine content of coffee beverages. If caffeine consumption is a concern, it is important to inform consumers about the caffeine content of all caffeine containing beverages, including coffee and tea. The current findings support previous research that the most effective way to reduce caffeine intake is to limit the consumption of coffee beverages and tea. PMID:27142708

  6. Effect of energy drink and caffeinated beverage consumption on sleep, mood, and performance in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Owens, Judith A; Mindell, Jodi; Baylor, Allison

    2014-10-01

    The increasing availability of highly caffeinated beverages, including energy drinks, in the United States has resulted in a rise in consumption by children and adolescents. In addition, there is mounting evidence that these products are often consumed by youth for their perceived fatigue-mitigating and mood- or performance-enhancing effects. Although such perceptions by children and adolescents about the potential consequences of caffeine consumption are highly likely to influence decision making regarding the use of such products, there is still a relative paucity of studies that focus on the effect of caffeinated beverages on sleep, mood, and performance in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the following aspects of this topic, as derived from the information currently available: 1) the perception, among youth, of caffeine's risks and benefits and the sources of information about caffeine, particularly with regard to sleep, mood, and performance; 2) the bidirectional effect of caffeine on sleep in children and adolescents and the association of caffeine with other sleep-related practices, and 3) the evidence that supports caffeine as a performance and mood enhancer as well as a countermeasure to sleepiness in the pediatric population. Finally, gaps in knowledge are identified, and a direction for future research is outlined. PMID:25293545

  7. The effect of caffeine on renal epithelial cells from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Belibi, Franck A; Wallace, Darren P; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Christensen, Marcy; Reif, Gail; Grantham, Jared J

    2002-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disorder characterized by the progressive enlargement of cysts derived from tubules. Tubule cell proliferation and chloride-dependent fluid accumulation, mechanisms underlying cyst expansion, are accelerated by adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). This study examined the extent to which caffeine may stimulate the production of cAMP by cyst epithelial cells, thereby adversely increasing proliferation and fluid secretion. Mural epithelial cells from ADPKD cysts and normal human kidney cortex cells (HKC) were cultured, and cAMP levels were determined in response to caffeine and receptor-mediated agonists linked to adenylyl cyclase. Caffeine, a methylxanthine, slightly increased basal levels of cAMP, as did other nonselective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors, 1-methyl-3- isobutyl xanthine and theophylline and rolipram, a specific PDE IV inhibitor. More importantly, clinically relevant concentrations of caffeine (10 to 50 micro M) potentiated the effects of desmopressin (DDAVP), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and isoproterenol to increase cAMP levels in both ADPKD and HKC cells. By contrast, at concentrations that augmented the DDAVP response, caffeine attenuated cAMP accumulation by adenosine, implicating an action apart from the inhibition of PDE. Caffeine enhanced the effect of DDAVP to stimulate transepithelial short-circuit current of polarized ADPKD monolayers, reflecting an increase in chloride secretion. Caffeine potentiated the effect of DDAVP and PGE(2) to increase the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK). By contrast, P-ERK levels in HKC cells were not raised by increased intracellular concentrations of cAMP. It is concluded that PDE inhibition by caffeine increases the accumulation of cAMP, and through this mechanism activates the ERK pathway to cellular proliferation and increases transepithelial fluid secretion in ADPKD cystic epithelium. Caffeine

  8. Caffeine, maximal power output and fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J H; Signorile, J F; Barnes, W S; Henrich, T W

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of caffeine ingestion on maximal power output and fatigue during short term, high intensity exercise. Nine adult males performed 15 s maximal exercise bouts 60 min after ingestion of caffeine (7 mg.kg-1) or placebo. Exercise bouts were carried out on a modified cycle ergometer which allowed power output to be computed for each one-half pedal stroke via microcomputer. Peak power output under caffeine conditions was not significantly different from that obtained following placebo ingestion. Similarly, time to peak power, total work, power fatigue index and power fatigue rate did not differ significantly between caffeine and placebo conditions. These results suggest that caffeine ingestion does not increase one's maximal ability to generate power. Further, caffeine does not alter the rate or magnitude of fatigue during high intensity, dynamic exercise. PMID:3228680

  9. Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Costill, D L; Dalsky, G P; Fink, W J

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to assess the effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and performance during prolonged exercise, nine competitive cyclists (two females and seven males) exercised until exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer at 80% of Vo2 max. One trial was performed an hour after ingesting decaffeinated coffee (Trial D), while a second trial (C) required that each subject consume coffee containing 330 mg of caffeine 60 min before the exercise. Following the ingestion of caffeine (Trial C), the subjects were able to perform an average of 90.2 (SE +/- 7.2) min of cycling as compared to an average of 75.5 (SE +/- 5.1) min in the D Trial. Measurements of plasma free fatty acids, glycerol and respiratory exchange ratios evidenced a greater rate of lipid metabolism during the caffeine trial as compared to the decaffeinated exercise treatment. Calculations of carbohydrate (CHO) metabolism from respiratory exchange data revealed that the subjects oxidized roughly 240 g of CHO in both trials. Fat oxidation, however, was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) during the C Trial (118 g or 1.31 g/min) than in the D Trial (57 g or 0.75 g/min). On the average the participants rated (Perceived Exertion Scale) their effort during the C Trial to be significantly (P less than 0.05) easier than the demands of the D treatment. Thus, the enhanced endurance performance observed in the C Trial was likely the combined effects of caffeine on lipolysis and its positive influence on nerve impulse transmission. PMID:723503

  10. Simple electrochemical sensor for caffeine based on carbon and Nafion-modified carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Torres, A Carolina; Barsan, Madalina M; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-04-15

    A simple, economic, highly sensitive and highly selective method for the detection of caffeine has been developed at bare and Nafion-modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). The electrochemical behaviour of caffeine was examined in electrolyte solutions of phosphate buffer saline, sodium perchlorate, and in choline chloride plus oxalic acid, using analytical determinations by fixed potential amperometry, phosphate buffer saline being the best. Modifications of the GCE surface with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), Nafion, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were tested in order to evaluate possible sensor performance enhancements, Nafion giving the most satisfactory results. The effect of interfering compounds usually found in samples containing caffeine was examined at GCE without and with Nafion coating, to exclude interferences, and the sensors were successfully applied to determine the caffeine content in commercial beverages and drugs. PMID:24295698

  11. Caffeine deprivation state modulates coffee consumption but not attentional bias for caffeine-related stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stafford, L D; Yeomans, M R

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has shown that caffeine deprivation state can exert a strong influence on the ability of caffeine to reinforce behaviour. Recent work has also found evidence for an attentional bias in habitual caffeine users. It remains unclear whether deprivation state can influence attentional bias. Here we explored the relationship between caffeine deprivation, attentional bias to caffeine-related stimuli and subsequent caffeine reinforcement measured by consumption of coffee. In three experiments, participants (between-subjects: n=28; within-subjects: n=20, within-subjects: n=20) were preloaded with either caffeine (experiments 1 and 3 : 100 mg; experiment 2 : 150 mg) or placebo, and in experiments 1 and 2 they completed a novel attentional bias task involving pre-attentive word recognition, and in experiment 3 a dot-probe task. In experiments 2 and 3, this was followed by a test of coffee consumption. Greater recognition for caffeine-related words (experiments 1 and 2) and faster reaction times to probes replacing caffeine-related rather than control stimuli (experiment 3) confirmed caffeine-related attentional biases, but in no case was this affected by manipulation of caffeine-deprivation state. Participants in a deprived versus nondeprived state, however, experienced increases in drowsiness and headaches (experiment 2) and reduced alertness (experiment 3). Further, coffee consumption was greatest when participants were caffeine-deprived than when they were nondeprived. Findings are discussed in relation to prevailing theories of drug addiction. PMID:16170233

  12. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  13. Caffeine induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via p300 and CaMKII pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Xu, Hao; Wei, Jinhong; Ma, Xingfeng; Zhang, Jianbao

    2014-09-25

    Caffeine is commonly utilized to trigger intracellular calcium in cardiomyocyte. It is well accepted that caffeine could induce cardiac arrhythmia, but it is not clear with regard of its impacts on the cardiac function. This article presents a recent study concerning the effects of caffeine on the cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the associated signal pathway. The experimental results showed that the total protein contents, the surface area of cardiomyocyte and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expression increased in ventricular myocytes of neonatal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats after 24h caffeine incubation. It is also observed that the basal intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) level has increased, while the amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillation and Ca(2+) content have decreased in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The caffeine-induced myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) expression and hypertrophy can be completely abolished by the inhibition of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), as well as KN93 and curcumin treatments. Meanwhile, the amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillation and the Ca(2+) content of SR in the completely-inhibited group have reached the physiological level. These results suggest that the caffeine-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy established the connection between Ca(2+) release from SR and cytosol that activates CaMKII and p300, which in turn enhances the expression of MEF2 that promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:25093688

  14. Caffeine consumption amongst British athletes following changes to the 2004 WADA prohibited list.

    PubMed

    Chester, N; Wojek, N

    2008-06-01

    This study was undertaken to examine self-reported caffeine consumption and reasons for its use, amongst UK athletes, following its removal from the 2004 World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List. A convenience sample of track and field athletes (n = 193) and cyclists (n = 287) completed a postal or Web-based questionnaire. Messages were posted on athletics and cycling club Web sites and mailing lists to direct athletes to the Web-based questionnaire. Postal questionnaires were distributed at domestic sporting events. A higher proportion of cyclists (59.9 %) compared with track and field athletes (32.6 %) consumed caffeine to enhance performance (p < 0.001). A higher proportion of elite as opposed to sub-elite athletes representing cycling (p = 0.031) and athletics (p = 0.010) used caffeine to enhance performance. Of all caffeine containing products used, coffee, energy drinks, pharmaceutical preparations and caffeinated sports supplements were most prevalent. Results revealed that amongst UK athletes, the intention to use caffeine as an ergogenic aid was high, and that use was more widespread and accepted in competitive sport, especially at elite level, when compared to recreational sport. PMID:18027309

  15. The effect of ephedra and caffeine on maximal strength and power in resistance-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew D; Cribb, Paul J; Cooke, Matthew B; Hayes, Alan

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and ephedrine-related alkaloids recently have been removed from International Olympic Committee banned substances lists, whereas ephedrine itself is now permissible at urinary concentrations less than 10 mug.mL. The changes to the list may contribute to an increased use of caffeine and ephedra as ergogenic aids by athletes. Consequently, we sought to investigate the effects of ingesting caffeine (C) or a combination of ephedra and caffeine (C + E) on muscular strength and anaerobic power using a double-blind, crossover design. Forty-five minutes after ingesting a glucose placebo (P: 300 mg), C (300 mg) or C + E (300 mg + 60 mg), 9 resistance-trained male participants were tested for maximal strength by bench press [BP; 1 repetition maximum (1RM)] and latissimus dorsi pull down (LP; 1RM). Subjects also performed repeated repetitions at 80% of 1RM on both BP and LP until exhaustion. After this test, subjects underwent a 30-second Wingate test to determine peak anaerobic cycling power, mean power, and fatigue index. Although subjects reported increased alertness and enhanced mood after supplementation with caffeine and ephedra, there were no significant differences between any of the treatments in muscle strength, muscle endurance, or peak anaerobic power. Our results do not support the contention that supplementation with ephedra or caffeine will enhance either muscle strength or anaerobic exercise performance. PMID:18550961

  16. Effect of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee on microvascular function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Katsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Toshihiro; Sakanashi, Mayuko; Hamadate, Naobumi; Uchida, Taro; Kina-Tanada, Mika; Kubota, Haruaki; Nakasone, Junko; Sakanashi, Matao; Ueda, Shinichiro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Ohya, Yusuke; Tsutsui, Masato

    2015-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that coffee drinking is associated with reduced mortality of cardiovascular disease. However, its precise mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we examined whether single ingestion of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee improves microvascular function in healthy subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in 27 healthy volunteers. A cup of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee was drunk by the subjects, and reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. In an interval of more than 2 days, the same experimental protocol was repeated with another coffee in a crossover manner. Caffeinated coffee intake slightly but significantly elevated blood pressure and decreased finger blood flow as compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. There was no significant difference in heart rate between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake. Importantly, caffeinated coffee intake significantly enhanced post-occlusive reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow, an index of microvascular endothelial function, compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. These results provide the first evidence that caffeine contained in a cup of coffee enhances microvascular function in healthy individuals. PMID:25727960

  17. The effect of a caffeinated mouth-rinse on endurance cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Doering, Thomas M; Fell, James W; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Shing, Cecilia M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if acute caffeine exposure via mouth-rinse improved endurance cycling time-trial performance in well-trained cyclists. It was hypothesized that caffeine exposure at the mouth would enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance. Ten well-trained male cyclists (mean ± SD: 32.9 ± 7.5 years, 74.7 ± 5.3 kg, 176.8 ± 5.1cm, VO₂peak = 59.8 ± 3.5 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) completed two experimental time-trials following 24 hr of dietary and exercise standardization. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was employed whereby cyclists completed a time-trial in the fastest time possible, which was equivalent work to cycling at 75% of peak aerobic power output for 60 min. Cyclists were administered 25 ml mouth-rinses for 10 s containing either placebo or 35 mg of anhydrous caffeine eight times throughout the time-trial. Perceptual and physiological variables were recorded throughout. No significant improvement in time-trial performance was observed with caffeine (3918 ± 243 s) compared with placebo mouth-rinse (3940 ± 227 s). No elevation in plasma caffeine was detected due to the mouth-rinse conditions. Caffeine mouth-rinse had no significant effect on rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, rate of oxygen consumption or blood lactate concentration. Eight exposures of a 35 mg dose of caffeine at the buccal cavity for 10s does not significantly enhance endurance cycling time-trial performance, nor does it elevate plasma caffeine concentration. PMID:23980239

  18. Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) in foods: a comprehensive review on consumption, functionality, safety, and regulatory matters.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Melanie A; Weil, Jorge; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2010-04-01

    Caffeine ranks as one of the top most commonly consumed dietary ingredients throughout the world. It is naturally found in coffee beans, cacao beans, kola nuts, guarana berries, and tea leaves including yerba mate. The total daily intake, as well as the major source of caffeine varies globally; however, coffee and tea are the 2 most prominent sources. Soft drinks are also a common source of caffeine as well as energy drinks, a category of functional beverages. Moderate caffeine consumption is considered safe and its use as a food ingredient has been approved, within certain limits, by numerous regulatory agencies around the world. Performance benefits attributed to caffeine include physical endurance, reduction of fatigue, and enhancing mental alertness and concentration. Caffeine has also been recently linked to weight loss and consequent reduction of the overall risks for developing the metabolic syndrome. However, the caloric contribution of caffeine-sweetened beverages needs to be considered in the overall energy balance. Despite all these benefits the potential negative effects of excessive caffeine intake should also be considered, particularly in children and pregnant women. PMID:20492310

  19. Alcohol and Caffeine: The Perfect Storm

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Mary Claire

    2011-01-01

    Although it is widely believed that caffeine antagonizes the intoxicating effects of alcohol, the molecular mechanisms underlying their interaction are incompletely understood. It is known that both caffeine and alcohol alter adenosine neurotransmission, but the relationship is complex, and may be dose dependent. In this article, we review the available literature on combining caffeine and alcohol. Ethical constraints prohibit laboratory studies that would mimic the high levels of alcohol intoxication achieved by many young people in real-world settings, with or without the addition of caffeine. We propose a possible neurochemical mechanism for the increase in alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences that have been observed in persons who simultaneously consume caffeine. Caffeine is a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. During acute alcohol intake, caffeine antagonizes the “unwanted” effects of alcohol by blocking the adenosine A1 receptors that mediate alcohol's somnogenic and ataxic effects. The A1 receptor–mediated “unwanted” anxiogenic effects of caffeine may be ameliorated by alcohol-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of adenosine. Moreover, by means of interactions between adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine A2A receptors can potentiate the effects of alcohol-induced dopamine release. Chronic alcohol intake decreases adenosine tone. Caffeine may provide a “treatment” for the withdrawal effects of alcohol by blocking the effects of upregulated A1 receptors. Finally, blockade of A2A receptors by caffeine may contribute to the reinforcing effects of alcohol. PMID:24761263

  20. Caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption and fecundability in a preconception cohort.

    PubMed

    Wesselink, Amelia K; Wise, Lauren A; Rothman, Kenneth J; Hahn, Kristen A; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Hatch, Elizabeth E

    2016-07-01

    Caffeine is an adenosine receptor antagonist that may influence fertility by affecting ovulation, menstrual characteristics, or sperm quality. We studied the association between female and male preconception caffeine intake and fecundability in a North American prospective cohort study of 2135 pregnancy planners. Frequency of caffeinated beverage intake was self-reported at baseline. Outcome data were updated every 8 weeks until reported pregnancy; censoring occurred at 12 months. Adjusted fecundability ratios (FR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using proportional probabilities regression. Total caffeine intake among males, but not females, was associated with fecundability (FR for ≥300 vs. <100mg/day caffeine among males=0.72, 95% CI=0.54-0.96), although the association was not monotonic. With respect to individual beverages, caffeinated tea intake was associated with slight reductions in fecundability among females, and caffeinated soda and energy drink intake were associated with reduced fecundability among males. PMID:27112524

  1. Stimulatory effect of oral administration of tea, coffee or caffeine on UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis of SKH-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Conney, Allan H. Zhou, Sherry; Lee Maojung; Xie Jianguo; Yang, Chung S.; Lou Yourong; Lu Yaoping

    2007-11-01

    Oral administration of green tea or a caffeine solution, but not decaffeinated green tea, inhibits UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice. Oral administration of green tea, coffee or a caffeine solution for 2 weeks enhanced UVB-induced increases in apoptosis in the epidermis, but these treatments had no effect in non-UVB treated normal epidermis. Our results suggest that administration of green tea, coffee and caffeine may inhibit UVB-induced carcinogenesis - at least in part - by enhancing UVB-induced apoptosis. Plasma levels of caffeine observed after its oral administration at cancer-preventive dose levels were within the range observed in moderate coffee drinkers. Topical applications of caffeine to mice previously treated with UVB for 20 weeks (high risk mice without tumors) inhibited the formation of tumors and stimulated apoptosis in the tumors but not in areas of the epidermis away from tumors. The selective effects of caffeine administration to stimulate UVB-induced apoptosis or apoptosis in tumors but not in normal epidermis or in areas of the epidermis away from tumors is of considerable interest, but the reasons for the selective effects of caffeine on apoptosis in DNA damaged tissues are unknown. Further studies are needed to determine mechanisms of these effects of caffeine and to determine the effects of caffeine administration on sunlight-induced actinic keratoses and squamous cell carcinomas in humans.

  2. Caffeine withdrawal and high-intensity endurance cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Christopher; Desbrow, Ben; Ellis, Aleisha; O'Keeffe, Brooke; Grant, Gary; Leveritt, Michael

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of a controlled 4-day caffeine withdrawal period on the effect of an acute caffeine dose on endurance exercise performance. Twelve well-trained and familiarized male cyclists, who were caffeine consumers (from coffee and a range of other sources), were recruited for the study. A double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design was employed, involving four experimental trials. Participants abstained from dietary caffeine sources for 4 days before the trials and ingested capsules (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) containing either placebo or caffeine (1.5 mg · kg(-1) body weight · day(-1)). On day 5, capsules containing placebo or caffeine (3 mg · kg(-1) body weight) were ingested 90 min before completing a time trial, equivalent to one hour of cycling at 75% peak sustainable power output. Hence the study was designed to incorporate placebo-placebo, placebo-caffeine, caffeine-placebo, and caffeine-caffeine conditions. Performance time was significantly improved after acute caffeine ingestion by 1:49 ± 1:41 min (3.0%, P = 0.021) following a withdrawal period (placebo-placebo vs. placebo-caffeine), and by 2:07 ± 1:28 min (3.6%, P = 0.002) following the non-withdrawal period (caffeine-placebo vs. caffeine-caffeine). No significant difference was detected between the two acute caffeine trials (placebo-caffeine vs. caffeine-caffeine). Average heart rate throughout exercise was significantly higher following acute caffeine administration compared with placebo. No differences were observed in ratings of perceived exertion between trials. A 3 mg · kg(-1) dose of caffeine significantly improves exercise performance irrespective of whether a 4-day withdrawal period is imposed on habitual caffeine users. PMID:21279864

  3. The effects of caffeine in women during aerobic-dance bench stepping.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jennifer N; Lloyd, Lisa K; Crixell, Sylvia H; Walker, John L

    2007-02-01

    People of all ages and fitness levels participate regularly in aerobic-dance bench stepping (ADBS) to increase fitness and control body weight. Any reasonable method for enhancing the experience or effectiveness of ADBS would be beneficial. This study examined the acute effects of a single dose of caffeine on physiological responses during ADBS in women. When compared with a placebo, neither a 3- nor a 6-mg/kg dose of caffeine altered physiological responses or rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in 20 women (age 19-28 y) of average fitness level, not habituated to caffeine, while they performed an ADBS routine. Since neither dose of caffeine had any effect on VO2, VCO2, minute ventilation, respiratory-exchange ratio, rate of energy expenditure, heart rate, or RPE during ADBS exercise, it would not be prudent for a group exercise leader to recommend caffeine to increase energy cost or decrease perception of effort in an ADBS session. Furthermore, caffeine ingestion should not interfere with monitoring intensity using heart rate or RPE during ADBS. PMID:17460331

  4. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    PubMed

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E; Voura, Evelyn B

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  5. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    PubMed Central

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R.; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  6. Analgesic effect of caffeine and clomipramine: a possible interaction between adenosine and serotonin systems.

    PubMed

    Bach-Rojecky, Lidija

    2003-03-01

    The goals of this study were to determine whether the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine exerts an analgesic effect and to investigate the time-dependent influence of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor clomipramine on the action of caffeine. Results suggest a possible interaction between serotonin and adenosine systems, which may contribute to the analgesic action of drugs. Therefore, the hot-plate and formalin tests were employed in order to measure the response to painful thermic and chemical stimuli. Results have shown that caffeine (1.67, 16.7 and 67 mg kg(-1), i.p.) exerts a direct dose-dependent analgesic action. When caffeine (1.67 and 16.7 mg kg(-1)) was combined with clomipramine (3 mg kg(-1) i.p.), an enhanced analgesic effect was obtained. However, the same combinations were ineffective in a subacute model. In this model, clomipramine was administered for 14 days and the respective dose of caffeine was added on the last day. Therefore, it can be concluded that the serotonin system interacts with the analgesic action of caffeine and that a long-term use of clomipramine probably triggers subsensitivity of adenosine receptors. PMID:14769250

  7. Health and ergogenic effects of caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, B H; Kulling, F A

    1989-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of caffeine by people of all ages may present health hazards. The public at large needs to be more informed of the presence of caffeine in commonly consumed foods and beverages, particularly by infants, children and pregnant women. It is the responsibility of all consumers to investigate the caffeine content of suspected products so that intake may be objectively monitored. Although doubts still exist about the efficacy of caffeine as an ergogenic aid, particularly for exercise of high intensity and short duration, the IOC and the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the US have adopted bans on the use of caffeine to aid sport performance. Currently, both of these organizations prohibit the concentration of caffeine in urine to exceed 15 micrograms-ml-1. That is to say, only very large amounts of caffeine are not permitted at present. Additional research is needed to confirm or deny the contraindications presented by the ingestion of caffeine on a chronic basis. PMID:2659130

  8. Extraction of Caffeine--A Modern Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Paul Shea; Smith, Eileen Patricia

    1969-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment suitable for high school students in second year or an advanced chemistry course. The techniques for the extraction and purification of caffeine from various household materials are described. Further experimentation with the extracted caffeine is suggested. (LC)

  9. Creatine and Caffeine: Considerations for Concurrent Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E

    2015-12-01

    Nutritional supplementation is a common practice among athletes, with creatine and caffeine among the most commonly used ergogenic aids. Hundreds of studies have investigated the ergogenic potential of creatine supplementation, with consistent improvements in strength and power reported for exercise bouts of short duration (≤ 30 s) and high intensity. Caffeine has been shown to improve endurance exercise performance, but results are mixed in the context of strength and sprint performance. Further, there is conflicting evidence from studies comparing the ergogenic effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous supplementation. Previous research has identified independent mechanisms by which creatine and caffeine may improve strength and sprint performance, leading to the formulation of multi-ingredient supplements containing both ingredients. Although scarce, research has suggested that caffeine ingestion may blunt the ergogenic effect of creatine. While a pharmacokinetic interaction is unlikely, authors have suggested that this effect may be explained by opposing effects on muscle relaxation time or gastrointestinal side effects from simultaneous consumption. The current review aims to evaluate the ergogenic potential of creatine and caffeine in the context of high-intensity exercise. Research directly comparing coffee and caffeine anhydrous is discussed, along with previous studies evaluating the concurrent supplementation of creatine and caffeine. PMID:26219105

  10. Fatal caffeine overdose: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Sarah; Lindsey, Tania

    2005-10-01

    Caffeine is a mild central nervous stimulant that occurs naturally in coffee beans, cocoa beans and tea leaves. In large doses, it can be profoundly toxic, resulting in arrhythmia, tachycardia, vomiting, convulsions, coma and death. The average cup of coffee or tea in the United States is reported to contain between 40 and 150 mg caffeine although specialty coffees may contain much higher doses. Over-the-counter supplements that are used to combat fatigue typically contain 100-200 mg caffeine per tablet and doses of 32-200mg are included in a variety of prescription drug mixtures. Fatal caffeine overdoses in adults are relatively rare and require the ingestion of a large quantity of the drug, typically in excess of 5 g. Over a period of approximately 12 months our office reported two cases of fatal caffeine intoxication. In the first case, the femoral blood of a 39-year-old female with a history of intravenous drug use contained 192 mg/L caffeine. In the second case, femoral blood from a 29-year-old male with a history of obesity and diabetes contained 567 mg/L caffeine. In both cases, the cause of death was ruled as caffeine intoxication and the manner of death was accidental. PMID:15935584

  11. Feeling smart: Effects of caffeine and glucose on cognition, mood and self-judgment.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Susann; de Vries, Yfke C; Kühn, Simone; Repantis, Dimitris; Dresler, Martin; Ohla, Kathrin

    2015-11-01

    During education and early career, young adults often face examinations and assessment centers. Coffee and energy drinks are convenient and commonly used to enhance or maintain performance in these situations. Whether these macronutrients improve performance in a demanding and drawn-out multi-task situation is not clear. Using double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, we set out to examine the effects of caffeine and glucose in an assessment center-like situation, under natural consumption conditions, in a group of young adults who were heterogeneous with respect to consumption patterns. We measured multi-task performance including logical thinking, processing speed, numeric and verbal memory, attention and the ability to concentrate, and mood over a two-hour period. Caffeine and glucose were administered in common beverages with appropriate placebo controls allowing the assessment of psychological effects of expectancy. Importantly, and in contrast to most previous studies, participants retained their habitual caffeine and sugar intake (studies 1 and 2) as this represents common behavior. Based on the bulk of literature, we hypothesized that (i) caffeine enhances attentional performance and mood, while performance in more complex tasks will remain unchanged, and that (ii) glucose enhances performance on memory tasks accompanied with negative mood. Our results provide evidence that neither caffeine nor glucose significantly influence cognitive performance when compared with placebo, water, or no treatment controls in a multi-task setting. Yet, caffeine and, by trend, placebo improve dispositions such that participants perceive preserved mental energy throughout the test procedure. These subjective effects were stronger after 24 h caffeine abstinence (study 3). Future studies will have to address whether these mood changes actually result in increased motivation during a challenging task. PMID:26320858

  12. Caffeine reduces dipyridamole-induced myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Corstens, F.H.; Thien, T. )

    1989-10-01

    The mechanism of action of coronary vasodilation after dipyridamole may be based on inhibition of cellular uptake of circulating endogenous adenosine. Since caffeine has been reported to be a competitive antagonist of adenosine we studied the effect of caffeine on the outcome of dipiridamole-{sup 201}Tl cardiac imaging in one patient. During caffeine abstinence dipyridamole induced myocardial ischemia with down-slope ST depressions on the ECG, and reversible perfusion defects on the scintigrams. When the test was repeated 1 wk later on similar conditions, but now shortly after infusion of caffeine (4 mg/kg), the ECG showed nodepressions, and the scintigrams only slight signs of ischemia. We conclude that when caffeine abstinence is not sufficient, the widespread use of coffee and related products may be responsible for false-negative findings in dipyridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging.

  13. Effect of caffeine and alcohol on the toxicity and metabolism of methacrylonitrile in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Mohammed Y H; Trevino, Maria; Garcia, Isabella

    This study reports the toxicity and metabolism of methacrylonitrile (MeAN) in normal male Sprague-Dawley rats and those pre-treated with caffeine, alcohol or both. Rats were divided into groups often. One group received an oral dose by gavage of 6 % MeAN solution in corn oil (equivalent to 0.5 LD50). Other three groups of rats were pre-treated with alcohol (2 ml of 50% solution in water), caffeine (1 ml of 2% solution in water) or both alcohol and caffeine 12 hr before receiving MeAN dose by gavage. The rats were observed for mortality, cholinomimetic and central nervous system (CNS) effects and urinary dysfunction for 6 hr. The concentrations of cyanide, thiocyanate and glutathione (GSH) were determined in blood, liver, kidney and brain. Alcohol and alcohol + caffeine pre-treatment caused significant increase in cholinomimetic, CNS and urinary dysfunction effects of MeAN and mortality. However, caffeine alone pre-treatment protected rats from these effects. In the rats treated with MeAN alone and those pre-treated with alcohol and alcohol + caffeine the GSH concentrations significantly decreased in liver, brain and kidney. In the rats pre-treated with caffeine alone the concentrations of GSH were not significantly different from controls. In the rats treated with MeAN alone and those pretreated with alcohol and alcohol + caffeine the cyanide and thiocyanate concentrations increased in the blood and other organs up to 2-4 folds whereas in rats pre-treated with caffeine alone the concentrations of cyanide and thiocyanate were not significantly different from controls. Western Blot experiment showed CYP2E1 induction in rats pretreated with alcohol and MeAN. These results suggest that caffeine inhibited and alcohol enhanced toxicity and metabolism of MeAN. PMID:21469506

  14. Chronic fetal exposure to caffeine altered resistance vessel functions via RyRs-BKCa down-regulation in rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Li, Yongmei; Gao, Qinqin; Li, Dawei; Tang, Jiaqi; Sun, Miao; Zhang, Pengjie; Liu, Bailin; Mao, Caiping; Xu, Zhice

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine modifies vascular/cardiac contractility. Embryonic exposure to caffeine altered cardiac functions in offspring. This study determined chronic influence of prenatal caffeine on vessel functions in offspring. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (5-month-old) were exposed to high dose of caffeine, their offspring (5-month-old) were tested for vascular functions in mesenteric arteries (MA) and ion channel activities in smooth muscle cells. Prenatal exposure to caffeine increased pressor responses and vasoconstrictions to phenylephrine, accompanied by enhanced membrane depolarization. Large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels in buffering phenylephrine-induced vasoconstrictions was decreased, whole cell BKCa currents and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) were decreased. Single channel recordings revealed reduced voltage/Ca2+ sensitivity of BKCa channels. BKCa α-subunit expression was unchanged, BKCa β1-subunit and sensitivity of BKCa to tamoxifen were reduced in the caffeine offspring as altered biophysical properties of BKCa in the MA. Simultaneous [Ca2+]i fluorescence and vasoconstriction testing showed reduced Ca2+, leading to diminished BKCa activation via ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels (RyRs), causing enhanced vascular tone. Reduced RyR1 was greater than that of RyR3. The results suggest that the altered STOCs activity in the caffeine offspring could attribute to down-regulation of RyRs-BKCa, providing new information for further understanding increased risks of hypertension in developmental origins. PMID:26277840

  15. Marking Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Teachers say that they would gladly teach a day in the classroom if at the end of the day they could leave and have no marking. There is a common staffroom perception that mathematics teachers have it easy when it comes to marking. In arts subjects, setting an essay can be a fairly straightforward matter--a one-line question may suffice--but…

  16. Behavioral Management of Excessive Caffeine Consumption: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Greene, Douglas; And Others

    Although caffeine is seemingly harmless in ordinary daily intake, there has been increasing concern about the possible side effects of habitual caffeine ingestion. The excessive daily ingestion of caffeine in the form of coffee, soda pop, tea, and various medications may lead to a chronic disorder known as caffeinism. This study tested the…

  17. Dasatinib suppression of medulloblastoma survival and migration is markedly enhanced by combining treatment with the aurora kinase inhibitor AT9283

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, William; Liu, Jingbo; Yuan, Liangping; Zhang, Hongying; Schneiderjan, Matthew; Cho, Yoon-Jae; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) expresses Src kinase, while aurora kinase A overexpression correlates with poor survival. We thus investigated novel combination treatment with dasatinib and AT9283, inhibitors of Src and aurora kinase, respectively, on MB growth in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with each drug significantly reduced cell viability and combined treatment markedly potentiated this response. AT9283 induced p53 expression, autophagy, and G2/M cell-cycle arrest, while combined treatment induced S phase arrest. Dasatinib treatment caused tumor regression in vivo. Activated Src was detected in 44% MB analyzed. We conclude that further evaluation of this combination therapy for MB is highly warranted. PMID:25107642

  18. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal

  19. Caffeine use and alexithymia in university students.

    PubMed

    Lyvers, Michael; Duric, Natalija; Thorberg, Fred Arne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alexithymia refers to difficulties with identifying, describing, and regulating one's own emotions. This trait dimension has been linked to risky or harmful use of alcohol and illicit drugs; however, the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world, caffeine, has not been examined previously in relation to alexithymia. The present study assessed 106 male and female university students aged 18-30 years on their caffeine use in relation to several traits, including alexithymia. The 18 participants defined as alexithymic based on their Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) scores reported consuming nearly twice as much caffeine per day as did non-alexithymic or borderline alexithymic participants. They also scored significantly higher than controls on indices of frontal lobe dysfunction as well as anxiety symptoms and sensitivity to punishment. In a hierarchical linear regression model, sensitivity to punishment negatively predicted daily caffeine intake, suggesting caffeine avoidance by trait-anxious individuals. Surprisingly, however, TAS-20 alexithymia scores positively predicted caffeine consumption. Possible reasons for the positive relationship between caffeine use and alexithymia are discussed, concluding that this outcome is tentatively consistent with the hypo-arousal model of alexithymia. PMID:25188705

  20. Caffeine and sports activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A; Debry, G

    1994-07-01

    Potential ergogenic effects of caffeine at the cellular level are mediated by three main mechanisms of action which are: intracellular mobilization of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum and increased sensitivity of myofibrilles to calcium; inhibition of phosphodiesterases leading to an increase in cyclic-3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in various tissues including muscle; and the antagonism at the level of adenosine receptors, mainly in the central nervous system. The main mechanism of action of caffeine at the level usually encountered in vivo after the ingestion of a few cups of coffee is undoubtedly linked to the antagonism of caffeine at adenosine receptors. Caffeine also increases production of plasma catecholamines that allow the body to adapt to the stress created by physical exercise. Catecholamine production increases probably, in turn, the availability of free fatty acids as muscle substrates during work, thus allowing glycogen sparing. Caffeine is able to increase muscle contractility, has no ergogenic effect on intense exercise of brief duration, but can improve the time before exhaustion. Caffeine is also able to improve physical performance and endurance during prolonged activity of submaximal intensity. Glycogen sparing resulting from increased rate of lipolysis could contribute to the prolonged time to exhaustion. Finally, tolerance to the methylxanthine should be taken into account when an athlete wants to draw any benefit from caffeine absorption prior to a sports event. PMID:7960313

  1. Caffeine in your drink: natural or synthetic?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Federherr, Eugen; Schmidt, Torsten C; Jochmann, Maik A

    2012-03-20

    Owing to possible adulteration and health concerns, it is important to discriminate between natural and synthetic food ingredients. A new method for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by coupling high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HT-RPLC/IRMS) was developed for discrimination of natural and synthetic caffeine contained in all types of drinks. The analytical parameters such as stationary phase, column inner diameter, and column temperature were optimized for the separation of caffeine directly from drinks (without extraction). On the basis of the carbon isotope analysis of 42 natural caffeine samples including coffee beans, tea leaves, guaraná powder, and maté leaves, and 20 synthetic caffeine samples from different sources by high-temperature reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry, it is concluded that there are two distinguishable groups of caffeine δ(13)C-values: one between -25 and -32‰ for natural caffeine, and the other between -33 and -38‰ for synthetic caffeine. Isotope analysis by HT-RPLC/IRMS has been applied to identify the caffeine source in 38 drinks. Four mislabeled products were detected due to added but nonlabeled synthetic caffeine with δ(13)C-values lower than -33‰. This work is the first application of HT-RPLC/IRMS to real-world food samples, which showed several advantages: simple sample preparation (only dilution), high throughput, long-term column stability, and high precision of δ(13)C-value. Thus, HT-RPLC/IRMS can be a very promising tool in stable isotope analysis of nonvolatile compounds. PMID:22339647

  2. Caffeine relaxes smooth muscle through actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Tazzeo, Tracy; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Khasnis, Mukta D; Eto, Masumi; Janssen, Luke J

    2012-08-15

    Caffeine is sometimes used in cell physiological studies to release internally stored Ca(2+). We obtained evidence that caffeine may also act through a different mechanism that has not been previously described and sought to examine this in greater detail. We ruled out a role for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, since the effect was 1) not reversed by inhibiting PKA or adenylate cyclase; 2) not exacerbated by inhibiting PDE4; and 3) not mimicked by submillimolar caffeine nor theophylline, both of which are sufficient to inhibit PDE. Although caffeine is an agonist of bitter taste receptors, which in turn mediate bronchodilation, its relaxant effect was not mimicked by quinine. After permeabilizing the membrane using β-escin and depleting the internal Ca(2+) store using A23187, we found that 10 mM caffeine reversed tone evoked by direct application of Ca(2+), suggesting it functionally antagonizes the contractile apparatus. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we found that caffeine did not affect phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by MLC kinase, actin-filament motility catalyzed by MLC kinase, phosphorylation of CPI-17 by either protein kinase C or RhoA kinase, nor the activity of MLC-phosphatase. However, we did obtain evidence that caffeine decreased actin filament binding to phosphorylated myosin heads and increased the ratio of globular to filamentous actin in precontracted tissues. We conclude that, in addition to its other non-RyR targets, caffeine also interferes with actin function (decreased binding by myosin, possibly with depolymerization), an effect that should be borne in mind in studies using caffeine to probe excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscle. PMID:22683573

  3. Caffeine alters the behavioural and body temperature responses to mephedrone without causing long-term neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Shortall, Sinead E; Green, A Richard; Fone, Kevin Cf; King, Madeleine V

    2016-07-01

    Administration of caffeine with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) alters the pharmacological properties of MDMA in rats. The current study examined whether caffeine alters the behavioural and neurochemical effects of mephedrone, which has similar psychoactive effects to MDMA. Rats received either saline, mephedrone (10 mg/kg), caffeine (10 mg/kg) or combined caffeine and mephedrone intraperitoneally twice weekly on consecutive days for three weeks. Locomotor activity (days 1 and 16), novel object discrimination (NOD, day 2), elevated plus maze (EPM) exploration (day 8), rectal temperature changes (day 9) and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle response (day 15) were assessed. Seven days after the final injection, brain regions were collected for the measurement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine and their metabolites. Combined caffeine and mephedrone further enhanced the locomotor response observed following either drug administered alone, and converted mephedrone-induced hypothermia to hyperthermia. Co-administration also abolished mephedrone-induced anxiogenic response on the EPM, but had no effect on NOD or PPI. Importantly, no long-term neurotoxicity was detected following repeated mephedrone alone or when co-administered with caffeine. In conclusion, the study suggests a potentially dangerous effect of concomitant caffeine and mephedrone, and highlights the importance of taking polydrug use into consideration when investigating the acute adverse effect profile of popular recreational drugs. PMID:27257032

  4. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  5. Stretch Marks

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes that can go with bodybuilding. People who use steroid-containing skin creams or ointments (such as hydrocortisone) for more than a few weeks may also get stretch marks. So might people who have to ... surgeon. These doctors may use one of many types of treatments — from actual ...

