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Sample records for calcific uremic arteriolopathy

  1. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy on Multimodal Combination Therapy: Still Unmet Goal

    PubMed Central

    Malabu, Usman Hammawa; Manickam, Valli; Kan, George; Doherty, Susan Lynette; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh

    2012-01-01

    Background. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) or calciphylaxis though generally noted for its high mortality, recent case reports have shown promising results using single agent therapies. However, it is not clear whether combination therapeutic agents will improve course of the disease. Objective. To determine clinical outcome in subjects with CUA on multimodal treatment. Methods. All patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, from April 1, 2006, to March 31, 2011, with diagnosis of CUA were retrospectively studied. Results. Six subjects with CUA (4 females and 2 males) were on various combination therapeutic agents comprising sodium thiosulphate, hyperbaric oxygen, prednisolone, cinacalcet, and parathyroidectomy in addition to intensified haemodialysis, specialist local wound care, and antibiotics. The wounds failed to heal in 3 patients while 5 of the 6 subjects died; cause of death being sepsis in 3 and myocardial infarction in 2. Conclusion. Prognosis of CUA remains poor in spite of multimodal combination therapy. Further prospective studies on a larger population are needed to verify our findings. PMID:22518312

  2. The Effect of Cinacalcet on Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy Events in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis: The EVOLVE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yumi; Floege, Anna; Chertow, Glenn M.; Parfrey, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Uncontrolled secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) in patients with ESRD is a risk factor for calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA; calciphylaxis). Design, setting, participants, & measurements Adverse event reports collected during the Evaluation of Cinacalcet HCl Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events trial were used to determine the frequency of CUA in patients receiving hemodialysis who had moderate to severe sHPT, as well as the effects of cinacalcet versus placebo. CUA events were collected while patients were receiving the study drug. Results Among the 3861 trial patients who received at least one dose of the study drug, 18 patients randomly assigned to placebo and six assigned to cinacalcet developed CUA (unadjusted relative hazard, 0.31; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.13 to 0.79; P=0.014). Corresponding cumulative event rates (95% CI) at year 4 were 0.011% (0.006% to 0.018%) and 0.005% (0.002% to 0.010%). By multivariable analysis, other factors associated with CUA included female sex, higher body mass index, higher diastolic BP, and history of dyslipidemia or parathyroidectomy. Median (10%, 90% percentile) plasma parathyroid hormone concentrations proximal to the report of CUA were 796 (225, 2093) pg/ml and 410 (71, 4957) pg/ml in patients randomly assigned to placebo and cinacalcet, respectively. Active use of vitamin K antagonists was recorded in 11 of 24 patients with CUA, nine randomly assigned to placebo, and two to cinacalcet, in contrast to 5%–7% at any one time point in patients in whom CUA was not reported. Conclusion Cinacalcet appeared to reduce the incidence of CUA in hemodialysis recipients who have moderate to severe sHPT. PMID:25887067

  3. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Melvin R; Tyagi, Suresh C; Kolb, Lisa; Sowers, James R; Khanna, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling). The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare) is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications. PMID:15777477

  4. Medial artery calcification of uremic patients: a histological, histochemical and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, P; Silvestrini, G; Pisanò, S; De Paolis, P; Di Giulio, S; Mantella, D; Iappelli, M; Favarò, A; Bonucci, E; Coen, G

    2011-02-01

    Recent findings suggest that vascular calcification (VC) is an active process similar to bone mineralization, the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) undergoing phenotypic differentiation into osteoblastic cells and synthesizing calcification-regulating proteins found in bone. This study has investigated the VC process of uremic patients, with a morphologic approach. Epigastric artery samples from 49 uremic, non-diabetic patients were taken during kidney transplantation. Sections from paraffin-embedded samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and von Kossa. CD68 was immunohistochemically detected, and sections from frozen samples were stained with Oil Red O. Deeply calcified samples were stained with Picrosirius Red, PAS, and Alcian blue. Specimens from one patient with moderate and one with severe VC were examined under the electron microscope. None of the samples had atherosclerosis. Calcifications were found in the media of 38 patients. In 23, dot-like calcifications were irregularly scattered near the adventitia (light VC); in 11, granular calcifications formed concentric rings near the adventitia (moderate-advanced VC); in 4, zones of consolidated calcifications were found (severe VC). These zones were poor in collagen, glycoproteins and proteoglycans. In cases with moderate or severe VC, VSCMs showed necrotic changes. Matrix vesicles could be recognized in the extracellular spaces. In cases with severe VC, uncalcified or partially calcified membranous bodies were found, together with Liesegang rings. Patches of fibrin were also found. These findings point to a mainly degenerative mechanism of VC, which proceeds from the outer portion of the media. An active mechanism, however, cannot be excluded. A unifying hypothesis is suggested. PMID:21154233

  5. Fetuin-A decrease induced by a low-protein diet enhances vascular calcification in uremic rats with hyperphosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Tokumoto, Masanori; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Tatsumoto, Narihito; Noguchi, Hideko; Kitazono, Takanari; Ooboshi, Hiroaki

    2015-10-15

    Although dietary phosphate restriction is important for treating hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, it remains unclear whether a low-protein diet (LPD), which contains low phosphate, has beneficial effects on malnutrition, inflammation, and vascular calcification. The effects of LPD on inflammation, malnutrition, and vascular calcification were therefore assessed in rats. Rats were fed a normal diet or diets containing 0.3% adenine and low/normal protein and low/high phosphate. After 6 wk, serum and urinary biochemical parameters, systemic inflammation, and vascular calcification were examined. The protective effect of fetuin-A and albumin were assessed in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Rats fed the diet containing 0.3% adenine developed severe azotemia. LPD in rats fed high phosphate induced malnutrition (decreases in body weight, food intake, serum albumin and fetuin-A levels, and urinary creatinine excretion) and systemic inflammation (increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-α and urinary oxidative stress marker). LPD decreased the serum fetuin-A level and fetuin-A synthesis in the liver and increased serum calcium-phosphate precipitates. A high-phosphate diet increased aortic calcium content, which was enhanced by LPD. Reduced fetal calf serum in the medium of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells enhanced phosphate-induced formation of calcium-phosphate precipitates in the media and calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells, both of which were prevented by fetuin-A administration. Our results suggest that phosphate restriction by restricting dietary protein promotes vascular calcification by lowering the systemic fetuin-A level and increasing serum calcium-phosphate precipitates and induces inflammation and malnutrition in uremic rats fed a high-phosphate diet. PMID:26180236

  6. Uremic pruritus.

    PubMed

    Mettang, Thomas; Kremer, Andreas E

    2015-04-01

    Uremic pruritus or chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus (CKD-aP) remains a frequent and compromising symptom in patients with advanced or end-stage renal disease, strongly reducing the patient's quality of life. More than 40% of patients undergoing hemodialysis suffer from chronic pruritus; half of them complain about generalized pruritus. The pathogenesis of CKD-aP remains obscure. Parathormone and histamine as well as calcium and magnesium salts have been suspected as pathogenetic factors. Newer hypotheses are focusing on opioid-receptor derangements and microinflammation as possible causes of CKD-aP, although until now this could not be proven. Pruritus may be extremely difficult to control, as therapeutic options are limited. The most consequential approaches to treatment are: topical treatment with or without anti-inflammatory compounds or systemic treatment with (a) gabapentin, (b) μ-opioid receptor antagonists and κ-agonists, (c) drugs with an anti-inflammatory action, (d) phototherapy, or (e) acupuncture. A stepwise approach is suggested starting with emollients and gabapentin or phototherapy as first-line treatments. In refractory cases, more experimental options as μ-opioid-receptor-antagonists (i.e., naltrexone) or κ-opioid-receptor agonist (nalfurafine) may be chosen. In desperate cases, patients suitable for transplantation might be set on 'high urgency'-status, as successful kidney transplantation will relieve patients from CKD-aP. PMID:24402092

  7. Uremic Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Mettang, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Uremic itch is a frequent and sometimes very tormenting symptom in patients with advanced or end-stage renal failure, with a strong negative impact on the quality of life. According to a representative study, the point prevalence of chronic itch is 25% in hemodialysis patients but may reach more than 50% in single cohorts depending on the country and dialysis efficacy. Not much is known regarding the pathogenesis of uremic itch. Besides parathyroid hormone, histamine, tryptase, and alteration of the calcium-phosphate metabolism have been suspected. More recently, derangements in the opioid system and an inflammatory condition have been investigated as suspected players in the pathogenesis of uremic itch, but remain unproven so far. Treatment of chronic itch in dialysis patients remains difficult. Besides topical application of rehydrating or immunomodulating compounds, such as γ-linolenic acid or tacrolimus treatment with nalfurafine may be helpful. Apart from that, gabapentin and pregabalin are promising drugs to alleviate uremic itch. In many cases, UVB phototherapy is effective in reducing the intensity of itch. When treating patients, one should take into account that most of the drugs available are not licensed for the treatment of itch. Therefore, a deliberate use of therapeutic options aiming for a good risk-benefit relation should be adopted. In very severe and refractory cases, patients suitable for renal transplantation might be switched to 'high urgency' status, as successful renal transplantation cures uremic pruritus in most of the cases. PMID:27578082

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  9. Soft tissue calcification in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzela, D. C.; Huffer, W. E.; Conger, J. D.; Winter, S. D.; Hammond, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Autopsy protocols and microscopic slides of 56 dialyzed and 18 nondialyzed chronically uremic patients were reviewed to assess the presence, extent, and severity of extraosseous soft tissue calcification. Calcification was identified in 79% of the dialysis patients and 44% of the nondialysis patients (P iss less than .025). Soft tissue calcification most frequently involved the heart, lungs, stomach, and kidneys. Lesions were severe in 36% of the dialysis patients and, when strategically located within the myocardium, were life-threatening. The deaths of 6 dialysis patients were attributed to severe calcification of the cardiac conduction system and/or myocardium. The presence and severity of soft tissue calcification was not related to duration of dialysis, patients' age, degree of parathyroid gland hyperplasia, radiographic evidence of soft tissue calcification, serum calcium and phosphate levels, Ca X P products, or type or severity of metabolic bone disease. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:836675

  10. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  11. BMP-7 is an efficacious treatment of vascular calcification in a murine model of atherosclerosis and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew R; Lund, Richard J; Hruska, Keith A

    2003-06-01

    Chronic renal failure is complicated by high cardiovascular mortality. One key contributor to this mortality is vascular calcification, for which no therapy currently exists. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 is an essential renal morphogen that maintains renal tubular differentiation in the adult and is downregulated in renal failure. Several studies have demonstrated its efficacy in treating various renal diseases in rodents, and it was hypothesized that it would also be an effective treatment of vascular calcification in this setting. Uremia was imposed on LDL receptor null mice (a model of atherosclerosis), which were then treated with bone morphogenetic protein 7 for 15 wk. Uremic animals had increased vascular calcification by histology and chemical analysis. Calcification in treated animals was similar to or less than non-uremic control animals. Cells exhibiting an osteoblast-like phenotype in the vessel wall may be important in the etiology of vascular calcification. Expression of osteocalcin was assessed as a marker of osteoblastic function, and it is shown that it is increased in untreated uremic animals but downregulated to levels similar to non-uremic control animals with treatment. The data are compatible with bone morphogenetic protein 7 deficiency as a pathophysiologic factor in chronic renal failure, and they demonstrate its efficacy as a potential treatment of vascular calcification. PMID:12761256

