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Sample records for calama basin northern

  1. Extensional Basins in a Convergent Margin: Oligocene-Early Miocene Salar de Atacama and Calama basins, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. E.; Mpodozis, C.; Blanco, N.; Pananont, P.; Dávila, F.

    2004-12-01

    The Salar de Atacama Basin (SdAB) is the largest and most persistent sedimentary basin of northern Chile, accumulating nonmarine sediment from Cretaceous to modern times. Its northwestern neighbor, the Calama, was a Cenozoic basin. Although SdAB was in the backarc zone early in the Andean orogeny, both are now forearc basins. Others demonstrated that the basins overlie anomalously cold, strong, and dense crust and lithosphere. We focus on an extensional Oligocene basin stage. Interpretation of the basin-controlling faults is based on seismic reflection studies supported by field relations. The SdAB is limited to the west by the NNE-trending, steeply east-dipping, Paciencia Fault (PF). The PF experienced 5-7 km of down-to-the-east offset during the Oligocene-early Miocene. Syntectonic strata, an arid succession of siliciclastics and evaporites, are asymmetric, with thicknesses of 5000 m and abundant halite adjacent to the PF, and of 1000 m with fine detrital clastic strata 25 km farther east. Relations in conglomeratic growth strata that overlap the PF also demonstrate normal displacement during sediment accumulation. Seismic data reveal that a buried normal fault with 1-1.5 km down-to-the-east displacement limits the western margin of the Oligocene-Miocene Calama siliciclastic basin fill. Regionally, Oligocene-early Miocene margin-parallel strike-slip deformation dominated northwest of the basins, contributing sinistral offset (West Fissure Fault) to the northern segment of the long-lived Domeyko Fault System. The new SdAB and Calama data reveal that a 20,000 km2 domain of extensional basins existed within the dominantly strike-slip region. Even if PF and the fault in the Calama Basin were transtensional, the proportion of extension to strike-slip displacement is much greater in these basins than elsewhere in northern Chile. Further study is required to understand what combination of factors caused this kinematic distinction as well as delayed the onset of CVZ

  2. The role of the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament in ore deposit deformation in the Andes of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Carlos; Ramírez, Luis E.; Townley, Brian; Solari, Marcelo; Guerra, Nelson

    2007-02-01

    During the Late Jurassic-Early Oligocene interval, widespread hydrothermal copper mineralization events occurred in association with the geological evolution of the southern segment of the central Andes, giving rise to four NS-trending metallogenic belts of eastward-decreasing age: Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Late Paleocene-Early Eocene, and Late Eocene-Early Oligocene. The Antofagasta-Calama Lineament (ACL) consists of an important dextral strike-slip NE-trending fault system. Deformation along the ACL system is evidenced by a right-lateral displacement of the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene metallogenic belts. Furthermore, clockwise rotation of the Early Cretaceous Mantos Blancos copper deposit and the Late Paleocene Lomas Bayas porphyry copper occurred. In the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene metallogenic belt, a sigmoidal deflection and a clockwise rotation is observed in the ACL. The ACL is thought to have controlled the emplacement of Early Oligocene porphyry copper deposits (34-37 Ma; Toki, Genoveva, Quetena, and Opache), whereas it deflected the Late Eocene porphyry copper belt (41-44 Ma; Esperanza, Telégrafo, Centinela, and Polo Sur ore deposits). These observations suggest that right-lateral displacement of the ACL was active during the Early Oligocene. We propose that the described structural features need to be considered in future exploration programs within this extensively gravel-covered region of northern Chile.

  3. Cenozoic evolution of the northwestern Salar de Atacama Basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pananont, P.; Mpodozis, C.; Blanco, N.; Jordan, T. E.; Brown, L. D.

    2004-12-01

    Since 90 Ma, the nonmarine Salar de Atacama Basin has been the largest, deepest, and most persistent sedimentary basin of northern Chile. Integration of 200 km of two-dimensional seismic reflection data with surface geological data clarifies Oligocene and Neogene evolution of the northern part of the basin. A normal fault with 6 ± 1 km of vertical separation controlled the western boundary of the basin during the accumulation of the Oligocene-lower Miocene Paciencia Group. The combination of this structure, a similar one in the Calama Basin, and regional structural data suggests that localized extension played an important role within a tectonic environment dominated by margin-perpendicular compression and margin-parallel strike-slip deformation. Seismic data substantiate the surface interpretation that much of the Cordillera de la Sal ridge resulted from diapiric flow of the Paciencia Group. Diapiric flow initiated during the late early Miocene or middle Miocene, associated with a deep reverse fault.

  4. Paleomagnetic evidence of earliest Paleocene deformation in Calama (˜22°S), northern Chile: Andean-type or ridge-collision tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoza, R.; Tomlinson, A. J.; Caffe, P. J.; Vilas, J. F.

    2012-08-01

    A paleomagnetic study from the earliest Paleocene Cerros de Montecristo Quartz Monzonite and its Jurassic to uppermost Cretaceous host rock (northern Chile, ˜22°S) provided high-temperature, high-coercivity magnetizations of dominantly reversed polarity. The remanences of the tilted host rock gave a negative fold-test and are indistinguishable from the remanences found in the pluton, indicating that the uppermost Cretaceous rocks underwent deformation before intrusion of the earliest Paleocene pluton, thus documenting a K-T deformation at the locality. Although this deformation may be another product of typical subduction-related noncollisional tectonics in the Central Andes, an alternative hypothesis, permitted by plate reconstructions, is that the event was associated with collision of an oceanic plate boundary. This latter hypothesis may also provide a context for several other tectonic events from northern Chile to the Patagonian Andes, wherein deformation would the consequence of a southward migrating triple junction between the latest Maastrichtian and Early Eocene.

  5. Caribbean basin framework, 2: Northern Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Tyburski, S.A.; Gordon, M.B.; Mann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    There are four Jurassic to Recent basin-forming periods in northern Central America (honduras, Honduran Borderlands, Belize, Guatemala, northern Nicaragua): (1) Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rifting and subsidence along normal faults in Honduras and Guatemala; rifts are suggested but are not well defined in Honduras by the distribution of clastic sediments and associated volcanic rocks. Rifting is attributed to the separation of Central America from the southern margin of the North American plate; (2) Cretaceous subsidence recorded by the development of a Cretaceous carbonate platform in Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize; subsidence is attributed to thermal subsidence of the rifted margins of the various blocks; (3) Late Cretaceous-Recent development of a volcanic arc along the western margin of Middle America and the northern margin of Honduras; (4) Late Cretaceous large-scale folding in Honduras, ophiolite obduction, and formation of a foredeep basin in Guatemala (Sepur trough); deformation is attributed to the collision between a north-facing arc in northern Honduras and the Nicaraguan Rise and the passive margin of Guatemala and Belize; and (5) Eocene to Recent strike-slip faulting along the present-day North American-Caribbean plate boundary in Guatemala, northern Honduras, and Belize. Strike-slip faults and basins form a California-type borderlands characterized by elongate basins that appear as half-grabens in profile. Counterclockwise rotation of the central honduras plateau, a thicker and topographically higher-than-average block within the plate boundary zone, is accommodated by rifting or strike-slip faults at its edges.

  6. Megafans of the Northern Kalahari Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.; Miller, R. McG.; Eckardt, F.; Kreslavsky, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We identify eleven megafans (partial cones of fluvial sediment, >80 km radius) in the northern Kalahari Basin, using several criteria based on VIS and IR remotely sensed data and SRTM-based surface morphology reconstructions. Two other features meet fewer criteria of the form which we class as possible megafans. The northern Kalahari megafans are located in a 1700 km arc around the southern and eastern flanks of the Angola's Bié Plateau, from northern Namibia through northwest Botswana to western Zambia. Three lie in the Owambo subbasin centered on the Etosha Pan, three in the relatively small Okavango rift depression, and five in the Upper Zambezi basin. The population includes the well-known Okavango megafan (150 km), Namibia's Cubango megafan, the largest megafan in the region (350 km long), and the largest nested group (the five major contiguous megafans on the west slopes of the upper Zambezi Valley). We use new, SRTM-based topographic roughness data to discriminate various depositional surfaces within the flat N. Kalahari landscapes. We introduce the concepts of divide megafans, derived megafans, and fan-margin rivers. Conclusions. (i) Eleven megafan cones total an area of 190,000 sq km. (ii) Different controls on megafan size operate in the three component basins: in the Okavango rift structural controls become the prime constraint on megafan length by controlling basin dimensions. Megafans in the other les constricted basins appear to conform to classic relationships fan area, slope, and feeder-basin area. (iii) Active fans occupy the Okavango rift depression with one in the Owambo basin. The rest of the population are relict but recently active fans (surfaces are relict with respect to activity by the feeder river). (iv) Avulsive behavior of the formative river-axiomatic for the evolution of megafans-has resulted in repeated rearrangements of regional drainage, with likely effects in the study area well back into the Neogene. Divide megafans comprise the

  7. Hydrothermal Activity in the Northern Guaymas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Hensen, C.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Sarkar, S.; Geilert, S.; Schmidt, M.; Liebetrau, V.; Kipfer, R.; Scholz, F.; Doll, M.; Muff, S.; Karstens, J.; Böttner, C.; Chi, W. C.; Moser, M.; Behrendt, R.; Fiskal, A.; Evans, T.; Planke, S.; Lizarralde, D.; Lever, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Rift-related magmatism in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California induces hydrothermal activity within the basin sediments. Mobilized fluids migrate to the seafloor where they are emitted into the water column changing ocean chemistry and fuelling chemosynthetic ecosystems. New seismic and geochemical data from the northern rift arm of the Guaymas Basin document the variety of fluid expulsion phenomena from large-scale subsurface sediment mobilization related to contact metamorphosis to focused small-scale structures. The geochemical composition of emitted fluids depends largely on the age of the fluid escape structures with respect to the underlying intrusions. Whereas, old structures are dominated by methane emission, young vent sites are characterized by hot fluids that carry a wide range of minerals in solution. The overall high geothermal gradient within the basin (mainly between 160 and 260 °C/km) leads to a thin gas hydrate stability zone. Thus, deep hydrothermal fluid advection affects the gas hydrate system and makes it more dynamic than in colder sedimentary basins.

  8. Basins and Sedimentation Within the Martian Northern Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K. L.; MacKinnon, D. J.

    1999-03-01

    MOLA data show that six basins and sedimentary plains make up the northern plains of Mars. Four types of plains units are deposited in them, in the following stratigraphic order: marginal, level-top, basin-floor, and downslope units.

  9. OVERVIEW OF VALVE TOWER FROM NORTHERN SIDE OF BASIN. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF VALVE TOWER FROM NORTHERN SIDE OF BASIN. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Ku Tree Reservoir, Valve Tower, Kalakoa Stream, East Range, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Miocene tephrochronology in the northern Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M.E.; Brown, F.H.; Nash, W.P. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Silicic air-fall tephra layers with unaltered glass shards preserved in Miocene basins of the northern Basin and Range Province (NBR) were sampled from well-exposed sections in the Goose Creek (GCB) and Ibapah (IB) basins in the northeastern NBR, and the El Pasco basin (EPB) in the southwestern NBR. Each basin may contain up to 50 tephras. Glass shards from individual tephras in any one basin are compositionally distinct, as shown by XRF and electron microprobe analysis. Seventeen tephra correlate between two or more basins; 12 of these are regionally important, providing precise stratigraphic ties across the NbR. Four regionally correlative tephras are white biotitic ashes from southern Nevada sources, whereas eight are gray vitric ashes from Yellowstone hot spot sources. Dates on tephra layers and lava flows in the basins, and on ashflow units correlated with four other tephra provide a preliminary chronology for the tephra in the all basins. In each section [Delta]h/[Delta]t appears constant on time scales [>=]1 Ma, but variation in [Delta]h/[Delta]t is demonstrated from IB, and is likely typical of all basins. Sedimentation in all five basins begins in the time interval of 14.5--12.5 Ma, which may represent the beginning of a phase of regional extension in the NBR. Post-[approximately]9.5 Ma deformation has affected all basins and likely contributed to the termination of sedimentation in the exposed areas of these basins.

  11. Timing of Cenozoic Basin Formation in Northern Sundaland, Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, K.K. )

    1994-07-01

    The present shorelines of northern Sundaland show preferential northwest-southeast elongation. This trend is parallel for subparallel to major faults and suture in this region. Continental wrench/shear basins developed on the western portion of this region and back-arc basins developed on the western portion of this region and back-arc basins in the rest of the region are also aligned to this trend. Different basin geometries and structural patterns among Cenozoic basins in northern Sundaland indicate different origins and/or timing of basin formation. Wrench faulting has played a significant role in the formation of these Cenozoic basins. The continued collision of the Indian subplate with the Eurasian plate during early Cenozoic has caused a redistribution of stress within this region. Zones of weakness have been reactivated or created with large lateral displacements by these changes, thus initiating the subsidence of these basins. The episodic initiation of Cenozoic basins may have begun as early as Jurassic and continued till Oligocene.

  12. Basin modeling of the Parang (Socotra) Basin, northern East China Sea shelf: Implications for hydrocarbon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Moon, S.; Lee, G.; Yoon, Y.; Kim, H.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrocarbon potential of the Parang (Socotra) Basin in the northern East China Sea shelf has remained poorly understood. We performed one-dimensional basin modeling for a dummy well located in the depocenter of the northern part of the Parang Basin to investigate the timings of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion. First, a depth-converted seismic profile crossing the dummy well was restored by backstripping and decompaction for eight regional and subregional unconformities, including the top of the acoustic basement, to reconstruct the subsidence history and to determine the timing of trap formation. The basin modeling, assuming rifting heat-flow model and source rocks with type III kerogen, suggests that the main phase of hydrocarbon (mostly gas) expulsion peaked in the Late Eocene, predating the inversion that created traps in the early Middle to latest Middle Eocene. Thus, the potential for large hydrocarbon accumulations in the northern Parang Basin is probably limited.

  13. JUNIPER CONTROL AND ASPEN RESTORATION IN THE NORTHERN GREAT BASIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western juniper woodlands are rapidly replacing lower elevation (< 2100 m) quaking aspen stands throughout the northern Great Basin. Aspen restoration is important because these communities provide important habitat for wildlife species and contain a high diversity of understory shrubs and herbaceou...

  14. Geomorphological characterization of endorheic basins in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsaz, J.; Gironas, J. A.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Rinaldo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative geomorphology regroups a large number of interesting tools to characterize natural basins across scales. The application of these tools to several river basins allows the description and comparison of geomorphological properties at different spatial scales as oppose to more traditional descriptors that are typically applied at a single scale, meaning the catchment scale. Most of the recent research using these quantitative geomorphological tools has focused on open catchments and no specific attention has been given to endorheic basins, and the possibility of having particular features that distinguish them from exorheic catchments. The main objective of our study is to characterize endorheic basins and investigate whether these special geomorphological features can be identified. Because scaling invariance is a widely observed and relatively well quantified property of open basins, it provides a suitable tool to characterize differences between the geomorphology of closed and open basins. Our investigation focuses on three closed basins located in northern Chile which describe well the diversity in the geomorphology and geology of this arid region. Results show that endhoreic basins exhibit different slope-area and flow paths sinuosity regimes compared to those observed in open basins. These differences are in agreement with the particular self-similar behavior across spatial scales of the Euclidean length of subcatchments, as well as the Hack's law and Horton's ratios. These regimes imply different physical processes inside the channel network regardless of the basin area, and they seem to be related to the endorheic character of these basins. The analysis of the probability density functions of contributing areas and lengths to the lower region shows that the hypothesis of self-similarity can also be applied to closed basins. Theoretical expressions for these distributions were derived and validated by the data. Future research will focus on (1

  15. Evolution of the Basco-Cantabrian basin, northern Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, O. )

    1988-08-01

    The Basco-Cantabrian basin (BCB) stretches for 150 km west from the Pyrenean system and displays a complex subsidence pattern through time, involving Triassic faulting, Jurassic quiescence, Cretaceous faulting and subsidence, followed by Tertiary compression. Its southern margin is rimmed by a narrow (40 km wide) Tertiary basin, deeper in places than the coeval Ebro basin in the southern Pyrenees, but lacking any driving load. This Tertiary Cantabrian basin may reflect the interaction between thermal subsidence phases at the southern margin of the BCB and uplift (inversion) of the Mesozoic basin to the north. In addition, the BCB shows a number of interactions between thin-skinned and thick-skinned styles of shortening. In the west, inversion has uplifted a major basement ridge between areas of vastly differing sedimentology and structural style. The southern thrust margin to the basin has no basement outcrops, even though it marks the southern margin of Mesozoic sedimentation. Balanced sections imply the reactivation of basement faults in controlling the geometry, position, and orientation of the thrust front. In the northern part of the BCB, around Bilbao, major monoclines and thrusts follow basement fault trends - trends which earlier strongly affected the distribution of the Mesozoic. The BCB has a stratigraphy and structure in common with eastern basins such as the Aquitaine and Ebro. Though it can be difficult to correlate individual structures, many features of basin dynamics are similar. It is valuable to study the less-deformed BCB in order to understand the basins of northern Spain and southern France.

  16. Annotated bibliography of the Black Warrior basin area, northern Alabama - northern Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography contains 1964 records related to the geology of the Black Warrior basin of northern Alabama and northern Mississippi. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: coal, petroleum, and natural gas deposits; mineralogy; lithology; paleontology; petrology; stratigraphy; tectonics; bauxite; iron ores; geologic correlations; earthquakes; fossils; gold deposits; geological surveys; hydrology; and water resources. The subject index provides listings of records related to each county and the geologic ages covered by this area. Some of the items (54) are themselves bibliographies.

  17. Subsidence history in basins of northern Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracene, Rabah; Patriat, Martin; Ellouz, Nadine; Gaulier, Jean-Michel

    2003-02-01

    The Tellian foreland in Algeria represents a part of the southern Tethyan margin during the Mesozoic. Its tectonic evolution includes a rifting stage during the Triassic and Liassic times characterised by tilted blocks and early diapiric events during the Liassic, a post-rift regime from Middle Jurassic up to the Late Cretaceous and basin inversion during the Tertiary related to the African and European plates convergence. The subsidence modelling supported by surface and subsurface data integration emphasises different subsidence phases. Liassic subsidence phase under Tethyan and Atlantic control related to crustal thinning. Late Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary subsidence phases, where the first one is linked to diapiric events and the second in eastern Algeria to the effects of the rifting event developed more easterly in the Gulf of Gabès and Sirte. The last one is flexural and occurs in foreland basins during the Tertiary. Taking into account the subsidence record of each structural domain, a correlation between tectonic events and the subsidence phases can be established.

  18. Rejuvenation of the Kuqa foreland basin, northern flank of the Tarim basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Huafu; Jia Dong; Cai Dongsheng

    1994-12-01

    The Kuqa depression along the northern flank of the Tarim basin is filled with a thick sequence of Neogene and Quaternary coarse elastic continental sediments. This structural depression is part of a large foreland basin that leads south of the Tianshan - an orogenic belt of intracontinental convergence resulting from the northward propagation of stress following the collision of India with the southern margin of Eurasia. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Hydrocarbon maturation in Laramide basins - constraints from evolution of northern Big Horn basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E.S.; Furlong, K.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal and mechanical models were used to quantify the effects of Laramide uplifts and subsequent synorogenic deposition on the hydrocarbon maturation of Cretaceous source rocks in the Big Horn basin. Laramide deformation and resultant sedimentation has clearly affected hydrocarbon maturation of Cretaceous source rocks. (Thermopolis, Mowry, Frontier, Cody). Modified Lopatin-type reconstructions suggest that a significant region containing Cretaceous source rocks has been within the liquid hydrocarbon window. The earliest onset of hydrocarbon maturation in the northern Big Horn basin was latest Eocene, with some regions still containing immature Cretaceous source rocks as a consequence of Cenozoic erosion, uplift of the Pryor Mountains, and lack of burial. Regional geologic features indicate that the basin formed as a result of flexural compensation of an elastic lithosphere during emplacement of the Beartooth and Pryor Mountains, and possibly the Absaroka volcanics. This was determined by 2-dimensional models which predict sediment thickness caused by tectonic loading and subsequent sedimentation. Flexural rigidities of 10/sup 2/2exclamation-10/sup 22/ newton-meters adequately explain flexural subsidence in the northern Big Horn basin. The present basin configuration also was compared with a theoretical profile based on geologic constraints. Subsidence models for the present basin profile suggest the Paleocene thrusting of the Beartooth block contributes a majority of the tectonic loading and that Cenozoic erosion has drastically affected the resultant sedimentary sequence (Fort Union and Wasatch). These models, along with stratigraphic reconstructions, can be combined to pinpoint areas of potential hydrocarbon maturation within Laramide-type basins.

  20. Potential cretaceous play in the Rharb basin of northern Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jobidon, G.P. )

    1993-09-01

    The autochthonous Cretaceous in the Rharb basin of northern Morocco is located underneath a cover of neogene sediments and of the Prerif nappe olistostrome, which was emplaced during the Tortonian 7 m.y. The presence of infranappe Cretaceous sediments is documented in a few onshore wells in the Rharb basin and in the adjacent Prerif Rides area, as well as in the Rif Mountains. Their presence in the deeper portion of the Rharb basin is difficult to detail because of poor seismic resolution data beneath dispersive prerif nappe. A recent study of offshore seismic data acquired by PCIAC in 1987 indicates that the infranappe interval can be more than 1500 m thick in some of the offshore Kenitra area. These sediments have seismic signatures that would correspond to Middle Cretaceous transgressions, culminating with a Turonian highstand. Their deposition systems were located on the northern and western flanks of the Meseta and were followed by a hiatus lasting until the Miocene. Regional studies of gravity and magnetic data provide and additional understanding of the Rif province, its evolution, and the possible presence of autochthonous Cretaceous sediments below the prerif nappe cover. The infranappe of Rharb basin has a good potential to develop into a major hydrocarbon play with the presence of middle Cretaceous reservoir rocks, Turonian-Cenomanian black shale source rocks, as well as the timely combination of trap formation, source rock maturation, and hydrocarbon migration.

  1. Hydrogeologic data for the northern Rocky Mountains intermontane basins, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, DeAnn M.; Lawlor, Sean M.; Briar, D.W.; Tresch, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of the Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins of western Montana and central and central and northern Idaho in 1990 to establish a regional framework of information for aquifers in 54 intermontane basins in an area of about 77,500 square miles. Selected hydrogeologic data have been used as part of this analysis to define the hydro- logic systems. Records of 1,376 wells completed in 31 of the 34 intermontane basins in the Montana part of the study area are tabulated in this report. Data consist of location, alttiude of land surface, date well constructed, geologic unit, depth of well, diameter of casing, type of finish, top of open interval, primary use of water, water level, date water level measured, discharge, specific capacity, source of discharge data, type of log available, date water-quality parameters measured, specific conductance, pH, and temperature. Hydrographs for selected wells also are included. Locations of wells and basins are shown on the accompanying plate.

  2. Integrated Watershed Assessment: The Northern River Basins Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, F. J.; Gummer, W. D.

    2001-05-01

    Begun in 1991 and completed in 1996, the Northern River Basins Study (NRBS) was a \\$12 M initiative established by the governments of Canada, Alberta, and the Northwest Territories to assess the cumulative impacts of development, particularly pulp mill related effluent discharges, on the health of the Peace, Athabasca and Slave river basins. The NRBS was launched in response to concerns expressed by northern residents following the 1991 approval of the Alberta Pacific Pulp Mill in Athabasca. Although initiated by governments, the NRBS was set-up to be `arms-length' and was managed by a 25 member Study Board that represented the many interests in the basins, including industry, environmental groups, aboriginal peoples, health, agriculture, education, municipalities, and the federal, territorial and provincial governments. Overseen by an independent Science Advisory Committee, an integrated research program was designed covering eight scientific components: fate and distribution of contaminants, food chain impacts, nutrients, hydrology/hydraulics and sediment transport, uses of the water resources, drinking water quality, traditional knowledge, and synthesis/modeling. Using a 'weight of evidence' approach with a range of ecological and sociological indicators, cumulative impacts from pulp and paper-related discharges and other point and non-point sources of pollution were determined in relation to the health and contaminant levels of aquatic biota, nutrient and dissolved oxygen-related stress, hydrology and climate related changes, and human health and use of the river basins. Based on this assessment and Study Board deliberations, site-specific and basin-wide scientific and management-related recommendations were made to Ministers regarding regulatory and policy changes, basin management and monitoring options, and future research. The Study reinforces the importance of conducting ecosystem-based , interdisciplinary science and the need for public involvement in

  3. A magnetotelluric model of the Mana Pools basin, northern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, D.; Whaler, K. A.; Zengeni, T.; Jones, P. C.; Gwavava, O.

    2000-05-01

    The Mana Pools sedimentary basin lies within the Zambezi mobile belt in northern Zimbabwe. New and preexisting magnetotelluric data and the available seismic reflection data are used to constrain the basin structure and the depth to the electrical basement. Long-period magnetotelluric (LMT) data were collected at five stations along a 60 km north-south profile across the Mana Pools basin and onto the southern escarpment. These data augment an existing audiofrequency (AMT) data set from 11 sites in the same area. The subsurface apparent resistivities measured at periods sampling the basin are very low (a few Ωm). After processing both data sets, the estimated impedance tensor is decomposed, showing that the resistivity structure of the Mana Pools basin can be modeled two dimensionally. The ρ+ algorithm is used to show that there is no systematic offset in magnitude between the AMT and LMT data sets before they are combined. Minimum structure resistivity models of the Mana Pools basin compare well with the information from reflection seismic data and support its previous description as a half graben basin of ˜7 km depth. The excellent conductor in the Mana Pools basin is quite different to those seen elsewhere in the orogenic belt in that it is a feature of the sedimentary fill rather than the basement. The resistivity of the basement is low but no localized good conductor is observed; these low resistivities may result from a high degree of either chemical or tectonic alteration to the underlying rocks due to metamorphic processes and tectonic disruption during rift formation.

  4. Tectonosedimentary history of the sedimentary basins in northern west Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Kunin, N.Ya.; Segalovich, I.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Sedimentary basins of northern west Siberia belong to the Arctic tectonosedimentary province. This basin evolved dissimilarly compared to those in the Urengoy and more southern areas, which resulted in substantial differences in the geologic characteristics. Seismic surveys indicate that the basement surface in northern west Siberia occurs at great depths, in places exceeding 15 km. The depressions of the basement surfaces are filled with the thick Paleozoic and Mesozoic sequences. The paper discussed the results of seismostratigraphic analysis of more than 13,000 km of regional common-depth-point profiles. These profiles identified systems of east-west-trending and isometric structures in the region. Some of the structures are buried; others are mapped in the upper horizons of the sedimentary cover and decrease in magnitude with depth. Cretaceous marine sediments that were deposited under deep-water conditions and did not compensate for the tectonic subsidence are widely present in the region. Noncompensated sedimentation was the longest from the Late Jurassic to the Hauterivian-Barremian on the Gydan peninsula and in adjacent areas. The Jurassic section is dominate by ingressive marine sediments. Sediments that did not compensate for tectonic subsidence widely occurred in the Early Jurassic and resulted in deposition of petroleum source rocks. Triassic and Jurassic strata occur conformable in most of northern west Siberia. Significant deformation of the Triassic sediments are identified in the periphery of the Triassic marine basin. This indicates that surrounding structures were thrust against northern west Siberia at the Triassic and Jurassic time boundary. Isometric structures of high magnitude were formed during the Paleozoic structure stage and these structures continued to grow through the Triassic and Jurassic. These and other results of seismostratigraphic analysis suggest the high oil potential of the region.

  5. Basement structures in the northern Tularosa Basin, central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whitebread, M.W.; Adams, D.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    A variety of geophysical data consisting of gravity and magnetic measurements, drill holes, and other geologic information have provided an analysis of basement structures within the northern Tularosa Basin of central New Mexico. Both the Laramide and Ancestral Rockies orogenies and the extension associated with the Rio Grande rift affected the structural development of this area. This area is significant in that it is the region in which the eastern boundary of the Rio Grande rift shifts 115 km eastward to the bounding fault between the Tularosa basin and the Sacramento uplift. The Tularosa basin is a large, complex structure consisting of two grabens and a horst block. At this latitude, it is probably the major Rio Grande rift structure. In fact, gravity modeling has determined that the thinnest crust (above 32 km) in the region lies beneath the north Tularosa basin. Analysis of gravity and magnetic anomaly maps identify gravity lows associated with Paleozoic or Precambrian basins. Gravity lows northeast of the Oscura uplift form a semi-continuous regional depression eastward to the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, a topographic feature believed to be a remnant of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

  6. Geoenvironmental Investigations of the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, Lisa L.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Nevada is one of the world's foremost regions of gold production. The Humboldt River Basin (HRB) covers 43,500 km2 in northern Nevada (Crompton, 1995), and it is home to approximately 18 active gold and silver mines (Driesner and Coyner, 2001) among at least 55 significant metallic mineral deposits (Long and others, 1998). Many of the gold mines are along the Carlin trend in the east-central portion of the HRB, and together they have produced 50 million ounces of gold from 1962 (when the Carlin mine first opened) through April 2002 (Nevada Mining Association, 2002). Mining is not new to the region, however. Beginning in 1849, mining has taken place in numerous districts that cover 39 percent of the land area in the HRB (Tingley, 1998). In addition to gold and silver, As, Ba, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Pb, S, Sb, V, W, Zn, and industrial commodities such as barite, limestone, fluorite, sand and gravel, gypsum, gemstones, pumice, zeolites, and building stone, have been extracted from the HRB (McFaul and others, 2000). All papers within this series of investigations can be found as lettered chapters of USGS Bulletin 2210, Geoenvironmental Investigations of the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada. Each chapter is available separately online. The data and software utilized in this product (Chapter F) permit the user to view and analyze the geographic relationships among chemistry of stream sediments and surface waters, geology, and various cartographic base information such as but not limited to cities, county boundaries, and land ownership. Data for this product were compiled and or produced as part of a mineral and environmental assessment of the Humboldt River basin conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1995 - 2000.

  7. Channeling in Paleocene coals, northern Powder River basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Interpretation of 1,200 geophysical logs in the northern Powder River basin, Montana, reveals the paleodrainages influencing coal deposition during the deposition of the Tongue River member (Paleocene, Fort Union Formation). Four channels with associated crevasse splay deposits are recognized: (1) an east-west rosebud drainage near Colstrip, (2) a north-south wall channel near Birney, (3) a north-south Dietz drainage near Tongue River Reservoir, and (4) a north-south Anderson channel in the vicinity of Moorhead. These channels support the concept of a major northeast-flowing drainage system during deposition of the Tongue River Member. Identification of these channels serves as a guide to future coal exploration.

  8. Unusual Radar Backscatter along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hawke, B. Ray; Leverington, David W.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of the unusual radar backscatter properties along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin is shown. The contents include: 1) Visual and Infrared Observations of Moon; 2) Radar Observations of Moon; 3) Lunar Orbiter Photographs Geologic Setting; 4) 70-cm Radar Data; 5) .70-cm Radar Dark Halo Craters; 6) 3.8-cm Radar Data; 7) 7.5-m Radar Data; 8) 70cm, 3.8 cm and 7.5-m Radar Data; 9) Optical and Infrared Data; 10) Plato Rilles; 11) Isopachs of Crater Ejecta; 12) Plato-like Craters; 13) Observation Summary; 14) Interpretation Matrix; 15) Dark Halo Diameters vs. Crater Size; and 16) Radar Geologic Column.

  9. Transfer structures in the Northern Tarim Basin, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Guang-Ya Zhang; Shi-Xia Gao

    1996-03-01

    The fold-thrust tectonics of the Northern Tarim Basin, oriented roughly parallel to the South Tianshan orogenic belt, consists of two large-scale tectonic regimes: (1) the foreland-basin, thin-skinned deformation belt; and (2) the foreland-craton, thick-skinned-dominated (i.e., basement-involved) deformation belt. Variations in the degree of deformation in these tectonic belts and style along the regional tectonic strike can be accounted for by longitudinal (progressive transfer or transverse (abrupt) transfer). Longitudinal transfer maintains the overall displacement or shortening within the fold-thrust belts as uniform or with gradual change along the tectonic strike. This includes the tectonic transfer between en echelon master thrusts and from the individual master thrust to terminal fold(s) or distributive thrusts. Transverse transfer resulted from an abrupt change in overall displacement or shortening along the tectonic strike. Within the transverse transfer zone, various tectonics-such as strike-slip faults, strike-slip thrusts, transverse anticlines, and en echelon folds-are developed. The development of longitudinal transfer zones can be attributed to the gradual variation of intrinsic and extrinsic and extrinsic deformational conditions along the tectonic strike. The initiation of transverse transfer may be related to variations in the thickness of sedimentary layers, detachment-layer distribution limits, and variation along strike of the degree and mode of the South Tianshan orogenic belt`s effect on the basin, as well as the variation of the boundary conditions of the deformation, such as in the geometry of plate margins. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D., (Edited By)

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The foothills of the Brooks Range contain an enormous accumulation of zinc (Zn) in the form of zinc sulfide and barium (Ba) in the form of barite in Carboniferous shale, chert, and mudstone. Most of the resources and reserves of Zn occur in the Red Dog deposit and others in the Red Dog district; these resources and reserves surpass those of most deposits worldwide in terms of size and grade. In addition to zinc and lead sulfides (which contain silver, Ag) and barite, correlative strata host phosphate deposits. Furthermore, prolific hydrocarbon source rocks of Carboniferous and Triassic to Early Jurassic age generated considerable amounts of petroleum that may have contributed to the world-class petroleum resources of the North Slope. Deposits of Zn-Pb-Ag or barite as large as those in the Brooks Range are very rare on a global basis and, accordingly, multiple coincident favorable factors must be invoked to explain their origins. To improve our understanding of these factors and to contribute to more effective assessments of resources in sedimentary basins of northern Alaska and throughout the world, the Mineral Resources Program and the Energy Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a project that was aimed at understanding the petroleum maturation and mineralization history of parts of the Brooks Range that were previously poorly characterized. The project, titled ?Regional Fluid Flow and Basin Modeling in Northern Alaska,? was undertaken in collaboration with industry, academia, and other government agencies. This Circular contains papers that describe the results of the recently completed project. The studies that are highlighted in these papers have led to a better understanding of the following: *The complex sedimentary facies relationships and depositional settings and the geochemistry of the sedimentary rocks that host the deposits (sections 2 and 3). *The factors responsible for formation of the barite and zinc deposits

  11. Geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity at basin scale: a case study from Datong basin, Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-05-01

    A hydrogeochemical investigation using integrated methods of stable isotopes ((18)O, (2)H), (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, Cl/Br ratios, chloride-mass balance, mass balance and hydrogeochemical modeling was conducted to interpret the geochemical evolution of groundwater salinity in Datong basin, northern China. The δ(2)H, δ(18)O ratios in precipitation exhibited a local meteoric water line of δ(2)H = 6.4 δ(18)O -5 (R(2) = 0.94), while those in groundwater suggested their meteoric origin in a historically colder climatic regime with a speculated recharge rate of less than 20.5 mm overall per year, in addition to recharge from a component of deep residual ancient lake water enriched with Br. According to the Sr isotope binary mixing model, the mixing of recharges from the Shentou karst springs (24%), the western margins (11%) and the eastern margins (65%) accounts for the groundwater from the deep aquifers of the down-gradient parts in the central basin is a possible mixing mechanism. In Datong, hydrolysis of silicate minerals is the most important hydrogeochemical process responsible for groundwater chemistry, in addition to dissolution of carbonate and evaporites. In the recharge areas, silicate chemical weathering is typically at the bisiallitization stage, while that in the central basin is mostly at the monosiallitization stage with limited evidence of being in equilibrium with gibbsite. Na exchange with bound Ca, Mg prevails at basin scale, and intensifies with groundwater salinity, while Ca, Mg exchange with bound Na locally occurs in the east pluvial and alluvial plains. Although groundwater salinity increases with the progress of water-rock/sediment interactions along the flow path, as a result of carbonate solubility control and continuous evapotranspiration, Na-HCO3 and Na-Cl-SO4 types of water are usually characterized respectively in the deep and the shallow aquifers of an inland basin with a silicate terrain in an arid climatic regime. PMID:24737419

  12. Hydrometeorology Testbed in the American River Basin of Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsmill, D.; Lundquist, J.; Jorgensen, D.; McGinley, J.; Werner, K.

    2006-12-01

    In California, most precipitation occurs in the winter, as a mixture of rain at lower elevations and snow in the higher mountains. Storms from the Pacific carry large amounts of moisture, and put people and property at risk from flooding because of the vast urban development and infrastructure in low-lying areas of the central valley of California. Improved flood prediction at finer spatial and temporal resolutions can help minimize these risks. The first step is to accurately measure and predict spatially-distributed precipitation. This is particularly true for river basins with complex orography where the processes that lead to the development of precipitation and determine its distribution and fate on the ground are not well understood. To make progress in this important area, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is leading a Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT) effort designed to accelerate the testing and infusion of new technologies, models, and scientific results from the research community into daily forecasting operations. HMT is a national effort (http://hmt.noaa.gov) that will be implemented in different regions of the U.S. over the next decade. In each region, the focus will be on individual experimental test basins. The first full-scale implementation of HMT, called HMT-West, targets northern California's flood-vulnerable American River Basin (4740 km2) on the west slopes of the Sierra Nevada between Sacramento and Lake Tahoe. The deployment strategy is focused on the North Fork of the basin (875 km2), which is the least- controlled portion of the entire catchment. This basin was selected as a test basin because it has reliable streamflow records dating back to 1941 and has been well characterized by prior field studies (e.g. the Sierra Cooperative Pilot Project) and modeling efforts, focusing on both short-term operations and long-term climate scenarios. Intensive field activities in the North Fork of the American River started in

  13. Evolution of an Intermontane Basin Along the Northern San Andreas System: Evidence from Basin Structure of Little Lake Valley (Willits), Northern California Inferred from Gravity and Geologic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, G.; Kelsey, H.; Langenheim, V.; Furlong, K.

    2007-12-01

    Associated with the northern strands of the San Andreas fault system in California is a series of small intermontane basins. While it is tempting to ascribe their formation to simple pull-apart tectonics along the dominantly strike-slip fault strands, direct evidence for basin genesis is lacking. In this study, a detailed gravity survey throughout the Little Lake Valley region (Willits, California) provides constraints on mechanisms of basin formation along this young segment of the San Andreas fault system. Interpretation of isostatic gravity anomaly data provides insight into fault geometry, basin structure, and thickness of Quaternary fill in Little Lake Valley, California. Although the active strike-slip Maacama fault zone diagonally trends through the southwest part of the valley, gravity and geologic interpretations indicate the valley conceals an earlier basin and faulting history. The isostatic gravity anomaly of the basin is negative (up to 13 mGals) and rhombic in shape. Modeling indicates two splays, less than a km apart, of an up-to-the-east East Valley fault; the basinward fault is buried by fill and the more easterly fault defines the eastern margin of the basin. Cumulative up-to-the-east vertical fault displacement along the East Valley fault increases southward up to 610 m in the southern portion of the valley. Gravity gradients also suggest approximately east-west trending faults bound the northern and southern sides of the valley and offset Quaternary fill. From gravity and geologic data combined, the basin floor dips approximately 7 degrees to the south in the north part of the valley and both the Quaternary sediment and basin floor dip approximately 13 degrees to the north in the south part of the valley, implying an approximately east-west axis of dip reversal of the basin floor at the northern stretch of East Hill Road (latitude 39.39 degrees N). Faults and basin fill structure are not consistent with any one simple structural model of basin

  14. Base of fresh ground water, northern Louisiana Salt-Dome Basin and vicinity, northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryals, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage Program is an effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to locate and develop sites for disposal or storage of commercially produced radioactive wastes. As part of this program, salt domes in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin are being studied to determine their suitability as repositories. Part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's participation in the program has been to describe the regional geohydrology of the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. A map based on a compilation of published data and the interpretation of electrical logs shows the altitude of the base of freshwater in aquifers in the northern Louisiana salt-dome basin. (USGS)

  15. The central and northern Appalachian Basin-a frontier region for coalbed methane development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the world's second largest coalbed-methane (CBM) producing basin. It has nearly 4000 wells with 1996 annual production at 147.8 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Cumulative CBM production is close to 0.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). The Black Warrior Basin of Alabama in the southern Appalachian basin (including a very minor amount from the Cahaba coal field) accounts for about 75% of this annual production and about 75% of the wells, and the remainder comes from the central and northern Appalachian basin. The Southwest Virginia coal field accounts for about 95% of the production from the central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin. Production data and trends imply that several of the Appalachian basin states, except for Alabama and Virginia, are in their infancy with respect to CBM development. Total in-place CBM resources in the central and northern Appalachian basin have been variously estimated at 66 to 76 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), of which an estimated 14.55 Tcf (~ 20%) is technically recoverable according to a 1995 U.S. Geological Survey assessment. For comparison in the Black Warrior basin of the 20 Tcf in-place CBM resources, 2.30 Tcf (~ 12%) is technically recoverable. Because close to 0.9 Tcf of CBM has already been produced from the Black Warrior basin and the proved reserves are about 0.8 Tcf for 1996 [Energy Information Administration (EIA), 1997]. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 1996 Annual Report. U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EIA-0216(96), 145 pp.], these data imply that the central and northern Appalachian basin could become increasingly important in the Appalachian basin CBM picture as CBM resources are depleted in the southern Appalachian basin (Black Warrior Basin and Cahaba Coal Field). CBM development in the Appalachian states could decrease the eastern U.S.A.'s dependence on coal for electricity. CBM is expected to provide over the next few decades a virtually untapped source of

  16. Uplift and Erosion in the Northern Al Kufrah Basin (Southeast Libya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, H. R.; Bjørnseth, H. M.; Higgins, S.; Vandré, C.; Walderhaug, O.; Geiger, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Al Kufrah Basin forms part of the North African continental basin system. While neighbouring basins (e.g. Murzuq Basin, Sirt Basin) are proven petroleum provinces, the Al Kufrah Basin is still in an early stage of exploration. This study combines outcrop studies from the northern basin margin (Jabal Az Zalmah) and the eastern basin margin (Jabal Azbah) with subsurface data in a regional analysis of the key episodes of uplift and erosion in the Al Kufrah Basin. The understanding of the burial and exhumation history of a sedimentary basin is an important parameter for modelling source rock maturation and contributes thus to the evaluation of the hydrocarbon potential. In a first approach the amount of net erosion is estimated using geometrical reconstructions along two perpendicular cross-sections, based on interpretation of 2D-seimic data. In a second step the resulting net erosion map is integrated with three different analytical methods: (1) Shale compaction analyses (based on outcrop samples and well logs), (2) sandstone diagenesis analyses (based on outcrop samples) and (3) apatite fission track analyses (based on outcrop samples). Several erosional events are documented in the Palaeozoic stratigraphic record of the Al Kufrah Basin. The major episodes of regional Palaeozoic uplift and erosion occurred in Late Silurian - Early Devonian and in Late Carboniferous - Early Permian ("Hercynian event"). For both episodes a general southward increase in uplift and erosion has been estimated from integrated analyses of seismic and outcrop data. The northern flank of the basin including the Jabal Az Zalmah outcrop area does not appear to have been subjected to major uplift and erosion during these two Palaeozoic events. Maximum burial was reached during the Mesozoic after deposition of Late Permian - Early Cretaceous (?) continental sandstones. The most important episode of uplift and erosion occurred after the Early Cretaceous (?) sedimentation, leading to net

  17. Deep crustal structure of the Adare and Northern Basins, Ross Sea, Antarctica, from sonobuoy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.; Stock, J. M.; Clayton, R. W.; Cande, S.; Granot, R.