  6. Quantitative HPLC Analysis of an Analgesic/Caffeine Formulation: Determination of Caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Glenda K.

    1998-04-01

    A modern high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) laboratory experiment which entails the separation of acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine and the quantitative assay of caffeine in commercial mixtures of these compounds has been developed. Our HPLC protocol resolves these compounds in only three minutes with a straightforward chromatographic apparatus which consists of a C-18 column, an isocratic mobile phase, UV detection at 254 nm, and an integrator; an expensive, sophisticated system is not required. The separation is both repeatable and rapid. Moreover, the experiment can be completed in a single three-hour period. The experiment is appropriate for any chemistry student who has completed a minimum of one year of general chemistry and is ideal for an analytical or instrumental analysis course. The experiment detailed herein involves the determination of caffeine in Goody's Extra Strength Headache Powders, a commercially available medication which contains acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine as active ingredients. However, the separation scheme is not limited to this brand of medication nor is it limited to caffeine as the analyte. With only minor procedural modifications, students can simultaneously quantitate all of these compounds in a commercial mixture. In our procedure, students prepare a series of four caffeine standard solutions as well as a solution from a pharmaceutical analgesic/caffeine mixture, chromatographically analyze each solution in quadruplicate, and plot relative average caffeine standard peak area versus concentration. From the mathematical relationship that results, the concentration of caffeine in the commercial formulation is obtained. Finally, the absolute standard deviation of the mean concentration is calculated.

  7. Beneficial synergistic effects of concurrent treatment with theanine and caffeine against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingyan; Tian, Xia; Gou, Lingshan; Ling, Xin; Wang, Ling; Feng, Yan; Yin, Xiaoxing; Liu, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Theanine and caffeine, 2 naturally occurring components in tea, have repeatedly been shown to deliver unique cognitive benefits when consumed in combination. In this study, we assessed the beneficial synergistic effects of concurrent treatment with theanine and caffeine against cerebral damage in rats. Theanine and caffeine had no effect on physiological variables, including pH, partial pressures of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2), mean arterial blood pressure, plasma glucose, or regional cerebral blood flow. Treatment with theanine (1 mg/kg body mass, intraperitoneal injection) alone significantly reduced cerebral infarction induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, but caffeine (10 mg/kg, intravenous administration) alone only had a marginal effect. However, the combination of theanine plus caffeine resulted in a significant reduction of cerebral infarction and brain edema compared with theanine monotherapy. Meanwhile, increased malondialdehyde levels as well as decreased superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, and glutathione levels observed in the cerebral cortex after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were significantly ameliorated by the combination therapy. Furthermore, the elevated inflammatory response levels observed in the cortex after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion were markedly attenuated by the combined treatment. Thus, it is suggested that the neuroprotective potential of a combination therapy with theanine and caffeine against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion is partly ascribed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:23826680

  8. A Simple Route to Reduced Graphene Oxide-Draped Nanocomposites with Markedly Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueqin; Yang, Jianbo; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Yang; Li, Zhen; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites (denoted RGO/ZnONRA) comprising reduced graphene oxide (RGO) draped over the surface of zinc oxide nanorod array (ZnONRA) were produced via a simple low-temperature route, dispensing with the need for hydrothermal growth, electrochemical deposition or other complex treatments. The amount of deposited RGO can be readily tuned by controlling the concentration of graphene oxide (GO). Interestingly, the addition of Sn(2+) not only enables the reduction of GO, but also functions as a bridge that connects the resulting RGO and ZnONRA. Remarkably, the incorporation of RGO improves the visible-light absorption and reduces the bandgap of ZnO, thereby leading to the markedly improved visible-light photocatalytic performance. Moreover, RGO/ZnONRA nanocomposites exhibit a superior stability as a result of the surface protection of ZnONRA by RGO. The mechanism on the improved photocatalytic performance based on the cophotosensitizations under the visible-light irradiation has been proposed. This simple yet effective route to the RGO-decorated semiconductor nanocomposites renders the better visible-light utilization, which may offer great potential for use in photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, solar cells, and optoelectronic materials and devices. PMID:27322494

  9. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit. PMID:25710190

  10. Caffeine Effects on ERP Components and Performance in an Equiprobable Auditory Go/NoGo Task.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M; Cave, Adele E

    2014-09-01

    Background: Research has reliably demonstrated that caffeine produces a general increase in physiological arousal in humans, but we previously failed to obtain the expected arousal-based changes in manually quantified event-related potential (ERP) components in response to the stimuli in a simple Go/NoGo task. Methods: A single oral dose of caffeine (250 mg) was used in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled repeated-measures cross-over study. Adult participants (N=24) abstained from caffeine for 4 hours before each of two sessions, approximately 1 week apart. An equiprobable auditory Go/NoGo task was used, with a random mix of 75 tones at 1,000 Hz and 75 at 1,500 Hz. All tones were 50 ms duration (rise/fall time 5 ms) at 60 dB SPL, with a fixed stimulus-onset asynchrony of 1100 ms. Principal component analysis (a form of factor analysis) was used to quantify orthogonal ERP components. Results: ERP components reflected the different sequential processing of each stimulus type in this paradigm, replicating previous results. Caffeine was associated with a reduction in reaction time and fewer omission errors. The major ERP effects of caffeine were apparent as a slightly enhanced Processing Negativity and larger P3b amplitudes to Go stimuli. There were few effects on components to NoGo stimuli. Conclusions: The results confirm our previous findings that caffeine improves aspects of the differential processing related to response production and task performance, but may be interpreted as supporting the simple amplification of ERP component amplitudes predicted by the general arousal induced by caffeine. PMID:25229010

  11. The Effects of Caffeine on Hyperactive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, Philip; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The psychological, physiological, and behavioral effects of a 2-week regimen of 300 mg of caffeine on 20 hyperactive males between the ages of 5 and 12 years were examined, using a double-blind crossover format. (Author)

  12. Caffeinated alcohol beverages: a public health concern.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Angela S

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol mixed with caffeinated energy drinks is becoming popular, and the number of pre-mixed caffeinated alcohol products on the worldwide market is increasing. There is public health concern and even occasional legal restriction relating to these drinks, due to associations with increased intoxication and harms. The precise nature and degree of the pharmacological relationship between caffeine and alcohol is not yet elucidated, but it is proposed that caffeine attenuates the sedative effects of alcohol intoxication while leaving motor and cognitive impairment unaffected. This creates a potentially precarious scenario for users who may underestimate their level of intoxication and impairment. While legislation in some countries has restricted production or marketing of pre-mixed products, many individuals mix their own energy drink-alcohol 'cocktails'. Wider dissemination of the risks might help balance marketing strategies that over-emphasize putative positive effects. PMID:22645036

  13. Caffeine in surface and wastewaters in Barbados, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Quincy A; Kulikov, Sergei M; Garner-O'Neale, Leah D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, a purine alkaloid drug, has been recognized as a contaminant of water bodies in various climatic regions, however, these environmental caffeine concentrations are the first to be reported in the tropical Caribbean. The major objective of this study was to develop an improved method to extract caffeine from surface and wastewaters in the warm Caribbean environment and measure caffeine concentrations in highly populated areas in Barbados. Caffeine was extracted from water via solid phase extraction (SPE); the acidified water samples were loaded onto C-18 cartridges and eluted with pure chloroform. The extracted caffeine was quantified using gas chromatography - mass spectroscopy - multiple reaction monitoring (GC-MS/MS-MRM). Method detection limits of 0.2 ng L(-1) from 1 L water samples were achieved. Caffeine was detected in all environmental water samples investigated. The concentrations of caffeine in surface waters were detected in the range 0.1 - 6.9 μg L(-1). The two wastewater treatment plants, primary and secondary treatment systems, significantly differed in their ability to eliminate caffeine in the raw sewage (38% and 99% caffeine removal efficiencies respectively). Thus, it may be essential to employ secondary treatment to effectively remove caffeine from wastewater systems in Barbados. Caffeine in water bodies are principally attributed to anthropogenic sources as caffeine-producing plants are not commonly grown on the island of Barbados. The study also shows the recalcitrance of caffeine to hydrolytic degradation. PMID:25729634

  14. Hydrophobic Mutagenesis and Semi-rational Engineering of Arginine Deiminase for Markedly Enhanced Stability and Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Serwanja; Liu, Meng-Han; Liu, Yong-Mei; Han, Rui-Zhi; Xu, Guo-Chao; Ni, Ye

    2015-07-01

    Due to its systemic arginine degradation, arginine deiminase (ADI) has attracted attentions as an anti-tumor drug. Its low activity at physiological conditions among other limitations has necessitated its engineering for improved properties. The present study describes the hydrophobic mutagenesis and semi-rational engineering of ADI from Pseudomonas plecoglossicida (PpADI). Using an improved ADI variant M13 (D38H/A128T/E296K/H404R/I410L) as parent, site saturation mutagenesis at position 162 resulted in an over 20 % increase in protein solubility. Compared with M13 (15.23 U/mg), mutants M13-2 (M13+S245D) and M13-5 (M13+R243L) exhibited enhanced specific activity of 21.19 and 31.20 U/mg at physiological conditions. M13-5 displayed enhanced substrate specificity with a dramatic reduction in its K m value (from 0.52 to 0.16 mM). It is speculated that the improvements in M13-5 could mainly be attributed to the enhanced structural stability due to an R243L substitution. The hydrophobic contribution of Leu 243 was supported by mutant M13-9 (M13+A276W) generated based on the hydrophobic mutagenesis concept. M13-9 showed a specific activity of 18.68 U/mg, as well as remarkable thermal and pH stability. It retained over 90 % activity over pH range from 4.5 to 8.5. At 60 °C, the half-life of M13-9 was enhanced from 4 to 17.5 min in comparison with M13, and its specific activity at 62 °C (93.0 U/mg) was approximately fivefold of that determined at 37 °C. Our results suggest that the increased hydrophobicity around the active regions of PpADI might be crucial in improving its structural stability and ultimately catalytic efficiency. PMID:26041055

  15. Characterization of individuals seeking treatment for caffeine dependence.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Laura M; Evatt, Daniel P; Richards, Brian D; Griffiths, Roland R

    2012-12-01

    Previous investigations have identified individuals who meet criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) substance dependence as applied to caffeine, but there is little research on treatments for caffeine dependence. This study aimed to thoroughly characterize individuals who are seeking treatment for problematic caffeine use. Ninety-four individuals who identified as being psychologically or physically dependent on caffeine, or who had tried unsuccessfully to modify caffeine consumption participated in a face-to-face diagnostic clinical interview. They also completed measures concerning caffeine use and quitting history, reasons for seeking treatment, and standardized self-report measures of psychological functioning. Caffeine treatment seekers (mean age 41 years, 55% women) consumed an average of 548 mg caffeine per day. The primary source of caffeine was coffee for 50% of the sample and soft drinks for 37%. Eighty-eight percent reported prior serious attempts to modify caffeine use (mean 2.7 prior attempts), and 43% reported being advised by a medical professional to reduce or eliminate caffeine. Ninety-three percent met criteria for caffeine dependence when generic DSM-IV-TR substance dependence criteria were applied to caffeine use. The most commonly endorsed criteria were withdrawal (96%), persistent desire or unsuccessful efforts to control use (89%), and use despite knowledge of physical or psychological problems caused by caffeine (87%). The most common reasons for wanting to modify caffeine use were health-related (59%) and not wanting to be dependent on caffeine (35%). This investigation reveals that there are individuals with problematic caffeine use who are seeking treatment and suggests that there is a need for effective caffeine dependence treatments. PMID:22369218

  16. Prenatal Caffeine Exposure Impairs Pregnancy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yadegari, Maryam; Khazaei, Mozafar; Anvari, Morteza; Eskandari, Mohadeseh

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, concerns have been raised about human reproductive disorders. Caffeine consumption is increasing by the world’s population and there is a relationship between caffeine intake and adverse reproductive outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on implantation sites, number of live births, birth weight, crown-rump length (CRL) and abnormality in pregnant rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 40 female albino rats (170-190 g) were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups (n=10/each group). In both experimental groups, animals received caffeine intraperitoneally (IP: 150 mg/kg/day) on days 1-5 of pregnancy. In experimental group 1, treated animals were euthanized on day 7of pregnancy and the number of implantation sites was counted. In experimental group 2, treated animals maintained pregnant and after delivery, the number of live births, birth weight, CRL and abnormality of neonates were investigated. In control group, animals received IP injections of distilled water. Data were analyzed by independent t test. Results Results showed that administration of caffeine significantly decreased the number of implantation sites, number of live births and CRL as compared with control group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences regarding birth weight and abnormality of neonate rats between experimental and control groups. Conclusion These results suggest that caffeine caused anti-fertility effect and significantly decreased CRL in neonate rats. PMID:26985345

  17. Effects of caffeine on human health.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, P; Jordan, S; Eastwood, J; Rotstein, J; Hugenholtz, A; Feeley, M

    2003-01-01

    Caffeine is probably the most frequently ingested pharmacologically active substance in the world. It is found in common beverages (coffee, tea, soft drinks), in products containing cocoa or chocolate, and in medications. Because of its wide consumption at different levels by most segments of the population, the public and the scientific community have expressed interest in the potential for caffeine to produce adverse effects on human health. The possibility that caffeine ingestion adversely affects human health was investigated based on reviews of (primarily) published human studies obtained through a comprehensive literature search. Based on the data reviewed, it is concluded that for the healthy adult population, moderate daily caffeine intake at a dose level up to 400 mg day(-1) (equivalent to 6 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) in a 65-kg person) is not associated with adverse effects such as general toxicity, cardiovascular effects, effects on bone status and calcium balance (with consumption of adequate calcium), changes in adult behaviour, increased incidence of cancer and effects on male fertility. The data also show that reproductive-aged women and children are 'at risk' subgroups who may require specific advice on moderating their caffeine intake. Based on available evidence, it is suggested that reproductive-aged women should consume caffeine per day (equivalent to 4.6 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for a 65-kg person) while children should consume

  18. Supraadditive formation of micronuclei in preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro after combined treatment with X-rays and caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, W.U.S.; Streffer, C.; Wurm, R.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of caffeine (0.1 or 2 mM), X-rays (0.24 Gy or 0.94 Gy, or of a combination of both on the formation of micronuclei in early stages of preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro was studied. X-rays as well as caffeine induced micronuclei. The dose-effect curve after irradiation was linear for the dose range measured. Caffeine did not induce micronuclei if the concentration was 1 mM or less; between 1 mM and 7 mM, however, there was a linear increase in the number of micronuclei. A considerable enhancement of the number of radiation-induced micronuclei was observed when irradiation of the embryos was followed by a treatment with caffeine. Not only was the sum of the single effects exceeded by the combination effects, but the combination results even lay in the range of supraadditivity of the envelope of additivity.

  19. [Caffeine in nutrition. Article 1. Consumption with food and regulation].

    PubMed

    Bessonov, V V; Khanferyan, R A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a review of the literature data on the effect of caffeine contained in a variety of foods on the functions of human, it presents the modern international legal regulatory rules in the consumption of caffeine, and caffeine consumption rules corresponding to the technical regulations of the Customs Union (Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, Belaruss). It describes the sources of caffeine in the traditional diet and its consumption, safety evaluation in connection with the acute and chronic caffeine consumption and the value of caffeine as an ingredient in soft drinks tonic. PMID:26852540

  20. Degradation of exogenous caffeine by Populus alba and its effects on endogenous caffeine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pierattini, Erika C; Francini, Alessandra; Raffaelli, Andrea; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-04-01

    This is the first study reporting the presence of endogenous caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in all organs of poplar plants. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used in order to evaluate the uptake, translocation, and metabolism of caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) in Populus alba L. Villafranca clone grown in hydroponic conditions. We investigated the remediation of caffeine since it is one of the most widely consumed drugs and it is frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant effluents, surface water, and groundwater worldwide. Our results demonstrated that poplar can absorb and degrade exogenous caffeine without negative effects on plant health. Data showed that concentrations of all endogenous compounds varied depending on caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) treatments. In particular, in control conditions, endogenous caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline were mainly distributed in roots. On the other hand, once caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) was provided, this compound and its dimethy-(13)C metabolites are mainly localized at leaf level. In conclusion, our results support the possible use of Villafranca clone in association with other water treatment systems in order to complete the process of caffeine remediation. PMID:26681326

  1. Fluorescence Based Turn-on Probe for the Determination of Caffeine Using Europium-Tetracycline as Energy Transfer Complex.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Shwetha; Krishna, Honnur; Bhatt, Praveena

    2016-05-01

    The study describes a simple and sensitive fluorometric sensor based on the enhancement of fluorescence intensity of Europium ion (Eu(3+)) - tetracycline (TC) charge transfer complex on addition of caffeine. The Eu(3+)-TC ternary complex has a characteristic emission peak at 615 nm (λex = 375 nm), the intensity of which increases with increase in concentration of caffeine. The caffeine sensor assay was found to be linear in the range of 0.0515 mM to 51.5 mM. The limit of detection and quantification were found to be 0.0515 mM and 0.382 mM, respectively. A caffeine recovery of 90 to 110 % in biological samples (serum and urine) indicated minimal interference by commonly present excipients in the samples. Rosenthal plots to calculate the binding capacity of caffeine with the Eu(3+)- TC complex revealed an association constant (K) of 238 x 10(3) L/mol and binding number (N) of 1.9. Bland-Altman plot comparing the developed assay and HPLC showed good agreement between values obtained by both the methods. The proposed fluorescent chemical sensor is a rapid and convenient method to determine caffeine with excellent recovery and low detection limit. The probable reaction mechanism for the formation of the turn on fluorescent probe enhancer is discussed. PMID:27063870

  2. On your marks, get set, go!-lessons from the UK in enhancing employability of graduates and postgraduates.

    PubMed

    Fahnert, Beatrix

    2015-10-01

    Employers expect graduates and postgraduates to demonstrate their education through more than good grades. Learning activities that develop subject skills during formalized programmes of undergraduate and postgraduate study also develop employability skills, if the curriculum is suitably aligned, and developmental planning is supported. Only little extra provision is required, but all development needs to be explicitly signposted to the learner, and the curriculum should be developed in consultation with employers. This review aims to raise awareness of current issues in the context of enhancing employability that arise from an increased global competition on the job market and the expectation of the Higher Education sector to produce work-ready graduates and postgraduates that are well equipped to adapt to a quickly changing work environment particularly due to transferable skills. In the context of lessons from the UK, these current issues and employability are discussed, and approaches to Personal Development Planning that prepare students for lifelong learning and that enable communicating and evidencing achievement are addressed. Issues specific to postgraduates, how actual work experience should be maximized as well as other career influences such as learned societies and social networking are highlighted. PMID:26337154

  3. Nanoimmunoliposome Delivery of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Markedly Enhances Targeting and Uptake in Human Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengli; Rait, Antonina; Pirollo, Kathleen F.; Dagata, John A.; Farkas, Natalia; Chang, Esther H.

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the problem of reduction of the supermagnetic properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles after chemical modification to conjugate targeting molecules, we have adapted a tumor-targeting nanoimmunoliposome platform technology (scL) to encapsulate and deliver SPIO (scL-SPIO) in vitro and in vivo without chemical modification. Scanning probe microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Prussian blue staining were employed to analyze the scL-SPIO nanoparticles and assess intracellular uptake and distribution of SPIO in vitro. In vivo targeting and tumor-specific uptake of scL-SPIO was examined using fluorescent-labeled SPIO. We demonstrated that SPIO encapsulation in the scL complex results in approximately an 11 fold increase in SPIO uptake in human cancer cells in vitro, with distribution to cytoplasm and nucleus. Moreover, the scL nanocomplex specifically and efficiently delivered SPIO into tumor cells after systemic administration, demonstrating the potential of this approach to enhance local tumor concentration and the utility of SPIO for clinical applications. PMID:18676207

  4. Reversal of caffeine withdrawal by ingestion of a soft beverage.

    PubMed

    Watson, J M; Lunt, M J; Morris, S; Weiss, M J; Hussey, D; Kerr, D

    2000-05-01

    Followlng regular use, acute cessation of caffeine is associated with a characteristic withdrawal syndrome. Despite this, caffeine remains popular with its consumers. The aim of this study was to examine the physiologic and psychologic effects of small caffeine doses, administered in the form of a market-leading soft drink, on healthy women who were acutely withdrawn from caffeine. After 48-h abstinence and overnight fast, 11 healthy (22 to 40 years) female volunteers, all regular caffeine users (daily consumption 143 to 773 mg) consumed using a double-blind. randomized, controlled cross-over design either 2 tins of regular or caffeine-free Diet Coke. On both visits a Mars bar was eaten to prevent hypoglycaemia. Thus, the caffeine load was 76 or 10 mg respectively. Following ingestion of regular Diet Coke, there was a l0% fall in middle cerebral artery velocity (95% CI [6%-l4%], p < 0.005 versus caffeine free) and improvement in feelings of pleasure (p < 0.046) and energy (p < 0.037). Intellectual function (4-choice reaction time) was unaffected by caffeine status. On both visits, ingestion of Diet Coke induced a pressor response (maximum rise in systolic pressure +15+/- 2 mm Hg with caffeine and +l2 +/- 2 mm Hg with caffeine-free beverage, both p < 0.001 compared with baseline). In conclusion, in women acutely withdrawn from caffeine, ingestion of a popular soft beverage containing modest amounts of caffeine is associated with demonstrable physiologic and psychologic effects. PMID:10837839

  5. Polar Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02155 Polar Markings

    These bright and dark markings occurred near the end of summer in the south polar region. The dark material is likely dust that has been freed of frost cover.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -76.3N, Longitude 84.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Mechanism of Nanotization-Mediated Improvement in the Efficacy of Caffeine Against 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine-Induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Naveen Kumar; Agarwal, Swati; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Tiwari, Manindra Nath; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Srivastava, Garima; Kumar, Pradeep; Brashket, Seth; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to measure the neuroprotective efficacy of caffeine-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles over bulk and to delineate the mechanism of improvement in efficacy both in vitro and in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of Parkinsonism. Caffeine-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles exhibited more pronounced increase in the endurance of dopaminergic neurons, fibre outgrowth and expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced alterations in vitro. Caffeine-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles also inhibited MPP(+)-mediated nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and augmented protein kinase B phosphorylation more potentially than bulk counterpart. Conversely, MPTP reduced the striatal dopamine and its metabolites and nigral TH immunoreactivity whereas augmented the nigral microglial activation and nigrostriatal lipid peroxidation and nitrite content, which were shifted towards normalcy by caffeine. The modulations were more evident in caffeine-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles treated animals as compared with bulk. Moreover, the striatal caffeine and its metabolites were found to be significantly higher in caffeine-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles-treated mice as compared with bulk. The results thus suggest that nanotization improves the protective efficacy of caffeine against MPTP-induced Parkinsonism owing to enhanced bioavailability, inhibition of the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and activation of protein kinase B phosphorylation. PMID:26510314

  7. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A.; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A.; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance

  8. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor

  9. The metabolic and performance effects of caffeine compared to coffee during endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Adrian B; Randell, Rebecca K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2013-01-01

    There is consistent evidence supporting the ergogenic effects of caffeine for endurance based exercise. However, whether caffeine ingested through coffee has the same effects is still subject to debate. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the performance enhancing effects of caffeine and coffee using a time trial performance test, while also investigating the metabolic effects of caffeine and coffee. In a single-blind, crossover, randomised counter-balanced study design, eight trained male cyclists/triathletes (Mean ± SD: Age 41 ± 7 y, Height 1.80 ± 0.04 m, Weight 78.9 ± 4.1 kg, VO2 max 58 ± 3 ml • kg(-1) • min(-1)) completed 30 min of steady-state (SS) cycling at approximately 55% VO2max followed by a 45 min energy based target time trial (TT). One hour prior to exercise each athlete consumed drinks consisting of caffeine (5 mg CAF/kg BW), instant coffee (5 mg CAF/kg BW), instant decaffeinated coffee or placebo. The set workloads produced similar relative exercise intensities during the SS for all drinks, with no observed difference in carbohydrate or fat oxidation. Performance times during the TT were significantly faster (~5.0%) for both caffeine and coffee when compared to placebo and decaf (38.35 ± 1.53, 38.27 ± 1.80, 40.23 ± 1.98, 40.31 ± 1.22 min respectively, p<0.05). The significantly faster performance times were similar for both caffeine and coffee. Average power for caffeine and coffee during the TT was significantly greater when compared to placebo and decaf (294 ± 21 W, 291 ± 22 W, 277 ± 14 W, 276 ± 23 W respectively, p<0.05). No significant differences were observed between placebo and decaf during the TT. The present study illustrates that both caffeine (5 mg/kg/BW) and coffee (5 mg/kg/BW) consumed 1 h prior to exercise can improve endurance exercise performance. PMID:23573201

  10. Neurobehavioral hazard identification and characterization for caffeine.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Duncan; Rodricks, Joseph V; Mariano, Gregory F

    2016-02-01

    This report evaluates the scientific literature on caffeine with respect to potential central nervous system (CNS) effects, specifically effects on sleep, anxiety, and aggression/risk-taking. Caffeine has been the subject of more scientific safety studies than any other food ingredient. It is important, therefore, to evaluate new studies in the context of this large existing body of knowledge. The safety of caffeine can best be described in a narrative form, and is not usefully expressed in terms of a "bright line" numerical value like an "acceptable daily intake" (ADI). Caffeine intake has been associated with a range of reversible physiological effects, in a few studies at levels of less than 100 mg in sensitive individuals. It is also clear that many people can tolerate much greater levels - perhaps up to 600-800 mg/day or more - without experiencing such effects. The reasons for this type of variability in response are described in this report. Based on all the available evidence, there is no reason to believe that experiencing such effects from caffeine intake has any significant or lasting effect on health. The point at which caffeine intake may cause harm to the CNS is not readily identifiable, in part because data on the effects of daily intakes greater than 600 mg is limited. Effects of caffeine on risk-taking and aggressive behavior in young people have received considerable publicity, yet are the most difficult to study because of ethical concerns and limitations in the ability to design appropriate studies. At present, the weight of available evidence does not support these concerns, yet this should not preclude ongoing careful monitoring of the scientific literature. PMID:26702789

  11. [Time course of inhibition of caffeine elimination in response to the oral depot contraceptive agent Deposiston. Hormonal contraceptives and caffeine elimination].

    PubMed

    Meyer, F P; Canzler, E; Giers, H; Walther, H

    1991-01-01

    In the course of six months, the influence of the oral depot contraceptive, Deposiston (3 mg ethinylestradiol sulphonate and 10 mg norethisterone acetate per menstrual cycle) on the pharmacokinetics of caffeine as a model substance was studied in seven women in intraindividual comparison. The first examination began prior to administration of Deposition. The women were subjected to little challenge as saliva was used as the measuring compartment. Deposiston was found markedly delay the elimination half-life life of caffeine (p less than 0.05): t1/2 prior to therapy 4.9 +/- 2.6 h and, after as little as 2 mg ethinylestradiol sulphonate 8.0 +/- 3.5 h. In contrast to the effect observed for preparations containing less estrogen, these longer half-lives persisted throughout the trial. As expected, the AUC values were slightly elevated during this period, whereas clearance values were reduced. PMID:2058339

  12. Caffeine's Jolt Can Sometimes Be Short-Lived

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159413.html Caffeine's Jolt Can Sometimes Be Short-Lived Stimulant effect ... 17, 2016 THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine no longer improves alertness or mental performance after ...

  13. Couples' Pre-Pregnancy Caffeine Consumption Linked to Miscarriage Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thursday, March 24, 2016 Couples’ pre-pregnancy caffeine consumption linked to miscarriage risk NIH study finds daily ... such lifestyle factors as cigarette use, caffeinated beverage consumption and multivitamin use among 344 couples with a ...

  14. Caffeine Intake -- Even Dad's -- Linked to Miscarriage, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... new in this study is that men's caffeine consumption also appears to play a role, said Janis ... time to get your body ready -- reduce your consumption of caffeine, get to a healthy weight, don' ...

  15. Smoking and caffeine and alcohol intake during pregnancy in a northern population: effect on fetal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Godel, J C; Pabst, H F; Hodges, P E; Johnson, K E; Froese, G J; Joffres, M R

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of smoking and of caffeine and alcohol intake during pregnancy in a northern population and to determine the relation of these factors to birth weight, length and head circumference. DESIGN: Questionnaire survey and collection of maternal and newborn measurements. SETTING: Ten communities in the Inuvik Zone, NWT. PATIENTS: A total of 162 women (56 Inuit, 38 Indian, 37 white and 31 mixed race) who presented for prenatal care in their community and gave birth in Inuvik between September 1987 and January 1990 and their newborns. RESULTS: In all, 64% (101/159) of the women smoked, 57% (88/154) ingested more than 300 mg of caffeine daily, and 34% (50/145) drank alcohol during their pregnancy. Smoking, caffeine intake and binge drinking were most frequent among the Inuit and Indian mothers. Smoking was significantly associated with decreased birth weight (p less than 0.001) and length (p less than 0.05). Alcohol intake, especially binge drinking, was significantly associated with decreased head circumference (p less than 0.05). Caffeine was found not to be related to any of the outcome variables after smoking was controlled for through stepwise multiple regression. CONCLUSIONS: The marked prevalence of smoking and alcohol intake during pregnancy and their effects on the newborn are public health concerns in the Northwest Territories and warrant intensive countermeasures. PMID:1623464

  16. Caffeine use among active duty US Army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Harris R; Stavinoha, Trisha; McGraw, Susan; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2012-06-01

    Eighty-percent of the US adult population regularly consumes caffeine, but limited information is available on the extent and patterns of use. Caffeine use is a public health issue and its risks and benefits are regularly considered in scientific literature and the lay media. Recently, new caffeine-containing products have been introduced and are widely available on Army bases and are added to rations to maintain cognitive performance. This study surveyed caffeine consumption and demographic characteristics in 990 US Army soldiers. Data were weighted by age, sex, rank, and Special Forces status. Total caffeine intake and intake from specific products were estimated. Logistic regression was used to examine relationships between caffeine use and soldier demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Eighty-two percent of soldiers consumed caffeine at least once a week. Mean daily caffeine consumption was 285 mg/day (347 mg/day among regular caffeine consumers). Male soldiers consumed, on average, 303 mg/day and females 163 mg/day (regular consumers: 365 mg/day for male soldiers, 216 mg/day for female soldiers). Coffee was the main source of caffeine intake. Among young males, energy drinks were the largest source of caffeine intake, but their intake was not greater than older males. Regression analysis indicated an association of higher caffeine intake with male sex, white race, and tobacco use (P<0.01). Most soldiers consume caffeine in levels accepted as safe, but some consume greater quantities than recommended, although definitive information on safe upper limits of caffeine intake is not available. Labels of caffeine-containing products should provide caffeine content so individuals can make informed decisions. PMID:22709816

  17. Caffeine Taste Signaling in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Köhn, Saskia; Stehle, Bernhard; Lutz, Michael; Wüst, Alexander; Mazija, Lorena; Rist, Anna; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Lüdke, Alja; Thum, Andreas S.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal, and ventral organ). However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative co-receptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s). This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviors. PMID:27555807

  18. Caffeine Taste Signaling in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Köhn, Saskia; Stehle, Bernhard; Lutz, Michael; Wüst, Alexander; Mazija, Lorena; Rist, Anna; Galizia, C Giovanni; Lüdke, Alja; Thum, Andreas S

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal, and ventral organ). However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative co-receptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s). This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviors. PMID:27555807

  19. Caffeine Use Disorder: A Comprehensive Review and Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Steven E.; Juliano, Laura M.; Hughes, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used drug in the world. Although consumption of low to moderate doses of caffeine is generally safe, an increasing number of clinical studies are showing that some caffeine users become dependent on the drug and are unable to reduce consumption despite knowledge of recurrent health problems associated with continued use. Thus, the World Health Organization and some health care professionals recognize caffeine dependence as a clinical disorder. In this comprehensive literature review, we summarize published research on the biological evidence for caffeine dependence; we provide a systematic review of the prevalence of caffeine dependence and rates of endorsement of clinically meaningful indicators of distress and functional impairment among habitual caffeine users; we discuss the diagnostic criteria for Caffeine Use Disorder—a condition for further study included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.); and we outline a research agenda to help guide future clinical, epidemiological, and genetic investigations of caffeine dependence. Numerous controlled laboratory investigations reviewed in this article show that caffeine produces behavioral and physiological effects similar to other drugs of dependence. Moreover, several recent clinical studies indicate that caffeine dependence is a clinically meaningful disorder that affects a nontrivial proportion of caffeine users. Nevertheless, more research is needed to determine the reliability, validity, and prevalence of this clinically important health problem. PMID:24761279

  20. Caffeine Consumption Patterns and Beliefs of College Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlvain, Gary E.; Noland, Melody P.; Bickel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Caffeine consumption by young people has increased dramatically over the last decade through increased coffee consumption and "energy drinks." In higher amounts, caffeine causes many adverse effects that are cause for concern. Purpose: Purposes of this study were to determine: (1) the amount of caffeine consumed by a sample of college…

  1. Caffeine Use Disorder: A Comprehensive Review and Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Steven E; Juliano, Laura M; Hughes, John R; Griffiths, Roland R

    2013-09-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used drug in the world. Although consumption of low to moderate doses of caffeine is generally safe, an increasing number of clinical studies are showing that some caffeine users become dependent on the drug and are unable to reduce consumption despite knowledge of recurrent health problems associated with continued use. Thus, the World Health Organization and some health care professionals recognize caffeine dependence as a clinical disorder. In this comprehensive literature review, we summarize published research on the biological evidence for caffeine dependence; we provide a systematic review of the prevalence of caffeine dependence and rates of endorsement of clinically meaningful indicators of distress and functional impairment among habitual caffeine users; we discuss the diagnostic criteria for Caffeine Use Disorder-a condition for further study included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5(th) ed.); and we outline a research agenda to help guide future clinical, epidemiological, and genetic investigations of caffeine dependence. Numerous controlled laboratory investigations reviewed in this article show that caffeine produces behavioral and physiological effects similar to other drugs of dependence. Moreover, several recent clinical studies indicate that caffeine dependence is a clinically meaningful disorder that affects a nontrivial proportion of caffeine users. Nevertheless, more research is needed to determine the reliability, validity, and prevalence of this clinically important health problem. PMID:24761279

  2. Beverage caffeine intakes in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diane C; Knight, Carol A; Hockenberry, Jon; Teplansky, Robyn; Hartman, Terryl J

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most researched food components, with the vast majority of dietary contributions coming from beverage consumption; however, there is little population-level data on caffeine intakes in the U.S. This study estimated the caffeine intakes of the U.S. population using a comprehensive beverage survey, the Kantar Worldpanel Beverage Consumption Panel. A nationally representative sample of 37,602 consumers (aged ≥ 2 years) of caffeinated beverages completed 7-day diaries which facilitated the development of a detailed database of caffeine values to assess intakes. Results showed that 85% of the U.S. population consumes at least one caffeinated beverage per day. The mean (±SE) daily caffeine intake from all beverages was 165±1 mg for all ages combined. Caffeine intake was highest in consumers aged 50-64 years (226±2 mg/day). The 90th percentile intake was 380 mg/day for all ages combined. Coffee was the primary contributor to caffeine intakes in all age groups. Carbonated soft drinks and tea provided a greater percentage of caffeine in the younger (<18 years) age groups. The percentage of energy drink consumers across all age groups was low (≤10%). These data provide a current perspective on caffeinated beverage consumption patterns and caffeine intakes in the U.S. population. PMID:24189158

  3. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  4. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure. PMID:25489060

  5. Effect of caffeine on the expression of a major X-ray induced protein in human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, E.N.; Boothman, D.A. )

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the effect of caffeine on the concomitant processes of the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) and the synthesis of X-ray-induced proteins in the human malignant melanoma cell line, Ul-Mel. Caffeine administered at a dose of 5mM after X radiation not only inhibited PLD repair but also markedly reduced the level of XIP269, a major X-ray-induced protein whose expression has been shown to correlate with the capacity to repair PLD. The expression of the vast majority of other cellular proteins, including seven other X-ray-induced proteins, remained unchanged following caffeine treatment. A possible role for XIP269 in cell cycle delay following DNA damage by X irradiation is discussed.

  6. The effect of caffeine on the reactions of the excited singlet state of pyrene in micellar sodium lauryl sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Thomas, J. Kerry

    1984-08-01

    The effect of caffeine on a few photo-induced reactions of pyrene in micellar sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) has been studied. In these systems caffeine complexes with the pyrene (K asso = 85 ± 10 M -1 and also with the other reactants, e.g. Cu 2+ or TI +. The efficiencies of reactions which involve contact, i.e. pyrene excimer formation, and quenching by TI + ions to give the triplet state of pyrene, are significantly reduced in the presence of caffeine, due to geometric inhibitions formed by the complexation processes. The kinetics of photo-induced electron transfer, e.g. between excited pyrene and Cu 2+, are not affected. However, the subsequent reactions of the products are modified and the yield of ionic products is markedly increased.

  7. Single and combined effects of beetroot juice and caffeine supplementation on cycling time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Lane, Stephen C; Hawley, John A; Desbrow, Ben; Jones, Andrew M; Blackwell, James R; Ross, Megan L; Zemski, Adam J; Burke, Louise M

    2014-09-01

    Both caffeine and beetroot juice have ergogenic effects on endurance cycling performance. We investigated whether there is an additive effect of these supplements on the performance of a cycling time trial (TT) simulating the 2012 London Olympic Games course. Twelve male and 12 female competitive cyclists each completed 4 experimental trials in a double-blind Latin square design. Trials were undertaken with a caffeinated gum (CAFF) (3 mg·kg(-1) body mass (BM), 40 min prior to the TT), concentrated beetroot juice supplementation (BJ) (8.4 mmol of nitrate (NO3(-)), 2 h prior to the TT), caffeine plus beetroot juice (CAFF+BJ), or a control (CONT). Subjects completed the TT (females: 29.35 km; males: 43.83 km) on a laboratory cycle ergometer under conditions of best practice nutrition: following a carbohydrate-rich pre-event meal, with the ingestion of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink and regular oral carbohydrate contact during the TT. Compared with CONT, power output was significantly enhanced after CAFF+BJ and CAFF (3.0% and 3.9%, respectively, p < 0.01). There was no effect of BJ supplementation when used alone (-0.4%, p = 0.6 compared with CONT) or when combined with caffeine (-0.9%, p = 0.4 compared with CAFF). We conclude that caffeine (3 mg·kg(-1) BM) administered in the form of a caffeinated gum increased cycling TT performance lasting ∼50-60 min by ∼3%-4% in both males and females. Beetroot juice supplementation was not ergogenic under the conditions of this study. PMID:25154895

  8. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Dobes, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 μmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed. PMID:23698772

  9. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  10. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  11. Effects of hyperoxia and caffeine on the expression of fragile site at Xq27.3

    SciTech Connect

    Rafi, S.K.; Surana, R.B.; Christopher, K.L.