  12. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently

  13. Normal and Pathologic Concentrations of Uremic Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Duranton, Flore; Cohen, Gerald; De Smet, Rita; Rodriguez, Mariano; Jankowski, Joachim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    An updated review of the existing knowledge regarding uremic toxins facilitates the design of experimental studies. We performed a literature search and found 621 articles about uremic toxicity published after a 2003 review of this topic. Eighty-seven records provided serum or blood measurements of one or more solutes in patients with CKD. These records described 32 previously known uremic toxins and 56 newly reported solutes. The articles most frequently reported concentrations of β2-microglobulin, indoxyl sulfate, homocysteine, uric acid, and parathyroid hormone. We found most solutes (59%) in only one report. Compared with previous results, more recent articles reported higher uremic concentrations of many solutes, including carboxymethyllysine, cystatin C, and parathyroid hormone. However, five solutes had uremic concentrations less than 10% of the originally reported values. Furthermore, the uremic concentrations of four solutes did not exceed their respective normal concentrations, although they had been previously described as uremic retention solutes. In summary, this review extends the classification of uremic retention solutes and their normal and uremic concentrations, and it should aid the design of experiments to study the biologic effects of these solutes in CKD. PMID:22626821

  14. Uremic tumoral calcinosis in the cervical spine: case report.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mostafa; Ahuja, Christopher S; Wang, Shelly; Ginsberg, Howard J

    2016-07-01

    Tumoral calcinosis is an uncommon condition characterized by the calcification of periarticular soft tissue. In uremic patients the disease is secondary to metabolic disturbances in predisposed patients. The authors report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with a new painful cervical mass while undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for long-standing end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A CT scan of the neck showed a lobulated, calcified mass in the left paraspinal soft tissue at C2-3. This mass affected the facet joint and also extended into the neural foramen but did not cause any neurological compromise. Due to the patient's significant medical comorbidities, resection was deferred and the patient was followed in the clinic. Subsequent repeat imaging has shown a significant decrease in the size of the mass. In the context of ESRD, a diagnosis of uremic tumoral calcinosis (UTC) was made. The authors conducted a search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases and identified 7 previously reported cases of UTC of the cervical spine. They present a summary of these cases and discuss the etiology, diagnosis, and management of the condition. Although the metabolic disturbances seen in patients undergoing dialysis can lead to tumoral calcinosis, most reported cases involve large joints such as the shoulder or the hip; however, the spine can also be affected and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with uremia as it can mimic aggressive bone-forming neoplasms. PMID:26943247

  15. Uremic pleuritis in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Rashid-Farokhi, Farin; Pourdowlat, Guitti; Nikoonia, Mohammad-Reza; Behzadnia, Neda; Kahkouee, Shahram; Nassiri, Amir-Ahmad; Masjedi, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients are predisposed to several complications associated with pleural effusion. In addition, uremia can directly cause pleuritis. However, there are inadequate data about pathogenesis and natural course of uremic pleuritis. In this study, 76 chronic HD patients with pleural effusion admitted to the Respiratory Center of Masih Daneshvari Hospital, in Tehran, Iran between June 2005 and May 2011 were evaluated to figure out the etiology of their pleural disease. Among these patients, patients with uremic pleuritis were identified and studied. The rate of uremic pleuritis was 23.7%. Other frequent etiologies of pleural effusion were parapneumonic effusion (23.7%), cardiac failure (19.7%), tuberculosis (6.6%), volume overload, malignancy, and unknown. In patients with uremic pleuritis, dyspnea was the most common symptom, followed by cough, weight loss, anorexia, chest pain, and fever. Compared to patients with parapneumonic effusion, patients with uremic effusion had a significantly higher rate of dyspnea and lower rate of cough and fever. Pleural fluid analysis showed that these patients had a significantly lower pleural to serum lactic dehydrogenase ratio, total pleural leukocytes, and polymorphonuclear count compared to patients with parapneumonic effusion. Improvement was achieved in 94.1% of patients with uremic pleuritis by continuation of HD, chest tube insertion or pleural decortication; an outcome better than the previous reports. Despite the association with an exudative effusion, inflammatory pleural reactions in patients with uremic pleuritis may not be as severe as infection-induced effusions. Owing to the advancement in HD technology and other interventions, outcome of uremic pleuritis may be improved. PMID:22716271

  16. An Enlarged Profile of Uremic Solutes

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hisae; Sirich, Tammy L.; Plummer, Natalie S.; Weaver, Daniel S.; Meyer, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Better knowledge of the uremic solutes that accumulate when the kidneys fail could lead to improved renal replacement therapy. This study employed the largest widely available metabolomic platform to identify such solutes. Plasma and plasma ultrafiltrate from 6 maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients and 6 normal controls were first compared using a platform combining gas and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Further studies compared plasma from 6 HD patients who had undergone total colectomy and 9 with intact colons. We identified 120 solutes as uremic including 48 that had not been previously reported to accumulate in renal failure. Combination of the 48 newly identified solutes with those identified in previous reports yielded an extended list of more than 270 uremic solutes. Among the solutes identified as uremic in the current study, 9 were shown to be colon-derived, including 6 not previously identified as such. Literature search revealed that many uremic phenyl and indole solutes, including most of those shown to be colon-derived, come from plant foods. Some of these compounds can be absorbed directly from plant foods and others are produced by colon microbial metabolism of plant polyphenols that escape digestion in the small intestine. A limitation of the metabolomic method was that it underestimated the elevation in concentration of uremic solutes which were measured using more quantitative assays. PMID:26317986

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease: The Link between Bone and the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Chang Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and increases mortality in those patients. Impaired calcium and phosphate homeostasis, increased oxidative stress, and loss of calcification inhibitors have been linked to vascular calcification in CKD. Additionally, impaired bone may perturb serum calcium/phosphate and their key regulator, parathyroid hormone, thus contributing to increased vascular calcification in CKD. Therapeutic approaches for CKD, such as phosphate binders and bisphosphonates, have been shown to ameliorate bone loss as well as vascular calcification. The precise mechanisms responsible for vascular calcification in CKD and the contribution of bone metabolism to vascular calcification have not been elucidated. This review discusses the role of systemic uremic factors and impaired bone metabolism in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in CKD. The regulation of the key osteogenic transcription factor Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and the emerging role of Runx2-dependent receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in vascular calcification of CKD are emphasized. PMID:25947259

  18. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  19. Protein-bound uremic toxins: new culprits of cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been considered a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Although great advances have recently been made in the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, CKD remains a major global health problem. Moreover, the occurrence rates of cardiovascular events among CKD patients increase even in cases in which patients undergo hemodialysis, and the mechanisms underlying the so-called "cardiorenal syndrome" are not clearly understood. Recently, small-molecule uremic toxins have been associated with cardiovascular mortality in CKD and/or dialysis patients. These toxins range from small uncharged solutes to large protein-bound structures. In this review, we focused on protein-bound uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate, which are poorly removed by current dialysis techniques. Several studies have demonstrated that protein-bound uremic toxins, especially indoxyl sulfate, induce vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular calcification, which may explain the relatively poor prognosis of CKD and dialysis patients. The aim of this review is to provide novel insights into the effects of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:24561478

  20. Future Avenues to Decrease Uremic Toxin Concentration.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond C; Eloot, Sunny; Glorieux, Griet L R L

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we review approaches for decreasing uremic solute concentrations in chronic kidney disease and in particular, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The rationale to do so is the straightforward relation between concentration and biological (toxic) effect for most toxins. The first section is devoted to extracorporeal strategies (kidney replacement therapy). In the context of high-flux hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration, we discuss increasing dialyzer blood and dialysate flows, frequent and/or extended dialysis, adsorption, bioartificial kidney, and changing physical conditions within the dialyzer (especially for protein-bound toxins). The next section focuses on the intestinal generation of uremic toxins, which in return is stimulated by uremic conditions. Therapeutic options are probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, and intestinal sorbents. Current data are conflicting, and these issues need further study before useful therapeutic concepts are developed. The following section is devoted to preservation of (residual) kidney function. Although many therapeutic options may overlap with therapies provided before ESRD, we focus on specific aspects of ESRD treatment, such as the risks of too-strict blood pressure and glycemic regulation and hemodynamic changes during dialysis. Finally, some recommendations are given on how research might be organized with regard to uremic toxins and their effects, removal, and impact on outcomes of uremic patients. PMID:26500179

  1. MicroRNAs 29b, 133b, and 211 Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Calcification Mediated by High Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Panizo, Sara; Naves-Díaz, Manuel; Carrillo-López, Natalia; Martínez-Arias, Laura; Fernández-Martín, José Luis; Ruiz-Torres, María Piedad; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodríguez, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD and the general population. The common association between vascular calcification and osteoporosis suggests a link between bone and vascular disorders. Because microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells into osteoblast-like cells, we investigated whether miRs implicated in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation are involved in vascular calcification. Different levels of uremia, hyperphosphatemia, and aortic calcification were induced by feeding nephrectomized rats a normal or high-phosphorus diet for 12 or 20 weeks, at which times the levels of eight miRs (miR-29b, miR-125, miR-133b, miR-135, miR-141, miR-200a, miR-204, and miR-211) in the aorta were analyzed. Compared with controls and uremic rats fed a normal diet, uremic rats fed a high-phosphorous diet had lower levels of miR-133b and miR-211 and higher levels of miR-29b that correlated respectively with greater expression of osteogenic RUNX2 and with lower expression of several inhibitors of osteoblastic differentiation. Uremia per se mildly reduced miR-133b levels only. Similar results were obtained in two in vitro models of vascular calcification (uremic serum and high-calcium and -phosphorus medium), and experiments using antagomirs and mimics to modify miR-29b, miR-133b, and miR-211 expression levels in these models confirmed that these miRs regulate the calcification process. We conclude that miR-29b, miR-133b, and miR-211 have direct roles in the vascular smooth muscle calcification induced by high phosphorus and may be new therapeutic targets in the management of vascular calcification. PMID:26187577

  2. Mechanism of atherosclerotic calcification.

    PubMed

    Shioi, A; Mori, K; Jono, S; Wakikawa, T; Hiura, Y; Koyama, H; Okuno, Y; Nishizawa, Y; Morii, H