    2014-11-01

    Extension associated with ultraslow seafloor spreading within the Adare Basin, in oceanic crust just north of the continental shelf in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, extended south into the Northern Basin. Magnetic and gravity anomaly data suggest continuity of crustal structure across the continental shelf break that separates the Adare and Northern Basins. We use sonobuoy refraction data and multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected during research cruise NBP0701, including 71 new sonobuoy records, to provide constraints on crustal structure in the Adare and Northern Basins. Adjacent 1D sonobuoy profiles along several MCS lines reveal deep crustal structure in the vicinity of the continental shelf break, and agree with additional sonobuoy data that document fast crustal velocities (6000-8000 m/s) at shallow depths (1-6 km below sea level) from the Adare Basin to the continental shelf, a structure consistent with that of other ultraslow-spread crust. Our determination of crustal structure in the Northern Basin only extends through sedimentary rock to the basement rock, and so cannot help to distinguish between different hypotheses for formation of the basin.

  18. Paleogene palaeogeography and basin evolution of the Western Carpathians, Northern Pannonian domain and adjoining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Michal; Plašienka, Dušan; Soták, Ján; Vojtko, Rastislav; Oszczypko, Nestor; Less, György; Ćosović, Vlasta; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Králiková, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    The data about the Paleogene basin evolution, palaeogeography, and geodynamics of the Western Carpathian and Northern Pannonian domains are summarized, re-evaluated, supplemented, and newly interpreted. The presented concept is illustrated by a series of palinspastic and palaeotopographic maps. The Paleogene development of external Carpathian zones reflects gradual subduction of several oceanic realms (Vahic, Iňačovce-Kričevo, Szolnok, Magura, and Silesian-Krosno) and growth of the orogenic accretionary wedge (Pieniny Klippen Belt, Iňačovce-Kričevo Unit, Szolnok Belt, and Outer Carpathian Flysch Belt). Evolution of the Central Western Carpathians is characterized by the Paleocene-Early Eocene opening of several wedge-top basins at the accretionary wedge tip, controlled by changing compressional, strike-slip, and extensional tectonic regimes. During the Lutetian, the diverging translations of the northward moving Eastern Alpine and north-east to eastward shifted Western Carpathian segment generated crustal stretching at the Alpine-Carpathian junction with foundation of relatively deep basins. These basins enabled a marine connection between the Magura oceanic realm and the Northern Pannonian domain, and later also with the Dinaridic foredeep. Afterwards, the Late Eocene compression brought about uplift and exhumation of the basement complexes at the Alpine-Carpathian junction. Simultaneously, the eastern margin of the stretched Central Western Carpathians underwent disintegration, followed by opening of a fore-arc basin - the Central Carpathian Paleogene Basin. In the Northern Hungarian Paleogene retro-arc basin, turbidites covered a carbonate platform in the same time. During the Early Oligocene, the rock uplift of the Alpine-Carpathian junction area continued and the Mesozoic sequences of the Danube Basin basement were removed, along with a large part of the Eocene Hungarian Paleogene Basin fill, while the retro-arc basin depocentres migrated toward the east

  19. Tectonic controls on rift basin morphology: Evolution of the northern Malawi (Nyasa) rift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Deino, A. L.; Tesha, A. L.; Becker, T.; Ring, U.

    1993-01-01

    Radiometric (K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39) age determinations of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, combined with structural, gravity, and seismic reflection data, are used to constrain the age of sedimentary strata contained within the seismically and volcanically active northern Malawi (Nyasa) rift and to characterize changes in basin and flank morphologies with time. Faulting and volcanism within the Tukuyu-Karonga basin began at approximately 8.6 Ma, when sediments were deposited in abroad, initially asymmetric lake basin bounded on its northeastern side by a border fault system with minor topographic relief. Extensions, primarily by a slip along the border fault, and subsequent regional isostatic compensation led to the development of a 5-km-deep basin bounded by broad uplifted flanks. Along the low-relief basin margin opposite border fault, younger stratigraphic sequences commonly onlap older wedge-shaped sequences, although their internal geometry is often progradational. Intrabasinal faulting, flankuplift, and basaltic and felsic volcanism from centers at the northern end of the basin became more important at about 2.5 Ma when cross-rift transfer faults developed to link the Tukuyu-Karonga basin to the Rukwa basin. Local uplift and volcanic construction at the northern end of the basin led to a southeastward shift in the basin's depocenter. Sequence boundaries are commonly erosional along this low-relief (hanging wall) margin and conformable in the deep lake basin. The geometry of stratigraphic sequences and the distribution of the erosion indicate that horizontal and vertical crustal movements both across and along the length of the rift basin led to changes in levels of the lake, irrespective of paleoclimatic fluctuations.

  20. Lithospheric Instabilities within the Northern Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. C.; Fouch, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Flat slab subduction and the subsequent removal of the subducting Farallon slab beneath the western United States has had a profound impact on the state of the North American lithosphere. In order to provide new constraints on the structure and evolution of the region's crust and upper mantle, we use surface wave tomography and receiver functions to image the earth beneath the Northern Basin and Range (NBR) and surrounding regions. We combine these results with published geophysical and geochemical data to further characterize lithospheric and asthenospheric processes and relate these to geological observations at the surface. Our initial results show high-velocity upper mantle, interpreted as lithosphere, beneath the center of the NBR and thinner lithosphere along its western, southern, and eastern margins. The zone of thickest lithosphere corresponds to areas with relatively thick crust, high elevations, and an absence of historic seismicity greater than magnitude 5.0. This region of thicker lithosphere also underlies a zone of reduced volcanic rock exposure relative to surrounding regions. Further, within the region there are no volcanic rocks in the NAVDAT database younger than 10 Ma, with the exception of Lunar Craters located in the south-central NBR. The shallow lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary observed along the margins of the NBR suggests that significant lithospheric thinning has occurred in these areas. This thinning is likely related to either extensional shear stresses or to the removal of lithospheric material, perhaps leading to accentuated strain along the margins of the Basin and Range. We interpret these data in the context of gravitational instabilities resulting in the removal of lithospheric material. A lithospheric downwelling has previously been identified within the center of the NBR based on high-velocity upper-mantle material observed in body wave tomography, a zone of weak or absent horizontal anisotropic fabric observed in shear

  1. Regional surficial geochemistry of the northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, S.; Folger, H.; Kotlyar, B.; Mossotti, V.G.; Coombs, M.J.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    The regional distribution of arsenic and 20 other elements in stream-sediment samples in northern Nevada and southeastern Oregon was studied in order to gain new insights about the geologic framework and patterns of hydrothermal mineralization in the area. Data were used from 10,261 samples that were originally collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program in the 1970s. The data are available as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02-0227. The data were analyzed using traditional dot maps and interpolation between data points to construct high-resolution raster images, which were correlated with geographic and geologic information using a geographic information system (GIS). Wavelength filters were also used to deconvolute the geochemical images into various textural components, in order to study features with dimensions of a few kilometers to dimensions of hundreds of kilometers. The distribution of arsenic, antimony, gold, and silver is different from distributions of the other elements in that they show a distinctive high background in the southeast part of the area, generally in areas underlain by the pre-Mesozoic craton. Arsenic is an extremely mobile element and can be used to delineate structures that served as conduits for the circulation of metal-bearing fluids. It was used to delineate large crustal structures and is particularly good for delineation of the Battle Mountain-Eureka mineral trend and the Steens lineament, which corresponds to a post-Miocene fault zone. Arsenic distribution patterns also delineated the Black Rock structural boundary, northwest of which the basement apparently consists entirely of Miocene and younger crust. Arsenic is also useful to locate district-sized hydrothermal systems an d clusters of systems. Most important types of hydrothermal mineral deposit in the northern Great Basin appear to be strongly associated with arsenic; this is less

  2. A Wintertime Aerosol Model for the Ganga Basin, Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2006-05-01

    An aerosol model has been developed using mass size distributions of various chemical components measured at Kanpur (an urban location in the Ganga basin, GB, in Northern India) and applied to estimate the radiative effects of the aerosols over the entire GB during the winter season for the first time. The number size distribution of various species was derived from the measured mass concentration and the optical properties were calculated using OPAC model. The anthropogenic contribution to the total extinction was found to be more than 90%. The relative contribution of various species to the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.5 μm are in the following order, (NH2)2SO4 (AS, 37%), nitrate (N, 28%), other salts (S, mainly NaCl and KCl, 19%), dust (9%) and black carbon, BC (7%). Contribution of AS, N, S to the observed AOD decreases with wavelength and that of dust increases with wavelength, whereas, BC contribution remains almost same. The extinction coefficient strongly depends on the relative humidity (RH), as the scattering by fine mode fraction (contributing 88% to the total extinction) is enhanced at high ambient RH. The spectral variation of absorption coefficient indicates that the most likely source of BC (as BC is the dominant absorbing species) in this region is fossil- fuel. The spectral variation of single scattering albedo (SSA) in the fine and coarse mode fractions and that of asymmetry parameter suggests that the internal mixing is more likely scenario, although the possibility of external mixing can not be ruled out. If the RH is lowered by ~20%, BC contribution to the AOD increases by ~3.5%, which implies that the RH is a strong controlling factor of the aerosol forcing. The mean shortwave clear sky top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface forcing over Kanpur are -13±3 and -43±8 W m-2. Extending the TOA and surface efficiency over the entire GB, the mean TOA and surface forcing become -9±3 and -25±10 W m-2. This results in high atmospheric

  3. The Bowser and Sustut Basins, Northern British Columbia, Canada: Insights From Analysis of Magnetic Anomaly Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, J.; Lowe, C.

    2005-12-01

    The Bowser and Sustut basins occupy an area of more than 60,000 km2 in northern British Columbia, Canada. They comprise three, dominantly sedimentary, stratigraphic successions, in part overlapping in age: the Bowser Lake Group, the Skeena Group, and the Sustut Group. These three successions overlie arc volcanic and volcaniclastic strata of Stikinia, an allochtonous island arc terrane that accreted to the western margin of North America in the Early Jurassic to early Middle Jurassic. All three basin successions and underlying Stikinia were deformed during development of a thin-skinned fold and thrust belt (the Skeena Fold and Thrust Belt) in Cretaceous and possibly into earliest Tertiary time. Recently, the basins have been the focus of intense geological studies which have resulted in major revisions to the stratigraphic and structural framework of the basins and demonstrated that they have significantly higher petroleum potential than had been previously recognized. To advance these new findings further requires better imaging of the three-dimensional geometry and architecture of the basins. In this study we harness existing magnetic anomaly data to provide the first quantitative estimates of sedimentary thickness across the entire extents of both basins. Our results, which are in general in accord with geological interpretations, indicate that basin-fill is relatively thin and fairly uniform in the Sustut Basin (2.5-3 km), but highly variable in the Bowser Basin, ranging from less than 2 km to more than 6 km. Overall, sedimentary fill is thicker in the northern half of Bowser Basin compared to the south and is typically less than 2 km near the basins northern, western and southern margins. In addition, we demonstrate how a large, buried intrusion beneath the northeast part of Bowser Basin can account for an observed magnetic anomaly and explain the high coalification gradients and localized high maturation levels of the overlying sedimentary rocks. Neither of

  4. Stress patterns of the Plio-Quaternary brittle deformation along the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro Fault, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, F.; Tibaldi, A.; Waite, G. P.; Corazzato, C.; Bonali, F.; Nardin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the geometry and kinematics of the major structures of an orogen is essential to elucidate its style of deformation, as well as its tectonic evolution. We describe the temporal and spatial changes in the state of stress of the trans-orogen area of the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT) Fault Zone in the Central Andes, at about 24° S within the northern portion of the Puna Plateau between the Argentina-Chile border. The importance of the COT derives principally from the Quaternary-Holocene activity recognized on some segments, which may shed new light on its possible control on Quaternary volcanism and on the seismic hazard assessment of the area. Field geological surveys along with kinematic analysis and numerical inversion of ~ 280 new fault-slip measurements have revealed that this portion of the COT consists mainly of NW-SE striking faults, which have been reactivated under three different kinematic regimes: 1) a Miocene transpressional phase with the maximum principal stress (σ1) chiefly trending NW-SE; 2) an extensional phase that started by 9 Ma, with a horizontal NW-SE-trending minimum principal stress (σ3) - permutations between σ2 and σ3 axes have been recognized at three sites - and 3) a left-lateral strike-slip phase with an ~ ENE-WSW σ1 and a ~ NNW-SSE σ3 dating to the late Pliocene-Quaternary. Spatially, in the Quaternary, the left-lateral component decreases toward the westernmost tip of the COT, where it transitions to extension; this produced to a N-S horst and graben structure. Hence, even if trascurrence is still active in the eastern portion of the COT, as focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes indicate, our study demonstrates that extension is becoming the predominant structural style of deformation, at least in the western region. These major temporal and spatial changes in the tectonic regimes are attributed in part to changes in the magnitude of the boundary forces due to subduction processes. The overall perpendicular

  5. Seasonal distribution of zooplankton in the northern basin of Lake Chad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, A.H.; Robinson, Patricia K.

    1971-01-01

    More than 300 pairs of fine and coarse mesh plankton net samples were collected in the northern basin of Lake Chad during an 18-month period, June 1967 to November 1968. The seasonal distribution and abundance of the dominant species of Rotifera and Crustacea are given in addition to a general description of the hydrology and circulation of the northern basin of the lake. The composition and abundance of the zooplankton varied considerably over the sampling period; a generalized seasonal cycle is suggested. Synoptic estimates of absolute abundance are presented and compared to those in the southeastern portion of the lake.

  6. Geochemical data for Jurassic diabase and basalt of the northern Culpeper basin, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Leavy, B.D.; Gottfried, D.

    1983-01-01

    The Culpeper basin is a north-northeast-trending faulted trough at the inner margin of the Piedmont geologic province along the east front of the Blue Ridge. Most of the Culpeper Group is intruded and locally metamorphosed by dikes, sills, and stocks of tholeiitic diabase. This report deals with a suite of samples from several diabase intrusives and basalt flows in the northern part of the Culpeper basin in Virginia. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (ACR)

  7. Deep seismic structure of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, B.; Rietbrock, A.

    2004-06-01

    The Atacama basin is a prominent morphological anomaly in the Central Andean forearc. 3D seismic structure beneath the depression and its surroundings has been determined from local earthquake tomography. Depth maps of P-wave velocity and attenuation (1/Qp) through the lithosphere reveal a rheologically strong (high Qp and vp) lithospheric block beneath the basin, surrounded by weak regions (low Qp and vp) beneath Pre- and Western Cordilleras. The anomalous lithospheric structure appears to bar hot asthenospheric mantle from penetrating trenchward, and hence causes the volcanic front to be deflected by the Salar de Atacama basin. The cold block may also influence the thermal structure of the subducted slab causing reduced Benioff seismicity and less hydration of mantle rocks evident from reduced vp/vs ratios. Seismic data are hard to reconcile with extension and lithospheric thinning as a mechanism for subsidence of the basin. Instead, high strength of the Atacama lithospheric block may contribute to basin formation by focussing deformation and uplift along the block's weak edges.

  8. Structure and evolution of the Sporadhes basin of the North Aegean trough, northern Aegean sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, M.; Ferentinos, G.

    1980-09-01

    Air gun and sparker profiling data from the northwest Aegean Sea provide detailed information on the structure of the Sporadhes basin (the western part of the North Aegean trough) and the adjacent shallow water area of Thermaicos Bay. Both areas are underlain by a thick postorogenic sedimentary sequence that exhibits "growth folds" (supratenuous folds attributable to synsedimentary tectonism) and associated antithetic faulting attributable to gravity creep down the limbs of the developing folds. The Sporadhes basin is an asymmetrical graben closely similar to Gulf Coast structures (down-to-basin faults) that have been modelled experimentally by Cloos (1968). Major listric faulting characterises the southern margin of the basin and the wide northern flank represents an associated downbend or reverse drag structure with antithetic faulting. Magmatism may occur in the axial zone of the basin. The Sporadhes basin has been formed in a late Cenozoic tensile stress regime and its evolution is discussed in terms of the regional tectonics and the process of back-arc extension. The structure and evolution of the northern Aegean area and the Pannonian basin are shown to be closely similar.

  9. Tectonoestratigraphic and Thermal Models of the Tiburon and Wagner Basins, northern Gulf of California Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, J.; Ramirez Zerpa, N. A.; Negrete-Aranda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Gulf of California Rift System consist sofa series faults that accommodate both normal and strike-slip motion. The faults formed a series of half-greens filled with more than 7 km of siliciclastic suc­cessions. Here, we present tectonostratigraphic and heat flow models for the Tiburón basin, in the southern part of the system, and the Wag­ner basin in the north. The models are constrained by two-dimensional seis­mic lines and by two deep boreholes drilled by PEMEX­-PEP. Analysis of the seismic lines and models' results show that: (i) subsidence of the basins is controlled by high-angle normal faults and by flow of the lower crust, (ii) basins share a common history, and (iii) there are significant differences in the way brittle strain was partitioned in the basins, a feature frequently observed in rift basins. On one hand, the bounding faults of the Tiburón basin have a nested geometry and became active following a west-to-east sequence of activation. The Tiburon half-graben was formed by two pulses of fault activity. One took place during the protogulf extensional phase in the Miocene and the other during the opening of Gulf of California in the Pleistocene. On the other hand, the Wagner basin is the result of two fault generations. During the late-to middle Miocene, the west-dipping Cerro Prieto and San Felipe faults formed a domino array. Then, during the Pleistocene the Consag and Wagner faults dissected the hanging-wall of the Cerro Prieto fault forming the modern Wagner basin. Thermal modeling of the deep borehole temperatures suggests that the heat flow in these basins in the order of 110 mW/m2 which is in agreement with superficial heat flow measurements in the northern Gulf of California Rift System.

  10. Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Earth-based radar backscatter from the lunar terrae is 2-4 times that of the maria. The largest (most conspicuous) exception is the terra along the northern rim of Imbrium Basin, where highlands that surround Sinus Iridium and crater Pluto have long wavelength (70-cm) radar backscatter that is comparable to (and sometimes weaker) the mare.

  11. Ecological Condition of Streams in Northern Nevada EPA R-MAP Humboldt Basin Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents stream data on the Humboldt River Basin in northern Nevada using the R-EMAP Program. Water is of primary importance to both the economy and the ecology of the region. Many of the waters of Nevada have previously received relatively little attention in regar...

  12. The northern Great Basin: a region of continual change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many controversies and conflicts surrounding land management in the Great Basin. The conflicts often revolve around the maintenance of native plant and animal communities. This paper outlines some of the historical aspects of plant community change and some of the unanticipated impacts of ...

  13. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the northern Wyoming Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundance of new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development in the Powder River Basin was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for the most comprehensive evaluation to date of coal resources and reserves in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. It is the second area within the Powder River Basin to be assessed as part of a regional coal assessment program; the first was an evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field, adjacent to and south of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. There are no active coal mines in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area at present. However, more than 100 million short tons of coal were produced from the Sheridan coal field between the years 1887 and 2000, which represents most of the coal production within the northwestern part of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. A total of 33 coal beds were identified during the present study, 24 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. Given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining, seven of the beds were evaluated for potential reserves. The restrictions included railroads, a Federal interstate highway, urban areas, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as depth, thickness of coal beds, mined-out areas, and areas of burned coal, were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area for all 24 coal beds assessed, with no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 285 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 263 billion short tons (92.3 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is that portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined

  14. War and early state formation in the northern Titicaca Basin, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Stanish, Charles; Levine, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    Excavations at the site of Taraco in the northern Titicaca Basin of southern Peru indicate a 2,600-y sequence of human occupation beginning ca. 1100 B.C.E. Previous research has identified several political centers in the region in the latter part of the first millennium B.C.E. The two largest centers were Taraco, located near the northern lake edge, and Pukara, located 50 km to the northwest in the grassland pampas. Our data reveal that a high-status residential section of Taraco was burned in the first century A.D., after which economic activity in the area dramatically declined. Coincident with this massive fire at Taraco, Pukara adopted many of the characteristics of state societies and emerged as an expanding regional polity. We conclude that organized conflict, beginning approximately 500 B.C.E., is a significant factor in the evolution of the archaic state in the northern Titicaca Basin. PMID:21788514

  15. Comparison of geoelectric and seismic reflection models of the Zambezi Valley basins, northern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David; Whaler, Kathy; Zengeni, Teddy

    2000-09-01

    The Mana Pools and Lower Zambezi Karoo sedimentary basins lie within the Zambezi mobile belt in northern Zimbabwe. The subsurface apparent resistivities measured at both locations are extremely low. Magnetotelluric (MT) data along a profile across part of the Lower Zambezi basin have been inverted using Rapid Relaxation Inversion (Smith & Booker 1991) to find the minimum structure needed to fit the data and compare with an earlier forward model. The resistivity models of both the Mana Pools and the Lower Zambezi basins are then compared with their structure revealed from seismic reflection data. The resistivity structure of the Mana Pools basin is well modelled as a series of different resistivity layers whose boundaries are defined by the seismic data. However, the resistivity structure of the Lower Zambezi basin cannot be matched easily to the seismic structure; additional structure with no seismic expression is required. There is a conductive feature in the two basins in the Upper Karoo sandstone layer that extends below the seismic basement beneath the Lower Zambezi basin. This indicates that the conductors may represent different types of features in the two basins, consistent with their proposed different tectonic origins. A resistive unit is present within the sediments in the Lower Zambezi basin that may represent intercalated basalt dykes, giving an anisotropic MT response. It has been suggested that there might be similar thin basalt layers within the sediments of the Mana Pools basin, but these could not be resolved by MT methods. The low resistivity of the basement, particularly beneath the Lower Zambezi basin, is remarkable and may result from a high degree of either chemical or tectonic alteration to the underlying rocks due to metamorphic processes and tectonic disruption during rift formation. The presence of the Lower Zambezi basin conductor at depths greater than the seismic basement is consistent with observations to the west, in the adjacent

  16. Groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges Basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily from mixture of ambient sources, including direct percolation of precipitation and irrigation waters, infiltration of runoff from surrounding hills/areas, seepage from rivers and creeks, and subsurface inflow (from non-alluvial geologic units that bound the alluvial basins). The primary sources of discharge are evaporation, discharge to streams, and water pumped for municipal supply and irrigation.

  17. Pedogenic and groundwater processes in a closed Miocene basin (northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenteros, Ildefonso; Angeles Bustillo, M. A.; Blanco, Jose Antonio

    1995-09-01

    The Sepúlveda-Ayllón Basin (SAB) was an episodically closed Miocene basin adjacent to the Tertiary Duero Basin (northern Spain). The sediments studied here represent a depositional system developed from the margin to the centre of the basin by alluvial fan, mud flat and saline mud flat/ ephemeral lacustrine environments. An assemblage of authigenic lithotypes was formed in the basin, their distribution being influenced by that of the depositional environments within the basin. Authigenesis took place mainly before sedimentation of the next set of beds. In the distal alluuial fan, authigenesis of smectite (outer part), palygorskite (inner part) and calcrete predominates, and the original muddy deposits are still recognizable. In the mud flat, a more intense transformation of the sediments took place, with predominant formation of palygorskite (outer part), interstitial gypsum, calcrete (outer part), dolocrete (inner part) and brown silcrete. In the saline mud flat /ephemeral lake, original sediment was extensively disturbed and replaced by magnesian clays (sepiolite and magnesian smectite), interstitial gypsum, dolocrete and cream and white silcrete. Authigenic alteration within each cycle varied in time and place, and was both pedogenic and groundwater-related. The authigenic assemblages point to a closed basin under evaporation in a seasonally dry climate. At the end of this period the SAB became connected with the Duero Basin to the northeast, thus losing the endoreic regime. Consequently, the authigenic evaporitic assemblages were then unstable and were partially replaced by a late sparry calcrete.

  18. The mechanics of continental extension in Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxian; Sun, Zhen; Wang, Zhenfeng; Sun, Zhipeng

    2015-09-01

    Located in the intersection of NE-trended rifted margin of South China Sea (SCS) and NW-oriented Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone (RRSZ), Qiongdongnan Basin shows significant differences in geological features from west to east, indicating different mechanics of continental extension. Based on the dense and updated multichannel seismic profiles, we disclose the characteristics of the remnant crystalline crust. Besides, we analyze the basin structures, calculate the stretching factors of upper and whole crust, and compute the syn-rift and post-rift unloaded tectonic subsidence along three selected transects in the west, middle and east of Qiongdongnan Basin. The crust thickness is 22 km on the northern and southern parts of Qiongdongnan Basin and thins gradually towards the central depression with two extremely thinned domains (<4 km), of which one is in Ledong Sag in the west and another is in Baodao and Changchang Sags in the east. Correspondingly, the stretching factors of crust are 1.5-2 on both sides and increase remarkably towards the central depression (β > 2) with two extremely stretched domains (β > 9), of which one is in Ledong Sag in the west and another is in Baodao and Changchang Sags in the east. However, the mechanics of continental extension vary significantly from west to east. The simple shear dominates in the west, the pure shear dominates in the east, and it is intermediate between the two end members of simple shear and pure shear in the middle of Qiongdongnan Basin. The simple shear in the west of Qiongdongnan Basin is probably controlled by the left-lateral movement of RRSZ. The pure shear in the east is probably related to the Cenozoic rifting along the northern continental margin of SCS. The transitional zone in the middle of Qiongdongnan Basin is possibly the combined results of the left-lateral movement of RRSZ and the Cenozoic rifting along the northern continental margin of SCS.

  19. Deformation of the Bellingham Basin in the Northern Cascadia Forearc as Inferred from Potential Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Wolf, L. W.; Blakely, R. J.; Sherrod, B. L.; Brown, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Bellingham basin, spanning onshore and offshore regions of northwestern Washington state and southwestern British Columbia, is deforming under north-south shortening in the north Cascadia forearc. Accommodating the regional strain are Holocene-active faults within the basin that have been traced both offshore and onshore on the basis of gravity, aeromagnetic, and limited seismic data. In this study, we add 160 new gravity measurements to an existing database to better define the geometry of the Bellingham basin and its relation to recently discovered NW-trending faults. The new gravity data, spaced at ~ 1 km in the study area, were collected to address gaps in the irregular spatial distribution of existing data and extrapolate deformation recorded in coastal areas eastward into the basin. Regional-residual separation methods and derivative maps suggest that the Bellingham basin is segmented into three smaller basins. The southeast-trending Birch Bay fault extends 30 km into the basin, in agreement with previous work. The Sandy Point fault to the south of Birch Bay and the Drayton Harbor fault to the north appear as pronounced NW-SE trending lineations in magnetic data but are not as apparent as the Birch Bay fault in the new gravity data. The new data indicate that the northern margin of the Bellingham basin follows an arcuate path, southeastward from Birch Bay, then curving northeastward to connect with the Boulder Creek Fault. Two cross-sectional 2.5D models crossing the Bellingham basin show that the Birch Bay fault is steeply dipping and closely associated with a NW-SE trending anticlinal structure involving the underlying Chuckanut Formation and older rocks. An industry seismic line located ~2 km north of the Birch Bay fault shows an anticline involving Quaternary strata, consistent with the cross-sectional models. Results from the study suggest that the Bellingham basin contains evidence of Holocene-active faulting that, like other forearc basins to the

  20. Palynology and organic/isotope geochemistry of the Mae Moh Basin, Northern Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, L.V.; Abrajano, T.; Burden, E.; Winsor, L. ); Ratanasthien, B. )

    1994-07-01

    The Mae Moh basin is one of several Tertiary intermontane basins in northern Thailand, whose evolution has been linked to the collision of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate since the early Eocene. As in most of these basins, lacustrine/swamp sedimentation in the Mae Moh basin can be broadly divided into an Oligocene to Miocene synrift sequence and a Miocene to Quarternary postrift sequence. The dominance of swamp flora recognized from spore and pollen assemblages (e.g., Polypodiidites usmensis, Verrucatosporites, Cyrtostachys), as well as the abundance of macrophytes and woody debris, indicate overwhelming hot and humid swamp conditions, with lake development restricted to relatively small areas. The distribution of alkanes and their compound-specific carbon isotope compositions are used to further show climatic variations affecting the lake/swamp ecology during the deposition of the synrift sequence.

  1. Contrasting red bed diagenesis: the southern and northern margin of the Central European Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöner, Robert; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2005-12-01

    We compare the diagenetic evolution of deeply buried Rotliegend (Permian) red bed sandstones at the southern and northern margin of the Central European Basin (CEB) in Germany. Main target is to evaluate the influence of maturation products from hydrocarbon (HC) source rocks during red bed diagenesis. At the southern margin of the CEB, thick coal-bearing Carboniferous source rocks are omnipresent beneath the Rotliegend. They contain dominantly gas-prone terrigenous organic material and some oil source rocks. Hydrocarbons were generated from Late Carboniferous onwards throughout most of basin subsidence. At the northern margin of the CEB, source rocks are almost absent due to deep erosion of Carboniferous rocks and a low TOC of local Lower Carboniferous relics. Early diagenetic processes are comparable at both basin margins. Significant differences in burial diagenetic evolution are spatially correlated to the occurrence of hydrocarbon source rocks. Burial diagenesis at the southern margin of the CEB is characterized especially by bleaching of red beds, major dissolution events, pervasive illite formation, impregnation of pore surfaces with bitumen, and formation of late Fe-rich cements. Almost none of these features were detected at the northern basin margin. Instead, relatively early cements are preserved down to maximum burial depths. This suggests that major diagenetic mineral reactions in deeply buried red bed sandstones are controlled by the presence or absence of maturing hydrocarbon source rocks.

  2. Structural features of northern Tarim basin: Implications for regional tectonics and petroleum traps

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Jia; Juafu Lu; Dongsheng Cai

    1998-01-01

    The rhombus-shaped Tarim basin in northwestern China is controlled mainly by two left-lateral strike-slip systems: the northeast-trending Altun fault zone along its southeastern side and the northeast-trending Aheqi fault zone along its northwestern side. In this paper, we discuss the northern Tarim basin`s structural features, which include three main tectonic units: the Kalpin uplift, the Kuqa depression, and the North Tarim uplift along the northern margin of the Tarim basin. Structural mapping in the Kalpin uplift shows that a series of imbricated thrust sheets have been overprinted by strike-slip faulting. The amount of strike-slip displacement is estimated to be 148 km by restoration of strike-slip structures in the uplift. The Kuqa depression is a Mesozoic-Cenozoic foredeep depression with well-developed flat-ramp structures and fault-related folds. The Baicheng basin, a Quaternary pull-apart basin, developed at the center of the Kuqa depression. Subsurface structures in the North Tarim uplift can be divided into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic and the Paleozoic lithotectonic sequences in seismic profiles. The Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence exhibits the interference of earlier left-lateral and later right-lateral strike-slip structures. Many normal faults in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic litho-tectonic sequence form the negative flower structures in the North Tarim uplift; these structures commonly directly overlie the positive flower structures in the Paleozoic litho-tectonic sequence. The interference regions of the northwest-trending and northeast-trending folds in the Paleozoic tectonic sequence have been identified to have the best trap structures. Our structural analysis indicates that the Tarim basin is a transpressional foreland basin rejuvenated during the Cenozoic.

  3. Evidence for bloc rotation tectonics in the seismic Cheliff basin (northern Algeria) from paleomagnetic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-M. Derder, Mohamed; Henry, Bernard; Amenna, Mohamed; Bayou, Boualem; Maouche, Said; Besse, Jean; Ayache, Mohamed; Abtout, Abdeslam

    2010-05-01

    The seismic activity in the Western Mediterranean area is mainly concentrated in northern Africa, particularly in northern Algeria, as it was shown by the 21 May 2003 Boumerdes and the 10 October 1980 El Asnam earthquakes (of moment magnitudes Mw =6.9, and Ms= 7.3 respectively), which were among the strongest recent ones recorded in the western Mediterranean area. This seismicity is due to the convergence between Africa and Eurasia plates since at least the Oligocene. This convergence involves a transpression tectonic with N-S to NNW-SSE direction of shortening, which is expressed by active deformations along the boundary of these two plates. In Algeria, the seismicity is focused in a coastal zone (the Tell Atlas) in the northern part of the country. Active structures define there NE-SW trending folds and NE-SW sinistral transpressive faults, which affect the intermountain and coastal basins of Neogene to Quaternary age (e.g. " Cheliff "basin, " Mitidja "basin). These reverse faults are coupled with NW-SE to E-W trending strike-slip deep faults. The active deformation in northern Algeria could thus be explained by a kinematic model of bloc rotation: the transpression tectonics with NNW-SSE direction of convergence defines NE-SW oriented blocs, which have been possibly subjected to clockwise rotation. The aim of this study is to look for such blocks rotation in the "Cheliff" basin (northern Algeria), by using the paleomagnetic tool. A paleomagnetic study has been thus conducted on the midlle Miocene, Tortonian, Messinian and Pliocene sedimentary rocks cropping out on the eastern part of this basin. The study is still in progress, but despite the very weak intensity of the Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) measured on the samples, and the frequently observed magnetization instability during the thermal demagnetization, the preliminary results show that clockwise rotations have affected different sites of the studied area. The magnitude of these rotations varies

  4. Structure and seismic stratigraphy of deep Tertiary basins in the northern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniest, Anouk; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Smit, Jeroen; Deschamps, Rémy; Hamon, Youri; Crombez, Vincent; Gorini, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Whereas active basin formation in the Aegean Sea is illustrated by seafloor bathymetry, the sedimentary and tectonic history of Tertiary basins is poorly known as existing offshore industrial seismic and well-log data are not easily accessible. We studied the evolution of the northern Aegean Sea with a focus on the North Aegean Trough and the Northern Skyros Basin, which are amongst the deepest basins of the northern Aegean domain. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of a 2D seismic dataset retrieved in the 1970's is combined with the well-investigated records of the onshore deep basins of northern Greece and Western Turkey. A general seismic signature chart was established using onshore basin stratigraphy and poorly-constrained well data. The studied domain shows two sharp unconformities that correspond to the Eocene-Oligocene transition and the Miocene-Pliocene shift, respectively. These transitions were then used as pillars for a more detailed structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation. A NW-SE trending seismic line that cross-cuts the southern part of the NE-SW-trending North Aegean Through displays the main features that are observed in the area: 1) an overall basin geometry that is rather symmetrical; 2) pre-Pliocene units affected by steep normal faults; 3) a rather constant thickness of Oligocene sediments that define a depocenter with an apparent NW-SE orientation; 4) an ablation of Miocene sediments by erosion, likely related to the Messinian Salinity Crises (MSC); (5) thick deltaic/turbiditic deposits in the NE-SW oriented central through of Neogene age; 6) trans-tensional growth patterns in Pliocene and Quaternary sediments that combine NE-SW steeply dipping fault zones, more likely corresponding to strike-slip corridors, and E-W-trending normal faults. The evidence listed above suggest that, in the northern Aegean Sea, (1) extension started at the latest during the Late Eocene/Early Oligocene (data quality does not allow for a

  5. Changes in tectonic stress field in the northern Sunda Shelf Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Tjia, H.D.; Liew, K.K. )

    1994-07-01

    The Tertiary hydrocarbon basins of the northern Sunda Shelf are underlain by continental and attenuated continental crust characterized by moderate to high average geothermic gradients in excess of 5[degrees]C/100 m. In the Malay basin, Oligocene and younger sediments are more than 12 km thick. The smaller basins (which are commonly half grabens) and probably also the main Malay basin were developed as pull-apart depressions associated with regional north-to-northwest-striking wrench faults. Initial basin subsidence took place during the Oligocene, but at least one small basin may have developed as early as the Jurassic. Sense of movement of the regional wrench faults was reversed during middle to late Miocene and in some of these faults, evidence was found for yet a younger phase of lateral displacement. These offsets range up to 45 km right-laterally along north-trending fault zones. During most of the Cenozoic, succeeding wrench faulting with sense of movement in the opposite direction caused structural inversion of the basin-filling sediments, which became folded. The regional wrench faults act as domain boundaries, each tectonic domain being characterized by different stress fields. The evolving stress system can be attributed to varying degrees of interference of plate motions coupled with changes in movement directions and/or rates of the Pacific plate Indian Ocean-Australian plate and possible expulsion of southeast Asian crustal slabs following the collision of the Indian subplate with the Eurasian plate.

  6. Microgastropod biofacies of the Upper Carboniferous system in the northern Appalachian (Dunkard) Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R. Jr.; Rollins, H.B.

    1985-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous microgastropod faunas are numerically abundant and diverse, and have recently received considerable taxonomic attention. However, there has been little attempt to appreciate their biostratigraphic utility. A comprehensive study of microgastropod distribution within fourteen marine units of the Pottsville, Allegheny, and Conemaugh Groups of the northern Appalachian Basin resulted in biofacies and range delimitation of many taxa. Microgastropod biofacies of the Pottsville and Allegheny Groups are less spatially and temporally static than those of the Conemaugh Group. Biofacies distribution suggests that Upper Carboniferous marine depocenters of the Dunkard Basin did not coincide with the structural basin observed today. The seaway connection between the Dunkard Basin and the mid-continent basins was most likely in central Ohio, rather than in southern Ohio and northern Kentucky. Upper Carboniferous microgastropod associations are much more diverse than their macrogastropod counterparts and, in addition, display more rapid temporal and spatial morphological change. Such microgastropod faunas not only offer potential for detailed biostratigraphic zonation of Upper Carboniferous strata, but also constitute a vast untapped data set for a variety of paleoecological and evolutionary studies.

  7. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie; Tewalt, Susan; Bragg, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is one of the most important coal-producing regions in the world. Bituminous coal has been mined in the basin for the last three centuries, and the cumulative production is estimated at 34.5 billion short tons. Annual production in 1998 was about 452 million short tons; the basin's production is mostly in the northern (32 percent) and central (63 percent) coal regions. The coal is used primarily within the Eastern United States for electric power generation, but some of it is suitable for metallurgical uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain.

  8. Estimating flows in ungauged river basins in northern Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minihane, M.

    2011-12-01

    In many regions across the globe, there are limited streamflow observations and therefore limited knowledge of availability of surface water resources. In many cases, these rivers lie in countries that would benefit from economic development and improved access to water and sanitation services, both of which are linked to water resources. Additional information about streamflow in these watersheds is critical to water resources planning and economic development strategies. In southeastern Africa, the remote Rovuma River lies on the border between Mozambique and Tanzania. There are limited historic measurements in the main tributary and no recent observations. Improved knowledge of the water resource availability and inter-annual variability of the Rovuma River will enhance transboundary river basin management discussions for this river basin. While major rivers farther south in the country are more closely monitored, those in the north have gauging stations with only scattered observations and have not been active since the early 1980's. Reliable estimates of historic conditions are fundamental to water resources planning. This work aims to provide estimates in these rivers and to quantify uncertainty and bounds on those estimates. A combination of methods is used to estimate historic flows: simple index gauge methods such as the drainage area ratio method and mean flow ratio method, a statistical regression method, a combination of an index gauge method and global gridded runoff data, and a hydrological model. These results are compared to in-situ streamflow estimates based on stage measurements and rating curves for the basins and time frames for which data is available. The evaluation of the methods is based on an efficiency ratio, bias, and representation of seasonality and inter-annual variability. Use of gridded global datasets, either with the mean flow ratio method or a hydrological model, appears to provide improved estimates over use of local observations

  9. Paleotectonic controls on sedimentation in northern Williston basin area, Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, D.M.