    1996-02-02

    To enhance the cytogenetic expression of the fragile X chromosome, we studied the effects of hyperoxia and caffeine on the induction of fragile Xq27.3. A lymphoblastoid cell line (GM 06912) derived from a fragile X male proband was cultured in RPMI 1640 containing 16% dialyzed fetal calf serum. The cells were synchronously subjected to one of 3 different atmospheric oxygen tensions (21%, 21.3 kPa, hyperoxic) during the last 24 hours of the 72 hour culture, immediately after the addition of 2{prime}-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (FUdR) at 25 ng/ml. To study the enhancing effect of caffeine, with or without hyperoxia, a second set of cultures was additionally subjected to caffeine (2.5 mM) during the last 6 hours of the culture. When the fragility of hyperoxic cells (38.1 kPa dissolved oxygen) was compared to that of normoxic control cells (13.3 kPa dissolved oxygen), the difference was significant (P < 0.05). These data suggest that there is a mean increase in the fragile Xq27.3 expressivity as the dissolved oxygen tension increases. Additionally, we observed that caffeine, with or without hyperoxia, significantly (P <0.05) suppressed the expression of the fragile X site in this lymphoblastoid cell line. 34 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Marked enhancement of the immune response to BioThrax® (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) by the TLR9 agonist CPG 7909 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rynkiewicz, Dianna; Rathkopf, Melinda; Sim, Iain; Waytes, A Thomas; Hopkins, Robert J; Giri, Lallan; DeMuria, Deborah; Ransom, Janet; Quinn, James; Nabors, Gary S; Nielsen, Carl J

    2011-08-26

    Immunization with BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) is a safe and effective means of preventing anthrax. Animal studies have demonstrated that the addition of CpG DNA adjuvants to BioThrax can markedly increase the immunogenicity of the vaccine, increasing both serum anti-protective antigen (PA) antibody and anthrax toxin-neutralizing antibody (TNA) concentrations. The immune response to CpG-adjuvanted BioThrax in animals was not only stronger, but was also more rapid and led to higher levels of protection in spore challenge models. The B-class CpG DNA adjuvant CPG 7909, a 24-base synthetic, single-strand oligodeoxynucleotide, was evaluated for its safety profile and adjuvant properties in a Phase 1 clinical trial. A double-blind study was performed in which 69 healthy subjects, age 18-45 years, were randomized to receive three doses of either: (1) BioThrax alone, (2) 1 mg of CPG 7909 alone or (3) BioThrax plus 1 mg of CPG 7909, all given intramuscularly on study days 0, 14 and 28. Subjects were monitored for IgG to PA by ELISA and for TNA titers through study day 56 and for safety through month 6. CPG 7909 increased the antibody response by 6-8-fold at peak, and accelerated the response by 3 weeks compared to the response seen in subjects vaccinated with BioThrax alone. No serious adverse events related to study agents were reported, and the combination was considered to be reasonably well tolerated. The marked acceleration and enhancement of the immune response seen by combining BioThrax and CPG 7909 offers the potential to shorten the course of immunization and reduce the time to protection, and may be particularly useful in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:21624418

  13. Induction of in vitro EROD activity and in vivo caffeine metabolism in two species of New Zealand birds.

    PubMed

    Numata, Mihoko; Fawcett, J Paul; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2008-05-01

    In birds, induction of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) is usually assessed as liver microsomal ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, but in mammals, it can be determined by a caffeine metabolism blood test. We investigated both of these measures in two species of New Zealand birds. Administration of a model CYP1A inducer, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) (80mg/kg i.p. twice 2 days apart), to paradise shelducks (Tadorna variegata; herbivore) and southern black-backed gulls (Larus dominicanus; omnivore) (n=5 or 6) caused marked increases in EROD activity (80- and 20-fold, respectively). In both species, BNF treatment also caused significant increases (>8-fold) in caffeine metabolism determined prior to sacrifice as the serum concentration ratio of the major metabolite, paraxanthine, to caffeine, after caffeine administration (1mg/kg i.p.). The results suggest in vivo caffeine metabolism is a potentially useful non-destructive biomarker of CYP1A induction in wild birds. PMID:21783874

  14. Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ): Construction, Psychometric Properties, and Associations with Caffeine Use, Caffeine Dependence, and Other Related Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Edward D.; Juliano, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancies for drug effects predict drug initiation, use, cessation, and relapse, and may play a causal role in drug effects (i.e., placebo effects). Surprisingly little is known about expectancies for caffeine even though it is the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. In a series of independent studies, the nature and scope of…

  15. Caffeine promotes wakefulness via dopamine signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nall, Aleksandra H.; Shakhmantsir, Iryna; Cichewicz, Karol; Birman, Serge; Hirsh, Jay; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely-consumed psychoactive drug in the world, but our understanding of how caffeine affects our brains is relatively incomplete. Most studies focus on effects of caffeine on adenosine receptors, but there is evidence for other, more complex mechanisms. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which shows a robust diurnal pattern of sleep/wake activity, caffeine reduces nighttime sleep behavior independently of the one known adenosine receptor. Here, we show that dopamine is required for the wake-promoting effect of caffeine in the fly, and that caffeine likely acts presynaptically to increase dopamine signaling. We identify a cluster of neurons, the paired anterior medial (PAM) cluster of dopaminergic neurons, as the ones relevant for the caffeine response. PAM neurons show increased activity following caffeine administration, and promote wake when activated. Also, inhibition of these neurons abrogates sleep suppression by caffeine. While previous studies have focused on adenosine-receptor mediated mechanisms for caffeine action, we have identified a role for dopaminergic neurons in the arousal-promoting effect of caffeine. PMID:26868675

  16. Fatal caffeine overdose: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Seema B; Hanly, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant that is consumed by large numbers of people on a routine basis, usually in the form of coffee or tea. However, if consumed in high doses, this xanthine alkaloid is profoundly toxic and can result in death. Increasingly being sold as a dietary supplement, many people, particularly those in the health and fitness community, where it is touted as a fitness and muscle building aid, are consuming caffeine anhydrous on a daily basis. We report a case of fatal caffeine overdose in a 39-year-old man resulting from the self-administered ingestion of approximately 12 g of pure caffeine anhydrous. Autopsy blood caffeine levels were 350 mg/L. We recommend mandated labeling of pure caffeine anhydrous, highlighting the toxicity risk of ingesting this chemical; and we recommend ensuring that caffeine levels are included in the comprehensive forensic toxicology panel performed on all cases. PMID:24196726

  17. Energy Drinks and the Neurophysiological Impact of Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Persad, Leeana Aarthi Bagwath

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body. PMID:22025909

  18. Naringin does not alter caffeine pharmacokinetics, energy expenditure, or cardiovascular haemodynamics in humans following caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Tasha L P; Halaweish, Fathi T; Stevermer, Cheryl L; Agrawal, Puja; Vukovich, Matthew D

    2006-04-01

    1. Naringin, a grapefruit constituent interacts with many medications including caffeine, a popular weight loss supplement. The purpose of the current study was to identify changes in caffeine pharmacokinetics, resting energy expenditure (REE), oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) after an acute dosage of caffeine and naringin. 2. Using a double-blinded, counterbalanced design, REE, VO(2), and RER were measured before and systematically for 8 h after a single dosage of caffeine (CAF, 200 mg) with and without naringin (100 mg (CN100) or 200 mg (CN200)) in 10 apparently healthy individuals. A standardized meal was provided following 240-minute measurements (400 kcals; 35 g carbohydrate; 27 g protein; 7 g fat). 3. Caffeine, CN100, CN200 did not alter VO(2) or VO(2) area under the curve (137 301 +/- 8318, 139 729 +/- 9300, 134 297 +/- 8318, mL/480 min). Resting energy expenditure (k/cals) was 10.0 +/- 1.4% higher with CAF versus CN200 (6.0 +/- 1.4%) and CN100 (6 +/- 1.5%) at 240 min (P = 0.07) which was then negated following a standardized meal. Percent change in RER from pre to 240 min and pre to 480 min was not different between the CAF, CN100, or CN200 (-0.2 +/- 1.7%, 1.7 +/- 1.7%, -2.8 +/- 1.9%). 4. Although caffeine alone suggests a trend of increased REE, the results of the present study indicate that concurrent consumption of caffeine with naringin in acute dosages does not affect RER, VO(2), and prevents the increase of REE in adult humans. The results suggest that the interaction of grapefruit juice and caffeine may be due to constituents of grapefruit juice other than naringin or in addition to naringin. PMID:16620293

  19. Transfer of Nicotine, Cotinine and Caffeine Into Breast Milk in a Smoker Mother Consuming Caffeinated Drinks.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Valeria; Escuder, Diana; Minutillo, Adele; Bastons-Compta, Adriana; García-Algar, Oscar; Pallás Alonso, Carmen Rosa; Pacifici, Roberta; Pichini, Simona

    2016-07-01

    Although the habits of cigarette smoking and associated coffee drinking are generally ceased during pregnancy, they are often reinitiated after delivery when the breastfeeding period starts. This is a case report of a 32-year-old lactating smoker mother who consumed caffeinated drinks and who agreed to donate breast milk after smoking one cigarette (containing 0.6 mg of nicotine) and drinking one cup of espresso (containing 80 mg of caffeine) for an investigation of the excretion of nicotine, its major metabolite cotinine and caffeine into the breast milk and subsequent transfer to the infant. Nicotine and its metabolite cotinine peaked in the breast milk at 0.5 h after the cigarette smoking, and caffeine peaked 2 h after drinking coffee. Moreover, the nicotine disappeared from the milk by 3 h, the caffeine required 24 h and the cotinine required 72 h. The relative infant doses of caffeine, nicotine and cotinine were found to be 8.9, 12.8 and 77.6%, respectively. In the light of these results obtained after the mother smoked only one cigarette and consumed one cup of espresso, if a lactating mother cannot refrain from smoking cigarettes, she should extend the time between the last smoked cigarette and breastfeeding to at least 3 h when the nicotine has been completely eliminated from the milk. Similarly, nursing mothers should also drink coffee sparingly and immediately after nursing and avoid coffee or caffeinated beverages for at least 4 h prior to breastfeeding to minimize the infant's exposure to caffeine. PMID:27129353

  20. Reinforcing effects of caffeine in coffee and capsules.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1989-09-01

    In a residential research ward the reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine were studied under double-blind conditions in volunteer subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. In Experiment 1, 6 subjects had 13 opportunities each day to self-administer either a caffeine (100 mg) or a placebo capsule for periods of 14 to 61 days. All subjects developed a clear preference for caffeine, with intake of caffeine becoming relatively stable after preference had been attained. Preference for caffeine was demonstrated whether or not preference testing was preceded by a period of 10 to 37 days of caffeine abstinence, suggesting that a recent history of heavy caffeine intake (tolerance/dependence) was not a necessary condition for caffeine to function as a reinforcer. In Experiment 2, 6 subjects had 10 opportunities each day to self-administer a cup of coffee or (on different days) a capsule, dependent upon completing a work requirement that progressively increased and then decreased over days. Each day, one of four conditions was studied: caffeinated coffee (100 mg/cup), decaffeinated coffee, caffeine capsules (100 mg/capsule), or placebo capsules. Caffeinated coffee maintained the most self-administration, significantly higher than decaffeinated coffee and placebo capsules but not different from caffeine capsules. Both decaffeinated coffee and caffeine capsules were significantly higher than placebo capsules but not different from each other. In both experiments, subject ratings of "linking" of coffee or capsules covaried with the self-administration measures. These experiments provide the clearest demonstrations to date of the reinforcing effects of caffeine in capsules and in coffee. PMID:2794839

  1. Reinforcing effects of caffeine in coffee and capsules.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1989-01-01

    In a residential research ward the reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine were studied under double-blind conditions in volunteer subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. In Experiment 1, 6 subjects had 13 opportunities each day to self-administer either a caffeine (100 mg) or a placebo capsule for periods of 14 to 61 days. All subjects developed a clear preference for caffeine, with intake of caffeine becoming relatively stable after preference had been attained. Preference for caffeine was demonstrated whether or not preference testing was preceded by a period of 10 to 37 days of caffeine abstinence, suggesting that a recent history of heavy caffeine intake (tolerance/dependence) was not a necessary condition for caffeine to function as a reinforcer. In Experiment 2, 6 subjects had 10 opportunities each day to self-administer a cup of coffee or (on different days) a capsule, dependent upon completing a work requirement that progressively increased and then decreased over days. Each day, one of four conditions was studied: caffeinated coffee (100 mg/cup), decaffeinated coffee, caffeine capsules (100 mg/capsule), or placebo capsules. Caffeinated coffee maintained the most self-administration, significantly higher than decaffeinated coffee and placebo capsules but not different from caffeine capsules. Both decaffeinated coffee and caffeine capsules were significantly higher than placebo capsules but not different from each other. In both experiments, subject ratings of "linking" of coffee or capsules covaried with the self-administration measures. These experiments provide the clearest demonstrations to date of the reinforcing effects of caffeine in capsules and in coffee. PMID:2794839

  2. Caffeine Does Not Modulate Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 3 mg/kg body weight (BW) dose of caffeine were assessed on behavioral indices of response inhibition. To meet these aims, we selected a modified AX version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the stop task, and the flanker task. In three double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects experiments, these tasks were…

  3. Soxhlet Extraction of Caffeine from Beverage Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, D. J.; Mainwaring, J.; Quigley, Michael N.

    1996-12-01

    A simple procedure is described for the extraction of caffeine from coffee beans or granules, tea leaves, mat leaves, etc. Since dichloromethane and several other hazardous substances are used, the procedure is best performed in a fume hood. Following extraction, melting point determination of the crystalline precipitate establishes its positive identity. Includes 33 references.

  4. Altered expression of the caffeine synthase gene in a naturally caffeine-free mutant of Coffea arabica

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we studied the biosynthesis of caffeine by examining the expression of genes involved in this biosynthetic pathway in coffee fruits containing normal or low levels of this substance. The amplification of gene-specific transcripts during fruit development revealed that low-caffeine fruits had a lower expression of the theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase genes and also contained an extra transcript of the caffeine synthase gene. This extra transcript contained only part of exon 1 and all of exon 3. The sequence of the mutant caffeine synthase gene revealed the substitution of isoleucine for valine in the enzyme active site that probably interfered with enzymatic activity. These findings indicate that the absence of caffeine in these mutants probably resulted from a combination of transcriptional regulation and the presence of mutations in the caffeine synthase amino acid sequence. PMID:21637458

  5. Acute effects of bright light and caffeine on nighttime melatonin and temperature levels in women taking and not taking oral contraceptives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Myers, B. L.; Plenzler, S. C.; Drake, C. L.; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Caffeine and bright light effects on nighttime melatonin and temperature levels in women were tested during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle (n=30) or the pseudo luteal phase for oral contraceptive users (n=32). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either bright (5000 lux) or dim room light (<88 lux) between 20:00 and 08:00 h under a modified constant routine protocol. Half the subjects in each lighting condition were administered either caffeine (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind manner at 20:00, 23:00, 02:00 and 05:00 h. Results showed that the combination of bright light and caffeine enhanced nighttime temperature levels to a greater extent than did either caffeine or bright light alone. Both of the latter groups had higher temperature levels relative to the dim light placebo condition and the two groups did not differ. Temperature levels in the bright light caffeine condition were maintained at near peak circadian levels the entire night in the luteal and pseudo luteal phase. Melatonin levels were reduced throughout the duration of bright light exposure for all women. Caffeine reduced the onset of melatonin levels for women in the luteal phase, but it had little effect on melatonin levels for oral contraceptive users. The results for women in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle are consistent with our previous findings in men. The results also suggest that oral contraceptives may alter the effects of caffeine on nighttime melatonin levels.

  6. Caffeine inhibits adipogenesis through modulation of mitotic clonal expansion and the AKT/GSK3 pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Yoon, Bo Kyung; Park, Hyounkyoung; Seok, Jo Woon; Choi, Hyeonjin; Yu, Jung Hwan; Choi, Yoonjeong; Song, Su Jin; Kim, Ara; Kim, Jae-woo

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine has been proposed to have several beneficial effects on obesity and its related metabolic diseases; however, how caffeine affects adipocyte differentiation has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that caffeine suppressed 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, two main adipogenic transcription factors. Anti-adipogenic markers, such as preadipocyte secreted factor (Pref)-1 and Krüppel-like factor 2, remained to be expressed in the presence of caffeine. Furthermore, 3T3-L1 cells failed to undergo typical mitotic clonal expansion in the presence of caffeine. Investigation of hormonal signaling revealed that caffeine inhibited the activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3 in a dose-dependent manner, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Our data show that caffeine is an anti-adipogenic bioactive compound involved in the modulation of mitotic clonal expansion during adipocyte differentiation through the AKT/GSK3 pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 111-115] PMID:26350746

  7. Psychostimulant and Other Effects of Caffeine in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heatherley, Susan V.; Hancock, Katie M. F.; Rogers, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Recent research on adults suggests that "beneficial" psychostimulant effects of caffeine are found only in the context of caffeine deprivation; that is, caffeine improves psychomotor and cognitive performance in habitual caffeine consumers following caffeine withdrawal. Furthermore, no net benefit is gained because performance is…

  8. A Survey of Caffeine Use and Associated Side Effects in a College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Greene, Douglas; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 270 college students concerning their caffeine consumption. Results suggest there is identifiable group using excessive amounts of caffeine. Identified several deleterious effects possibly related to caffeine use. Approximately 75 percent of caffeine users surveyed rarely sought information on caffeine content of products or avoided…

  9. Caffeine Awareness in Children: Insights from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakre, Tushar P.; Deoras, Ketan; Griffin, Catherine; Vemana, Aarthi; Podmore, Petra; Krishna, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Caffeine, a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, can have significant effects on sleep. Caffeine intake among children is increasing, mainly in the form of sodas. However, adolescent caffeine consumers may lack knowledge about the caffeine content in common beverages. If true, this very fact may hamper the assessment of the effects of caffeine consumption on sleep in children if such assessments are a priori dependent on responders being able to reliably distinguish between caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages. This preliminary study investigated adolescents' caffeine knowledge and intake at a Cleveland-area public middle school. Methods: Seventh- and eighth-grade students were surveyed using: (1) the Caffeine Literacy and Sleep Study (CLASS), a 15-question pilot instrument designed to assess caffeine knowledge and intake by type, quantity and timing, as well as sleep habits; and (2) the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a validated survey measuring excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. These questionnaires were distributed and collected during a specified class period. Results: Of the 635 seventh- and eighth-grade students who attended school on the day of the study, 555 (87%) participated. Lack of knowledge about caffeine content of particular drinks was noted in seventh and eighth graders of both sexes with nearly 29% unaware that their favorite drinks contain caffeine and more than 50% unable to correctly identify the drinks with the most caffeine. A low percentage of students correctly identified light-colored sodas lacking caffeine: 7-Up (24.1%), Sierra Mist (38.9%), ginger ale (39.8%), Sprite (39.8%), and Fresca (53.7%). The percentages of students correctly identifying caffeinated light-colored beverages were: Arizona Green Tea (43.5%), Mello Yellow (50.9%), and A&W cream soda (67.6%). However, Mountain Dew was correctly identified by most (93.5%) as caffeinated. Conclusions: Students were not

  10. Caffeine increases food intake while reducing anxiety-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Patrick; Levack, Russell; Watters, Jared; Xu, Zhenping; Yang, Yunlei

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of caffeine on appetite and anxiety-related behavior. Additionally, we sought to determine if withdrawal from chronic caffeine administration promotes anxiety. In this study, we utilized rodent open field testing and feeding behavior assays to determine the effects of caffeine on feeding and anxiety-related behavior (n = 8 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We also measured 2 h and 24 h food intake and body-weight during daily administration of caffeine (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). To test for caffeine withdrawal induced anxiety, anxiety-related behavior in rodents was quantified following withdrawal from four consecutive days of caffeine administration (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We find that acute caffeine administration increases food intake in a dose-dependent manner with lower doses of caffeine more significantly increasing food intake than higher doses. Acute caffeine administration also reduced anxiety-related behaviors in mice without significantly altering locomotor activity. However, we did not observe any differences in 24 h food intake or body weight following chronic caffeine administration and there were no observable differences in anxiety-related behaviors during caffeine withdrawal. In conclusion, we find that caffeine can both increase appetite and decrease anxiety-related behaviors in a dose dependent fashion. Given the complex relationship between appetite and anxiety, the present study provides additional insights into potential caffeine-based pharmacological mechanisms governing appetite and anxiety disorders, such as bulimia nervosa. PMID:26972351

  11. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Jalilian, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine which exists in drinks such as coffee as well as in drug dosage forms in the global market is among the materials that increase alertness and decrease fatigue. Compared to other forms of caffeine, caffeine gum can create faster and more prominent effects. In this study, the main goal is to design a new formulation of caffeine gum with desirable taste and assess its physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods: Caffeine gum was prepared by softening of gum bases and then mixing with other formulation ingredients. To decrease the bitterness of caffeine, sugar, aspartame, liquid glucose, sorbitol, manitol, xylitol, and various flavors were used. Caffeine release from gum base was investigated by mechanical chewing set. Content uniformity test was also performed on the gums. The gums were evaluated in terms of organoleptic properties by the Latin-Square design at different stages. Results: After making 22 formulations of caffeine gums, F11 from 20 mg caffeine gums and F22 from 50 mg caffeine gums were chosen as the best formulation in organoleptic properties. Both types of gum released about 90% of their own drug content after 30 min. Drug content of 20 and 50 mg caffeine gum was about 18.2-21.3 mg and 45.7-53.6 mg respectively. Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release) were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test. PMID:24223387

  12. The Arabidopsis transcription factor NAI1 is required for enhancing the active histone mark but not for removing the repressive mark on PYK10, a seedling–specific gene upon embryonic-to-postgerminative developmental phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Masakatsu; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kagaya, Yasuaki; Takeda, Shin; Hattori, Tsukaho

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the expression onset of a seedling-specific gene, PYK10, occurs in a cell-by-cell manner upon the transition from the embryonic to the postgerminative phase and during embryogenesis in seed maturation regulator mutants such as lec1, and implicated epigenetic mechanisms in the process. Here, the role of the NAI1 transcription factor required for PYK10 expression in the developmental switching of PYK10 was investigated. The cell-by-cell onset of PYK10-EGFP in lec1 embryo was still observed in the nai1 background, but at greatly reduced levels. Decreases in the level of the repressive histone mark, H3K27 trimethylation observed upon the transition to the postgeminative phase normally occurred in nai1. However, concomitant increases in the level of the active mark, H3K4 trimethylation observed in wild type was significantly compromised in nai1. These results indicate that the switching of PYK10 upon developmental phase transition involves 2 separable steps of chromatin state change. PMID:26479492

  13. Recovering Americium and Curium from Mark-42 Target Materials- New Processing Approaches to Enhance Separations and Integrate Waste Stream Disposition - 12228

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Brad D.; Benker, Dennis; Collins, Emory D.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Robinson, Sharon M.; Wham, Robert M.

    2012-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating flowsheets to enhance processing efficiencies and to address waste streams associated with recovery of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) from Mark-42 (Mk-42) target materials stored at ORNL. The objective of this work was to identify the most effective flowsheet with which to process the 104 Mk-42 oxide capsules holding a total of 80 g of plutonium (Pu), 190 g of Cm, 480 g of Am, and 5 kg of lanthanide (Ln) oxides for the recovery and purification of the Am/Cm for future use as feedstock for heavy actinide production. Studies were also conducted to solidify the process flowsheet waste streams for disposal. ORNL is investigating flowsheets to enhance processing efficiencies and address waste streams associated with recovery of Am and Cm from Mk-42 target materials stored at ORNL. A series of small-scale runs are being performed to demonstrate an improved process to recover Am/Cm and to optimize the separations of Ln fission products from the Am/Cm constituents. The first of these runs has been completed using one of the Am/Cm/Ln oxide capsules stored at ORNL. The demonstration run showed promising results with a Ln DF of 40 for the Am/Cm product and an Am/Cm DF of 75 for the Ln product. In addition, the total losses of Am, Cm, and Ln to the waste solvents and raffinates were very low at <0.2%, 0.02%, and 0.04%, respectively. However, the Ln-actinide separation was less than desired. For future Reverse TALSPEAK demonstration runs, several parameters will be adjusted (flow rates, the ratio of scrub to strip stages, etc.) to improve the removal of Ln from the actinides. The next step will also include scale-up of the processing flowsheet to use more concentrated solutions (15 g/L Ln versus 5 g/L) and larger volumes and to recycle the HDEHP solvent. This should improve the overall processing efficiency and further reduce losses to waste streams. Studies have been performed with simulated wastes to develop solidification

  14. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  15. Effect of caffeine on cocaine locomotor stimulant activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B

    1986-03-01

    The effect of caffeine on the locomotor stimulant activity induced by intravenous cocaine in rats was investigated. Low doses of caffeine (20 mg/kg IP) potentiated the locomotor activity induced by 1, 2.5 mg/kg intravenous doses of cocaine and higher doses of caffeine (50, 100 mg/kg IP) had no significant effect. The locomotor stimulant effect of 20 mg/kg IP dose of caffeine per se in vehicle was significantly higher and that with 100 mg/kg dose significantly lower than that of the vehicle control. Thus caffeine produced dose-dependent effects on cocaine-induced locomotor stimulant activity, with low dose potentiating and higher doses having no significant effect on such activity. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors did not appear to play a role in potentiation of cocaine locomotor stimulant activity by caffeine. PMID:3703910

  16. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous on strength and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine and coffee are widely used among active individuals to enhance performance. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of acute coffee (COF) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF) intake on strength and sprint performance. Fifty-four resistance-trained males completed strength testing, consisting of one-rep max (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) at 80% of 1RM for leg press (LP) and bench press (BP). Participants then completed five, 10-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by one minute of rest. Peak power (PP) and total work (TW) were recorded for each sprint. At least 48 hours later, participants returned and ingested a beverage containing CAF (300 mg flat dose; yielding 3-5 mg/kg bodyweight), COF (8.9 g; 303 mg caffeine), or placebo (PLA; 3.8 g non-caloric flavouring) 30 minutes before testing. LP 1RM was improved more by COF than CAF (p = .04), but not PLA (p = .99). Significant interactions were not observed for BP 1RM, BP RTF, or LP RTF (p > .05). There were no sprint × treatment interactions for PP or TW (p > .05). 95% confidence intervals revealed a significant improvement in sprint 1 TW for CAF, but not COF or PLA. For PLA, significant reductions were observed in sprint 4 PP, sprint 2 TW, sprint 4 TW, and average TW; significant reductions were not observed with CAF or COF. Neither COF nor CAF improved strength outcomes more than PLA, while both groups attenuated sprint power reductions to a similar degree. Coffee and caffeine anhydrous may be considered suitable pre-exercise caffeine sources for high-intensity exercise. PMID:26394649

  17. Caffeine-containing energy drink improves sprint performance during an international rugby sevens competition.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Portillo, Javier; Muñoz, Gloria; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Muñoz-Guerra, Jesús

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a caffeine-containing energy drink on physical performance during a rugby sevens competition. A second purpose was to investigate the post-competition urinary caffeine concentration derived from the energy drink intake. On two non-consecutive days of a friendly tournament, 16 women from the Spanish National rugby sevens Team (mean age and body mass = 23 ± 2 years and 66 ± 7 kg) ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink (Fure(®), ProEnergetics) or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min for caffeine absorption, participants performed a 15-s maximal jump test, a 6 × 30 m sprint test, and then played three rugby sevens games against another national team. Individual running pace and instantaneous speed during the games were assessed using global positioning satellite (GPS) devices. Urine samples were obtained pre and post-competition. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of the energy drink increased muscle power output during the jump series (23.5 ± 10.1 vs. 25.6 ± 11.8 kW, P = 0.05), running pace during the games (87.5 ± 8.3 vs. 95.4 ± 12.7 m/min, P < 0.05), and pace at sprint velocity (4.6 ± 3.3 vs. 6.1 ± 3.4 m/min, P < 0.05). However, the energy drink did not affect maximal running speed during the repeated sprint test (25.0 ± 1.5 vs. 25.0 ± 1.7 km/h). The ingestion of the energy drink resulted in a higher post-competition urine caffeine concentration than the placebo (3.3 ± 0.7 vs. 0.2 ± 0.1 μg/mL; P < 0.05). In summary, 3 mg/kg of caffeine in the form of a commercially available energy drink considerably enhanced physical performance during a women's rugby sevens competition. PMID:23462927

  18. Biosynthesis of caffeine underlying the diversity of motif B' methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Fumiyo; Mizuno, Kouichi; Kato, Misako

    2015-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) are well-known purine alkaloids in Camellia, Coffea, Cola, Paullinia, Ilex, and Theobroma spp. The caffeine biosynthetic pathway depends on the substrate specificity of N-methyltransferases, which are members of the motif B' methyl-transferase family. The caffeine biosynthetic pathways in purine alkaloid-containing plants might have evolved in parallel with one another, consistent with different catalytic properties of the enzymes involved in these pathways. PMID:26058161

  19. A case of fatal caffeine poisoning.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, T; Knudsen, K

    2010-04-01

    Caffeine is a natural alkaloid methylxanthine that is found in various plants such as coffee or tea. Symptoms of a severe overdose may present with hypokalemia, hyponatremia, ventricular arrhythmias, hypertension followed by hypotension, respiratory failure, seizures, rhabdomyolysis, ventricular fibrillation and finally circulatory collapse. A 21-year-old woman called for the ambulance herself soon after the ingestion of about 10,000 mg of caffeine. At the arrival of the ambulance, the patient went into cardiac arrest almost immediately. After a total resuscitation period of 34 min including seven counter-shocks and 2 mg epinephrine, the patient was stable enough to be transferred to the hospital. The patient soon went into VF again and received two more counter-shocks and 1 mg epinephrine and finally an intravenous bolus dose of 300 mg amiodarone. The initial arterial blood gas showed pH at 6.47, lactate at 33 mmol/l and potassium level at 2.3 mmol/l. Unfortunately, no blood samples for caffeine analysis were taken. Three days after hospital admission, the patient developed myoclonus, which did not respond to medical treatment. Excessive intake of caffeine may produce arrhythmias and pronounced hypokalemia and ensuing ventricular fibrillation. In case of counter-shock-resistant VF, it can be necessary to give an early loading dose of amiodarone. Furthermore, it may be beneficial to replace the potassium as early as possible. Epinephrine and buffer solutions used during resuscitation may further decrease blood potassium levels and should be administrated cautiously. Epinephrine can be replaced by other vasopressor drugs, such as vasopressin without effects on beta-receptors. PMID:20096021

  20. Caffeine Content in Popular Energy Drinks and Energy Shots.

    PubMed

    Attipoe, Selasi; Leggit, Jeffrey; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    The use of energy beverages is high among the general population and military personnel. Previous studies have reported discrepancies between the actual amount of caffeine in products and the amount of caffeine on stated labels. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the content of caffeine listed on the labels of various energy drinks and energy shots. Top-selling energy drinks (n = 9) and energy shots (n = 5) were purchased from retail stores. Three of each of the 14 products were purchased and analyzed for caffeine content by an independent laboratory. Of the 14 products tested, 5 did not provide caffeine amounts on their facts panel-of those, 3 listed caffeine as an ingredient and 2 listed caffeine as part of a proprietary blend. The remaining 9 (of 14) products stated the amounts of caffeine on their labels, all of which were within 15% of the amount indicated on the label. In this study, although the energy beverages that indicated the amount of caffeine it contained had values within ±15% of the amount listed on the label, a potentially acceptable range, this finding is not acceptable with regard to current labeling regulations, which require added ingredients to total 100%. PMID:27612347

  1. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emily J; Coates, Alison M; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = -0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. PMID:27527212

  2. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Emily J.; Coates, Alison M.; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = −0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. PMID:27527212

  3. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions. PMID:26307771

  4. Intranasal Mucosal Boosting with an Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccine Markedly Enhances the Protection of BCG-Primed Guinea Pigs against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zhou; McFarland, Christine T.; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Izzo, Angelo; Wang, Jun; McMurray, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant adenovirus-vectored (Ad) tuberculosis (TB) vaccine platform has demonstrated great potential to be used either as a stand-alone or a boost vaccine in murine models. However, Ad TB vaccine remains to be evaluated in a more relevant and sensitive guinea pig model of pulmonary TB. Many vaccine candidates shown to be effective in murine models have subsequently failed to pass the test in guinea pig models. Methods and Findings Specific pathogen-free guinea pigs were immunized with BCG, AdAg85A intranasally (i.n), AdAg85A intramuscularly (i.m), BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.n, BCG boosted with AdAg85A i.m, or treated only with saline. The animals were then infected by a low-dose aerosol of M. tuberculosis (M.tb). At the specified times, the animals were sacrificed and the levels of infection in the lung and spleen were assessed. In separate studies, the long-term disease outcome of infected animals was monitored until the termination of this study. Immunization with Ad vaccine alone had minimal beneficial effects. Immunization with BCG alone and BCG prime-Ad vaccine boost regimens significantly reduced the level of M.tb infection in the tissues to a similar extent. However, while BCG alone prolonged the survival of infected guinea pigs, the majority of BCG-immunized animals succumbed by 53 weeks post-M.tb challenge. In contrast, intranasal or intramuscular Ad vaccine boosting of BCG-primed animals markedly improved the survival rate with 60% of BCG/Ad i.n- and 40% of BCG/Ad i.m-immunized guinea pigs still surviving by 74 weeks post-aerosol challenge. Conclusions Boosting, particularly via the intranasal mucosal route, with AdAg85A vaccine is able to significantly enhance the long-term survival of BCG-primed guinea pigs following pulmonary M.tb challenge. Our results thus support further evaluation of this viral-vectored TB vaccine in clinical trials. PMID:19516906

  5. Energy drink consumption and impact on caffeine risk.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Barbara M; Campbell, Donald M; Cressey, Peter; Egan, Ursula; Horn, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    The impact of caffeine from energy drinks occurs against a background exposure from naturally occurring caffeine (coffee, tea, cocoa and foods containing these ingredients) and caffeinated beverages (kola-type soft drinks). Background caffeine exposure, excluding energy drinks, was assessed for six New Zealand population groups aged 15 years and over (n = 4503) by combining concentration data for 53 caffeine-containing foods with consumption information from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey (ANS). Caffeine exposure for those who consumed energy drinks (n = 138) was similarly assessed, with inclusion of energy drinks. Forty-seven energy drink products were identified on the New Zealand market in 2010. Product volumes ranged from 30 to 600 ml per unit, resulting in exposures of 10-300 mg caffeine per retail unit consumed. A small percentage, 3.1%, of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, with most energy drink consumers (110/138) drinking one serving per 24 h. The maximum number of energy drinks consumed per 24 h was 14 (total caffeine of 390 mg). A high degree of brand loyalty was evident. Since only a minor proportion of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, a greater number of New Zealanders exceeded a potentially adverse effect level (AEL) of 3 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for caffeine from caffeine-containing foods than from energy drinks. Energy drink consumption is not a risk at a population level because of the low prevalence of consumption. At an individual level, however, teenagers, adults (20-64 years) and females (16-44 years) were more likely to exceed the AEL by consuming energy drinks in combination with caffeine-containing foods. PMID:25010189

  6. Cytochrome P450-Dependent Metabolism of Caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone—an inhibitor of CYP enzymes—showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:25671424

  7. Increased caffeine consumption is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Apurva A; Feld, Jordan J; Park, Yoon; Kleiner, David E; Everhart, James E.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although coffee consumption has been associated with reduced frequency of liver disease, it is unclear whether the effect is from coffee or caffeine and whether there is an effect on hepatic fibrosis specifically. Aim To use a food-frequency instrument for dietary caffeine consumption to evaluate the relationship between caffeine intake and liver fibrosis. Methods Patients undergoing liver biopsy completed a detailed caffeine questionnaire on 3 occasions over a 6-month period. Caffeine intake was compared between patients with mild and advanced liver fibrosis (bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and hepatic fibrosis. Results 177 patients (99 male, 104 Caucasian, 121 with chronic hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection) undergoing liver biopsy completed the caffeine questionnaire on up to three occasions. Results from repeated questionnaires were consistent. Daily caffeine consumption above the 75th percentile for the cohort (308 mg ~2.25 cups of coffee equivalents) was associated with reduced liver fibrosis (OR 0.33, 95% CI: 0.14-0.80, p=0.015) and the protective association persisted after controlling for age, sex, race, liver disease, body mass index and alcohol intake in all patients (OR 0.25, 95% CI: 0.09-0.67, p=0.006), as well as the subset with HCV infection (OR 0.19, 95% CI: 0.05-0.66, p=0.009). Despite a modest trend, consumption of caffeine from sources other than coffee or of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with reduced liver fibrosis. Conclusion A reliable tool for measurement of caffeine consumption demonstrated that caffeine consumption, particularly from regular coffee, above a threshold of approximately 2 coffee-cup equivalents per day, was associated with less severe hepatic fibrosis. PMID:20034049

  8. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions. PMID:24726984

  9. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  10. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics for comparison of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and its implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai Lun; Ho, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Findings from epidemiology, preclinical and clinical studies indicate that consumption of coffee could have beneficial effects against dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The benefits appear to come from caffeinated coffee, but not decaffeinated coffee or pure caffeine itself. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use metabolomics approach to delineate the discriminant metabolites between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, which could have contributed to the observed therapeutic benefits. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to characterize the metabolic differences between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) showed distinct separation between the two types of coffee (cumulative Q(2) = 0.998). A total of 69 discriminant metabolites were identified based on the OPLS-DA model, with 37 and 32 metabolites detected to be higher in caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. These metabolites include several benzoate and cinnamate-derived phenolic compounds, organic acids, sugar, fatty acids, and amino acids. Our study successfully established GC-TOF-MS based metabolomics approach as a highly robust tool in discriminant analysis between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee samples. Discriminant metabolites identified in this study are biologically relevant and provide valuable insights into therapeutic research of coffee against AD. Our data also hint at possible involvement of gut microbial metabolism to enhance therapeutic potential of coffee components, which represents an interesting area for future research. PMID:25098597

  11. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  12. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  13. Caffeine. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Caffeine" program developed by Lane Community College and sold by the Oregon Department of Education. (The program--not included in this document--is part of a computer-assisted instruction project with nursing applications.) Part A describes "Caffeine" in terms of topics (food and nutrition, allied health)…

  14. The Effects of Caffeine and Provocation on Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Tamara J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Administered caffeine to males (N=39) who were provoked or not provoked by a partner. Provoked participants attributed their feelings to both the drug and their partner's behavior. Angered subjects were more aversive when thinking they had taken caffeine but reduced their aggression when told the drug was a placebo. (Author/JAC)

  15. Effects of Pre- and Postnatal Caffeine Exposure on Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Sandra W.; Dowler, Jeffrey K.