    2000-01-01

    Calcification is almost invariably associated with atherosclerotic plaque lesions. Recent data suggest that plaque calcification is an active, regulated process similar to osteogenesis. In order to clarify the mechanism of plaque calcification, we developed an in vitro model of vascular calcification by utilizing bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (BVSMCs). This model is useful in that diffuse and massive calcification can be induced within 2 weeks and thereby biochemical analyses of vascular calcification can be performed. We have analyzed several aspects of vascular calcification by using this model and demonstrated as follows: 1) in vitro calcification of BVSMCs is regulated by calciotropic hormones and BVSMCs are equipped with a unique autocrine and/or paracrine system regulating calcium metabolism. 2) Sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport plays a crucial role in BVSMC calcification as well as in mineralization of skeletal tissues. 3) BVSMCs acquire osteoblastic phenotype under certain conditions. Finally, we discuss the roles of macrophages in the development of atherosclerotic calcification. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) induces gene expression of 25-hydrovitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1 alpha OHase) and its activity in macrophages. Since 1 alpha OHase can locally convert 25-hydroxyvitamin D into 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), an active metabolite of vitamin D, it is suggested that local production of 1,25(OH)2D by macrophages may promote atherosclerotic calcification. Moreover, macrophages may be involved in the phenotypic changes of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to acquire calcifying capacity. Therefore, the phenotypic changes of VSMCs in atherosclerotic plaque may contribute to the development of atherosclerotic calcification. PMID:10769407

  3. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2009-03-01

    Skin disorders associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) can markedly affect a patient's quality of life and can negatively impact their mental and physical health. Uremic pruritus, which is frequently encountered in patients with CKD, is considered to be an inflammatory systemic disease rather than a local skin disorder. Biomarkers of inflammation are increased in patients with uremic pruritus and an imbalance of the endogenous opioidergic system might be involved in the complex pathogenesis of the disease. Treatment options for uremic pruritus include emollients, topical capsaicin cream, ultraviolet B phototherapy, gabapentin, oral activated charcoal and nalfurafine, a kappa-opioid-receptor agonist. Calcific uremic arteriolopathy is triggered by an imbalance of promoters and inhibitors of vascular calcification, caused by the inflammatory changes that occur in uremia. Promising therapeutic strategies for calcific uremic arteriolopathy include bisphosphonates and intravenous sodium thiosulfate. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a devastating condition associated with the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with CKD. At present, no therapies are available for this complication. Preventive measures include use of iodine-based contrast agents, particularly in patients with CKD stage 4 and 5. If gadolinium contrast is necessary, administration of low volumes of the more stable macrocyclic ionic types of gadolinium-based contrast agent is advocated. Hemodialysis following gadolinium exposure might offer benefits but evidence is lacking. PMID:19190625

  4. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... uremic syndrome Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Hemolytic Anemia National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Thrombocytopenia National Institute of Diabetes ...

  5. Bioengineered kidney tubules efficiently excrete uremic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, J.; Fedecostante, M.; Wilmer, M. J.; Peters, J. G.; Kreuser, U. M.; van den Broek, P. H.; Mensink, R. A.; Boltje, T. J.; Stamatialis, D.; Wetzels, J. F.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Hoenderop, J. G.; Masereeuw, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biotechnological platform for the removal of waste products (e.g. uremic toxins), often bound to proteins in plasma, is a prerequisite to improve current treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Here, we present a newly designed bioengineered renal tubule capable of active uremic toxin secretion through the concerted action of essential renal transporters, viz. organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4). Three-dimensional cell monolayer formation of human conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells (ciPTEC) on biofunctionalized hollow fibers with maintained barrier function was demonstrated. Using a tailor made flow system, the secretory clearance of human serum albumin-bound uremic toxins, indoxyl sulfate and kynurenic acid, as well as albumin reabsorption across the renal tubule was confirmed. These functional bioengineered renal tubules are promising entities in renal replacement therapies and regenerative medicine, as well as in drug development programs. PMID:27242131

  6. [Disk calcifications in children].

    PubMed

    Schmit, P; Fauré, C; Denarnaud, L

    1985-05-01

    It is not unusual for intervertebral disk calcifications to be detected in pediatric practice, the 150 or so cases reported in the literature probably representing only a small proportion of lesions actually diagnosed. Case reports of 33 children with intervertebral disk calcifications were analyzed. In the majority of these patients (31 of 33) a diagnosis of "idiopathic" calcifications had been made, the cervical localization of the lesions being related to repeated ORL infections and/or trauma. A pre-existing pathologic factor was found in two cases (one child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treated by corticoids and one child with Williams and Van Beuren's syndrome). An uncomplicated course was noted in 31 cases, the symptomatology (pain, spinal stiffness and febricula) improving after several days. Complications developed in two cases: one child had very disabling dysphagia due to an anteriorly protruding cervical herniated disc and surgery was necessary; the other child developed cervicobrachial neuralgia due to herniated disc protrusion into the cervical spinal canal, but symptoms regressed within several days although calcifications persisted unaltered. These findings and the course of the rare complications documented in the literature suggest the need for the most conservative treatment possible in cases of disc calcifications in children. PMID:4032343

  7. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below. PMID:27252789

  8. Calcific Metamorphosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Shoaib Haider; Mohamed, Ahmed Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Dental trauma to the permanent dentition can lead to clinical complications and its management may considerably challenge a practitioner. The incidence of pulp canal obliteration following dental trauma has been reported to be approximately 4 – 24%. Attempting to locate canals following calcific metamorphosis and negotiating it to full working length may lead to iatrogenic errors such as fractured instrument and perforation. This review article describes the possible etiology of Calcific Metamorphosis, its clinical and radiographic features as well as its management. PMID:27610067

  9. Calciphylaxis: Controversies in Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Haneol S; Dominguez, Arturo R

    2016-02-01

    Calcific uremic arteriolopathy, otherwise known as calciphylaxis, is a rare disease characterized by skin ulceration and tissue necrosis, likely the result of vascular calcification with accompanying intimal hypertrophy and small vessel thrombosis. Although most often associated with end-stage renal disease, it has also been seen in a number of other disorders (collectively referred to as nonuremic calciphylaxis). The purpose of this review is to summarize and analyze the currently available literature regarding the pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnostic features and treatment modalities for this exceptionally uncommon illness. A series of recommended treatments is proposed for optimal treatment of calciphylaxis lesions. PMID:26897281

  10. What is new in uremic toxicity?

    PubMed Central

    Van Laecke, Steven; Glorieux, Griet

    2008-01-01

    Uremic syndrome results from a malfunctioning of various organ systems due to the retention of compounds which, under normal conditions, would be excreted into the urine and/or metabolized by the kidneys. If these compounds are biologically active, they are called uremic toxins. One of the more important toxic effects of such compounds is cardio-vascular damage. A convenient classification based on the physico-chemical characteristics affecting the removal of such compounds by dialysis is: (1) small water-soluble compounds; (2) protein-bound compounds; (3) the larger “middle molecules”. Recent developments include the identification of several newly detected compounds linked to toxicity or the identification of as yet unidentified toxic effects of known compounds: the dinucleotide polyphosphates, structural variants of angiotensin II, interleukin-18, p-cresylsulfate and the guanidines. Toxic effects seem to be typically exerted by molecules which are “difficult to remove by dialysis”. Therefore, dialysis strategies have been adapted by applying membranes with larger pore size (high-flux membranes) and/or convection (on-line hemodiafiltration). The results of recent studies suggest that these strategies have better outcomes, thereby clinically corroborating the importance attributed in bench studies to these “difficult to remove” molecules. PMID:18324423

  11. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  12. Uremic pruritus. Clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Ståhle-Bäckdahl, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clinical aspects of pruritus in maintenance hemodialysis patients and to evaluate factors of putative pathogenic importance. 60-65% of the patients in a maintenance hemodialysis program during a two-year period suffered from itching. Patients with pruritus tended to have been on dialysis treatment longer than those without pruritus (p = 0.05), otherwise there was no difference in clinical data or routine laboratory tests. Measurement of itch intensity continuously over one week in 28 patients using a computerized method showed that itching peaked at night after two days without dialysis, was relatively high during treatment and lowest during the day following dialysis. Our results suggest that the accumulation of pruritogens between dialysis sessions influences the intensity of itching. Most patients had "dry" skin. Recording of the stratum corneum water content by measurement of electrical capacitance, in 31 patients (19 with pruritus) and 12 controls, disclosed no significant difference between dialysis patients and controls, but a tendency that pruritic patients had a lower water content than the other subjects. In different body areas, there was a positive correlation in all groups between the clinical estimation of xerosis and hydration. Serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were significantly higher in dialysis patients with pruritus than in those without, but there was no correlation between the degree of symptoms and the PTH level. Indirect immunohistochemistry revealed no immunoreactivity for different parts of the PTH molecule in skin biopsies from uremic patients. Intradermal injections of PTH fragments did not evoke itching or other cutaneous reactions in patients or controls. Our results do not support PTH as a peripheral mediator of uremic itching. Flare reactions induced by intradermal histamine injections were significantly smaller in 26 dialysis patients (18 with pruritus) than in 9 healthy

  13. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  14. Chondrocalcinosis and other calcifications.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P S

    1988-11-01

    Less than 30 years ago, McCarty and others first described a syndrome which presented with gout-like attacks of arthritis but was due to CPPD crystals instead of urate crystals. They termed the condition "pseudogout." It was noted that this was often associated with chondrocalcinosis and it was commonly held that cartilage calcification had to be present if the diagnosis was to be suggested on the basis of the radiographic findings. Subsequently, a clinical and radiographic pattern has emerged in which the diagnosis of CPPD deposition disease can be suggested in the absence of chondrocalcinosis. This condition is termed pyrophosphate arthropathy and is differentiated from degenerative disease by the pattern and distribution of the joint disease. It is important to recognize CPPD deposition disease because of its association with other diseases, such as hemochromatosis and hyperparathyroidism. Although painful periarticular tendinous calcification (peritendinitis calcarea) resulting from the deposition of calcium HA crystals has long been recognized, it has only recently been discovered that intra-articular HA can be associated with an acute inflammatory synovitis. Additionally, patients are now being identified who have CPPD deposition at one anatomic location and HA deposition at another. Differentiation of these various types of crystal-induced arthropathies should lead to more effective therapy in the future. PMID:2845468

  15. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Toxins, Vessels, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Victoria; Trachtman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy of the glomerular microcirculation and other vascular beds. Its defining clinical phenotype is acute kidney injury (AKI), microangiopathic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. There are many etiologies of HUS including infection by Shiga toxin-producing bacterial strains, medications, viral infections, malignancy, and mutations of genes coding for proteins involved in the alternative pathway of complement. In the aggregate, although HUS is a rare disease, it is one of the most common causes of AKI in previously healthy children and accounts for a sizable number of pediatric and adult patients who progress to end stage kidney disease. There has been great progress over the past 20 years in understanding the pathophysiology of HUS and its related disorders. There has been intense focus on vascular injury in HUS as the major mechanism of disease and target for effective therapies for this acute illness. In all forms of HUS, there is evidence of both systemic and intra-glomerular inflammation and perturbations in the immune system. Renewed investigation into these aspects of HUS may prove helpful in developing new interventions that can attenuate glomerular and tubular injury and improve clinical outcomes in patients with HUS. PMID:25593915