    1983-08-01

    The Williston basin lies within the so-called stable cratonic interior and would not be expected to have had the same intensity of tectonic activity as is generally considered to be characteristic of cratonic margin sedimentary basins. From time to time, however, other structural features appear to have been effective controls on sediment distribution patterns. In southern Saskatchewan, one of the most active of these was the Swift current platform. This feature appears to have been sufficiently positive during early Paleozoic time to have caused a distinct thinning of those sediments over it. The platform was mildly positive during other periods of sedimentation, as well as during periods of erosion. It was a site of widespread salt solution during Mesozoic time, which was also its time of major tectonic fluctuation, as well as being the period when it had the most significant influence on sedimentation. Southeastern Saskatchewan is the locale for some significant regional gravity and magnetic anomalies which appear related to exposed structural zones in the Precambrian Shield. A major gravity anomaly on the extreme eastern side of the province is on trend with the Nelson River zone of Manitoba and a magnetic anomaly (Camfield-Gough conductor zone) can be traced to the Wollaston trend in north-central Saskatchewan. The Camfield-Gough zone is particularly significant in that it lies along the axis of the Hummingbird trough, an area affected by basement-controlled early salt solution, and it extends southward into the United States, where it is flanked by a number of local multizone oil-producing structures in North Dakota and Montana.

  10. Cenozoic subsurface stratigraphy and structure of the Salar de Atacama Basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. E.; Mpodozis, C.; Muñoz, N.; Blanco, N.; Pananont, P.; Gardeweg, M.

    2007-02-01

    Sequence mapping of industry seismic lines and their correlation to exposed stratigraphic formations enable a description of the evolution of the nonmarine Salar de Atacama Basin. This major tectonic basin, located in the present-day forearc of the northern Chilean Andes, was first defined topographically by late Cretaceous inversion of the Jurassic-early Cretaceous extensional Tarapacá backarc Basin. Inversion led to both the uplift of the Cordillera de Domeyko and subsidence of the Salar de Atacama Basin along its eastern flank. The basin evolved from a continental backarc in the Cretaceous and Paleogene to a forearc tectonic setting during the Neogene. The principal causes of basin-scale tectonic subsidence include late Cretaceous and earliest Paleocene shortening and Oligocene-early Miocene localized extension. The basin was not completely filled by late Cretaceous (Purilactis Group, sequence G) and Paleocene (sequence H) strata, and its empty space persisted through the Cenozoic. Eocene deformation caused long-wavelength rotation of a deeply weathered surface, generating an erosional unconformity across which coarse clastic strata accumulated (sequence J). Oligocene-early Miocene normal faulting, perhaps in a transtensional environment, repositioned the western basin margin and localized hangingwall subsidence, leading to the accumulation of thousands of meters of evaporitic strata (sequence K, Paciencia Group). By the close of the early Miocene, shortening resumed, first uplifting the intrabasinal Cordillera de la Sal and later generating Pliocene blind reverse faults within the topographically lowest part of the basin. Unequal deposition and tilting across the nascent Cordillera de la Sal induced diapirism of the Paciencia Group halite. In combination, inherited accommodation space and new tectonic subsidence, plus local salt-withdrawal subsidence, shaped the distribution of Upper Miocene-Recent ignimbrites, evaporites, and clastics (sequence M and Vilama

  11. Flathead River Basin Hydrologic Observatory, Northern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, W. W.; Running, S. W.; Potts, D. F.; Kimball, J. S.; Deluca, T. H.; Fagre, D. B.; Makepeace, S.; Hendrix, M. S.; Lorang, M. S.; Ellis, B. K.; Lafave, J.; Harper, J.

    2004-12-01

    We are proposing the 22, 515 km2 glacially-sculpted Flathead River Basin located in Montana and British Columbia as a Hydrologic Observatory. This hydrologic landscape is diverse and includes large pristine watersheds, rapidly developing intermountain valleys, and a 95 km2 regulated reservoir and 510 km2 lake. The basin has a topographic gradient of over 2,339 m, and spans high alpine to arid climatic zones and a range of biomes. Stream flows are snow-melt dominated and underpinned by groundwater baseflow. The site headwaters contain 37 glaciers and thousands of square kilometers of watersheds in which fire and disease are the only disturbances. In contrast, the HO also contains watersheds at multiple scales that were dominated by glaciers within the last 100 years but are now glacier free, impacted by timber harvests and fires of varying ages to varying degrees, modified by water management practices including irrigation diversion and dams, and altered by development for homes, cities and agriculture. This Observatory provides a sensitive monitor of historic and future climatic shifts, air shed influences and impacts, and the consequences of land and water management practices on the hydrologic system. The HO watersheds are some of the only pristine watersheds left in the contiguous U.S.. They provide critical habitat for key species including the native threaten bull trout and lynx, and the listed western cutthroat trout, bald eagle, gray wolf and the grizzly bear. For the last several thousand years this system has been dominated by snow-melt runoff and moderated by large quantities of water stored in glacial ice. However, the timing and magnitude of droughts and summer flows have changed dramatically. With the information that can be gleaned from sediment cores and landscape records at different scales, this HO provides scientists with opportunities to establish baseline watershed conditions and data on natural hydrologic variability within the system. Such a

  12. Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    In general, radar backscatter from the lunar terrae is 2-4 times that of the maria. One exception to this is the terra terrain along the northern rim of Imbrium Basin. The highlands that surround Sinus Iridum and crater Plato have long-wavelength (70-cm) radar backscatter that is comparable to or lower than that from the adjacent maria. We are studying new 70-cm radar images and earlier multispectral data to better constrain the regional geology.

  13. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  14. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  15. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion.

  16. 2000 resource assessment of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northern and Central Appalachian Basin Coal Regions Assessment Team

    2001-01-01

    This report includes results of a digital assessment of six coal beds or zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions that produce over 15 percent of the Nation's coal. Other chapters include an executive summary, a report on geology and mining, a report summarizing other selected coal zones that were not assessed, and a report on USGS coal availability and recoverablity studies in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions.

  17. Delineating the northern part of the Socotra Basin, offshore Korea, using marine magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, M.; F. Abdallatif, T.; Han, J.; Choi, S.; Oh, J.

    2005-12-01

    A marine magnetic survey was carried out in and around the northern part of Socotra Basin, offshore Korea (31°42'32″ 32°46'29″N and 123°56'26″ 125°49'16″E), in order to better delineate its northern and eastern boundaries. Analyses of the observed magnetic field and estimation of the basement depth were used to assess these boundaries. The power spectrum and the three-dimensional analytical signal methods were used for depth estimation and to reconstruct basement configuration. Estimated depths resulting from the power spectrum method range from 1.5 to 6.0 km for deep sources (basement troughs), and from 0.3 to 1.7 km for shallower sources (basement peaks). An isopach map shows that the sedimentary sequence varies from 1.4 to 6.0 km in thickness. Estimated depths from the analytic signal method fluctuate in the range 1.2 6 km. The results of the observed field analysis and depth estimation indicate good agreement with the formerly proposed eastern boundary but disagreement with the northern boundary. The findings suggest either an extension of the Socotra Basin or the existence of other sub-basins possibly interconnected with the study area.

  18. Diachronous fault array growth within continental rift basins: Quantitative analyses from the East Shetland Basin, northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claringbould, Johan; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert; Odinsen, Tore

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of rift basins has been the subject of many studies, however, these studies have been mainly restricted to investigating the geometry of rift-related fault arrays. The relative timing of development of individual faults that make up the fault array is not yet well constrained. First-order tectono-stratigraphic models for rifts predict that normal faults develop broadly synchronously throughout the basin during a temporally distinct 'syn-rift' episode. However, largely due to the mechanical interaction between adjacent structures, distinctly diachronous activity is known to occur on the scale of individual fault segments and systems. Our limited understanding of how individual segments and systems contribute to array-scale strain largely reflects the limited dimension and resolution of the data available and methods applied. Here we utilize a regional extensive subsurface dataset comprising multiple 3D seismic MegaSurveys (10,000 km2), long (>75km) 2D seismic profiles, and exploration wells, to investigate the evolution of the fault array in the East Shetland Basin, North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Previous studies propose this basin formed in response to multiphase rifting during two temporally distinct extensional phases in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-to-Late Jurassic, separated by a period of tectonic quiescence and thermal subsidence in the Early Jurassic. We document the timing of growth of individual structures within the rift-related fault array across the East Shetland Basin, constraining the progressive migration of strain from pre-Triassic-to-Late Jurassic. The methods used include (i) qualitative isochron map analysis, (ii) quantitative syn-kinematic deposit thickness difference across fault & expansion index calculations, and (iii) along fault throw-depth & backstripped displacement-length analyses. In contrast to established models, we demonstrate that the initiation, growth, and cessation of individual fault segments and

  19. Paleostress perturbations and salt tectonics in the Subhercynian Basin, northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Schmidt, C.; Tanner, D.; Winsemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Paleostress field analysis provide valuable data about deformation phases of a sedimentary basin and are of particular interest to understand modern stress-field patterns. Salt domes commonly represent inhomogeneities in a basin-fill that can cause significant stress pertubations, which can seriously influence the choice of exploration targets and the course of drilling campaigns (Koupriantchik et al., 2007). The Subhercynian Basin, located between the Harz and Flechting basement highs in northern Germany, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the paleostress field in a structurally-complex, salt-dominated basin. The basin-fill is characterized by a set of alternating narrow and broad, NW-SE trending, salt-cored anticlines. We use a multi-scale approach that combines outcrop-scale observations with regional-scale deformation structures to analyse the central and northwestern part of the Subhercynian Basin. We determined paleostress data from the orientation of faults, slickensides, joints and stylolites. On a regional scale, the major normal paleo-stress vector was mainly horizontally NNE-SSW-oriented, which reflects the Late Creatceous inversion phase in Central Europe, but locally the paleostress field shows distinct perturbations that are related to the salt structures. In some cases, the maximum principle normal paleostress vector is deflected by up to 80° from the regional trend. Nevertheless, this deflection is predictable, because our dataset shows that the maximum principle normal paleostress is always perpendicular to the axes of the salt anticlines. Another perturbation occurs at the edges of the salt structures; towards the tips of anticlines, the maximum principle normal paleostress vector tends to rotate towards the trend of the anticline axis. Reference Koupriantchik, D., Hunt, S.P., Boult, P.J. & Meyers, A.G. (2007) Geomechanical modelling of salt diapirs: 3D salt structures from the Officer Basin, South Australia. In: Munson, T.J. and Ambrose, G

  20. Stratigraphic context of fossil hominids from the Omo group deposits: northern Turkana Basin, Kenya and Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect

    Feibel, C.S.; Brown, F.H.; McDougall, I.

    1989-04-01

    The chronometric framework developed for Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the northern Turkana Basin is reviewed in light of recent advances in lithostratigraphy, geochemical correlation, paleomagnetic stratigraphy, and isotopic dating. The sequence is tightly controlled by 20 precise ages on volcanic materials. These ages are internally consistent but are at variance with estimates for the boundaries of the magnetic polarity time scale by about 0.07 my. This discrepancy can be only partially resolved at present. Based on the established chronometric framework and stratigraphic sequences, depositional ages can be estimated for significant marker beds. These ages can in turn be used to constrain the 449 hominid specimens thus far reported from the basin. Ages for most hominid specimens can be estimated with a precision of +/- 0.05 my. In addition, the chronometric framework will be applicable to other paleontological collections, archeological excavations, and future discoveries in the basin.

  1. Organic geochemistry of Pennsylvanian-Permian oils and black shales, northern Denver basin

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, J.L.; King, J.D.

    1984-04-01

    Organic geochemical analyses were performed on Paleozoic shales and oils from the northern Denver basin to determine oil-source bed relationships. Two general oil types were recognized: oil produced from reservoirs of Virgilian and Wolfcampian age in northeastern Colorado and Nebraska, and oil produced form the Lower Permian Lyons Sandstone near the basin axis in Colorado. Low-gravity oil (20/sup 0/ API) produced from the Virgilian-age reservoir at the Amazon field (Nebraska) and a higher gravity oil (37/sup 0/ API) produced from a well near the Amazon field (Wespro 1-23 Lyngholm) can be distinguished geochemically from the other Virgilian-Wolfcampian oils studied and may be genetically unrelated to them. For comparison, oils were analyzed from the Minnelusa Formation (Permian-Pennsylvanian) in the Powder River basin. These oils are geochemically unlike any Paleozoic oils analyzed in this study in southeastern Wyoming and Colorado.

  2. Tectonic control on the Late Quaternary hydrography of the Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Marco; Bonini, Marco; Moroni, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    We examine the intramontane Upper Tiber Basin in the Northern Apennines (central Italy), where sub-orthogonal fault systems forced river deviation and the abandonment of alluvial fans since the late Middle Pleistocene. Archaeological material, spanning the Middle Palaeolithic-Iron Age, was collected mostly from the surface of the Late Quaternary alluvial landforms and related deposits (MUP and HOL units). This information contributed to the partial dating of seven major stages of drainage development. Normal faults parallel and transverse to the basin trend were active at different times and conditioned the valley pattern of the Middle (MUP1-2)-Late (MUP3) Pleistocene Tiber, Singerna, Sovara and Tignana rivers, which still flow today into the basin. The MUP1 and the MUP3 fans were beheaded by the displacement of their feeder valleys along the basin-transverse Carmine and Montedoglio faults. In some cases, the former feeder rivers underwent stream piracy but their courses mostly deviated in response of the topographic gradient created by faulting, as well as through the incision of new valleys that exploited the lithological contrast along the fault lines. The MUP3 Tignana fan was abandoned mostly due to the activity of the basin-parallel, dip-slip Sansepolcro fault. Subsidence driven by the basin-parallel Anghiari and Sansepolcro fault systems also provided the accommodation space for the MUP3 and HOl1-2 Afra fans between Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. This study exemplifies the interplay between longitudinal and transverse fault systems, and the Late Quaternary hydrographic evolution of an extensional basin settled in the axial zone of an active fold-and-thrust belt. Although the faulting has interacted with the forcing exerted by the Late Quaternary climate fluctuations on the basin drainage systems, the tectonic rates are sufficiently high to represent the prime controller on base-level change and drainage routing patterns.

  3. MOLA Topography of Impact Basins in the Northern Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Roark, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    Coverage of the northern hemisphere of Mars by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) during the aerobraking hiatus and the two Science Phasing Operation periods provides improved definition and characterization of large impact basins. Gridded MOLA data show the Utopia Basin has a pronounced bowl-like structure, as opposed to the interior rises suggested by the earlier USGS DEM. The elevation structure is concentric about the basin center as mapped by McGill. In particular, the proposed inner ring closely follows the -4 km contour over much of the southern, western and northwestern sides. Higher topography along portions of the dichotomy boundary aligns with the basin's outer ring. High topography in the polar region also occurs where the outer ring should lie, raising the possibility that perhaps some of the polar topography is due to basin structure as well as ice. Two MOLA passes near Phison Rupes provide evidence for a large "stealth" hole where Viking imagery show little evidence of any major structure. The 2 km deep, 600 km wide depression at 31OW, 3ON is as large as the Cassini impact basin 1000 km to the SW. While Cassini is easily recognized in image data, the "MOLA Hole" is not. If this depression is a deeply eroded and buried impact basin (as perhaps suggested by a decrease in the crater density and somewhat smoother terrain than in adjacent areas), it is not clear why it has managed to maintain its great depth. In Tempe at the dichotomy boundary a 300 km wide impact basin is revealed by pronounced bowl-like topography centered at 87W, 47N, even though only about 1/3 of the basin rim structure is obvious. The basin lies on a sloping boundary zone, with the more buried N rim up to 2 km below the rugged S rim. A similar N-S asymmetry in basin ring structure occurs for the much larger Isidis Basin, where the S rim rises 6 km but the subdued N rim rises barely 2 km above the floor. There is essentially no topographic expression of the main ring in the NE

  4. Reactive Transport of Nitrate in Northern California Groundwater basins: An Integrated Characterization and Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, B. K.; Moran, J. E.; Hudson, G. B.; Carle, S. F.; McNab, W.; Tompson, A. F.; Moore, K.; Beller, H.; Kane, S.; Eaton, G.

    2003-12-01

    More than 1/3 of active public drinking water supply wells in California produce water with nitrate-N levels indicative of anthropogenic inputs (> 4 mg/L). Understanding how the distribution of nitrate in California groundwater basins will evolve is vital to water supply and infrastructure planning. To address this need, we are studying the basin-scale reactive transport of nitrate in the Livermore and Llagas basins of Northern California. Both basins have increasingly urban populations heavily reliant on groundwater. A distinct nitrate "plume" exists in the Livermore Basin (Alameda County) whereas pervasive nitrate contamination exists in shallow groundwaters of the Llagas Basin (Santa Clara County). The sources and timing of nitrate contamination in these basins are not definitively known; septic systems, irrigated agriculture and livestock operations exist or have existed in both areas. The role of denitrification in controlling nitrate distribution is also unknown; dissolved oxygen levels are sufficiently low in portions of each basin as to indicate the potential for denitrification. We have collected water from 60 wells, and are determining both groundwater age (by the 3H/3He method) and the extent of denitrification (by the excess N2 method). Excess nitrogen is being determined by both membrane-inlet and noble gas mass spectrometry, using Ar and Ne content to account for atmospheric N2. We are also analyzing for stable istotopes of nitrate and water, nitrate co-contaminants, and general water quality parameters. Preliminary analysis of archival water district data from both basins suggests positive correlations of nitrate with Ca+2, Mg+2 and bicarbonate and negative correlation with pH. In the Llagas Basin, a negative correlation also exists between nitrate and temperature. Flow path-oriented reactive transport modeling is being explored as a tool to aid in the identification of both the sources of nitrate and evidence for denitrification in both basins

  5. Geodynamic evolution of the northern Dinarides and the southern part of the Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, Vlasta; Pamić, Jakob

    1998-11-01

    Most of the recent geodynamic interpretations of the Pannonian Basin focus on its relation to the formation of the Carpathians and the Alpine orogeny. However, also the Dinarides were severely affected by Neogene tectonics related to the formation of the Pannonian Basin. Especially in the northernmost Dinarides Neogene deformation played a very important role in the evolution of this mountain chain. Geological records clearly show evidence of two phases of plate convergence along the northern and eastern margins of the present-day Dinarides. At the end of the Jurassic the Dinaridic parts of the Tethys ophiolites were obducted onto the northeastern margins of the Apulian microplate. The second phase is documented in the central part of the northernmost Dinarides. It is genetically related to an ancient volcanic arc, as indicated by Late Cretaceous-Palaeogene trench sediments with blueschist olistolithes which are interlayered by basalt, rhyolites, pyroclastics, medium-pressure metamorphosed trench sediments, and associated synkinematic granitoids. In the northern part of the Dinarides subduction processes terminated with the Eocene compressional event which caused the uplift of the Dinarides. Numerous intramontane basins with shallow-marine, fluviatile and lacustrine deposits were generated during the Oligocene. Penecontemporaneous andesites which are found along the Drava and Sava depressions of the South Pannonian Neogene Basin can be correlated with the easternmost Periadriatic tonalites. However, observations do not indicate strike-slip faulting at that time in this area. The Neogene rift stage initiated the evolution of the Pannonian Basin. It is marked by extruded submarine trachyandesites of Karpathian age, Badenian basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites, and Pannonian alkali basalts, which are interlayered by coeval sedimentary rocks. Main evidence for the large-scale tectonic transport of large Dinaridic blocks into the Pannonian Basin area are the

  6. Neotectonic of Dead Sea pull-apart basin. A new tectonic model for its northern closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Awabdeh, Mohammad; Pérez-Peña, J. Vicente; Azañón, J. Miguel; Booth-Rea, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The Dead Sea is a pull-apart basin formed by the relative motion of two active fault segments of the southern Dead Sea Transform Fault system (DSTF); the Wadi Araba Fault (WAF) and the Jordan Valley Fault (JVF) in northwest Jordan. Both of them are sinistral strike slip faults, however, the WAF has slightly faster slip-rate than the JVF. The northern termination of the Dead Sea basin is not well constrained, without clear transverse structures closing the basin. However, geophysical data suggest an abrupt thinning in this northern termination. Based on fieldwork and observations of recent tectonic structures, we suggest that the northern closure of this pull-apart basin corresponds to an active NW-SE normal fault system to the north of the Kafrain Dam (28 km southwest Amman; the capital of Jordan). These normal faults constitute a transtensional zone formed by the partial reactivation of two major structures; the Shueib and the Amman Hallabat structures (SHS and AHS). Normal faults dipping SW present low to moderate throws, lateral ramps coalescing in the SHS, and probably they merge into a low-dipping main plane. This fault system is also the responsible of the extension of the upper Cretaceous formations to the NE of Kafrain Dam and has associated colluvial wedges of Holocene sediments, indicating a seismic component with related small to medium earthquakes. This work reveals the Quaternary reactivation of tectonic structures that thought inactive in the Neogene and how they accommodate part of the stress in the region alongside with the DSFT.

  7. Advective and Conductive Heat Flow Budget Across the Wagner Basin, Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, F.; Negrete-Aranda, R.; Contreras, J.; Müller, C.; Hutnak, M.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Harris, R. N.; Sclater, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015, we conducted a cruise across the northern Gulf of California, an area of continental rift basin formation and rapid deposition of sediments. The cruise was undertaken aboard the R/V Alpha Helix; our goal was to study variation in superficial conductive heat flow, lateral changes in the shallow thermal conductivity structure, and advective transport of heat across the Wagner basin. We used a Fielax heat flow probe with 22 thermistors that can penetrate up to 6 m into the sediment cover. The resulting data set includes 53 new heat flow measurements collected along three profiles. The longest profile (42 km) contains 30 measurements spaced 1-2 km apart. The western part of the Wagner basin (hanging wall block) exhibit low to normal conductive heat flow whereas the eastern part of the basin (foot wall block) heat flow is high to very high (up to 2500 mWm-2). Two other short profiles (12 km long each) focused on resolving an extremely high heat flow anomaly up to 15 Wm-2 located near the intersection between the Wagner bounding fault system and the Cerro Prieto fault. We hypothesize that the contrasting heat flow values observed across the Wagner basin are due to horizontal water circulation through sand layers and fault pathways of high permeability. Circulation appears to be from west (recharge zone) to east (discharge zone). Additionally, our results reveal strong vertical advection of heat due to dehydration reactions and compaction of fine grained sediments.

  8. Late Miocene and Pliocene synorogenic sedimentation in northern Livermore basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, K.A.; Andersen, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    Late Tertiary synorogenic sedimentation in the northern Livermore basin, Contra Costa County, California, has recorded two major changes in provenance. Changes in clast composition of fluvial conglomerates reflect regional tectonic reorganization as the San Andreas fault system began to evolve at this latitude. Shallow marine deposition of Sierran andesitic sediment gave way at approximately 8 Ma to fluvially dominated deposition of sediment from a local, graywacke-rich, Coast Range source. Deposition of reworked andesitic material prior to 5.5 Ma records development of anticlinal uplifts along trends of the present Altamont Hills and Calaveras fault system. By 4 Ma, the areal extent of the subsiding basin had increased; the Altamont Hills continued to be uplifted, but the Calaveras fault region began to subside rapidly. Late Miocene and Pliocene deformation of the Livermore basin area extended over a broad zone east of the developing transform fault system. Structures that developed included broad synclinal basins and gentle anticlinal uplifts that had topographic expression but were not deeply incised. Intense deformation of the basin and uplift of Mount Diablo occurred after 3 Ma.

  9. Extensional collapse along the Sevier Desert reflection, northern Sevier Desert basin, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, James C.; Decelles, Peter G.

    1996-10-01

    Newly released and previously published seismic reflection data from the northern Sevier Desert basin provide a complete seismic transect between the tilted western margin of the basin and the eastern breakaway zone. When tied to well and surface age data, the transect delineates a continuum of extensional fault and basin fill geometries that developed between late Oligocene and Pleistocene time across the basin. A minimum of 18 km of top-to-the-west normal displacement is estimated across the Sevier Desert from only the most conspicuous growth geometries and offsets across listric normal faults that sole downward into the Sevier Desert reflection (SDR). The SDR clearly marks a normal fault zone beneath the entire basin, where stratal truncations are imaged for 50% of the 39 km length of the reflection east of the Cricket Mountains block. Restoration of extensional displacement along this entire 39 km fault length is necessary to reconstruct the pre-Oligocene configuration and erosion level of Sevier thrust sheets across the Sevier Desert area. The SDR normal fault zone underlies the former topographic crest of the Sevier orogenic belt, where it accommodated extensional collapse after cessation of regional contractile tectonism.

  10. Tectonic Subsidence Analysis of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Huang, S. S. X. E. C.; Zhuang, W.; LIU, Z.; Duan, W.; Hu, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB hereafter) in the northern margin of the South China Sea has attracted great attention not only because of its special tectonic location but also for its abundant hydrocarbon resources. Tectonic evolution controls the petroleum geological condition of hydrocarbon-bearing basins. Efforts have been made to understand the tectonic evolution of this basin. However, many issues about the tectonic features and the evolution process of this basin, such as the age of the breakup unconformities and the anomalously accelerated subsidence during the post-rifting stage, remain controversial. Here we employ tectonic subsidence analysis of sedimentary basins, a technique of removing isostatic loading and compaction effects by back-stripping, to investigate the tectonic controls on the basin formation of the PRMB. We performed the analysis on 4 drill wells and 43 synthetic wells constructed based on recently acquired seismic profiles. The result shows that tectonic subsidence in the eastern sags of the PRMB began to decrease at ~30Ma while in the western sags the onset was ~23.8Ma. This suggests that the break-up time i.e. the end of rifting in the PRMB is earlier in the eastern sags than in the western sags. Abnormally accelerated tectonic subsidence occurred between 17.5-16.4Ma during the post-rifting stage, at an average subsidence rate as high as 301.9m/Ma. This phenomenon discriminates the PRMB from the category of classical Atlantic passive continental marginal basins, of which the tectonic subsidence during the post-rifting stage decays exponentially. The main objective of this paper is to provide insights into the geological and geodynamic evolution of the PRMB. The result bears significance to hydrocarbon exploration in this region.

  11. Tectonic fabric of northern North Fiji and Lau basins from GLORIA sidescan

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffin, D.L. ); Clarke, J.E.H.; Johnson, D. ); Jarvis, P. ); Hill, P. ); Huggett, Q.; Pearson, L. ); Price, R. )

    1990-06-01

    GLORIA mosaics, Seabeam, and seismic data over parts of the backarc New Hebrides arc, northwest and central North Fiji basin, Fiji Fracture Zone north of Fiji, Peggy Ridge, northeast Lau basin, northern Tonga arc, northwestern Tonga Trench, and Western Samoa reveal a complex tectonic framework for the region. Two triple junctions and several rifts are clearly delineated by outcrops and ridges of neovolcanic rocks. Backarc troughs in the New Hebrides Arc are commonly floored by volcanic rocks with little sediment cover. The locus of major faults are well defined in places by volcanic ridges and scarps. On the Fiji Fracture Zone north of Fiji, scarps indicate the trace, but west of Fiji it disappears for about 100 km, becoming well pronounced again near the central North Fiji basin triple junction. At Peggy Ridge a very extensive area of sheet-like volcanics indicates activity extends northeast from Peggy Ridge toward the western extension of the Tonga Trench passing west of Niuafo'ou Island, possibly marking a fault-to-trench transition. East of Niuafo'ou Island, backarc spreading close to the Tofua Arc is seen at a nascent triple junction, its northern arm approaching close to the western Tonga Trench. Long linear fault scarps in the trench result from bending of the crust. Only a few areas, including the seafloor north of Samoa, are mainly sediment covered. Two known hydrothermal deposits near the two triple junctions have been imaged, but other mapped areas of extensive neo-volcanics in the vicinity of propagators and pull-apart basins suggest sites for further investigation. The prevalence of ridge propagators and extensional basins suggests their significant role in the development of the region.

  12. Diachronous Growth of Normal Fault Systems in Multiphase Rift Basins: Structural Evolution of the East Shetland Basin, Northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claringbould, Johan S.; Bell, Rebecca E.; A-L. Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Odinsen, Tore

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to determine the structural evolution and interaction of fault systems (kinematically linked group of faults that are in the km to 10s of km scale) within a rift basin is typically limited by the spatial extent and temporal resolution of the available data and methods used. Physical and numerical models provide predictions on how fault systems nucleate, grow and interact, but these models need to be tested with natural examples. Although field studies and individual 3D seismic surveys can provide a detailed structural evolution of individual fault systems, they are often spatially limited and cannot be used examine the interaction of fault systems throughout the entire basin. In contrast, regional subsurface studies, commonly conducted on widely spaced 2D seismic surveys, are able to capture the general structural evolution of a rift basin, but lack the spatial and temporal detail. Moreover, these studies typically describe the structural evolution of rifts as comprising multiple discrete tectonic stages (i.e. pre-, syn- and post-rift). This simplified approach does not, however, consider that the timing of activity can be strongly diachronous along and between faults that form part of a kinematically linked system within a rift basin. This study focuses on the East Shetland Basin (ESB), a multiphase rift basin located on the western margin of the North Viking Graben, northern North Sea. Most previous studies suggest the basin evolved in response to two discrete phases of extension in the Permian-Triassic and Middle-Late Jurassic, with the overall geometry of the latter rift to be the result of selective reactivation of faults associated with the former rift. Gradually eastwards thickening intra-rift strata (deposited between two rift phases) that form wedges between and within fault blocks have led to two strongly contrasting tectonic interpretations: (i) Early-Middle Jurassic differential thermal subsidence after Permian-Triassic rifting; or (ii

  13. Organic geochemistry and petroleum geology, tectonics and basin analysis of southern Tarim and northern Qaidam basins, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew Dean

    Organic geochemistry of oils from the Tarim basin, NW China, distinguish at least seven genetic groups of oils. The largest group are derived from Middle-Upper Ordovician anoxic slope-facies marls coincident with the margins of structural uplifts. Other groups include non-marine derived oils in the Luntai uplift, from southwest Tarim, in the Kuqa depression, and west of the Bachu uplift. A seep sample from west of Kashi clusters with Luntai oils. These results suggest that numerous source-rock horizons occur, but they are really restricted. Organic geochemistry of oils from northern Qaidam defines a family of hypersaline, anoxic lacustrine derived oils. Cenozoic outcrop samples from northern Qaidam are too organic lean to be of source quality, but dark laminated upper Oligocene mudstones from the Shi 28 well are of fair to good quality. Biomarkers provide a good correlation between the oils and the core samples. Organic matter is from algae and bacteria and lacks terrestrial material. Hydrocarbons are contained in upper Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene reservoirs. Eight oils are from NW Qaidam, but one sample comes from NE Qaidam, an area previously believed to only produce oils derived from Jurassic source rocks. Thus an unidentified Cenozoic source rock occurs in NE Qaidam. Thermal modeling indicates generation occurred in northwestern Qaidam within the last 3 million years, agreeing with observed low maturity biomarker parameters. Cenozoic stratigraphy in northern Qaidam and southern Tarim basins record the tectonic history of the surrounding structural/topographic elements. Paleocurrents record flow away from adjacent ranges from the Miocene to the present. Provenance data tie sediments to adjacent structural elements. Petrography indicates increasingly immature sandstones in Miocene and younger sediments relative to pre-Miocene samples. Apatite fission-track results from southeastern Tarim yield a cooling age of 17 +/- 1 Ma indicative of unroofing since at

  14. Miocene woods from the Qaidam Basin on northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau with implications for paleoenvironmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ye-Ming; Yang, Xiao-Nan

    2016-02-01

    The Qaidam Basin with the most complete Cenozoic sedimentary preservation in northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is a key area for studying uplift and environmental change of the plateau. Three types of woods, Ulmus (Ulmaceae), Leguminosae (?) (angiosperm) and Cupressaceae (gymnosperm) were recognized from the large-scale preservation of fossil woods in late Miocene Shang Youshashan Formation in northern Qaidam Basin on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Both investigations of their Nearest Living Relatives (NLRs) and previous grassland mammal evidences suggest that there have been temperate deciduous broad-leaved forest and needle-leaved forest with grass in northern Qaidam Basin during the late Miocene in contrast to the desert vegetation found there nowadays. The presence of the ancient forest steppe further implies that the southern part of the plateau used to be adequately low, so that the Indian and East Asian monsoons could approach the northern area and to accommodate the vegetation in late Miocene.

  15. Structural evolution of the northern East China Sea Shelf Basin interpreted from cross-section restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukur, Deniz; Horozal, Senay; Lee, Gwang H.; Kim, Dae C.; Han, Hyun C.; Kang, Moo H.

    2011-09-01

    The northern East China Sea Shelf Basin consists of three depressions (the Domi, Jeju, and Socotra Depressions), separated by basement highs or rises. Reconstruction of depth-converted seismic reflection profiles from these depressions reveals that the northern East China Sea Shelf Basin experienced two phases of rifting, followed by regional subsidence. Initial rifting in the Late Cretaceous was driven by the NW-SE crustal stretching of the Eurasian plate, caused by the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the plate margin. Major extension (~15 km) took place during the early phase of basin formation. The initial rifting was terminated by regional uplift in the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene, which was probably due to reorganization of plate boundaries. Rifting resumed in the Early Oligocene; the magnitude of extension was mild (<1 km) during this period. A second phase of uplift in the Early Miocene terminated the rifting, marking the transition to the postrift phase of regional subsidence. Up to 2,600 m of sediments and basement rock were removed by erosion during and after the second phase of uplift. An inversion in the Late Miocene interrupted the postrift subsidence, resulting in an extensive thrust-fold belt in the eastern part of the area. Subsequent erosion removed about 900 m of sediments. The regional subsidence has dominated the area since the Late Miocene.

  16. Developing the Late Quaternary Record of Pluvial Lake Clover, Northern Great Basin, U.S.A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laabs, B. J.; Munroe, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Clover was one of numerous closed-basin pluvial lakes that formed in the northern Great Basin during the Pleistocene. The geomorphic record of the lake includes continuous shoreline ridges and spits at altitudes of as much as 25 m above the modern playa surface. The history of Lake Clover is poorly known compared to those of the larger lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, but can provide a useful framework for understanding regional-scale environmental changes during the latest Pleistocene. Shoreline ridges of Lake Clover are preserved at altitudes of ca. 1729, 1725, 1719, and 1715 m asl, which correspond to intervals when the lake attained a surface area of 788, 726, 618, and 524 km2, respectively. Although the chronology of highstands at these altitudes is still being developed (through radiocarbon and luminescence-dating methods), the morphology and orientations of prominent shoreline features provide clues to regional air-circulation patterns during highstands. The highest shoreline is represented by a gravel ridge that can be traced nearly continuously around the perimeter of the lake basin. The ridge is uniformly developed along shorelines of differing aspect, suggesting that the wind field during the ice-free season was not dominated by a single direction. Along the eastern and western shores of the basin, the lower shorelines are manifested by a similar gravel ridge. However, in other sectors of the basin, features associated with progressively lower shorelines reveal an increasing dominance of northward longshore drift. The most dramatic features correspond with the 1719 m shoreline and include 1) a pronounced V-shaped, northward projecting spit at the southern end of the basin, 2) a 3-km long spit projecting to the north-northwest along the northeastern shoreline, and 3) a tombolo connecting a former island to the northern shore. Together these features suggest that dominant wind directions became more southerly during the ice-free season when the lake

  17. Paleozoic stratigraphy and tectonics of northern Uncompahgre front, Paradox basin, Utah - an alternative view

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, G.M.; Powell, T.G.

    1986-08-01

    The Paradox basin is a complex pull-apart basin of major proportions that developed along intersecting basement fracture zones by strong east-west extensional pulses in the Middle Pennsylvanian. These stresses caused the Ancestral Rocky Mountains to emerge and the Paradox basin to subside. Oblique divergent strike-slip faulting along the Uncompahgre-San Luis uplifts allowed smaller subbasins to develop by orthogonal spreading along intersecting northeast-trending transform faults. The rate of basin-floor subsidence was related to combinations of normal reverse, and strike-slip faulting. The northernmost subbasin of the Paradox basin is bounded by the northwest-trending Uncompahgre uplift, the salt Valley diapiric feature, and the northeast-trending San Rafael and Cataract lineaments. Although generally straight on a regional scale, the Uncompahgre master fault system is complicated in detail. The zone consists of en echelon fault slices, thrust blocks, and detachment faults. Few Paleozoic tests have been drilled along the northern Uncompahgre front. Most structural interpretations have been based on seismic data that have disregarded empirical geologic data from the few deep tests in the area. Structural features such as the Thompson-Yellow Cat anticlines have been assumed to be salt bulges or pillow structures. Geologic and geophysical data strongly suggest these features may be low-angle detachment thrust sheets. The true economic potential of the area also remains unknown; however, the structural style, burial history, and sedimentary rock types suggest that sizable accumulations of untapped hydrocarbons may exist in this portion of the Paradox basin.

  18. Structural style and Basin Formation in Deep-water Area of Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, Z.; Zhen, S.; Xiong, P.; Min, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    In the deep-water area of northern South China Sea (SCS) developed a series of sedimentary basins. Active exploration for deep-water hydrocarbon has begun in these areas since this century. The well LW3-1-1 at water depth of 1480m in the BaiYun Sag (BYS) of the Pearl River Mouth Basin in 2006 discovered 56m layer of pure gas, demonstrated the good hydrocarbon potential of the area. Wide-angle seismic profiling has verified the transitional type of crust in the slope areas. The Moho surface shoals step-by-step from 30-29km under the shelf, ~15 km under the slope, and ~12km under the abyssal plain. Moho also rises beneath depocenters, mirroring the shape of sedimentary basement. The crustal thickness at the center of the BYS is <7km. Lower crustal high velocity layer is found in the eastern and central portions of the northern SCS. The pre-Cenozoic basement in northern SCS is the extension of the inland basement and consists of mainly metamorphosed Paleozoic and Mesozoic marine and continental strata, complicated by Yanshanian (J-K) intrusive and extrusive rocks. From geophysical data we inferred that a SW-NE Mesozoic trench-arc system exists beneath the Cenozoic sediments in the northeastern SCS, related to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean towards the East Eurasian margin. The stress field in the East Eurasian margin changed abruptly in Late Cretaceous. Rifting started in the entire margin and eventually led to the opening of the SCS in late Early Oligocene. Large sedimentary basins developed in the margins of the SCS. Paleogene lacustrine sediments contain hydrocarbon sources, while traps are mostly found in Neogene marine strata. The structure of the northern SCS shows clear W-E variation, divided into NE-, NEE-, and NE-trending segments by two major NW-SE transfer faults. The Southern Depression of the Qiongdongnan Basin to the west is characterized by NE-trending half grabens. The BYS at the central segment is characterized by NEE-trending composite

  19. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tewalt, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coal beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia.

  20. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Susan J. Tewalt

    2002-02-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coals beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Ruppert; Susan Tewalt; Linda Bragg

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Visan miospore biostratigraphy and correlation of the Poti Formation (Parnaba Basin, northern Brazil).

    PubMed

    Melo; Loboziak

    2000-10-01

    The Poti Formation, which consists mainly of sandstones with minor proportions of carbonaceous shales and other siliciclastic lithologies, represents all the Viséan strata thus far recorded in the Parnaíba Basin, northern Brazil.Well-preserved miospores featuring species with both Southern Euramerican and Gondwanan affinities have been recovered from this formation in four well sections. The most characteristic species are listed in this paper, and brief systematic descriptions are presented for the most significant species, along with comments on their biostratigraphy. A new generic combination is proposed: Cordylosporites magnidictyus (Playford and Helby) Loboziak and Melo comb. nov. Comparisons with miospores illustrated from the Grand Erg Occidental, Algerian Sahara, are tentatively proposed.In terms of the Western European Carboniferous palynozonation, miospore assemblages from the Poti Formation are assignable to the Perotrilites tessellatus-Schulzospora campyloptera (TC)-Raistrickia nigra-Triquitrites marginatus (NM) zonal range. This corresponds to the upper part of the Holkerian and the whole Asbian, which are British regional stages for the lower to middle parts of the upper Viséan. The Viséan age formerly attributed to biostratigraphic interval XII of Petrobras' regional palynostratigraphic scheme is therefore confirmed. As already noted in our recent investigations of the Faro Formation in the Amazon Basin and equivalent strata of the Solimões Basin, latest Tournaisian and early to middle Viséan sections are either absent or barren of characteristic miospores in the Parnaíba Basin as well. PMID:11042330

  3. Latest Miocene to Quaternary deformation in the southern Chaiwopu Basin, northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Honghua; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Tianqi; Zhao, Junxiang; Zheng, Xiangmin; Li, Youli

    2015-12-01

    Basinward propagation of fold and thrust belts is a crucial geological process accommodating Cenozoic crustal shortening within the India-Eurasia collision zone. Anticlinal growth strata in the southern Chaiwopu Basin (a piggyback basin) of the northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland record basinward encroachment of the Tian Shan along the Junggar Frontal Thrust Fault. A new magnetostratigraphic section constrains the onset of syntectonic growth strata at circa 6.4 Ma and suggests synchronous basinward thrusting and propagation of the Tian Shan. The intense alluviation in the southern Chaiwopu Basin ceased at circa 0.55 Ma due to significant anticlinal growth and its resultant river incision. More recent anticlinal growth and deformation during the late Quaternary are revealed by folded river terraces developing across the anticline. The terrace height profile indicates that terrace T1H has been vertically offset about 0.6 m by thrust faulting since its formation at about 7 Ka. The stratigraphic and geomorphic data presented in this work are helpful to understand the initiation of thrust-related folding, as well as aggradation and subsequent incision, in foreland basins of the Tian Shan in relation to the India-Asia collision.