    An investigation was made of the behavioral effects of caffeine in a sample of 313 newborns and their mothers. A weighted measure of caffeine based on daily ingestion of coffee, tea, and cola was derived from a maternal interview. The majority of mothers consumed the equivalent of about 1.3 cups of coffee per day. Infant outcome measures included…

  16. The Effects of Caffeine on Memory for Word Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erikson, George; And Others

    Research has suggested that behavioral differences may account for the effects of caffeine on information processing. To investigate the effects of caffeine on memory for supraspan word lists, 107 college students (47 males, 60 females), divided into 12 groups by high and low impulsivity scores on the Eysenck Personality Inventory, participated in…

  17. Low-dose caffeine physical dependence in humans.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R R; Evans, S M; Heishman, S J; Preston, K L; Sannerud, C A; Wolf, B; Woodson, P P

    1990-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of terminating low dose levels of caffeine (100 mg/day) in 7 normal humans. Substitution of placebo capsules for caffeine capsules occurred under double-blind conditions while subjects rated various dimensions of their mood and behavior. In the first phase of the study, substitution of placebo for 12 consecutive days resulted in an orderly withdrawal syndrome in 4 subjects which peaked on days 1 or 2 and progressively decreased toward prewithdrawal levels over about 1 week. Data from the remaining three subjects provided no evidence of withdrawal. In the second phase of the study, the generality of the withdrawal effect was examined by repeatedly substituting placebo for 100 mg/day of caffeine for 1-day periods separated by an average of 9 days. Despite differences within and across subjects with respect to the presence, nature and magnitude of symptoms, each of the seven subjects demonstrated a statistically significant withdrawal effect. Although the phenomenon of caffeine withdrawal has been described previously, the present report documents that the incidence of caffeine withdrawal is higher (100% of subjects), the daily dose level at which withdrawal occurs is lower (roughly equivalent to the amount of caffeine in a single cup of strong brewed coffee or 3 cans of caffeinated soft drink) and the range of symptoms experienced is broader (including headache, fatigue and other dysphoric mood changes, muscle pain/stiffness, flu-like feelings, nausea/vomiting and craving for caffeine) than heretofore recognized. PMID:2262896

  18. Human coffee drinking: manipulation of concentration and caffeine dose.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; O'Keeffe, M; O'Leary, D; Russ, N

    1986-01-01

    In a residential research ward coffee drinking was studied in 9 volunteer human subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. A series of five experiments was undertaken to characterize adlibitum coffee consumption and to investigate the effects of manipulating coffee concentration, caffeine dose per cup, and caffeine preloads prior to coffee drinking. Manipulations were double-blind and scheduled in randomized sequences across days. When cups of coffee were freely available, coffee drinking tended to be rather regularly spaced during the day with intercup intervals becoming progressively longer throughout the day; experimental manipulations showed that this lengthening of intercup intervals was not due to accumulating caffeine levels. Number of cups of coffee consumed was an inverted U-shaped function of both coffee concentration and caffeine dose per cup; however, coffee-concentration and dose-per-cup manipulations did not produce similar effects on other measures of coffee drinking (intercup interval, time to drink a cup, within-day distribution of cups). Caffeine preload produced dose-related decreases in number of cups consumed. As a whole, these experiments provide some limited evidence for both the suppressive and the reinforcing effects of caffeine on coffee consumption. Examination of total daily coffee and caffeine intake across experiments, however, provides no evidence for precise regulation (i.e., titration) of coffee or caffeine intake. PMID:3958660

  19. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  20. Maternal Caffeine Consumption and Risk of Congenital Limb Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Bell, Erin M.; Browne, Marilyn L.; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Romitti, Paul A.; Schmidt, Rebecca J.; Burns, Trudy L.; Moslehi, Roxana; Olney, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Animal studies have shown that high doses of caffeine might cause congenital limb deficiencies (LDs); however, no epidemiologic studies have explored this relation. METHODS This case-control study assessed associations between maternal dietary caffeine and congenital LDs using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), with 844 LD cases and 8069 controls from 1997 to 2007. Caffeine intakes from beverages (coffee, tea, and soda) and chocolate combined and by beverage type were examined. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for subtypes of isolated LDs (no additional major anomalies) and LDs with other major anomalies separately, comparing the odds of 10 to <100, 100 to <200, 200 to <300, and 300+ mg/day total caffeine intake to 0 to <10 mg/day. RESULTS All total dietary caffeine intake categories of 10 mg/day and above were marginally associated with odds of all isolated LDs combined (aOR, 1.4–1.7), isolated longitudinal LDs (aOR, 1.2–1.6), and isolated transverse LDs (aOR, 1.3–1.8) compared to the lowest intake category. A dose-response pattern for total dietary caffeine intake was not observed. CONCLUSIONS A weak increased risk of congenital LDs associated with maternal dietary caffeine consumption was observed in this study; however, risk did not vary by amount of caffeine consumed. PMID:22903936

  1. Dimer excision in Escherichia coli in the presence of caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    The observation that polA1 and recL152 mutations result in both slow pyrimidine dimer excision and large repair patch size leads to the hypothesis that patch size is directly related to the rate of excision. In this study caffeine, a known inhibitor of excision repair, was used to examine the extent of correlation between excision rate and patch size by measuring patch size in the presence of several concentrations of caffeine. Both the rate of excision and the resistance to ultraviolet radiation were reduced with increasing concentrations of caffeine after irradiation. Caffeine also inhibited the rate at which incisions were made and prolonged the time required to rejoin the discontinuities. Patch size, however, was unaffected by caffeine treatment.

  2. [Study on interaction of caffeine with myoglobin by fluorescence spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, He-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Tian; Ding, Yan; Zhou, Jia-Hong; Feng, Yu-Ying

    2009-10-01

    The interaction of caffein and myoglobin was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of myoglobin was significantly quenched by caffein under the physiological condition (pH 7.4). The results indicated that caffeine was capable of binding with myoglobin to form a 1:1 complex and the quenching mechanism of myoglobin affected by caffeine was shown to be a static quenching procedure by calculating quenching constant, binding sites and binding constant. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the main binding force of the interaction is electrostatic force and hydrophobic force. The change in the micro-circumstance of aminos of myoglobin was analyzed by synchronous fluorescence spectrometry. The result indicated that caffeine can change the conformation of the protein, leading to the change in the micro-environment of tryptophane and tyrosine residues from hydrophobic environment to hydrophilic environment to different extent. PMID:20038063

  3. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  4. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  5. Cardiovascular Responses to Caffeine by Gender and Pubertal Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amanda M.; Graczyk, Adam; Bendlin, Ashley; Sion, Teresa; Vattana, Karina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caffeine use is on the rise among children and adolescents. Previous studies from our laboratory reported gender differences in the effects of caffeine in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that gender differences in cardiovascular responses to caffeine emerge after puberty and that cardiovascular responses to caffeine differ across the phases of the menstrual cycle. METHODS: To test these hypotheses, we examined heart rate and blood pressure before and after administration of placebo and 2 doses of caffeine (1 and 2 mg/kg) in prepubertal (8- to 9-year-olds; n = 52) and postpubertal (15- to 17-year-olds; n = 49) boys (n = 54) and girls (n = 47) by using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response design. RESULTS: There was an interaction between gender and caffeine dose, with boys having a greater response to caffeine than girls. In addition, we found interactions between pubertal phase, gender, and caffeine dose, with gender differences present in postpubertal, but not in prepubertal, participants. Finally, we found differences in responses to caffeine across the menstrual cycle in post-pubertal girls, with decreases in heart rate greater in the midluteal phase and blood pressure increases greater in the midfollicular phase of the menstrual cycle. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that gender differences in response to caffeine emerge after puberty. Future research will determine the extent to which these gender differences are mediated by physiological factors, such as steroid hormones, or psychosocial factors, such as more autonomy and control over beverage purchases. PMID:24935999

  6. Variation in caffeine concentration in single coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Fox, Glen P; Wu, Alex; Yiran, Liang; Force, Lesleigh

    2013-11-13

    Twenty-eight coffee samples from around the world were tested for caffeine levels to develop near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) calibrations for whole and ground coffee. Twenty-five individual beans from five of those coffees were used to develop a NIRS calibration for caffeine concentration in single beans. An international standard high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to analyze for caffeine content. Coffee is a legal stimulant and possesses a number of heath properties. However, there is variation in the level of caffeine in brewed coffee and other caffeinated beverages. Being able to sort beans on the basis of caffeine concentration will improve quality control in the level of caffeine in those beverages. The range in caffeine concentration was from 0.01 mg/g (decaffeinated coffee) to 19.9 mg/g (Italian coffee). The majority of coffees were around 10.0-12.0 mg/g. The NIRS results showed r(2) values for bulk unground and ground coffees were >0.90 with standard errors <2 mg/g. For the single-bean calibration the r(2) values were between 0.85 and 0.93 with standard errors of cross validation of 0.8-1.6 mg/g depending upon calibration. The results showed it was possible to develop NIRS calibrations to estimate the caffeine concentration of individual coffee beans. One application of this calibration could be sorting beans on caffeine concentration to provide greater quality control for high-end markets. Furthermore, bean sorting may open new markets for novel coffee products. PMID:24070227

  7. Caffeine causes pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) in broilers.

    PubMed

    Kamely, M; Torshizi, M A Karimi; Rahimi, S; Wideman, R F

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), or ascites, is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. Experimental models are required for triggering PHS to study the pathogenesis of this syndrome and to select resistant genetic lines. Caffeine increases vascular resistance and promotes systemic hypertension in mammals, but a similar effect of caffeine on the pulmonary circulation had not previously been demonstrated. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of caffeine alone (Exp. 1) or in combination with cold temperature (Exp. 2) on parameters associated with PHS in young broiler chicks. In Exp. 1, 288 chicks were distributed among 24 pens and brooded at standard environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 2, 192 chicks were distributed among 16 pens and brooded at cool environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 15, 30, and 45 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 1 caffeine administered at or above 12.5 mg/(kg BW·d) induced severe PHS and resulted in acute mortality and RVH ( < 0.05). Hematocrit also slightly increased by caffeine supplementation ( = 0.07). In Exp. 2 caffeine-treated broilers exposed to cold temperatures remarkably exhibited PHS incidences and developed RVH with right ventricular to total ventricular weight ratios of 30% or greater. Moreover, hematocrit significantly increased because of caffeine supplementation in cool ambient temperature ( = 0.002). Our data demonstrate that caffeine induces high incidences of PHS in broilers, which is exacerbated by exposure to low temperatures. PMID:27136008

  8. [Combined action of caffeine and sydnocarb].

    PubMed

    Zakusov, V V; Tozhanova, N M

    1983-08-01

    Combined application of two stimulants caffeine and sydnocarb (a sydnonimine derivative) was studied in rabbits, rats and mice using the method of summation of impulses in the central nervous system, the method of conditioned avoidance response, forced swimming and hexobarbital sleep in order to find out the changes in their main and side effects. It was established that the main stimulant effect of the drug combination given in optimal doses appeared to be additive, while side effects on the ECG and blood pressure remained unchanged. PMID:6136303

  9. Caffeine treatment prevents rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced impairment of late-phase long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2015-11-01

    The CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) are physically and functionally closely related areas of the hippocampus, but they differ in various respects, including their reactions to different insults. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of chronic caffeine treatment on late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signalling cascade in the DG area of the hippocampus of rapid eye movement sleep-deprived rats. Rats were chronically treated with caffeine (300 mg/L drinking water) for 4 weeks, after which they were sleep-deprived for 24 h. L-LTP was induced in in anaesthetized rats, and extracellular field potentials from the DG area were recorded in vivo. The levels of L-LTP-related signalling proteins were assessed by western blot analysis. Sleep deprivation markedly reduced L-LTP magnitude, and basal levels of total cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB), and calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV). Chronic caffeine treatment prevented the reductions in the basal levels of P-CREB, total CREB and CaMKIV in sleep-deprived rats. Furthermore, caffeine prevented post-L-LTP sleep deprivation-induced downregulation of P-CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the DG. The current findings show that caffeine treatment prevents acute sleep deprivation-induced deficits in brain function. PMID:26449851

  10. Evidence for anxiolytic effects of acute caffeine on anxiety-related behavior in male and female rats tested with and without bright light.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert N; Hancock, Nicola J; Henwood, Gina A; Rapley, Susan A

    2014-09-01

    Male and female PVG/c rats were observed in an open field (OF) and an elevated plus maze (EPM) either with or without a bright light stressor (600-692 lx) following an intraperitoneal injection of saline, 25 or 50mg/kg of caffeine. One week later, the same rats were observed under the same drug and lighting conditions but in the opposite apparatus to that experienced earlier. Either the higher or both doses of caffeine decreased anxiety as indicated by increased OF rearing and decreased grooming, immobility and corner occupancy (in the presence of bright light). A similar interpretation applied to caffeine-related increased entries into and observations in the EPM open arms for males only, and increased entries into the open arms for females alone in the presence of bright light. Bright light increased anxiety as shown by longer latencies of emergence into the OF and decreased ambulation and, for males only, decreased center occupancy and increased corner occupancy. Fewer entries into the open arms in the presence of bright light for females only also suggested heightened anxiety. Apart from one OF and one EPM measure, bright light did not appear to markedly influence the effects of caffeine which were concluded to be primarily anxiolytic, with males being more affected than females. Although the central mechanisms responsible for caffeine's anxiolytic action remain to be established, it is possible that antagonism of A2A adenosine receptors might somehow be involved. PMID:24875772

  11. Understanding Adolescent Caffeine Use: Connecting Use Patterns with Expectancies, Reasons, and Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludden, Alison Bryant; Wolfson, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about adolescents' caffeine use, yet caffeinated soda, and more recently coffee and energy drinks, are part of youth culture. This study examines adolescents' caffeine use and, using cluster analysis, identifies three groups of caffeine users who differed in their reasons for use, expectancies, and sleep behaviors. In this high…

  12. Caffeine Use Disorder: A Review of the Evidence and Future Implications.

    PubMed

    Addicott, Merideth A

    2014-09-01

    The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) has introduced new provisions for caffeine-related disorders. Caffeine Withdrawal is now an officially recognized diagnosis, and criteria for caffeine use disorder have been proposed for additional study. caffeine use disorder is intended to be characterized by cognitive, behavioral, and physiological symptoms indicative of caffeine use despite significant caffeine-related problems, similar to other Substance Use Disorders. However, since nonproblematic caffeine use is so common and widespread, it may be difficult for some health professionals to accept that caffeine use can result in the same types of pathological behaviors caused by alcohol, cocaine, opiates, or other drugs of abuse. Yet there is evidence that some individuals are psychologically and physiologically dependent on caffeine, although the prevalence and severity of these problems is unknown. This article reviews the recent changes to the DSM, the concerns regarding these changes, and some potential impacts these changes could have on caffeine consumers. PMID:25089257

  13. Improving clinical examination in acute tibial fractures by enhancing visual cues: the case for always 'cutting back' a tibial back-slab and marking the dorsalis pedis pulse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alasdair; Kimber, Cheryl; Bramwell, Donald; Jaarsma, Ruurd

    2016-08-01

    Look, feel, move is a simple and widely taught sequence to be followed when undertaking a clinical examination in orthopaedics (Maher et al., 1994; McRae, 1999; Solomon et al., 2010). The splinting of an acute tibial fracture with a posterior back-slab is also common practice; with the most commonly taught design involving covering the dorsum of the foot with bandaging (Charnley, 1950; Maher et al., 1994; McRae, 1989). We investigated the effect of the visual cues provided by exposing the dorsum of the foot and marking the dorsalis pedis pulse. We used a clinical simulation in which we compared the quality of the recorded clinical examination undertaken by 30 nurses. The nurses were randomly assigned to assess a patient with either a traditional back-slab or one in which the dorsal bandaging had been cut back and the dorsalis pedis pulse marked. We found that the quality of the recorded clinical examination was significantly better in the cut-back group. Previous studies have shown that the cut-back would not alter the effectiveness of the back-slab as a splint (Zagorski et al., 1993). We conclude that all tibial back-slabs should have the bandaging on the dorsum of the foot cut back and the location of the dorsalis pedis pulse marked. This simple adaptation will improve the subsequent clinical examinations undertaken and recorded without reducing the back-slab's effectiveness as a splint. PMID:27236718

  14. Confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate statistical analysis for determination of different penetration abilities of caffeine and propylene glycol applied simultaneously in a mixture on porcine skin ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Mujica Ascencio, Saul; Choe, ChunSik; Meinke, Martina C; Müller, Rainer H; Maksimov, George V; Wigger-Alberti, Walter; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-07-01

    Propylene glycol is one of the known substances added in cosmetic formulations as a penetration enhancer. Recently, nanocrystals have been employed also to increase the skin penetration of active components. Caffeine is a component with many applications and its penetration into the epidermis is controversially discussed in the literature. In the present study, the penetration ability of two components - caffeine nanocrystals and propylene glycol, applied topically on porcine ear skin in the form of a gel, was investigated ex vivo using two confocal Raman microscopes operated at different excitation wavelengths (785nm and 633nm). Several depth profiles were acquired in the fingerprint region and different spectral ranges, i.e., 526-600cm(-1) and 810-880cm(-1) were chosen for independent analysis of caffeine and propylene glycol penetration into the skin, respectively. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) combined with Student's t-test were employed to calculate the maximum penetration depths of each substance (caffeine and propylene glycol). The results show that propylene glycol penetrates significantly deeper than caffeine (20.7-22.0μm versus 12.3-13.0μm) without any penetration enhancement effect on caffeine. The results confirm that different substances, even if applied onto the skin as a mixture, can penetrate differently. The penetration depths of caffeine and propylene glycol obtained using two different confocal Raman microscopes are comparable showing that both types of microscopes are well suited for such investigations and that multivariate statistical PCA-LDA methods combined with Student's t-test are very useful for analyzing the penetration of different substances into the skin. PMID:27108784

  15. The Combined Effects of Alcohol, Caffeine and Expectancies on Subjective Experience, Impulsivity and Risk-Taking

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; de Wit, Harriet; Lilje, Todd C.; Kassel, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption is a rapidly growing phenomenon among young adults and is associated with a variety of health-risk behaviors. The current study examined whether either caffeinated alcohol or the expectation of receiving caffeinated alcohol altered affective, cognitive and behavioral outcomes hypothesized to contribute to risk behavior. Young adult social drinkers (N=146) participated in a single session where they received alcohol (peak Breath Alcohol Content = .088 g/dL, SD = .019; equivalent to about 4 standard drinks) and were randomly assigned to one of four further conditions 1) no caffeine, no caffeine expectancy, 2) caffeine and caffeine expectancy, 3) no caffeine but caffeine expectancy, 4) caffeine but no caffeine expectancy. Participants’ habitual CAB consumption was positively correlated with measures of impulsivity and risky behavior, independently of study drugs. Administration of caffeine (mean dose = 220 mg, SD = 38; equivalent to about 2.75 Red Bulls) in the study reduced subjective ratings of intoxication and reversed the decrease in desire to continue drinking, regardless of expectancy. Caffeine also reduced the effect of alcohol on inhibitory reaction time (faster incorrect responses). Participants not expecting caffeine were less attentive after alcohol, whereas participants expecting caffeine were not, regardless of caffeine administration. Alcohol decreased response accuracy in all participants except those who both expected and received caffeine. Findings suggest that CABs may elevate risk for continued drinking by reducing perceived intoxication, and by maintaining the desire to continue drinking. Simply expecting to consume caffeine may reduce the effects of alcohol on inattention, and either expecting or consuming caffeine may protect against other alcohol-related performance decrements. Caffeine, when combined with alcohol, has both beneficial and detrimental effects on mechanisms known to contribute to

  16. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation. PMID:24974722

  17. Caffeine as a cause of urticaria-angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Linda; Murdaca, Francesco; Fimiani, Michele

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a young woman presenting with recurrent urticaria. The episodes occurred both in and out of the workplace. On three occasions it presented as urticaria-angioedema, requiring emergency care on one occassion. A thorough clinical history along with serological and allergological tests allowed a diagnosis of caffeine-induced urticaria-angioedema. We advised the patient to follow a caffeine-free diet and to avoid all caffeine or methylxanthine-containing drugs. After two years of caffeine abstinence, she had not experienced any further episodes of urticaria-angioedema. Only a few cases of caffeine-induced urticaria and/or anaphylaxis have been reported till date, with varying outcomes in allergologic investigations. Moreover, several cases are probably undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as idiopathic urticaria or as occupational allergy. We speculate that hypersensitivity to caffeine rather than autoimmine reaction may be the probable cause of urticaria. Caffeine should considered as a potential urticaria-inducing agent and should be included in the allergological test series. PMID:25593798

  18. Complex Behavior of Caffeine Crystallites on Muscovite Mica Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Defined fabrication of organic thin films is highly desired in technological, as well as pharmaceutical, applications since morphology and crystal structure are directly linked to physical, electrical, and optical properties. Within this work, the directed growth of caffeine deposited by hot wall epitaxy (HWE) on muscovite mica is studied. Optical and atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the presence of caffeine needles exhibiting a preferable alignment in the azimuthal directions with respect to the orientation of the defined mica surface. Specular X-ray diffraction and X-ray diffraction pole figure measurements give evidence that the β-polymorphic form of caffeine forms on the mica surface. All results consent that caffeine molecules have an edge-on conformation i.e. minimizing their interaction area with the surface. Furthermore, the azimuthal alignment of the long caffeine needle axis takes place along the [11̅0], [100], and [110] real space directions of mica; needles are observed every 60° azimuthally. While mica has a complex surface structure with mirror planes and lowered oxygen rows, the slightly disturbed 3-fold symmetry dictates the crystal alignment. This is different to previous findings for solution cast caffeine growth on mica. For HWE the needles align solely along the mica main directions whereby solution cast needles show an additional needle splitting due to a different alignment of caffeine with respect to the surface. PMID:26366127

  19. Physiology, biochemistry and possible applications of microbial caffeine degradation.

    PubMed

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Bhavya, B; Ashok, Nandhini

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine, a purine alkaloid is a constituent of widely consumed beverages. The scientific evidence which has proved the harm of this alkaloid has paved the way for innumerable research in the area of caffeine degradation. In addition to this, the fact that the by-products of the coffee and tea industry pollute the environment has called for the need of decaffeinating coffee and tea industry's by-products. Though physical and chemical methods for decaffeination are available, the lack of specificity for removal of caffeine in these techniques and their non-eco-friendly nature has opened the area of microbial and enzymatic degradation of caffeine. Another important application of microbial caffeine degradation apart from its advantages like specificity, eco-friendliness and cost-effectiveness is the fact that this process will enable the production of industrially and medically useful components of the caffeine degradation pathway like theobromine and theophylline. This is a comprehensive review which mainly focuses on caffeine degradation, large-scale degradation of the same and its applications in the industrial world. PMID:22139018

  20. Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages – An Emerging Trend in Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Kelle M; Hauser, Sheketha R; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are pervasive in society and their impact affects quality of life, morbidity and mortality, as well as individual productivity. Alcohol has detrimental effects on an individual’s physiology and nervous system, and is associated with disorders of many organ and endocrine systems impacting an individual’s health, behavior, and ability to interact with others. Youth are particularly affected. Unfortunately, adolescent usage also increases the probability for a progression to dependence. Several areas of research indicate that the deleterious effects of alcohol abuse may be exacerbated by mixing caffeine with alcohol. Some behavioral evidence suggests that caffeine increases alcohol drinking and binge drinking episodes, which in turn can foster the development of alcohol dependence. As a relatively new public health concern, the epidemiological focus has been to establish a need for investigating the effects of caffeinated alcohol. While the trend of co-consuming these substances is growing, knowledge of the central mechanisms associated with caffeinated ethanol has been lacking. Research suggests that caffeine and ethanol can have additive or synergistic pharmacological actions and neuroadaptations, with the adenosine and dopamine systems in particular implicated. However, the limited literature on the central effects of caffeinated ethanol provides an impetus to increase our knowledge of the neuroadaptive effects of this combination and their impact on cognition and behavior. Research from our laboratories indicates that an established rodent animal model of alcoholism can be extended to investigate the acute and chronic effects of caffeinated ethanol. PMID:25419478

  1. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2014-01-01

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness. PMID:25031227

  2. Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages - An Emerging Trend in Alcohol Abuse.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Kelle M; Hauser, Sheketha R; Bell, Richard L; Engleman, Eric A

    2013-08-20

    Alcohol use disorders are pervasive in society and their impact affects quality of life, morbidity and mortality, as well as individual productivity. Alcohol has detrimental effects on an individual's physiology and nervous system, and is associated with disorders of many organ and endocrine systems impacting an individual's health, behavior, and ability to interact with others. Youth are particularly affected. Unfortunately, adolescent usage also increases the probability for a progression to dependence. Several areas of research indicate that the deleterious effects of alcohol abuse may be exacerbated by mixing caffeine with alcohol. Some behavioral evidence suggests that caffeine increases alcohol drinking and binge drinking episodes, which in turn can foster the development of alcohol dependence. As a relatively new public health concern, the epidemiological focus has been to establish a need for investigating the effects of caffeinated alcohol. While the trend of co-consuming these substances is growing, knowledge of the central mechanisms associated with caffeinated ethanol has been lacking. Research suggests that caffeine and ethanol can have additive or synergistic pharmacological actions and neuroadaptations, with the adenosine and dopamine systems in particular implicated. However, the limited literature on the central effects of caffeinated ethanol provides an impetus to increase our knowledge of the neuroadaptive effects of this combination and their impact on cognition and behavior. Research from our laboratories indicates that an established rodent animal model of alcoholism can be extended to investigate the acute and chronic effects of caffeinated ethanol. PMID:25419478

  3. Caffeine Eye Drops Protect Against UV-B Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Kronschläger, Martin; Löfgren, Stefan; Yu, Zhaohua; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Varma, Shambhu D.; Söderberg, Per

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if topically applied caffeine protects against in vivo ultraviolet radiation cataract and if so, to estimate the protection factor. Three experiments were carried out. First, two groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were pre-treated with a single application of either placebo or caffeine eye drops in both eyes. All animals were then unilaterally exposed in vivo to 8 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation for 15 min. One week later, the lens GSH levels were measured and the degree of cataract was quantified by measurement of in vitro lens light scattering. In the second experiment, placebo and caffeine pre-treated rats were divided in five UV-B radiation dose groups, receiving 0.0, 2.6, 3.7, 4.5 or 5.2 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation in one eye. Lens light scattering was determined after one week. In the third experiment, placebo and caffeine pre-treated rats were UV-B-exposed and the presence of activated caspase-3 was visualized by immunohistochemistry. There was significantly less UV-B radiation cataract in the caffeine group than in the placebo group (95% confidence interval for mean difference in lens light scattering between the groups = 0.10 ± 0.05 tEDC), and the protection factor for caffeine was 1.23. There was no difference in GSH levels between the placebo- and the caffeine group. There was more caspase-3 staining in UV-B-exposed lenses from the placebo group than in UV-B-exposed lenses from the caffeine group. Topically applied caffeine protects against ultraviolet radiation cataract, reducing lens sensitivity 1.23 times. PMID:23644096

  4. Timing of Caffeine Therapy and Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Ivan; Zaghloul, Nahla; Barash, Lily; Parris, Rudolph; Aden, Ulrika; Li, Hsiu-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caffeine is widely used to treat apnea of prematurity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of early caffeine (1-2 DOL) in decreasing the incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes. Methods. A retrospective cohort was used to compare the neonatal morbidity of 150 preterm neonates with gestational age ≤29 weeks. Infants were divided into 3 groups based on the initiation timing of caffeine therapy; (1) early caffeine (1-2 DOL), (2) late caffeine (3–7 DOL), and (3) very late caffeine (≥8 DOL). Results. The neonatal outcomes of early caffeine were comparable with those of the late caffeine group. Moreover, when comparing the neonatal morbidity of the very late caffeine group with that of the early caffeine group, multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. We found that the timing of caffeine did not influence the risk of BPD (OR, 0.393; CI, 0.126–1.223; p = 0.107), but birthweight did (OR, 0.996; CI, 0.993–0.999; p = 0.018) in these infants. Conclusion. Neonatal outcomes of preterm infants were comparable whether caffeine was administered early or late in the first 7 DOL. The risk of BPD in infants receiving caffeine after 8 DOL was irrespective of delayed treatment with caffeine. Our results clearly demonstrate the need for further studies before caffeine prophylaxis can be universally recommended. PMID:27242907

  5. [Caffeine as adjuvant analgeticum for treating acute pain].

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2013-10-14

    Based on 19 studies (7,238 participants) a Cochrane review concludes that the addition of caffeine to an analgesic drug provides superior analgesia compared with the analgesic drug alone. The benefit is small, with a number needed to treat of approx. 16. The use of analgesics containing caffeine is associated with an increased risk of the development of physical dependence, overuse headache, and withdrawal symptoms upon abrupt discontinuation. Combination analgesics with caffeine should only be used temporarily and exclusively for the treatment of acute pain conditions. PMID:24629115

  6. N-carbamylglutamate Markedly Enhances Ureagenesis in N-acetylglutamate Deficiency and Propionic Acidemia as Measured by Isotopic Incorporation and Blood Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Mendel; Caldovic, Ljubica; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Nissim, Itzhak; Korson, Mark; Burton, Barbara; Yudkoff, Marc

    2009-01-01

    N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an endogenous essential cofactor for conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver. Deficiency of NAG causes hyperammonemia and occurs because of inherited deficiency of its producing enzyme, NAG synthase (NAGS), or interference with its function by short fatty acid derivatives. N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) can ameliorate hyperammonemia from NAGS deficiency and propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. We developed a stable isotope 13C tracer method to measure ureagenesis and to evaluate the effect of NCG in humans. Seventeen healthy adults were investigated for the incorporation of 13C label into urea. [13C]urea appeared in the blood within minutes, reaching maximum by 100 min, whereas breath 13CO2 reached a maximum by 60 min. A patient with NAGS deficiency showed very little urea labeling before treatment with NCG and normal labeling thereafter. Correspondingly, plasma levels of ammonia and glutamine decreased markedly and urea tripled after NCG treatment. Similarly, in a patient with propionic acidemia, NCG treatment resulted in a marked increase in urea labeling and decrease in glutamine, alanine, and glycine. These results provide a reliable method for measuring the effect of NCG on nitrogen metabolism and strongly suggest that NCG could be an effective treatment for inherited and secondary NAGS deficiency. PMID:18414145

  7. N-carbamylglutamate markedly enhances ureagenesis in N-acetylglutamate deficiency and propionic acidemia as measured by isotopic incorporation and blood biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Mendel; Caldovic, Ljubica; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Nissim, Itzhak; Korson, Mark; Burton, Barbara; Yudkoff, Marc

    2008-08-01

    N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an endogenous essential cofactor for conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver. Deficiency of NAG causes hyperammonemia and occurs because of inherited deficiency of its producing enzyme, NAG synthase (NAGS), or interference with its function by short fatty acid derivatives. N-carbamylglutamate (NCG) can ameliorate hyperammonemia from NAGS deficiency and propionic and methylmalonic acidemia. We developed a stable isotope (13)C tracer method to measure ureagenesis and to evaluate the effect of NCG in humans. Seventeen healthy adults were investigated for the incorporation of (13)C label into urea. [(13)C]urea appeared in the blood within minutes, reaching maximum by 100 min, whereas breath (13)CO(2) reached a maximum by 60 min. A patient with NAGS deficiency showed very little urea labeling before treatment with NCG and normal labeling thereafter. Correspondingly, plasma levels of ammonia and glutamine decreased markedly and urea tripled after NCG treatment. Similarly, in a patient with propionic acidemia, NCG treatment resulted in a marked increase in urea labeling and decrease in glutamine, alanine, and glycine. These results provide a reliable method for measuring the effect of NCG on nitrogen metabolism and strongly suggest that NCG could be an effective treatment for inherited and secondary NAGS deficiency. PMID:18414145

  8. On Your Marks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbach, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Examines the application of field, rink, track, and court markings and explains why the use of proper materials and some knowledge of science is important. Specific issues when using marking paints and dyes are addressed. (GR)

  9. [Excessive energy drink consumption caused marked QT prolongation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Tomcsányi, János; Jávor, Kinga

    2015-10-25

    The authors report a case of a 22-year-old man with atypical chest pain after consumption of six energy drinks (1.5 liter containing 470 mg coffein) with vodka. On admission ECG showed marked QT/QTc prolongation (QT/QTc, 520/580 msec). Next day the QT/QTc returned to fully normal (QT/QTc, 360/430 msec). It was assumed that the patient had a silent long QT syndrome and that high dose of highly caffeinated energy drink triggered the (paradoxical) prolonged QT/QTc. The authors conclude that excessive energy drink intake with alcohol or during physical exercise should be avoided. PMID:26477618

  10. Association of the anxiogenic and alerting effects of caffeine with ADORA2A and ADORA1 polymorphisms and habitual level of caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Peter J; Hohoff, Christa; Heatherley, Susan V; Mullings, Emma L; Maxfield, Peter J; Evershed, Richard P; Deckert, Jürgen; Nutt, David J

    2010-08-01

    Caffeine, a widely consumed adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor antagonist, is valued as a psychostimulant, but it is also anxiogenic. An association between a variant within the ADORA2A gene (rs5751876) and caffeine-induced anxiety has been reported for individuals who habitually consume little caffeine. This study investigated whether this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) might also affect habitual caffeine intake, and whether habitual intake might moderate the anxiogenic effect of caffeine. Participants were 162 non-/low (NL) and 217 medium/high (MH) caffeine consumers. In a randomized, double-blind, parallel groups design they rated anxiety, alertness, and headache before and after 100 mg caffeine and again after another 150 mg caffeine given 90 min later, or after placebo on both occasions. Caffeine intake was prohibited for 16 h before the first dose of caffeine/placebo. Results showed greater susceptibility to caffeine-induced anxiety, but not lower habitual caffeine intake (indeed coffee intake was higher), in the rs5751876 TT genotype group, and a reduced anxiety response in MH vs NL participants irrespective of genotype. Apart from the almost completely linked ADORA2A SNP rs3761422, no other of eight ADORA2A and seven ADORA1 SNPs studied were found to be clearly associated with effects of caffeine on anxiety, alertness, or headache. Placebo administration in MH participants decreased alertness and increased headache. Caffeine did not increase alertness in NL participants. With frequent consumption, substantial tolerance develops to the anxiogenic effect of caffeine, even in genetically susceptible individuals, but no net benefit for alertness is gained, as caffeine abstinence reduces alertness and consumption merely returns it to baseline. PMID:20520601

  11. Association of the Anxiogenic and Alerting Effects of Caffeine with ADORA2A and ADORA1 Polymorphisms and Habitual Level of Caffeine Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Peter J; Hohoff, Christa; Heatherley, Susan V; Mullings, Emma L; Maxfield, Peter J; Evershed, Richard P; Deckert, Jürgen; Nutt, David J

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine, a widely consumed adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist, is valued as a psychostimulant, but it is also anxiogenic. An association between a variant within the ADORA2A gene (rs5751876) and caffeine-induced anxiety has been reported for individuals who habitually consume little caffeine. This study investigated whether this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) might also affect habitual caffeine intake, and whether habitual intake might moderate the anxiogenic effect of caffeine. Participants were 162 non-/low (NL) and 217 medium/high (MH) caffeine consumers. In a randomized, double-blind, parallel groups design they rated anxiety, alertness, and headache before and after 100 mg caffeine and again after another 150 mg caffeine given 90 min later, or after placebo on both occasions. Caffeine intake was prohibited for 16 h before the first dose of caffeine/placebo. Results showed greater susceptibility to caffeine-induced anxiety, but not lower habitual caffeine intake (indeed coffee intake was higher), in the rs5751876 TT genotype group, and a reduced anxiety response in MH vs NL participants irrespective of genotype. Apart from the almost completely linked ADORA2A SNP rs3761422, no other of eight ADORA2A and seven ADORA1 SNPs studied were found to be clearly associated with effects of caffeine on anxiety, alertness, or headache. Placebo administration in MH participants decreased alertness and increased headache. Caffeine did not increase alertness in NL participants. With frequent consumption, substantial tolerance develops to the anxiogenic effect of caffeine, even in genetically susceptible individuals, but no net benefit for alertness is gained, as caffeine abstinence reduces alertness and consumption merely returns it to baseline. PMID:20520601

  12. Marking nut anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Anita Christine; Hayball, John; Smith, William B

    2016-01-01

    Marking nut Semecarpus anacardium, so-called because it contains a pigment that has been used in the past to mark fabrics, is a known cause of contact hypersensitivity. It may be ingested as an ingredient of some traditional Hindi foods. We describe the first reported case of anaphylaxis to marking nut. PMID:27489793

  13. Marking nut anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Fok, Jie Shen; Kral, Anita Christine; Hayball, John; Smith, William B

    2016-07-01

    Marking nut Semecarpus anacardium, so-called because it contains a pigment that has been used in the past to mark fabrics, is a known cause of contact hypersensitivity. It may be ingested as an ingredient of some traditional Hindi foods. We describe the first reported case of anaphylaxis to marking nut. PMID:27489793

  14. [Double ricochet marks].

    PubMed

    Sellier, K

    1987-01-01

    When bullets are flying stably and ricochet on a surface, only one mark is produced. In contrast yawing bullets can produce a double mark if the angle of incidence is sufficiently small (less than or equal to 5 degrees). Distances up to 15 cm were seen between the two marks. PMID:3660953

  15. Assessing Caffeine as an Emerging Environmental Concern Using Conventional Approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic wastewater contaminants, including pharmaceuticals, caffeine, and nicotine, have received increased scrutiny because of their detection in water bodies receiving wastewater discharge. Despite recent measurement in US streams, caffeine’s effect on freshwater organisms is not well documented....

  16. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  17. [Evaluation of liberation of caffeine from dermal semisolids drugs].