  16. Hemolytic uremic syndrome: toxins, vessels, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Victoria; Trachtman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy of the glomerular microcirculation and other vascular beds. Its defining clinical phenotype is acute kidney injury (AKI), microangiopathic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. There are many etiologies of HUS including infection by Shiga toxin-producing bacterial strains, medications, viral infections, malignancy, and mutations of genes coding for proteins involved in the alternative pathway of complement. In the aggregate, although HUS is a rare disease, it is one of the most common causes of AKI in previously healthy children and accounts for a sizable number of pediatric and adult patients who progress to end stage kidney disease. There has been great progress over the past 20 years in understanding the pathophysiology of HUS and its related disorders. There has been intense focus on vascular injury in HUS as the major mechanism of disease and target for effective therapies for this acute illness. In all forms of HUS, there is evidence of both systemic and intra-glomerular inflammation and perturbations in the immune system. Renewed investigation into these aspects of HUS may prove helpful in developing new interventions that can attenuate glomerular and tubular injury and improve clinical outcomes in patients with HUS. PMID:25593915

  17. Cardiorenal syndrome: role of protein-bound uremic toxins.

    PubMed

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Krum, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Renal impairment is a strong independent risk factor associated with poor prognosis in cardiovascular disease patients. Renal dysfunction is likely contributed by progressive renal structural damage. Accurate detection of kidney injury in a timely manner as well as increased knowledge of the pathophysiology and mechanisms underlying this injury is of great importance in developing therapeutic interventions for combating renal complications at an early stage. Regarding the role of uremic solutes in the pathophysiology of cardiorenal syndrome, a number of further studies are warranted. There may be uremic solutes discovered from proteomics not yet chemically identified or tested for biological activity. Beyond Protein-bound uremic toxins, uremic solutes in other classes (according to the European Uraemic Toxin Work Group classification) may have adverse cardiorenal effects. Although most small water-soluble solutes and middle molecules can be satisfactorily removed by either conventional or newly developed dialysis strategies, targeting uremic toxins with cardiorenal toxicity at predialysis stage of chronic kidney disease may retard or prevent incident dialysis as well as the initiation/progression of cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:25556308

  18. Uremic toxins, oxidative stress, and renal fibrosis: an interwined complex.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal diseases is currently on the rise globally, and finding the way to curb this tide is urgently needed. Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is a common pathway for essentially all the nephropathy categories known to date, and the manifestations of renal fibrosis include excessive deposition of extracellular matrix with distortion of renal microstructures and functional deterioration. Uremic toxins have been gradually found to play an important role in the development of progressive renal fibrosis, with protein-bound indoxyl sulfate, p-cresol, and p-cresyl sulfate receiving the most attention. However, the contribution of oxidative stress among the pathogenesis of uremic toxins and renal fibrosis has not been evaluated much until recently. In this review, we will discuss about the nature and sources of oxidative stress in the kidney and how uremic toxins use oxidative stress to orchestrate the processes of renal fibrosis. PMID:25511523

  19. [Calcifications in the maxillofacial area].

    PubMed

    Németh Bertalan; Pataky, Levente; Arpád, Joób F; Koppany, Ferenc; Barabás, József

    2015-09-01

    Among patients presenting for dental treatment we could reveal various calcifications on panoramic x-rays or on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) Calcifications is more likely to occur in vessels, ligaments, glandular tissues and is usually associated with chronic inflammation or scarring. The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging characteristics of commonly observed calcifications of the maxillofacial area with presenting our own cases such as: tonsilloliths, calcified lymph nodes, elongeated styloid process (calcified stylohyoid chain), phleboliths, carotid atheromas, calcified laryngeal cartilage. PMID:26731963

  20. Thyroid calcifications: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Lacout, Alexis; Chevenet, Carole; Thariat, Juliette; Marcy, Pierre Yves

    2016-05-01

    Incidental diagnosis of thyroid nodules is very common on adult neck ultrasonography examination. Thyroid calcifications are encountered in benign thyroid nodules and goiters as well as in thyroid malignancy. Depiction and characterization of such calcifications within a thyroid nodule may be a key element in the thyroid nodule diagnosis algorithm. The goal of this paper is to display typical radio-pathological correlations of various thyroid pathologies of benign and malignant conditions in which the calcification type diagnosis can play a key role in the final diagnosis of the thyroid nodule. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:245-251, 2016. PMID:26891122

  1. Current treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bernard S.; Ruebner, Rebecca L.; Spinale, Joann M.; Copelovitch, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tremendous advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis of atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), an extremely rare disease. Insights into the molecular biology of aHUS resulted in rapid advances in treatment with eculizumab (Soliris®, Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc.). Historically, aHUS was associated with very high rates of mortality and morbidity. Prior therapies included plasma therapy and/or liver transplantation. Although often life saving, these were imperfect and had many complications. We review the conditions included under the rubric of aHUS: S. pneumoniae HUS (SpHUS), inborn errors of metabolism, and disorders of complement regulation, emphasizing their differences and similarities. We focus on the clinical features, diagnosis, and pathogenesis, and treatment of aHUS that results from mutations in genes encoding alternative complement regulators, SpHUS and HUS associated with inborn errors of metabolism. Mutations in complement genes, or antibodies to their protein products, result in unregulated activity of the alternate complement pathway, endothelial injury, and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits the production of the terminal complement components C5a and the membrane attack complex (C5b-9) by binding to complement protein C5a. This blocks the proinflammatory and cytolytic effects of terminal complement activation. Eculizumab use has been reported in many case reports, and retrospective and prospective clinical trials in aHUS. There have been few serious side effects and no reports of tachphylaxis or drug resistance. The results are very encouraging and eculizumab is now recognized as the treatment of choice for aHUS. PMID:25343125

  2. Uremic parkinsonism with atypical phenotypes and radiologic features.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jee-Eun; Kim, Ji Sun; Park, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Roh, Hakjae; Park, Sung Tae; Cho, Jin Whan; Ahn, Moo-Young

    2016-04-01

    Uremic encephalopathy with bilateral basal ganglia lesions has been reported as an acute neurometabolic disease which shows reversible clinical course and brain imaging features. The exact nature and pathophysiology have not been well established. We encountered two patients who showed a relapsing and aggravating course and an atypical phenotype including parkinsonism with paroxysmal dystonic head tremor and acute onset monoparesis of the lower extremity. They also showed unusual radiological findings which revealed combined lesions in the basal ganglia and cortex, persistent hemorrhagic transformation, and focal ischemic lesion in the internal capsule. Herein, we present the unusual phenomenology with atypical radiologic findings and suggest the possible multifactorial pathogenesis of uremic encephalopathy. PMID:26631408

  3. Calcification prevention tablets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, Geoffrey A.; Hasting, Michael A.; Gustavson, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid tablets, which slowly release citric acid when flushed with water, are under development by the Navy for calcification prevention. The citric acid dissolves calcium carbonate deposits and chelates the calcium. For use in urinals, a dispenser is not required because the tablets are non-toxic and safe to handle. The tablets are placed in the bottom of the urinal, and are consumed in several hundred flushes (the release rate can be tailored by adjusting the formulation). All of the ingredients are environmentally biodegradable. Mass production of the tablets on commercial tableting machines was demonstrated. The tablets are inexpensive (about 75 cents apiece). Incidences of clogged pipes and urinals were greatly decreased in long term shipboard tests. The corrosion rate of sewage collection pipe (90/10 Cu/Ni) in citric acid solution in the laboratory is several mils per year at conditions typically found in traps under the urinals. The only shipboard corrosion seen to date is of the yellow brass urinal tail pieces. While this is acceptable, the search for a nontoxic corrosion inhibitor is underway. The shelf life of the tablets is at least one year if stored at 50 percent relative humidity, and longer if stored in sealed plastic buckets.

  4. Calcification Transformation of Diasporic Bauxite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiuyue; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Lv, Guozhi; Zhang, Zimu; Yin, Zhengnan; Zhang, Tingan

    2016-06-01

    The disposal of red mud, which is a solid waste that is generated during the extraction of alumina from bauxite, is one of major problems faced by the aluminum industry. Alkali in red mud seeping under the soil may pollute land and water. The Northeastern University, China, has proposed a calcification-carbonation method to deal with low-grade bauxite or red mud. Its main purpose is to change the equilibrium phase of red mud to 2CaO·SiO2 and CaCO3 hydrometallurgically, so that recomposed alkali-free red mud can be widely used. We conducted calcification transformation experiments using diasporic bauxite sampled from Wenshan, and investigated the effects of parameters such as diasporic bauxite grain size, temperature and treatment time on the calcification transformation digestion rate, which is also termed the calcification transformation rate (CTR). The main phase in the calcification transformation slag (CTS) is hydrogarnet with different grain sizes. The CTR increases with decrease in diasporic bauxite grain size, or increase in temperature or reaction time. The CTR reaches a maximum of 87% after 120 min reaction at 240°C. The Na2O/Al2O3 ratio decreases with increase in temperature and reaches 1.5. The sodium content in the CTS decreases with increasing reaction time and is lower than that in the red mud treated using the Bayer process (4-12%).

  5. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  6. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Lilian M Pereira; Langman, Craig B

    2016-01-01

    The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach. PMID:27110144

  7. Distribution of purine nucleotides in uremic fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Słomińska, Ewa; Swierczyński, Julian

    2010-09-01

    There are almost 100 different substances called uremic toxins. In this study, we analyze all findings concerning the new family of uremic compounds--nicotinamide end products: N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (Met2PY), N-methyl-4-pyridone-5-carboxamide, newly described 4-pyridone-3-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribonucleoside (4PYR) and 4-pyridone-3-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribonucleoside triphosphate (4PYTP). After few years of studies, we have found that these substances have higher plasma concentration in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) in comparison with the healthy population. We noted a 40-fold increase in plasma 4PYR concentration in patients with CRF. This increment correlates significantly with the decline of kidney function measured as an increase of serum creatinine concentration and decrease of estimated glomerular filtration rate. Tested compounds are present and measurable in physiological fluids and tissues. We found higher saliva Met2PY concentration in patients with CRF in comparison with controls. Saliva Met2PY correlated negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate and positively with serum creatinine concentration. One-third of studied group had higher concentration of Met2PY in the saliva than in plasma, and this segment of patients may be called as "good excretors." In rats with experimental CRF, we found that both Met2PY and N-methyl-4-pyridone-5-carboxamide accumulated in selected tissues. We also demonstrated formation of 4PYTP in intact human erythrocytes during incubation with the precursor 4PYR. Incubation with 4PYR leads to lowering concentration of adenosine-5'-triphosphate. 4PYTP formation may be a way to remove 4PYR from the circulation and save adenosine-5'-triphosphate depletion. Summarizing, end products of the nicotinamide family are members of uremic toxins; however, exact pathophysiological role of these compounds in the development of uremic syndrome needs further studies. PMID:20797575