  4. Ground-water levels in intermontane basins of the northern Rocky Mountains, Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briar, David W.; Lawlor, S.M.; Stone, M.A.; Parliman, D.J.; Schaefer, J.L.; Kendy, Eloise

    1996-01-01

    The Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program is a series of studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to analyze regional ground-water systems that compose a major portion of the Nation's water supply (Sun, 1986). The Northern Rocky Mountains Intermontane Basins is one of the study regions in this national program. The main objectives of the RASA studies are to (1) describe the groundwater systems as they exist today, (2) analyze the known changes that have led to the systems present condition, (3) combine results of previous studies in a regional analysis, where possible, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated.The purpose of this study, which began in 1990, was to increase understanding of the hydrogeology of the intermontane basins of the Northern Rocky Mountains area. This report is Chapter B of a three-part series and shows the general distribution of ground-water levels in basin-fill deposits in the study area. Chapter A (Tuck and others, 1996) describes the geologic history and generalized hydrogeologic units. Chapter C (Clark and Dutton, 1996) describes the quality of ground and surface waters in the study area.Ground-water levels shown in this report were measured primarily during summer 1991 and summer 1992; however, historical water levels were used for areas where more recent data could not be obtained. The information provided allows for the evaluation of general directions of ground-water flow, identification of recharge and discharge areas, and determination of hydraulic gradients within basin-fill deposits.

  5. Holocene faulting in the Bellingham forearc basin: upper-plate deformation at the northern end of the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Blakely, Richard J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    The northern Cascadia forearc takes up most of the strain transmitted northward via the Oregon Coast block from the northward-migrating Sierra Nevada block. The north-south contractional strain in the forearc manifests in upper-plate faults active during the Holocene, the northern-most components of which are faults within the Bellingham Basin. The Bellingham Basin is the northern of four basins of the actively deforming northern Cascadia forearc. A set of Holocene faults, Drayton Harbor, Birch Bay, and Sandy Point faults, occur within the Bellingham Basin and can be traced from onshore to offshore using a combination of aeromagnetic lineaments, paleoseismic investigations and scarps identified using LiDAR imagery. With the recognition of such Holocene faults, the northernmost margin of the actively deforming Cascadia forearc extends 60 km north of the previously recognized limit of Holocene forearc deformation. Although to date no Holocene faults are recognized at the northern boundary of the Bellingham Basin, which is 15 km north of the international border, there is no compelling tectonic reason to expect that Holocene faults are limited to south of the international border.

  6. Geophysical observations on northern part of Georges Bank and adjacent basins of Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldale, R.N.; Hathaway, J.C.; Dillon, William P.; Hendricks, J.D.; Robb, James M.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous-seismic-reflection and magnetic-intensity profiles provide data for inferences about the geology of the northern part of Georges Bank and the basins of the Gulf of Maine adjacent to the bank. Basement is inferred to be mostly sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Paleozoic age that were metamorphosed and intruded locally by felsic and mafic plutons near the end of the Paleozoic Era. During Late Triassic time, large fault basins formed within the Gulf of Maine and probably beneath Georges Bank. The fault basins and a possible major northeast-trending fault zone beneath the northern part of the bank probably formed as a result of the opening Atlantic during the Mesozoic. Nonmarine sediments, associated with mafic flows and intrusive rocks, were deposited in the fault basins as they formed. The upper surface of the Triassic and pre-Triassic rocks that comprise basement is an unconformity that makes up much of the bottom of the Gulf of Maine. Depth to the basement surface beneath the gulf differ greatly because of fluvial erosion in Tertiary time and glacial erosion in Pleistocene time. Beneath the northern part of Georges Bank the basement surface is smoother and slopes southward. Prominent valleys, cut before Late Cretaceous time, are present beneath this part of the bank. Cretaceous, Tertiary, and possibly Jurassic times were characterized by episodes of coastal-plain deposition and fluvial erosion. During this time a very thick wedge of sediment, mostly of Jurassic(?) and Cretaceous ages, was deposited on the shelf. Major periods of erosion took place at the close of the Cretaceous and during the Pliocene. Fluvial erosion during the Pliocene removed much of the coastal-plain sedimentary wedge and formed the Gulf of Maine. Pleistocene glaciers eroded all but a few remnants of the coastal-plain sediments within the gulf and deposited a thick section of drift against the north slope of Georges Bank and a thin veneer of outwash on the bank. Marine sediments were

  7. Paleozoic evolution of active margin basins in the southern Central Andes (northwestern Argentina and northern Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, H.; Breitkreuz, C.

    The geodynamic evolution of the Paleozoic continental margin of Gondwana in the region of the southern Central Andes is characterized by the westward progression of orogenic basin formation through time. The Ordovician basin in the northwest Argentinian Cordillera Oriental and Puna originated as an Early Ordovician back-arc basin. The contemporaneous magmatic arc of an east-dipping subduction zone was presumably located in northern Chile. In the back-arc basin, a ca. 3500 meter, fining-up volcaniclastic apron connected to the arc formed during the Arenigian. Increased subsidence in the late Arenigian allowed for the accomodation of large volumes of volcaniclastic turbidites during the Middle Ordovician. Subsidence and sedimentation were caused by the onset of collision between the para-autochthonous Arequipa Massif Terrane (AMT) and the South American margin at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. This led to eastward thrusting of the arc complex over its back-arc basin and, consequently, to its transformation into a marine foreland basin. As a result of thrusting in the west, a flexural bulge formed in the east, leading to uplift and emergence of the Cordillera Oriental shelf during the Guandacol Event at the Arenigian-Llanvirnian transition. The basin fill was folded during the terminal collision of the AMT during the Oclóyic Orogeny (Ashgillian). The folded strata were intruded post-tectonically by the presumably Silurian granitoids of the "Faja Eruptiva de la Puna Oriental." The orogeny led to the formation of the positive area of the Arco Puneño. West of the Arco Puneño, a further marine basin developed during the Early Devonian, the eastern shelf of which occupied the area of the Cordillera Occidental, Depresión Preandina, and Precordillera. The corresponding deep marine turbidite basin was located in the region of the Cordillera de la Costa. Deposition continued until the basin fill was folded in the early Late Carboniferous Toco Orogeny. The basin

  8. Geology, Streamflow, and Water Chemistry of the Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Ewart, Charles J., III

    1995-01-01

    A study of the geology, streamflow, and water chemistry of Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, was undertaken to determine the flow characteristics of Talufofo Stream and the relation to the geology of the drainage basin. The Commonwealth government is exploring the feasibility of using water from Talufofo Stream to supplement Saipan's stressed municipal water supply. Streamflow records from gaging stations on the principal forks of Talufofo Stream indicate that peak streamflows and long-term average flow are higher at the South Fork gaging station than at the Middle Fork gaging station because the drainage area of the South Fork gaging station is larger, but persistent base flow from ground-water discharge during dry weather is greater in the Middle Fork gaging station. The sum of the average flows at the Middle Fork and South Fork gaging stations, plus an estimate of the average flow at a point in the lower reaches of the North Fork, is about 2.96 cubic feet per second or 1.91 million gallons per day. Although this average represents the theoretical maximum long-term draft rate possible from the Talufofo Stream Basin if an adequate reservoir can be built, the actual amount of surface water available will be less because of evaporation, leaks, induced infiltration, and reservoir-design constraints. Base-flow characteristics, such as stream seepage and spring discharge, are related to geology of the basin. Base flow in the Talufofo Stream Basin originates as discharge from springs near the base of limestones located in the headwaters of Talufofo Stream, flows over low-permeability volcanic rocks in the middle reaches, and seeps back into the high-permeability limestones in the lower reaches. Water sampled from Talufofo Stream during base flow had high dissolved-calcium concentrations (between 35 and 98 milligrams per liter), characteristic of water from a limestone aquifer. Concentrations of potassium, sodium, and chloride

  9. Recognition of relict Mesozoic Dongsha Basin in the northern margin, South China Sea and its implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pin; Wang, Yanlin

    2015-04-01

    The Pearl River Mouth Basin (PRMB) is dominated by NE-trending rift architecture produced mainly during Cenozoic Era. It comprises a series of grabens built up with thick Paleogene and thick Neogene sediments, up to 12000 m, and dividing basement highs composing Yanshanian granitic rocks. Though previously considered as one constituent part of PRMB in the southeast, Dongsha Basin displays major differences in sedimentary architecture and tectonic framework. Firstly, Dongsha Basin is characterized by a prominent angular unconformity, interpreted as a spectacular planation or rough erosion surface which separates the sediment column into two distinct parts. It is interpreted with accumulating seismic and drill data that the underlying strata comprise Early Cretaceous terrestrial, Jurassic marine and possibly Triassic sedimentary rocks totaling to 4~9 km thick, whereas the overlying strata are very thin (usually 0.5~1 km in whole) composing mainly Neogene sediments. The major sedimentary hiatus between them corresponds to the Late Cretaceous to mid-Miocene Epoch, well during the rifting to spreading process when the PRMB developed. Secondly, unlike the PRMB, the Dongsha Basin has suffered considerably less extension except its boundary areas, and actually remained as a relatively stable block though Cenozoic Era. Moreover, there are a few compressive open fold structures within the buried Mesozoic strata over the central Dongsha Basin. These folds trend in NNE and are characterized mostly by few minor growing upthrust faults with offsets in the order of few tens to hundreds meter. The upthrust faults dipped mostly southeastward against the northwestward subduction of paleo-Pacific plate as postulated in other previous study. The blind folds featured more like back-thrust growth tectonics, formed a broad NNE-SSW trending belt, obviously oblique to the trend of northern margin of the South China Sea and the PRMB as well. In a few recent models, the most prominent

  10. Extraordinarily thick-boned fish linked to the aridification of the Qaidam Basin (northern Tibetan Plateau)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Meemann; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Huanzhang; Miao, Desui; Zhao, Quanhong; Wu, Guoxuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Qiang; Sun, Zhencheng; Wang, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Scattered with numerous salt lakes and ≈2,700–3,200 m above sea level, the giant Qaidam inland basin on the northern Tibetan Plateau has experienced continuing aridification since the beginning of the Late Cenozoic as a result of the India–Asia plate collision and associated uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous evidence of aridification comes mainly from evaporite deposits and salinity-tolerant invertebrate fossils. Vertebrate fossils were rare until recent discoveries of abundant fish. Here, we report an unusual cyprinid fish, Hsianwenia wui, gen. et sp. nov., from Pliocene lake deposits of the Qaidam Basin, characterized by an extraordinarily thick skeleton that occupied almost the entire body. Such enormous skeletal thickening, apparently leaving little room for muscles, is unknown among extant fish. However, an almost identical condition occurs in the much smaller cyprinodontid Aphanius crassicaudus (Cyprinodonyiformes), collected from evaporites exposed along the northern margins of the Mediterranean Sea during the Messinian desiccation period. H. wui and A. crassicaudus both occur in similar deposits rich in carbonates (CaCO3) and sulfates (CaSO4), indicating that both were adapted to the extreme conditions resulting from the aridification in the two areas. The overall skeletal thickening was most likely formed through deposition of the oversaturated calcium and was apparently a normal feature of the biology and growth of these fish. PMID:18757732

  11. Diversity of Bacteroidetes in high-altitude saline evaporitic basins in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorador, Cristina; Meneses, Daniela; Urtuvia, Viviana; Demergasso, Cecilia; Vila, Irma; Witzel, Karl-Paul; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2009-06-01

    The phylum Bacteroidetes represents one of the most abundant bacterial groups of marine and freshwater bacterioplankton. We investigated the diversity of Bacteroidetes in water and sediment samples from three evaporitic basins located in the highlands of northern Chile. We used both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries created with targeted Bacteroidetes-specific primers and separation of specifically amplified gene fragments by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). DGGE analysis revealed a reduced richness of these organisms in samples from Salar de Huasco (two to four DGGE bands) increasing in Salar de Ascotán (two to seven DGGE bands) and Laguna Tebenquiche at Salar de Atacama (four to eight DGGE bands). Cluster analysis (WPGMA) of DGGE bands showed that bands from Salar de Huasco and Salar de Ascotán grouped together and samples from Salar de Atacama formed separate clusters in water and sediment samples, reflecting different Bacteroidetes communities between sites. Most of the sequences analyzed belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae and clustered with the genera Psychroflexus, Gillisia, Maribacter, Muricauda, Flavobacterium, and Salegentibacter. The most abundant phylotype was highly related to Psychroflexus spp. and was recovered from all three study sites. The similarity of the analyzed sequences with their closest relatives in GenBank was typically <97% and notably lower when compared with type strains, demonstrating the unique character of these sequences. Culture efforts will be necessary to get a better description of the diversity of this group in saline evaporitic basins of northern Chile.

  12. Extraordinarily thick-boned fish linked to the aridification of the Qaidam Basin (northern Tibetan Plateau).

    PubMed

    Chang, Meemann; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Huanzhang; Miao, Desui; Zhao, Quanhong; Wu, Guoxuan; Liu, Juan; Li, Qiang; Sun, Zhencheng; Wang, Ning

    2008-09-01

    Scattered with numerous salt lakes and approximately 2,700-3,200 m above sea level, the giant Qaidam inland basin on the northern Tibetan Plateau has experienced continuing aridification since the beginning of the Late Cenozoic as a result of the India-Asia plate collision and associated uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous evidence of aridification comes mainly from evaporite deposits and salinity-tolerant invertebrate fossils. Vertebrate fossils were rare until recent discoveries of abundant fish. Here, we report an unusual cyprinid fish, Hsianwenia wui, gen. et sp. nov., from Pliocene lake deposits of the Qaidam Basin, characterized by an extraordinarily thick skeleton that occupied almost the entire body. Such enormous skeletal thickening, apparently leaving little room for muscles, is unknown among extant fish. However, an almost identical condition occurs in the much smaller cyprinodontid Aphanius crassicaudus (Cyprinodonyiformes), collected from evaporites exposed along the northern margins of the Mediterranean Sea during the Messinian desiccation period. H. wui and A. crassicaudus both occur in similar deposits rich in carbonates (CaCO(3)) and sulfates (CaSO(4)), indicating that both were adapted to the extreme conditions resulting from the aridification in the two areas. The overall skeletal thickening was most likely formed through deposition of the oversaturated calcium and was apparently a normal feature of the biology and growth of these fish. PMID:18757732

  13. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems of the Lower Silurian Medina Group, northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Detailed sedimentological analysis of 3500 ft of continuous core from 44 wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ontario, New York, and West Virginia, combined with regional study of geophysical logs, results in new interpretations of sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems in Lower Silurian siliciclastic rocks of the northern Appalachian basin. Above a type-1 sequence boundary at the base of the Medina Group are a lowstand systems tract and a transgressive systems tract that are represented, respectively, by the Whirlpool Sandstone and by the overlying Cabot Head Shale. The thickest sandstones in the Medina Group occur in the Grimsby Sandstone, which is interpreted as a highstand systems tract with basinward-prograding parasequences. Sea level rise after Grimsby parasequence deposition is represented by marine-shelf shale in the uppermost part of the Medina Group. Based on facies successions in the cores, four mappable depositional systems are interpreted for the Grimsby Sandstone and correlative sandstone units; (1) wave-dominated middle shelf, (2) wave- and tide-influenced inner shelf, (3) tide dominated shoreline, and (4) fluvial. The wave-dominated middle-shelf system, which includes very fine-grained shelf-ridge sandstones encased in marine shale, is the most basinward system, occurring from Ontario through parts of eastern Ohio. Shoreward, across the northern Appalachian basin, the influence of tidal processes relative to wave processes generally increased, which may have been related to distance across the shelf, water depth, and shoreline configuration. The shoreline may have been deltaic in some areas and straight in other areas.

  14. The Cenozoic on-shore basins of Northern Vietnam: Biostratigraphy, vertebrate and invertebrate faunas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Madelaine; Prieto, Jérôme; Schneider, Simon; Hung, Nguyen Viet; Quang, Do Duc; Tran, Dang Ngoc

    2011-01-01

    A first account of paleontological data from three Cenozoic on-shore basins in Northern Vietnam, i.e. the Na Duong, Cao Bang, and Hang Mon basins, reveals a rich fossil fauna and flora of supposed Oligocene age, offering a great potential for taxonomic, paleoenvironmental, and paleobiogeographic studies. Two excavation campaigns unearthed well-preserved fossil remains of mammals, crocodiles, at least six turtle species, some 20 fish taxa, some other 20 mollusc species, and different plant remains. The majority of these taxa are regarded as new to science. However, close affinities to modern faunas of northern Southeast Asia demonstrate the importance of these fossils for an evaluation of the biological history of this modern biodiversity hot spot. Moreover, the fossil assemblages may help to disentangle the intricate Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia by application of paleobiogeographic modelling. Finally, the discovery of complex paleo-food-webs and the presence of several taxa indicative of certain ecological conditions provide a solid base for autecologic, synecologic and paleoclimatic studies. The potential biostratigraphic value of the macrofauna has to be demonstrated yet, as evolutionary concepts for most of the respective groups have not been proposed to date.

  15. Selective ingress of a Samoan plume component into the northern Lau backarc basin.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Oliver; Arculus, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Intra-plate basalt isotopic trends require mixing between enriched mantle components (EM1, EM2, HIMU) and a primordial component with high (3)He/(4)He termed FOZO. However, proportions of components, geometric distributions within individual plumes, relative proportions of melting components and loci of mixing of melts and residues remain poorly understood. Here we present new Hf-Nd isotopic data of dredged sea floor basalts from the northern Lau backarc basin, ~250 km south of the subaerial and submerged Samoan chain, with high (3)He/(4)He, (20)Ne/(22)Ne and primordial (129)Xe/(130)Xe, characteristic of the FOZO component. Combined Hf-Nd-noble gas isotope systematics require mixing of refractory, sub-northwestern Lau backarc mantle only with a spatially restricted FOZO component, most plausibly sourced from part of the Samoan plume. Other geographically restricted and possibly volumetrically minor enriched Samoan plume components are not detectable in northern Lau backarc samples, consistent with selective plume ingress of the FOZO component beneath the basin. PMID:25761912

  16. Imaging lithospheric structure in northern Scotland and the South Caspian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asencio, Eugenio

    Passive- and active-source seismological studies of northern Scotland and the South Caspian Basin indicate: (1) pervasive and laterally heterogeneous velocity discontinuities within the upper mantle influenced by the localized tectonic and thermal history of northwest Scotland, and (2) growth fault-bend folds overriding a regional ductile detachment zone at a depth of about 13 to 16 km in response to a component of right-lateral simple shear of the underlying crust between the South Caspian Basin and the central and western Caucasus. Teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a small array of portable broadband stations and permanent short-period stations are used to ascertain the lateral extent of velocity discontinuities within the continental mantle lithosphere beneath Scotland. Radial receiver functions contain distinct P-to-S ( Ps) converted phases at about 3.1--3.2 s and at 4.5--5.2 s after the direct P-wave. These observations suggest that the upper mantle Ps phase originates from a high velocity and/or anisotropic layer within the upper mantle. At two stations, ORE and BACA, located along the northern shoreline of Scotland, these upper mantle phases can be correlated with the W-reflector, a bright, regionally extensive seismic reflector previously observed on marine deep seismic reflection and wide-angle refraction-reflection profiles. However, the variability in physical characteristics suggests the possibility that there may be multiple layered reflectors in the upper mantle beneath northern Scotland and revives debates on the regional and global significance of upper mantle layering. Deep seismic reflection profiles acquired in the deepwater of the South Caspian Sea, offshore Azerbaijan image a thick sequence of sediments (19--22 km thick) that structurally have been deformed into relatively symmetrical folds. These structures are interpreted as fault-bend growth folds overriding a regional ductile detachment zone at a depth of about 13 to 16 km. The analysis

  17. Towards large scale modelling of wetland water dynamics in northern basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedinotti, V.; Sapriza, G.; Stone, L.; Davison, B.; Pietroniro, A.; Quinton, W. L.; Spence, C.; Wheater, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the hydrological behaviour of low topography, wetland-dominated sub-arctic areas is one major issue needed for the improvement of large scale hydrological models. These wet organic soils cover a large extent of Northern America and have a considerable impact on the rainfall-runoff response of a catchment. Moreover their strong interactions with the lower atmosphere and the carbon cycle make of these areas a noteworthy component of the regional climate system. In the framework of the Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN), this study aims at providing a model for wetland water dynamics that can be used for large scale applications in cold regions. The modelling system has two main components : a) the simulation of surface runoff using the Modélisation Environmentale Communautaire - Surface and Hydrology (MESH) land surface model driven with several gridded atmospheric datasets and b) the routing of surface runoff using the WATROUTE channel scheme. As a preliminary study, we focus on two small representative study basins in Northern Canada : Scotty Creek in the lower Liard River valley of the Northwest Territories and Baker Creek, located a few kilometers north of Yellowknife. Both areas present characteristic landscapes dominated by a series of peat plateaus, channel fens, small lakes and bogs. Moreover, they constitute important fieldwork sites with detailed data to support our modelling study. The challenge of our new wetland model is to represent the hydrological functioning of the various landscape units encountered in those watersheds and their interactions using simple numerical formulations that can be later extended to larger basins such as the Mackenzie river basin. Using observed datasets, the performance of the model to simulate the temporal evolution of hydrological variables such as the water table depth, frost table depth and discharge is assessed.

  18. Sequence stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation, northern Delaware basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, A.R.; Baltensperger, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Stratigraphic sequence analysis of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation is a new technique useful in predicting and understanding shifts in sand trends that can help locate Morrow gas reservoirs in the mature northern Delaware basin. Morrow sandstone reservoirs are fluvial deltaic channel fill and transgressive beach deposits that typically are 10-30 ft thick and consistently less than 1 mi wide. Detailed mapping and correlation within the systems tracts of each sequence can high-grade specific areas in the basin for exploration. Based on subsurface log correlations, the Morrow clastics and Atoka carbonates in the northern Delaware basin are interpreted as three stratigraphic sequences bounded by subregional type I unconformities. The post-Mississippian unconformity represents the oldest sequence boundary in the Morrow-to-Atoka succession and formed as the base level dropped and the shoreline shifted at least 50 mi basinward. The uplifted Pedernal Highlands supplied sediment to dip-trending lower Morrow channels that downcut into the exposed Mississippian carbonate ramp surface. The transgressive systems tract in this sequence consists of landward-stepping, wave-dominated deltaic deposit. The Morrow shale, a regionally correlatable organic-rich shale that separates the lower Morrow from the middle Morrow, represents the highstand deposits as base level that rose to a maximum. Another base level drop occurred at the end of Morrow shale deposition and resulted in dip-trending channel-fill sandstones and, stacked landward stepping transgressive beach and offshore ridge deposits oriented parallel to strike. The highstand progradational deposits of this sequence formed a terrace that supplied a shelf margin system of deltaic and slope-apron sediments during the succeeding third sequence. The shelf margin deposits are capped by highstand shelf carbonates of the upper Morrow and lower Atoka.

  19. Ellipticity of Rayleigh waves in basin and hard-rock sites in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-04-01

    We measure ellipticity of teleseismic Rayleigh waves at 95 seismic stations in Northern Italy, for wave period between 10 s and 110 s, using an automatic technique and a large volume of high-quality seismic recordings from over 500 global earthquakes that occurred in 2008-2014. Northern Italy includes a wide range of crustal structures, from the wide and deep Po Plain sedimentary basin to outcropping sedimentary and cristalline rocks in the Northern Apennines and Alps. It thus provides an excellent case for studying the influence of shallow earth structure on polarisation of surface waves. The ellipticity measurements show excellent spatial correlation with geological features in the region, such as high ellipticity associated with regions of low seismic velocity in the Po Plain and low ellipticity values in faster, hard rock regions in the Alps and Apennine mountains. Moreover, the observed ellipticity values also relate to the thickness of the basement, as highlighted by observed differences beneath the Alps and the Apennines. Comparison between observations and predicted ellipticity from a reference crustal model of the region show substantial fit, particularly for T ˜ 38 s data. Discrepancy for shorter wave period suggests that slight modifications of the model are needed, and that the ellipticity measurements could help to better constrain the shallow crustal structure of the region. Predictions for the Po Plain are larger than the observations by a factor of four or more and transition from retrograde to prograde Rayleigh wave motion at the surface for periods of T ˜ 10-13 s is predicted for seismic stations in the Plain. Analysis of corresponding real data indicates a possible detection of teleseismic prograde particle motion, but the weak teleseismic earthquake signals are mixed with ambient noise signals at the predicted, short, transition periods. Detection of the period of polarity inversion from the joint analysis of earthquake and ambient noise

  20. Ellipticity of Rayleigh waves in basin and hard-rock sites in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbellini, Andrea; Morelli, Andrea; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-07-01

    We measure ellipticity of teleseismic Rayleigh waves at 95 seismic stations in Northern Italy, for wave period between 10 and 110 s, using an automatic technique and a large volume of high-quality seismic recordings from over 500 global earthquakes that occurred in 2008-2014. Northern Italy includes a wide range of crustal structures, from the wide and deep Po Plain sedimentary basin to outcropping sedimentary and crystalline rocks in the Northern Apennines and Alps. It thus provides an excellent case for studying the influence of shallow earth structure on polarization of surface waves. The ellipticity measurements show excellent spatial correlation with geological features in the region, such as high ellipticity associated with regions of low seismic velocity in the Po Plain and low ellipticity values in faster, hard rock regions in the Alps and Apennine mountains. Moreover, the observed ellipticity values also relate to the thickness of the basement, as highlighted by observed differences beneath the Alps and the Apennines. Comparison between observations and predicted ellipticity from a reference crustal model of the region show substantial fit, particularly for T ˜ 38 s data. Discrepancy for shorter wave period suggests that slight modifications of the model are needed, and that the ellipticity measurements could help to better constrain the shallow crustal structure of the region. Predictions for the Po Plain are larger than the observations by a factor of four or more and transition from retrograde to prograde Rayleigh wave motion at the surface for periods of T ˜ 10-13 s is predicted for seismic stations in the plain. Analysis of corresponding real data indicates a possible detection of teleseismic prograde particle motion, but the weak teleseismic earthquake signals are mixed with ambient noise signals at the predicted, short, transition periods. Detection of the period of polarity inversion from the joint analysis of earthquake and ambient noise

  1. Water masses of the northern part of the Iceland Basin in the late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashina, N. P.

    2013-02-01

    A core of bottom sediments AMK-4438 with a length of 320 cm was taken in the North-Eastern part of the Iceland Basin from the depth of 2240 m. The continuous sampling (every 2 cm) made it possible to study the core using the principle of high-resolving paleoceanology. For the stratigraphic partition of the core, we applied the paleotemperature analysis by planktonic foraminifera and carbonate analysis; the distribution of the iceberg rafted debris (IRD) was studied. As a result, nine isotopic stages were distinguished. The change in the complexes of benthic foraminifera indicates that the present-day deepwater circulation in the North-Eastern part of the Iceland Basin had no analogs in earlier glacial periods, including the MIS 5 age. During almost 300 ka, there were relatively warm, rich in nutrients, and poor in oxygen water masses. The formation of the modern Northern-Eastern deep water in the Iceland Basin began in the Bolling-Allerod 14 ka B.P.

  2. Alpine tectonics of granites in basement of Ysyk-Köl Basin, northern Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, M. G.; Przhiyalgovsky, E. S.; Lavrushina, E. V.; Poleshchuk, A. V.; Rybin, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    The Ysyk-Köl Basin filled with Lower Jurassic-Quaternary sedimentary rocks is the largest intermontane negative structural unit of the northern Tien Shan. The basement of this basin is composed of Precambrian-Paleozoic rocks, largely of Ordovician and Silurian granitoids exposed in mountain ranges of the basin framework and as separate anticlinal domes situated in areas occupied by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary cover. The postmagmatic tectonic internalstructure of the Chonkurchak (Chunkurchak), Kyzyl-Choku, Kyzyl-Bulak, and Prishib massifs emplaced in the basement, as well as their relationships to the sedimentary cover, are described in the paper. The study was carried out using the morphostructural method, detailed geological mapping, structural kinematic analysis, and petrographic examination of rocks. The internalstructure of Paleozoic granites in the basement and indications of their 3D tectonic flow are characterized. It is shown that granites underwent 3D deformation after their emplacement in the consolidated crust, and this process had a substantial influence on tectonic processes at the plate and orogenic stages of regional evolution.

  3. Morphotectonics and sedimentation in convergent margin basins: An example from juxtaposed marginal sea basin and foreland basin, Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ho-Shing; Huang, Zehn-Yin

    2009-03-01

    Using reflection seismic profiles and bathymetric mapping this paper reveals the tectonic-sedimentary characteristics of the convergent margins in the northern South China Sea, where it is strongly related to flexure of Chinese rifted margin and overthrust of Taiwan orogen. Convergent margin tectonics of the South China Sea near southern Taiwan is characterized by a progressively northward transition from oceanic subduction along the Manila Trench to the incipient collision zone offshore southern Taiwan where the continental crust of the Eurasian plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. North of 21°N, dip angles of the Benioff zone increase up to 80° in the incipient collision zone where the Manila Trench becomes shallower, gradually loses its morphological identity and finally merges into the nearly N-S trending Penghu Canyon. Convergent margin tectonics in the initial collision zone in SW Taiwan is manifested by the beginning of flexure of the Chinese margin under the westward migrating overthrust belt of Taiwan, forming two distinct basins. On the passive Chinese margin, the marginal sea basin becomes smaller and is underlain by the South China Sea Slope, while on the active Taiwan margin, a wedge-top basin has formed above the frontal thrust sheets of the Taiwan orogenic wedge. Sediments derived from the Taiwan orogen progressively overlie the strata of the passive Chinese margin, resulting in sediment thickening and basin shallowing from south to north. Sedimentary facies shows that offshore deep-water mud is gradationally overlain by shallow marine sediments. Sediments of the wedge-top basin are being actively deformed into mud diapiric intrusions and a series of west-vergent thrusts and folds with their associated piggy-back basins, resulting in irregular topography of the sea floor with alternating sea ridges and troughs. Pliocene-Quaternary strata of the passive Chinese margin are a little deformed under the westward compression induced by the

  4. Reinterpretation of the Northern Terminus of the San Andreas Transform System: Implications for basin development and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Foland, S.S. ); Enzor, K.J. )

    1994-07-01

    The northern San Andreas transform system was studied to evaluate the tectonic history of offshore Point Arena basin, northern California. The Point Arena basin lies 250 km north of San Francisco and encompasses 8500 km[sup 2] on the outer continental shelf. It is a tertiary basin formed during Eocene subduction and overprinted by Pliocene-Pleistocene strike-slip motion of the San Andreas fault system. Interpretation of the data yields a new tectonic model for the northern San Andreas fault system and Point Arena basin. Previous models curved the fault system east parallel to the coast, intersecting faults exposed on Point Delgada, and then bending the fault sharply west to join the Mendocino triple junction. The new model projects the San Andreas fault system due northwest, straight into the offshore basin, as a series of parallel faults aligned with the onshore fault trace to directly intersect the triple junction. The new interpretation is supported by aeromagnetic data, which indicates the basin is divided by a major northwest-trending structural boundary and floored by two distinct basement types (Mesozoic Salinian granies and Jurassic Franciscan metasediments). The latest seismic data contain enough information to determine the genesis and orientation of the offshore fault system and associated folds. Basin modeling indicates hydrocarbon generation has occurred in the Miocene source beds. The model estimates the Point Arena basin contains multibillion barrel potential trapped in large antiforms associated with the through-going San Andreas system. Integration of all geotechnical data allowed reinterpretation of the tectonic history, and produced an enhanced understanding of Point Arena basin.

  5. Giant mudwaves in the Northern Argentine Basin: born and buried by bottom currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitrii; Murdmaa, Ivar; Ivanova, Elena; Levchenko, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    New sedimentary records and very high resolution seismic profiles collected during four cruises of the RV "Akademik Ioffe" (2011-2013) were correlated with seismic, multibeam and coring data obtained during cruises of the RV "Robert Conrad", "Knorr", "Meteor". A complex analysis of the geological-geophysical data revealed an extensive field of giant mudwaves (48 000 km2) in the northwestern Argentine Basin, South Atlantic. The symmetric waves up to 60 m in height and 4000 m in wavelength are oriented roughly parallel to contours. They partly cover the Santa Catarina Plateau and extend through the Santos Basin to the Sao Paulo Plateau. The mudwaves field is traced at the depth range from 3400 to 4000 m and divided into buried (northern) and non-buried (southern) parts. The non-buried sediment waves cover the surface of the huge drift in the Santa Catarina Plateau. The wave height increases from the drift summit to its flanks and decreases at the foot. Two cores retrieved from the drift top and its northern flank recovered muddy contourites with a greater amount of silt-size material in the core from the drift flank. The age of the recovered sediments is at least 130 ka. In the northern Santos basin, the sediment waves are buried under a large lens-like sediment body (drift?) inclined at the margins. Cores obtained from the buried part of the mudwaves field recovered an intercalation of hemipelagic clay and silty-clay contourite. The age of recovered sediments does not exceed 150 ka (Bleil et al., 1993). Contourites deposition in the study area is related to the activity of the Antarctic bottom water (AABW) contour current. The AABW flow is considered to be divided into two branches by the Santa Catarina Plateau. We suggest that this topographic obstacle causes a flow velocity increase. Wave height and grain-size variations indicate higher bottom current velocities at the plateau flanks and relative tranquil conditions at the flat summit of the plateau. The symmetric

  6. Petroleum evaluation of Ordovician black shale source rocks in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.G.; Roen, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the Ordovician black shale source beds in the northern part of the Appalachian basin shows that the sequence is composed of the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale and its correlatives. The shales range in thickness from less than 200 ft in the west to more than 600 ft in the east along the Allegheny Front. Structure contours indicate that the shales plunge from 2,000 ft below sea level in central Ohio and to about 12,000 ft below sea level in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Geochemical analyses of 175 samples indicate that the sequence has an average total organic carbon content (TOC) of 1.34%. Conodont alteration indices (CAI) and production indices indicate that the stages of maturation range from diagenetic in the less deeply buried western part of the basin, which probably produced mostly oil, to catagenetic in the more deeply buried eastern part of the basin, which probably produced mostly gas. Potential for continued hydrocarbon generation is poor in the east and fair to moderate in the western part of the basin. If the authors assume that these rocks have produced hydrocarbons, the hydrocarbons have since migrated. Using an average TOC of 1%, an organic carbon to hydrocarbon conversion factor of 10%, and a volume of rock within the oil and gas generation range as defined by CAI values of 1.5-4, the Ordovician shale could have generated 165 billion bbl of oil or equivalent. If only 1% of the 165 billion bbl was trapped after migration, then 1.65 billion bbl of oil or equivalent would be available for discovery.

  7. Climatic responses to anthropogenic groundwater exploitation: a case study of the Haihe River Basin, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jing; Xie, Zhenghui; Yu, Yan; Zhan, Chesheng; Sun, Qin

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a groundwater exploitation scheme is incorporated into the regional climate model, RegCM4, and the climatic responses to anthropogenic alteration of groundwater are then investigated over the Haihe River Basin in Northern China where groundwater resources are overexploited. The scheme models anthropogenic groundwater exploitation and water consumption, which are further divided into agricultural irrigation, industrial use and domestic use. Four 30-year on-line exploitation simulations and one control test without exploitation are conducted using the developed model with different water demands estimated from relevant socioeconomic data. The results reveal that the groundwater exploitation and water consumption cause increasing wetting and cooling effects on the local land surface and in the lower troposphere, along with a rapidly declining groundwater table in the basin. The cooling and wetting effects also extended outside the basin, especially in the regions downwind of the prevailing westerly wind, where increased precipitation occurs. The changes in the four exploitation simulations positively relate to their different water demands and are highly non-linear. The largest changes in climatic variables usually appear in spring and summer, the time of crop growth. To gain further insights into the direct changes in land-surface variables due to groundwater exploitation regardless of the atmospheric feedbacks, three off-line simulations using the land surface model Community Land Model version 3.5 are also conducted to distinguish these direct changes on the land surface of the basin. The results indicate that the direct changes of land-surface variables respond linearly to water demand if the climatic feedbacks are not considered, while non-linear climatic feedbacks enhance the differences in the on-line exploitation simulations.

  8. Strain Partitioning in the Northern Walker Lane and Western Basin and Range from GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2009-05-01

    The northern Walker Lane, in the western Basin and Range Province of the United States, is a complex system of dextral, normal and sinestral faults that work together to accommodate approximately 9 mm/yr of relative motion between the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley block and the more slowly extending Province. GPS measurements made using the BARGEN, EarthScope PBO and MAGNET GPS networks since 2004 are now providing improved resolution of deformation patterns and crustal fault slip rates inside the Walker Lane and western Basin and Range. We have processed all the GPS data as part of a uniform global solution, and filtered the solution on a Great Basin spatial scale to obtain rates of motion of the Walker Lane crust with respect to North America. Using these rates we have constrained slip rates on regional faults using a block model whose boundaries conform to Quaternary surface rupture geometries. These results show a very strong correlation between the geologic domains and style of strain measured with GPS. In particular, east of the Walker Lane, where the topography and crustal faulting are characteristic of classic Basin and Range tectonic extension, the GPS velocities show a highly uniform southeast to northwest uniaxial extension of 2.5 mm/yr distributed over 250 km. This uniform extension implies normal slip rates of approximately 0.1 mm/yr on average for each fault (horizontal extension). The transition between Basin and Range morphology and the Walker Lane is matched in the GPS velocities by a transition from uniaxial extension to transtension that is resolved into dextral slip on northwest trending faults, with minor contributions from left lateral slip on northeast striking faults and normal slip. Right oblique extension is well-distributed across the Walker Lane, with most faults contributing some slip to accommodate the overall slip budget. The greatest slip rates occur on the western and eastern margins, and by far the greatest amount of normal slip

  9. Early life history of the northern pikeminnow in the lower Columbia River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, D.M.; Barfoot, C.A.; Bayer, J.M.; Poe, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    The northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis is a large, native cyprinid in the Columbia River basin that has persisted in spite of substantial habitat alterations. During the months of June to September 1993-1996, we investigated the temporal and spatial patterns of northern pikeminnow spawning, along with describing larval drift and characterizing larval and early juvenile rearing habitats in the lower Columbia River (the John Day and Dalles reservoirs and the free-flowing section downstream of Bonneville Dam) as well as in the lower sections of two major tributaries (the John Day and Deschutes rivers). The density of newly emerged drifting larvae was higher in dam tailraces (a mean of 7.7 larvae/100 m3 in surface tows) than in the lower reservoirs (0.3 larvae/100 m3), indicating that tailraces were areas of more intense spawning. Density was particularly high in the Bonneville Dam tailrace (15.1 larvae/100 m3), perhaps because adult northern pikeminnow are abundant below Bonneville Dam and this is the first tailrace and suitable main-stem spawning habitat encountered during upriver spawning migrations. Spawning also occurred in both of the tributaries sampled but not in a backwater. Spawning in the Columbia River primarily took place during the month of June in 1993 and 1994, when the water temperature rose from 14??C to 18??C, but occurred about 2 weeks later in 1995 and 1996, possibly because of cooler June water temperature (14-15??C) in these years. The period of drift was brief (about 1-3 d), with larvae recruiting to shallow, low-velocity shorelines of main-channel and backwater areas to rear. Larvae reared in greatest densities at sites with fine sediment or sand substrates and moderate- to high-density vegetation (a mean density of 92.1 larvae/10 m3). The success of northern pikeminnow in the Columbia River basin may be partly attributable to their ability to locate adequate spawning and rearing conditions in a variety of main-stem and tributary

  10. Polyphase tectonic subsidence evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from quantitative subsidence analysis of the northern and central parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin is a tectonically complex Neogene basin situated at the Alpine-Carpathian transition. This study analyzes a detailed quantification of subsidence in the northern and central parts of the Vienna Basin to understand its tectonic subsidence evolution. About 200 wells were used to arrange stratigraphic setting, and wells reaching the pre-Neogene basement were analyzed for subsidence. To enhance the understanding of the regional subsidences, the wells were sorted into ten groups based on their position on major fault blocks. In the Early Miocene, subsidence was slow and along E-W to NE-SW trending axis, indicating the development of thrust-controlled piggyback basins. During the late Early Miocene data show abruptly increasing subsidence, making the initiation of the Vienna pull-apart basin system. From the Middle Miocene, the tectonic subsidence curves show regionally different patterns. The tectonic subsidence during the Middle Miocene varies laterally across the Vienna Basin, and the differential subsidence can be related to the changing tensional regime of weakening transtension and strengthening extension toward the late Middle Miocene. From the late Middle Miocene to the Late Miocene, the tectonic subsidence occurred dominantly along the regional active faults, and corresponds to the axis of E-W trending extension of the western parts of the Pannonian Basin system. In the Quaternary the Vienna Basin has been reactivated, and resulted in subsidence along the NE-SW trending Vienna Basin transfer fault system.