    PubMed

    Kodadová, Alexandra; Vitková, Zuzana; Herdová, Petra

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with formulation of caffeine into dermal semisolid dosage forms - hydrogels. Caffeine was chosen as a model drug because its properties can be successfully used just in hydrogels. Protective and tranquilization effects can be used in the preparations for sunbathing, and its lipolytic and regenerative effect can be used for the treatment of androgenic alopecia or cellular bioprotection. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of different concentrations of chitosan and caffeine on the liberation of gels. Besides, stability of the prepared samples was evaluated by means of the evaluation of their rheological parameters. Based on the obtained results, there was determined the optimal drug concentration - caffeine 0.2% (w/w) and also the gel forming substance - chitosan 2.3% (w/w). PMID:24237472

  18. Removal of caffeine from industrial wastewater using Trichosporon asahii.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, V; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a natural alkaloid present mainly in tea and coffee products has been suggested as an environmental pollutant. Decaffeination is an important process for the removal of caffeine from coffee industrial wastes. In the present study, caffeine removal (through degradation) by yeast isolate, Trichosporon asahii immobilized on various conventional matrices (sodium alginate, carboxymethyl cellulose, chitosan, agar and agarose) was investigated using the method of entrapment. The biofilm forming ability of T. asahii was monitored by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Exopolysaccharide produced by T asahii biofilm was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and HPLC analysis. Caffeine removal from coffee processing industrial effluent was found to be 75 and 80 % by alginate immobilized yeast and yeast biofilm formed on gravels over a period of 48 hr in batch mode. Effectiveness of the process was also tested involving the continuous--flow column studies. PMID:24640246

  19. Consumption and foraging behaviors for common stimulants (nicotine, caffeine).

    PubMed

    Phillips, James G; Currie, Jonathan; Ogeil, Rowan P

    2016-01-01

    Models are needed to understand the emerging capability to track consumers' movements. Therefore, we examined the use of legal and readily available stimulants that vary in their addictive potential (nicotine, caffeine). One hundred sixty-six participants answered the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), the Severity of Dependence Scale for nicotine and caffeine, and reported the number of times and locations stimulants were purchased and used. On average, nicotine dependent individuals made their purchases from 2 locations, while caffeine dependent individuals consumed caffeine at 2 locations, but some people exhibited a greater range and intensity of use. Stimulant foraging behavior could be described by power laws, and is exacerbated by dependency. The finding has implications for attempts to control substance use. PMID:26555360

  20. ATP level and caffeine efficiency on cytokinesis inhibition in plants.

    PubMed

    López-Sáez, J F; Mingo, R; González-Fernández, A

    1982-06-01

    Plant cytokinesis appears to be a topographically organized process of exocytosis. Golgi vesicles which contain cell wall precursors are translocated during telophase, by interzonal microtubules, to the equatorial region of the mitotic apparatus where they fuse with each other giving rise to the new cell wall. Caffeine inhibits cytokinesis by hindering Golgi vesicle coalescence. The present results demonstrate that treatments which increase the cellular ATP level (adenosine, cycloheximide and anisomycin) counteract caffein-induced cytokinesis inhibition in meristem cells of onion root tips (Allium cepa L.), while treatments which decrease ATP level potentiate this caffeine effect (dinitrophenol, fluoroacetate, low oxygen tensions, etc.). We postulate that caffeine, in competition with the cellular ATP level, blocks cell plate formation by inhibiting a certain ATPase activity required for membrane fusion of Golgi vesicles. PMID:7117265

  1. Caffeine and cardiovascular diseases: critical review of current research.

    PubMed

    Zulli, Anthony; Smith, Renee M; Kubatka, Peter; Novak, Jan; Uehara, Yoshio; Loftus, Hayley; Qaradakhi, Tawar; Pohanka, Miroslav; Kobyliak, Nazarii; Zagatina, Angela; Klimas, Jan; Hayes, Alan; La Rocca, Giampiero; Soucek, Miroslav; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Caffeine is a most widely consumed physiological stimulant worldwide, which is consumed via natural sources, such as coffee and tea, and now marketed sources such as energy drinks and other dietary supplements. This wide use has led to concerns regarding the safety of caffeine and its proposed beneficial role in alertness, performance and energy expenditure and side effects in the cardiovascular system. The question remains "Which dose is safe?", as the population does not appear to adhere to the strict guidelines listed on caffeine consumption. Studies in humans and animal models yield controversial results, which can be explained by population, type and dose of caffeine and low statistical power. This review will focus on comprehensive and critical review of the current literature and provide an avenue for further study. PMID:26932503

  2. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas sp. to caffeine and related methylxanthines.

    PubMed

    Dash, Swati Sucharita; Sailaja, Nori Sri; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas sp. isolated from soil of coffee plantation area has been shown to degrade higher concentrations of caffeine ( approximately 15 g l(-1)) by N-demethylation at a rate higher than what has been reported for any strain so far. This strain exhibits positive chemotaxis towards caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in swarm plate assay and modified capillary assay in a dose dependant manner. Related methylxanthines and xanthine also act as chemoattractants for the strain with the highest relative chemotactic response (RCR) seen for xanthine. Chemotaxis in Pseudomonas sp. is possibly plasmid mediated as indicated by positive chemotaxis of plasmid transformed E. coli DH5alpha. The chemotactic abilities of Pseudomonas sp. combined with higher rates of degradation of caffeine can be used in the development of strategies for biodecaffeination of caffeine containing wastes. PMID:18383225

  3. [Caffeine--common ingredient in a diet and its influence on human health].

    PubMed

    Wierzejska, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed by people of all ages. In the last period a market of caffeine-containing products, particularly energy drinks and food supplements increased. Caffeine for years is under discussion, whether has positive whether adverse impact on health. Children are a group of special anxieties. Caffeine is a stimulant of central nervous system and therefore is probably the most commonly used psychoactive substance in the world. The physiological effect of caffeine and the lack of nutrition value causes a great interest its impact on health, especially with reference to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Results of scientific research are not clear. The influence of caffeine on the human body is conditioned with the individual metabolism of caffeine which also depends on many endogenic and environmental factors. According to the current knowledge moderate caffeine intake by healthy adults at a dose level of 400 mg a day is not associated with adverse effects, but it also depends on other health determinants of a lifestyle. Excessive caffeine consumption can cause negative health consequences such as psychomotor agitation, insomnia, headache, gastrointestinal complaints. Adverse effect of caffeine intoxication is classified in World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Metabolism of caffeine by pregnant woman is slowed down. Caffeine and its metabolites pass freely across the placenta into a fetus. For this reason pregnant women should limit caffeine intake. Children and adolescents should also limit daily caffeine consumption. It results from the influence of caffeine on the central nervous system in the period of rapid growth and the final stage of brain development, calcium balance and sleep duration. Average daily caffeine consumption in European countries ranging from 280-490 mg. The highest caffeine intake is in Scandinavian countries what results from the great consumption of the coffee. As far as caffeine

  4. In Vivo Deletion of the Cebpa +37 kb Enhancer Markedly Reduces Cebpa mRNA in Myeloid Progenitors but Not in Non-Hematopoietic Tissues to Impair Granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Cooper, Stacy; Friedman, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains a +37 kb, evolutionarily conserved 440 bp enhancer that directs high-level expression to myeloid progenitors in transgenic mice. The enhancer is bound and activated by Runx1, Scl, GATA2, C/EBPα, c-Myb, Pu.1, and additional Ets factors in myeloid cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated replacement of the wild-type enhancer with a variant mutant in its seven Ets sites leads to 20-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in the 32Dcl3 myeloid cell line. To determine the effect of deleting the enhancer in vivo, we now characterize C57BL/6 mice in which loxP sites flank a 688 bp DNA segment containing the enhancer. CMV-Cre mediated germline deletion resulted in diminution of the expected number of viable Enh(f/f);CMV-Cre offspring, with 28-fold reduction in marrow Cebpa mRNA but normal levels in liver, lung, adipose, intestine, muscle, and kidney. Cre-transduction of lineage-negative marrow cells in vitro reduced Cebpa mRNA 12-fold, with impairment of granulocytic maturation, morphologic blast accumulation, and IL-3 dependent myeloid colony replating for >12 generations. Exposure of Enh(f/f);Mx1-Cre mice to pIpC led to 14-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in GMP or CMP, 30-fold reduction in LSK, and <2-fold reduction in the LSK/SLAM subset. FACS analysis of marrow from these mice revealed 10-fold reduced neutrophils, 3-fold decreased GMP, and 3-fold increased LSK cells. Progenitor cell cycle progression was mildly impaired. Granulocyte and B lymphoid colony forming units were reduced while monocytic and erythroid colonies were increased, with reduced Pu.1 and Gfi1 and increased Egr1 and Klf4 in GMP. Finally, competitive transplantation indicated preservation of functional long-term hematopoietic stem cells upon enhancer deletion and confirmed marrow-intrinsic impairment of granulopoiesis and B cell generation with LSK and monocyte lineage expansion. These findings demonstrate a critical role for the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer for hematopoietic-specific Cebpa expression

  5. In Vivo Deletion of the Cebpa +37 kb Enhancer Markedly Reduces Cebpa mRNA in Myeloid Progenitors but Not in Non-Hematopoietic Tissues to Impair Granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Cooper, Stacy; Friedman, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains a +37 kb, evolutionarily conserved 440 bp enhancer that directs high-level expression to myeloid progenitors in transgenic mice. The enhancer is bound and activated by Runx1, Scl, GATA2, C/EBPα, c-Myb, Pu.1, and additional Ets factors in myeloid cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated replacement of the wild-type enhancer with a variant mutant in its seven Ets sites leads to 20-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in the 32Dcl3 myeloid cell line. To determine the effect of deleting the enhancer in vivo, we now characterize C57BL/6 mice in which loxP sites flank a 688 bp DNA segment containing the enhancer. CMV-Cre mediated germline deletion resulted in diminution of the expected number of viable Enh(f/f);CMV-Cre offspring, with 28-fold reduction in marrow Cebpa mRNA but normal levels in liver, lung, adipose, intestine, muscle, and kidney. Cre-transduction of lineage-negative marrow cells in vitro reduced Cebpa mRNA 12-fold, with impairment of granulocytic maturation, morphologic blast accumulation, and IL-3 dependent myeloid colony replating for >12 generations. Exposure of Enh(f/f);Mx1-Cre mice to pIpC led to 14-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in GMP or CMP, 30-fold reduction in LSK, and <2-fold reduction in the LSK/SLAM subset. FACS analysis of marrow from these mice revealed 10-fold reduced neutrophils, 3-fold decreased GMP, and 3-fold increased LSK cells. Progenitor cell cycle progression was mildly impaired. Granulocyte and B lymphoid colony forming units were reduced while monocytic and erythroid colonies were increased, with reduced Pu.1 and Gfi1 and increased Egr1 and Klf4 in GMP. Finally, competitive transplantation indicated preservation of functional long-term hematopoietic stem cells upon enhancer deletion and confirmed marrow-intrinsic impairment of granulopoiesis and B cell generation with LSK and monocyte lineage expansion. These findings demonstrate a critical role for the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer for hematopoietic-specific Cebpa expression

  6. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, O A

    2015-01-01

    EEG recordings reflect the gross electrical activity emanating from synaptic currents of individual neurons across large cortical areas. During periods of cortical activation, waking, and higher EEG frequencies, neurons display increased excitability and exhibit more asynchronous discharge. The activity of a number of subcortical neurotransmitter systems from several brain regions outside the thalamus can directly affect cortical activity patterns. These neurotransmitter systems are generally targets of pharmacological intervention or participate in neurological disease states. The EEG trace comprises 4 primary rhythms: alfa (α), beta (β), theta (θ) and delta (δ), which differ in frequency and amplitude. Caffeine effect on brain asymmetry will be studied in this work. The study was realized by means of Fourier spectral frequency analysis (Fast Fourier Transformation) of the EEG signal on anesthetized rats. All 3 doses of caffeine increased the global wave power of brain activity compared to the control group. All 3 doses of caffeine reduced the number of peaks for the 0.5-4 Hz frequency band, with the intermediate dose of caffeine having such an effect in the 4-7 Hz frequency band and the high dose of caffeine for the 23-33 Hz frequency band. The group that received high doses of caffeine showed an increase of the percentage of delta waves, with a concurrent decrease of the percentage of alpha1, alpha2, beta and theta 2 compared to the control group. Low-dose caffeine produced positive values of left-right difference in brain electrical activity (left predominance) for the 0.5-5 Hz and 7.8-10.3 Hz frequency intervals. The group that received high-dose caffeine exhibited a left hemisphere dominance for the 0.5-1.5 Hz; 13.9-14.1 Hz and 19-20 Hz frequency ranges while right dominance was present in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. In conclusion, all doses of caffeine modified the global power of the brain as well as the number of peaks on

  7. Caffeine and theobromine levels in chocolate couverture and coating products.

    PubMed

    Ramli, N; Rahman, S; Hassan, O; Mohd Yatim, A; Said, M; Lim, L; Ng, W

    2000-03-01

    Thirty-two samples of chocolate products were analysed by HPLC for caffeine and theobromine contents. Defatted residues of samples were extracted with 80% aqueous acetone. After extraction into boiling water, the methylxanthines were identified and quantified with the use of μ-Bondapak column and mobile phase of methanol:water:acetic acid (20:79:1). Levels of caffein and theobromine in 32 samples of chocolate products averaged 0.62-1.14 mg/g and 0.026-0.153 mg/g respectively. Mean values for theobromine and caffeine content for chocolate coating were 0.82 and 0.07 mg/g respectively. The chocolate coating made from fat substitute had theobromine and caffeine levels ranging from 0.36-0.70 mg/g and 0.027-0.061 mg/g respectively, with mean values of 0.49 mg theobromine/g and 0.039 mg caffeine/g. In local chocolate, the mean theobromine and caffeine levels respectively were 0.72 mg/g and 0.04 mg/g in milk chocolate, and 0.85 mg/g and 0.06 mg/g in dark chocolate. Meanwhile, for imported chocolate, the mean theobromine and caffeine levels respectively were 1.05 mg/g and 0.12 mg/g in dark chocolate; 0.76 mg/g and 0.04 mg/g in milk chocolate; and 0.74 mg/g and 0.03 mg/g in white chocolate. Compared with the local chocolates, imported chocolates had higher levels of theobromine and caffeine at 1.141 mg/g and 0.1533mg/g. The average theobromine and caffeine concentrations in local chocolate were 0.082mg/g and 0.066mg/g. Theobromine concentration in chocolate samples is within the range of 0.62mg/g-1.141mg/g and the range of caffeine concentration is 0.026mg/g-0.153mg/g respectively. Bittersweet chocolates were found to have higher theobromine and caffeine concentrations than normal sweet chocolates and milk chocolates. PMID:22692392

  8. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, OA

    2015-01-01

    EEG recordings reflect the gross electrical activity emanating from synaptic currents of individual neurons across large cortical areas. During periods of cortical activation, waking, and higher EEG frequencies, neurons display increased excitability and exhibit more asynchronous discharge. The activity of a number of subcortical neurotransmitter systems from several brain regions outside the thalamus can directly affect cortical activity patterns. These neurotransmitter systems are generally targets of pharmacological intervention or participate in neurological disease states. The EEG trace comprises 4 primary rhythms: alfa (α), beta (β), theta (θ) and delta (δ), which differ in frequency and amplitude. Caffeine effect on brain asymmetry will be studied in this work. The study was realized by means of Fourier spectral frequency analysis (Fast Fourier Transformation) of the EEG signal on anesthetized rats. All 3 doses of caffeine increased the global wave power of brain activity compared to the control group. All 3 doses of caffeine reduced the number of peaks for the 0.5-4 Hz frequency band, with the intermediate dose of caffeine having such an effect in the 4-7 Hz frequency band and the high dose of caffeine for the 23-33 Hz frequency band. The group that received high doses of caffeine showed an increase of the percentage of delta waves, with a concurrent decrease of the percentage of alpha1, alpha2, beta and theta 2 compared to the control group. Low-dose caffeine produced positive values of left-right difference in brain electrical activity (left predominance) for the 0.5-5 Hz and 7.8-10.3 Hz frequency intervals. The group that received high-dose caffeine exhibited a left hemisphere dominance for the 0.5-1.5 Hz; 13.9-14.1 Hz and 19-20 Hz frequency ranges while right dominance was present in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. In conclusion, all doses of caffeine modified the global power of the brain as well as the number of peaks on

  9. [Teratogenic and mutagenic studies with caffeine in the animal experiment].

    PubMed

    von Kreybig, T; Czok, G

    1976-03-01

    Principles of teratogenic and mutagenic actions are defined. The recent experimental studies with laboratory animals, and our investigations with caffeine-sodium benzoicum and with soluble coffee in pregnant rats and mice showed no teratogenicity. The results are compared with specific teratogenic effects of cytostatic agents. A teratogenicity of caffeine can be excluded, a mutagenicity in animal experiments can also not be proved. PMID:960793

  10. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-04-15

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain's response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine's effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  11. Evaluation of the central effects of alcohol and caffeine interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Azcona, O; Barbanoj, M J; Torrent, J; Jané, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The dynamic and kinetic interactions of alcohol and caffeine were studied in a double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial. Treatments were administered to eight healthy subjects in four experimental sessions, leaving a 1 week wash-out period between each, as follows: 1) placebo, 2) alcohol (0.8 g kg-1), 3) caffeine (400 mg) and 4) alcohol (0.8 g kg-1) + caffeine (400 mg). 2. Evaluations were performed by means of: 1) objective measures: a) psychomotor performance (critical flicker fusion frequency, simple reaction time and tapping test), b) long latency visual evoked potentials ('pattern reversal'); 2) subjective self-rated scales (visual analogue scales and profile of mood states); 3) caffeine and alcohol plasma concentration determinations. 3. The battery of pharmacodynamic tests was conducted at baseline and at +0.5 h, +1.5 h, +2.5 h, +4 h and +6 h. An analysis of variance was applied to the results, accepting a P < 0.05 as significant. The plasma-time curves for caffeine and alcohol were analysed by means of model-independent methods. 4. Results obtained with caffeine in the objective measures demonstrated a decrease in simple reaction time and an increase in the amplitude of the evoked potentials; the subjects' self-ratings showed a tendency to be more active. Alcohol increased simple reaction time and decreased amplitude of the evoked potentials, although the subjects rated themselves as being active. The combination of alcohol + caffeine showed no significant difference from placebo in the objective tests; nevertheless, the subjective feeling of drunkenness remained. The area under the curve (AUC) for caffeine was significantly higher when administered with alcohol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8554942

  12. Effects of caffeine intake and smoking on neurocognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Christian; Stephan-Otto, Christian; Cuevas-Esteban, Jorge; Maria Haro, Josep; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Ochoa, Susana; Usall, Judith; Brébion, Gildas

    2015-12-30

    Although most studies support the beneficial effects of caffeine on neurocognition, its effects have never been assessed in psychiatric patients. In addition, results from studies in smokers are contradictory. Moreover, there are no data available about the neurocognitive effects of caffeine and tobacco together. We explored the concomitant effects of regular caffeine and tobacco intake on neurocognition in 52 schizophrenic patients and 61 healthy controls. Verbal fluency, processing speed, and working, visual and verbal memory were assessed. For each measurement, two tasks with two levels of complexity were administered. Our results showed that caffeine intake had beneficial effects on male schizophrenic patients only in complex tasks requiring deeper cognitive processing (semantic fluency, cognitive speed, working memory, and visual memory). Female patients and controls were unaffected. In contrast, smoking had a negative effect on male, but not on female, schizophrenic patients in semantic fluency. The effects of smoking in controls were inconsistent. In conclusion, our data showed, for the first time, beneficial effects of caffeine intake on neurocognition in male schizophrenic patients. These data suggest that further research of therapeutics based on caffeine is needed, as this could be beneficial for schizophrenic patients. In contrast, smoking appears to be detrimental. PMID:26614014

  13. Ultrastructural changes in the developing chicken cornea following caffeine administration.

    PubMed

    Monika, Kujawa-Hadryś; Dariusz, Tosik; Hieronim, Bartel

    2010-09-30

    Caffeine is one of the most frequently consumed psychoactive substances. It has been known for many years that caffeine at high concentrations exerts harmful effects on both women's and laboratory animals' fertility, moreover it may impair normal development of many organs in the prenatal period. So far there have been few studies performed that demonstrate teratogenic effects of caffeine on structures of the developing eye, particularly the cornea. The aim of the study was to show ultrastructural changes in the developing cornea, as the effect of caffeine administration to chicken embryos. The experimental materials were 26 chicken embryos from incubated breeding eggs. Eggs were divided into two groups: control (n=30) in which Ringer liquid was administrated, and experimental (n=30) in which teratogenic dose of caffeine 3.5mg/egg was given. In 36th hour of incubation solutions were given with cannula through hole in an egg shell directly onto amniotic membrane. After closing the hole with a glass plate and paraffine, eggs were put back to incubator. In 10th and 19th day of incubation corneas were taken for morphological analysis with a use of electron microscopy. Administration of caffeine during chicken development causes changes of collagen fibers of Bowman's membrane patterns and of the corneal stroma but it also changes proportion of amount of collagen fibers and of the stromal cells. PMID:21071341

  14. Caffeine and theophylline counteract diazepam effects in man.

    PubMed

    Mattila, M J; Nuotto, E

    1983-01-01

    A total of 237 healthy subjects were studied in four placebo-controlled double-blind trials with parallel treatment groups. The subjects ingested a capsule (diazepam or placebo) and decaffeinated coffee with or without added caffeine or theophylline. Diazepam (10 and 20 mg) impaired dose dependently cognitive skills as measured by digit symbol substitution and letter cancellation, the balance of extraocular muscles, flicker fusion, and tapping speed. With diazepam 10 mg statistically significant effects were seen on digit symbols and exophoria only. Theophylline (10 mg/kg) increased tapping speed and heart rate, whereas other objective measurements were negative for the effects of theophylline or caffeine (250 and 500 mg) alone. Subjectively they reduced calmness, and caffeine also increased alertness. Caffeine 250 mg counteracted diazepam induced (10 mg) impairment of cognitive skills and relaxation of extraocular muscles whereas caffeine 500 mg counteracted the same effects of diazepam 20 mg, respectively. Theophylline antagonized diazepam-induced impairment in digit symbol substitution and tapping speed tests. Subjectively, caffeine and theophylline counteracted diazepam induced drowsiness and mental slowness. The results suggest, therefore, that the ample use of methylxanthines compensates various side-effects of benzodiazepines in man. It may also increase the need of sedation and thus the consumption of benzodiazepines. PMID:6374311

  15. Caffeine treatment aggravates secondary degeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Chang; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in some form of paralysis. Recently, SCI therapy has been focused on preventing secondary injury to reduce both neuroinflammation and lesion size so that functional outcome after an SCI may be improved. Previous studies have shown that adenosine receptors (AR) are a major regulator of inflammation after an SCI. The current study was performed to examine the effect of caffeine, a pan-AR blocker, on spontaneous functional recovery after an SCI. Animals were assigned into 3 groups randomly, including sham, PBS and caffeine groups. The rat SCI was generated by an NYU impactor with a 10 g rod dropped from a 25 mm height at thoracic 9 spinal cord level. Caffeine and PBS were injected daily during the experiment period. Hind limb motor function was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale at 1 week and 4 weeks after the SCI. Spinal cord segments were collected after final behavior evaluation for morphological analysis. The tissue sparing was evaluated by luxol fast blue staining. Immunofluorescence stain was employed to assess astrocyte activation and neurofilament positioning, while microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemistry stain.The results showed that spontaneous functional recovery was blocked after the animals were subjected caffeine daily. Moreover, caffeine administration increased the demyelination area, promoted astrocyte and microglia activation and decreased the quantity of neurofilaments. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity effect of caffeine may be associated with the inhibition of neural repair and the promotion of neuroinflammation. PMID:26746340

  16. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders. PMID:10474669

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Caffeine and Theobromine Production

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lu; Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, XiangQi; Han, Jixiang; Deng, WeiWei; Wang, Min; Yu, Oliver; Zhang, Zhengzhu

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3, 7-dimethylxanthine) are the major purine alkaloids in plants, e.g. tea (Camellia sinensis) and coffee (Coffea arabica). Caffeine is a major component of coffee and is used widely in food and beverage industries. Most of the enzymes involved in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway have been reported previously. Here, we demonstrated the biosynthesis of caffeine (0.38 mg/L) by co-expression of Coffea arabica xanthosine methyltransferase (CaXMT) and Camellia sinensis caffeine synthase (TCS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we endeavored to develop this production platform for making other purine-based alkaloids. To increase the catalytic activity of TCS in an effort to increase theobromine production, we identified four amino acid residues based on structural analyses of 3D-model of TCS. Two TCS1 mutants (Val317Met and Phe217Trp) slightly increased in theobromine accumulation and simultaneously decreased in caffeine production. The application and further optimization of this biosynthetic platform are discussed. PMID:25133732

  18. The role of caffeine in otorhinolaryngology: guilty as charged?

    PubMed

    Trinidade, A; Robinson, T; Phillips, J S

    2014-08-01

    Caffeine is implicated as causing or aggravating numerous otorhinolaryngological conditions, including tinnitus, Ménière's disease, laryngopharyngeal reflux, globus pharyngeus and dysphonia. We address caffeine's effects in such conditions and to determine whether such implications are founded. The defined search limits of data sources included human trials and either randomised control trials, meta-analyses, editorials, letters, clinical trials, case reports, comments or journal articles over the last 40 years. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases were searched using 'otorhinolaryngological diseases' and 'caffeine' as a duplicate filter. PubMed databases were searched using 'caffeine' in combination with 'tinnitus', 'Ménière's', 'vertigo', 'motion sickness', 'imbalance', 'vestibular migraine', 'voice', 'vocal hygiene', 'reflux', 'ear', 'nose', 'throat' and 'head neck cancer', respectively. Searches were not limited to the English language. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL database searches identified 417 papers. Of these, 200 abstracts were chosen for further scrutiny, following which 30 full manuscripts were chosen for full review. The PubMed database search identified 275 abstracts of which 33 were reviewed. Of the total 692 studies searched, 63 studies were reviewed and 36 were finally used. At present, there is little evidence in the literature to support the notion that caffeine causes or aggravates otorhinolaryngological conditions. In tinnitus, its withdrawal may actually worsen symptoms whereas in motion sickness, there is some clinical evidence for its benefit. More research is needed into the role caffeine plays in otorhinolaryngological conditions to allow clinicians to give informed advice to their patients. PMID:23934351

  19. Effects of caffeine on the rate of perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L O; Russo, A K; Silva, A C; Piçarro, I C; Silva, F R; Zogaib, P S; Soares, D D

    1990-01-01

    The role of caffeine in improving performance in endurance exercises is controversial and its mechanism of action is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) by exercising athletes. Six male non-smoking runners, aged 26.8 +/- 4.9 years (mean +/- SD), who had been in training continuously for at least two years before the experiment were studied. Mean maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) was 61.21 +/- 5.36 ml kg-1 min-1. The subjects were asked to exercise on a bicycle ergometer for 3 min each at 300 and 600 kg m min-1, after which the work load was elevated to 1200 kg m min-1 and they exercised until exhaustion. In order to evaluate the effects of caffeine, the exercise was performed twice following the ingestion of 200 ml decaffeinated coffee with and without caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight). Caffeine had no significant effect on exercise time, pulmonary ventilation, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide extraction or exchange respiratory ratio, but the RPE was significantly lower (P less than 0.05) at the work load of 1200 kg m min-1 after the ingestion of caffeine for both trials I and II. The present results suggest that metabolic acidosis and glycogen depletion were not the main causes of exhaustion. PMID:2101061

  20. Organoclays in water cause expansion that facilitates caffeine adsorption.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohiko; Oguchi, Junpei; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Shiono, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiko; Iiyama, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of caffeine in water on organically modified clays (a natural montmorillonite and synthetic saponite, which are smectite group of layered clay minerals). The organoclays were prepared by cation-exchange reactions of benzylammonium and neostigmine with interlayer exchangeable cations in the clay minerals. Although less caffeine was uptaken on neostigmine-modified clays than on raw clay minerals, uptake was increased by adding benzylammonium to the clays. The adsorption equilibrium constant was considerably higher on benzylammonium-modified saponite (containing small quantities of intercalated benzylammonium) than on its montmorillonite counterpart. These observations suggest that decreasing the size and number of intercalated cations enlarges the siloxane surface area available for caffeine adsorption. When the benzylammonium-smectite powders were immersed in water, the intercalated water molecules expanded the interlayer space. Addition of caffeine to the aqueous dispersion further expanded the benzylammonium-montmorillonite system but showed no effect on benzylammonium-saponite. We assume that intercalated water molecules were exchanged with caffeine molecules. By intercalating benzylammonium into smectites, we have potentially created an adaptable two-dimensional nanospace that sequesters caffeine from aqueous media. PMID:25522121

  1. Quercetin, not caffeine, is a major neuroprotective component in coffee.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Edith G; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that coffee consumption reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. To determine the factors involved, we examined the protective effects of coffee components. The test involved prevention of neurotoxicity to SH-SY5Y cells that was induced by lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ or interferon-γ released from activated microglia and astrocytes. We found that quercetin, flavones, chlorogenic acid, and caffeine protected SH-SY5Y cells from these toxins. They also reduced the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 from the activated microglia and astrocytes and attenuated the activation of proteins from P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB). After exposure to toxin containing glial-stimulated conditioned medium, we also found that quercetin reduced oxidative/nitrative damage to DNA, as well as to the lipids and proteins of SH-SY5Y cells. There was a resultant increase in [GSH]i in SH-SY5Y cells. The data indicate that quercetin is the major neuroprotective component in coffee against Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27479153

  2. Caffeine Ingestion Reverses the Circadian Rhythm Effects on Neuromuscular Performance in Highly Resistance-Trained Men

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Pallarés, Jesús García; López-Samanes, Álvaro; Ortega, Juan Fernando; Fernández-Elías, Valentín E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether caffeine ingestion counteracts the morning reduction in neuromuscular performance associated with the circadian rhythm pattern. Methods Twelve highly resistance-trained men underwent a battery of neuromuscular tests under three different conditions; i) morning (10:00 a.m.) with caffeine ingestion (i.e., 3 mg kg−1; AMCAFF trial); ii) morning (10:00 a.m.) with placebo ingestion (AMPLAC trial); and iii) afternoon (18:00 p.m.) with placebo ingestion (PMPLAC trial). A randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo controlled experimental design was used, with all subjects serving as their own controls. The neuromuscular test battery consisted in the measurement of bar displacement velocity during free-weight full-squat (SQ) and bench press (BP) exercises against loads that elicit maximum strength (75% 1RM load) and muscle power adaptations (1 m s−1 load). Isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVCLEG) and isometric electrically evoked strength of the right knee (EVOKLEG) were measured to identify caffeine's action mechanisms. Steroid hormone levels (serum testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone) were evaluated at the beginning of each trial (PRE). In addition, plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine were measured PRE and at the end of each trial following a standardized intense (85% 1RM) 6 repetitions bout of SQ (POST). Results In the PMPLAC trial, dynamic muscle strength and power output were significantly enhanced compared with AMPLAC treatment (3.0%–7.5%; p≤0.05). During AMCAFF trial, muscle strength and power output increased above AMPLAC levels (4.6%–5.7%; p≤0.05) except for BP velocity with 1 m s−1 load (p = 0.06). During AMCAFF, EVOKLEG and NE (a surrogate of maximal muscle sympathetic nerve activation) were increased above AMPLAC trial (14.6% and 96.8% respectively; p≤0.05). Conclusions These results indicate that caffeine ingestion reverses the morning neuromuscular declines in highly resistance

  3. The ingestion of a caffeinated energy drink improves jump performance and activity patterns in elite badminton players.

    PubMed

    Abian, Pablo; Del Coso, Juan; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, Cesar; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Lara, Beatriz; Soriano, Lidon; Muñoz, Victor; Abian-Vicen, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeine-containing energy drink to enhance physical and match performance in elite badminton players. Sixteen male and elite badminton players (25.4 ± 7.3 year; 71.8 ± 7.9 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomised experiment. On two different sessions, badminton players ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed the following tests: handgrip maximal force production, smash jump without and with shuttlecock, squat jump, countermovement jump and the agility T-test. Later, a 45-min simulated badminton match was played. Players' number of impacts and heart rate was measured during the match. The ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased squat jump height (34.5 ± 4.7 vs. 36.4 ± 4.3 cm; P < 0.05), squat jump peak power (P < 0.05), countermovement jump height (37.7 ± 4.5 vs. 39.5 ± 5.1 cm; P < 0.05) and countermovement jump peak power (P < 0.05). In addition, an increased number of total impacts was found during the badminton match (7395 ± 1594 vs. 7707 ± 2033 impacts; P < 0.05). In conclusion, the results show that the use of caffeine-containing energy drink may be an effective nutritional aid to increase jump performance and activity patterns during game in elite badminton players. PMID:25530454

  4. Ultraviolet survival and sensitizing effect of caffeine in mouse hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F.; Delhaise, P.; Limbosch, S.

    1980-10-01

    In a previous paper it was reported that three hybrid cell lines between mouse lymphoma cells (L5178YS) and mouse fibroblasts (A9) were more resistant to x rays than either of the parental cells. In this work, these hybrids displayed a degree of resistance to uv light either higher than (hybrid clone 3) or similar to (hybrid clones 1 and 2) that of the more resistant parent (A9). The enhanced resistance of hybrid clone 3 to uv was related neither to changes in cell shape, ploidy, and growth rate nor to an increase in a caffeine-sensitive recovery process after uv irradiation.

  5. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  6. Caffeine exposure during rat brain development causes memory impairment in a sex selective manner that is offset by caffeine consumption throughout life.

    PubMed

    Ardais, Ana Paula; Rocha, Andréia S; Borges, Maurício Felisberto; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Nunes, Fernanda; Pagnussat, Natália; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira

    2016-04-15

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. In moderate doses, it affords a beneficial effect in adults and upon aging, but has a deleterious effect during brain development. We now tested if caffeine consumption by rats (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 g/L in the drinking water, only during active cycle and weekdays) during adulthood could revert the potentially negative effects of caffeine during early life. Thus, we compared caffeine intake starting 15 days before mating and lasting either up to weaning (development) or up to adulthood, on behavior and synaptic proteins in male and female rats. Recognition memory was impaired only in female rats receiving caffeine (0.3 and 1.0 g/L) during development, coincident with increased proBDNF and unchanged BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Caffeine in both treatment regimens caused hyperlocomotion only in male rats, whereas anxiety-related behavior was attenuated in both sexes by caffeine (1.0 g/L) throughout life. Both caffeine treatment regimens decreased GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker) in the hippocampus from male rats. TrkB receptor was decreased in the hippocampus from both sexes and treatment regimens. These findings revealed that caffeine intake during a specific time window of brain development promotes sex-dependent behavioral outcomes related to modification in BDNF signaling. Furthermore, caffeine throughout life can overcome the deleterious effects of caffeine on recognition memory during brain development in female rats. PMID:26774980

  7. A vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein epitope-incorporated oncolytic adenovirus overcomes CAR-dependency and shows markedly enhanced cancer cell killing and suppression of tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Utility of traditional oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) has been limited due to low expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in cancer cells which results in poor infectivity of Ads. Here with an aim of improving the efficiency of Ad's entry to the cell, we generated a novel tropism-expanded oncolytic Ad which contains the epitope of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) at the HI-loop of Ad fiber. We generated 9 variants of oncolytic Ads with varying linkers and partial deletion to the fiber. Only one VSVG epitope-incorporated variant, RdB-1L-VSVG, which contains 1 linker and no deletion to fiber, was produced efficiently. Production of 3-dimensionaly stable fiber in RdB-1L-VSVG was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. RdB-1L-VSVG shows a remarkable improvement in cytotoxicity and total viral yield in cancer cells. RdB-1L-VSVG demonstrates enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells with subdued CAR-expression as it can be internalized by an alternate pathway. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody (Ab) or VSVG receptor, phosphatidyl serine (PS), reveals that cell internalization of RdB-1L-VSVG is mediated by both CAR and PS. Furthermore, treatment with RdB-1L-VSVG significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect in vivo. These studies demonstrate that the strategy to expand oncolytic Ad tropism may significantly improve therapeutic profile for cancer treatment. PMID:26430798

  8. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear. PMID:26670991

  9. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (p<0.001), global CMRO2 did not change significantly. Instead, the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain’s response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine’s effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  10. Marking as Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Val

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of assessment which has received little attention compared with perennial concerns, such as standards or reliability, is the role of judgment in marking. This paper explores marking as an act of judgment, paying particular attention to the nature of judgment and the processes involved. It brings together studies which have explored…

  11. Physiological and cognitive responses to caffeine during repeated, high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Melissa J; Leicht, Anthony S; Spinks, Warwick L

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of caffeine on repeated, anaerobic exercise using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Seventeen subjects (five female) underwent cognitive (reaction time, number recall) and blood (glucose, potassium, catecholamines, lactate) testing before and after consuming caffeine (6 mg/kg), placebo, or nothing (control). An exercise test (two 60 s maximal cycling bouts) was conducted 90 min after caffeine/placebo consumption. Plasma caffeine concentrations significantly increased after caffeine ingestion, however, there were no positive effects on cognitive or blood parameters except a significant decrease in plasma potassium concentrations at rest. Potentially negative effects of caffeine included significantly higher blood lactate compared to control and significantly slower time to peak power in exercise bout 2 compared to control and placebo. Caffeine had no significant effect on peak power, work output, RPE, or peak heart rate. In conclusion, caffeine had no ergogenic effect on repeated, maximal cycling bouts and may be detrimental to anaerobic performance. PMID:17240784

  12. Caffeine toxicity in forensic practice: possible effects and under-appreciated sources.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, Ian F; Farrington, Rachael L; Hoban, Claire; Byard, Roger W

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine is considered a very safe stimulant and is widely consumed in a variety of forms, from pure caffeine to beverages and foods. Typically, death is only seen when gram quantities of caffeine are consumed, usually in suicide attempts. Even in this scenario, death is rare. However, there are special populations that need to be considered in forensic presentations, who may be at greater risk. These include poor metabolizers, people with liver disease, and people with cardiac conditions, who can die as a result of caffeine intake at levels well below what is ordinarily considered toxic. Also, caffeine intake may be hidden. For example, herbal medicines with substantial caffeine content may not disclose these concentrations on their product label. The role of caffeine in medicolegal deaths is yet to be defined, however, herbal medicines and herbal weight loss supplements may represent an underappreciated source of caffeine in this context. PMID:27344159

  13. Caffeine, body fluid-electrolyte balance, and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2002-06-01

    Recreational enthusiasts and athletes often are advised to abstain from consuming caffeinated beverages (CB). The dual purposes of this review are to (a) critique controlled investigations regarding the effects of caffeine on dehydration and exercise performance, and (b) ascertain whether abstaining from CB is scientifically and physiologically justifiable. The literature indicates that caffeine consumption stimulates a mild diuresis similar to water, but there is no evidence of a fluid-electrolyte imbalance that is detrimental to exercise performance or health. Investigations comparing caffeine (100-680 mg) to water or placebo seldom found a statistical difference in urine volume. In the 10 studies reviewed, consumption of a CB resulted in 0-84% retention of the initial volume ingested, whereas consumption of water resulted in 0-81% retention. Further, tolerance to caffeine reduces the likelihood that a detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalance will occur. The scientific literature suggests that athletes and recreational enthusiasts will not incur detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalances if they consume CB in moderation and eat a typical U.S. diet. Sedentary members of the general public should be a less risk than athletes because their fluid losses via sweating are smaller. PMID:12187618

  14. Caffeine inhibits hepatitis C virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Batista, Mariana N; Carneiro, Bruno M; Braga, Ana Cláudia S; Rahal, Paula

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis C is considered the major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Conventional treatment is not effective against some hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes; therefore, new treatments are needed. Coffee and, more recently, caffeine, have been found to have a beneficial effect in several disorders of the liver, including those manifesting abnormal liver biochemistry, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Caffeine acts directly by delaying fibrosis, thereby improving the function of liver cellular pathways and interfering with pathways used by the HCV replication cycle. In the current study, the direct relationship between caffeine and viral replication was evaluated. The Huh-7.5 cell line was used for transient infections with FL-J6/JFH-5'C19Rluc2AUbi and to establish a cell line stably expressing SGR-Feo JFH-1. Caffeine efficiently inhibited HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner at non-cytotoxic concentrations and demonstrated an IC50 value of 0.7263 mM after 48 h of incubation. These data demonstrate that caffeine may be an important new agent for anti-HCV therapies due to its efficient inhibition of HCV replication at non-toxic concentrations. PMID:25491197

  15. Potential Role of Caffeine in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Mohsin H K; Tambo, Amos; Pace, Nikolai P

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease [PD] is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease, affecting 1% of the population over the age of 55. The underlying neuropathology seen in PD is characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with the presence of Lewy bodies. The Lewy bodies are composed of aggregates of α-synuclein. The motor manifestations of PD include a resting tremor, bradykinesia, and muscle rigidity. Currently there is no cure for PD and motor symptoms are treated with a number of drugs including levodopa [L-dopa]. These drugs do not delay progression of the disease and often provide only temporary relief. Their use is often accompanied by severe adverse effects. Emerging evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that caffeine may reduce parkinsonian motor symptoms by antagonising the adenosine A2A receptor, which is predominately expressed in the basal ganglia. It is hypothesised that caffeine may increase the excitatory activity in local areas by inhibiting the astrocytic inflammatory processes but evidence remains inconclusive. In addition, the co-administration of caffeine with currently available PD drugs helps to reduce drug tolerance, suggesting that caffeine may be used as an adjuvant in treating PD. In conclusion, caffeine may have a wide range of therapeutic effects which are yet to be explored, and therefore warrants further investigation in randomized clinical trials. PMID:27563362

  16. Impact of Caffeine on Weight Changes Due to Ketotifen Administration

    PubMed Central

    Habibi Asl, Bohlool; Vaez, Haleh; Imankhah, Turan; Hamidi, Samin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Prescription of ketotifen as an effective antihistamine in asthma and allergic conditions is associated with side effect of weight gain. Caffeine is an agent which increases thermogenesis and improves energy expenditure and also effective in asthma. The aim of current study was to evaluate caffeine impact in reducing weight gain side effect of ketotifen. Methods: Male mice at the weight limit of 20-30 gr in 8 groups were randomly chosen and injected following drug dosages for 45 days intraperitoneally: control group (normal saline 10 ml/kg), three groups of ketotifen (4, 8, 16 mg/kg), three groups of caffeine (4, 8, 16 mg/kg) and one group of ketotifen (4 mg/kg) in combination with caffeine (4 mg/kg). Weight changes have been recorded and assessed every 3 days for 45 days. Results: The results showed that in all dosages of the two drugs, significant weight loss occurred in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: The effect of caffeine on weight loss according to our results, matches with human studies, while ketotifen contradictory to our assumption, resulted in weight loss which probably was related to the difference in metabolic pathways in mice and humans, or maybe the used doses of ketotifen in this study were insufficient to reduce TNF-α production or influence in serotonin release and be effective on appetite or weight gain. PMID:24409414

  17. Pharmacokinetic Interaction of Chrysin with Caffeine in Rats.

    PubMed

    Noh, Keumhan; Oh, Do Gyeong; Nepal, Mahesh Raj; Jeong, Ki Sun; Choi, Yongjoo; Kang, Mi Jeong; Kang, Wonku; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic interaction of chrysin, a flavone present in honey, propolis and herbs, with caffeine was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Because chrysin inhibited CYP1A-selective ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase activities in enriched rat liver microsomes, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine, a CYP 1A substrate, was studied following an intragastric administration with 100 mg/kg chrysin. In addition to the oral bioavailability of chrysin, its phase 2 metabolites, chrysin sulfate and chrysin glucuronide, were determined in rat plasma. As results, the pharmacokinetic parameters for caffeine and its three metabolites (i.e., paraxanthine, theobromine and theophylline) were not changed following chrysin treatment in vivo, despite of its inhibitory effect on CYP 1A in vitro. The bioavailability of chrysin was found to be almost zero, because chrysin was rapidly metabolized to its sulfate and glucuronide conjugates in rats. Taken together, it was concluded that the little interaction of chrysin with caffeine might be resulted from the rapid metabolism of chrysin to its phase 2 metabolites which would not have inhibitory effects on CYP enzymes responsible for caffeine metabolism. PMID:27098862

  18. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology. PMID:25907748

  19. Pharmacokinetic Interaction of Chrysin with Caffeine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Keumhan; Oh, Do Gyeong; Nepal, Mahesh Raj; Jeong, Ki Sun; Choi, Yongjoo; Kang, Mi Jeong; Kang, Wonku; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic interaction of chrysin, a flavone present in honey, propolis and herbs, with caffeine was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Because chrysin inhibited CYP1A-selective ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase activities in enriched rat liver microsomes, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine, a CYP 1A substrate, was studied following an intragastric administration with 100 mg/kg chrysin. In addition to the oral bioavailability of chrysin, its phase 2 metabolites, chrysin sulfate and chrysin glucuronide, were determined in rat plasma. As results, the pharmacokinetic parameters for caffeine and its three metabolites (i.e., paraxanthine, theobromine and theophylline) were not changed following chrysin treatment in vivo, despite of its inhibitory effect on CYP 1A in vitro. The bioavailability of chrysin was found to be almost zero, because chrysin was rapidly metabolized to its sulfate and glucuronide conjugates in rats. Taken together, it was concluded that the little interaction of chrysin with caffeine might be resulted from the rapid metabolism of chrysin to its phase 2 metabolites which would not have inhibitory effects on CYP enzymes responsible for caffeine metabolism. PMID:27098862

  20. 46 CFR 108.661 - Unit markings: Draft marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Unit markings: Draft marks. 108.661 Section 108.661... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.661 Unit markings: Draft marks. (a) Each unit must have draft marks for each foot of immersion— (1) If the unit is a surface unit, on both the...