  8. Acute calcific tendinitis in children.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Millet, J P; Henia, A O

    1999-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis is uncommon in children. Clinical manifestations are similar to those in adults. The abrupt onset, functional impairment, and frequent presence of fever suggest an infection. Radiographic findings establish the diagnosis, obviating the need for further investigations. PMID:10526384

  9. Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome—An Outbreak in Sacramento, California

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Martha F.; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Budnick, Lawrence D.; Hurwitz, Eugene S.; Hatch, Milford H.; Gary, G. William; Bopp, Cheryl A.; Kirson, Ian; Karmali, Mohamed A.; Layne, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Between July and November 1982, 14 cases of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome occurred in the Sacramento, California, metropolitan area; 9 of the 14 patients lived within a 7.5-mile radius in northeast Sacramento, 10 were female, 12 were white non-Hispanic and 13 were children with a mean age of 3.6 years. Of the 14 patients, 13 were admitted to hospital; 7 required peritoneal dialysis. The 14th child, a 3-month-old white female infant, was found dead in her crib and had renal histopathologic findings consistent with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Of the 13 nonfatal cases, 12 patients had diarrhea before being admitted to hospital. A case-control study involving 11 cases and 22 controls did not show any significant differences in exposure to a variety of possible risk factors including restaurants, specific foods and water supply. Stool specimens were negative for enteric bacterial pathogens by culture and for viruses by tissue culture assay, suckling mouse inoculation and immune electron microscopy; no serologic evidence was found for infection due to enteroviruses, respiratory viruses or arenaviruses. Two of four children tested, however, showed serologic evidence of infection by Vero-cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. These 14 cases represent one of the largest reported outbreaks of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in the United States. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:3953085

  10. Effect of Sertraline on Uremic Pruritus Improvement in ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Mansor; Sanadgol, Hoshang; Azmoude, Hamid Reza; Mashhadi, Mohamad Ali; Sharifi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although uremic pruritus is a common and upsetting problem of chronic kidney disease, there is no approved treatment for it. This study was undertaken to find the efficiency of sertraline as a possible treatment for uremic pruritus. Methods. 19 ESRD patients under hemodialysis with severe chronic pruritus were randomly selected to participate in this before-after clinical trial. Before and after starting treatment with sertraline, a detailed pruritus history was obtained and pruritus graded by the 30-item inventory of pruritus that patients based on priorities grade allocated to 3 classes. Subjects were treated with sertraline 50 mg oral daily for four months, with monthly assessments of pruritus symptoms. Results. Before treatment with sertraline, the grade of pruritus in 9 (47.4%) patients was moderate and severe in 10 (52.6%) patients. After treatment, grade of pruritus in 11 (57.8%) patients was weak, 6 (31.5%) have moderate and only 2 (10.7%) patients have severe pruritus. Of 10 patients with severe pruritus, 5 (50%) patients experiencing weak pruritus, and 4 (40%) patients have moderate pruritus after treatment. Based on Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the difference between the grade of pruritus before and after treatment with sertraline was significant (P = 0.001). Conclusions. Although no definitive recommendation can be made regarding treatment of uremic pruritus, we found an increased antipruritic effect of sertraline in ESRD patients. PMID:22973512

  11. Pregnancy-Associated Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saad, Antonio F; Roman, Jorge; Wyble, Aaron; Pacheco, Luis D

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Early diagnosis of atypical uremic-hemolytic syndrome may be challenging during the puerperium period. Correct diagnosis and timely management are crucial to improve outcomes. Background Pregnancy-associated atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (p-aHUS) is a rare condition characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Triggered by pregnancy, genetically predisposed women develop the syndrome, leading to a disastrous hemolytic disease characterized by diffuse endothelial damage and platelet consumption. This disease is a life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and therapy. Case A 19-year-old G1P1 Caucasian female with suspicion of HELLP syndrome was treated at our facility for severe thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. A diagnosis of atypical uremic-hemolytic syndrome was later confirmed. The patient's condition improved with normalization of platelets and improvement in kidney function after 14 days of plasmapheresis. She was subsequently treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5. The patient tolerated well the therapy and is currently in remission. Conclusion Diagnosis of p-aHUS is challenging, as it can mimic various diseases found during pregnancy and the postpartum. Plasma exchange should be promptly initiated within 24 hours of diagnosis. Eculizumab has risen to become an important tool to improve long-term comorbidities and mortality in this group population. PMID:26989566

  12. Genetics and molecular biology of brain calcification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Zheng, Wen; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Brain calcification is a common neuroimaging finding in patients with neurological, metabolic, or developmental disorders, mitochondrial diseases, infectious diseases, traumatic or toxic history, as well as in otherwise normal older people. Patients with brain calcification may exhibit movement disorders, seizures, cognitive impairment, and a variety of other neurologic and psychiatric symptoms. Brain calcification may also present as a single, isolated neuroimaging finding. When no specific cause is evident, a genetic etiology should be considered. The aim of the review is to highlight clinical disorders associated with brain calcification and provide summary of current knowledge of diagnosis, genetics, and pathogenesis of brain calcification. PMID:25906927

  13. Sodium thiosulfate protects brain in rat model of adenine induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Subhash, N; Sriram, R; Kurian, Gino A

    2015-11-01

    Vascular bed calcification is a common feature of ends stage renal disease that may lead to a complication in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular beds, which is a promoting cause of myocardial infarction, stroke, dementia and aneurysms. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) due to its multiple properties such as antioxidant and calcium chelation has been reported to prevent vascular calcification in uremic rats, without mentioning its impact on cerebral function. Moreover, the previous studies have not explored the effect of STS on the mitochondrial dysfunction, one of the main pathophysiological features associated with the disease and the main site for STS metabolism. The present study addresses this limitation by using a rat model where 0.75% adenine was administered to induce vascular calcification and 400 mg/kg b wt. of STS was given as preventive and curative agent. The blood and urine chemistries along with histopathology of aorta confirms the renal protective effect of STS in two modes of administration. The brain oxidative stress assessment was made through TBARS level, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, found to be in the near normal level. STS administration not only reduced the mitochondrial oxidative stress (measured by TBARS, SOD, GPx and CAT) but also preserved the mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activities (NADH dehydrogenase, Succinate dehydrogenase and Malate dehydrogenase) and its physiology (measured by P/O ratio and RCR). In fact, the protective effect of STS was prominent, when it was administered as a curative agent, where low H2S and high thiosulfate level was observed along with low cystathionine β synthase activity, confirms thiosulfate mediated renal protection. In conclusion, STS when given after induction of calcification is protective to the brain by preserving its mitochondria, compared to the treatment given concomitantly. PMID:26363090

  14. Mineralization (calcification) of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R; Wachowiak, J

    1994-01-01

    Mineralogical investigations of calcifications located in coronary vessels were performed on the material obtained from the endarterectomized arteries of 18 patients (15 M, 3 F, aged 36-65) during surgical revascularization procedures consisting in coronary artery bypass grafting. The samples were tested using scanning microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe and neutron activation spectroscopy. The results of analyses were calculated with the use of computer programmes. Two types of mineralization were determined: 1. secret mineralization identified as higher than normal content of elements in biological tissues, not demonstrating any mineral grains, and 2. apparent mineralization, appearing micro- and macroscopically as grains composed mainly of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonate groups, i.e. a mineral identical with apatite present in bones, or as calcification of other tissues (heart valves, lungs etc.). The authors suggest that the phenomenon of mineralization should be taken into consideration in the preventive treatment of coronary atheriosclerosis. PMID:7808039

  15. Coral calcification and ocean acidification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Jury, Christopher P.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, the discovery that light increased calcification in the coral plant-animal symbiosis triggered interest in explaining the phenomenon and understanding the mechanisms involved. Major findings along the way include the observation that carbon fixed by photosynthesis in the zooxanthellae is translocated to animal cells throughout the colony and that corals can therefore live as autotrophs in many situations. Recent research has focused on explaining the observed reduction in calcification rate with increasing ocean acidification (OA). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between declining ocean pH, declining aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), declining [CO32_] and coral calcification. Nearly all previous reports on OA identify Ωarag or its surrogate [CO32] as the factor driving coral calcification. However, the alternate “Proton Flux Hypothesis” stated that coral calcification is controlled by diffusion limitation of net H+ transport through the boundary layer in relation to availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The “Two Compartment Proton Flux Model” expanded this explanation and synthesized diverse observations into a universal model that explains many paradoxes of coral metabolism, morphology and plasticity of growth form in addition to observed coral skeletal growth response to OA. It is now clear that irradiance is the main driver of net photosynthesis (Pnet), which in turn drives net calcification (Gnet), and alters pH in the bulk water surrounding the coral. Pnet controls [CO32] and thus Ωarag of the bulk water over the diel cycle. Changes in Ωarag and pH lag behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet, rather than concentration-based parameters (e.g., Ωarag, [CO3 2], pH and [DIC]:[H+] ratio) is the primary driver of Gnet. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes DIC from the bulk seawater. Photosynthesis increases the bulk seawater pH while providing the energy that drives

  16. Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis. [Radiological findings

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S.

    1981-12-01

    Calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis is an imflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon which is located on the anterior surface of the verterbral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. The acute inflammatory condition is selflimiting with symptoms consisting of a gradually increasing neck pain often associated with throat pain and difficulty swallowing. The pain is aggravated by head and neck movement. Clinically the condition can be confused with retropharyngeal absecess, meningitis, infectious spondylitis, and post-traumatic muscle spasm. The radiographic features of this condition consist of pre-vertebral soft tissue swelling from C1 to C4 and amorphous calcific density in the longus colli tendon anterior to the body of C2 and inferior to the anterior arch of C1.