  11. A Very Large Population of Likely Buried Impact Basins in the Northern Lowlands of Mars Revealed by MOLA Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.; Shockey, K. M.; Frey, E. L.; Roark, J. H.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2001-01-01

    High resolution Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data have revealed a large number of subdued quasi-circular depressions (QCDs) >50 km diameter in the northern lowlands of Mars which are generally not visible in Viking imagery and which may be buried ancient impact basins. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Geodynamic evolution and sedimentary infill of the northern Levant Basin: A source to sink-perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawie, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nicolas Hawie a,b,c (nicolas.hawie@upmc.fr) Didier Granjeon c (didier.granjeon@ifpen.fr) Christian Gorini a,b (christian.gorini@upmc.fr) Remy Deschamps c (remy.deschamps@ifpen.fr) Fadi H. Nader c (fadi-henri.nader@ifpen.fr) Carla Müller Delphine Desmares f (delphine.desmares@upmc.fr) Lucien Montadert e (lucien.montadert@beicip.com) François Baudin a (francois.baudin@upmc.fr) a UMR 7193 Institut des Sciences de la Terre de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie/ Univ. Paris 06, case 117. 4, place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France b iSTEP, UMR 7193, CNRS, F-75005, Paris, France c IFP Energies nouvelles, 1-4 avenue du Bois Préau 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex, France d UMR 7207, Centre de Recherche sur la Paleobiodiversité et les Paleoenvironnements. Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Tour 46-56 5ème. 4, place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France e Beicip Franlab, 232 Av. Napoléon Bonaparte, 95502 Rueil-Malmaison, France Sedimentological and biostratigraphic investigations onshore Lebanon coupled with 2D offshore reflection seismic data allowed proposing a new Mesozoic-Present tectono-stratigraphic framework for the northern Levant Margin and Basin. The seismic interpretation supported by in-depth facies analysis permitted to depict the potential depositional environments offshore Lebanon as no well has yet been drilled. The Levant region has been affected by successive geodynamic events that modified the architecture of its margin and basin from a Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic rift into a Late Cretaceous subduction followed by collision and Miocene-Present strike slip motion. The interplay between major geodynamic events as well as sea level fluctuations impacted on the sedimentary infill of the basin. During Jurassic and Cretaceous, the Levant Margin is dominated by the aggradation of a carbonate platform while deepwater mixed-systems prevailed in the basin. During the Oligo-Miocene, three major sedimentary pathways are expected to drive important

  13. Monitoring and modeling of two alluvial aquifers in lower Nestos river basin, Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Boskidis, Ioannis; Pisinaras, Vassilios; Petalas, Christos; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A

    2012-01-01

    A groundwater monitoring and modeling program in two aquifers within the lower Nestos river basin in Northern Greece is presented. A monitoring network of 54 wells was developed in the two study areas, and groundwater level measurements and water quality sample analyses were conducted for a period of 2.5 years, from March 2007 to October 2009. The field data were used for the calibration and verification of the mathematical model MODFLOW in the two aquifers. The validated model was used to examine ten alternative management scenarios regarding groundwater abstraction in the two aquifers. The study showed that MODFLOW, if properly validated, is a useful and flexible tool in groundwater resources management. PMID:22755533

  14. Miocene non-marine diatoms from the western Cordillera basins of northern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fourtanier, E.; Gasse, F.; Bellier, O.; Bonhomme, M.G.; Robles, I.

    1993-01-01

    Diatom assemblages are documented from diatomite layers of two Miocene fluvio-lacustrine units from the basins of the western Cordillera of northern Peru: the Namora Formation and the Cajabamba Formation. Emphasis is given to taxa of particular stratigraphic interest. The diatom assemblages indicate for the Namora Formation the occurrence of swampy conditions with very dilute, low alkalinity water. The diatom assemblages of the Cajabamba Formation reflect the occurrence of fresh, slightly alkaline, eutrophic lakes with deep water in some samples, and swampy conditions with relatively high salt content in other samples. The Namora formation is late Miocene in age based on the diatom assemblages and radiometric analyses. The diatom layers of the Cajabamba Formation are dated as late middle to early late Miocene. -from Authors

  15. Distribution of maximum burial temperatures across northern Appalachian Basin and implications for Carboniferous sedimentation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Clay-mineral diagenesis and apatite fission-track age data indicate that the maximum burial temperatures to which the Middle Devonian Tioga metabentonite was exposed rise abruptly from low values in western New York State to higher values in the east. The highest temperatures, which approach 175/sup 0/C, were reached just west of Syracuse. Neither the pattern nor the magnitude of burial temperatures can be explained solely by burial of the metabentonite beneath Upper Devonian sediments. Although spatial variations in the geothermal gradient could have produced the observed pattern of burial temperatures, it is more likely that Carboniferous sediments, no longer preserved in the area, were responsible for the indicated burial. The inferred presence of thick Carboniferous sequences in western New York State suggests that the Allegheny orogeny had a stronger influence on sedimentation in the northern Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Comparison of offshore and onshore gas occurrences, Eel River basin, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenson, T.D.; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Orange, Daniel L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Brewer, Peter G.; Martin, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    The Eel River basin of northern California is a upper Cenozoic depocenter containing more than 3,000 meters of sedimentary rock located near the Mendocino triple junction. Active tectonism has resulted in folding, faulting and rapid sedimentation. Both thermogenic and microbial hydrocarbons are known to be present in the sediments. In August 1997, we sampled two submarine gas seeps, one at a water depth of 520 m that supports a chemosynthetic-based ecosystem very near an area of previously recovered gas hydrate. Another vent site was sampled in sand covered with white bacterial mats at a water depth 41 m. We compared the hydrocarbon gas composition and methane isotopic composition of these seeps with land-based gas occurrences that include: 1) a gas seep and 2) gas from a 2360 m-deep gas well.

  17. Prediction of the distribution of Glossina tachinoides (Diptera: Glossinidae) in the Volta basin of northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mahama, C I; Koné, A; de la Rocque, S; De Deken, R; Geerts, S

    2005-02-01

    The classification of a Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite image helped demonstrate prevailing habitat types and land use intensity in the Volta basin of the Northern Region of Ghana. A geo-referenced data layer comprising the capture results of a cross-sectional survey of Glossina tachinoides Westwood was over-laid on a data layer of habitat types within 500 m of either bank of the Volta river and its tributaries. An evaluation of the relationship between habitat types and the capture results of G. tachinoides suggested a strong preference of G. tachinoides for woodland, followed by shrubland, grassland and flood plains. The findings were used to classify the suitability of habitat types for G. tachinoides as 'high', 'medium' and 'low' and a prediction map for the distribution of G. tachinoides in the entire river network was produced. The usefulness of this method in estimating the potential distribution of G. tachinoides in an area of increasing agricultural expansion is discussed. PMID:15705216

  18. Lunar impact basins: New data for the nearside northern high latitudes and eastern limb from the second Galileo flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, J. W.; Belton, M.; Greeley, R.; Pieters, C.; Fischer, E.; Sunshine, J.; Klaasen, K.; Mcewen, A.; Becker, T.; Neukum, G.

    1993-01-01

    During the December 1992 Galileo Earth/Moon encounter the northern half of the nearside, the eastern limb, and parts of the western farside of the Moon were illuminated and in view, a geometry that was complementary to the first lunar encounter in December, 1990, which obtained images of the western limb and eastern farside. The Galileo Solid State Imaging System (SSI) obtained multispectral images for these regions during the second encounter and color ratio composite images were compiled using combinations of band ratios chosen on the basis of telescopic spectra and laboratory spectra of lunar samples. Ratios of images taken at 0.41 and 0.76 micron are sensitive to changes in the slope in the visible portion of the spectrum, and ratios of 0.99 and 0.76 micron relate to the strength of near-infrared absorptions due to iron-rich mafic minerals (0.76/0.99 ratio) such as olivine and pyroxene. Results of the analyses of the compositional diversity of the crust, maria, and Copernican craters are presented elsewhere. Primary objectives for lunar basin analysis for the second encounter include analysis of: the north polar region and the Humboldtianum basin; the characteristics of the Imbrium basin along its northern border and the symmetry of associated deposits; the origin of light plains north of Mare Frigoris and associated with several other basins; the nature and significance of pre-basin substrate; the utilization of the stereo capability to assess subtle basis structure; the identification of previously unrecognized ancient basins; basin deposits and structure for limb and farside basins; and assessment of evidence for proposed ancient basins. These data and results will be applied to addressing general problems of evaluation of the nature and origin of basin deposits, investigation of mode of ejecta emplacement and ejecta mixing, analysis of the origin of light plains deposits, analysis of basin deposit symmetry/asymmetry, investigation of basin depth of

  19. Mapping and monitoring cheatgrass dieoff in rangelands of the Northern Great Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyte, Stephen P.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Major, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dynamics in the Northern Great Basin rangelands, USA, is necessary to effectively manage the region’s lands. This study’s goal was to map and monitor cheatgrass performance to identify where and when cheatgrass dieoff occurred in the Northern Great Basin and to discover how this phenomenon was affected by climatic, topographic, and edaphic variables. We also examined how fire affected cheatgrass performance. Land managers and scientists are concerned by cheatgrass dieoff because it can increase land degradation, and its causes and effects are not fully known. To better understand the scope of cheatgrass dieoff, we developed multiple ecological models that integrated remote sensing data with geophysical and biophysical data. The models’ R2 ranged from 0.71 to 0.88, and their root mean squared errors (RMSEs) ranged from 3.07 to 6.95. Validation of dieoff data showed that 41% of pixels within independently developed dieoff polygons were accurately classified as dieoff, whereas 2% of pixels outside of dieoff polygons were classified as dieoff. Site potential, a long-term spatial average of cheatgrass cover, dominated the development of the cheatgrass performance model. Fire negatively affected cheatgrass performance 1 year postfire, but by the second year postfire performance exceeded prefire levels. The landscape-scale monitoring study presented in this paper helps increase knowledge about recent rangeland dynamics, including where cheatgrass dieoffs occurred and how cheatgrass responded to fire. This knowledge can help direct further investigation and/or guide land management activities that can capitalize on, or mitigate the effects of, cheatgrass dieoff.

  20. Gas Chemistry of Hydrothermal Systems of the Northern Lau Basin - New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, J. E.; Lilley, M. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Resing, J. A.; Arculus, R. J.; Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Evans, L.

    2013-12-01

    The northern Lau Basin is host to widely-dispersed volcanism in a complicated pattern of activity, including the volcanoes of the Tofua Arc, rear-arc volcanoes such as the Mata group, several back-arc spreading centers and rifts, and various intervening isolated volcanic centers. Farther west along the Rochambeau Rifts and the NW Lau Spreading Center, elevated 3He/4He ratios in the seafloor lavas and hydrothermal plumes suggest that an OIB or mantle plume signature, possibly from Samoa, has influenced this extensional zone. During a recent expedition aboard the R/V Revelle in Sept. 2012, we used the QUEST 4000 remotely operated vehicle to visit several new sites of active hydrothermal venting in this region, including Niuatahi (formerly called Volcano O), Niua North, Niua South, and the so-called northern Matas (Mata Ua, Mata Tolu, and Mata Fitu). Fluid samples collected using special titanium gas-tight bottles were analyzed for helium, helium isotopes, neon, CO2, H2, CH4, etc. When these new data are combined with previous sampling at West Mata, East Mata, the 2008 eruption site on the NE Lau Spreading Center as well as Maka volcano, an interesting pattern emerges. The combined helium isotope and C/3He ratios derived from both fluid and rock samples can be used to differentiate between arc, rear-arc, back-arc, and mantle hotspot influences. Thus far the elevated 3He/4He ratios indicative of an OIB or hotspot signature are confined to the Rochambeau Rifts and Northwest Lau Spreading Center. In the northeast Lau Basin, the individual volcanic centers and the zones of back-arc spreading show varying degrees of arc vs. back-arc (MORB-like) influence based on their 3He/4He - C/3He fingerprint.

  1. Patterns and mechanisms of heat transport in the northern Denver Basin: Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsner, Aaron Thomas

    Finite difference simulations of the hydrothermal system of the northern Denver Basin are suggestive of a correlation between anomalous heat flux and the presence of faults and structural lineaments mapped in the region. Geothermal, hydrogeological, lithological, and structural data available for the northern Denver Basin were compiled and analyzed in an effort to determine the hydrothermal mechanisms responsible for observed heat flow anomalies in the study area. Measurement of thermal conductivity was conducted for 82 solid core samples and 60 unconsolidated samples from drill cuttings, yielding a harmonic mean thermal conductivity value of 1.52 +/- 0.91W m-1 K -1 for the stratigraphic column of the study area. A total of 929 thermal gradient values compiled from several databases were incorporated with thermal conductivity data to produce a heat flow map of the study area, delineating prominent areas of anomalous heat flux. Data was processed using finite difference simulation software (Hydrotherm Interactive) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the purposes of modeling and predicting heat and fluid transport in porous media. Two-dimensional cross-sectional models were calibrated using heat flow profiles and available potentiometric surface data for the Madison and Dakota aquifers in the region. Although calibrated models resulted in accurate simulations of non-anomalous heat flow profiles, anomalous heat flow highs were not reproduced. Acknowledging the existence of several major faults and numerous structural lineaments documented in the study area, vertical pathways of fluid flow were added to simulations to recreate the effect of such structural features. Models which incorporated a hypothetical linear fracture sufficiently accounted for previous discrepancies, and indicate probable upward advective flow through existing vertical fractures.

  2. Density, topography, and regional, tensile stresses: Gravity-driven extension of the northern Basin and range

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    It has long been recognized that regional topographic gradients may give rise to tectonic (non-lithostatic) stresses in the lithosphere (Artyushkov, 1973). The elevation of a buoyantly-uplifted region represents a balance between these stresses and the strength of the lithosphere. This study uses existing data on crustal and lithospheric structure in the western United States to test the hypothesis that the topographically high (1.5--2.2 km) northern Basin and Range is spreading under it own weight. Following England and Jackson (1989), the total deviatoric tensile force (Fl) in the northern Basin and Range (NBR) due to the regional high topography is the difference between the vertically-integrated lithostatic stress in the NBR and in western California. Using available velocity models for the crust and upper mantle, and empirically-derived velocity-density relationships, calculated values of Fl range between 1--3 [times] 10[sup 12] N/m. Assuming a visco-elastic rheology for the lithosphere, an average heat flow of 90 m W/m[sup 2], and a crustal thickness of 35 km, values of Fl ranging from 1--3 [times] 10[sup 12] N/m may result in horizontal extension rates of approximately 10[sup [minus]15]/s to 10[sup [minus]15]/s to 10[sup [minus]16]/s. This is comparable to the rate of seismically-released strain in the NBR, and to extension rates of 8--9 mm/yr across the region determined from geologic and geodetic data. These results imply that shear tractions on the base of the lithosphere from mantle convection are not necessary to explain NBR extension. In addition to driving active extension, the weight of the topographically high NBR may exert a compressive force on surrounding lowlands. If so, this may account for some of the active shortening in western California, and the state of horizontal compressive stress in the western Great Plains.

  3. Tertiary fluvial systems within the Bear Creek coal field, northern Big Horn basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N. ); Gruber, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    The Bear Creek coal field contains the 250-m-thick coal-bearing Paludal Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Big Horn Basin, Montana. Detailed field and subsurface data show two contrasting geometries in alluvial strata, each bounded by an economic coal bed. The lower 50 m of the Paludal Member is dominated by sheet and ribbon sandstones. The sheet sandstones are as long as 1.5 km and fine upwards from medium to fine grained. Some sandstones are multistory with sharp upoper and lower contacts. The upper portion has convolute bedding, ripple lamination, and some horizontal and tabular crossbeds. Stratigraphically higher is a 12-m-thick fine-grained sequence, containing large tree trunks in growth position and extensively rooted mud rocks. Sandstone bodies, 6 m thick and 10 m wide, are enclosed within mudstones and siltstones. The sandstones are primarily ripple laminated and have stepped bases and internal erosion surfaces. This interval has previously been interpreted as deposits of an anastomosed fluvial system. The sandstones show little evidence of significant lateral migration. In contrast to the lower interval, the environment here consisted of well-developed vegetated islands separating fluvial channels. Subsurface data show that the major coal beds are laterally continuous within the study area. The cyclic development of the coals reflects intermittent periods of long-term basin stability. Alternating dominance of the sandstones suggests that influx and distribution were controlled through episodic uplift of the nearby Beartooth Mountains.

  4. The spatial and temporal variability of groundwater recharge in a forested basin in northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dripps, W.R.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Recharge varies spatially and temporally as it depends on a wide variety of factors (e.g. vegetation, precipitation, climate, topography, geology, and soil type), making it one of the most difficult, complex, and uncertain hydrologic parameters to quantify. Despite its inherent variability, groundwater modellers, planners, and policy makers often ignore recharge variability and assume a single average recharge value for an entire watershed. Relatively few attempts have been made to quantify or incorporate spatial and temporal recharge variability into water resource planning or groundwater modelling efforts. In this study, a simple, daily soil-water balance model was developed and used to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater recharge of the Trout Lake basin of northern Wisconsin for 1996-2000 as a means to quantify recharge variability. For the 5 years of study, annual recharge varied spatially by as much as 18 cm across the basin; vegetation was the predominant control on this variability. Recharge also varied temporally with a threefold annual difference over the 5-year period. Intra-annually, recharge was limited to a few isolated events each year and exhibited a distinct seasonal pattern. The results suggest that ignoring recharge variability may not only be inappropriate, but also, depending on the application, may invalidate model results and predictions for regional and local water budget calculations, water resource management, nutrient cycling, and contaminant transport studies. Recharge is spatially and temporally variable, and should be modelled as such. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Using Diverse Data Types to Calibrate a Watershed Model of the Trout Lake Basin, Northern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. J.; Feinstein, D. T.; Pint, C. D.; Anderson, M. P.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the USGS Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets project and NSF Long-Term Ecological Research work, a parameter estimation code was used to calibrate a deterministic groundwater flow model of the Trout Lake Basin in northern Wisconsin. Observations included traditional calibration targets (head, lake stage, and baseflow observations) as well as unconventional targets such as groundwater flows to and from lakes, depth of a lake plume, and time of travel. The unconventional data types were important for parameter estimation convergence and allowed the development of a more parameterized model. Independent estimates of groundwater inflow to lakes were most important for constraining lakebed leakance, and the depth of the lake plume was important for determining hydraulic conductivity and conceptual aquifer layering. The most important target, however, was a conventional regional baseflow target that was important for correctly distributing flow between sub-basins and the regional system. The use of parameter estimation: 1) facilitated the calibration process by providing a quantitative assessment of the model's ability to match disparate observed data types; and 2) provided a best fit for the particular model conceptualization. The model calibration required the use of a "universal" parameter estimation code in order to include all types of observations in the objective function. The methods described here help address issues of watershed complexity and non-uniqueness common to deterministic watershed models.

  6. Palaeoenvironmental significance of the clay mineral composition of Olduvai basin deposits, northern Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mees, Florias; Segers, Stijn; Ranst, Eric Van

    2007-01-01

    Quaternary deposits in the southeastern part of the Olduvai basin, northern Tanzania, consist of lake margin deposits, followed by a series of fluvial sediments. The clay mineral fraction of the lake margin deposits (Bed I and lower part of Bed II) is composed of smectite and subordinate illite. All smectite is largely dioctahedral and shows indications for a limited degree of irregular interstratification by illite. In the overlying fluvial deposits (Beds II-IV), illite is the most abundant clay mineral. Smectite only occurs in lower parts of the fluvial deposits (up to the middle of Bed III), where it generally shows a high degree of irregular interstratification. Differences in clay mineral composition between the lake margin deposits and the fluvial deposits record differences in sediment source area and degree of alteration. Dioctahedral smectite in the lake margin deposits and the oldest fluvial deposits is derived from a region with volcanic material extending to the east and south of the basin, which also supplies a certain amount of illite. Illite in the fluvial deposits of Bed IV originates from an area with a metamorphic bedrock to the west and north. Alteration of detrital clay minerals resulted in Mg-enrichment of dioctahedral smectite in part of the lake margin deposits and partial illitization of smectite in the older fluvial deposits. Formation of clay minerals during diagenesis or soil development is not documented by analysis of the total clay fraction.

  7. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional facies of the Silurian-Devonian interval of the northern Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, K.L.; Geesaman, R.C. ); Wheeler, D. )

    1992-04-01

    The Silurian and Devonian intervals of the northern Central Basin platform area of west Texas and southeastern New Mexico include the Fusselman, Wristen, and Thirtyone formations and the Woodford Shale. The carbonate-rich Fusselman, Wristen, and Thirtyone formations record a transition from ramp to platform deposition. Oolite grainstones of the lower Fusselman Formation were deposited in a ramp setting during an Upper Ordovician/Lower Silurian transgression. The overlying crinoid packstones and grainstones represent shoals that developed along a break in slope separating the evolving platform from a southward-dipping starved basin. By the close of Fusselman deposition, the platform was well developed, with shallow peridtidal mudstones and wackestones, and high-energy grainstones deposited as near-parallel facies tracts over the platform area. The platform system became fully developed during the deposition of the Wristen Formation. Porous dolomitic peridtidal and platform margin facies grade downdip into nonporous, limy and argillaceous open-shelf facies. Platform facies are typified by numerous shallowing-upward parasequences that terminated at subaerial exposure surfaces. The rocks of the Lower Devonian Thirtyone Formation were deposited as a wedge that onlaps the exposed Silurian platform margin. This formation contains a porous, chert-rich, lowstand deposit; a transgressive disconformity; and variably porous, grain-rich highstand deposits representing an overall sea level rise. A major unconformity marks the contact between the karsted upper surface of the Thirtyone Formation and the overlying organic-rich, anoxic Woodford Shale.

  8. Vertical movements of the crust: Case histories from the northern Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gerald M.

    1987-12-01

    Evidence of former deep burial of Ordovician to Devonian strata of the northern Appalachian Basin has been obtained from various techniques of study, including fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures, δ18O, and vitrinite reflectance. Diagenetic minerals indicate paleotemperatures of 100 200 °C. Maximum depths of burial were calculated from the estimated paleotemperatures; a gradient of 26 °C/km was assumed. Silurian strata of the basin are interpreted to have reached maximum burial depths of 5.0 km; Devonian strata in the Catskill Mountains had former burial depths of ˜6.5 km; Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences were buried to >7 km; Middle Ordovician strata had paleodepths of ˜5 km; and Devonian carbonate strata had paleodepths from 4.5 to 5 km. If these strata were buried deeper than previously thought, unexpectedly large amounts of uplift and erosion, ranging from 4.3 to 7 km, must also have taken place to bring these strata to the present land surface. The occurrence of such large-scale vertical movements of the crust and lithosphere must be recognized in paleogeographic reconstructions. Such drastic changes represent isostatic unroofing, with widespread implications for paleogeography of a kind unrecognized at present.

  9. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  10. Hydrogeochemistry of high-fluoride groundwater at Yuncheng Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengcheng; Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope methods were integrated to delineate the spatial distribution and enrichment of fluoride in groundwater at Yuncheng Basin in northern China. One hundred groundwater samples and 10 Quaternary sediment samples were collected from the Basin. Over 69% of the shallow groundwater (with a F(-) concentration of up to 14.1mg/L), 44% of groundwater samples from the intermediate and 31% from the deep aquifers had F(-) concentrations above the WHO provisional drinking water guideline of 1.5mg/L. Groundwater with high F(-) concentrations displayed a distinctive major ion chemistry: Na-rich and Ca-poor with a high pH value and high HCO3(-) content. Hydrochemical diagrams and profiles and hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions indicate that variations in the major ion chemistry and pH are controlled by mineral dissolution, cation exchange and evaporation in the aquifer systems, which are important for F(-) mobilization as well. Leakage of shallow groundwater and/or evaporite (gypsum and mirabilite) dissolution may be the major sources for F(-) in groundwater of the intermediate and deep aquifers. PMID:25478652

  11. Mictomys borealis (northern bog lemming) and the Wisconsin paleoecology of the east-central Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Bell, Christopher J.; Murray, Lyndon K.

    1992-03-01

    Teeth of northern bog lemming, Mictomys borealis, are reported from Cathedral and Smith Creek caves and represent the first Wisconsin remains of the genus from the Great Basin. Specimens from Cathedral Cave, Snake Range, are associated with U-series ages of 24,000 to 15,000 yr B.P. Previous work with pollen and packrat middens, dating to the same age as the Mictomys, indicate that Smith Creek Canyon contained a riparian, locally mesic community, including Picea engelmannii (spruce), Betula sp. (birch), Cercocarpus sp. (mountain mahogany), and Artemisia sp. (sagebrush) among other species. Exposed canyon slopes and the adjacent valley apparently contained a more xeric steppe community including sagebrush and Chenopodiineae species; rocky outcrop permitted Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and P. longaeva (bristlecone pine) to grow adjacent to Lake Bonneville or low in the canyon. The region apparently experienced a dry climate (not necessarily drier than today); however, Smith Creek Canyon was fed by glacial meltwater from Mt. Moriah. The northern bog lemming probably lived only in the riparian community and possibly on the north-facing slope below Cathedral Cave. Few canyons of the Snake Range would have had the unusually mesic conditions found in Smith Creek Canyon.

  12. Spatial distribution of pelagic fish larvae in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roseman, Edward F.; O'Brien, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Larval fish occurrence in inshore and offshore zones in the northern main basin of Lake Huron was assessed during 2007 as part of a larger ecological examination of Lake Huron foodwebs and habitats. Day and night collections using neuston and conical nets at inshore (1.5–15 m depths) and offshore (37 and 91 m depths) locations at De Tour and Hammond Bay to assess the abundance, phenology, and spatial distribution of pelagic ichthyoplankton during spring and early summer were made. In general, densities of larval fishes were higher at De Tour than Hammond Bay during daytime neuston net collections, with the exception of Longnose Sucker, which were only collected at Hammond Bay. Lake Whitefish, Burbot, and Rainbow Smelt dominated inshore catches in early spring with Cisco, Deepwater Sculpin, Emerald Shiner, Bloater, Slimy Sculpin, Ninespine Stickleback, and Yellow Perch larvae also collected. Nighttime nearshore and offshore sampling revealed that Rainbow Smelt and Burbot larvae were present in relatively high abundances compared to inshore densities. Concentrations of larvae of deepwater demersal fishes such as Lake Whitefish and Deepwater Sculpin suggest that inshore zones in northern Lake Huron are important nursery habitats emphasizing a critical production and recruitment linkage between inshore and deepwater zones.

  13. Gravity analysis of the Precambrian basement topography associated with the northern boundary of Ghadames Basin (southern Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaoui, Mohamed; Gabtni, Hakim; Jallouli, Chokri; Jleilia, Ali; Mickus, Kevin Lee; Turki, Mohamed Moncef

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data were analyzed to determine the structural development of the northern boundary of the Ghadames Basin in southern Tunisia. The Ghadames Basin which also occurs in eastern Algeria and northwestern Libya is one of the most prolific hydrocarbon producers in North Africa with several of the largest oil fields occurring along its northern boundary. The Ghadames Basin was formed during a series of tectonic events ranging from the Early Paleozoic to the Early Cenozoic. These tectonic events produced a basin in southern Tunisia that has a complex basement configuration which is not completely known. A residual gravity anomaly map constructed using polynomial trend surfaces, and vertical and horizontal gravity derivative maps indicate that the northern boundary contains a series of maxima and minima anomalies that trend in two prominent directions: northeast-southwest and east-west. The horizontal and vertical derivative gravity anomaly maps indicate that the width of the basement structures range between 10 and 20 km in width. Three-dimensional (3D) Euler deconvolution and 3D forward modeling constrained by well data, one seismic reflection profile and remote sensing data confirm the width of the basement structures and indicates that the depth of basin varies between 1.5 and 5 km, with deeper sections in general more numerous in the southern sections of the boundary. The gravity analysis constrained by the seismic reflection profile and well data implies that the basement topography may have been formed during the Pan African and/or late Mesozoic rifting. However, additional seismic reflection and well data are needed to confirm this conclusion. The discovery of the numerous basement structures suggests that there may exist additional hydrocarbon traps within the northern boundary of the Ghadames Basin.

  14. Provenance and tectonic-paleogeographic evolution: Constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb ages of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic deposits in the northern Sichuan basin, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tongbin; Cheng, Nanfei; Song, Maoshuang

    2016-09-01

    U-Pb ages of 290 new detrital zircons from five Late Triassic-Early Jurassic sandstone samples in the northern Sichuan basin, along with other geological data, are used to constrain the sediment provenance and evaluate tectonic-paleogeographic evolution for the adjacent orogens through/from which these sediments were potentially derived. The Upper Triassic depocenter was located at the front of the Longmen Shan belt, and sediments in the western, southern and eastern Sichuan basin shared the southern North China block (NCB) and Qinling belt with the eastern Songpan-Ganzi terrane of Middle-Upper Triassic via the Longmen Shan belt, whereas the northern part of the basin was fed by dominant South Qinling belt (SQB) and northern Yangtze block and possibly subordinate southern NCB. Also, the youngest population in the northern Sichuan basin has a slightly younger age peak (∼235 Ma) than those (∼270 Ma) in other parts of the basin. During the Early Jurassic, the depocenter was still at the front of the Longmen Shan belt but only northern regions (e.g., SQB and northern Yangtze block) fed the basin. The northern Sichuan basin received less sediments from the southern NCB and more from the SQB and northern Yangtze block during the Early Jurassic than during the Late Triassic. The middle Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons, which likely originated from the North Qinling belt and northern Yangtze block where rocks with these zircons may be unexposed, occur more widely in the Lower Jurassic than in the Upper Triassic. These facts suggest that from the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, it was increasingly difficult for sediments to transport from the NCB into the northern Sichuan basin and the provenance transferred progressively from the southern NCB to both the SQB and northern Yangtze block, implying the continuous South China block-NCB collision during that time.

  15. Land cover changes associated with recent energy development in the Williston Basin; Northern Great Plains, USA.

    PubMed

    Preston, Todd M; Kim, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The Williston Basin in the Northern Great Plains has experienced rapid energy development since 2000. To evaluate the land cover changes resulting from recent (2000-2015) development, the area and previous land cover of all well pads (pads) constructed during this time were determined, the amount of disturbed and reclaimed land adjacent to pads was estimated, land cover changes were analyzed over time for three different well types, and the effects from future development were predicted. The previous land cover of the 12,990ha converted to pads was predominately agricultural (49.5%) or prairie (47.4%) with lesser amounts of developed (2.3%), aquatic (0.5%), and forest (0.4%). Additionally, 12,121ha has likely been disturbed and reclaimed. The area required per gas well remained constant through time while the land required per oil well increased initially and then decreased as development first shifted from conventional to unconventional drilling and then to multi-bore pads. For non-oil-and-gas wells (i.e. stratigraphic test wells, water wells, and injection wells), the area per well increased through time likely due to increased produced water disposal requirements. Future land cover change is expected to be 2.7 times greater than recent development with much of the development occurring in five counties in the core Bakken development area. Direct land cover change and disturbance from recent and expected development are predicted to affect 0.4% of the landscape across the basin; however, in the core Bakken development area, 2.3% of the landscape will be affected including 2.1% of the remaining grassland. Although future development will result in significant land cover change, evolving industry practices and proactive siting decisions, such as development along energy corridors and placing pads in areas previously altered by human activity, have the potential to reduce the ecological effects of future energy development in the Williston Basin. PMID:27318516

  16. Land cover changes associated with recent energy development in the Williston Basin; Northern Great Plains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, Todd M.; Kim, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Williston Basin in the Northern Great Plains has experienced rapid energy development since 2000. To evaluate the land cover changes resulting from recent (2000 – 2015) development, the area and previous land cover of all well pads (pads) constructed during this time was determined, the amount of disturbed and reclaimed land adjacent to pads was estimated, land cover changes were analyzed over time for three different well types, and the effects from future development were predicted. The previous land cover of the 12,990 ha converted to pads was predominately agricultural (49.5%) or prairie (47.4%) with lesser amounts of developed (2.3%), aquatic (0.5%), and forest (0.4%). Additionally, 12,121 ha have likely been disturbed and reclaimed. The area required per gas well remained constant through time while the land required per oil well increased initially and then decreased as development first shifted from conventional to unconventional drilling and then to multi-bore pads. For non-oil-and- gas wells (i.e. stratigraphic test wells, water wells, injection wells, etc.), the area per well increased through time likely due to increased produced water disposal requirements. Future land cover change is expected to be 2.7 times greater than recent development with much of the development occurring in five counties in the core Bakken development area. Direct land cover change and disturbance from recent and expected development are predicted to affect 0.4% of the landscape across the basin; however, in the core Bakken development area, 2.3% of the landscape will be affected including 2.1% of the remaining grassland. Although future development will result in significant land cover change, evolving industry practices and proactive siting decisions, such as development along energy corridors and placing pads in areas previously altered by human activity, have the potential to reduce the ecological effects of future energy development in the Williston Basin.

  17. Stable isotopic signatures of diachronous Andean mountain building from volcanic glass, Condoroma Basin, northern Altiplano, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, J.; Horton, B. K.; Stockli, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    Recent stable isotopic analyses of pedogenic carbonates from the central Altiplano (~18S) suggest that the plateau may have uplifted rapidly between 10 and 6 Ma possibly in response to removal of mantle lithosphere. Climate modeling, however, suggests that gradual uplift may have produced a similar magnitude effect in the stable isotopic system of the central Altiplano in response to attainment of a critical elevation. We present the results of new stable isotope (δD) analyses of volcanic glass from the Condoroma Basin in southern Peru (~15S). Nonmarine sedimentation in this hinterland basin extended from ~20 to ~5 Ma. The basin fill is composed primarily of lacustrine and lake-margin lithofacies but, critically, contains records of multiple volcanic eruptions. Samples of volcanic glass, which hydrates in the presence of surface water within ~10 kyr following eruption, were separated from multiple volcanic levels in two stratigraphic sections. Analysis of the deuterium isotopic composition of the volcanic glass reveals an abrupt and pronounced decrease of approximately 50-70‰ in both stratigraphic sections. Analyses of multiple grain size fractions yield consistent δD values, providing additional confidence in the robustness of the data. (U-Th)/He analysis of zircons separated from volcanic strata indicate that this shift occurred at ~18-14 Ma; earlier than in the central Altiplano. Applying the modern lapse rate implies an elevation increase of ~2.5 km. However, the isotopic shift could be the result of attainment of a threshold elevation, rather than representing a rapid, large-magnitude uplift event. Nevertheless, temporal variations suggest that uplift was not a single, plateau-wide event but rather, that the northern Altiplano was rapidly uplifted or attained the critical elevation prior to the central Altiplano. The possible effects of a diachronous rise in the Andes have not fully been incorporated into climate models. These data point to a diachronous

  18. Structural style and petroleum prospects of the Kuqa depression, northern Tarim basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, C.L.; Hendrix, M.; Sobel, E.; Schulein, B.; Carroll, A.; Chu, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The Kuqa depression is a 400-km {times} 100-km, east-west-trending foredeep basin located on the northern margin of the Tarim craton in northwestern China. A 10-km-thick nonmarine Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary section has accumulated in the basin as the Tian Shan range to the north and has been episodically uplifted and thrust southward, tectonically loading the craton margin and providing source areas for clastic sediments. Regional mapping from Landsat images and field reconnaissance reveal important details of the structural style of the Kuqa depression. The Kuqa depression is characterized by thin-skinned deformation resulting in a series of steep, faulted, elongate folds. Thick, mobile Tertiary shale sequences and an Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary evaporite section in the west form detachment horizons separating disharmonically deformed structural packages. At the southern margin of the depression, the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section overrides faulted Paleozoic strata of the North Tarim uplift. Here, the Neogene Qiulitage anticline extends 250 km along the basin margin. Beginning in 1984, several important oil discoveries have been made in the Paleozoic section on the North Tarim uplift. Analysis of an oil sample indicates its compatibility with a lower Paleozoic marine source. Other potential source rocks in the Kuqa depression include Jurassic oil shales and coals. Sandstone reservoir strata and structural trapping geometries are numerous, but exploration risks are complicated by the presence of the ductile evaporite and shale seals. If nonmarine source rocks are also present in the thick Cenozoic section, the Kuqa depression may be an attractive exploration target.

  19. Crustal structure beneath the Northern Transantarctic Mountains and Wilkes Subglacial Basin: Implications for tectonic origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Samantha E.; Kenyon, Lindsey M.; Graw, Jordan H.; Park, Yongcheol; Nyblade, Andrew A.

    2016-02-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest noncollisional mountain range on Earth. Their origin, as well as the origin of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin (WSB) along the inland side of the TAMs, has been widely debated, and a key constraint to distinguish between competing models is the underlying crustal structure. Previous investigations have examined this structure but have primarily focused on a small region of the central TAMs near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint. In this study, we use data from the new Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute to investigate the crustal structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the TAMs. Using S wave receiver functions and Rayleigh wave phase velocities, crustal thickness and average crustal shear velocity (V>¯s) are resolved within ±4 km and ±0.1 km/s, respectively. The crust thickens from ~20 km near the Ross Sea coast to ~46 km beneath the northern TAMs, which is somewhat thicker than that imaged in previous studies beneath the central TAMs. The crust thins to ~41 km beneath the WSB. V>¯s ranges from ~3.1-3.9 km/s, with slower velocities near the coast. Our findings are consistent with a flexural origin for the TAMs and WSB, where these features result from broad flexure of the East Antarctic lithosphere and uplift along its western edge due to thermal conduction from hotter mantle beneath West Antarctica. Locally, thicker crust may explain the ~1 km of additional topography in the northern TAMs compared to the central TAMs.

  20. The structure of the Chañarcillo Basin: An example of tectonic inversion in the Atacama region, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, F.; Arriagada, C.; Peña, M.; Del Real, I.; Deckart, K.

    2013-03-01

    The Chañarcillo Basin is an Early Cretaceous extensional basin in northern Chile (27-29°S). The folding style of the syn-rift successions along the eastern side of the basin reveals an architecture consisting of a NNE-trending anticline “Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium”, associated with the inversion of the Elisa de Bordos Fault. A set of balanced cross sections and palinspastic restorations across the basin show that a partially inverted “domino-style” half-graben as the structural framework is most appropriate for reproducing the deformation observed at the surface. This inverted system provides a 9-14 km shortening in the basin. The ages of the synorogenic deposits preserved next to the frontal limb of the “Tierra Amarilla Anticlinorium” suggest that basin inversion occurred close to the “K-T” boundary (“K-T” phase of Andean deformation). We propose that tectonic inversion is the fundamental deformation mechanism, and that it emphasizes the regional importance of inherent Mesozoic extensional systems in the evolution of the northern Chilean Andes.

  1. Landsat investigations of the northern Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado: implications for radioactive waste emplacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Jules D.; Simpson, Shirley L.

    1978-01-01

    The first stages of a remote-sensing project on the Paradox basin, part of the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) radioactive waste-emplacement program, consisted of a review and selection of the best available satellite scanner images to use in geomorphologic and tectonic investigations of the region. High-quality Landsat images in several spectral bands (E-2260-17124 and E-5165-17030), taken under low sun angle October 9 and 10, 1975, were processed via computer for planimetric rectification, histogram analysis, linear transformation of radiance values, and edge enhancement. A lineament map of the northern Paradox basin was subsequently compiled at 1:400,000 using the enhanced Landsat base. Numerous previously unmapped northeast-trending lineaments between the Green River and Yellowcat dome; confirmatory detail on the structural control of major segments of the Colorado, Gunnison, and Dolores Rivers; and new evidence for late Phanerozoic reactivation of Precambrian basement structures are among the new contributions to the tectonics of the region. Lineament trends appear to be compatible with the postulated Colorado lineament zone, with geophysical potential-field anomalies, and with a northeast-trending basement fault pattern. Combined Landsat, geologic, and geophysical field evidence for this interpretation includes the sinuousity of the composite Salt Valley anticline, the transection of the Moab-Spanish Valley anticline on its southeastern end by northeast-striking faults, and possible transection (?) of the Moab diapir. Similarly, northeast-trending lineaments in Cottonwood Canyon and elsewhere are interpreted as manifestations of structures associated with northeasterly trends in the magnetic and gravity fields of the La Sal Mountains region. Other long northwesterly lineaments near the western termination of the Ryan Creek fault zone. may be associated with the fault zone separating the Uncompahgre horst uplift from the Paradox basin. Implications of the

  2. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the northern San Joaquin Basin, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Jurgens, Bryant C.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 2,079 square mile Northern San Joaquin Basin (Northern San Joaquin) study unit was investigated from December 2004 through February 2005 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 that was passed by the State of California and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Northern San Joaquin study unit was the third study unit to be designed and sampled as part of the Priority Basin Project. Results of the study provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw (untreated) groundwater, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 61 wells in parts of Alameda, Amador, Calaveras, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus Counties; 51 of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based approach to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 10 of the wells were sampled to increase spatial density and provide additional information for the evaluation of water chemistry in the study unit (understanding/flowpath wells). The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the California Department of Public Health database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource; and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors

  3. Altered volcanic ash partings in Wasatch Formation coal beds of the northern Powder River basin: composition and geologic applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, Bruce Forbes; Phillips, Richard E.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    1979-01-01

    In contrast to the coal-bearing rocks of the Appalachian and Eastern Interior Basins, those of the northern Powder River Basin exhibit more complex stratigraphic and facies relationships, and regional correlations of coal beds are, therefore, more difficult to establish. Recently, however, several coal beds in the Powder River Basin, as well as coal beds in several other coal basins of the Rocky Mountain region, have been found to contain thin but persist·ent layers. of altered volcanic ash described as kaolinitic bentonites (Bohor, 1976, 1977, 1978, Bohor and others, 1976, 1978, Bohor and Pillmore, 1976). These layers serve as isochronous marker horizons which aid in correlating coal beds over broad areas.

  4. Late Cenozoic lacustrine and climatic environments at Tule Lake, northern Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt Bradbury, J.

    1992-01-01

    Cores of lake sediment to a depth of 334 m in the town of Tulelake, Siskiyou County, northern California, document the late Cenozoic paleolimnologic and paleoclimatic history of the northwestern edge of the Great Basin. The cores have been dated by radiometric, tephrochronologic and paleomagnetic analyses. Lacustrine diatoms are abundant throughout the record and document a nearly continuous paleolimnologic history of the Tule Lake basin for the last 3 Myr. During most of this time, this basin (Tule Lake) was a relatively deep, extensive lake. Except for a drier (and cooler?) interval recorded by Fragilaria species about 2.4 Ma, the Pliocene is characterized by a dominance of planktonic Aulacoseira solida implying a warm monomictic lake under a climatic regime of low seasonality. Much of the Pleistocene is dominated by Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria species suggesting a cooler, often drier, and highly variable climate. Benthic diatoms typical of alkaline-enriched saline waters commonly appear after 1.0 Ma, and tephrochronology indicates slow deposition and possible hiatuses between about 0.6 and 0.2 Ma. The chronology of even-numbered oxygen isotope stages approximately matches fluctuations in the abundance of Fragilaria since 800 ka indicating that glacial periods were expressed as drier environments at Tule Lake. Glacial and interglacial environments since 150 ka were distinct from, and more variable than, those occurring earlier. The last full glacial period was very dry, but shortly thereafter Tule Lake became a deep, cool lacustrine system indicating a substantial increase in precipitation. Aulacoseira ambigua characterized the latest glacial and Holocene record of Tule Lake. Its distribution indicates that warmer and wetter climates began about 15 ka in this part of the Great Basin. Diatom concentration fluctuates at 41 000 year intervals between 3.0 and 2.5 Ma and at approximately 100 000 year intervals after 1.0 Ma. In the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene

  5. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-01-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ(18)O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time. PMID:27272610

  6. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N.; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-01-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ18O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time. PMID:27272610

  7. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N.; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-06-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ18O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time.