  1. 46 CFR 108.661 - Unit markings: Draft marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unit markings: Draft marks. 108.661 Section 108.661... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.661 Unit markings: Draft marks. (a) Each unit must have draft marks for each foot of immersion— (1) If the unit is a surface unit, on both the...

  2. 46 CFR 108.661 - Unit markings: Draft marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Unit markings: Draft marks. 108.661 Section 108.661... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.661 Unit markings: Draft marks. (a) Each unit must have draft marks for each foot of immersion— (1) If the unit is a surface unit, on both the...

  3. 46 CFR 108.661 - Unit markings: Draft marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Unit markings: Draft marks. 108.661 Section 108.661... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.661 Unit markings: Draft marks. (a) Each unit must have draft marks for each foot of immersion— (1) If the unit is a surface unit, on both the...

  4. 46 CFR 108.661 - Unit markings: Draft marks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Unit markings: Draft marks. 108.661 Section 108.661... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.661 Unit markings: Draft marks. (a) Each unit must have draft marks for each foot of immersion— (1) If the unit is a surface unit, on both the...

  5. Lack of specific association between panicogenic properties of caffeine and HPA-axis activation. A placebo-controlled study of caffeine challenge in patients with panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2015-09-30

    A subgroup of patients with Panic Disorder (PD) exhibits increased sensitivity to caffeine administration. However, the association between caffeine-induced panic attacks and post-caffeine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activation in PD patients remains unclear. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 19 PD patients underwent a 400-mg caffeine-challenge and a placebo-challenge, both administered in the form of instant coffee. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were assessed at both baseline and post-challenge. No patient panicked after placebo-challenge, while nine patients (47.3%) panicked after caffeine-challenge. Placebo administration did not result in any significant change in hormones' plasma levels. Overall, sample's patients demonstrated significant increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEAS plasma levels after caffeine administration. However, post-caffeine panickers and non-panickers did not differ with respect to the magnitude of the increases. Our results indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are not specifically associated with HPA-axis activation, as this is reflected in post-caffeine increases in ACTH, cortisol and DHEAS plasma levels, suggesting that caffeine-induced panic attacks in PD patients are not specifically mediated by the biological processes underlying fear or stress. More generally, our results add to the evidence that HPA-axis activation is not a specific characteristic of panic. PMID:26243374

  6. Assessing dietary exposure to caffeine from beverages in the U.S. population using brand-specific versus category-specific caffeine values.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diane C; Hockenberry, Jon; Teplansky, Robyn; Hartman, Terryl J

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on caffeine intakes in the United States have highlighted the importance of obtaining accurate and valid measures of caffeine exposure. The objective of this study is to compare two methods of assigning caffeine values to beverages: brand-specific values versus an aggregate single value representing a broader range of products within a beverage category (i.e., category-specific). The two methods yielded some small, but statistically significant differences in the estimation of caffeine intake from coffee, tea, and carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) for all ages combined and within several of the adult age groups (i.e., 35-49, 50-64, and ≥65 years). These differences, while small, suggest that detailed brand-specific data, particularly for CSDs, commercially pre-packaged or bottled teas, coffee, and specialty coffee drinks, provide more accurate estimates of caffeine exposure for some age groups. Despite these differences, these data provide some assurance that studies using a single aggregate caffeine value provide reasonable measures of caffeine exposure, particularly for studies conducted over a decade ago when there were fewer caffeinated products and brand-specific data available. As the caffeinated beverage marketplace continues to evolve, the use of more detailed, brand-specific data will likely strengthen the assessment of caffeine exposure in the United States. PMID:25818465

  7. Effect of Caffeine Ingestion on Cardiorespiratory Endurance in Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, N. K.; Crowell, D.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen uptake, heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion were used to measure the effect of caffeine ingestion on active college students. The results do not support the general use of caffeine as an ergogenic aid for either males or females, although caffeine may have that effect on specific individuals. (Author/MT)

  8. Storm in a coffee cup: caffeine modifies brain activation to social signals of threat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica E; Lawrence, Andrew D; Diukova, Ana; Wise, Richard G; Rogers, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine A₁ and A(2A) receptor antagonist, is the most popular psychostimulant drug in the world, but it is also anxiogenic. The neural correlates of caffeine-induced anxiety are currently unknown. This study investigated the effects of caffeine on brain regions implicated in social threat processing and anxiety. Participants were 14 healthy male non/infrequent caffeine consumers. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, they underwent blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional face processing task 1 h after receiving caffeine (250 mg) or placebo in two fMRI sessions (counterbalanced, 1-week washout). They rated anxiety and mental alertness, and their blood pressure was measured, before and 2 h after treatment. Results showed that caffeine induced threat-related (angry/fearful faces > happy faces) midbrain-periaqueductal gray activation and abolished threat-related medial prefrontal cortex wall activation. Effects of caffeine on extent of threat-related amygdala activation correlated negatively with level of dietary caffeine intake. In concurrence with these changes in threat-related brain activation, caffeine increased self-rated anxiety and diastolic blood pressure. Caffeine did not affect primary visual cortex activation. These results are the first to demonstrate potential neural correlates of the anxiogenic effect of caffeine, and they implicate the amygdala as a key site for caffeine tolerance. PMID:21972425

  9. The buzz on caffeine in invertebrates: effects on behavior and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mustard, Julie A

    2014-04-01

    A number of recent studies from as diverse fields as plant-pollinator interactions, analyses of caffeine as an environmental pollutant, and the ability of caffeine to provide protection against neurodegenerative diseases have generated interest in understanding the actions of caffeine in invertebrates. This review summarizes what is currently known about the effects of caffeine on behavior and its molecular mechanisms in invertebrates. Caffeine appears to have similar effects on locomotion and sleep in both invertebrates and mammals. Furthermore, as in mammals, caffeine appears to have complex effects on learning and memory. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects may differ between invertebrates and vertebrates. While caffeine's ability to cause release of intracellular calcium stores via ryanodine receptors and its actions as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor have been clearly established in invertebrates, its ability to interact with invertebrate adenosine receptors remains an important open question. Initial studies in insects and mollusks suggest an interaction between caffeine and the dopamine signaling pathway; more work needs to be done to understand the mechanisms by which caffeine influences signaling via biogenic amines. As of yet, little is known about whether other actions of caffeine in vertebrates, such as its effects on GABAA and glycine receptors, are conserved. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine remains to be elucidated. Overall behavioral responses to caffeine appear to be conserved amongst organisms; however, we are just beginning to understand the mechanisms underlying its effects across animal phyla. PMID:24162934

  10. Storm in a coffee cup: caffeine modifies brain activation to social signals of threat

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Diukova, Ana; Wise, Richard G.; Rogers, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist, is the most popular psychostimulant drug in the world, but it is also anxiogenic. The neural correlates of caffeine-induced anxiety are currently unknown. This study investigated the effects of caffeine on brain regions implicated in social threat processing and anxiety. Participants were 14 healthy male non/infrequent caffeine consumers. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, they underwent blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional face processing task 1 h after receiving caffeine (250 mg) or placebo in two fMRI sessions (counterbalanced, 1-week washout). They rated anxiety and mental alertness, and their blood pressure was measured, before and 2 h after treatment. Results showed that caffeine induced threat-related (angry/fearful faces > happy faces) midbrain-periaqueductal gray activation and abolished threat-related medial prefrontal cortex wall activation. Effects of caffeine on extent of threat-related amygdala activation correlated negatively with level of dietary caffeine intake. In concurrence with these changes in threat-related brain activation, caffeine increased self-rated anxiety and diastolic blood pressure. Caffeine did not affect primary visual cortex activation. These results are the first to demonstrate potential neural correlates of the anxiogenic effect of caffeine, and they implicate the amygdala as a key site for caffeine tolerance. PMID:21972425

  11. Gas Chromatography Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-Based Metabolomics for Comparison of Caffeinated and Decaffeinated Coffee and Its Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kai Lun; Ho, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Findings from epidemiology, preclinical and clinical studies indicate that consumption of coffee could have beneficial effects against dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The benefits appear to come from caffeinated coffee, but not decaffeinated coffee or pure caffeine itself. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use metabolomics approach to delineate the discriminant metabolites between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, which could have contributed to the observed therapeutic benefits. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to characterize the metabolic differences between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) showed distinct separation between the two types of coffee (cumulative Q2 = 0.998). A total of 69 discriminant metabolites were identified based on the OPLS-DA model, with 37 and 32 metabolites detected to be higher in caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. These metabolites include several benzoate and cinnamate-derived phenolic compounds, organic acids, sugar, fatty acids, and amino acids. Our study successfully established GC-TOF-MS based metabolomics approach as a highly robust tool in discriminant analysis between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee samples. Discriminant metabolites identified in this study are biologically relevant and provide valuable insights into therapeutic research of coffee against AD. Our data also hint at possible involvement of gut microbial metabolism to enhance therapeutic potential of coffee components, which represents an interesting area for future research. PMID:25098597

  12. Caffeine vs caffeine-free sports drinks: effects on urine production at rest and during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Wemple, R D; Lamb, D R; McKeever, K H

    1997-01-01

    We compared the effects of caffeinated vs non-caffeinated carbohydrate electrolyte (CE) drinks on urine volume (UV), free water clearance (CH2O), fractional excretion of water (FEH2O), and osmolar excretion during 4 h of rest or 1 h rest followed by 3 h of cycling at 60% VO2max in six subjects. We also tested maximal performance at 85% VO2max following the 3-h exercise trials. Throughout the two resting trials and the two rest + exercise trials, subjects ingested CE (total volume = 35 ml/kg) without (PLAC) or with (CAFF) caffeine (25 mg/dl). Blood samples were collected, and body weight and UV were recorded every hour. Urine and blood were analyzed for osmolality and creatinine, and plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined. At rest, mean (+/-SE) UV between 60 min and 240 min was greater for CAFF (1843 +/- 166 ml) vs PLAC (1411 +/- 181 ml) (p < 0.01); during exercise the difference in UV between CAFF (398 +/- 32 ml) and PLAC (490 +/- 57 ml) was not significant. Cycling performance was unaffected by caffeine. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were not different between PLAC and CAFF but were greater during exercise than rest (p < 0.01) and may have counteracted the diuretic effect of caffeine observed at rest. Thus, CAFF consumed in CE during moderate endurance exercise apparently does not compromise bodily hydration status. PMID:9059904

  13. [Pharmacological action on emotional sphere with phenazepam and caffeine changes preference of ethanol in Wistar male rats].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Earlier we have shown that essential for formation of preference to alcohol is not that much the initial anxiety level, but rather direction of its change in the process of forced alcoholization. The goal of this work was study of effect of change in the anxiety level on formation of action on the emotional sphere. Out of four groups, for 4 months of experiment, the 1st group had access only to the 10 % ethanol solution; the 2nd group--to the 10% ethanol with addition of 0.4 g/l caffeine; the 3rd - to 10% ethanol with 0.5 mg/l phenazepam; the 4th (control)--only to water. The anxiety level and behavioral parameters were estimated prior to the experiment and after each 5 weeks with aid of the test "the open field". Preference of ethanol was determined with aid of the test "the two-glass sample" before the experiment and each 4 weeks. In experimental groups of rats the long-term consumption of ethanol, of ethanol with caffeine, and of ethanol with phenazepam led to an increase in preference of alcohol as compared with control. A decrease of motor activity at the period of forced alcoholization was found to correlate positively with the low level of preference of alcohol. The rats consuming ethanol with caffeine and sensitive to action of the psychostimulator enhancing anxiety formed faster the preference to alcohol. In rats not sensitive to action of caffeine the preference to alcohol was not formed. Rats sensitive to the sedative action of phenazepam were less anxious and subsequently did not prefer alcohol. In rats not sensitive to phenazepam, anxiety was enhanced and preference to alcohol was formed. PMID:25508949

  14. [Pharmacological action on emotional sphere with phenazepam and caffeine changes preference of ethanol in Wistar male rats].

    PubMed

    Kulagina, K O; Egorov, A Yu; Filatova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Earlier we have shown that essential for formation of preference to alcohol is not that much the initial anxiety level, but rather direction of its change in the process of forced alcoholization. The goal of this work was study of effect of change in the anxiety level on formation of action on the emotional sphere. Out of four groups, for 4 months of experiment, the 1st group had access only to the 10 % ethanol solution; the 2nd group--to the 10% ethanol with addition of 0.4 g/l caffeine; the 3rd - to 10% ethanol with 0.5 mg/l phenazepam; the 4th (control)--only to water. The anxiety level and behavioral parameters were estimated prior to the experiment and after each 5 weeks with aid of the test "the open field". Preference of ethanol was determined with aid of the test "the two-glass sample" before the experiment and each 4 weeks. In experimental groups of rats the long-term consumption of ethanol, of ethanol with caffeine, and of ethanol with phenazepam led to an increase in preference of alcohol as compared with control. A decrease of motor activity at the period of forced alcoholization was found to correlate positively with the low level of preference of alcohol. The rats consuming ethanol with caffeine and sensitive to action of the psychostimulator enhancing anxiety formed faster the preference to alcohol. In rats not sensitive to action of caffeine the preference to alcohol was not formed. Rats sensitive to the sedative action of phenazepam were less anxious and subsequently did not prefer alcohol. In rats not sensitive to phenazepam, anxiety was enhanced and preference to alcohol was formed. PMID:25486818

  15. Gender-specific increase in susceptibility to metabolic syndrome of offspring rats after prenatal caffeine exposure with post-weaning high-fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Luo, Hanwen; Wu, Yimeng; He, Zheng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yu; Ma, Lu; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) alters the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming and induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome (MS) in intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) offspring rats. High-fat diet (HFD) is one of the main environmental factors accounting for the incidence of MS. In this study, we aimed to clarify the gender-specific increase in susceptibility to MS in offspring rats after PCE with post-weaning HFD. Maternal Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. The offspring rats with normal diet or HFD were euthanized at postnatal week 24, and blood samples were collected. Results showed that PCE not only reduced serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels, but also enhanced serum glucose, triglyceride and total cholesterol (TCH) concentrations in the offspring rats. Moreover, several interactions among PCE, HFD and gender were observed by a three-way ANOVA analysis. In PCE offspring, HFD could aggravate the degree of increased serum triglyceride level. Meanwhile, serum corticosterone levels of females were decreased more obviously than those of males in PCE offspring. The results also revealed interactions between HFD and gender in the levels of serum ACTH, triglyceride and TCH, which were changed more evidently in female HFD offspring. These results indicate that HFD could exacerbate the dysfunction of lipid metabolism and the susceptibility to MS induced by PCE, and the female offspring are more sensitive to HFD-induced neuroendocrine metabolic dysfunction than their male counterparts. - Highlights: • Caffeine induced HPA axis dysfunction in offspring rats fed by high-fat diet (HFD). • Caffeine induced an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. • HFD aggravated susceptibility to metabolic syndrome induced by caffeine. • Female was more sensitive to HFD-induced neuroendocrine

  16. Carbohydrate mouth rinse and caffeine improves high-intensity interval running capacity when carbohydrate restricted.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Andreas M; Cocking, Scott; Cockayne, Molly; Barnard, Marcus; Tench, Jake; Parker, Liam; McAndrew, John; Langan-Evans, Carl; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrate mouth rinsing, alone or in combination with caffeine, augments high-intensity interval (HIT) running capacity undertaken in a carbohydrate-restricted state. Carbohydrate restriction was achieved by performing high-intensity running to volitional exhaustion in the evening prior to the main experimental trials and further refraining from carbohydrate intake in the post-exercise and overnight period. On the subsequent morning, eight males performed 45-min steady-state (SS) exercise (65% [Formula: see text]) followed by HIT running to exhaustion (1-min at 80% [Formula: see text]interspersed with 1-min walking at 6 km/h). Subjects completed 3 trials consisting of placebo capsules (administered immediately prior to SS and immediately before HIT) and placebo mouth rinse at 4-min intervals during HIT (PLACEBO), placebo capsules but 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) at corresponding time-points or finally, caffeine capsules (200 mg per dose) plus 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CAFF + CMR) at corresponding time-points. Heart rate, capillary glucose, lactate, glycerol and NEFA were not different at exhaustion during HIT (P > 0.05). However, HIT capacity was different (P < 0.05) between all pair-wise comparisons such that CAFF + CMR (65 ± 26 min) was superior to CMR (52 ± 23 min) and PLACEBO (36 ± 22 min). We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing and caffeine ingestion improves exercise capacity undertaken in carbohydrate-restricted states. Such nutritional strategies may be advantageous for those athletes who deliberately incorporate elements of training in carbohydrate-restricted states (i.e. the train-low paradigm) into their overall training programme in an attempt to strategically enhance mitochondrial adaptations of skeletal muscle. PMID:26035740

  17. High-pressure liquid chromatography of caffeine in coffee.

    PubMed

    Madison, B L; Kozarek, W J; Damo, C P

    1976-11-01

    A new method is described for the determination of caffeine in coffee, based on high-pressure liquid chromatography. The caffeine is extracted from the sample with water and/or methylene chloride, and then separated from interfering materials by passing an aliquot of the extract through a high-pressure column containing sulfonated cation exchange resin, using 0.01M nitric acid as the mobile phase. An ultraviolet detector measures the absorption of the solution directly. The method is rapid and eliminates the lengthy separations common to other methods. The procedure was applied successfully to decaffeinated and non-decaffeinated green, roasted, and instant coffees. This method gives a more accurate measure of the caffeine content in decaffeinated coffee samples than the micro Bailey-Andrew and modified Levine methods, with equal or better precision. This method gives results equal to those obtained by the official methods for non-decaffeinated samples. PMID:993180

  18. [Self-rated Caffeine Sensitivity: Implications for Personalized Sleep Medicine?].

    PubMed

    Landolt, Hans Peter

    2016-05-11

    The prevalence of the insomnia syndrome and the effects of caffeine on sleep are in part genetically determined. Pharmacogenetic studies in humans demonstrate that functional polymorphisms of the genes encoding adenosine A2A receptors and dopamine transporters contribute to individual differences in impaired sleep quality by caffeine. The A2A receptor and dopamine transporter are preferentially expressed in the striatum. Together, these observations suggest that the striatum plays an important role in sleep-wake regulation. Individual caffeine sensitivity and A2A receptor genotype should be taken into account in the development of possible novel adenosine-based pharmacotherapies of sleep-wake disorders and neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. This may permit the prediction of individual drug effects and improve the reliability of clinical trials. PMID:27167478

  19. Ames Fellows Award - Mark

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Hans Mark is a leading expert in the fields of aerospace design and national defense policy. From 1969 to 1977, he served as Director of the NASA Ames Research Center. During his tenure, Ames b...

  20. Maternal Caffeine Consumption and Infant Nighttime Waking: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Iná S.; Matijasevich, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coffee and other caffeinated beverages are commonly consumed in pregnancy. In adults, caffeine may interfere with sleep onset and have a dose-response effect similar to those seen during insomnia. In infancy, nighttime waking is a common event. With this study, we aimed to investigate if maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and lactation leads to frequent nocturnal awakening among infants at 3 months of age. METHODS: All children born in the city of Pelotas, Brazil, during 2004 were enrolled on a cohort study. Mothers were interviewed at delivery and after 3 months to obtain information on caffeine drinking consumption, sociodemographic, reproductive, and behavioral characteristics. Infant sleeping pattern in the previous 15 days was obtained from a subsample. Night waking was defined as an episode of infant arousal that woke the parents during nighttime. Multivariable analysis was performed by using Poisson regression. RESULTS: The subsample included 885 of the 4231 infants born in 2004. All but 1 mother consumed caffeine in pregnancy. Nearly 20% were heavy consumers (≥300 mg/day) during pregnancy and 14.3% at 3 months postpartum. Prevalence of frequent nighttime awakeners (>3 episodes per night) was 13.8% (95% confidence interval: 11.5%–16.0%). The highest prevalence ratio was observed among breastfed infants from mothers consuming ≥300 mg/day during the whole pregnancy and in the postpartum period (1.65; 95% confidence interval: 0.86–3.17) but at a nonsignificant level. CONCLUSIONS: Caffeine consumption during pregnancy and by nursing mothers seems not to have consequences on sleep of infants at the age of 3 months. PMID:22473365

  1. Absorption of caffeine in fermented Pu-er tea is inhibited in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ye-wei; Xu, Huan-huan; Wang, Su-min; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Yu-min; Li, Run-bo; Wang, Xuan-jun; Hao, Shu-mei; Sheng, Jun

    2014-07-25

    Caffeine is present in a number of dietary sources consumed worldwide. Although its pharmacokinetics has been intensively explored, little is known about complexed caffeine (C-CAF) in aqueous extraction of fermented Pu-er tea. The major components of C-CAF are oxidative tea polyphenols (OTP) and caffeine. Furthermore, the C-CAF can be precipitated in low pH solution. After administering the same amount of total caffeine and comparing the peak level of plasma caffeine with the coffee (contains 0.11 ± 0.01% C-CAF) group, the results showed that the caffeine/OTP (contains 66.67 ± 0.02% C-CAF) group and the instant Pu-er tea (contains 23.18 ± 0.02% C-CAF) group were 33.39% and 25.86% lower, respectively. The concentration of the metabolites of caffeine supports the idea that the absorption of the C-CAF was inhibited in mice. Congruent with this result, the amount of caffeine detected in mice excrement showed that more caffeine was eliminated in the caffeine/OTP group and the Pu-er tea group. The locomotor activity tests of mice demonstrated that the stimulating effect of caffeine in caffeine/OTP and Pu-er tea was weaker than in coffee. Our findings demonstrate that caffeine can be combined with OTP and the absorption of C-CAF is inhibited in mice, thus decreasing the irritation effect of caffeine. This may also be developed as a slow release formulation of caffeine. PMID:24836454

  2. Effect of coffee (caffeine) against human cataract blindness

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Shambhu D

    2016-01-01

    Previous biochemical and morphological studies with animal experiments have demonstrated that caffeine given topically or orally to certain experimental animal models has significant inhibitory effect on cataract formation. The present studies were undertaken to examine if there is a correlation between coffee drinking and incidence of cataract blindness in human beings. That has been found to be the case. Incidence of cataract blindness was found to be significantly lower in groups consuming higher amounts of coffee in comparison to the groups with lower coffee intake. Mechanistically, the caffeine effect could be multifactorial, involving its antioxidant as well as its bioenergetic effects on the lens. PMID:26869755

  3. Online Activity Levels Are Related to Caffeine Dependency.

    PubMed

    Phillips, James G; Landhuis, C Erik; Shepherd, Daniel; Ogeil, Rowan P

    2016-05-01

    Online activity could serve in the future as behavioral markers of emotional states for computer systems (i.e., affective computing). Hence, this study considered relationships between self-reported stimulant use and online study patterns. Sixty-two undergraduate psychology students estimated their daily caffeine use, and this was related to study patterns as tracked by their use of a Learning Management System (Blackboard). Caffeine dependency was associated with less time spent online, lower rates of file access, and fewer online activities completed. Reduced breadth or depth of processing during work/study could be used as a behavioral marker of stimulant use. PMID:27096737

  4. The effects of catechin rich teas and caffeine on energy expenditure and fat oxidation: a meta-analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different outcomes of the effect of catechin-caffeine mixtures and caffeine-only supplementation on energy expenditure and fat oxidation have been reported in short-term studies. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted to elucidate whether catechin-caffeine mixtures and caffeine-only supplementatio...

  5. Molecular adsorption study of nicotine and caffeine on single-walled carbon nanotubes from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung-June; Kim, Gunn; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2013-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic structures and binding properties of nicotine and caffeine adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes to determine whether CNTs are appropriate for filtering or sensing nicotine and caffeine molecules. We find that caffeine adsorbs more strongly than nicotine. The different binding characteristics are discussed by analyzing the modification of the electronic structure of the molecule-adsorbed CNTs. We also calculate the quantum conductance of the CNTs in the presence of nicotine or caffeine adsorbates and demonstrate that the influence of caffeine is stronger than nicotine on the conductance of the host CNT.

  6. Sensitivity of BN nano-cages to caffeine and nicotine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Baei, Mohammad T.; Tazikeh Lemeski, E.; Shahini, Malihe

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules over B12N12 and B16N16 nano-cages were investigated by using first-principles calculations to define whether BN nano-cages are applicable for filtering or sensing caffeine and nicotine molecules. The chemisorption energy of nicotine molecule on BN nano-cages is very stronger than caffeine molecule. Upon the adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules, the electronic properties of the BN nano-cages can be significantly changed, being too much sensitized on the caffeine and nicotine adsorptions.

  7. The buzz on caffeine in invertebrates: effects on behavior and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent studies from as diverse fields as plant-pollinator interactions, analyses of caffeine as an environmental pollutant, and the ability of caffeine to provide protection against neurodegenerative diseases have generated interest in understanding the actions of caffeine in invertebrates. This review summarizes what is currently known about the effects of caffeine on behavior and its molecular mechanisms in invertebrates. Caffeine appears to have similar effects on locomotion and sleep in both invertebrates and mammals. Furthermore, as in mammals, caffeine appears to have complex effects on learning and memory. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects may differ between invertebrates and vertebrates. While caffeine’s ability to cause release of intracellular calcium stores via ryanodine receptors and its actions as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor have been clearly established in invertebrates, its ability to interact with invertebrate adenosine receptors remains an important open question. Initial studies in insects and mollusks suggest an interaction between caffeine and the dopamine signaling pathway; more work needs to be done to understand the mechanisms by which caffeine influences signaling via biogenic amines. As of yet, little is known about whether other actions of caffeine in vertebrates, such as its effects on GABAA and glycine receptors, are conserved. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine remains to be elucidated. Overall behavioral responses to caffeine appear to be conserved amongst organisms; however, we are just beginning to understand the mechanisms underlying its effects across animal phyla. PMID:24162934

  8. Action of Caffeine as an Amyloid Inhibitor in the Aggregation of Aβ16-22 Peptides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused due to aggregation of Aβ peptides in the brain tissues. Recently, several studies on AD transgenic mice have shown the effect of caffeine in significantly reducing the Aβ amyloid level in their brains. However, the mechanism and mode of caffeine action on amyloid aggregation are not known. Therefore, in this study, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of five amyloid-forming Aβ16-22 peptides in pure water and in a regime of caffeine solutions, with different caffeine/peptide stoichiometric ratios. The secondary structure analyses of peptides in pure water show the formation of β-sheet conformations, whereas on addition of caffeine, these ordered conformations become negligible. The radial distribution function, contact map, nonbonding interaction energy, hydrogen bonding, potential of mean force, and hydration analyses show that there is less interpeptide interaction in the presence of caffeine, and the effect is greater with an increasing caffeine ratio. The interaction of aromatic phenylalanine residues of peptides with caffeine restricts the interpeptide interaction tendency. Upon increasing the number of caffeine molecules, interaction of caffeine with other hydrophobic residues also increases. Thus, the hydrophobic core-recognition motif of amyloid formation of peptides is physically blocked by caffeine, thereby abolishing the self-assembly formation. PMID:27487451

  9. Inhibitory effects of caffeine on gustatory plasticity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Urushihata, Takuya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Yukako; Sakata, Kazumi; Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Nishino, Asuka; Matsuura, Tetsuya

    2016-10-01

    The effects of caffeine on salt chemotaxis learning were investigated using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. To estimate the degree of salt chemotaxis learning, nematodes were placed in a mixed solution of NaCl and caffeine, and then the chemotaxis index of NaCl was obtained from the nematodes placed on agar medium after pre-exposure to caffeine concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0%. Locomotor activity and preference behavior for caffeine were also estimated under these caffeine conditions. Nematodes pre-exposed to 0.3% caffeine showed inhibition of salt chemotaxis learning. Additional experiments indicated that nematodes showed a preference response to the middle concentration of caffeine (0.1%), with preference behavior declining in the 0.3% caffeine condition. Stable locomotor activity was observed under 0.01-0.3% caffeine conditions. These results suggest that salt chemotaxis learning with 0.3% caffeine is useful for investigating the effects of caffeine on learning in nematodes. PMID:27280475

  10. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed. PMID:23363704

  11. Relationship of chromosomal damage induced by caffeine to growth temperature and ATP level in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández, P; Mingo, R; González-Fernández, A; López-Sáez, J F

    1986-10-01

    Caffeine is known to induce chromosomal aberrations in proliferating cells when they are incubated during G2 and mitotic prophase. In the present paper, this caffeine effect has been analyzed in Allium cepa root meristems growing at different culture temperatures under steady-state kinetics. Caffeine (1-10 mM) induces chromosomal aberrations in a dose-dependent manner, and the treatment efficiency correlates linearly with the square of caffeine concentration. The efficiency of caffeine incubations, within the range 5-25 degrees C during equivalent cycle time periods has also been studied. It has been found that the lower the culture temperature, the higher the level of chromosomal aberrations. Moreover, at different temperatures, the level of chromosomal aberrations is a simple function of caffeine concentration and the ATP level. Therefore, the efficiency of caffeine treatment appears to be determined by some interaction between caffeine concentration and cellular ATP level. Our present results demonstrate that the influence of growth temperature on the chromosome-breaking effect of caffeine can be, at least partially, explained by the ATP levels during the incubation periods. In short, under different kinetics of plant cell proliferation, the ATP level, and/or something correlating with it, could explain the efficiency of caffeine in inducing chromosomal aberrations: the lower the ATP level, the higher the caffeine efficiency. PMID:3773927

  12. Chronic caffeine ingestion causes microglia activation, but not proliferation in the healthy brain

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Rob; Kamal, Arifa; Lutchman, Sara; Intrabartolo, Liliana; Sohail, Rabia; Brumberg, Joshua C.

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is the most popular psychoactive drug in the world which contributes to behavioral and metabolic changes when ingested. Within the central nervous system (CNS), caffeine has a high affinity for A1 and A2a adenosine receptors. Serving as an antagonist, caffeine affects the ability for adenosine to bind to these receptors. Caffeine has been shown to alter neuronal functioning through increasing spontaneous firing. However, the effects of caffeine on non-neuronal cells in the CNS has been not been studied extensively. Microglia are one phenotype of non-neuronal glia within the CNS. Acting as phagocytes, they contribute to the immune defense system of the brain and express A1 and A2a adenosine receptors. Caffeine, therefore, may affect microglia. In order to test this hypothesis, CD-1 mice were randomly placed into one of three groups: control, low caffeine (0.3g/L water) and high caffeine (1.0g/L water) and were allowed to drink freely for 30 days. Following 30 days, brain sections were stained to reveal microglia. Morphological reconstructions and density measurements were examined in cortical and subcortical areas including the primary sensory cortex, primary motor cortex and striatum. Results indicate that microglial density throughout the brain is decreased in the caffeine groups as compared to the control. Caffeine also impacted microglia morphology shortening process length and decreasing branching. These results suggest that chronic caffeine ingestion has a systemic impact on microglia density and their activation. PMID:24881873

  13. The Combined Effect of Caffeine and Ornithine on the Mood of Healthy Office Workers

    PubMed Central

    Misaizu, Akane; Kokubo, Takeshi; Tazumi, Kyoko; Kanayama, Masaya; Miura, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed and well known for stimulating the central nervous system. When developing new foods and beverages that contain caffeine, it is important to explore the potential synergistic effects of consuming amino acids and other food ingredients with caffeine on humans. Given the physiological pathways affected by the amino acid ornithine, consumption of ornithine with caffeine may have synergistic effects. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of consuming caffeine with ornithine in humans. The study used a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover design. The subjects were all healthy office workers who ingested the placebo, 100 mg caffeine, or 100 mg caffeine plus 200 mg ornithine in the morning and completed questionnaires about their mood. Office workers who consumed the combination of caffeine and ornithine had higher mood ratings 8 h after consumption than office workers who consumed caffeine alone. The results of the present study suggest that there is a unique synergistic effect between caffeine and ornithine on the mood of healthy office workers and that ornithine may potentiate the effects of caffeine. PMID:25580405

  14. Effects of different steeping methods and storage on caffeine, catechins and gallic acid in bag tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Jye; Hwang, Lucy Sun; Lin, Jau-Tien

    2007-07-13

    Bag teas, packed 3g of ground black, green, oolong, paochoung and pu-erh tea leaves (the particle size used was 1-2mm), were steeped in 150 mL of 70, 85 or 100 degrees C hot water to study the effects of the number of steeping (the same bag tea was steeped repeatedly eight times, 30s each time, as done in China for making ceremonial tea) and varied steeping durations (0.5-4 min) on caffeine, catechins and gallic acid in tea infusions. The changes in tea infusions during storage at 4 or 25 degrees C for 0-48 h and the variations in these compounds of bag tea infused with 150 mL of 4 or 25 degrees C cold water for 0.5-16 h were also investigated. A HPLC method with a C18 column and a step gradient solvent system consisting of acetonitrile and 0.9% acetic acid in deionized water was used for analysis. Results for all kinds of tea samples showed that the second tea infusion contained the highest contents of caffeine, catechins and gallic acid when bag teas were steeped in 70 degrees C water. It was different from that steeped at 85 and 100 degrees C, the highest contents existed in the first infusion. These compounds decreased gradually in later infusions. Higher amounts of caffeine, catechins and gallic acid could be released from bag teas as hotter water was used. As steeping duration prolonged, these ingredients increased progressively, however, their levels were lower than that cumulated from the infusions with the identical bag tea prepared recurrently at the same temperature and time points. (-)-Gallocatechin gallate and (+)-catechin existed in these tea infusions rarely and could not be detected until a certain amount of them infusing. Except gallic acid that showed a significant increase and caffeine that exhibited no significant change, all kinds of catechins decreased appreciably after tea infusions were stored at 25 degrees C for 36 h; nevertheless, all of them showed no evident changes at 4 degrees C storage. The caffeine, catechins and gallic acid in tea

  15. Meetings with Mark Vishik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalikinskaya, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    Mark Iosifovich Vishik was my husband Vladimir Chepyzhov's advisor during his years as a student in the Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics at Moscow State University, and afterwards they worked together for almost 30 years. This is why I knew him personally while not being a mathematician myself: we sometimes talked on the phone, and met during common trips and a few holidays. In his last years, after the death of his devoted wife who was also his best friend, my husband and I decided to visit Mark regularly in order to comfort him in his loneliness, and many other of his friends did the same. I can say without exaggeration that Mark loved to talk with me about everyday matters, to reminisce about his wife Asya Moiseevna, their friends and relatives, to tell stories of his youth and the wonderful encounters that had so enriched his life. We had the idea to write down our conversations and publish them as a book. Unfortunately, few such conversations lay ahead. The last one took place in January 2010. We did not write a book, but we did write an article [1], which was published in English in the form of an interview with Mark. The present article is based on our conversations with Mark. Here I will try to recount his memories about people who played an important role in his life.