  17. Uremic Toxins Enhance Statin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Differentiated Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Shinmoto, Tadakazu; Ogino, Hitomi; Oda, Tomoko; Yoshida, Takuya; Furukubo, Taku; Izumi, Satoshi; Yamakawa, Tomoyuki; Tachiki, Hidehisa; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Nishiguchi, Kohshi

    2014-01-01

    The risk of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis is considerably increased in statin users with end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Uremic toxins, which accumulate in patients with ESRF, exert cytotoxic effects that are mediated by various mechanisms. Therefore, accumulation of uremic toxins might increase statin-induced cytotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of four uremic toxins—hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionate, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-indoxyl sulfate—on statin-induced myopathy. Differentiated rhabdomyosarcoma cells were pre-treated with the uremic toxins for seven days, and then the cells were treated with pravastatin or simvastatin. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by viability assays and flow cytometry. Pre-treatment with uremic toxins increased statin- but not cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated). In addition, the pre-treatment increased statin-induced apoptosis, which is one of the cytotoxic factors (p < 0.05 vs. untreated). However, mevalonate, farnesol, and geranylgeraniol reversed the effects of uremic toxins and lowered statin-induced cytotoxicity (p < 0.05 vs. untreated). These results demonstrate that uremic toxins enhance statin-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity. The mechanism underlying this effect might be associated with small G-protein geranylgeranylation. In conclusion, the increased severity of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis in patients with ESRF is likely due to the accumulation of uremic toxins. PMID:25192420

  18. Changes in gluconeogenesis and intracellular lipid accumulation characterize uremic human hepatocytes ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa; Johansson, Helene; Nowak, Greg; Isaksson, Bengt; Gnocchi, Davide; Parini, Paolo; Axelsson, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) leads to an increased risk of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular mortality. The liver is a central organ for metabolism, but its function in the uremic setting is still poorly characterized. We used human primary hepatocytes isolated from livers of nine donors with normal renal function to investigate perturbations in key metabolic pathways following exposure to uremic (n = 8) or healthy (n = 8) sera, and to serum-free control medium. Both uremic and healthy elicited consistent responses from hepatocytes from multiple donors and compared with serum-free control. However, at physiological insulin concentrations, uremic cells accumulated 56% more intracellular lipids. Also, when comparing uremic with healthy medium after culture, it contained more very-low-density lipoprotein-triglyceride and glucose. These changes were accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of AktS473 mRNA levels of key regulators of gluconeogenesis in uremic sera-treated hepatocytes such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 and glucose 6-phosphate were elevated. We also found increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase mRNA in uremic cells, along with high phosphorylation of downstream p53 and phospholipase C-γ1Y783 Thus our ex vivo data suggest that the uremic hepatocytes rapidly develop a glycogenic and lipogenic condition accompanied by perturbations in a large number of signaling networks. PMID:27056725

  19. Pleural calcification in northwest Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Bazas, T.; Oakes, D.; Gilson, J.C.; Bazas, B.; McDonald, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    Mass miniature radiography in 1969 detected a high prevalence of pleural calcification in three villages in northwest Greece. In 1980 a survey of a 15% sample of the population over the age of 10 was carried out with a 80% response rate. Full-size radiographs, ventilatory capacity measurements, and a detailed questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, type of work, and residence were used. Independent classification of the 408 films by two readers using the ILO/UC scheme showed very few small opacities but a very high prevalence of pleural calcification first evident in young adults and rising to 70% in the elderly. The overall prevalence was 34.7% in men and 21.5% in women. A comparison with the 1969 survey showed a progression rate of 5% per annum. In neither sex was there a significant relation of pleural calcification to smoking, ventilatory capacity, nor type of work, though those classified as field croppers had a slightly higher prevalence. There was no obvious evidence of increased lung cancer or mesothelioma in the village. The agent responsible for this apparently benign condition was not identified.

  20. Imaging Atherosclerotic Plaque Calcification: Translating Biology.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Grant; Meadows, Judith; Morrison, Alan R

    2016-08-01

    Calcification of atherosclerotic lesions was long thought to be an age - related, passive process, but increasingly data has revealed that atherosclerotic calcification is a more active process, involving complex signaling pathways and bone-like genetic programs. Initially, imaging of atherosclerotic calcification was limited to gross assessment of calcium burden, which is associated with total atherosclerotic burden and risk of cardiovascular mortality and of all cause mortality. More recently, sophisticated molecular imaging studies of the various processes involved in calcification have begun to elucidate information about plaque calcium composition and consequent vulnerability to rupture, leading to hard cardiovascular events like myocardial infarction. As such, there has been renewed interest in imaging calcification to advance risk assessment accuracy in an evolving era of precision medicine. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the biologic process of atherosclerotic calcification as well as some of the molecular imaging tools used to assess it. PMID:27339750

  1. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  2. Pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome and steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Groves, Andrew P; Reich, Patrick; Sigdel, Binayak; Davis, T Keefe

    2016-08-01

    Pneumococcal-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (pHUS) is a rare but severe complication of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. We report the case of a 12-year-old female with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome treated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (H.P. Acthar(®) Gel), who developed pneumococcal pneumonia and subsequent pHUS. While nephrotic syndrome is a well-known risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease, this is the first reported case of pHUS in an adolescent patient with nephrotic syndrome, and reveals novel challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and potential prevention of this complication. PMID:27478599

  3. Uremic pruritus treated successfully with the Goeckerman Program.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mio; Koo, John; Bhutani, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a common condition among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis (HD). We report 19 a case of severe UP recalcitrant to conventional therapy including topical corticosteroids, anti-histamines, and phototherapy, 20 which was treated successfully with the Goeckerman regimen consisting of topical coal tar, topical corticosteroids, and broadband 21 UVB (BB-UVB). Little is known about the pathophysiology of UP, and there is currently no consensus or evidence-based 22 treatments for UP. Although further studies are necessary, Goeckerman therapy may be a promising treatment option when 23 available for severe UP intractable to conventional therapies. PMID:27617950

  4. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  5. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  6. Clinical guides for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Nangaku, Masaomi; Hataya, Hiroshi; Sawai, Toshihiro; Ashida, Akira; Fujimaru, Rika; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Kaname, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Yasuda, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoko; Ito, Shuichi; Hattori, Motoshi; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Okada, Hirokazu; Kagami, Shoji

    2016-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. In 2013, we developed diagnostic criteria to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate treatment for aHUS. Recent clinical and molecular findings have resulted in several proposed classifications and definitions of thrombotic microangiopathy and aHUS. Based on recent advances in this field and the emerging international consensus to exclude secondary TMAs from the definition of aHUS, we have redefined aHUS and proposed diagnostic algorithms, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic strategies for aHUS. PMID:27422619

  7. Clinical guides for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Nangaku, Masaomi; Hataya, Hiroshi; Sawai, Toshihiro; Ashida, Akira; Fujimaru, Rika; Hidaka, Yoshihiko; Kaname, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Yasuda, Takashi; Yoshida, Yoko; Ito, Shuichi; Hattori, Motoshi; Miyakawa, Yoshitaka; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Okada, Hirokazu; Kagami, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. In 2013, we developed diagnostic criteria to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate treatment for aHUS. Recent clinical and molecular findings have resulted in several proposed classifications and definitions of thrombotic microangiopathy and aHUS. Based on recent advances in this field and the emerging international consensus to exclude secondary TMAs from the definition of aHUS, we have redefined aHUS and proposed diagnostic algorithms, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic strategies for aHUS. PMID:27460397

  8. Osmotic concentration of polypeptides from hemofiltrate of uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, K; Holland, F; Turnham, T; Klein, E

    1980-07-01

    Hemofiltrate from uremic patients was concentrated 15- to 40-fold by osmotic removal of water across a reverse osmosis membrane which retains salts and proteins. Salts and low molecular weight components were removed from the concentrate by partial dialysis using a highly impermeable cellulose membrane. Following this desalting step, 100- to 500-fold concentration could be achieved by evaporation at low pressure. The concentrate was fractionated on Sephadex G15 columns. Fractions were tested for their toxicity to human cells in culture. Fractions containing components with molecular weights greater than 700 daltons inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of HeLa and skin fibroblast cells more than did low molecular weight peptides and an iso-osmolar control. Components eluting in the molecular weight range of angiotensin I and vitamin B-12 were most inhibitory. These studies show that hemofiltrate from uremic patients is a readily available source of toxic polypeptides. The osmotic concentration and gel chromatographic procedures described should make available large amounts of these molecules for further studies. PMID:7408253

  9. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  10. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  11. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-01-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  12. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-11-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  13. Uremic Toxins – Novel Arrhythmogenic Factor in Chronic Kidney Disease – Related Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Chen, Yi-Ann; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen; Lin, Yung-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a high prevalence of AF, and uremic toxins are an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases associated with CKD. Uremic toxins can produce pro-fibrotic, pro-hypertrophic, and pro-inflammatory effects on cardiac tissues and enhance oxidative stress or neurohormonal phenomena of cardiovascular injury, which are recognized as arrhythmogenic factors of AF. This article reviews the clinical, molecular, and electrophysiological data of uremic toxins in CKD considered to induce AF through multiple mechanisms on structural and electrical remodeling of the cardiovascular system. PMID:27274165

  14. Calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue tumors. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of ... Saunders; 2015:chap 26. Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Cellular responses to stress and toxic insults: ...

  15. Reversible visual evoked potential abnormalities in uremic children.

    PubMed

    Ethier, Audrey-Anne; Lippé, Sarah; Mérouani, Aicha; Lassonde, Maryse; Saint-Amour, Dave

    2012-06-01

    In this case study, two cystinosis-related uremic children were followed at the Department of Nephrology, University of Montreal Hospital Center Sainte-Justine. Pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials were recorded at two time points, during dialysis treatment (time 1) and after renal transplant (time 2). Data were compared with those obtained from a control group (n = 6). The P1 component was selected and analyzed as the electrophysiologic marker of interest. At time 1, P1 latency was delayed, and P1 amplitude was reduced compared with control subjects. Both responses fell within normal range after kidney transplantation. These results indicate that renal failure and dialysis are associated with abnormal visual evoked potentials in children with chronic renal failure, but such alterations of visual processing are reversible after kidney transplant. PMID:22633636

  16. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a relatively rare condition but a medical urgency requiring immediate intervention to avoid irreversible organ damage or death. Symptoms on presentation include microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and organ damage. The most frequent direct causes of TMA are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The most common form of HUS is related to Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection while approximately 10% of cases are due to dysregulation of the complement pathway (atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, aHUS). Optimal treatment regimens differ depending on the underlying cause; however, differential diagnosis may be difficult. The most accurate method of diagnosis is based on exclusion and should consider, beyond the symptoms common to TMA, ADAMTS13 activity levels and STEC infection status. For the management of TTP, plasma exchange (PE) is the most important acute intervention and is associated with lower mortality and better outcomes than plasma infusion. In most patients with STEC-HUS, the course of disease is self-limiting although management of acute kidney injury is often required. Until recently, the management of aHUS consisted of early and intensive PE, although this was mostly ineffective in protecting from subsequent organ damage. Eculizumab, an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, produces a rapid and sustained inhibition of the TMA process, with significant improvements in long-term clinical outcomes. Due to the significant improvement achieved, eculizumab has subsequently been approved as first-line therapy when an unequivocal diagnosis of aHUS has been made. PMID:25803082

  17. Notch signaling in cardiovascular disease and calcification.

    PubMed

    Rusanescu, Gabriel; Weissleder, Ralph; Aikawa, Elena

    2008-08-01

    Recent increase in human lifespan has shifted the spectrum of aging-related disorders to an unprecedented upsurge in cardiovascular diseases, especially calcific aortic valve stenosis, which has an 80% risk of progression to heart failure and death. A current therapeutic option for calcified valves is surgical replacement, which provides only temporary relief. Recent progress in cardiovascular research has suggested that arterial and valve calcification are the result of an active process of osteogenic differentiation, induced by a pro-atherogenic inflammatory response. At molecular level, the calcification process is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Notch, Wnt and TGFbeta/BMP pathways, which control the master regulator of osteogenesis Cbfa1/Runx2. Genetic and in vitro studies have implicated Notch signaling in the regulation of macrophage activation and cardiovascular calcification. Individuals with inactivating Notch1 mutations have a high rate of cardiovascular disorders, including valve stenosis and calcification. This article reviews recent progress in the mechanism of cardiovascular calcification and discusses potential molecular mechanisms involved, focusing on Notch receptors. We propose a calcification model where extreme increases in vascular wall cell density due to inflammation-induced cell proliferation can trigger an osteogenic differentiation program mediated by Notch receptors. PMID:19936191