  8. Oligocene-Miocene deformational and depositional history of the Andean hinterland basin in the northern Altiplano plateau, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.

    2014-09-01

    Cenozoic basin fill of the northern Altiplano plateau records the tectonic development of the flanking Western Cordillera magmatic arc and Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt. The Ayaviri hinterland basin of southern Peru contains a ~2300 m thick succession of fluvial sandstones and overbank siltstones (upper Oligocene Puno Group and lower Miocene lower Tinajani Formation) capped by ~400 m of alluvial fan conglomerates (middle Miocene upper Tinajani Formation). New U-Pb zircon chronostratigraphic constraints from ~30 to 15 Ma yield sediment accumulation rates of 110-660 m/Myr. Newly dated growth strata highlight the genetic role played by thrust displacement in basin evolution. A several phase accumulation history derived from chronostratigraphic, provenance, and structural data reveals Oligocene basin filling by fluvial sand and mud that changes provenance from Western Cordillera Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks to Paleozoic-Mesozoic Eastern Cordillera sedimentary rocks driven by deformation along the southwest directed, northeastern basin margin Ayaviri thrust at 28-26 Ma. Continued early Miocene fluvial deposition was sourced solely from the Eastern Cordillera. An abrupt middle Miocene shift to coarse alluvial fan deposition sourced from the Western Cordillera was driven by out-of-sequence deformation along the northeast directed, southwestern basin margin Pasani thrust at 18-16 Ma. This northern Altiplano out-of-sequence deformation was coincident with increased Eastern and Western Cordillera exhumation and thrusting and may be symptomatic of changes in critical wedge dynamics. The overall record of basin sedimentation and syndepositional fold-thrust deformation emphasizes the role of regional shortening in governing crustal thickening and basin evolution in the central Andes during the Oligocene to Miocene.

  9. Oligocene-Miocene Mammalian Fossils from Hongyazi Basin and Its Bearing on Tectonics of Danghe Nanshan in Northern Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Xie, Guangpu; Yin, An

    2013-01-01

    A shortage of Cenozoic vertebrate fossils in the Tibetan Plateau has been an obstacle in our understanding of biological evolution in response to changes in tectonism, topography, and environment. This is especially true for Paleogene records, so far known by only two sites along the northern rim of the Plateau. We report a Hongyazi Basin in northern Tibetan Plateau that produces at least three mammalian faunas that span Oligocene through late Miocene. Located at the foothills of the Danghe Nanshan and presently connected to the northern margin of the Suganhu Basin through the Greater Haltang River, the intermountain basin is controlled by the tectonics of the Danghe Nanshan to the north and Chahan’ebotu Mountain to the south, making the basin sediments well suited for inferring the evolutionary history of these two mountain ranges. At the bottom of the local section, the Oligocene Haltang Fauna is best compared to the early Oligocene Desmatolagus-Karakoromys decessus assemblage in the Dingdanggou Fauna in Tabenbuluk Basin. The Middle Miocene Ebotu Fauna from the middle Hongyazi section shares many taxa with the late Middle Miocene Tunggur mammal assemblage in Inner Mongolia, such as Heterosminthus orientalis, Megacricetodon sinensis, Democricetodon lindsayi, and Alloptox gobiensis. Toward the top of the section, the Hongyazi Fauna includes late Miocene elements typical of Hipparion faunas of North China. All three faunas are of typical North China-Central Asian characteristics, suggesting a lack of geographic barriers for faunal differentiation through the late Miocene. Sedimentary packages producing these faunas are arrayed from north to south in progressively younger strata, consistent with a compressive regime to accommodate shortening between Danghe Nanshan and Chahan’ebotu Mountain by thrust faults and folds. With additional constraints from vertebrate fossils along the northern flanks of the Danghe Nanshan, an eastward propagation of the Danghe Nanshan

  10. Advances in ammonite biostratigraphy of the marine Atacama basin (Lower Cretaceous), northern Chile, and its relationship with the Neuquén basin, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, Francisco Amaro

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results about the Lower Cretaceous ammonite biostratigraphy of northern Chile reveal eight fossiliferous levels: Lower-Upper Valanginian neocomitid and olcostephanid faunas in the Punta del Cobre and Abundancia Formations and Upper Hauterivian-Barremian crioceratid in the Nantoco, Totoralillo, and Pabellón Formations. The faunal affinities with the Neuquén are strong during the Valanginian and Hauterivian. In contrast, during the Barremian and Aptian, the ammonites show affinities with Austral, California, and Tethys basinal faunas. The Lower Valanginian-lower Upper Aptian series in northern Chile comprises two sedimentary cycles separated by a regressive pulse of Upper Hauterivian-Lower Barremian age. This pulse may be equivalent to the regression that ended the Early Cretaceous marine cycle in central Chile and central west Argentina, where the second marine sedimentary cycle observed in northern Chile is not represented.

  11. Late Pliocene-Quaternary evolution of outermost hinterland basins of the Northern Apennines (Italy), and their relevance to active tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Federico; Bonini, Marco; Piccardi, Luigi; Vannucci, Gianfranco; Delle Donne, Dario; Benvenuti, Marco; Moratti, Giovanna; Corti, Giacomo; Montanari, Domenico; Sedda, Lorenzo; Tanini, Chiara

    2009-10-01

    We examine the tectonic evolution and structural characteristics of the Quaternary intermontane Mugello, Casentino, and Sansepolcro basins, in the Northern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. These basins have been classically interpreted to have developed under an extensional regime, and to mark the extension-compression transition. The results of our study have instead allowed framing the formation of these basins into a compressive setting tied to the activity of backthrust faults at their northeastern margin. Syndepositional activity of these structures is manifested by consistent architecture of sediments and outcrop-scale deformation. After this phase, the Mugello and Sansepolcro basins experienced a phase of normal faulting extending from the middle Pleistocene until Present. Basin evolution can be thus basically framed into a two-phase history, with extensional tectonics superposed onto compressional structures. Analysis of morphologic features has revealed the occurrence of fresh fault scarps and interaction of faulting with drainage systems, which have been interpreted as evidence for potential ongoing activity of normal faults. Extensional tectonics is also manifested by recent seismicity, and likely caused the strong historical earthquakes affecting the Mugello and Sansepolcro basins. Qualitative comparison of surface information with depth-converted seismic data suggests the basins to represent discrete subsiding areas within the seismic belt extending along the axial zone of the Apennines. The inferred chronology of deformation and the timing of activity of normal faults have an obvious impact on the elaboration of seismic hazard models.

  12. Assessment of metallic mineral resources in the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada, with a section on Platinum-Group-Element (PGE) Potential of the Humboldt Mafic Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.; Ludington, Steve; Mihalasky, Mark J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Theodore, Ted G.; Ponce, David A.; John, David A.; and Berger, Byron R.; Zientek, Michael L.; Sidder, Gary B.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The Humboldt River Basin is an arid to semiarid, internally drained basin that covers approximately 43,000 km2 in northern Nevada. The basin contains a wide variety of metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits and occurrences, and, at various times, the area has been one of the Nation's leading or important producers of gold, silver, copper, mercury, and tungsten. Nevada currently (2003) is the third largest producer of gold in the world and the largest producer of silver in the United States. Current exploration for additional mineral deposits focuses on many areas in northern Nevada, including the Humboldt River Basin.

  13. Late cenozoic lacustrine and climatic environments at Tule Lake, northern Great Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Cores of lake sediment to a depth of 334 m in the town of Tulelake, northern California, document the late Cenozic paleolimnologic and paleoclimatic history of the northwestern Great Basin. Lacustrine diatoms are abundant throughout the record documenting a nearly continuous paleolimnologic history of the Tule Lake basin. Except for a drier (and cooler?) interval recorded by Fragilaria species about 2.4 Ma, the Pliocene is characterized by a dominance of planktonic Aulacoseira solida implying a warm monomictic lake under a climatic regime of low seasonality. Much of the Pleistocene is dominated by Stephanodiscus and Fragilaria species suggesting a cooler, drier, and highly variable climate. Benthic diatoms typical of alkaline-enriched saline waters commonly appear after 1.0 Ma, and tephrochronology indicates slow deposition and possible hiatuses between about 0.6 and 0.2 Ma. The chronology of even-numbered oxygen isotope stages approximately matches fluctuations in the abundance of Fragilaria since 800 ka indicating that glacial periods were drier environments at Tule Lake. Glacial and interglacial environments since 150 ka were distinct from, and more variable than, those occurring earlier. The last full glacial period was very dry, but shortly Tule Lake became a deep, cool lacustrine system indicating a substantial increase in precipitation. Aulacoseira ambigua characterized the latest glacial and Holocene record of Tule Lake, indicating that warmer and wetter climates began about 15 ka. Diatom concentration fluctuates at 41000 year intervals between 3.0 and 2.5 Ma and at approximately 100000 year intervals after 1.0 Ma. In the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, Aulacoseira solida percentages wax and wane in an approximately 400000 year cycle. The possible response of Tule Lake diatom communities to orbitally-induced insolation cycles underscores the importance of this record for the study of late Cenozoic paleoclimate change. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Effects of precipitation and potential evaporation on actual evapotranspiration over the Laohahe basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Ren, L.; Yang, X.; Ma, M.; Yuan, F.; Jiang, S.

    2015-06-01

    Problems associated with water scarcity are facing new challenges under the climate change. As one of main consumptions in water cycle on the Earth, evapotranspiration plays a crucial role in regional water budget. In this paper, we employ two methods, i.e. hydrological sensitivity analysis and hydrological model simulation, to investigate the effect of climate variability and climatic change on actual evapotranspiration (Ea) within the Laohahe basin during 1964-2009. Calibrations of the two methods are firstly conducted during the baseline period (1964-1979), then with the two benchmarked models, simulations in climatic change duration (1980-2009) are further conducted and quantitative assessments on climatic change-induced variation of Ea are analysed accordingly. The results show that affected by combined impacts of decreased precipitation and potential evapotranspiration, variation of annual Ea in most sub-catchments suffer a downward trend during 1980-2009, with a higher descending rate in northern catchments. At decadal scale, Ea shows significant oscillation in accordance with precipitation patterns. Northern catchments generally suffer more decadal Ea changes than southern catchments, implying the impact of climatic change on decadal Ea is more intense in semi-arid areas than that in semi-humid regions. For whole changed durations, a general 0-20 mm reduction of Ea is found in most parts of studied region. For this water-limited region, Ea shows higher sensitivity to precipitation than to potential evaporation, which confirms the significant role of precipitation in controlling Ea patterns, whereas the impact of potential evapotranspiration variation would be negligible.

  15. Fine-grained suspended sediment source identification for the Kharaa River basin, northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Michael; Theuring, Philipp; Collins, Adrian L.

    2015-04-01

    Fine sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and heavy metals and have a strong impact on the water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes, including those in semiarid regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in Central Asia. Accordingly, a sediment source fingerprinting technique was used to assess the spatial sources of fine-grained (<10 microns) sediment in the 15 000 km2 Kharaa River basin in northern Mongolia. Five field sampling campaigns in late summer 2009, and spring and late summer in both 2010 and 2011, were conducted directly after high water flows, to collect an overall total of 900 sediment samples. The work used a statistical approach for sediment source discrimination with geochemical composite fingerprints based on a new Genetic Algorithm (GA)-driven Discriminant Function Analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis H-test and Principal Component Analysis. The composite fingerprints were subsequently used for numerical mass balance modelling with uncertainty analysis. The contributions of the individual sub-catchment spatial sediment sources varied from 6.4% (the headwater sub-catchment of Sugnugur Gol) to 36.2% (the Kharaa II sub-catchment in the middle reaches of the study basin) with the pattern generally showing higher contributions from the sub-catchments in the middle, rather than the upstream, portions of the study area. The importance of riverbank erosion was shown to increase from upstream to midstream tributaries. The source tracing procedure provides results in reasonable accordance with previous findings in the study region and demonstrates the general applicability and associated uncertainties of an approach for fine-grained sediment source investigation in large scale semi-arid catchments. The combined application of source fingerprinting and catchment modelling approaches can be used to assess whether tracing estimates are

  16. High resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Late Miocene Abu Madi Formation, Northern Nile Delta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Mohammad Abdelfattah

    2015-12-01

    Abu Madi Formation represents the Upper Miocene Messinian age in the Nile Delta basin. It consists mainly of sandstones and shale intercalations and because of its richness in hydrocarbon, it has been subdivided by the petroleum companies into Level-I, Level-II and Level-III, respectively according to the increase in the sandstone to the shale ratio. The Miocene cycle in the northern subsurface section of the Nile Delta encompasses three main formations namely from the base; Sidi Salim formation, Qawasim Formation and Abu Madi Formation at the top. The high resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis, using gamma ray responses, has been done for the Late Miocene formation in the northern part of the Nile delta subsurface section. For this purpose, the gamma-ray logs of ten deep wells, arranged in four cross-sections trending in almost north-south direction throughout the northern region of the Nile Delta, were analyzed. The analysis has revealed that the interpreted 4th order depositional cycles within Abu Madi Formation display great variations in both number and gamma ray responses in each investigated well, and cannot be traced laterally, even in the nearest well. These variations in the interpreted 4th order depositional sequences could be attributed to the presence of normal faults buried in the inter-area laying between the investigated wells. This finding matches with the conclusion of that Abu Madi Formation represents a part of the Upper Miocene Nile Delta syn-rift megasequence, developed during the Upper Miocene rift phase of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez province in Egypt. Accordingly, in the sequence stratigraphic approach, the depositional history of Abu Madi Formation was strongly overprinted by the tectonic controls rather than the relative sea-level changes which are assumed to be of a secondary influence. Regarding the hydrocarbon aspects of the Abu Madi Formation, the present work recommends to direct the drilling efforts into the stratigraphic traps

  17. Preliminary study of the uranium potential of the northern part of the Durham Triassic Basin, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.B.; Thayer, P.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a four-channel spectrometric survey of the northern part of the Durham Triassic basin and adjacent Piedmont, North Carolina. Gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were obtained at 112 localities from 136 different lithologies. The nominal sampling density in the Durham Basin is one site per 2 mi/sup 2/. Surface radiometric surveys reveal no anomalous radioactivity in the northern part of the Durham Basin. Uranium concentrations in Triassic rocks are from 0.6 to 9.7 ppM and average 2.9 ppM. Mudrocks contain from 1.3 to 9.7 ppM, and the average is 4.5 ppM. Sandstones contain from 0.6 to 8.8 ppM, and the average is 2.5 ppM. Fanglomerates contain the lowest concentrations of uranium, from 1.4 to 2.0 ppM, for an average of 1.8 ppM. Uranium/thorium ratios average 0.27 for Triassic rocks and are from 0.04 to 1.85. The mean log uranium/log thorium for Triassic rocks is 0.37. Mudrock has the highest average uranium/thorium ratio (0.32), and the range is 0.09 to 0.66. Sandstones have an average uranium/thorium ratio of 0.26, and the range is 0.04 to 1.85. Fanglomerates have the lowest range uranium/thorium ratio (0.19), and the range is 0.12 to 0.19. On the basis of surface radiometric surveys and geologic studies, it is believed that sedimentary strata in the northern part of the Durham Basin are poor targets for further uranium exploration. This conclusion is based on the lack of favorable characteristics commonly present in fluvial uranium deposits. Among these are: (1) carbonaceous material is absent in Triassic rocks of the northern basin, (2) indicators of a reduzate facies in sandstones are not present, and (3) no tuffaceous beds are associated with sediments in the northern Durham Basin.

  18. Peat accumulation in drained thermokarst lake basins in continuous, ice-rich permafrost, northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Miriam C.; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Anthony, Katey Walter

    2012-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and peat-accumulating drained lake basins cover a substantial portion of Arctic lowland landscapes, yet the role of thermokarst lake drainage and ensuing peat formation in landscape-scale carbon (C) budgets remains understudied. Here we use measurements of terrestrial peat thickness, bulk density, organic matter content, and basal radiocarbon age from permafrost cores, soil pits, and exposures in vegetated, drained lake basins to characterize regional lake drainage chronology, C accumulation rates, and the role of thermokarst-lake cycling in carbon dynamics throughout the Holocene on the northern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Most detectable lake drainage events occurred within the last 4,000 years with the highest drainage frequency during the medieval climate anomaly. Peat accumulation rates were highest in young (50–500 years) drained lake basins (35.2 g C m−2 yr−1) and decreased exponentially with time since drainage to 9 g C m−2 yr−1 in the oldest basins. Spatial analyses of terrestrial peat depth, basal peat radiocarbon ages, basin geomorphology, and satellite-derived land surface properties (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF)) from Landsat satellite data revealed significant relationships between peat thickness and mean basin NDVI or MNF. By upscaling observed relationships, we infer that drained thermokarst lake basins, covering 391 km2 (76%) of the 515 km2 study region, store 6.4–6.6 Tg organic C in drained lake basin terrestrial peat. Peat accumulation in drained lake basins likely serves to offset greenhouse gas release from thermokarst-impacted landscapes and should be incorporated in landscape-scale C budgets.

  19. Geologic evolution and aspects of the petroleum geology of the northern East China Sea shelf basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.H.; Kim, B.Y.; Shin, K.S.; Sunwoo, D.

    2006-02-15

    Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles reveals that the northern East China Sea shelf basin experienced two phases of rifting, followed by regional subsidence. The initial rifting in the Late Cretaceous created a series of grabens and half grabens, filled by alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposits. Regional uplift and folding (Yuquan movement) in the late Eocene-early Oligocene terminated the initial rifting. Rifting resumed in the early Oligocene, while alluvial and fluviolacustrine deposition continued to prevail. A second phase of uplift in the early Miocene terminated the rifting, marking the transition to the postrift phase. The early postrift phase (early Miocene-late Miocene) is characterized by regional subsidence and westward and northwestward marine transgression. Inversion (Longjing movement) in the late Miocene interrupted the postrift subsidence, resulting in an extensive thrust-fold belt in the eastern part of the area. The entire area entered a stage of regional subsidence again and has become a broad continental shelf. Source rocks include synrift lacustrine facies, fluvial shales, and coal beds. Synrift fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic deposits, postrift littoral and/or shallow-marine sandstones, and fractured basement have the potential to provide reservoirs. Various types of hydrocarbon traps (e.g., faulted anticlines, overthrusts, rollover anticlines, faults, unconformity traps, combination structural-stratigraphic traps, weathered basement, and stratigraphic traps) are recognized, but many of these traps have not been tested.

  20. Post-Laramide uplift and erosional history of northern Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Conel, J.E.; Lang, H.R.; Paylor, E.D.

    1985-02-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral scanner images together with aerial photographs have been used to infer Laramide to Holocene tectonic events along the northern fringe of Wind River basin near Wind River Canyon, Wyoming. TM images reveal the presence of a large system of alluvial fans, terraces, and residual tongue-shaped debris deposits covering an area of 90 mi/sup 2/ at the base of Copper Mountain. The debris system contains predominantly dark metasedimentary clasts. Both Eocene (Wind River and Wagon Bed Formations) and Quaternary deposits are present, and some Eocene gravel has been reworked into the later units. These deposits contrast sharply in brightness and color with rocks in adjacent areas. Detailed topographic analysis of the terraces and fan remnants disclosed an episodic history of post-Wagon Bed (upper to middle Eocene) uplift and pediment cutting. At least 3 principal stages covering a vertical interval possibly as great as 1300 ft have been identified. Soil profiles in Quaternary gravels capping the pediments show increase in maturity consistent with age inferred from topographic elevations. These local erosional stages may record tectonic events of regional significance. Their absolute ages need to be determined.

  1. Lithologic variations and diagenesis of Lower Cretaceous Muddy Formation in northern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.L.; Patterson, P.E.

    1986-08-01

    Regional facies studies show that sandstones in the Muddy Formation, northern Powder River basin, were deposited in fluvial and nearshore marine paleoenvironments. Most sandstones of the fluvial facies contain only minor amounts of clay matrix and are classified as quartzarenite or sublitharenite, whereas those of the shoreface facies contain appreciable clay and are classified as litharenite or arkose. The arkoses are concentrated along a narrow belt that trends northeastward, parallel to the inferred paleoshoreline. Both the fluvial and shoreface sandstones have been variably affected by postdepositional alteration. During early stages of diagenesis, matrix clay was formed predominantly within the shoreface sandstones, owing mainly to alteration of volcanic material. Later, quartz overgrowths and calcite cement were precipitated within the remaining pore spaces in both fluvial and shoreface sandstones. Calcite also replaced detrital framework grains and some of the previously formed matrix clay. During intermediate diagenetic stages, detrital feldspar grains, particularly those in the arkosic shoreface sandstones, were replaced by albite, which characteristically lacks twinning or displays distinctive chessboard texture. Microprobe analyses indicate that both forms are essentially pure albite. During later stages of diagenesis, following maximum burial, much of the calcite was dissolved, producing secondary porosity. Inasmuch as the calcite was precipitated early, i.e., prior to significant compaction, and inasmuch as it replaced both framework grains and authigenic matrix clay, the secondary pores exhibit a relatively high level of interconnection. It is this secondary porosity that has contributed to the migration and storage of hydrocarbons in the Muddy Formation.

  2. New palynological data from Karoo sediments, Mana Pools basin, northern Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Engelbronner, E. R.

    1996-07-01

    The palynological associations of 16 Karoo samples, collected in the Mana Pools basin, Northern Zimbabwe, were studied, and four zonal assemblages can be recognized. Assemblage I (Kondo Pools Formation) is dominated by monosaccate pollen grains and diverse alete bisaccate pollen grains occur frequently. Important but rare marker genera include Limitisporites, Vittatina and Weylandites. These indicate a middle to late Early Permian age (e.g. Late Sakmarian to Early Artinskian). The palynological assemblage, derived from the Massive Sandstone Member, Angwa Sandstone Formation, is characterized by a small number of smooth and apiculate spores, but is lacking any age significant marker taxa. Assemblages II and III, both from the Alternations Member (Angwa Sandstone Formation), and Assemblage IV (Pebbly Arkose Formation) are dominated by alete bisaccate and multitaeniate pollen grains. The rare occurrence of Vittatina, Weylandites lucifer and Guttulapollenites hannonicus indicates a Late Permian to Early Triassic age for Assemblage II. Based on sedimentological data and literature, a preliminary age of Early Triassic (Induan) can be given. A range from latest Fassanian (Ladinian) to Lacian (Norian) for Assemblage III is indicated by the occurrence of Asseretospora gyrata, Cadargasporites senectus, Eucommiidites, Infernopollenites, Minutosaccus crenulatus, Retisulcites perforatus and Samaropollenites speciosus. Small amounts of Asseretospora gyrata, Cadargasporites senectus, Cycadopites, Microcachryidites and Minutosaccus crenulatus indicate a slightly larger age range for Assemblage IV (e.g. Carnien to Rhaetian).

  3. Provenance and accommodation pathways of late Quaternary sediments in the deep-water northern Ionian Basin, southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Francesco; Critelli, Salvatore; Dominici, Rocco; Muto, Francesco; Tripodi, Vincenzo; Ceramicola, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    The northern Calabria along the southeastern coast of Italy provides a favorable setting in which to study complete transects from continental to deep-marine environments. The present northern Ionian Calabrian Basin is a wedge-top basin within the modern foreland-basin system of southern Italy. The Ionian margin of northern Calabria consists of a moderately developed fluvial systems, the Crati and Neto rivers, and diverse smaller coastal drainages draining both the Calabria continental block (i.e., Sila Massif) and the southern Apennines thrust belt (i.e., Pollino Massif). The main-channel sand of the Crati and Neto rivers is quartzofeldspathic with abundant metamorphic and plutonic lithic fragments (granodiorite, granite, gneiss, phyllite and sedimentary lithic fragments). Sedimentary lithic fragments were derived from Jurassic sedimentary successions of the Longobucco Group. The mud samples contain mostly phyllosilicates, quartz, calcite, feldspars and dolomite. Traces of gypsum are present in some samples. The I-S mixed layers, 10 Å-minerals (illite and micas), chlorite and kaolinite are the most abundant phyllosilicates, whereas smectite and chlorite/smectite mixed layers are in small amounts. The geochemical signatures of the muds reflect a provenance characterized by both felsic and mafic rocks with a significant input from carbonate rocks. Furthermore, the degree of source-area weathering was most probably of low intensity rather than moderately intense because CIA values for the studied mud samples are low. Extrapolation of the mean erosion budget from 1 to 25 Ma suggests that at least 5 to 8 km of crust have been removed from the Calabrian orogenic belt and deposited in the marine basins. The Calabrian microplate played an important role in the dynamic evolution of southern Italian fossil and modern basins, representing the key tectonic element of the entire orogenic belt.

  4. Precipitation thresholds for triggering floods in Corgo hydrographic basin (Northern Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Monica; Fragoso, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation is a major cause of natural hazards and is therefore related to the flood events (Borga et al., 2011; Gaál et al., 2014; Wilhelmi & Morss, 2013). The severity of a precipitation event and their potential damage is dependent on the total amount of rain but also on the intensity and duration event (Gaál et al., 2014). In this work, it was established thresholds based on critical combinations: amount / duration of flood events with daily rainfall data for Corgo hydrographic basin, in northern Portugal. In Corgo basin are recorded 31 floods events between 1865 and 2011 (Santos et al., 2015; Zêzere et al., 2014). We determined the minimum, maximum and pre-warning thresholds that define the boundaries so that an event may occur. Additionally, we applied these thresholds to different flood events occurred in the past in the study basin. The results show that the ratio between the flood events and precipitation events that occur above the minimum threshold has relatively low probability of a flood happen. These results may be related to the reduced number of floods events (only those that caused damage reported by the media and produced some type of damage). The maximum threshold is not useful for floods forecasting, since the majority of true positives are below this limit. The retrospective analysis of the thresholds defined suggests that the minimum and pre warning thresholds are well adjusted. The application of rainfall thresholds contribute to minimize possible situations of pre-crisis or immediate crisis, reducing the consequences and the resources involved in emergency response of flood events. References Borga, M., Anagnostou, E. N., Blöschl, G., & Creutin, J. D. (2011). Flash flood forecasting, warning and risk management: the HYDRATE project. Environmental Science & Policy, 14(7), 834-844. doi: 10.1016/j.envsci.2011.05.017 Gaál, L., Molnar, P., & Szolgay, J. (2014). Selection of intense rainfall events based on intensity thresholds and

  5. The Post-Permian evolution of the Northern Part of the North German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M. B.; Huebscher, C.; Lykke-Andersen, H.; Gajewski, D.; Dehghani, A.; Reicherter, K.

    2004-12-01

    In the frame of the Priority Program 1135 of the German Research Foundation (DFG) "Dynamics of sedimentary systems under varying stress conditions by example of the Central European Basin System", the scientific goal of the NeoBaltic project is to describe the post-Permian to recent geological evolution of the entire western Baltic Sea region, with a special emphasis on neotectonic activity and it relation to salt dynamics. The western Baltic Sea comprises the northern part of the North German Basin (NGB), a part of the Central European Basin System (CEBS), and the transitional zone between the NGB and the Baltic Shield. In order to investigate these scientific goals the Universities of Aarhus (Denmark) and Hamburg (Germany) has since 1998 completed seven marine campaigns in the western Baltic Sea, collecting 2D high resolution seismic (HRS), gravity and magnetic data in the entire region during different projects. Since 2003 all these data has been available for the NeoBaltic project. All together the data pool have more than 7000 km HRS, 5000 km gravity and 4000 km magnetic data. Until now the project work has been focused on the completion of the data processing and the digital interpretation of important Mesozoic and Cenozoic markers on the seismic sections from the Bays of Kiel and Mecklenburg. Furthermore, several maps have been completed from the potential field data (gravity and magnetic). As a result of the digital interpretation of the HRS data, the overall geological evolution of the northern part of the NGB can be subdivided into four distinct periods. During the Triassic and the Early Jurassic, E-W extension and the deposition of clastic sediments initiated the movement of the underlying Zechstein evaporites. This is seen by the presence of several salt pillows in the region. The deposition ceased during the Middle Jurassic, when the entire area was uplifted, due to the Mid North Sea Doming. The uplift resulted in a pronounced erosion of Upper Triassic

  6. Northern latitude chemical weathering rates: clues from the Mackenzie River Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Romain; Gaillardet, J. érôme; Dupré, Bernard; Allègre, Claude Jean

    2003-04-01

    The main scope of this study is to investigate parameters controlling chemical weathering rates for a large river system submitted to subarctic climate. More than 110 river water samples from the Mackenzie River system (northern Canada) have been sampled and analyzed for major and trace elements and Sr isotopic ratios in the dissolved phase. The three main morphological units are reflected in water chemistry. Rivers from the Canadian Shield are very dilute, dominated by silicate weathering (Millot et al., 2002), whereas the rivers of the Rocky and Mackenzie Mountains as well as the rivers of the sedimentary Interior Platform are dominated by carbonate weathering and are SO 4 rich. Compared to the rivers of the Mackenzie and Rocky Mountains, the rivers of the interior plains are organic, silica, and Na rich and constitute the dominant input term to the Mackenzie River mainstream. Rivers of the Canadian Shield area do not significantly contribute to the Mackenzie River system. Using elemental ratios and Sr isotopic ratios, a mathematical inversion procedure is presented that distinguishes between solutes derived from silicate weathering and solutes derived from carbonate weathering. Carbonate weathering rates are mostly controlled by runoff, which is higher in the mountainous part of the Mackenzie basin. These rates are comparable to the carbonate weathering rates of warmer areas of the world. It is possible that part of the carbonate weathering is controlled by sulfide oxidative weathering, but its extent remains difficult to assess. Conversely to what was stated by Edmond and Huh (1997), overall silicate weathering rates in the Mackenzie basin are low, ranging from 0.13 to 4.3 tons/km 2/yr (Na + K + Ca + Mg), and confirm the negative action of temperature on silicate weathering rates for river basins in cold climates. In contrast to what has been observed in other large river systems such as the Amazon and Ganges Rivers, silicate weathering rates appear 3 to 4

  7. Timing, distribution, amount, and style of Cenozoic extension in the northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, Christopher D.; McGrew, Allen J.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Snoke, Arthur W.; Brueseke, Matthew E.

    2011-01-01

    This field trip examines contrasting lines of evidence bearing on the timing and structural style of Cenozoic (and perhaps late Mesozoic) extensional deformation in northeastern Nevada. Studies of metamorphic core complexes in this region report extension beginning in the early Cenozoic or even Late Cretaceous, peaking in the Eocene and Oligocene, and being largely over before the onset of “modern” Basin and Range extension in the middle Miocene. In contrast, studies based on low-temperature thermochronology and geologic mapping of Eocene and Miocene volcanic and sedimentary deposits report only minor, localized extension in the Eocene, no extension at all in the Oligocene and early Miocene, and major, regional extension in the middle Miocene. A wealth of thermochronologic and thermobarometric data indicate that the Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex (RMEH) underwent ~170 °C of cooling and 4 kbar of decompression between ca. 85 and ca. 50 Ma, and another 450 °C cooling and 4–5 kbar decompression between ca. 50 and ca. 21 Ma. These data require ~30 km of exhumation in at least two episodes, accommodated at least in part by Eocene to early Miocene displacement on the major west-dipping mylonitic zone and detachment fault bounding the RMEH on the west (the mylonitic zone may also have been active during an earlier phase of crustal extension). Meanwhile, Eocene paleovalleys containing 45–40 Ma ash-flow tuffs drained eastward from northern Nevada to the Uinta Basin in Utah, and continuity of these paleovalleys and infilling tuffs across the region indicate little, if any deformation by faults during their deposition. Pre–45 Ma deformation is less constrained, but the absence of Cenozoic sedimentary deposits and mappable normal faults older than 45 Ma is also consistent with only minor (if any) brittle deformation. The presence of ≤1 km of late Eocene sedimentary—especially lacustrine—deposits and a low-angle angular

  8. Asynchronous timing of extension and basin formation in the South Rhodope core complex, SW Bulgaria, and northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stübner, Konstanze; Drost, Kerstin; Schoenberg, Ronny; Böhme, Madelaine; Starke, Jessica; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2016-01-01

    Upper crustal extensional structures range from steep normal faults to shallow-dipping detachments. The relationship between extension and formation of synkinematic hanging wall basins including their relative timing is not well understood. The South Rhodope core complex, Southern Balkans, has experienced extension for >40 Ma leading to a number of extensional structures and Cenozoic sedimentary basins. We present new bedrock and basin detrital zircon and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He ages from the Pirin and Rila Mountains and the Sandanski basin. Results identify three episodes of Cenozoic extension in SW Bulgaria accommodated by (1) the Eocene/Oligocene Mesta detachment; (2) the early to middle Miocene Gorno Spanchevo fault (circa 18-15 Ma), which is the northern prolongation of the Strymon low-angle detachment; and (3) the late Miocene West Pirin fault (≤10 Ma). Detachment faulting on the Strymon fault accommodated tens of kilometers of ENE-WSW extension and created ~1500 m topographic relief, but because the resulting hillslopes were gentle (≤10°), extension did not lead to enhanced footwall erosion or formation of a hanging wall basin. In contrast, the West Pirin normal fault resulted in mostly vertical motion of its footwall causing steep topography, rapid erosion, and formation of the synrift Sandanski basin. Digital topographic analysis of river channel profiles identifies the latest episodes of deformation including westward tilting of the Sandanski and Strymon basins and Quaternary N-S extension. This study demonstrates that basin formation in the South Rhodope core complex is related to normal faulting postdating the main episode of crustal stretching by detachment faulting.

  9. Depositional and provenance record of the Paleogene transition from foreland to hinterland basin evolution during Andean orogenesis, northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Christopher J.; Horton, Brian K.; Caballero, Victor; Mora, Andrés; Parra, Mauricio; Sierra, Jair

    2011-10-01

    The Central Cordillera and Eastern Cordillera of the northern Andes form the topographic flanks of the north-trending Magdalena Valley Basin. Constraining the growth of these ranges and intervening basin has implications for Andean shortening and the transformation from a foreland to hinterland basin configuration. We present sedimentological, paleocurrent, and sandstone petrographic results from Cenozoic type localities to provide insights into the tectonic history of the northern Middle Magdalena Valley Basin of Colombia. In the Nuevo Mundo Syncline, the mid-Paleocene transition from marine to nonmarine deposystems of the Lisama Formation corresponds with a paleocurrent shift from northward to eastward transport. These changes match detrital geochronological evidence for a contemporaneous shift from cratonic (Amazonian) to orogenic (Andean) provenance, suggesting initial shortening-related uplift of the Central Cordillera and foreland basin generation in the Magdalena Valley by mid-Paleocene time. Subsequent establishment of a meandering fluvial system is recorded in lower-middle Eocene strata of the lower La Paz Formation. Eastward paleocurrents in mid-Paleocene through uppermost Eocene fluvial deposits indicate a continuous influence of western sediment source areas. However, at the upper middle Eocene (˜40 Ma) boundary between the lower and upper La Paz Formation, sandstone compositions show a drastic decrease in lithic content, particularly lithic volcanic fragments. This change is accompanied by a facies shift from mixed channel and overbank facies to thick, amalgamated braided fluvial deposits of possible fluvial megafans, reflecting changes in both the composition and proximity of western sediment sources. We attribute these modifications to the growing influence of exhumed La Cira-Infantas paleohighs in the axial Magdalena Valley, features presently buried beneath upper Eocene-Quaternary basin fill along the western flank of the Nuevo Mundo Syncline. In

  10. California GAMA Program: Ground-Water Quality Data in the Northern San Joaquin Basin Study Unit, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing concern over the closure of public-supply wells because of ground-water contamination has led the State Water Board to establish the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. With the aid of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the program goals are to enhance understanding and provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where ground water is an important source of drinking water. The Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit covers an area of approximately 2,079 square miles (mi2) across four hydrologic study areas in the San Joaquin Valley. The four study areas are the California Department of Water Resources (CADWR) defined Tracy subbasin, the CADWR-defined Eastern San Joaquin subbasin, the CADWR-defined Cosumnes subbasin, and the sedimentologically distinct USGS-defined Uplands study area, which includes portions of both the Cosumnes and Eastern San Joaquin subbasins. Seventy ground-water samples were collected from 64 public-supply, irrigation, domestic, and monitoring wells within the Northern San Joaquin Basin GAMA study unit. Thirty-two of these samples were collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin study area, 17 in the Tracy Basin study area, 10 in the Cosumnes Basin study area, and 11 in the Uplands Basin study area. Of the 32 samples collected in the Eastern San Joaquin Basin, 6 were collected using a depth-dependent sampling pump. This pump allows for the collection of samples from discrete depths within the pumping well. Two wells were chosen for depth-dependent sampling and three samples were collected at varying depths within each well. Over 350 water-quality field parameters, chemical constituents, and microbial constituents were analyzed and are reported as concentrations and as detection frequencies, by compound classification as well as for individual constituents, for the Northern San Joaquin Basin study unit as a whole and for each individual study area

  11. The architecture of an incipient oceanic basin: a tentative reconstruction of the Jurassic Liguria-Piemonte basin along the Northern Apennines-Alpine Corsica transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroni, Michele; Pandolfi, Luca

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a scenario for the early evolution of the Jurassic oceanic Liguria-Piemonte basin is sketched. For this purpose, four selected examples of ophiolite sequences from the Northern Apennines and Corsica are described and analyzed. In the External Ligurian units (Northern Apennines), the ocean-continent transition of the Adria plate was characterized by a basement made up of subcontinental mantle and lower continental crust, covered by extensional allochthons of upper crust. Both, the basement rocks and the extensional allochthons are cut by basaltic dikes and covered by basalts and pelagic deposits. The conjugate ocean-continent transition of the Corsica margin, represented by the Balagne nappe (Corsica), was composed of mantle peridotites and gabbros covered by basaltic flows and minor breccias, that in addition include continent-derived clasts. By contrast, the innermost (i.e., closest to the ocean) preserved area observed in the Internal Ligurian (Northern Apennines) and Inzecca (Corsica) units consists of former morphological highs of mantle peridotites and gabbros, bordered by small basins where the basement is covered by a volcano-sedimentary complex, characterized by ophiolitic breccias and cherts interlayered with basaltic flows. The overall picture resulting from our reconstructions suggests an asymmetric architecture for the Liguria-Piemonte basin with a central area bounded by two different transition zones toward the continental margins. This architecture can be interpreted as the result of a rifting process whose development includes a final stage characterized by passive, asymmetric extension of the lithosphere along an east-dipping detachment fault system.

  12. Deglacial and postglacial evolution of the Pingualuit Crater Lake basin, northern Québec (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiage, Pierre-Arnaud; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Normandeau, Alexandre; Ledoux, Grégoire; Guyard, Hervé; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    The Pingualuit Crater, located in the Ungava Peninsula (northern Québec, Canada) is a 1.4-Ma-old impact crater hosting a ~ 245-m-deep lake. The lake has a great potential to preserve unique paleoclimatic and paleoecological sedimentary records of the last glacial/interglacial cycles in the terrestrial Canadian Arctic. In order to investigate the stratigraphy in the lake and the late Quaternary glacial history of the Pingualuit Crater, this study compiles data from three expeditions carried out in May 2007 (~ 9-m-long sediment core), in August 2010 (~ 50 km of seismic lines), and in September 2012 (high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR topography of the inner slopes). Despite the weak penetration (~ 10 m) of the 3.5-kHz subbottom profiling caused by the presence of boulders in the sedimentary column, seismic data coupled with the stratigraphy established from the sediment core enabled the identification of two glaciolacustrine units deposited during the final stages of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) retreat in the crater. Two episodes of postglacial mass wasting events were also identified on the slopes and in the deep basin of the crater. The high-resolution topography of the internal slopes of the crater generated from the LiDAR data permitted the confirmation of a paleolake level at 545 m and determination of the elevation of drainage outlets. Together with the mapping of glacial and deglacial landforms from air photographs, the LiDAR data allowed the development of a new deglaciation and drainage scenario for the Pingualuit Crater Lake and surrounding area. The model proposes three main phases of lake drainage, based on the activation of seven outlets following the retreat of the LIS front toward the southwest. Finally, as opposed to other high-latitude crater lake basins such as Lake El'gygytgyn or Laguna Potrok Aike where high-resolution paleoclimatic records were obtained owing to high sediment accumulation rates, the seismic data from the Pingualuit Crater Lake

  13. Terrasar-X Insar Processing in Northern Bohemian Coal Basin Using Corner Reflectors (preliminary Results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváčová, I.; Halounová, L.; Svobodová, K.