  16. Autopsy report for a caffeine intoxication case and review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takuma; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kubo, Shin-ichi; Emoto, Yuko; Hara, Kenji; Waters, Brian; Umehara, Takahiro; Murase, Takehiko; Ikematsu, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a popular mild central nervous system stimulant found in the leaves, seeds and fruits of various plants and in foodstuffs such as coffee, tea, and chocolate, among others. Caffeine is widely used and is not associated with severe side effects when consumed at relatively low doses. Although rarely observed, overdoses can occur. However, only a few fatal caffeine intoxication cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report the pathological examination results and information on caffeine concentrations in the blood, urine and main organs in a fatal caffeine intoxication case. Even though high caffeine concentrations were found in the systemic organs, no caffeine-related pathological changes were detected. PMID:26023259

  17. Study of Caffein - Catechin Association in Lyophilized Fresh Seeds and in Stabilized Extract of Cola nitida.

    PubMed

    Maillard, C; Babadjamian, A; Balansard, G; Ollivier, B; Bamba, D

    1985-12-01

    Caffein-catechin association has been demonstrated in lyophilized fresh seeds and in stabilized extract of COLA NITIDA (Vent.) A. Chev. by using various analytical techniques which have made it possible to determine specifically the concentrations of free caffein versus associated caffein. Associated caffein varies from 0% in dried seeds to 91% in lyophilized fresh seeds and in stabilized extract of COLA. It was possible to simulate these quantitative variations of associated caffein by using an experimental model with a saturated aqueous solution of caffein and various amounts of catechin. Infrared spectrophotometric studies have shown the hydrogen bond type of the association. The differences of pharmacological effects of fresh and dried seeds may be due to the varying concentrations of associated and free caffein. PMID:17345274

  18. Aircraft vortex marking program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, reliable device for identifying atmospheric vortices, principally as generated by in-flight aircraft and with emphasis on the use of nonpolluting aerosols for marking by injection into such vortex (-ices) is presented. The refractive index and droplet size were determined from an analysis of aerosol optical and transport properties as the most significant parameters in effecting vortex optimum light scattering (for visual sighting) and visual persistency of at least 300 sec. The analysis also showed that a steam-ejected tetraethylene glycol aerosol with droplet size near 1 micron and refractive index of approximately 1.45 could be a promising candidate for vortex marking. A marking aerosol was successfully generated with the steam-tetraethylene glycol mixture from breadboard system hardware. A compact 25 lb/f thrust (nominal) H2O2 rocket chamber was the key component of the system which produced the required steam by catalytic decomposition of the supplied H2O2.

  19. Improvements in concentration, working memory and sustained attention following consumption of a natural citicoline-caffeine beverage.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Steven E; Werner, Kimberly B; Preston, Brittany F; Baker, Laurie M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the neurocognitive and electrophysiological effects of a citicoline-caffeine-based beverage in 60 healthy adult participants enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Measures of electrical brain activity using electroencephalogram (EEG) and neuropsychological measures examining attention, concentration and reaction time were administered. Compared to placebo, participants receiving the citicoline-caffeine beverage exhibited significantly faster maze learning times and reaction times on a continuous performance test, fewer errors in a go/no-go task and better accuracy on a measure of information processing speed. EEG results examining P450 event-related potentials revealed that participants receiving the citicoline-caffeine beverage exhibited higher P450 amplitudes than controls, suggesting an increase in sustained attention. Overall, these findings suggest that the beverage significantly improved sustained attention, cognitive effort and reaction times in healthy adults. Evidence of improved P450 amplitude indicates a general improvement in the ability to accommodate new and relevant information within working memory and overall enhanced brain activation. PMID:25046515

  20. Effect of caffeinated coffee on running speed, respiratory factors, blood lactate and perceived exertion during 1500-m treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Wiles, J D; Bird, S R; Hopkins, J; Riley, M

    1992-06-01

    Using a motorized treadmill the study investigated the effects of the ingestion of 3 g of caffeinated coffee on: the time taken to run 1500 m; the selected speed with which athletes completed a 1-min 'finishing burst' at the end of a high-intensity run; and respiratory factors, perceived exertion and blood lactate levels during a high intensity 1500-m run. In all testing protocols decaffeinated coffee (3 g) was used as a placebo and a double-blind experimental design was used throughout. The participants in the study were middle distance athletes of club, county and national standard. The results showed that ingestion of caffeinated coffee: decreases the time taken to run 1500 m (P less than 0.005); increases the speed of the 'finishing burst' (P less than 0.005); and increases VO2 during the high-intensity 1500-m run (P less than 0.025). The study concluded that under these laboratory conditions, the ingestion of caffeinated coffee could enhance the performance of sustained high-intensity exercise. PMID:1623356

  1. The PCB mark

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on October 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. The requirements outlined at 40 CFR 761.40 through 761.45 specify marking requirements for most PCB items (i.e., any PCB Article, PCB Container, PCB Article Container, or PCB Equipment that contains PCBs). Most PCB items require PCB marks, which are defined as a descriptive name, instructions, cautions, or other information applied to PCB Items or other objects subject to these regulations. The marking regulations include requirements for PCB marks on PCB Items, storage areas, and temporary storage areas. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning marking requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  2. Solid-state characterization and solubility of a genistein-caffeine cocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Michał; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Matczak-Jon, Ewa

    2014-11-01

    Combination of genistein and caffeine leads to a 1:1 cocrystalline phase, which was identified by means of a solvent-drop grinding experiment and isolated afterwards in a solution-evaporation approach. Obtained cocrystal was characterized by X-ray single-crystal and powder diffraction as well as investigated in terms of thermal stability and Hirshfeld surfaces. A scale-up procedure was provided by slurry technique, enabling solubility determination. Neutral forms of both compounds cocrystallize in a common P21/c space group of the monoclinic crystal system. Analysis of packing and interactions in the crystal lattice reveals formation of molecular layers, formed by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O-type contacts between genistein and caffeine molecules, whereas stabilization of the three-dimensional crystal lattice is provided by π⋯π interactions. Dissolution studies in a 50:50 v/v ethanol-water medium revealed that the maximum solubility of the cocrystalline phase reached 0.861 mg/mL after 8 h, revealing some degree of enhancement as compared to parent genistein, maximum solubility of which was also reached after 8 h and equalled 0.588 mg/mL.

  3. The acute physiological and mood effects of tea and coffee: the role of caffeine level.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, P T; Lane, J; Moore, K L; Aspen, J; Rycroft, J A; O'Brien, D C

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine level in tea and coffee on acute physiological responses and mood. Randomised full crossover design in subjects after overnight caffeine abstention was studied. In study 1 (n = 17) the caffeine level was manipulated naturalistically by preparing tea and coffee at different strengths (1 or 2 cups equivalent). Caffeine levels were 37.5 and 75 mg in tea, 75 and 150 mg in coffee, with water and no-drink controls. In study 2 (n = 15) caffeine level alone was manipulated (water, decaffeinated tea, plus 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg caffeine). Beverage volume and temperature (55 degrees C) were constant. SBP, DBP, heart rate, skin temperature, skin conductance, and mood were monitored over each 3-h study session. In study 1, tea and coffee produced mild autonomic stimulation and an elevation in mood. There were no effects of tea vs. coffee or caffeine dose, despite a fourfold variation in the latter. Increasing beverage strength was associated with greater increases in DBP and energetic arousal. In study 2, caffeinated beverages increased SBP, DBP, and skin conductance and lowered heart rate and skin temperature compared to water. Significant dose-response relationships to caffeine were seen only for SBP, heart rate, and skin temperature. There were significant effects of caffeine on energetic arousal but no consistent dose-response effects. Caffeinated beverages acutely stimulate the autonomic nervous system and increase alertness. Although caffeine can exert dose-dependent effects on a number of acute autonomic responses, caffeine level is not an important factor. Factors besides caffeine may contribute to these acute effects. PMID:10837840

  4. Sensitization and Tolerance Following Repeated Exposure to Caffeine and Alcohol in Mice

    PubMed Central

    May, Christina E.; Haun, Harold L.; Griffin, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Energy drinks are popular mixers with alcohol. While energy drinks contain many ingredients, caffeine is an important pharmacologically active component and is generally present in larger amounts than in other caffeinated beverages. In these studies, we investigated the hypothesis that caffeine would influence the effects of alcohol (ethanol) on conditioned taste aversion, ataxia and locomotor activity after repeated exposure. Methods Four groups of mice were exposed by oral gavage twice daily to vehicle, ethanol (4 g/kg), caffeine (15 mg/kg), or the ethanol/caffeine combination. Conditioned taste aversion to saccharin and ataxia in the parallel rod task were evaluated after 8 or 16 gavages, respectively, using ethanol (1–3 g/kg) or ethanol/caffeine (3mg/kg + 2 g/kg) challenges. In addition, locomotor activity was evaluated initially and after repeated exposure to oral gavage of these drugs and doses. Results Repeated oral gavage of ethanol produced significant locomotor sensitization, with those mice increasing total distance traveled by 2-fold. The locomotor response to caffeine, while significantly greater than vehicle gavage, did not change with repeated exposure. On the other hand, repeated gavage of caffeine/ethanol combination produced a substantial increase in total distance traveled after repeated exposure (~4-fold increase). After repeated ethanol exposure, there was significant tolerance to ethanol in the conditioned taste aversion and parallel rod tests. However, neither a history of caffeine exposure nor including caffeine influenced ethanol-induced conditioned taste aversion. Interestingly, a history of caffeine exposure increased the ataxic response to the caffeine/ethanol combination and appeared to reduce the ataxic response to high doses of ethanol. Conclusion The data support the general hypothesis that repeated exposure to caffeine influences the response to ethanol. Together with previously published work, these data indicate

  5. Acute and chronic caffeine administration increases physical activity in sedentary adults.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Patrick; Panek, Leah M; Temple, Jennifer L

    2013-06-01

    Caffeine is a commonly used stimulant thought to have ergogenic properties. Most studies on the ergogenic effects of caffeine have been conducted in athletes. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that caffeine reduces ratings of perceived exertion and increases liking of physical activity in sedentary adults. Participants completed treadmill walking at 60% to 70% of their maximal heart rate at baseline and for 6 subsequent visits, during which half of the participants were given caffeine (3 mg/kg) and half given placebo in a sports drink vehicle. To investigate the potential synergistic effects of acute and chronic caffeine on self-determined exercise duration, participants were rerandomized to either the same or different condition for the last visit, creating 4 chronic/acute treatment groups (placebo/placebo, placebo/caffeine, caffeine/placebo, caffeine/caffeine). Participants rated how much they liked the activity and perceived exertion at each visit. There was a main effect of time on liking of physical activity, with liking increasing over time and an interaction of sex and caffeine treatment on liking, with liking of activity increasing in female participants treated with caffeine, but not with placebo. There was no effect of caffeine on ratings of perceived exertion. Individuals who received caffeine on the final test day exercised for significantly longer than those who received placebo. These data suggest that repeated exposure to physical activity significantly increases liking of exercise and reduces ratings of perceived exertion and that caffeine does little to further modify these effects. PMID:23746561

  6. Caffeine alleviates the deterioration of Ca2+ release mechanisms and fragmentation of in vitro aged mouse eggs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Wakai, Takuya; Fissore, Rafael. A.

    2011-01-01

    The developmental competence of mammalian eggs is compromised by postovulatory aging. We and others found that in these eggs the intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses required for egg activation and initiation of development are altered. Nevertheless, the mechanism(s) underlying this defective Ca2+ release is not well known. Here, we investigated if the function of IP3R1, the major Ca2+ release channel at fertilization, was undermined in in vitro aged mouse eggs. We found that in aged eggs IP3R1 displayed reduced function, as many of the changes acquired during maturation that enhance IP3R1 Ca2+ conductivity such as phosphorylation, receptor reorganization and increased Ca2+ store content ([Ca2+]ER) were lost with increasing postovulatory time. IP3R1 fragmentation, possibly associated with the activation of caspase-3, was also observed in these eggs. Many of these changes were prevented when the postovulatory aging of eggs was carried out in the presence of caffeine, which minimized the decline in IP3R1 function and maintained [Ca2+]ER content. Caffeine also maintained mitochondrial membrane potential as measured by JC-1 fluorescence. We therefore conclude that [Ca2+]i responses in aged eggs are undermined by reduced IP3R1 sensitivity, decreased [Ca2+]ER and compromised mitochondrial function, and that addition of caffeine ameliorates most of these aging-associated changes. Understanding the molecular basis of the protective effects of caffeine will be useful in elucidating, and possibly reversing, the signaling pathway(s) compromised by in vitro culture of eggs. PMID:22095868

  7. Caffeinated Alcohol, Sensation Seeking, and Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Thomas P.; Egan, Kathleen L.; Goldin, Shoshanna; Rhodes, Scott D.; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background College students who consume caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CaffAlc) are at increased injury risk. This study examines the extent to which a sensation-seeking personality accounts for the relationship between consumption of CaffAlc and negative outcomes. Methods A Web-based survey was administered to stratified random samples of 4907 college students from eight North Carolina universities in Fall 2009. Sensation seeking was assessed using the Brief Sensation-Seeking Scale (BSSS) (α=0.81). Data were analyzed using linear and logistic regression. Results 3390 students (71.2%) reported past 30-day drinking, of whom 786 (23.2%) consumed CaffAlc. CaffAlc past 30-day drinkers had higher BSSS scores (3.8 vs. 3.4; p<0.001), compared to non-CaffAlc drinkers. Consumption of CaffAlc was associated with more frequent binge drinking (p<0.001) and drunken days in a typical week (p<0.001), even after adjusting for the BSSS score. CaffAlc students were more likely to be taken advantage of sexually (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.70, p=0.012), drive under the influence of alcohol (AOR=2.00, p<0.001), and ride with a driver under the influence of alcohol (AOR=1.87, p<0.001). Injury requiring medical treatment was more prevalent among CaffAlc students with higher BSSS-8 scores (interaction p=0.024), even after adjustment for drinking levels and student characteristics. Conclusions Sensation seeking does not fully account for the increase in risky drinking among college students who consume CaffAlc, nor does it moderate the relationship between CaffAlc and drinking behaviors. Sensation seeking moderates the risk of alcohol-associated injury requiring medical treatment among college students who consume CaffAlc. Those with strong sensation-seeking dispositions are at the highest risk of alcohol-associated injury requiring medical treatment. PMID:24761275

  8. Effects of caffeine and Bombesin on ethanol and food intake

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, M.A.; Kulkosky, P.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The methylxanthine caffeine and ethyl alcohol are widely used and powerful psychotropic drugs, but their interactions are not well understood. Bombesin is a brain-gut neuropeptide which is thought to function as a neurochemical factor in the inhibitory control of voluntary alcohol ingestion. We assessed the effects of combinations of intraperitoneal doses of caffeine and bombesin on 5% w/v ethanol solution and food intake in deprived rats. Deprived male and female Wistar rats received access to 5% ethanol or Purina chow for 30 minutes after i.p. injections. In single doses, CAF and BBS significantly decreased both ethanol and food consumption, at 50 mg/kg and 10 {mu}g/kg, respectively. CAF and BBS combinations produced infra-additive, or less-than-expected inhibitory effects on ethanol intake, but simple additive inhibitory effects on food intake. This experimental evidence suggests a reciprocal blocking of effects of CAF and BBS on ethanol intake but not food intake. Caffeine, when interacting and bombesin, increases alcohol consumption beyond expected values. Caffeine could affect the operation of endogenous satisfy signals for alcohol consumption.

  9. Determination of Caffeine in Beverages by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiNunzio, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the equipment, procedures, and results for the determination of caffeine in beverages by high performance liquid chromatography. The method is simple, fast, accurate, and, because sample preparation is minimal, it is well suited for use in a teaching laboratory. (JN)

  10. Ethanol and caffeine effects on daytime sleepiness/alertness.

    PubMed

    Lumley, M; Roehrs, T; Asker, D; Zorick, F; Roth, T

    1987-08-01

    Eighteen normal-sleeping young (mean age 25.6 years) volunteers received either ethanol (0.75 g/kg producing blood ethanol concentrations of 71.1 +/- 24.3 mg/100 ml on average) or caffeine (4.0 mg/kg dissolved in 300 ml of 97% caffeine-free instant coffee) at 0920-0950 h after spending 5, 8, or 11 h time in bed (TIB) the previous night. Latency to sleep onset was tested at 1000, 1200, 1400, and 1600 h. Mean sleep latency differed significantly between drugs on each day of testing, with subjects being sleepier after ethanol than caffeine. On day 2 the TIB manipulation produced significant differences in latency, with the 11-h condition differing from both the 8- and 5-h conditions. The significant interaction revealed that in fully rested subjects (11-h TIB), ethanol did not produce sleepiness to the degree it did after 5 or 8 h in bed. In this condition latencies were similar to those of the caffeine and 5- or 8-h TIBs. PMID:3659729

  11. The Determination of Caffeine in Coffee: Sense or Nonsense?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckers, Jozef L.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of caffeine in coffee is determined by the use of separation devices and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the use of various analytical tools helps to perceive the higher concentration values obtained through UV-vis spectrophotometry than with separation methods.

  12. Caffeine, coffee and ephedrine: impact on exercise performance and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Graham, T E

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses areas where there is controversy regarding caffeine as an ergogenic aid and also identifies topics that have not been adequately addressed. It is clear that caffeine, in moderate amounts, can be used orally as an ergogenic aid in aerobic activity lasting for more than 1 min. It increases endurance and speed, but not maximal VO2 and related parameters. While there are fewer well-controlled studies for resistance exercise, the literature would suggest similar improvements: increased endurance at submaximal tension and power generated in repeated contractions and no change in maximal ability to produce force. It is likely that theophylline (a related methylxanthine) has similar actions and it has been suggested that the combination of caffeine and sympathomimetics may be a more potent erogenic aid. The voids in our understanding of caffeine include the dose (what amount is optimal, what vehicle is used to deliver the drug as well as method, pattern, and mode of administration), the potential side effects (particularly in competitive settings), health implications (insulin resistance and if combined with ephedrine, cardiovascular risks) and mechanisms of action. It appears unlikely that increased fat oxidation and glycogen sparing is the prime ergogenic mechanism. PMID:11897887

  13. Association of riboflavin, caffeine, and sodium salicylate in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskii, S. F.; Bolotin, P. A.

    2007-03-01

    We have used UV and visible spectrophotometry to study self-association of aromatic riboflavin molecules (RFN, vitamin B2, 7,8-dimethyl-10-N-(1'-D-ribityl)isoalloxazine) in aqueous solution (pH 6.86) at T = 298 K, using a dimer model. We have determined the equilibrium dimerization constant for riboflavin, KdB = 125 ± 40 M-1. We have studied heteroassociation in the system of molecules of 7,8-dimethyl-10-ribitylisoalloxazine with 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine (caffeine) and sodium salicylate (NAS) in aqueous solution (pH 6.86; T = 298 K). We have determined the heteroassociation constants for RFN-NAS and RFN-caffeine molecules in the absence and in the presence of urea in solutions using a modified Benesi-Hildebrand equation: 25 ± 4, 17 ± 3, and 74 ± 11, 53 ± 7 M-1 respectively. We have determined the dimerization constants for NAS (2.7 ± 0.5 M-1) and caffeine (17.0 ± 1.5 M-1). We conclude that heteroassociation of the aromatic molecules leads to a lower effective riboflavin concentration in solution, and the presence of urea in mixed solutions leads to an decrease in the complexation constants for the RFN-NAS and RFN-caffeine systems.

  14. Fatigue related impairments in oculomotor control are prevented by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Connell, Charlotte J W; Thompson, Benjamin; Kuhn, Gustav; Claffey, Michael P; Duncan, Shelley; Gant, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Strenuous exercise can result in an inability of the central nervous system to drive skeletal muscle effectively, a phenomenon known as central fatigue. The impact of central fatigue on the oculomotor system is currently unexplored. Fatigue that originates in the central nervous system may be related to perturbations in the synthesis and metabolism of several neurotransmitters. In this study we examine central fatigue in the oculomotor system after prolonged exercise. The involvement of central neurotransmission was explored by administering caffeine during exercise. Within a double-blind, randomized, repeated measures, crossover design, 11 cyclists consumed a placebo or caffeine solution during 180 min of stationary cycling. Saccadic eye movements were measured using infra-red oculography. Exercise decreased saccade velocity by 8% (placebo trial). This effect was reversed by caffeine, whereby velocity was increased by 11% after exercise. A non-oculomotor perceptual task (global motion processing) was unaffected by exercise. The human oculomotor system is impaired by strenuous exercise of the locomotor system. Caffeine exerts a protective effect on oculomotor control, which could be related to up-regulated central neurotransmission. In addition, cortical processes supporting global motion perception appear to be robust to fatigue. PMID:27222342

  15. Caffeine-water-polypeptide interaction in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabi, Habib; Dhahbi, Mahmoud

    1999-04-01

    The interaction of caffeine monomer with the synthetic polypeptides polyasparagine (pAg) and polyaspartic acid (pAsp) was studied by UV spectrophotometry. The results show that different types of interactions are possible depending on the nature of polypeptide. The form of the complex was discussed.

  16. Fatigue related impairments in oculomotor control are prevented by caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Charlotte J. W.; Thompson, Benjamin; Kuhn, Gustav; Claffey, Michael P.; Duncan, Shelley; Gant, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Strenuous exercise can result in an inability of the central nervous system to drive skeletal muscle effectively, a phenomenon known as central fatigue. The impact of central fatigue on the oculomotor system is currently unexplored. Fatigue that originates in the central nervous system may be related to perturbations in the synthesis and metabolism of several neurotransmitters. In this study we examine central fatigue in the oculomotor system after prolonged exercise. The involvement of central neurotransmission was explored by administering caffeine during exercise. Within a double-blind, randomized, repeated measures, crossover design, 11 cyclists consumed a placebo or caffeine solution during 180 min of stationary cycling. Saccadic eye movements were measured using infra-red oculography. Exercise decreased saccade velocity by 8% (placebo trial). This effect was reversed by caffeine, whereby velocity was increased by 11% after exercise. A non-oculomotor perceptual task (global motion processing) was unaffected by exercise. The human oculomotor system is impaired by strenuous exercise of the locomotor system. Caffeine exerts a protective effect on oculomotor control, which could be related to up-regulated central neurotransmission. In addition, cortical processes supporting global motion perception appear to be robust to fatigue. PMID:27222342

  17. Associations between smoking and caffeine consumption in two European cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Amy E.; Ware, Jennifer J.; McMahon, George; Hottenga, Jouke‐Jan; Baselmans, Bart M. L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Vink, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To estimate associations between smoking initiation, smoking persistence and smoking heaviness and caffeine consumption in two population‐based samples from the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Design Observational study employing data on self‐reported smoking behaviour and caffeine consumption. Setting Adults from the general population in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Participants Participants from the Netherlands Twin Register [NTR: n = 21 939, mean age 40.8, standard deviation (SD) = 16.9, 62.6% female] and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC: n = 9086, mean age 33.2, SD = 4.7, 100% female). Measurements Smoking initiation (ever versus never smoking), smoking persistence (current versus former smoking), smoking heaviness (number of cigarettes smoked) and caffeine consumption in mg per day through coffee, tea, cola and energy drinks. Findings After correction for age, gender (NTR), education and social class (ALSPAC), smoking initiation was associated with consuming on average 52.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 45.6–60.0; NTR] and 59.5 (95% CI = 51.8–67.2; ALSPAC) mg more caffeine per day. Smoking persistence was also associated with consuming more caffeine [+57.9 (95% CI = 45.2–70.5) and +83.2 (95% CI = 70.2–96.3) mg, respectively]. Each additional cigarette smoked per day was associated with 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9–5.5; NTR) and 8.4 (95% CI = 6.9–10.0; ALSPAC) mg higher daily caffeine consumption in current smokers. Smoking was associated positively with coffee consumption and less strongly with cola and energy drinks. For tea, associations were positive in ALSPAC and negative in NTR. Conclusions There appears to be a positive association between smoking and caffeine consumption in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. PMID:26750569

  18. Digitally Marking RSA Moduli

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.M.

    2000-10-09

    The moduli used in RSA (see [5]) can be generated by many different sources. The generator of that modulus (assuming a single entity generates the modulus) knows its factorization. They would have the ability to forge signatures or break any system based on this moduli. If a moduli and the RSA parameters associated with it were generated by a reputable source, the system would have higher value than if the parameters were generated by an unknown entity. So for tracking, security, confidence and financial reasons it would be beneficial to know who the generator of the RSA modulus was. This is where digital marking comes in. An RSA modulus ia digitally marked, or digitally trade marked, if the generator and other identifying features of the modulus (such as its intended user, the version number, etc.) can be identified and possibly verified by the modulus itself. The basic concept of digitally marking an RSA modulus would be to fix the upper bits of the modulus to this tag. Thus anyone who sees the public modulus can tell who generated the modulus and who the generator believes the intended user/owner of the modulus is.

  19. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  20. Marking Advanced Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, Michael

    1978-01-01

    A list of points to aid essay writers is suggested as the basis of a marking system for the teacher of English as a foreign language. The checklist, obtained from a book on higher education by Ruth Beard, can be adapted to the English as a foreign language situation. (SW)

  1. Airbag bounce marks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Looking east from the lander, the last few bounce marks as Pathfinder rolled to a stop on July 4 are visible in the soil in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The two most distant marks, identified by pointers in the image, consist of dark patches of disturbed soil. The three closest marks are clearly visible in the foreground, with one easily identifiable behind the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET) mast, is at right. The most distant positively identified bounce mark, indicated by the pointer at right, is approximately 11.3 meters (37 feet) from the lander.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. Fathoming Mark Twain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggar, Joanna

    1988-01-01

    Relates the efforts of completing two collections of the works and papers of Mark Twain. Describes the combined efforts of the University of Iowa and the University of California to publish both a scholarly edition and a reader's edition devoted to Twain. (KO)

  3. Teaching with Mark Dion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusaro, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Mark Dion creates sculptures, installations, and interactive environments that sometimes seem contrary to what one expects from visual artists. Remarkable curiosity cabinets and carefully arranged artifacts from specific places and time periods make up a large part of his work. His work does not neatly fit into traditional lessons about elements…

  4. Double Marking Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Val

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) published the report of an independent panel of experts into maintaining standards at Advanced Level (A-Level). One of its recommendations was for: limited experimental double marking of scripts in subjects such as English to determine whether the strategy would significantly reduce errors…

  5. Maximum tension and force-velocity properties of fatigued, single Xenopus muscle fibres studied by caffeine and high K+.

    PubMed Central

    Lännergren, J; Westerblad, H

    1989-01-01

    1. The importance of reduced maximum force-generating capacity in the development of skeletal muscle fatigue has been studied using potassium and caffeine contractures as tools. 2. Single, intact fibres isolated from the lumbrical and iliofibularis muscles of Xenopus were fatigued by repeated tetanic stimulations until they produced close to 40% of the original tetanic tension (P0). Using this stimulation scheme three major types of fibres can be distinguished: easily fatigued (type 1), fatigue resistant (type 2), and very fatigue-resistant (type 3) fibres (Westerblad & Lännergren, 1986). 3. When activated by 8-15 mM-caffeine-Ringer solutions fatigued fibres of all three types developed tensions similar to those of controls (81.0 +/- 6.6 vs. 83.9 +/- 4.2% of P0, respectively; means +/- S.D.). 4. Tension output also increased markedly when fatigued fibres were depolarized by 190 mM-K+ solution. The tension produced was in this case fibre type dependent: 71.4 +/- 6.6, 81.3 +/- 2.5 and 95.0 +/- 4.4% of P0 in fibre types 1, 2 and 3, respectively. 5. Force-velocity measurements were performed during caffeine contractures in fatigued iliofibularis fibres (types 1 and 2) to obtain more information about the functional state of cross-bridges. 6. In fatigued type 1 fibres the shortening velocity was reduced to about 25% of that in controls, while it was not significantly depressed in type 2 fibres. 7. It is concluded that cross-bridges of fatigued fibres can produce nearly full tension, but they may work at a much slower rate in this state. 8. Fibre types 1 and 2 mostly display a long-lasting, reversible state of severely depressed tension production during the recovery period, which has been named post-contractile depression, PCD (Westerblad & Lännergren, 1986). Fibres tested in this state generated full caffeine-activated tension and the shortening velocity was not significantly reduced. The tension output during K+ contractures was, however, markedly depressed (12

  6. Caffeine electrochemical sensor using imprinted film as recognition element based on polypyrrole, sol-gel, and gold nanoparticles hybrid nanocomposite modified pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Behzad; Khalili Boroujeni, Malihe; Ensafi, Ali A

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, a novel sensitive and selective nanocomposite imprinted electrochemical sensor for the indirect determination of caffeine has been prepared. The imprinted sensor was fabricated on the surface of pencil graphite electrode (PGE) via one-step electropolymerization of the imprinted polymer composed of conductive polymer, sol-gel, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and caffeine. Due to such combination like the thin film of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) with specific binding sites, the sensor responded quickly to caffeine. AuNPs were introduced for the enhancement of electrical response by facilitating charge transfer processes of [Fe(CN)6](3-)/[Fe(CN)6](4-) which was used as an electrochemical active probe. The fabrication process of the sensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Several important parameters controlling the performance of the sensor were investigated and optimized. The imprinted sensor has the advantages of high porous surface structure, inexpensive, disposable, excellent stability, good reproducibility and repeatability. The linear ranges of the MIP sensor were in the range from 2.0 to 50.0 and 50.0 to 1000.0 nmol L(-1), with the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.9 nmol L(-1) (S/N=3). Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully intended for the determination of caffeine in real samples (urine, plasma, tablet, green tea, energy and soda drink). PMID:24769451

  7. PillCam(TradeMark), a Noninvasive Endoscopic Device for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal Motility Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Zahman; Crady, Camille; Raju, G. S.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs given by mouth are governed in part by gastrointestinal (GI) motility and function. Microgravity has been shown to decrease GI motility as indicated by a 3 fold increase in gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). The PillCam(TradeMark), an endoscopic camera embedded in a capsule, is a novel noninvasive and unobtrusive device that is used for the diagnosis of GI pathology. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of PillCam(TradeMark) as an alternative to the Lactulose Breath Hydrogen Test (LBHT) for estimating GI motility. The sensitivity and applicability of this device for detection and estimation of the effect of promethazine, a deterrent, and caffeine, a prokinetic, on GI motility were also examined. Method: In this semi-randomized cross-over design study, six male and six female subjects were administered the following 4 treatments: PillCam(TradeMark) alone, PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose (10g), PillCam(TradeMark)+caffeine (200mg), and PillCam(TradeMark)+Promethazine (50mg). Results: GITT ranged between 1:24 and 7:52 hr:min. Lactulose did not alter GITT. A significant increase in GITT was noticed after administration of PMZ when compared to values from PillCam(TradeMark) treatment alone or PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose treatment. No difference in GITT after caffeine treatment was noticed. While there were no gender related differences in GITT after administration of PillCam(TradeMark) or with lactulose, a significant difference (p<.05) between genders was observed after promethazine administration with mean GITT higher in males (5:50 hr:min) than females (4:15 hr:min). Conclusion: The PillCam(TradeMark) capsule is applicable for the determination of GITT using time stamped GI images. It can be successfully used for the assessment of drug induced changes in GI motility and therefore, may be applicable for microgravity and analog environment studies on GI motility and function.

  8. Caffeine intake antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension through improvement of renal sodium handling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Yang, Tao; Gao, Peng; Wei, Xing; Zhang, Hexuan; Xiong, Shiqiang; Lu, Zongshi; Li, Li; Wei, Xiao; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yu; Arendshorst, William J.; Shang, Qianhui; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake is a major risk factor for hypertension. Although acute caffeine intake produces moderate diuresis and natriuresis, caffeine increases the blood pressure (BP) through activating sympathetic activity. However, the long-term effects of caffeine on urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure are rarely investigated. Here, we investigated whether chronic caffeine administration antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension by promoting urinary sodium excretion. Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats were fed with high salt diet with or without 0.1% caffeine in drinking water for 15 days. The BP, heart rate and locomotor activity of rats was analyzed and urinary sodium excretion was determined. The renal epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) expression and function were measured by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Chronic consumption of caffeine attenuates hypertension induced by high salt without affecting sympathetic nerve activity in Dahl-S rats. The renal α-ENaC expression and ENaC activity of rats decreased after chronic caffeine administration. Caffeine increased phosphorylation of AMPK and decrease α-ENaC expression in cortical collecting duct cells. Inhibiting AMPK abolished the effect of caffeine on α-ENaC. Chronic caffeine intake prevented the development of salt-sensitive hypertension through promoting urinary sodium excretion, which was associated with activation of renal AMPK and inhibition of renal tubular ENaC. PMID:27173481

  9. Cortisol responses to mental stress, exercise, and meals following caffeine intake in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Lovallo, William R.; Farag, Noha H.; Vincent, Andrea S.; Thomas, Terrie L.; Wilson, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine elevates cortisol secretion, and caffeine is often consumed in conjunction with exercise or mental stress. The interactions of caffeine and stress on cortisol secretion have not been explored adequately in women. We measured cortisol levels at eight times on days when healthy men and women consumed caffeine (250 mg × 3) and underwent either mental stress or dynamic exercise protocols, followed by a midday meal, in a double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Men and women had similar cortisol levels at the predrug baselines, but they responded differently to mental stress and exercise. The cortisol response to mental stress was smaller in women than in men (p=.003). Caffeine acted in concert with mental stress to further increase cortisol levels (p=.011), the effect was similar in men and women. Exercise alone did not increase cortisol, but caffeine taken before exercise elevated cortisol in both men and women (ps<.05). After a postexercise meal, the women had a larger cortisol response than the men, and this effect was greater after caffeine (p<.01). Cortisol release in response to stress and caffeine therefore appears to be a function of the type of stressor and the sex of the subject. However, repeated caffeine doses increased cortisol levels across the test day without regard to the sex of the subject or type of stressor employed (p<.00001). Caffeine may elevate cortisol by stimulating the central nervous system in men but may interact with peripheral metabolic mechanisms in women. PMID:16631247

  10. Behavioural effects of compounds co-consumed in dietary forms of caffeinated plants.

    PubMed

    Haskell, C F; Dodd, F L; Wightman, E L; Kennedy, D O

    2013-06-01

    Research into the cognitive and mood effects of caffeine in human subjects has highlighted some fairly robust and well-accepted effects. However, the majority of these studies have focused on caffeine in isolation; whilst caffeine is normally consumed in the form of plant-derived products and extracts that invariably contain other potentially bioactive phytochemicals. The aim of the present review is to consider the possible mechanisms of action of co-occurring phytochemicals, and any epidemiological evidence suggesting that they contribute to potential health benefits ascribed to caffeine. Intervention studies to date that have been conducted to explore the effects on brain function of the non-caffeine components in caffeine-bearing plants (coffee, tea, cocoa, guaraná), either alone or in combination with caffeine, will also be summarised. Research is beginning to accumulate showing independent effects for several of the phytochemicals that co-occur with caffeine, and/or a modulation of the effects of caffeine when it is co-consumed with these naturally concomitant phytochemicals. The present review highlights that more research aimed at understanding the effects of these compounds is needed and, more importantly, the synergistic relationship that they may have with caffeine. PMID:23561485

  11. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G.; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10–16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25–9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development. PMID:26501326

  12. Maternal caffeine exposure alters neuromotor development and hippocampus acetylcholinesterase activity in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Claudia; Souza, Andressa; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; De Oliveira, Carla; Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bonan, Carla D; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L S

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal caffeine intake on the neuromotor development of rat offspring and on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in the hippocampus of 14-day-old infant rats. Rat dams were treated with caffeine (0.3g/L) throughout gestation and lactation until the pups were 14 days old. The pups were divided into three groups: (1) control, (2) caffeine, and (3) washout caffeine. The washout group received a caffeine solution until the seventh postnatal day (P7). Righting reflex (RR) and negative geotaxis (NG) were assessed to evaluate postural parameters as an index of neuromotor reflexes. An open-field (OF) test was conducted to assess locomotor and exploratory activities as well as anxiety-like behaviors. Caffeine treatment increased both RR and NG latency times. In the OF test, the caffeine group had fewer outer crossings and reduced locomotion compared to control, while the washout group showed increased inner crossings in relation to the other groups and fewer rearings only in comparison to the control group. We found decreased AChE activity in the caffeine group compared to the other groups, with no alteration in AChE transcriptional regulation. Chronic maternal exposure to caffeine promotes important alterations in neuromotor development. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere with cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development. PMID:25451122

  13. Kinetics of growth and caffeine demethylase production of Pseudomonas sp. in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Santhosh, Devarai

    2010-09-01

    The effect of various initial caffeine concentrations on growth and caffeine demethylase production by Pseudomonas sp. was studied in bioreactor. At initial concentration of 6.5 g l(-1) caffeine, Pseudomonas sp. showed a maximum specific growth rate of 0.2 h(-1), maximum degradation rate of 1.1 g h(-1), and caffeine demethylase activity of 18,762 U g CDW(-1) (CDW: cell dry weight). Caffeine degradation rate was 25 times higher in bioreactor than in shake flask. For the first time, we show highest degradation of 75 g caffeine (initial concentration 20 g l(-1)) in 120 h, suggesting that the tested strain has potential for successful bioprocess for caffeine degradation. Growth kinetics showed substrate inhibition phenomenon. Various substrate inhibition models were fitted to the kinetic data, amongst which the double-exponential (R(2) = 0.94), Luong (R(2) = 0.92), and Yano and Koga 2 (R(2) = 0.94) models were found to be the best. The Luedeking-Piret model showed that caffeine demethylase production kinetics was growth related. This is the first report on production of high levels of caffeine demethylase in batch bioreactor with faster degradation rate and high tolerance to caffeine, hence clearly suggesting that Pseudomonas sp. used in this study is a potential biocatalyst for industrial decaffeination. PMID:20495941

  14. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep.