  18. Corneal calcification after amniotic membrane transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, S B; de Souza, R Ferreira; Hofmann-Rummelt, C; Seitz, B

    2003-01-01

    Background/aims: Amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) has become well established as a treatment for chronic epithelial defects, conjunctival reconstruction, and partial limbal cell deficiency. The aim of this study was to describe cases of corneal calcification following AMT and to search for risk factors that might predispose to this unusual finding. Methods: Details of 117 AMTs on 93 corneas of 91 patients with a follow up period of at least 1 month performed since 1999 were collected prospectively. In those with calcification clinical photographs were studied and the medical records retrospectively examined. Results: 15 calcifications in 117 AMTs (12.8%) were identified, occurring 3–17 (median 6.1) weeks after AMT, during a follow up period of 4–151 (median 25) weeks. Overall epithelial healing rate was 83%. Calcification covered a surface area between 0.7–40.5 mm2 maximum size with varied morphology. The primary diagnosis was diverse. Risk factors included the use of phosphate eye drops and pre-existing calcification in the operative or other eye. No patient with a “patch” AMT developed calcification. Conclusions: Corneal calcification occurs after some cases of AMT. A common risk factor was the postoperative use of phosphate containing eye drops. PMID:12714401

  19. Fluid Secretion in Isolated Proximal Straight Renal Tubules EFFECT OF HUMAN UREMIC SERUM

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Jared J.; Irwin, Richard L.; Qualizza, Patti B.; Tucker, Donald R.; Whittier, Frederick C.

    1973-01-01

    We have examined the effect of normal and uremic human sera on the transtubular flow of fluid in isolated perfused segments of rabbit proximal convoluted and straight renal tubules. Proximal convoluted and straight tubules absorbed fluid from the lumen when the external bath was normal rabbit serum. Normal human sera in the bath depressed net fluid absorption in both tubular segments, but more importantly, uremic human serum caused proximal straight tubules to secrete fluid into the lumen. Fluid secretion was also demonstrated indirectly by observing in nonperfused proximal straight, but not proximal convoluted tubules, that the normally collapsed lumens opened widely in uremic serum. Nonperfused proximal straight tubules developed expanded lumens even after a 25-fold dilution of human uremic serum with normal rabbit serum, whereas lumen expansion occurred only in undiluted normal human serum, on the average. Serum from acutely uremic rabbits possessed secretory activity but normal rabbit serum did not. The secretory effect of uremic sera in proximal straight tubules was inhibited by cooling and ouabain and probenecid. The secretory activity of uremic sera was removed by dialysis, but not by freezing or boiling. Para-aminohippurate and benzoate caused fluid secretion in proximal straight tubules but urea, creatinine, guanidinosuccinate, and urate did not. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the secretory factor in serum may be a substance or group of substances possibly related to the hippurate class of organic molecules that are accumulated to relatively high concentrations in renal failure. The secretory material in the serum of uremic patients may significantly influence the transport of salt and water in relatively intact residual nephrons. Images PMID:4738063

  20. Radiographic spectrum of rectocolonic calcification from schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Fataar, S; Bassiony, H; Hamed, M S; Ghoneim, I; Satyanath, S; Hebbar, H G; Elgindy, N N; Hanna, R M

    1984-05-01

    Rectocolonic calcification was detected radiographically in 17 sites in 14 patients undergoing excretory urography for the assessment of urinary schistosomiasis. The right colon was involved in 11 sites, the rectum in four, and the left colon in two. The pattern of calcification varied according to the degree of bowel distension. A laminar pattern was common to all sites and occurred when the rectum or colon was distended with air, feces, or barium. A laminar or irregular amorphous density was found in the empty colon, whereas the calcified, empty rectum had a corrugated pattern. Rectocolonic calcification is probably the most common radiographic manifestation of schistosomal infestation of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:6609576

  1. Costs and benefits of calcification in coccolithophorids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anning, T.; Nimer, N.; Merrett, M. J.; Brownlee, C.

    1996-10-01

    Calcification in coccolithophorids requires major intracellular fluxes of inorganic carbon and calcium. This paper summarises the major cellular fluxes of substrates and products of calcification described in a simple four compartment model (cytosol, Golgi, coccolith vesicle and chloroplast). Measurements of the cytosolic and intra-coccolith vesicle pH and electrical potentials across the plasma membrane and coccolith vesicle membrane allow calculations of the proton electrochemical gradients across these membranes and estimates of the free carbonate and calcium concentrations in the coccolith vesicle. Calcification may provide a relatively low cost route for elevating the concentration of carbon dioxide in the chloroplast. This may have benefits in terms of the nutrient requirements for photosynthesis and growth. In particular, a close relationship appears to exist between calcification and the availability of phosphorus which may correlate with the occurrence of large scale blooms of Emiliania huxleyi in the North Atlantic.

  2. Alendronate conjugated nanoparticles for calcification targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanying; Song, Juqing; Zhu, Guanglin; Shi, Xuetao; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the synthesis of a novel calcification-targeting nanoparticle (NP) is reported, which is realized through dopamine self-polymerization on the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particle surface and subsequent alendronate conjugation. Cell viability and proliferation tests confirmed that such particle has low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility. Experiments were designed to observe whether the synthesized NPs can pass through an obstructive hydrogel and directly bind themselves to hydroxyapatite (HA) NPs (mimicking calcified spots) and HA porous scaffolds (mimicking calcified tissues); and the result was positive, indicating ingenious targeting of NPs on calcifications. The calcification-targeting NPs are expected to be with promising applications on calcification-related disease diagnoses and therapies. PMID:26970822

  3. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  4. Coral calcification in a changing ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of the Coral Reef Ecosystem Studies (CREST) project is to examine how calcification rates in reef-building corals and encrusting coralline algae are changing in response to changes in the ocean environment.

  5. The relationship between pulp calcifications and salivary gland calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kaswan, Sumita; Maheshwari, Sneha; Rahman, Farzan; Khandelwal, Suneet

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Pulp stones are discrete calcified bodies found in the dental pulp. Sialolithasis is the most common salivary gland disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between the pulp stones and salivary gland stones. Material and Methods: 196 patients were randomly selected from the out patient department for the study. The periapical radiographs for all patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of dental pulp chambers and pulp canals. The intra oral occlusal radiographs were also evaluated to determine the presence or absence of salivary stones. The results were compared and analyzed using the Chi-square test (p<0.001). Results: Salivary gland calcifications were detected in 5 patients. 191 patients had pulp narrowing and 118 patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and salivary stones (p>0.001) and also between pulp stones and salivary gland stones (p>0.001). Conclusions: However, the incidental findings of salivary gland stones on intra oral occlusal radiographs can provide useful information in the early diagnosis of the condition, but in the present study no significant relationship was found between the presence of pulp stones and salivary gland stones. Key words:Pulp stone, salivary gland stone, periapical radiograph, occlusal radiograph. PMID:25674311

  6. Comparative histology of pineal calcification.

    PubMed

    Vígh, B; Szél, A; Debreceni, K; Fejér, Z; Manzano e Silva, M J; Vígh-Teichmann, I

    1998-07-01

    The pineal organ (pineal gland, epiphysis cerebri) contains several calcified concretions called "brain sand" or acervuli (corpora arenacea). These concretions are conspicuous with imaging techniques and provide a useful landmark for orientation in the diagnosis of intracranial diseases. Predominantly composed of calcium and magnesium salts, corpora arenacea are numerous in old patients. In smaller number they can be present in children as well. The degree of calcification was associated to various diseases. However, the presence of calcified concretions seems not to reflect a specific pathological state. Corpora arenacea occur not only in the actual pineal tissue but also in the leptomeninges, in the habenular commissure and in the choroid plexus. Studies with the potassium pyroantimonate (PPA) method on the ultrastructural localization of free calcium ions in the human pineal, revealed the presence of calcium alongside the cell membranes, a finding that underlines the importance of membrane functions in the production of calcium deposits. Intrapineal corpora arenacea are characterized by a surface with globular structures. Meningeal acervuli that are present in the arachnoid cover of the organ, differ in structure from intrapineal ones and show a prominent concentric lamination of alternating dark and light lines. The electron-lucent lines contain more calcium than the dark ones. There is a correlation between the age of the subject and the number of layers in the largest acervuli. This suggests that the formation of these layers is connected to circannual changes in the calcium level of the organ. The histological organization of the human pineal is basically the same as that of mammalian experimental animals. Pineal concretions present in mammalian animal species are mainly of the meningeal type. Meningeal cells around acervuli contain active cytoplasmic organelles and exhibit alkaline phosphatase reaction in the rat and mink, an indication of a presumable

  7. The Role of Epigenetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shan-Shan; Lin, Xiao; Yuan, Ling-Qing; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Arterial calcification is highly prevalent and correlated with cardiovascular mortality, especially in patients with ESRD or diabetes. The pathogenesis of arterial calcification is multifactorial, with both genetic and environmental factors being implicated. In recent years, several mechanisms contributing to arterial calcification have been proposed. However, these can only explain a small proportion of the variability in arterial calcification, which is a major obstacle for its prevention and management. Epigenetics has emerged as one of the most promising areas that may fill in some of the gaps in our current knowledge of the interaction between the environmental insults with gene regulation in the development of diseases. Epigenetics refers to heritable and acquired changes in gene transcription that occur independently of the DNA sequence. Well-known components of epigenetic regulation include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs. Epigenetics research in the regulation of arterial calcification has only recently been elucidated. In this review, we will summarise recent progress in epigenetic pathways involved in arterial calcification and discuss potential therapeutic interventions based on epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26221588

  8. Eculizumab in Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) With Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Lars; Hartmann, Hans; Bange, Franz Christoph; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bueltmann, Eva; Ahlenstiel-Grunow, Thurid

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) approximately 25% of patients show central nervous system (CNS) involvement often leading to serious long-term disabilities. We used the C5-complement inhibitor Eculizumab as rescue therapy. From 2011 to 2014, 11 children (median age 22 months, range 11–175) with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli-positive HUS requiring dialysis who had seizures (11/11) and/or were in a stupor or coma (10/11) were treated with Eculizumab. Two patients enrolled on the Safety and Efficacy Study of Eculizumab in Shiga-Toxin Producing E coli Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (STEC-HUS) each received 6 doses of Eculizumab, 3 patients 2 doses, and 6 patients 1 dose. Laboratory diagnostics of blood samples and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed as per center practice. Data were analyzed retrospectively. Cranial MRI was abnormal in 8 of 10 patients with findings in the basal ganglia and/or white matter. A 2-year-old boy with severe cardiac involvement and status epilepticus needed repeated cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. He died 8 days after start of Eculizumab treatment. Two patients with hemorrhagic colitis and repeated seizures required artificial ventilation for 6 and 16 days, respectively. At the time of discharge, 1 patient showed severe neurological impairment and 1 mild neurological impairment. The 8 surviving patients experienced no further seizures after the first dose of Eculizumab. Three patients showed mild neurological impairment at discharge, whilst the remaining 5 showed no impairment. The platelets normalized 4 days (median) after the first dose of Eculizumab (range 0–20 days). The mean duration of dialysis after the first dose of Eculizumab was 14.1 ± 6.1 days. In children with typical HUS and CNS involvement early use of Eculizumab appears to improve neurological outcome. In severe HUS cases which progress rapidly with multiple organ involvement, late treatment with

  9. Acute Renal Infarction Secondary to Calcific Embolus from Mitral Annular Calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Bande, Dinesh; Abbara, Suhny; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2011-06-15

    We report a case of a 62-year-old man who presented with right groin pain who subsequently was found to have a renal infarct secondary to calcific embolus from mitral annular calcification on CT and angiography. We briefly review the literature and discuss the importance of this entity in clinical practice.