    2012-07-01

    The area of Northern Bohemian coal basin is rich in brown coal. Part of it is undermined, but large areas were mined using open-pit mines. There are numerous reclaimed waste dumps here, with a horse racetrack, roads and in some cases also houses. However, on most of the waste dumps, there are forests, meadows and fields. Above the coal basin, there are the Ore mountains which are suspected to be sliding down to the open mines below them. We installed 11 corner reflectors in the area and monitor them using the TerraSAR-X satellite. One of the reflectors is situated in the area of radar layover, therefore it cannot be processed. We present preliminary results of monitoring the remaining corner reflectors, with the use of 7 TerraSAR-X scenes acquired between June and December 2011. We process whole scene crops, as well as the artificial reflector information alone. Our scene set contains interferometric pairs with perpendicular baselines reaching from 0 to 150 m. Such a configuration allows us to distinguish deformations from DEM errors, which are usual when the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) DEM (X-band) is used for Stripmap data. Unfortunately, most of the area of interest is decorrelated due to vegetation that covers both the Ore mountains and the reclaimed waste dumps. We had to enlarge the scene crop in order to be able to distinguish deformations from the atmospheric delay. We are still not certain about the stability of some regions. For the installed artificial reflectors, the expected deformations are in the order of mm/year. Generally, deformations in the area of interest may reach up to about 5 cm/year for the Ervěnice corridor (a road and railway built on a waste dump). When processing artificial corner reflector information alone, we check triangular sums and perform the processing for all possible point combinations - and that allows us to correct for some unwrapping errors. However, the problem is highly ambiguous.

  14. Localized Stress Perturbations in the Northern Newark Basin: Implications for Induced Seismicity and Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.

    2013-12-01

    Induced seismicity has emerged as one of the primary concerns for large-volume underground injections, such as wastewater disposal and carbon sequestration. In order to mitigate potential seismic risks, detailed knowledge of reservoir geometry, occurrence of faults and fractures, and the distribution of in situ stresses is required to predict the effect of pore pressure increase on formation stability. We present a detailed analysis of in situ stress distribution at a potential carbon sequestration site in the northern Newark basin, and then consider fault and fracture stability under injection conditions taking into account the effects of localized stress perturbations, formation anisotropy and poroelasticity. The study utilizes borehole geophysical data obtained in a 2-km-deep well drilled into Triassic lacustrine sediments in Rockland County, NY. A complex pattern of local variations in the stress field with depth and at multiple scales is revealed by borehole breakouts, including: (i) gradual counter-clockwise rotation of horizontal stress orientation and decrease in relative magnitude with depth, (ii) pronounced rotations of the principal horizontal stresses at two depths, ~800 m and ~1200 m, and (iii) small-scale departures from mean orientation at the scale of meters to tens of meters. Localized stress drop near active faults may explain these observations. Seismic profiling in the vicinity of the borehole and along dip and strike of basin sediments suggests the presence of crosscutting, and potentially active, fault zones but their geometry cannot be accurately resolved. Borehole image data from the site indicates the presence of numerous fractures with increasing density over depth that roughly form two sets: high-angle fractures striking NE-SW and sub-horizontal fractures dipping NW. We perform iterative dislocation modeling for various fault orientations and slip distances to match the observed stress distribution in the borehole. Both intersecting and

  15. Post-rift Magmatism at Passive Margins: An Integrated Study of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Murphy, M. A.; Cannon, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The pre-Cenozoic tectonic history of the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) can be broadly described as Triassic rifting, followed by Jurassic seafloor spreading and post-rift igneous activity as well as domal uplifts and rapid subsidence during the Late Cretaceous. Igneous rocks, identified from geophysical data and outcrops, extend from the Uvalde and Balcones volcanic fields in Texas, through northern Louisiana and eastern Arkansas, to the Jackson Dome in Mississippi. How this widespread magmatic event affected the thermal and structural framework of the crust and the sedimentary system in the northern GoM basin, remain poorly understood. Competing hypotheses exist regarding post-rift igneous activity: 1) Magmatism in the northeastern GoM basin is part of the Bermuda hotspot track; 2) The subduction of the Farallon plate caused distant lithospheric flexure and associated igneous activity in the northwestern GoM basin; 3) Edge-driven mantle convection produced melts at the continent-ocean boundary; 4) Grenville and Ouachita sutures led to opportunistic igneous activity. Preliminary results show that, instead of an eastward age progressive track, which is predicted by the Bermuda hotspot hypothesis, the spatial distribution and ages of igneous rocks follow the transition between continental and oceanic crust; it also roughly coincides with the Grenville and Ouachita sutures. It is also possible that the shallow-angle subduction of the Farallon plate could trigger magmatism ca. 1500 km from the trench; a modern analog is the subduction of the west Pacific plate and the Changbai volcano in northeast Asia. Here we emphasize the tectonomagmatic evolution of the northern GoM basin; and moreover suggest post-rift magmatism at passive continental margins is likely affected by both edge-driven convection and inherited lithospheric structures.

  16. Calibration and use of integrated hydrological models in a large groundwater basin in Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, Claudio; Giudici, Mauro; Ponzini, Giansilvio; Agostani, Davide; Rienzner, Michele

    2010-05-01

    We present and discuss the main steps of the implementation and use of the ground water flow model of a large alluvial aquifer system underlying a densely settled and heavily irrigated territory, with a special focus on the estimation of the distributed recharge and on the calibration of the model. The 2500 km² grounwater basin lies in the Padana plain (Northern Italy), one of the most developed industrial and agricultural areas of Europe, and is bordered by the rivers Adda, Oglio and Po. The model implementation was urged by the water management and administration authorities in the area, which in the last years have been under increasing pressure for the release of pumping consents, especially from the irrigation sector. Indeed, the limitation to water withdrawal from rivers to ensure the minimum instream flow, along with a sequence of very dry years, pushed the farmers to seek new sources of irrigation water. On the other side the water authorities are trying to drive a process of transformation of the irrigation systems, towards an increase of their water use efficiency. The same authorities, however, are aware that this process must be carefully controlled in order to protect a number of groundwater dependent ecosystems, that are largely dependent on the distributed recharge due to irrigation. Therefore, the main practical goals of the model is to provide a tool for the assessment of both the sustainability of increased groundwater withdrawals and the effects of changes of the irrigation systems characteristics. Distributed recharge, mainly due to rainfall and irrigation, has been often treated in a simplified way in many applications of groundwater models, in spite of the fact that the unsaturated zone scientific community has achieved significant progresses in the modelling of soil-water-atmosphere interactions. Indeed, especially when irrigation systems are densely spread over a large area but poorly efficient, the distributed recharge term may represent

  17. Palaeoenvironment and Its Control on the Formation of Miocene Marine Source Rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, Northern South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter. PMID:25401132

  18. Palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Zhang, Zhihuan; Wang, Weiming; Lu, Shuangfang; Li, Youchuan; Fu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The main factors of the developmental environment of marine source rocks in continental margin basins have their specificality. This realization, in return, has led to the recognition that the developmental environment and pattern of marine source rocks, especially for the source rocks in continental margin basins, are still controversial or poorly understood. Through the analysis of the trace elements and maceral data, the developmental environment of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin is reconstructed, and the developmental patterns of the Miocene marine source rocks are established. This paper attempts to reveal the hydrocarbon potential of the Miocene marine source rocks in different environment and speculate the quality of source rocks in bathyal region of the continental slope without exploratory well. Our results highlight the palaeoenvironment and its control on the formation of Miocene marine source rocks in the Qiongdongnan Basin of the northern South China Sea and speculate the hydrocarbon potential of the source rocks in the bathyal region. This study provides a window for better understanding the main factors influencing the marine source rocks in the continental margin basins, including productivity, preservation conditions, and the input of terrestrial organic matter. PMID:25401132

  19. Modeling of gas generation from the Alam El-Bueib formation in the Shoushan Basin, northern Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mohamed Ragab; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah

    2013-01-01

    The Shoushan Basin is an important hydrocarbon province in the northern Western Desert, Egypt, but the burial/thermal histories for most of the source rocks in the basin have not been assigned yet. In this study, subsurface samples from selected wells were collected to characterize the source rocks of Alam El-Bueib Formation and to study thermal history in the Shoushan Basin. The Lower Cretaceous Alam El-Bueib Formation is widespread in the Shoushan Basin, which is composed mainly of shales and sandstones with minor carbonate rocks deposited in a marine environment. The gas generative potential of the Lower Cretaceous Alam El-Bueib Formation in the Shoushan Basin was evaluated by Rock-Eval pyrolysis. Most samples contain sufficient type III organic matter to be considered gas prone. Vitrinite reflectance was measured at eight stratigraphic levels (Jurassic-Cretaceous). Vitrinite reflectance profiles show a general increase of vitrinite reflectance with depth. Vitrinite reflectance values of Alam El-Bueib Formation range between 0.70 and 0.87 VRr %, indicating a thermal maturity level sufficient for hydrocarbon generation. Thermal maturity and burial histories models predict that the Alam El-Bueib source rock entered the mid-mature stage for hydrocarbon generation in the Tertiary. These models indicate that the onset of gas generation from the Alam El-Bueib source rock began in the Paleocene (60 Ma), and the maximum volume of gas generation occurred during the Pliocene (3-2 Ma).

  20. Palaeoclimatic oscillations in the Pliensbachian (Lower Jurassic) of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. J.; Comas-Rengifo, M. J.; Goy, A.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main controversial items in palaeoclimatology is to elucidate if climate during the Jurassic was warmer than present day, with no ice caps, or if ice caps were present in some specific intervals. The Pliensbachian Cooling event (Lower Jurassic) has been pointed out as one of the main candidates to have developed ice caps on the poles. To constrain the timing of this cooling event, including the palaeoclimatic evolution before and after cooling, as well as the calculation of the seawater palaeotemperatures are of primary importance to find arguments on this subject. For this purpose, the Rodiles section of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain), a well exposed succession of the uppermost Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Lower Toarcian deposits, has been studied. A total of 562 beds were measured and sampled for ammonites, for biostratigraphical purposes and for belemnites, to determine the palaeoclimatic evolution through stable isotope studies. Comparison of the recorded uppermost Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Lower Toarcian changes in seawater palaeotemperature with other European sections allows characterization of several climatic changes of probable global extent. A warming interval which partly coincides with a negative δ13Cbel excursion was recorded at the Upper Sinemurian. After a "normal" temperature interval, a new warming interval that contains a short lived positive δ13Cbel peak, was developed at the Lower-Upper Pliensbachian transition. The Upper Pliensbachian represents an outstanding cooling interval containing a positive δ13Cbel excursion interrupted by a small negative δ13Cbel peak. Finally, the Lower Toarcian represented an exceptional warming period pointed as the main responsible for the prominent Lower Toarcian mass extinction.

  1. Palaeoclimatic oscillations in the Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Juan J.; Comas-Rengifo, María J.; Goy, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    One of the main controversial themes in palaeoclimatology involves elucidating whether climate during the Jurassic was warmer than the present day and if it was the same over Pangaea, with no major latitudinal gradients. There has been an abundance of evidence of oscillations in seawater temperature throughout the Jurassic. The Pliensbachian (Early Jurassic) constitutes a distinctive time interval for which several seawater temperature oscillations, including an exceptional cooling event, have been documented. To constrain the timing and magnitude of these climate changes, the Rodiles section of the Asturian Basin (Northern Spain), a well exposed succession of the uppermost Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Lower Toarcian deposits, has been studied. A total of 562 beds were measured and sampled for ammonites, for biochronostratigraphical purposes, and for belemnites, to determine the palaeoclimatic evolution through stable isotope studies. Comparison of the recorded latest Sinemurian, Pliensbachian and Early Toarcian changes in seawater palaeotemperature with other European sections allows characterization of several climatic changes that are likely of a global extent. A warming interval partly coinciding with a δ13Cbel negative excursion was recorded at the Late Sinemurian. After a "normal" temperature interval, with temperatures close to average values of the Late Sinemurian-Early Toarcian period, a new warming interval containing a short-lived positive δ13Cbel peak, developed during the Early-Late Pliensbachian transition. The Late Pliensbachian represents an outstanding cooling interval containing a δ13Cbel positive excursion interrupted by a small negative δ13Cbel peak. Finally, the Early Toarcian represented an exceptional warming period, which has been pointed out as being responsible for the prominent Early Toarcian mass extinction.

  2. A review of tectonics and sedimentation in a forearc setting: Hellenic Thrace Basin, North Aegean Sea and Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelis, A. G.; Boutelier, D.; Catuneanu, O.; Seymour, K. St.; Zelilidis, A.

    2016-04-01

    Exposure of the forearc region of the North Aegean Sea, Greece, offers insight into evolving convergent margins. The sedimentary fill of the Thrace Basin during the Late Eocene to Oligocene time provides a record of subduction-driven processes, such as growth of magmatic arcs and construction of accretionary complexes. This large sediment repository received sediment from two sources. The southern (outboard) basin margin reflects the active influence of the exhumed accretionary prism (e.g. Pindic Cordillera or Biga peninsula), while the northern (inboard) margin records the effect of the magmatic arc in the Rhodope region. The forearc basin sedimentary fills shoal upward into shallow-marine strata but are dominated mainly by deep-marine facies. The depositional trend and stacking pattern are dominated by progradational patterns. This trend, which is observed in both basin margins, is related to tectonic deformation rather than sea-level fluctuations. Additional evidence for this tectonic uplift comes from the backstripping analysis. The accretionary complex provided material into the forearc basin. This material was transported northeast and formed a sand-rich turbidity system that evolved upslope into shallow-marine deposits. Stratigraphic data indicate that this turbidity system exhibits a successive landward (inboard) migration of the depocenter. Provenance data utilizing sandstone petrography, conglomerate clast composition, and bulk-rock geochemistry suggest that this system reflects an increased influx of mafic material into the basin. Volcanic arc-derived material was transported south and east and accumulated in deep-marine settings. Both stratigraphic and provenance data indicate a seaward (outboard) migration of the basin depocenter and a significant increase in felsic detritus into the forearc.

  3. Active deformation and shallow structure of the Wagner, Consag, and Delfín Basins, northern Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Patricia; Stock, Joann M.; Steckler, Michael S.; MartíN-Barajas, Arturo; Diebold, John B.; GonzáLez-FernáNdez, Antonio; Mountain, Gregory S.

    2003-07-01

    Oblique rifting began synchronously along the length of the Gulf of California at 6 Ma, yet there is no evidence for the existence of oceanic crust or a spreading transform fault system in the northern Gulf. Instead, multichannel seismic data show a broad shallow depression, ˜70 × 200 km, marked by active distributed deformation and six ˜10-km-wide segmented basins lacking well-defined transform faults. We present detailed images of faulting and magmatism based on the high resolution and quality of these data. The northern Gulf crust contains a dense (up to 18 faults in 5 km) complex network of mainly oblique-normal faults, with small offsets, dips of 60-80° and strikes of N-N30°E. Faults with seafloor offsets of tens of meters bound the Lower and two Upper Delfín Basins. These subparallel basins developed along splays from a transtensional zone at the NW end of the Ballenas Transform Fault. Twelve volcanic knolls were identified and are associated with the strands or horsetails from this zone. A structural connection between the two Upper Delfín Basins is evident in the switching of the center of extension along axis. Sonobuoy refraction data suggest that the basement consists of mixed igneous sedimentary material, atypical of mid-ocean ridges. On the basis of the near-surface manifestations of active faulting and magmatism, seafloor spreading will likely first occur in the Lower Delfín Basin. We suggest the transition to seafloor spreading is delayed by the lack of strain-partitioned and focused deformation as a consequence of shear in a broad zone beneath a thick sediment cover.

  4. Is long range transport of pollen in the NW Mediterranean basin influenced by Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns?

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Rebeca; Alarcon, Marta; Periago, Cristina; Belmonte, Jordina

    2015-11-01

    Climatic oscillations triggered by the atmospheric modes of the Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns have an important influence on the atmospheric circulation at synoptic scale in Western Mediterranean Basin. Simultaneously, this climate variability could affect a variety of ecological processes. This work provides a first assessment of the effect of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Mediterranean Oscillation (WeMO) on the atmospheric long-range pollen transport episodes in the North-Eastern Iberian Peninsula for the period 1994-2011. Alnus, Ambrosia, Betula, Corylus and Fagus have been selected as allergenic pollen taxa with potential long-range transport associated to the Northern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns in the Western Mediterranean Basin. The results showed an increase of long range pollen transport episodes of: (1) Alnus, Corylus and Fagus from Western and Central Europe during the negative phase of annual NAO and AO; (2) Ambrosia, Betula and Fagus from Europe during the negative phase of winter WeMO; (3) Corylus and Fagus from Mediterranean area during the positive phase of the annual AO; and (4) Ambrosia from France and Northern Europe during the positive phase of winter WeMO. Conversely, the positive phase of annual NAO and AO are linked with the regional transport of Alnus, Betula and Corylus from Western Iberian Peninsula. The positive phase of annual WeMO was also positively correlated with regional transport of Corylus from this area. PMID:26125408

  5. Unraveling burial heating and sediment recycling in retroarc foreland basins: Detrital thermochronologic insights from the northern Magallanes Basin, Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosdick, J. C.; Grove, M. J.; Graham, S. A.; Hourigan, J. K.; Lovera, O. M.; Romans, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment recycling is expected in many tectonic settings, such as foreland basins, where the path followed by grains initially derived from erosion of a basement source region typically involves significant intermediate stages of crustal evolution before the detritus is finally incorporated into tectonically stable basin strata. The shallow-crustal thermal histories experienced by eroded sediment may go undetected by traditional provenance methods but are potentially recoverable by thermochronologic methods. The Patagonian Magallanes retroarc foreland basin affords an excellent case study of sediment burial and recycling within a thrust belt setting. Combined detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He thermochronology data and thermal modeling results confirm delivery of both rapidly cooled, first-cycle volcanogenic sediments from the Patagonian magmatic arc and recycled sediment from deeply buried and exhumed Cretaceous foredeep strata to the Cenozoic Magallanes basin depocenter. Numerical models of temperature-time histories indicate that ca. 54-45 Ma burial of the Maastrichtian Dorotea Formation produced 164-180°C conditions and heating to within the zircon He partial retention zone. Such deep burial is unusual for Andean foreland basins and may have resulted from combined effects of high basal heat flow and high sediment accumulation within a rapidly subsiding foredeep that was floored by basement weakened by previous Late Jurassic rifting. In this interpretation, Cenozoic thrust-related deformation deeply eroded the Dorotea Formation and underlying strata from ~5 km burial depths and may be associated with the development of a regionally extensive Paleogene unconformity. Results from the Cenozoic Río Turbio and Santa Cruz formations confirm that they contain both Cenozoic first-cycle zircon from the Patagonian magmatic arc and highly outgassed recycled zircon. This work suggests that Middle Miocene sediments were most likely derived from recycling of

  6. Cheatgrass percent cover change: Comparing recent estimates to climate change − Driven predictions in the Northern Great Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyte, Stephen P.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Major, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) is a highly invasive species in the Northern Great Basin that helps decrease fire return intervals. Fire fragments the shrub steppe and reduces its capacity to provide forage for livestock and wildlife and habitat critical to sagebrush obligates. Of particular interest is the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), an obligate whose populations have declined so severely due, in part, to increases in cheatgrass and fires that it was considered for inclusion as an endangered species. Remote sensing technologies and satellite archives help scientists monitor terrestrial vegetation globally, including cheatgrass in the Northern Great Basin. Along with geospatial analysis and advanced spatial modeling, these data and technologies can identify areas susceptible to increased cheatgrass cover and compare these with greater sage grouse priority areas for conservation (PAC). Future climate models forecast a warmer and wetter climate for the Northern Great Basin, which likely will force changing cheatgrass dynamics. Therefore, we examine potential climate-caused changes to cheatgrass. Our results indicate that future cheatgrass percent cover will remain stable over more than 80% of the study area when compared with recent estimates, and higher overall cheatgrass cover will occur with slightly more spatial variability. The land area projected to increase or decrease in cheatgrass cover equals 18% and 1%, respectively, making an increase in fire disturbances in greater sage grouse habitat likely. Relative susceptibility measures, created by integrating cheatgrass percent cover and temporal standard deviation datasets, show that potential increases in future cheatgrass cover match future projections. This discovery indicates that some greater sage grouse PACs for conservation could be at heightened risk of fire disturbance. Multiple factors will affect future cheatgrass cover including changes in precipitation timing and totals and

  7. Apatite fission track evidence for Miocene extensional faulting east-central Nevada, northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L.; Dumitru, T.A. . Geology Dept.); Gans, P.B. . Geological Sciences Dept.); Brown, R.W. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Apatite fission track ages indicates that a large component of motion along many of the present range-bounding faults occurred in the Early to Middle Miocene, tilting and uplifting rocks through the apatite annealing zone (120--60 C) between 18--13 Ma (n = 20, Deep Creeks), 18--15 Ma (northern Snake Range, n = 20), 25--17 Ma (n = 7, southern Snake Range), 24--15 Ma (Egan Range, n = 6), 23--18 Ma (Kern Mts., n = 2) and 28--16 ma (Schell Creek Range, n = 2). Long track length distributions indicate rapid cooling through the 120--60 C interval followed by residence at low, near surface temperatures. The data set also indicates that the combined Deep Creek-Kern Mountains-northern and southern Snake Range constitutes a single coherent footwall crustal block beneath a > 150 km-long system of east-dipping Miocene faults which includes at least the eastern portions of faults that have been mapped as the Snake Range decollement (NSRD). Conglomerates deposited in hanging wall basins along this fault system contain metamorphic and granitic boulders whose FT ages are coeval with footwall unroofing. The deposits themselves are now known to be younger than previously reported (Oligocene) as ages from boulders are Miocene. The thick (> 2 km) sequences of synorogenic conglomerate indicates rapid unroofing; large slide blocks attest to generation of steep, fault-controlled topography. Faults that cut this sequence are now known to be younger than 15 Ma. Thus, protracted extensional faulting affected the region, beginning in the Early Oligocene and continuing to the Recent, but a significant part of this extension, including a large component of the slip on the NSRD, was accomplished in the Early to Middle Miocene. Data from this region is compatible with a growing base of apatite fission track data from elsewhere in the northern Basin and Range, which, together with geologic relationships, suggest an important episode of Miocene extension and Basin and Range development.

  8. Depositional Record of the Bagua Basin, Northern Peru: Implications for Climate and Tectonic Evolution of Tropical South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; George, S. W. M.; Williams, L. A.; Horton, B. K.; Garzione, C. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Andes Mountains exert critical controls on the climate, hydrology, and biodiversity of South America. The Bagua Basin, a low elevation (400-600 m) intermontane basin in northern Peru, offers a unique opportunity to study the ecological, climatic, and structural evolution of the western topographic boundary of the Amazonian foreland. Situated between the Marañon fold-thrust belt of the Western Cordillera and basement block uplifts of the Eastern Cordillera, the Bagua region contains a protracted, semi-continuous record of Triassic through Pleistocene sedimentation. Whereas Triassic-Cretaceous marine deposits were potentially related to extension and regional thermal subsidence, a Paleocene-Eocene shift to shallow marine and fluvial systems marks the onset of foreland basin conditions. Oligocene-Miocene sedimentation corresponds to a braided-meandering fluvial system with exceptional development of paleosols. In this study, we use new detrital zircon U-Pb geochronologic and oxygen stable isotopic datasets to establish a chronology of pre-Andean and Andean processes within the Bagua Basin. Detrital zircon geochronology provides constraints on when the Western and Eastern cordilleras shed sediments into the basin. Syndepositional zircons within Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene strata provide key age control for a previously poorly constrained depositional chronology. Preliminary results suggest a dramatic provenance shift in which Paleocene deposits contain almost exclusively cratonic populations (500-1600 Ma) whereas Eocene deposits show a mix of syndepositional zircons from the magmatic arc, recycled Mesozoic zircons, and cratonic zircon populations. Oxygen stable isotopes (δ18O) of carbonate nodules from Neogene paleosols will help elucidate when the Eastern Cordillera became an orographic barrier intercepting moisture from the Amazon basin to the east. Together, these records will help uncover the history of tectonics and climate interaction in tropical South

  9. Late paleozoic tectonic amalgamation of northwestern China. Sedimentary record of the northern Tarim, northwestern Turpan, and southern Junggar basins

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.R.; Graham, S.A.; Hendrix, M.S.; Ying, D.; Zhou, D.

    1995-05-01

    This study focuses on areas adjacent to the Tian Shan (shan is Chinese for mountains) in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, northwestern China, and provides new field data on Carboniferous and Permian outcrop exposures of sedimentary rocks of the southern Junggar, northwestern Turpan, and northern Tarim basins that bear directly on the history of late Paleozoic tectonic amalgamation. We present here a multifaceted sedimentary basin analysis, including sedimentary facies, paleocurrent, and sandstone provenance analyses, and reconstructions of late Paleozoic basin subsidence. These data provide a unique record not only of the basins themselves, but also of the evolution of the adjacent orogenic belts. This study is based on fieldwork during the summers of 1987, 1988, 1991, and 1992 by workers from Stanford University, the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, and the Xinjiang Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources. Although reconnaissance in nature, the data presented here provide a basis for evaluating alternative hypotheses for the evolution of northwestern China and provide a starting point for more comprehensive future studies. 72 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Geologic assessment of natural gas from coal seams in the Northern Appalachian Coal Basin. Topical report, September 1986-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kelafant, J.R.; Wicks, D.E.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    Based on a geologic assessment of the Northern Appalachian Coal Basin, natural gas in place is estimated at 61 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), contained in 352,000 billion tons of coal. Over one third of the gas in place is in the deep, areally extensive Kittanning group (24.0 Tcf), although the Freeport (15.5 Tcf), Brookville/Clarion (11.0 Tcf), and Pittsburgh (7.0 Tcf) groups also hold considerable potential for coalbed gas. Five regional cross sections correlating the six major coal groups are included along with areal extent, overburden (depth of burial), coal isopach, and coal-rank maps.

  11. An astronomically calibrated early Paleocene magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy at Zumaia (Basque Basin, Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinarès-Turell, J.; Baceta, J. I.; Pujalte, V.; Orue-Etxebarria, X.; Bernaola, G.; Lorito, S.

    2003-04-01

    We have retrieved the magnetostratigraphy of a 54 m long section above the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary at the sea-cliff section of Zumaia in the Basque basin (Northern Spain). The section encompasses the entire Danian and the lower part of the Selandian stages as indicated by calcareous plankton biostratigraphy (planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils) performed along section. The studied interval is made up by pelagic-marl alternations in the form of couplets and bundles, which range from centimetre/decimetre to meter scale respectively including a few intercalations of thin-bedded calcareous turbidites. The pelagic carbonate beds grade from reddish-pink to light grey colour and are similar to many well-known pelagic sequences like the Scaglia Rossa sequences in the Umbrian basin from Italy, which have provided reference Paleocene magneto- and biostratigraphic chronologies. Our magnetostratigraphy is based in the identification of the primary remanence component after stepwise thermal demagnetisation up to 580-600°C in samples from about 200 stratigraphic levels, which allows the identification of six reversal boundaries from chron C29r to C26r at a bed level. A lithologically coded series has been derived for the studied section taking also the colour information into account and studied with spectral analysis. The spatial (or temporal) evolution of periodicities in the coded series is studied with a wavelet spectral technique. The same wavelet approach has been performed on a published calcium carbonate record for the lower Paleocene 14 m of the Zumaia section (Ten Kate and Sprenger, 1993) obtaining comparable results, which validates our lithologically coded approach. A preliminary time-model based on the standard GPTS indicates that the basic lithologic carbonate-marl couplet corresponds to the 19-23 ky precession cycle (21-31 cm cycle in the depth domain) and that a cycle (usually bundles of 4-6 basic couplets) with global periodicity centred at 1

  12. Past, present and future formation of groundwater resources in northern part of Baltic Artesian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandi, A.; Vallner, L.; Vaikmae, R.; Raidla, V.

    2012-04-01

    Cambrian-Vendian Aquifer System (CVAS) is the deepest confined aquifer system used for water consumption in northern part of Baltic Artesian Basin (BAB). A regional groundwater flow and transport model (Visual Modflow) was used to investigate the paleohydrogeological scientific and contemporary management problems of CVAS. The model covers the territory of Estonia and its close surrounding, all together 88,000 km2 and includes all main aquifers and aquitards from ground surface to as low as the impermeable part of the crystalline basement. Three-dimensional distribution of groundwater heads, flow directions, velocities, and rates as well as transport and budget characteristics were simulated by the model. Water composition was changed significantly during the last glaciations.Strongly depleted O and H stable isotope composition, absence of 3H and low radiocarbon concentration are the main indicators of glacial origin of groundwater in the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer in northern Estonia. The noble gas analyses allowed concluding, that palaeorecharge took place at temperatures around the freezing point. While in North Estonia, most of water was changed by glacial melt water, high salinity water is till preserved in Southern part of Estonia.First results of modeling suggest that during the intrusion period lasting 7.3-9.3 ka the front of glacial thaw water movement had southeast direction and reachedto 180-220 kmfrom CVAS outcrop in Baltic Sea. Confining layer of CVAS is cut through by deep buried valleys in several places in North Estonia making possible for modern precipitation to infiltrate into aquifer system in present day. In case of natural conditions, the water pressure of CVAS is few meters above sea level and most of valleys act as discharge areas for aquifers system. Two regional depression ones have formed in North Estonia as a result of groundwater use from CVAS. Water consumption changes the natural groundwater gradient, flow direction and thereforerecharge

  13. Radar Probing of Planetary Regoliths: An Example from the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hawke, B. Ray; Leverington, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Imaging radar measurements at long wavelengths (e.g., >30 cm) allow deep (up to tens of meters) probing of the physical structure and dielectric properties of planetary regoliths. We illustrate a potential application for a Mars orbital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) using new Earth-based 70-cm wavelength radar data for the Moon. The terrae on the northern margin of Mare Imbrium, the Montes Jura region, have diffuse radar backscatter echoes that are 2-4 times weaker at 3.8-cm, 70-cm, and 7.5-m wavelengths than most other lunar nearside terrae. Possible geologic explanations are (1) a pyroclastic deposit associated with sinuous rilles in this region, (2) buried mare basalt or a zone of mixed highland/basaltic debris (cryptomaria), or (3) layers of ejecta associated with the Iridum and Plato impacts that have fewer meter-sized rocks than typical highlands regolith. While radar data at 3.8-cm to 7.5-m wavelengths suggest significant differences between the Montes Jura region and typical highlands, the surface geochemistry and rock abundance inferred from Clementine UV-VIS data and eclipse thermal images are consistent with other lunar terrae. There is no evidence for enhanced iron abundance, expected for basaltic pyroclastic deposits, near the source vents of the sinuous rilles radial to Plato. The regions of low 70-cm radar return are consistent with overlapping concentric ''haloes'' about Iridum and Plato and do not occur referentially in topographically low areas, as is observed for radar-mapped cryptomaria. Thus we suggest that the extensive radar-dark area associated with the Montes Jura region is due to overlapping, rock-poor ejecta deposits from Iridum and Plato craters. Comparison of the radial extent of low-radar-return crater haloes with a model for ejecta thickness shows that these rock-poor layers are detected by 70-cm radar where they are on the order of 10 m and thicker. A SAR in orbit about Mars could use similar deep probing to reveal the nature of

  14. Trace Perchlorate in Background Ground Water and Local Precipitation, Northern Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, M.; Longmire, P.; Granzow, K. P.; Englert, D.; Yanicak, S.; Larson, T.; Rearick, M.; Heikoop, J.; Perkins, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate occurs at detectable concentrations of 0.07 to 0.45 parts per billion (ppb) in ground water of background quality within the northern Rio Grande basin, New Mexico. Ground-water samples were collected from 47 wells and springs near Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Taos, New Mexico. Analytical methods consisted of liquid and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and IC/MS/MS). An upper tolerance limit (mean plus two standard deviations) of 0.40 ppb was calculated from 184 analytical results for the background samples. Six distinguishable ground-water zones were sampled based on location, age, and hydrochemistry. In the Los Alamos area, ground water within the mountain-front and mountain-block region is mostly young or modern (less than 50 years). The regional aquifer including the White Rock Canyon springs are of sub-modern age (greater than 50 years). Tritium data from springs north of Taos indicate ground water of modern and sub-modern ages. Background perchlorate concentrations within the Los Alamos area were consistently higher than those measured in the Taos area. Ground water from the Taos area contains less perchlorate and has lower δ18O and δ2H values than ground water from the Los Alamos area. The elevation at which precipitation occurs with respect to recharge and/or the amount of evapotranspiration may play a role in perchlorate concentration in ground water. Natural variability, hydrogeology, and atmospheric inputs may also affect perchlorate concentration in ground water. A linear regression through perchlorate and chloride concentrations for all stations resulted in an r2 = 0. However, the r2 value of the Los Alamos regional aquifer for perchlorate versus chloride was 0.66. Thirteen precipitation samples were collected in the Los Alamos area. Results from eleven of these samples showed no perchlorate greater than 0.05 and 0.009 ppb, the method detection limit (MDL). Two precipitation samples analyzed using the IC

  15. Biomarkers of contaminant exposure in northern pike (Esox lucius) from the Yukon River Basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, J.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Myers, M.S.; Gross, T.S.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger investigation, northern pike (n = 158; Esox lucius) were collected from ten sites in the Yukon River Basin (YRB), Alaska, to document biomarkers and their correlations with organochlorine pesticide (total p,p'-DDT, total chlordane, dieldrin, and toxaphene), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and elemental contaminant (arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, total mercury, selenium, and zinc) concentrations. A suite of biomarkers including somatic indices, hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, vitellogenin concentrations, steroid hormone (17B- ustradiol and 16-kebtestosteront) concentrations, splenic macrophage aggregates (MAs), oocyte atresia, and other microscopic anomalies in various tissues were documented in YRB pike. Mean condition factor (0.50 to 0.68), hepatosomatic index (1.00% to 3.56%), and splenosomatic index (0.09% to 0.18%) were not anomalous at any site nor correlated with any contaminant concentration. Mean EROD activity (0.71 to 17.51 pmol/min/mg protein) was similar to basal activity levels previously measured in pike and was positively correlated with selenium concentrations (r = 0.88, P < 0.01). Vitellogenin concentrations in female (0.09 to 5.32 mg/mL) and male (0.01 mg/mL in male pike from multiple sites indicated exposure to estrogenic compounds. Mean steroid hormone concentrations and percent oocyte atresia were not anomalous in pike from any YRB site. Few site differences were significant for mean MA density (1.86 to 6.42 MA/mm2), size (812 to 1481 ??m2), and tissue occupied (MA-%; 0.24% to 0.75%). A linear regression between MA-% and total PCBs was significant, although PCB concentrations were generally low in YRB pike (???63 ng/g), and MA-% values in female pike (0.24% to 0.54%) were lower than in male pike (0.32% to 0.75%) at similar PCB concentrations. Greater numbers of MAs were found as zinc concentrations increased in YRB female pike, but it is unlikely that this is a causative relationship

  16. The correlation between Historical and Instrumental Seismicity in the Sansepolcro Basin, Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, F.; Ciaccio, M. G.; Hunstad, I.; Palombo, B.; Ferrari, G.

    2009-04-01

    The area investigated, the Sansepolcro basin, is characterized by the presence of important earthquakes in the past with estimated intensity even larger than IX MCS (the 1352 Monterchi earthquake, the 1389 Boccaserriola, the 1458 Citta' di Castello, the 1781 Cagliese and the 1917 Monterchi-Citerna earthquakes, CPTI Working Group, 2004) and by a surprisingly scarce instrumental seismicity compared to the adjacent areas struck by high seismicity (Castello et al., 2005; Ciaccio et al., 2006). The area north of Sansepolcro has been struck in recent years by four minor sequences, occurred between 1987 and 2001 with magnitude ranging from Ml3.0 to Mw4.7. In this work we analyse the most important earthquakes of the 20th century occurred in the Altotiberina Valley in 1917, 1918, 1919 and 1948; in particular instrumental relocation, focal mechanisms and Ms and Mw magnitude estimation are re-evaluated. The relocation of these earthquakes is particularly critical and is an important issue. An instrumental and precise location is critical for the complexity of the problems associated with the study of seismograms prior to the first half of the twentieth century and is relevant because in the surrounding regions higher seismicity is observed. Regarding this peculiarity of the area, it's very important to detect the location of the historical earthquakes: in particular, the 1917 event is often associated to the possibility that the regional low angle Altotiberina Fault (Barchi et al., 1998) is able or not to nucleate large- or moderate-magnitude events, being historically located close to its surface (Boncio and Lavecchia, 2000). References: Barchi, M.R., A. De Feyter, M.B. Magnani, G. Minelli, G. Pialli and B.M. Sotera (1998) Extensional tectonics in the Northern Apennines (Italy): Evidence from the CROP03 deep seismic reflection line, Mem. Soc. Geol. It., 52, 527-538. Boncio, P. and G. Lavecchia (2000) A structurl model for active extension in Central Italy, J. of Geodynamics

  17. Structure of the Wagner Basin in the Northern Gulf of California From Interpretation of Seismic Reflexion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, M.; Aguilar, C.; Martin, A.

    2007-05-01

    The northern Gulf of California straddles the transition in the style of deformation along the Pacific-North America plate boundary, from distributed deformation in the Upper Delfin and Wagner basins to localized dextral shear along the Cerro Prieto transform fault. Processing and interpretation of industry seismic data adquired by Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) allow us to map the main fault structures and depocenters in the Wagner basin and to unravel the way strain is transferred northward into the Cerro Prieto fault system. Seismic data records from 0.5 to 5 TWTT. Data stacking and time-migration were performed using semblance coefficient method. Subsidence in the Wagner basin is controlled by two large N-S trending sub-parallel faults that intersect the NNW-trending Cerro Prieto transform fault. The Wagner fault bounds the eastern margin of the basin for more than 75 km. This fault dips ~50° to the west (up to 2 seconds) with distinctive reflectors displaced more than 1 km across the fault zone. The strata define a fanning pattern towards the Wagner fault. Northward the Wagner fault intersects the Cerro Prieto fault at 130° on map view and one depocenter of the Wagner basin bends to the NW adjacent to the Cerro Prieto fault zone. The eastern boundary of the modern depocenter is the Consag fault, which extends over 100 km in a N-S direction with an average dip of ~50° (up to 2s) to the east. The northern segment of the Consag fault bends 25° and intersects the Cerro Prieto fault zone at an angle of 110° on map view. The acoustic basement was not imaged in the northwest, but the stratigraphic succession increases its thickness towards the depocenter of the Wagner basin. Another important structure is El Chinero fault, which runs parallel to the Consag fault along 60 km and possibly intersects the Cerro Prieto fault to the north beneath the delta of the Colorado River. El Chinero fault dips at low-angle (~30°) to the east and has a vertical offset of about 0

  18. Evolution of the Neogene Andean foreland basins of the Southern Pampas and Northern Patagonia (34°-41°S), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Alicia; Zárate, Marcelo; Tedesco, Ana; Dávila, Federico; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampas plain (30°-41°S) has historically been considered as a sector that evolved independently from the adjacent Andean ranges. Nevertheless, the study of the Pampas showed that it is reasonable to expect an important influence from the Andes into the extraandean area. The Pampas plain can be divided into two sectors: the northern portion, adjacent to the Pampean Ranges, has been studied by Davila (2005, 2007, 2010). The southern sector (34°-41°S) is the objective of the present work. The study of this area allowed to characterize two separate foreland basins: the Southern Pampa basin and the Northern Patagonian basin. The infill is composed of Late Miocene and Pliocene units, interpreted as distal synorogenic sequences associated with the late Cenozoic Andean uplift at this latitudinal range. These foreland basins have been defined based on facies changes, distinct depositional styles, along with the analysis of sedimentary and isopach maps. The basins geometries are proposed following De Celles and Gilles (1996) taking into account the infill geometry, distribution and grain size. In both cases, these depocenters are located remarkably far away from the Andean tectonics loads. Therefore they cannot be explained with short-wave subsidence patterns. Elastic models explain the tectonic subsidence in the proximal depocenters but fail to replicate the complete distal basins. These characteristics show that dynamic subsidence is controlling the subsidence in the Southern Pampas and Northern Patagonian basins.

  19. Invasions and impacts of alligatorweed in the upper Xiaoqing River basin of northern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb), is a problematic and difficult to manage invasive weed. The recent invasion in the upper Xiaoqing River, northern China extends its range northwards through almost five degrees latitude and 500 km from the northern limit and main invasion a...

  20. Hydrogeochemistry and stable isotopes of ground and surface waters from two adjacent closed basins, Atacama Desert, northern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemistry and stable isotopes of groundwaters, surface waters, and precipitation indicate different sources of some dissolved constituents, but a common source of recharge and other constituents in two adjacent closed basins in the Atacama Desert region of northern Chile (24??15???-24??45???S). Waters from artesian wells, trenches, and ephemeral streams in the Punta Negra Basin are characterized by concentrations of Na>Ca>Mg and Cl ???SO4, with TDS Mg ??? Ca and SO4 > Cl, with TDS also Mg ??? Ca and SO4 > Cl, but with TDS up to 40 g/l. The deep mine waters have pH between 3.2 and 3.9, and are high in dissolved CO2 (??13 C = -4.8%PDB), indicating probable interaction with oxidizing sulfides. The deep mine waters have ??18O values of ???-1.8%.compared with values < -3.5??? for other Hamburgo Basin waters; thus the mine waters may represent a mixture of meteoric waters with deeper "metamorphic" waters, which had interacted with rocks and exchanged oxygen isotopes at elevated temperatures. Alternatively, the deep mine waters may represent fossil meteoric waters which evolved isotopically along an evaporative trend starting from values quite depleted in ??18O and ??Dd relative to either precipitation or shallow groundwaters. High I/Br ratios in the Hamburgo Basin waters and La Escondida mine waters are consistent with regionally high I in surficial deposits in the Atacama Desert region and may represent dissolution of a wind-blown evaporite component. Rain and snow collected during June 1984, indicate systematic ??18O and ??D fractionation with increasing elevation between 3150 and 4180 m a.s.l. (-0.21??.??18O and -1.7??.??D per 100 m). Excluding the deep mine waters from La Escondida, the waters from the Hamburgo and Punta Negra Basins have similar ??D and ??18O values and together show a distinct evaporative trend (??D = 5.0 ??18O - 20.2). Snowmelt from the central Andes Cordillera to the east is the most likely source of recharge to both basins. Some of the

  1. Petroleum systems of the Po Basin Province of northern Italy and the northern Adriatic Sea; Porto Garibaldi (biogenic), Meride/Riva di Solto (thermal), and Marnoso Arenacea (thermal)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindquist, Sandra J.