    PubMed

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children's and adolescents' sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10-16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1-4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25-9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development. PMID:26501326

  15. Caffeine intake antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension through improvement of renal sodium handling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Yang, Tao; Gao, Peng; Wei, Xing; Zhang, Hexuan; Xiong, Shiqiang; Lu, Zongshi; Li, Li; Wei, Xiao; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yu; Arendshorst, William J; Shang, Qianhui; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake is a major risk factor for hypertension. Although acute caffeine intake produces moderate diuresis and natriuresis, caffeine increases the blood pressure (BP) through activating sympathetic activity. However, the long-term effects of caffeine on urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure are rarely investigated. Here, we investigated whether chronic caffeine administration antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension by promoting urinary sodium excretion. Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats were fed with high salt diet with or without 0.1% caffeine in drinking water for 15 days. The BP, heart rate and locomotor activity of rats was analyzed and urinary sodium excretion was determined. The renal epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) expression and function were measured by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Chronic consumption of caffeine attenuates hypertension induced by high salt without affecting sympathetic nerve activity in Dahl-S rats. The renal α-ENaC expression and ENaC activity of rats decreased after chronic caffeine administration. Caffeine increased phosphorylation of AMPK and decrease α-ENaC expression in cortical collecting duct cells. Inhibiting AMPK abolished the effect of caffeine on α-ENaC. Chronic caffeine intake prevented the development of salt-sensitive hypertension through promoting urinary sodium excretion, which was associated with activation of renal AMPK and inhibition of renal tubular ENaC. PMID:27173481

  16. Acute effects of fructose and glucose ingestion with and without caffeine in young and old humans.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, N K; Veirs, H; Langeloh, G

    1995-05-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in energy expenditure (EE), glucose intolerance, and a reduction in body nitrogen content. In addition, a reduction in the thermic response to glucose but not to fructose or protein has been reported in the elderly. The present study was conducted to further examine nutrient-induced thermogenesis and the effects of specific sugars on amino acid metabolism in relation to age. After 3 days on a weight-maintaining, 250-g carbohydrate diet, 16 healthy non-obese men and women in two age groups (18 to 29 and 66 to 80 years) consumed on 4 different days 500 mL of either a 75-g fructose or 75-g glucose solution, with or without 300 mg caffeine or vitamin C as a placebo. Blood substrate and hormone levels and EE, using indirect calorimetry, were measured at timed intervals for 3 hours after consumption of the drinks. There was no difference in the carbohydrate-induced increase in EE in either young or old even after adjustments for body weight and fat-free mass (FFM). An approximately 20-fold increase in serum caffeine levels increased EE in both groups (P < .003), but had minimal effects on substrate and hormone responses. In contrast to glucose, fructose induced a marked elevation in plasma alanine from combined basal levels of 301 +/- 24 to approximately 500 +/- 18 mumol/L (mean +/- SEM) in both groups (P < .001). However, both fructose and glucose ingestion resulted in a similar decline in branched-chain and aromatic amino acids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7752912

  17. Trends and patterns of caffeine consumption among US teenagers and young adults, NHANES 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Tran, N L; Barraj, L M; Bi, X; Jack, M M

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine consumption among US teenagers (13-17y), young adults (18-24y) and adults (25-29y) for a 10 year period was examined using NHANES 2003-12. Of the 85% who consume caffeine 84% consume caffeinated beverages. This percentage remained constant despite new caffeine sources. Less than 7.1% of the population consume energy drinks. While mean caffeine intake among teenage caffeine consumers decreased from 62 to 55 mg/day (p-value = 0.018) over the 10-year period, no discernable trend was observed for other age groups. Caffeine intake from energy drinks increased, and was only statistically significant for age 18-24y accounting for <9% of total caffeine intake. Mean caffeine intake per consumption occasion was equivalent between coffee and energy drinks for teenagers and young adults. During a 30-min period mean caffeine consumption was similar when an energy drink was the only consumption event or when it occurred with other caffeinated beverage products suggestive of a substitution effect. Linear regression models of caffeine intake from energy drinks against caffeine from coffee, tea and soda among energy drink consumers in the upper 50th percentile shows a statistically significant inverse relationship (R2 = 28%, coffee: β = -0.35, p < 0.001; tea: β = -0.44, p < 0.001; soda: β = -0.22, p = 0.036) and further supports the substitution concept. PMID:27288929

  18. No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; Buyse, Luk; Pauwels, Frank; Delbeke, Frans; Deventer, Koen; Meeusen, Romain

    2011-12-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30°C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Caffeine did not change performance (p = 0.462). Rectal temperature was significantly elevated after caffeine administration (p < 0.036). Caffeine significantly increased B-endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30°C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40°C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature. PMID:21461761

  19. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  20. Caffeine Junkie: an Unprecedented Glutathione S-Transferase-Dependent Oxygenase Required for Caffeine Degradation by Pseudomonas putida CBB5

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ryan M.; Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Quandt, Erik M.; Yu, Chi Li; Barrick, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine and other N-methylated xanthines are natural products found in many foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, it is not surprising that bacteria have evolved to live on caffeine as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The caffeine degradation pathway of Pseudomonas putida CBB5 utilizes an unprecedented glutathione-S-transferase-dependent Rieske oxygenase for demethylation of 7-methylxanthine to xanthine, the final step in caffeine N-demethylation. The gene coding this function is unusual, in that the iron-sulfur and non-heme iron domains that compose the normally functional Rieske oxygenase (RO) are encoded by separate proteins. The non-heme iron domain is located in the monooxygenase, ndmC, while the Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain is fused to the RO reductase gene, ndmD. This fusion, however, does not interfere with the interaction of the reductase with N1- and N3-demethylase RO oxygenases, which are involved in the initial reactions of caffeine degradation. We demonstrate that the N7-demethylation reaction absolutely requires a unique, tightly bound protein complex composed of NdmC, NdmD, and NdmE, a novel glutathione-S-transferase (GST). NdmE is proposed to function as a noncatalytic subunit that serves a structural role in the complexation of the oxygenase (NdmC) and Rieske domains (NdmD). Genome analyses found this gene organization of a split RO and GST gene cluster to occur more broadly, implying a larger function for RO-GST protein partners. PMID:23813729

  1. Caffeine and agricultural pesticide concentrations in surface water and groundwater on the north shore of Kauai (Hawaii, USA).

    PubMed

    Knee, Karen L; Gossett, Richard; Boehm, Alexandria B; Paytan, Adina

    2010-08-01

    Caffeine has been associated with wastewater pollution in temperate and subtropical locations, but environmental caffeine concentrations in tropical locations have not been reported. The objectives of this study were to measure caffeine and agricultural pesticide (carbaryl, metalaxyl, and metribuzin) concentrations in environmental waters on the tropical north shore of Kauai (Hawaii, USA) and assess whether patterns in caffeine concentration were consistent with a wastewater caffeine source. Groundwater, river, stream and coastal ocean samples were collected in August 2006 and February 2007. Caffeine was detected in all August 2006 samples and in 33% of February 2007 samples at concentrations up to 88ngL(-1). Metribuzin was detected in five samples collected in February 2007. Carbaryl and metalaxyl were not detected in any sample. Caffeine was not detected in offshore ocean samples or river samples upstream of human development. A positive correlation between caffeine and enterococci suggested a possible wastewater caffeine source. PMID:20557899

  2. Mark Twain on phrenology.

    PubMed

    Stone, James L

    2003-12-01

    Mark Twain was a noted 19th century American writer and humorist. He often elaborated upon the personalities of his characters, and his observational skills reflected a strong interest in psychology. Similarly, he found an interest in phrenology, a pseudoscience that purported to characterize personality traits according to elevations or depressions on the head. Twain's style is clearly reflected in the interesting essay he wrote regarding his personal experience with phrenology. PMID:14633308

  3. Homologous recombination as a potential target for caffeine radiosensitization in mammalian cells: reduced caffeine radiosensitization in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asaad, N. A.; Zeng, Z. C.; Guan, J.; Thacker, J.; Iliakis, G.

    2000-01-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine has been associated with the disruption of multiple DNA damage-responsive cell cycle checkpoints, but several lines of evidence also implicate inhibition of DNA repair. The role of DNA repair inhibition in caffeine radiosensitization remains uncharacterized, and it is unknown which repair process, or lesion, is affected. We show that a radiosensitive cell line, mutant for the RAD51 homolog XRCC2 and defective in homologous recombination repair (HRR), displays significantly diminished caffeine radiosensitization that can be restored by expression of XRCC2. Despite the reduced radiosensitization, caffeine effectively abrogates checkpoints in S and G2 phases in XRCC2 mutant cells indicating that checkpoint abrogation is not sufficient for radiosensitization. Another radiosensitive line, mutant for XRCC3 and defective in HRR, similarly shows reduced caffeine radiosensitization. On the other hand, a radiosensitive mutant (irs-20) of DNA-PKcs with a defect in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is radiosensitized by caffeine to an extent comparable to wild-type cells. In addition, rejoining of radiation-induced DNA DSBs, that mainly reflects NHEJ, remains unaffected by caffeine in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants, or their wild-type counterparts. These observations suggest that caffeine targets steps in HRR but not in NHEJ and that abrogation of checkpoint response is not sufficient to explain radiosensitization. Indeed, immortalized fibroblasts from AT patients show caffeine radiosensitization despite the checkpoint defects associated with ATM mutation. We propose that caffeine radiosensitization is mediated by inhibition of stages in DNA DSB repair requiring HRR and that checkpoint disruption contributes by allowing these DSBs to transit into irreparable states. Thus, checkpoints may contribute to genomic stability by promoting error-free HRR.

  4. Case Marking Strategies in Kope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifton, John

    Case marking strategies in Kope, a Papuan language of Papua New Guinea, are analyzed in light of previous claims that most Papuan languages have one strategy for marking core relations and another for marking peripheral relations. A brief grammatical overview illustrates how core and peripheral relations are marked in Kope, including nominal case…

  5. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson's School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The "minimal-marking" concept (Haswell, 1983), which requires…

  6. Renal and cardiovascular effects of caffeine: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Passmore, A P; Kondowe, G B; Johnston, G D

    1987-06-01

    The effects of increasing oral doses of caffeine (45, 90, 180 and 360 mg) on effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), plasma renin activity (PRA), serum electrolytes, plasma noradrenaline, blood pressure and heart rate were studied in eight healthy male volunteers. Urine volume was increased by 360 mg of caffeine only. At caffeine doses greater than 90 mg urinary sodium excretion was significantly increased. There were no changes in ERPF. Serum potassium was significantly reduced by 360 mg of caffeine. Caffeine increased systolic pressure in a dose related manner. Diastolic pressure was also increased, but not in relation to dose. A 360 mg dose of caffeine produced a late increase in heart rate. These changes were not associated with any alterations in PRA or in plasma noradrenaline. PMID:3297472

  7. Association between caffeine intake and age at onset in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Clémence; Duru, Cécile; Salleron, Julia; Hincker, Pascale; Charles, Perrine; Delval, Arnaud; Youssov, Katia; Burnouf, Sylvie; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Verny, Christophe; Scherer, Clarisse; Tranchant, Christine; Goizet, Cyril; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Defebvre, Luc; Sablonnière, Bernard; Romon-Rousseaux, Monique; Buée, Luc; Destée, Alain; Godefroy, Olivier; Dürr, Alexandra; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Richard, Florence; Blum, David; Krystkowiak, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Habitual consumption of caffeine, a non-selective adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist, has been suggested to be beneficial in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Experimental evidence support that ARs play a role in Huntington's disease (HD) raising the hypothesis that caffeine may be a life-style modifier in HD. To determine a possible relationship between caffeine consumption and age at onset (AAO) in HD, we retrospectively assessed caffeine consumption in 80 HD patients using a dietary survey and determined relationship with AAO. Following adjustment for gender, smoking status and CAG repeat length, caffeine consumption greater than 190mg/day was significantly associated with an earlier AAO. These data support an association between habitual caffeine intake and AAO in HD patients, but further studies are warranted to understand the link between these variables. PMID:23732677

  8. Caffeine and human cerebral blood flow: A positron emission tomography study

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, O.G.; Modell, J.G.; Hariharan, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify the effect of caffeine on whole brain and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans. A mean dose of 250 mg of caffeine produced approximately a 30% decrease in whole brain CBF; regional differences in caffeine effect were not observed. Pre-caffeine CBF strongly influenced the magnitude of the caffeine-induced decrease. Caffeine decreased p{sub a}CO{sub 2} and increased systolic blood pressure significantly; the change in p{sub a}CO{sub 2} did not account for the change in CBF. Smaller increases in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine, and subjectively reported anxiety were also observed.

  9. Effect of caffeine on simulator flight performance in sleep-deprived military pilot students.

    PubMed

    Lohi, Jouni J; Huttunen, Kerttu H; Lahtinen, Taija M M; Kilpeläinen, Airi A; Muhli, Arto A; Leino, Tuomo K

    2007-09-01

    Caffeine has been suggested to act as a countermeasure against fatigue in military operations. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effect of caffeine on simulator flight performance was examined in 13 military pilots during 37 hours of sleep deprivation. Each subject performed a flight mission in simulator four times. The subjects received either a placebo (six subjects) or 200 mg of caffeine (seven subjects) 1 hour before the simulated flights. A moderate 200 mg intake of caffeine was associated with higher axillary temperatures, but it did not affect subjectively assessed sleepiness. Flight performance was similar in both groups during the four rounds flown under sleep deprivation. However, subjective evaluation of overall flight performance in the caffeine group tended to be too optimistic, indicating a potential flight safety problem. Based on our results, we do not recommend using caffeine pills in military flight operations. PMID:17937364

  10. [Clinical research on improvement of glucose metabolic marker level by coffee drinking-validity of saliva caffeine concentration measurement].

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kono, Suminori; Shimazoe, Takao

    2010-05-01

    We measured both serum and saliva caffeine concentration using HPLC and assessed the correlation between them in volunteers with mild obesity. Significant correlation was shown between saliva and serum caffeine concentration. It may be necessary to measure caffeine metabolite concentration because its metabolites may also have an improving effect of glucose metabolism. In summary, we found that saliva caffeine concentration measurement was useful to assess caffeine intake level. Moreover, it will be helpful to know whether caffeine has an improving effect of glucose metabolism. PMID:20460869

  11. Caffeine and central noradrenaline: effects on mood, cognitive performance, eye movements and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; Brice, Carolyn; Nash, Jon; Rich, Neil; Nutt, David J

    2003-09-01

    There have been numerous studies on the effects of caffeine on behaviour and cardiovascular function. It is now important to clarify the mechanisms that underlie such effects, and the main objective of the present study was to investigate whether changes in central noradrenaline underlie some of the behavioural and cardiovascular effects of caffeine. This was examined using a clonidine challenge paradigm. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were assigned to one of four conditions: (i) clonidine/caffeine; (ii) clonidine/placebo; (iii) placebo/caffeine: (iv) placebo/placebo. Baseline measurements of mood, cognitive performance, saccadic eye movements and cardiovascular function were recorded. Subsequently, volunteers were given either clonidine (200 microg) or placebo and consumed coffee containing caffeine (1.5 mg/kg) or placebo. The test battery was then repeated 30 min, 150 min and 270 min later. A second cup of coffee (with the same amount of caffeine as the first) was consumed 120 min after the first cup. The results showed that clonidine reduced alertness, impaired many aspects of performance and slowed saccadic eye movements; caffeine removed many of these impairments. Both clonidine and caffeine influenced blood pressure (clonidine reduced it, caffeine raised it) but the effects appeared to be independent, suggesting that separate mechanisms were involved. In addition, there were some behavioural effects of caffeine that were independent of the clonidine effect (e.g. effects on speed of encoding of new information) and these may reflect other neurotransmitter systems (e.g cholinergic effects). Overall, the results suggest that caffeine counteracts reductions in the turnover of central noradrenaline. This mechanism may underlie the beneficial effects of caffeine seen in low alertness states. PMID:14513920

  12. The Extraction of Caffeine from Tea: An Old Undergraduate Experiment Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Scott D.; Hansen, Peter J.

    1995-09-01

    The extraction of caffeine from tea leaves is a common organic chemistry experiment. A water/1-propanol/sodium chloride ternary system was found to be a suitable replacement for the more traditional water/organochlorine solvent systems. Approximately 80% of the caffeine in the tea leaves can be recovered as crude caffeine. The ternary system employs chemicals which are not only less expensive, but also less toxic.

  13. Awareness and use of caffeine by athletes competing at the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championships.

    PubMed

    Desbrow, Ben; Leveritt, Michael

    2006-10-01

    This study assessed the knowledge, prevalence, and quantity of caffeine use by athletes competing at the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championships. Caffeine-related questionnaires were self-administered to 140 (105 male and 35 female, 40.3 +/- 10.7 y) athletes representing 16 countries. Fifty of these athletes further consented to immediate post-race blood samples for analysis of plasma caffeine and paraxanthine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seventy-two percent of 70 athletes correctly identified caffeine as being an unrestricted substance in triathlon. The majority of athletes [125 (89%)] were planning on using a caffeinated substance immediately prior to or throughout the race. Cola drinks (78%), caffeinated gels (42%), coffee (usually pre-race) (37%), energy drinks (13%), and NoDoz tablets (9%) were the most popular caffeinated choices. Mean +/- standard deviation (and range) post race plasma caffeine and paraxanthine levels were 22.3 +/- 20 micromol/L (1.7 to 98.4) and 9.4 +/- 6 micromol/L (1.8 to 28.9), respectively. Seven athletes (14%) finished with plasma caffeine levels > or = 40 micromol/L. Plasma values from elite athletes did not differ from age group competitors. Despite the prevalence of its consumption and the training experience of this athletic group, over one quarter of athletes remained either confused or uninformed about caffeine's legality. Levels of plasma caffeine taken immediately post race indicated that athletes typically finish with quantities of caffeine that have been shown to improve endurance performance (i.e., approximately 20 micromol/L or a dose of > or = 3 mg/kg body weight). PMID:17240785

  14. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA.

  15. Effects of some polymeric additives on the cocrystallization of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jihae; Kim, Il Won

    2011-11-01

    Effects of polymeric additives on the model cocrystallization were examined. The model cocrystal was made from caffeine and oxalic acid, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly( L-lactide) (PLLA), poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were the additives. The cocrystals were formed as millimeter-sized crystals without additives, and they became microcrystals with PLLA and PCL, and nanocrystals with PAA. XRD and IR revealed that the cocrystal structure was unchanged despite the strong effects of the additives on the crystal morphology, although some decrease in crystallinity was observed with PAA as confirmed by DSC. The DSC study also showed that the cocrystal melted and recrystallized to form α-caffeine upon heating. The present study verified that the polymeric additives can be utilized to modulate the size and morphology of the cocrystals without interfering the intermolecular interactions essential to the integrity of the cocrystal structures.

  16. Fluorescence polarization immunoassays for the quantification of caffeine in beverages.

    PubMed

    Oberleitner, Lidia; Grandke, Julia; Mallwitz, Frank; Resch-Genger, Ute; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2014-03-19

    Homogeneous fluorescence polarization immunoassays (FPIAs) were developed and compared for the determination of caffeine in beverages and cosmetics. FPIAs were performed in cuvettes in a spectrometer for kinetic FP measurements as well as in microtiter plates (MTPs) on a multimode reader. Both FPIAs showed measurement ranges in the μg/L range and were performed within 2 and 20 min, respectively. For the application on real samples, high coefficients of variations (CVs) were observed for the performance in MTPs; the CVs for FPIAs in cuvettes were below 4%. The correlations between this method and reference methods were satisfying. The sensitivity was sufficient for all tested samples including decaffeinated coffee without preconcentration steps. The FPIA in cuvettes allows a fast, precise, and automated quantitative analysis of caffeine in consumer products, whereas FPIAs in MTPs are suitable for semiquantitative high-throughput screenings. Moreover, specific quality criteria for heterogeneous assays were applied to homogeneous immunoassays. PMID:24597592

  17. Fluoride content in caffeinated, decaffeinated and herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Chan, J T; Koh, S H

    1996-01-01

    The fluoride contents of infusions prepared from 44 different brands and types of teas were measured. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 3.71 ppm (mean = 1.50 ppm) in caffeinated tea infusions, 0.02-0.14 ppm (mean = 0.05 ppm) in herbal tea infusions, and 1.01-5.20 ppm (mean = 3.19) in decaffeinated tea infusions. This is the first report of the fluoride content of decaffeinated teas. The mean fluoride content of decaffeinated tea infusions is significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the corresponding caffeinated tea. The use of mineral water containing a naturally high fluoride level during the process of decaffeination is the most likely explanation of the above observation. PMID:8850589

  18. Caffeine in coffee: its removal. Why and how?

    PubMed

    Ramalakshmi, K; Raghavan, B

    1999-09-01

    The popularity of coffee as a beverage is ever increasing despite the fact that there are reports antagonized to its consumption. Of the several factors cited, the alkaloid caffeine present in coffee can cause addiction and stimulate the central nervous system. It has an effect on the cardiovascular system with a slight increase in blood pressure and heart output. It undergoes biotransformation in the human body to form methylated derivatives of uric acid. In recent times, much effort has gone into the research on the removal of caffeine in coffee, resulting in a specialty product called decaffeinated coffee. Decaffeination methods mainly employ organic solvents or water or supercritical carbon dioxide. These methods with their attendant advantages and disadvantages are reviewed in this article. PMID:10516914

  19. Optimal marking of threatened species to balance benefits of information with impacts of marking.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael A; Parris, Kirsten M

    2008-12-01

    Marking animals so that they are uniquely identifiable provides information that may assist conservation efforts. Nevertheless, some methods used to mark animals can be harmful. We used mathematical methods to assess the trade-off between the impact of marking threatened species and the value of the information gained. We considered the case where 2 management strategies, each aiming to improve a species' survival rate, are implemented in an experimental phase. The results of the experiment were applied in a postexperimental management phase. We expressed the expected number of survivors in both phases mathematically, accounting for any mortality caused by the experiment, and determined the proportion of animals to mark to maximize this number. The optimal number of animals to mark increased with the number of individuals available for the experiment and with the number of individuals to be managed in the future. The optimal solution was to mark only 25% of the animals when there were 1000 individuals available for the experiment, the results were used to manage 2000 individuals, and marking caused mortality of 1%. Fewer animals were marked when there were fewer animals in either phase or when marking caused higher mortality. In the case of the Helmeted Honeyeater (Lichenostomus melanops cassidix), the optimal proportion to mark was <1 if the mortality rate was >0.15%-1%, with the threshold depending on the number of animals in the experimental and postexperimental phases. The trade-off between gaining more information about a species and possibly harming individuals of that species by marking them is difficult to assess subjectively. We show how to determine objectively the optimal proportion of animals to mark to enhance the management of threatened species. PMID:18680498

  20. Caffeine for apnea of prematurity: a neonatal success story.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, K; Bassler, D

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine, a methylxanthine and nonspecific inhibitor of adenosine receptors, is an example of a drug that has been in use for more than 40 years. It is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in neonatal medicine. However, until 2006, it had only a few relatively small and short-term studies supporting its use. It is thanks to the efforts of Barbara Schmidt and the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity (CAP) Trial Group that we now have high-quality and reliable data not only on short-term but also long-term outcomes of caffeine use for apnea of prematurity. CAP was an international, multicenter, placebo-controlled randomized trial designed to determine whether survival without neurodevelopmental disability at a corrected age of 18 months is improved if apnea of prematurity is managed without methylxanthines in infants at a high risk of apneic attacks. CAP was kept simple and pragmatic in order to allow for maximum generalizability and applicability. Infants with birth weights of 500-1,250 g were enrolled during the first 10 days of life if their clinicians considered them to be candidates for methylxanthine therapy. The most frequent indication for therapy reported in CAP was treatment of documented apnea, followed by the facilitation of the removal of an endotracheal tube. Only about 20% of the neonatologists in the trial started caffeine for the prevention of apnea and the findings of CAP cannot automatically be extrapolated to an exclusive prophylactic indication. However, recent data suggest that the administration of prophylactic methylxanthine by neonatologists is now common practice. PMID:24931325

  1. Extended Essay Marking on Screen: Is Examiner Marking Accuracy Influenced by Marking Mode?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Martin; Hopkin, Rebecca; Shiell, Hannah; Bell, John F.

    2012-01-01

    In the UK and elsewhere, large-scale educational assessment agencies are shifting the mode of school examination marking towards having examiners mark examination scripts on screen rather than on paper. This shift has prompted questions about whether the mode of marking might influence examiner marking accuracy, particularly in relation to…

  2. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation involved in caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Yanling; Hao, Jifang

    2010-07-01

    Caffeine, which specifically inhibits ATM/ATR kinases, efficiently abrogates the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G2 arrest and increases the sensitivity of various tumor cells to IR. Mechanisms for the effect of caffeine remain to be elucidated. As a target of ATM/ATR kinases, BRCA1 becomes activated and phosphorylated in response to IR. Thus, in this work, we investigated the possible role of BRCA1 in the effect of caffeine on G2 checkpoint and observed how BRCA1 phosphorylation was regulated in this process. For these purposes, the BRCA1 protein level and the phosphorylation states were analyzed by Western blotting by using an antibody against BRCA1 and phospho-specific antibodies against Ser-1423 and Ser-1524 residues in cells exposed to a combination of IR and caffeine. The results showed that caffeine down-regulated IR-induced BRCA1 expression and specifically abolished BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524, which was followed by an override of G2 arrest by caffeine. In addition, the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate p21 may be required for MCF-7 but not necessary for Hela response to caffeine. These data suggest that BRCA1 may be a potential target of caffeine. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation are most likely to be involved in the caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 arrest.

  3. Caffeine interferes embryonic development through over-stimulating serotonergic system in chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Di; He, Rong-Rong; Qin, Yang; Tsoi, Bun; Li, Yi-Fang; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Yang, Xuesong; Kurihara, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The potential harmful effects of caffeine in pregnant women aroused public interests due to its possibility to jeopardize fetal development. Monoamine neurotransmitters are thought to regulate neural development processes through maternal-fetal interactions, which may have long term impact on mental and behavioral effects. The current study focuses on investigating the effects of caffeine on the monoamine neurotransmitter system using developmental chicken embryos. The ED(50) value of caffeine toxicity was 27.3 μmol/egg in chicken embryo. Administration of caffeine, with lower dosage than ED(50) (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 μmol/egg), caused failure of neural tube closure. In addition, contents of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-HIAA were increased under dosage of 10.0 μmol/egg caffeine administration. Gene expression of TPH2 was also increased by caffeine treatment. Caffeine could result in defect of neural tube closure and induce disorder of serotonergic system development, which may increase teratogenic rate of embryos. Meanwhile, it is probably an underlying factor for inducing psychological and behavioral disorders in adult. Moreover, caffeine was found to be accumulated in the embryonic brain and not being metabolized, which may incur a magnification of adverse effects. This study may provide valuable data for further investigations on toxicology of caffeine during different stages of pregnancy. PMID:22449533

  4. Fecal coliforms, caffeine and carbamazepine in stormwater collection systems in a large urban area.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Sébastien; Aboulfadl, Khadija; Dorner, Sarah; Payment, Pierre; Deschamps, Guy; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    Water samples from streams, brooks and storm sewer outfall pipes that collect storm waters across the Island of Montréal were analyzed for caffeine, carbamazepine and fecal coliforms. All samples contained various concentrations of these tracers, indicating a widespread sanitary contamination in urban environments. Fecal coliforms and caffeine levels ranged over several orders of magnitude with a modest correlation between caffeine and fecal coliforms (R(2) value of 0.558). An arbitrary threshold of 400 ng caffeine L(-1) allows us to identify samples with an elevated fecal contamination, as defined by more than 200 colony-forming units per 100 mL (cfu 100 mL(-1)) of fecal coliforms. Low caffeine levels were sporadically related to high fecal coliform counts. Lower levels of caffeine and fecal coliforms were observed in the brooks while the larger streams and storm water discharge points contained over ten times more. The carbamazepine data showed little or no apparent correlation to caffeine. These data suggest that this storm water collection system, located in a highly urbanized urban environment, is widely contaminated by domestic sewers as indicated by the ubiquitous presence of fecal contaminants as well as caffeine and carbamazepine. Caffeine concentrations were relatively well correlated to fecal coliforms, and could potentially be used as a chemical indicator of the level of contamination by sanitary sources. The carbamazepine data was not significantly correlated to fecal coliforms and of little use in this dataset. PMID:22075053

  5. Effect of caffeine on performances of a perceptual-restructuring task at different stages of practice.

    PubMed

    Broverman, D M; Casagrande, E

    1982-01-01

    Caffeine, a sympathomimetic drug which stimulates the adrenergic nervous system, was hypothesized to exert opposite effects upon performances of a perceptual-restructuring task (the Embedded Figures Task) at different stages of practice. Specifically, caffeine was hypothesized to impair performances of perceptual-restructuring tasks when the task is still novel in early trials; and to facilitate practice induced gains in task performance as the task becomes less novel. Sixty male undergraduates were studied. Each subject was tested on the Embedded Figures Task twice, in one of the following three sequences: caffeine-placebo; placebo-caffeine; and placebo-placebo. Both hypotheses received statistically significant support. PMID:6818581

  6. Low Concentration of Caffeine Inhibits the Progression of the Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuying; Kong, Jian; Kong, Jinge; Shen, Qiang; Kong, Fandong; Sun, Wenbing; Zheng, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have reported that caffeine has anticancer effects at high blood concentrations. However, whether caffeine has anticancer effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells at low concentration, especially at physiologically applicable concentration (< 412 μM) is still not well understood. In this study, HCC cell lines HepG2 and Huh7 were used. The cells were incubated with varying concentrations of caffeine (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 or 600 μM). MTT assay was used to investigate the proliferation ability in vitro. Migration and invasion abilities were determined by wound healing assay and transwell assay. The molecular changes were detected by western blot. An ectopic nude mice model which the mice were gavaged with caffeine was used to reveal the anticancer effects of caffeine on HepG2 cells in vivo. Results showed that caffeine could inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion significantly at physiologically applicable concentration in vitro. Also the associated molecular changes of cancer progression were observed. In animal experiment, the mice gavaged with caffeine also performanced reduced tumor burden in vivo. Moreover, the interrelated protein expression was also observed in vivo which was coincident with the results in vitro. All in all, this observation indicated that caffeine may suppress the progression of HCC through Akt signaling pathway. This makes caffeine a potential candidate for treating HCC which will be a safer and more effective treatment by giving for a long time at physiologically applicable concentration. PMID:25666502

  7. Caffeine and Creatine Content of Dietary Supplements Consumed by Brazilian Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Suelen Galante; de Oliveira, Gustavo Vieira; Alvares, Thiago Silveira

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine and creatine are ingredients in the most popular dietary supplements consumed by soccer players. However, some products may not contain the disclosed amounts of the ingredients listed on the label, compromising the safe usage and the effectiveness of these supplements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the content of caffeine and creatine in dietary supplements consumed by Brazilian soccer players. The results obtained were compared with the caffeine content listed on the product label. Two batches of the supplement brands consumed by ≥ 50% of the players were considered for analysis. The quantification of caffeine and creatine in the supplements was determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography system with UV detector. Nine supplements of caffeine and 7 supplements of creatine met the inclusion criteria for analysis. Eight brands of caffeine and five brands of creatine showed significantly different values (p < .05) as compared with the values stated on the label. There were no significant differences between the two batches of supplements analyzed, except for one caffeine supplement. It can be concluded that caffeine and creatine dietary supplements consumed by Brazilian soccer players present inaccurate values listed on the label, although most presented no difference among batches. To ensure consumer safety and product efficacy, accurate information on caffeine and creatine content should be provided on all dietary supplement labels. PMID:26696650

  8. L-theanine partially counteracts caffeine-induced sleep disturbances in rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hwan-Soo; Jung, Ji Young; Jang, Il-Sung; Jang, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2012-04-01

    L-theanine has been reported to inhibit the excitatory effects of caffeine. The present study examined the effects of L-theanine on caffeine-induced sleep disturbances in rats. Rats received the following drug pairings: saline and saline (Control), 7.5 mg/kg caffeine and saline, or 7.5 mg/kg of caffeine followed by various doses of L-theanine (22.5, 37.5, 75, or 150 mg/kg). Vigilance states were divided into: wakefulness (W), transition to slow-wave sleep (tSWS), slow-wave sleep (SWS), and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS). Caffeine significantly increased the duration of W and decreased the duration of SWS and REMS compared to the Control. Although L-theanine failed to reverse the caffeine-induced W increase, at 22.5 and 37.5 mg/kg (but not at 75 and 150 mg/kg), it significantly reversed caffeine-induced decreases in SWS. In conclusion, low doses of L-theanine can partially reverse caffeine-induced reductions in SWS; however, effects of L-theanine on caffeine-induced insomnia do not appear to increase dose-dependently. PMID:22285321

  9. Estimating caffeine intake from energy drinks and dietary supplements in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Regan L; Saldanha, Leila G; Gahche, Jaime J; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2014-01-01

    No consistent definition exists for energy products in the United States. These products have been marketed and sold as beverages (conventional foods), energy shots (dietary supplements), and in pill or tablet form. Recently, the number of available products has surged, and formulations have changed to include caffeine. To help characterize the use of caffeine-containing energy products in the United States, three sources of data were analyzed: sales data, data from federal sources, and reports from the Drug Abuse Warning Network. These data indicate that sales of caffeine-containing energy products and emergency room visits involving their consumption appear to be increasing over time. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010 indicate that 2.7% [standard error (SE) 0.2%] of the US population ≥1 year of age used a caffeine-containing energy product, providing approximately 150–200 mg/day of caffeine per day in addition to caffeine from traditional sources like coffee, tea, and colas. The highest usage of these products was among males between the ages of 19 and 30 years (7.6%, SE 1.0). Although the prevalence of caffeine-containing energy product use remains low overall in the US population, certain subgroups appear to be using these products in larger amounts. Several challenges remain in determining the level of caffeine exposure from and accurate usage patterns of caffeine-containing energy products. PMID:25293539

  10. Caffeine and the central nervous system: mechanisms of action, biochemical, metabolic and psychostimulant effects.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A; Daval, J L; Debry, G

    1992-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed central-nervous-system stimulant. Three main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the central nervous system have been described. Mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of specific phosphodiesterases only occur at high non-physiological concentrations of caffeine. The only likely mechanism of action of the methylxanthine is the antagonism at the level of adenosine receptors. Caffeine increases energy metabolism throughout the brain but decreases at the same time cerebral blood flow, inducing a relative brain hypoperfusion. Caffeine activates noradrenaline neurons and seems to affect the local release of dopamine. Many of the alerting effects of caffeine may be related to the action of the methylxanthine on serotonin neurons. The methylxanthine induces dose-response increases in locomotor activity in animals. Its psychostimulant action on man is, however, often subtle and not very easy to detect. The effects of caffeine on learning, memory, performance and coordination are rather related to the methylxanthine action on arousal, vigilance and fatigue. Caffeine exerts obvious effects on anxiety and sleep which vary according to individual sensitivity to the methylxanthine. However, children in general do not appear more sensitive to methylxanthine effects than adults. The central nervous system does not seem to develop a great tolerance to the effects of caffeine although dependence and withdrawal symptoms are reported. PMID:1356551

  11. Caffeine and 3-km cycling performance: Effects of mouth rinsing, genotype, and time of day.

    PubMed

    Pataky, M W; Womack, C J; Saunders, M J; Goffe, J L; D'Lugos, A C; El-Sohemy, A; Luden, N D

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of caffeine mouth rinsing on 3-km cycling performance and determined whether caffeine mouth rinsing affects performance gains influenced by the CYP1A2 polymorphism. Thirty-eight recreational cyclists completed four simulated 3-km time trials (TT). Subjects ingested either 6 mg/kg BW of caffeine or placebo 1 h prior to each TT. Additionally, 25 mL of 1.14% caffeine or placebo solution were mouth rinsed before each TT. The treatments were Placebo, caffeine Ingestion, caffeine Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse. Subjects were genotyped and classified as AA homozygotes or AC heterozygotes for the rs762551 polymorphism of the CYP1A2 gene involved in caffeine metabolism. Magnitude-based inferences were used to evaluate treatment differences in mean power output based on a predetermined meaningful treatment effect of 1.0%. AC heterozygotes (4.1%) and AA homozygotes (3.4%) benefited from Ingestion+Rinse, but only AC performed better with Ingestion (6.0%). Additionally, Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse elicited better performance relative to Placebo among subjects that performed prior to 10:00 h (Early) compared with after 10:00 h (Late). The present study provides additional evidence of genotype and time of day factors that affect the ergogenic value of caffeine intake that may allow for more personalized caffeine intake strategies to maximize performance. PMID:26062916

  12. Estimating caffeine intake from energy drinks and dietary supplements in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regan L; Saldanha, Leila G; Gahche, Jaime J; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2014-10-01

    No consistent definition exists for energy products in the United States. These products have been marketed and sold as beverages (conventional foods), energy shots (dietary supplements), and in pill or tablet form. Recently, the number of available products has surged, and formulations have changed to include caffeine. To help characterize the use of caffeine-containing energy products in the United States, three sources of data were analyzed: sales data, data from federal sources, and reports from the Drug Abuse Warning Network. These data indicate that sales of caffeine-containing energy products and emergency room visits involving their consumption appear to be increasing over time. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010 indicate that 2.7% [standard error (SE) 0.2%] of the US population ≥1 year of age used a caffeine-containing energy product, providing approximately 150-200 mg/day of caffeine per day in addition to caffeine from traditional sources like coffee, tea, and colas. The highest usage of these products was among males between the ages of 19 and 30 years (7.6%, SE 1.0). Although the prevalence of caffeine-containing energy product use remains low overall in the US population, certain subgroups appear to be using these products in larger amounts. Several challenges remain in determining the level of caffeine exposure from and accurate usage patterns of caffeine-containing energy products. PMID:25293539

  13. Lifespan Extension Induced by Caffeine in Caenorhabditis elegans is Partially Dependent on Adenosine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bridi, Jessika Cristina; Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de Almeida; Sampaio, Letícia Reis; Ferreira, Júlia Castro Damásio; Antunes Soares, Felix Alexandre; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely used psychoactive substance. Studies have shown that caffeine may play a protective role in aging-associated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which caffeine modulates aging are not yet clear. In this study, we have shown that caffeine increases Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan, delays its larval development, reduces reproduction and body length. These phenotypes were partly reversed by worm’s exposure to adenosine, which suggest a putative common target. Moreover, they were dependent on a functional insulin/IGF-1-like pathway. Our results may shed light on new genetic determinants of aging. PMID:26696878

  14. The effects of caffeinated "energy shots" on time trial performance.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Matthew Mark; Astorino, Todd Anthony; Azevedo, John Leal

    2013-06-01

    An emerging trend in sports nutrition is the consumption of energy drinks and "energy shots". Energy shots may prove to be a viable pre-competition supplement for runners. Six male runners (mean ± SD age and VO2max: 22.5 ± 1.8 years and 69.1 ± 5.7 mL·kg-1·min-1) completed three trials [placebo (PLA; 0 mg caffeine), Guayakí Yerba Maté Organic Energy Shot™ (YM; 140 mg caffeine), or Red Bull Energy Shot™ (RB; 80 mg caffeine)]. Treatments were ingested following a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design. Participants ran a five kilometer time trial on a treadmill. No differences (p > 0.05) in performance were detected with RB (17.55 ± 1.01 min) or YM ingestion (17.86 ± 1.59 min) compared to placebo (17.44 ± 1.25 min). Overall, energy shot ingestion did not improve time-trial running performance in trained runners. PMID:23743969

  15. Oxidative stress parameters in rats exposed to fluoride and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Inkielewicz-Stepniak, I; Czarnowski, W

    2010-06-01

    In our experiment, the 1-month effects of caffeine (Caff) and fluoride (F) administered separately and together on nitric oxide and total antioxidant status in serum, brain, liver and kidney of rats were investigated. Also, the influence of caffeine on fluoride excretion with urine was studied. Thirty adult male Wistar rats were divided into five equal groups of six each: (I) controls drinking tap water; (II) controls drinking tap water and receiving intragastrically 0.5 ml of tap water; (III) animals receiving 25 mg F/L in drinking water; (IV) animals receiving 4.7 mg Caff/kg bw/day; (V) animals receiving 25 mg F/L in drinking water and 4.7 mg Caff/kg bw/day. The applied fluoride caused increase of nitric oxide level (NO), intensified lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and decreased total antioxidant status in serum (TAS), brain, kidney and liver. Caffeine administered intragastrically, as an antioxidant, was relatively efficient in alleviating these adverse effects of F. In rats treated only with fluoride the F excretion in urine significantly increased in an exposure-time dependent-manner and did not change both in rats treated with Caff and co-exposed to Caff a