    1999-01-01

    The Porto Garibaldi total petroleum system dominates the Po Basin Province of onshore northern Italy and offshore Italy and Croatia in the northern Adriatic Sea. Porto Garibaldi contains Pliocene (primarily) and Pleistocene (secondarily) biogenic gas ? approximately 16 TCF (2.66 BBOE) ultimately recoverable ? accumulated in co-eval siliciclastic reservoirs. This area was the northwestern edge of the Gondwanan (African) continental plate in pre-Hercynian time until the assembly of Pangea, a dominantly carbonate passive continental margin during the Mesozoic breakup of Pangea, and a Cenozoic collision zone with siliciclastic foredeep and foreland regions surrounded by thrust belts. At least two other petroleum systems, with Triassic (Meride / Riva di Solto) and Miocene (Marnoso Arenacea) source rocks, contribute oil and thermal gas reserves (nearly 1 BBOE) to the province. The major time of hydrocarbon expulsion of the thermal systems was Late Neogene during the Alpine and Apennine orogenies. Local Mesozoic oil expulsion from Triassic rocks also occurred, but those oils either were not trapped or were leaked from faulty traps through time.

  2. Active deformation in the frontal part of the Northern Apennines: insights from the lower Metauro River basin area (northern Marche, Italy) and adjacent Adriatic off-shore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bucci, D.; Mazzoli, S.; Nesci, O.; Savelli, D.; Tramontana, M.; De Donatis, M.; Borraccini, F.

    2003-09-01

    An integration of seismological data with geological and geomorphological information aided by seismic interpretation was performed to characterise the Quaternary tectonic evolution of the Metauro River basin area (northern Marche) and adjacent off-shore sector of the external Northern Apennines. On-shore, along the Adriatic coast, the youngest age of thrusting and folding post-dates the Early-Middle Pliocene, while Pleistocene deposits appear to be, at least in part, not involved in the deformation. Recent (i.e. post-thrusting) tectonic structures have been recognised both in pre-Quaternary substratum rocks and in Upper Quaternary continental deposits (Upper Pleistocene terrace alluvium, Upper Pleistocene-Holocene slope deposits). These faults are all compatible with a WSW-ENE oriented extension. In the Metauro River basin area, preserved flights of stream terraces have been categorised according to the presence or absence of alluvial suites in relationship to each terrace level. Here, based on both the heights above the valley floor and the areal distribution of stream terraces, a generalised vertical tectonic uplift can be inferred, particularly during the Middle-Late Pleistocene. Moreover, the along-valley distribution of stream terraces provides further constraints on the age of thrusting and folding. In fact, the reconstructed terrace-levels are substantially parallel, and no evidence for any significant deformation by fold activity has been recognised. Local deformation displayed by both terrace surfaces and alluvial/slope-waste deposits suggests, instead, the intervening of some minor differential movements associated with the generalised uplift and/or to Middle-Late Pleistocene normal faulting. Their occurrence appears anyhow to be unrelated with the pattern of folds and associated thrusts. The present-day seismic activity of the study area was considered by analysing 83 seismic events that occurred from 1987 to 2000. The epicentre distribution is very

  3. Physics-Based Long-Period Ground Motion Scenarios in and Around the Po Plain Sedimentary Basin (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, I.; Morelli, A.; Casarotti, E.

    2014-12-01

    Unexpected large and prolonged shaking (> 80s) associated with long-period ground motion has been observed inside the Po Plain sedimentary basin (Northern Italy) during the two M~6, May 20-29, 2012, earthquakes. Long-period ground motion impacts on the seismic response of taller structures. It is hence important to understand the characteristics of long-period ground motion associated with the 3D structure and finite fault properties, in particular in those regions with deep sedimentary basins and a complex geological context. We implement a recent high resolution model of the Po basin (MAMBo), derived from geological constraints, in spectral-element code SPECFEM3D_cartesian (Peter et al., 2012). The simulations are numerically accurate for periods of 2 sec and longer, and incorporate complex 3D basin structure and topography as well as the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of source rupture. The response of our basin model has been evaluated for several instrumental earthquakes. Synthetics seismograms reproduce well amplitude and long duration, as well as envelope and coda, observed in paths that travel through sediments. We also evaluate ground motion produced by plausible earthquakes inferred from historical data, such as the Modena (1501) and Verona (1117) events that caused well-documented strong effects in a unusually wide areas with lengths of hundreds of kilometers. We test different representations of the seismic source, from point source to finite sources with different rupture histories, evaluating the impact on shaking amplitude. We compare our results with damage maps (when available) and with the GMPEs currently adopted for this area, evaluating the effects of finite fault and 3D propagation on ground shaking. We show that deterministic ground motion calculation can indeed provide information to be actively used to mitigate the effects of destructive earthquakes on critical infrastructures.

  4. The segmentations and the significances of the Central Canyon System in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming; Xie, Xinong; Xie, Yuhong; Wang, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Cheng; Jiang, Tao; He, Yunlong

    2014-01-01

    The submarine canyons as the important element of the source to sink have attracted the widespread interests in studying their morphologic features, stratigraphic frames, depositional architectures, as well as the related depositional model, hydrodynamic simulation, and hydrocarbon exploration. The Central Canyon System, a large axial submarine canyon, in the Qiongdongnan Basin is developed in Neogene passive continental margin of northern South China Sea, which is paralleled to the shelf break with an "S-shaped" geometry and an NE-NEE orientation. Based on the integrated analysis of high-resolution 2D/3D seismic data and well log data, the whole canyon could be divided into three segments from west to east through its distinct morphological and depositional architecture characteristics, the head area, the western segment and the eastern segment. The canyon shows the classical U-shaped morphology in seismic profiles, and the infillings are composed of a suit of turbidite channel complex in the head area. In the western segment, the canyon demonstrates the sinuous geometry and multiple-shaped morphology in seismic profiles. Four complexes of turbidite channel and mass transport complex (MTC) are observed, which could constitute into two stratigraphic cycles. The canyon in the eastern segment shows V-shaped morphology with steep flanks and a narrow and straight course, which is composed of collapse deposits in the flanks and the sheet sand-MTC complex. The sediment supply, northern continental slope system, paleo-geomorphic characteristics and tectonic setting in the Qiongdongnan Basin are considered as the controlling factors on the development and evolution of the Central Canyon System, each of them have different influences in the three segments. The turbidite channel in the head area was triggered by the abundant sediment supply from western source together with the fault activity at 5.7 Ma of the Red River Fault. The evolution of the canyon in the western

  5. Nested Calderas in the Northern Kawich Range, Central Nevada: Termination of the Ignimbrite Flare-up in the Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honn, D. K.; Smith, E. I.

    2006-05-01

    During the ignimbrite flare-up in the Great Basin of the western United States nearly 500,000 km3 of ash- flow tuff related to caldera collapse was erupted between about 40 and 23 Ma. In the central Great Basin the flare-up ended abruptly at about 23 Ma and major caldera generating eruptions did not occur again for nearly 7 Ma. To test models for the demise of this voluminous igneous event, we studied ash-flow tuffs in the northern Kawich Range, central Nevada that erupted just before the end of the ignimbrite flare-up. Five calderas were discovered in the northern Kawich Range; each filled with intracaldera rhyolite tuffs and caldera collapse breccias. Based on 40Ar / 39Ar dating of sanidine and crosscutting relations, the calderas erupted in the following order from oldest to youngest: Clifford Spring (23.67 ± 0.09 Ma), Tobe Spring (22.77 ± 0.07 Ma), Cow Canyon (22.78 ± 0.07 Ma), Bellehelen (22.87 ± 0.16 Ma), and Warm Springs. Field evidence including the occurrence of older welded tuff clasts in younger collapse breccia deposits indicates that these calderas represent separate events and not a single caldera with piecemeal collapse. The five intracaldera tuffs are chemically and chronologically similar to the widespread Pahranagat Formation (33,000 km2)and the Pyramid Spring tuff. To explain the eruption of at least seven tuffs of very similar chemistry over a short period of time (1.06 m.y), large scale partial melting (>50%) of the lower crust is required. Transfer of heat from the crust to the atmosphere during these eruptions cooled the crust may have resulted in the suppression of the ignimbrite flare-up in the Great Basin at 23 Ma.

  6. A modern analogue for tectonic, eustatic, and climatic processes in cratonic basins: Gulf of Carpentaria, northern Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edgar, N. Terence; Cecil, C. Blaine; Mattick, R.E.; de Deckker, Patrick; Djajadihardja, Yusuf S.

    2003-01-01

    The Gulf of Carpentaria is a tropical, silled epicontinental sea and may be a modern analogue for ancient cratonic basins. For the purpose of this study, the Gulf of Carpentaria is compared to Pennsylvanian cratonic basins of the United States. During the Pennsylvanian, the North American continent moved from the Southern Hemisphere, through the Equator, into the Northern Hemisphere. Today, the Gulf of Carpentaria–New Guinea region is a few degrees south of the Equator and is moving towards it. During the Pennsylvanian, the world was subjected to major glaciations and associated sea-level changes. The island of New Guinea and the Gulf of Carpentaria have undergone similar processes during the Quaternary. A reconnaissance seismic survey of the gulf conducted by the USGS and the Australian National University (ANU), combined with oil-exploration well data, provided the first step in a systematic evaluation of a modern tropical epicontinental system. During the Cenozoic, the region was dominated by terrestrial sedimentation in a temperate climate. At the same time, carbonates were being deposited on the northern shelf edge of the Australian Plate. During the Miocene, carbonate deposition expanded southward into the gulf region. Then in the Late Miocene, carbonate sedimentation was replaced by terrigenous clastics derived from the developing Central Range of the island of New Guinea, which developed a wetter climate while moving northwards into the tropics. At least 14 basin-wide transgressive–regressive cycles are identified by channels that were eroded under subaerial conditions since about the Miocene. Comparison of the modern Gulf of Carpentaria sequences with those of the Pennsylvanian reveals many similarities.

  7. Seismo-stratigraphic evolution of the northern Austral Basin and its possible relation to the Andean tectonics, onshore Argentina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, Victoria; Anka, Zahie; Pagan, Facundo; Kohler, Guillermina; Cagnolatti, Marcelo; di Primio, Rolando; Rodriguez, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    The Austral Basin is situated in a formerly and recently high active tectonic zone in southern Argentina. The opening of the South Atlantic to the east, the opening of the Drake Passage in the south, and the subduction related to the rise of the Andes to the west, had major influence on the study area. To identify the impact of the tectonic events on basin geometry, sediment thickness and depocenter migration through time, 2D seismic interpretation was performed for an area of approx. 180.000 km² covering the onshore northern Austral Basin. A total of 10 seismic horizons were mapped and tied to the stratigraphy from well reports, representing 9 syn- and post- rift sequences. The main units are: Basement (U1), Jurassic Tobifera Formation (U2), Early Cretaceous (U3), Late Cretaceous (U4), sub-unit Campanian (U4A), Paleocene (U5), Eocene (U6), Oligocene (U7), Miocene (U8), and Plio-Pleistocene (U9). Main tectonic events are identified representing the break-up phase forming graben systems and the evolution from the ancient backarc Rocas Verdes Basin to the foreland Austral Basin. Inversion and changes in the tectonic regime are concomitant with onlapping and thinning of the base of the Upper Cretaceous to Campanian sediments, while the Top of the Upper Cretaceous represents a Maastrichtian unconformity. Units depth maps show a triangular geometry since the Jurassic, tracing the north-eastern basement high and deepening to the south. Since the Campanian the former geometry of basin fill changed and deepening to the south stopped. Beginning of the foreland phase is assigned to this time as well as changes in the stress regime. Paleogene times are marked by a relatively high sedimentation rate coupled with enduring thermal subsidence, on-going rise of the Andes and changes in the convergence rates of the Nazca relative to the South American plate. Onset of sediment supply from the Andes (Incaic phase) resulted in enhanced sedimentation rates during the Paleocene

  8. Moisture History and Small Mammal Community Richness during the Latest Pleistocene and Holocene, Northern Bonneville Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Donald K.

    1998-05-01

    Precipitation and net primary productivity are positively correlated in arid environments. Both variables are, in turn, correlated with mammal species richness, but this relationship is not necessarily positive. With increasing precipitation in arid areas of low to moderate productivity, mammal richness increases linearly; as rainfall and productivity increase beyond this point, mammal richness is known to decline in some areas, producing a relationship that has been termed "unimodal" or "humped." In the Great Basin of the arid western United States, studies of the relationship between rodent species richness and precipitation have revealed only a positive relationship between these two variables. It has, however, been argued that if areas of higher precipitation were to be sampled within this region, the decline phase would become evident. When latest Pleistocene and Holocene small mammal assemblages from the northern Bonneville Basin (central Utah) are examined across a temporal moisture gradient, species richness declines as moisture declines. Since the Great Basin was significantly moister during the latest Pleistocene and Early Holocene than it has been since that time, the unimodal response model does not appear to apply to this region.

  9. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of Lower Shihezi Formation in Shenguhao area, northern Ordos basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Lu, Yongchao; Lin, Zi

    2015-04-01

    The structural location of Shenguhao area locates at the transition zone of Yimeng uplift and Yishan slope of northern Ordos basin, China. The study area is in erosion condition until Late Carboniferous and has deposited Taiyuan Formation (C2t), Shanxi Formation (P1s), Lower Shihezi Formation (P1x), Upper Shihezi Formation (P2s) and Shiqianfeng Formation (P2sh) in succession during Late Paleozoic, which mainly develops transition facies and alluvial plain facies. The fluvial sandstone of Lower Shihezi Formation is the major target layer of gas exploration and development in this area. This study is based on the interpretation of 38 wells and 113 sesmic reflection profiles. Three significant lithofacies were identified with sedimentological analysis of cores from the Shenguhao area: fluvial conglomerates, fluvial sandstone and floodplain mudstone, which represent fluvial depositional environment. Based on sequence stratigraphy methodology, well log patterns and lithofacies analysis, Lower Shihezi Formation can be divided into four depositional sequence cycles (1-4) bounded by fluvial scouring erosional surfaces. Each sequence succession shows the trend of base level rising and overall performs fining-upward feature, which characterized by coarsening-upward lower to upper fluvial sandstone and floodplain mudstone. In ascending order, sequence 1 records the transition from the underlying braided river delta plain fine-grained sediments of Shanxi Formation into the overlying fluvial sandstone of Lower Shihezi Formation and develops scouring erosional unconformity at the base, representing a regression. Sequence 1 consists of a package of progradting thick layer of amalgamated fluvial sandstone at the lower part passing into aggrading thin layer of floodplain mudstone at the upper part, suggesting that accommodation growing rate is gradually greater than deposition supply rate under the background of base level gradual increase. Sequence 2 and 3 record similar

  10. Genetic structure of lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis, populations in the northern main basin of Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, Wendylee; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd; Schaeffer, Jeff; Roseman, Edward F.; Harford, William J.; Johnson, James E.; Fietsch, Cherie-Lee

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of spawning lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from six sites in the main basin of Lake Huron was conducted to determine population structure. Samples from fisheryindependent assessment surveys in the northwest main basin were analyzed to determine the relative contributions of lake whitefish genetic populations. Genetic population structure was identified using data from seven microsatellite DNA loci. One population was identified at Manitoulin Island, one to two were observed in the east-central main basin (Fishing Island and Douglas Point), and one to two populations were found in the northwest (Thunder Bay and Duncan Bay). The genetic identity of collections from Duncan Bay and Thunder Bay was not consistent among methods used to analyze population structure. Low genetic distances suggested that they comprised one population, but genic differences indicated that they may constitute separate populations. Simulated data indicated that the genetic origins of samples from a mixed-fishery could be accurately identified, but accuracy could be improved by incorporating additional microsatellite loci. Mixture analysis and individual assignment tests performed on mixed-stock samples collected from the western main basin suggested that genetic populations from the east-central main basin contributed less than those from the western main basin and that the proportional contribution of each baseline population was similar in each assessment sample. Analysis of additional microsatellite DNA loci may be useful to help improve the precision of the estimates, thus increasing our ability to manage and protect this valuable resource.

  11. The linkage between longitudinal sediment routing systems and basin types in the northern South China Sea in perspective of source-to-sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming; Hsiung, Kan-Hsi; Zhang, Cuimei; Xie, Xinong; Yu, Ho-Shing; Wang, Zhenfeng

    2015-11-01

    Using bathymetric and seismic data, this study describes the morpho-sedimentary features in Qiongdongnan basin and southwest Taiwan collision basin, northern South China Sea and reveals the linkages between sediment routing system and basin types. The modern Central Canyon in the Qiongdongnan basin is located along the rift margin, and subparallel to the shelf-break southeast of Hainan Island. The modern Central Canyon develops along the basin axis (i.e., Xisha Trough) and longitudinally transports sediments eastward which are mainly supplied by northern continental slope. The Penghu Canyon in the southwest Taiwan collision basin is located along the collision boundary parallel to the strike of the adjacent uplifted Taiwan orogen. The Penghu Canyon develops along the tilting basin axis transporting sediments longitudinally southward to the deep-sea basin and Manila Trench. The Penghu Canyon is supplied with sediments from both flank Kaoping and South China Sea slopes where tributary canyons and channels transport sediments down-slope and feed the axial canyon. The certain basin types may be occupied by particular styles of sediment routing system. By comparing the morpho-sedimentary features and basin characteristics associated with the modern Central Canyon to that of the Valencia Channel in NW Mediterranean Sea, the longitudinal sediment routing system in rift basin type can be determined. In contrast, the longitudinal sediment routing systems in collision setting can be represented by the comparable examples of Penghu Canyon in southwest Taiwan collision basin and Markham Canyon in western Solomon Sea. The rift type sediment routing system is characterized by an axial canyon with a single sediment supply from land drainage margin. In contrast, sediment routing system in collision type basins consists of an axial canyon and dual sediment supplies from flank adjacent slopes. The axial canyons in collision basins are more active than that of the rift basin due to

  12. Gravity and Magnetotelluric Modeling of the Santo Domingo Basin, Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, K. D.; Keithline, N.; Blum, C.; Cunningham, E.; Fromont, A.; Jorgensen, M.; Lee, R.; McBride, K.; Saez Berrios, P.; Harper, C.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D.; Ferguson, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Santo Domingo Basin, one of a series of basins within the Rio Grande Rift, is located between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, NM, and has been the focus of research by the Summer of Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program since 2000. Gravity, magnetotelluric (MT), and seismic data have been collected throughout the region, although we are concentrating on gravity and MT data collected during SAGE 2014 and 2015. The study area is located in the center of the Santo Domingo basin, an extensional, Miocene age, rift basin, in an area that was minimally involved in the preceding local Laramide orogenic activity. Rift sediments (~3.5 km thick) are underlain by Eocene age sediments that were shed from adjacent uplifts. Up to 3 km of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sediments are preserved above the Precambrian basement. Geologic outcrop, borehole and seismic reflection data, and known density values were used in the construction of a ~100 km-long, generalized geologic cross section from which a gravity response was calculated. The modeled gravity response makes fairly definitive predictions about the geometry of the basin as well as the stratigraphy and faulting within and bounding the basin. MT data was collected at ten stations within the basin. The MT sounding curves exhibit one-dimensional behavior at short periods (<10 s), not surprisingly considering the relatively flat local structure in the area. Layered-earth MT models, without geologic constraints, show a conductive (<10 ohm-m) layer at ~1.5 km above a more resistive layer (>1000 ohm-m) at ~ 3.5-4 km. Conductivities of the major stratigraphic units have been determined from well logs and previous MT modeling. Forward and inverse MT models constrained by the gravity-modeled geologic cross section are used to develop a conductivity model consistent with the geology, and are a step towards a better unified treatment of MT, seismic and gravity data.

  13. Seasonal variation of clogging of an artificial recharge basin in a northern climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, W. M.

    1990-12-01

    The decrease of infiltration rate, and the depth, cause, and hydraulic effect of clogging, were evaluated for a sandy, artificial-recharge test basin during the application of water containing between 51 and 61 mg l -1 suspended solids. Infiltration rate decreased by two orders of magnitude under fall operational conditions for a clean sand surface. Clogging was caused by clay deposition within the basin soil profile during early operation times (19-75 h) followed by the complete interception of sediment in the surface filter cake during later operational times. Impedance decreased by two to three orders of magnitude in the surface 8 cm, and by zero to two orders of magnitude from 8 to 38 cm. Increased clay content following basin operation was measured to a depth of 5 cm. During the spring test, sediment movement and deposition were similar to the fall test. In addition, carbonates and iron oxyhydroxides precipitated, causing cementation of the surface soil grains. The cementation caused increased hydraulic impedance and resulted in a decrease of total recharge. Carbonate precipitation was caused by increased basin-water pH resulting from algal photosynthesis. Allowing the basin to dry and crack for ten days resulted in a substantial recovery (64%) of infiltration rate. Following the drying treatment the basin reclogged more quickly than for the previous test on clean sands, and the impedance of the surface layer reached values larger than those prior to the drying treatment. The decrease of impedance caused by drying was confined to the surface layer, and no effect was observed below 8 cm. Following the natural drying treatment, total recharge was about half that of the clean basin.

  14. A tectogenetic mechanism controlling the evolution of the Texel-IJsselmeer High (northern Netherlands) and adjacent basins

    SciTech Connect

    Rijkers, R.; Geluk, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Geological studies around the Texel-IJsselmeer High have been carried out for the regional subsurface mapping project of the Geological Survey of The Netherlands. The Texel-IJsselmeer High, in the northern part of the Netherlands, is a northwest-southeast-trending structural unit, slightly tilted to the northeast. The geological evolution of the Texel-IJsselmeer High and the adjacent areas can be linked to an extensional tectonic regime during which several Jurassic basins in the Netherlands originated. During the Late Jurassic, the southern border of the Texel-IJsselmeer High was characterized by normal faulting. Main faults are dipping southwest and are generally part of a half-graben structure. Faulting is accompanied by subsidence of the hanging wall (Jurassic basin area), while the footwall (the Texel-IJsselmeer High) is isostatically uplifted and eroded. The proposed model is based on thinning of the lower crust beneath the basins during Jurassic extension by pure shear. This mechanism is coupled locally with shear zones (simple shear) as a result of lower crustal failure. The model is supported by observations on deep regional seismics at the southern margin of the basin area. During the Late Cretaceous/early Tertiary, transpressional intraplate stresses reactivated the structural weakness zones in the lower and upper crust in a reversed way (inversion). During this tectonic inversion the northwest-southeast-trending Texel-IJsselmeer High acted as a buffer zone perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress. Paleogeographical studies and geohistory analysis support the proposed tectogenetic model of the Texel-IJsselmeer High.

  15. Architecture and subsidence history of the intracratonic Hudson Bay Basin, northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas; Lavoie, Denis; Dietrich, Jim; Hu, Kezhen; Keating, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The Phanerozoic Hudson Bay Basin is a large intracratonic basin that is almost completely encircled by Precambrian rocks of the Canadian Shield. The preserved sedimentary succession is up to 2500 m thick and consists mainly of Upper Ordovician to Upper Devonian limestones, dolostones, evaporites and minor siliciclastics that were deposited in shallow marine conditions. Backstripping, based on new paleontological data and well correlations, reveals an irregular subsidence history marked by several periods of exhumation. In seismic data, the Hudson Bay Basin appears to have a relatively simple geometry, characterized by a lower sedimentary package cut by high-angle faults, overlain by a saucer-shape, essentially underformed upper sedimentary package. Normal (or transtensional) faults imaged on seismic reflection profiles provide clear evidence for crustal extension during deposition of the older sedimentary packages or slightly later, indicating that the basin is, at least partly, extensional in nature. However, significant changes in the depocenter location during the Paleozoic and variable exhumation values required by new maturation data indicate that other mechanisms influenced the subsidence/exhumation history of the basin. In particular, the influence of far-field events and dynamic topography transmitted by large-scale mantle flow in the continental interior (creating long-wavelength tilting and unconformities) is suspected but not yet proven.

  16. Evolution of the Lower Cretaceous Coqen basin in northern Lhasa, central Tibet Plateau: stratigraphy, sedimentology, and detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gaoyuan; Hu, Xiumian; Sinclair, Hugh; BouDagher-Fadel, Marcelle

    2016-04-01

    potential sources, the Zelong volcanic rocks and the pre-Carboniferous strata within the northern part of the Lhasa terrane are the most possible sources for the Duoni Formation. The evolution of the Early Cretaceous Coqen basin can be indivied into two stags. During Aptian time (~123-115 Ma), the Duoni Formation received materials southward from the Zelong volcanic rocks and the sedimentary basement rocks in the central Lhasa terrane. The basin developed in a retro-arc setting related to the northward subduction of Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere, resulting in the occurrence of the Zelong volcanics arc meanwhile. Our data are inconsistent with the foreland basin related to the Lhasa-Qiangtang collision in the north as previous interpreted. During latest Aptian-earliest Cenomanian (~115-98 Ma), the Coqen basin was prevailed by the shallow marine Langshan limestone, developed in a sag basin that developed in the retro side of the Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere subduction. The mechinism of this sag basin was the dynamic subsidence resulted from the low-angle or flatted subduction of the Neo-tethyan oceanic lithosphere during this time interval.

  17. Geochemical evidence for Paleozoic oil in Lower Cretaceous O Sandstone, northern Denver basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clayton, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Organic geochemical properties of the oil produced from the Lower Cretaceous O sandstone on the eastern flank of the Denver basin indicate that this oil has been derived from a different source rock than other Cretaceous oils in the basin. O sandstone oil is characterized by low pristane/phytane ratio, high isoprenoid/n-alkane ratios, high asphaltene content, high sulfur content, and slight predominance of even-carbon numbered n-alkanes in the C25+ fraction. These features are evidence of a Paleozoic source and indicate a carbonate rock is the likely source. Preliminary source rock evaluation and correlation data suggest that calcareous black shales and marls of Middle Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) age are the source of the O sandstone oil. This is the first reported occurrence of oil from Paleozoic source rocks in a Cretaceous reservoir in the Denver basin. -from Author

  18. A digital resource model of the Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal bed, Monongahela Group, northern Appalachian basin coal region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, L.F.; Tewalt, S.J.; Bragg, L.J.; Wallack, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation's coal resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh coal bed is the first bed in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region to undergo a fully-digital assessment. The bed-specific assessment is being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), and Maryland (MD). Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the Pittsburgh coal bed, and areal extent, mined areas, structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness maps of the bed have been released as United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The resulting resource model indicates that of the original 34 billion short tons (31 billion tonnes) of Pittsburgh coal, 16 billion short tons (14 billion tonnes) remain. Although most of the remaining coal is thinner, deeper, and higher in ash and sulfur (S) than the original resource, there are blocks of extensive thick (6-8 ft or 1.8-2.4 m) coal in southwestern PA and the northern panhandle of WV.The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation's coal resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh coal bed is the first bed in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region to undergo a fully-digital assessment. The bed-specific assessment is being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), and Maryland (MD). Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the Pittsburgh coal bed, and areal extent, mined areas, structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness maps of the bed have been released as United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The resulting resource

  19. Geophysical characteristics of Qiongdongnan Basin, Northern South China Sea and its significance in crustal structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Sun, Z.; Wang, Z.; Sun, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Qiongdongnan Basin was initiated in the Cenozoic above Pre-Cenozoic basement which overprinted by Cenozoic rifting basin tectonics soon after became as part of a South China Sea rifted passive continental margin. Decades of industrial exploration and scientific research in this petroliferous region have produced a lat of geological and geophysical data. We have integrated available grids of sedimentary horizons, well, seismic reflection data, and the observed gravity field into the first crust-scale structural model of the Qiongdongnan Basin. Reflectors of the base of Cenozoic were time-depth converted by implementing available information on time-depth relations. The relations time-depth conversion in different regions was made with reference to the adjacent wells. The depth and thickness data sets were compiled and integrated and then we interpolateidng of scattered data to create regular grids. The dimensions of the finalisedfinal depth and thickness maps amount tospan 300 km in an east--west direction and 150 km in a north-south direction, which is mainly limited by the distribution of available data Qiongdongnan Basin developed as a rifted continental margin that was overprinted by foreland tectonics soon after its initiation. To fully understand the complex history of the basin, it is indispensable necessary to widen integrate the knowledge about the present-day structure of the sub-sedimentary parts of the crust. We confront this challenge by combining existing information on the composition of the crust and on the depth of the crust-mantle boundary as indicated by refraction seismic lines with isostatic calculations and gravity modelling. (1) The sedimentary thickness distributions (a) sag belt center thicker than uplift belt; (b) the western parts of the basin are thicker than in the eastern; (c) a mainly general trend of gradual west(/southwest)ward shift of the migration of the depocentre form towards the westsouthwest during the Paleogene to Neogene

  20. Hydrochemistry (major and trace elements) of Lake Malawi (Nyasa), Tanzanian Northern Basin: local versus global considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchu, P.; Bergonzini, L.; Ambrosi, J.-P.; Cardinal, D.; Delalande, M.; Pons-Branchu, E.; Benedetti, M.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the first inventory of dissolved minor and trace element (F, Al, Fe, Mn, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo, Bi, Sr, Zn) concentrations in Lake Malawi, the second largest African lake. Sampling was carried out during 1993 dry season in the northern part of the lake. Trace metal concentrations were measured, together with Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cl, SO4, Alkalinity and Si, along three profiles in the lake northern extremity, in five tributaries and two on-land hydrothermal springs. Water profiles show similar elemental distributions and concentrations that are influenced by lake physical-chemical stratification. Stratification, assessed using temperature, conductivity, Si and Mn profiles, is characterised by two boundaries: the thermocline (70-90 m) and the oxicline (150-190 m). Elemental water concentrations are discussed using simple covariance analyse. Epilimnetic concentrations and distribution are also influenced by atmospheric deposition and river diving. Comparison of dissolved concentrations for potentially polluting elements with World Health Organisation Guidelines and those reported for other East African lakes shows that this reservoir is uncontaminated despite an increasing human stress. Major element behaviour is assessed through a 3 boxes model. In this model Cl and K are conservative elements whereas Si is removed from the solution by diatom productivity and sedimentation. Ca, Na, Mg and alkalinity show low reactivity. Evaporation is one of the controlling factors of lake element concentration that superimposes on the watershed control. Hydrothermal activity, not evidenced in the lake, controls the chemistry of one of the main northern tributary. Chemical comparison between Northern rivers and other tributaries characterises the geographical and geological specificity of studied northern watershed. Moreover the lake annual chemical budget shows that northern watershed generates the main elemental input to the lake, illustrating the dual importance of

  1. National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Basin Electric Project at Northern Border Pipeline Company's Compressor Station #7, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetzer, Richard; Leslie, Neil

    2008-02-01

    A field research test and verification project was conducted at the recovered energy generation plant at Northern Border Pipeline Company Compressor Station #7 (CS#7) near St. Anthony. Recovered energy generation plant equipment was supplied and installed by ORMAT Technologies, Inc. Basin Electric is purchasing the electricity under a purchase power agreement with an ORMAT subsidiary, which owns and operates the plant.

  2. The northern and central Appalachian basin coal region -- The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal bed assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, L.; Tewalt, S.; Bragg, L.; Wallack, R.; Freeman, P.; Tully, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal beds are two of six coal beds being assessed by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region. The coal resource assessments were designed to provide up-to-date, concise data on the location, quantity, and quality of US coals for Federal agencies, the public, industry and academia. Assessment products are fully digital and include original and remaining resource estimates; maps depicting areal extent, mined areas, geologic structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness, ash yield, sulfur content, calorific value, and selected trace-element contents; and public domain geochemical and stratigraphic databases. The assessment methodology and a few results are presented.

  3. Innovative Methodology For Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-28

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: “Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  4. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-31

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: "Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  5. Fluvio-lacustrine sedimentation and volcanism in a Late Carboniferous tensional intra-arc basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkreuz, Christoph

    1991-11-01

    Extensive outcrops of Late Carboniferous to Triassic volcanoplutonic magnetic-arc complexes occur in the Andes of northern Chile. In the Salar de Atacama area, terrestrial volcanosedimentary successions include a 200-600 m thick fluvio-lacustrine sequence ("Miembro Medio"). The terrestrial basin which accommodated this sequence formed during the latest Carboniferous on top of the deposits of the pre-existing Carboniferous composite volcanoes. The lower part of the Miembro Medio consists of green limnic and multicoloured alluvial fan deposits; the upper part is made up of red fluvial sedimentary rocks. Basic volcanic rocks occur locally throughout the sequence. The climate is inferred to have been warm and humid. The limnic (freshwater) environment had a minimum extension of 300 × 100 km. Limnic facies is inferred from the existence of fine-parallel-bedded sediments, ooliths and a limnic benthic fauna. Lake-shore deposits prevail in the outcrops. In some sections, the green limnic sequence is followed by red fine-grained floodplain or alluvial plain, and fluvial channel deposits. The framework composition of the Miembro Medio is dominated by volcanogenic detritus presumably eroded from the successions of the previous Late Carboniferous volcanic arc. Another volcanogenic clast type was provided by syndepositional basalto-andesitic phreatomagmatic activity, which also produced peperitic sills, dykes and lavas. The limnic-alluvial fan facies association, the predominance of volcanogenic detritus, and the accompanying intrabasinal basic calc-alkaline volcanism together with the considerable size of the basin point to a ?NW-SE trending half-graben setting controlled by (trans-)tensional arc tectonics. With regard to the Late Carboniferous-Triassic volcanosedimentary successions of northern Chile, this Latest Carboniferous tensional setting is the only feature in this area supporting those models, which inferred an extensional magmatic arc for the entire Central and

  6. Fission track evidence for widespread early to Middle miocene extension in the northern Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.; Miller, E.; Savage, C. . Geological Dept.); Gans, P. . Geological Science Dept.); Brown, R. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The northern Basin and Range province has experienced multiple periods of extension but the precise timing and relative importance of the various periods is poorly known. Geologic data in many areas suggest inception of extension was closely tied with the southward sweep in earliest magmatism, which is Eocene in southern Idaho, Oligocene in east-central Nevada, and Miocene in southern Nevada. Ar/Ar ages suggest that extension continued into the Early Miocene in areas such as the Raft River, Albion, Ruby, and Snake Range metamorphic core complexes. Youthful topography and recent faulting have been taken as indicating that faulting leading to present physiography is commonly younger than [approximately]10 Ma. New apatite fission track cooling age and track length data, supplemented by other information, point to the Early to Middle Miocene as an additional time of very significant extension-induced uplift and range formation. Many ranges in a 700-km-long north-south corridor from the Utah-Nevada-Idaho border to southernmost Nevada experience extension and major exhumation in Early to Middle Miocene time. Whether extension of Early to Middle Miocene age is restricted to this corridor or is more widespread is unclear due to the paucity of similar data to the east and west. Reconnaissance apatite ages from the Toiyabe Range and environs (NV) are [approximately]15 Ma and geologic data indicate Early to Middle Miocene extension at Yerington NV (Proffet and Dillis, 1984). Thus, it appears from the available data that the Early to Middle Miocene was an important, and previously little recognized, period of major extension over broad areas of the northern Basin and Range.

  7. Late Quaternary faulting on the Manas and Hutubi reverse faults in the northern foreland basin of Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhijun; Li, Sheng-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-08-01

    The Tian Shan Range lies in the actively deforming part of the India-Asia collision zone. In the northern foreland basin of Tian Shan, the strata were intensively deformed by Cenozoic folding and faulting. Slip rate studies along these faults are important for understanding the dynamics of crustal deformation and evaluating the seismic hazards in the region. Two reverse faults (the Manas and Hutubi faults) in the northern foreland basin were investigated. Due to past faulting events along these faults, the terrace treads along the Manas River were ruptured, forming fault scarps several meters in height. Loess deposits were trapped and preserved at the surface ruptures along these scarps. The thickness of the trapped loess is dependent on the size of the ruptures. The minimum and maximum ages of these scarps are constrained by dating the loess preserved at the surface ruptures and the terrace treads, respectively, using the quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating technique. Our dating results suggest that the loess trapped at the ruptures was deposited from the early to mid-Holocene at the Hutubi Fault, and from the mid- to late-Holocene at the Manas Fault. The vertical displacements of the faults were evaluated by measuring the topographic profiles across the investigated fault scarps using the differential global position system (DGPS). Our results suggest that, during the late Quaternary in the studied region, the vertical slip rates of the Manas Fault were between ˜ 0.74 mm /yr and ˜ 1.6 mm /yr, while the Hutubi Fault had a much lower vertical slip rate between ˜ 0.34 mm /yr and ˜ 0.40 mm /yr. The tectonic implications of our results are discussed.

  8. Crustal structure of the Boreas Basin formed at ultraslow spreading Knipovich Ridge - Northern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, T.; Jokat, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Boreas Basin is located in Norwegian Greenland Sea bordered by the Greenland Fracture Zone in the south and the Hovgard Ridge in the north, respectively. In the east it adjoins the ultraslow mid-ocean Knipovich Ridge. Previous seismic reflection studies in the Boreas Basin have shown that the basement topography has a roughness, which is typical for ultraslow spreading ridges. This observation supports assumptions that the basin was formed at ultraslow spreading rates during its entire geological history. However, the detailed crustal structure remained unresolved. In summer 2009 new seismic refraction data were acquired in the Boreas Basin during the expedition ARK-XXIV/3 with the research vessel Polarstern. The deep seismic sounding line has a length of 340 km. Forward modelling of the data of 18 ocean bottom seismometers deployed along the NW-SE trending profile reveal an unusual 3.2 km thin oceanic crust. The crustal model is further constrained by S-wave and 2D gravity modelling. The P-wave velocity model shows a layered oceanic crust without oceanic layer 3 and with velocities less than 6.3 km/s except beneath a nearly 2000 m high seamount. Beneath the seamount velocities of up to 6.7 km/s were observed. The mantle velocities range between 7.5 km/s in the uppermost mantle and 8.0 km/s in almost 15 km depth. A serpentinisation of approximately 13% in the uppermost mantle decreasing downwards can explain the low mantle velocities. In summary, the transect confirms earlier models that the entire Boreas Basin was formed at ultraslow spreading rates. Indications for this are the basement roughness and the overall thin oceanic crust. Both observations are typical for ultraslow spreading systems.

  9. What drives basin scale spatial variability of snowpack properties in northern Colorado?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexstone, G. A.; Fassnacht, S. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study uses a combination of field measurements and Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) operational snow data to understand the drivers of snow density and snow water equivalent (SWE) variability at the basin scale (100s to 1000s km2). Historic snow course snowpack density observations were analyzed within a multiple linear regression snow density model to estimate SWE directly from snow depth measurements. Snow surveys were completed on or about 1 April 2011 and 2012 and combined with NRCS operational measurements to investigate the spatial variability of SWE near peak snow accumulation. Bivariate relations and multiple linear regression models were developed to understand the relation of snow density and SWE with terrain variables (derived using a geographic information system (GIS)). Snow density variability was best explained by day of year, snow depth, UTM Easting, and elevation. Calculation of SWE directly from snow depth measurement using the snow density model has strong statistical performance, and model validation suggests the model is transferable to independent data within the bounds of the original data set. This pathway of estimating SWE directly from snow depth measurement is useful when evaluating snowpack properties at the basin scale, where many time-consuming measurements of SWE are often not feasible. A comparison with a previously developed snow density model shows that calibrating a snow density model to a specific basin can provide improvement of SWE estimation at this scale, and should be considered for future basin scale analyses. During both water year (WY) 2011 and 2012, elevation and location (UTM Easting and/or UTM Northing) were the most important SWE model variables, suggesting that orographic precipitation and storm track patterns are likely driving basin scale SWE variability. Terrain curvature was also shown to be an important variable, but to a lesser extent at the scale of interest.

  10. New insights into lithology and hydrogeology of the northern Newark Rift Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D. S.; Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Morgan, S.; Yang, Q.; Stute, M.; Matter, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    The marginal facies of the Triassic rift basins in the eastern United States are poorly documented, particularly on the hinge or hanging wall margins. This study presents a lithological description and multiscale petrophysical analysis of basement rocks, overlying marginal facies of the early synrift strata, and the basal contact of the Palisade Sill that were drilled and cored in the northeastern part of the Newark Basin, near its terminus. The expression of the Stockton Formation differs from that in the central basin in having thinner layers, with uncertain temporal relationship to the type area. The bottom 50 m is lithologically distinct with brick-red to dark-purple mudstones and sandstones, abundant gypsum-filled fractures, and a thin zone with anomalously high uranium concentration, not associated with organic-rich mudstones as other occurrences in the basin. The crystalline basement is apparently Fordham gneiss, overlain by a thin sandstone layer and a dark-purple hydrophilic mudstone. Despite the abundance of coarse-grained strata and multiple sets of tectonic fractures, hydraulically transmissive zones are sparse, and do not uniquely correlate to fracture and/or matrix characteristics. Enhanced transmissivity may exist along intrusion boundaries due to enhanced thermal fracturing, but more hydraulic data are needed to verify it. Comparison of petrophysical data in two boreholes ˜210 m apart shows no direct correlation of individual lithological units and their hydraulic properties, although the overall formation characteristics are similar. The results highlight challenges for outcrop correlation at the marginal edges of the rift basins and estimating reservoir properties of these heterogeneous formations.