  10. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures. PMID:24966691

  11. Update on hemolytic uremic syndrome: Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease. In this work the authors review the recent findings on HUS, considering the different etiologic and pathogenetic classifications. New findings in genetics and, in particular, mutations of genes that encode the complement-regulatory proteins have improved our understanding of atypical HUS. Similarly, the complement proteins are clearly involved in all types of thrombotic microangiopathy: typical HUS, atypical HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Furthermore, several secondary HUS appear to be related to abnormalities in complement genes in predisposed patients. The authors highlight the therapeutic aspects of this rare disease, examining both “traditional therapy” (including plasma therapy, kidney and kidney-liver transplantation) and “new therapies”. The latter include anti-Shiga-toxin antibodies and anti-C5 monoclonal antibody “eculizumab”. Eculizumab has been recently launched for the treatment of the atypical HUS, but it appears to be effective in the treatment of typical HUS and in TTP. Future therapies are in phases I and II. They include anti-C5 antibodies, which are more purified, less immunogenic and absorbed orally and, anti-C3 antibodies, which are more powerful, but potentially less safe. Additionally, infusions of recombinant complement-regulatory proteins are a potential future therapy. PMID:24255888

  12. Erythropoietin treatment for non-uremic patients: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Biesma, D H

    1999-01-01

    The correction of anemia in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) has become the most important application of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo). The merits of rHuEpo therapy in patients with CRF are overt. Firstly, patients with CRF have an absolute deficiency in endogenous erythropoietin production and a relatively low maintenance dose of rHuEpo (often less than 100 IU/kg body weight per week) is effective in avoiding regular transfusions in the majority of the patients with CRF. Secondly, rHuEpo is able to avoid long-term complications of frequent transfusions (hemochromatosis, transfusion-transmissible diseases). Thirdly, patients with uremia notice a considerable improvement in quality of life (QOL) after initiation of rHuEpo. These advantages justify administration of this costly drug in CRF patients. The use of rHuEpo outside the setting of uremia do, however, not cover the complete spectrum of beneficial effects as compared to its use in (pre)dialysis patients. The aim of this overview is to provide some annotations on recently approved (cisplatin-induced anemia, preoperative anemia, zidovudine-related anemia) and possibly future (several types of malignancy and inflammation) indications for rHuEpo in non-uremic patients, leaving out the correction of anemia due to relatively uncommon disorders in the Dutch population (such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia). PMID:10048290

  13. Age-related penetrance of hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maren; Rybicki, Lisa A; Winter, Aurelia; Hoffmann, Michael M; Reiermann, Stefanie; Linke, Hannah; Arbeiter, Klaus; Patzer, Ludwig; Budde, Klemens; Hoppe, Bernd; Zeier, Martin; Lhotta, Karl; Bock, Andreas; Wiech, Thorsten; Gaspert, Ariana; Fehr, Thomas; Woznowski, Magdalena; Berisha, Gani; Malinoc, Angelica; Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2011-11-01

    Hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a dramatic disease frequently leading to dialysis, is associated with germline mutations of the CFH, CD46, or CFI genes. After identification of the mutation in an affected aHUS patient, single-site gene testing of relatives is the preventive care perspective. However, clinical data for family counselling are scarce. From the German-Speaking-Countries-aHUS-Registry, 33 index patients with mutations were approached for permission to offer relatives screening for their family-specific mutations and to obtain demographic and clinical data. Mutation screening was performed using direct sequencing. Age-adjusted penetrance of aHUS was calculated for each gene in index cases and in mutation-positive relatives. Sixty-one relatives comprising 41 parents and 20 other relatives were enrolled and mutations detected in 31/61. In total, 40 research participants had germline mutations in CFH, 19 in CD46 and in 6 CFI. Penetrance at age 40 was markedly reduced in mutation-positive relatives compared to index patients overall with 10% versus 67% (P < 0.001); 6% vs. 67% (P < 0.001) in CFH mutation carriers and 21% vs. 70% (P= 0.003) in CD46 mutation carriers. Age-adjusted penetrance for hereditary aHUS is important to understand the disease, and if replicated in the future, for genetic counselling. PMID:21906045

  14. Pregnancy-Associated Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Antonio F.; Roman, Jorge; Wyble, Aaron; Pacheco, Luis D.

    2016-01-01

    Précis Introduction Early diagnosis of atypical uremic–hemolytic syndrome may be challenging during the puerperium period. Correct diagnosis and timely management are crucial to improve outcomes. Background Pregnancy-associated atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (p-aHUS) is a rare condition characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Triggered by pregnancy, genetically predisposed women develop the syndrome, leading to a disastrous hemolytic disease characterized by diffuse endothelial damage and platelet consumption. This disease is a life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and therapy. Case A 19-year-old G1P1 Caucasian female with suspicion of HELLP syndrome was treated at our facility for severe thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. A diagnosis of atypical uremic–hemolytic syndrome was later confirmed. The patient's condition improved with normalization of platelets and improvement in kidney function after 14 days of plasmapheresis. She was subsequently treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5. The patient tolerated well the therapy and is currently in remission. Conclusion Diagnosis of p-aHUS is challenging, as it can mimic various diseases found during pregnancy and the postpartum. Plasma exchange should be promptly initiated within 24 hours of diagnosis. Eculizumab has risen to become an important tool to improve long-term comorbidities and mortality in this group population. PMID:26989566

  15. Recessive mutations in DGKE cause atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Mathieu; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Schaefer, Franz; Choi, Murim; Tang, Wai Ho; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Taque, Sophie; Nobili, François; Martinez, Frank; Ji, Weizhen; Overton, John D.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Morin, Denis; Deschenes, Georges; Baudouin, Véronique; Llanas, Brigitte; Collard, Laure; Majid, Mohammed A.; Simkova, Eva; Nürnberg, Peter; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Gubler, Marie Claire; Hwa, John; Loirat, Chantal; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Pathologic thrombosis is a major cause of mortality. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) features episodes of small vessel thrombosis resulting in microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure1. Atypical HUS (aHUS) can result from genetic or autoimmune factors2 that lead to pathologic complement cascade activation3. By exome sequencing we identify recessive mutations in DGKE (diacylglycerol kinase epsilon) that co-segregate with aHUS in 9 unrelated kindreds, defining a distinctive Mendelian disease. Affected patients present with aHUS before age 1, have persistent hypertension, hematuria and proteinuria (sometimes nephrotic range), and develop chronic kidney disease with age. DGKE is found in endothelium, platelets, and podocytes. Arachidonic acid-containing diacylglycerols (DAG) activate protein kinase C, which promotes thrombosis. DGKE normally inactivates DAG signaling. We infer that loss of DGKE function results in a pro-thrombotic state. These findings identify a new mechanism of pathologic thrombosis and kidney failure and have immediate implications for treatment of aHUS patients. PMID:23542698

  16. Partial ADAMTS13 deficiency in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shuju; Eyler, Stephen J.; Zhang, Yuzhou; Maga, Tara; Nester, Carla M.; Kroll, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Complement dysregulation leads to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), while ADAMTS13 deficiency causes thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We investigated whether genetic variations in the ADAMTS13 gene partially explain the reduced activity known to occur in some patients with aHUS. We measured complement activity and ADAMTS13 function, and completed mutation screening of multiple complement genes and ADAMTS13 in a large cohort of aHUS patients. In over 50% of patients we identified complement gene mutations. Surprisingly, 80% of patients also carried at least 1 nonsynonymous change in ADAMTS13, and in 38% of patients, multiple ADAMTS13 variations were found. Six of the 9 amino acid substitutions in ADAMTS13 were common single nucleotide polymorphisms; however, 3 variants—A747V, V832M, and R1096H— were rare, with minor allele frequencies of 0.0094%, 0.5%, and 0.32%, respectively. Reduced complement and ADAMTS13 activity (<60% of normal activity) were found in over 60% and 50% of patients, respectively. We concluded that partial ADAMTS13 deficiency is a common finding in aHUS patients and that genetic screening and functional tests of ADAMTS13 should be considered in these patients. PMID:23847193

  17. A Comparison of Uremic Pruritus in Patients Receiving Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hon-Yen; Peng, Yu-Sen; Chen, Hung-Yuan; Tsai, Wan-Chuan; Yang, Ju-Yeh; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Pai, Mei-Fen; Lu, Hui-Min; Chiang, Ju-Fen; Ko, Mei-Ju; Wen, Su-Ying; Chiu, Hsien-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uremic pruritus is common and bothersome in patients receiving either peritoneal dialysis (PD) or hemodialysis (HD). To date, the preferred dialysis modality regarding the alleviation of uremic pruritus remains controversial. We conducted this cross-sectional study to compare the prevalence, intensity, and characteristics of uremic pruritus between PD and HD patients. Patients receiving maintenance dialysis at a referral medical center in Taiwan were recruited. Dialysis modality, patient demographic, clinical characteristics, and laboratory data were recorded. The intensity of uremic pruritus was measured using visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted to compare the severity of uremic pruritus between PD and HD patients. Generalized additive models were applied to detect nonlinear effects between pruritus intensity and continuous covariates. A total of 380 patients completed this study, with a mean age of 60.3 years and 49.2% being female. Uremic pruritus was presented in 24 (28.6%) of the 84 PD patients and 113 (38.2%) of the 296 HD patients (P = .12). The VAS score of pruritus intensity was significantly lower among the PD patients than the HD patients (1.32 ± 2.46 vs 2.26 ± 3.30, P = .04). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that PD was an independent predictor for lower VAS scores of pruritus intensity compared with HD (β-value −0.88, 95% confidence interval −1.62 to −0.13). The use of active vitamin D was also an independent predictor for a lower intensity of uremic pruritus, whereas hyperphosphatemia and higher serum levels of triglyceride and aspartate transaminase were significantly associated with higher pruritus intensity. There was a trend toward a less affected body surface area of uremic pruritus in the PD patients than in the HD patients, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (P = .13). In conclusion, the severity of uremic pruritus

  18. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Tarek Hamed; Abd Alhamed, Mohamed Maisara; Selim, Mohamed Fouad; Haggag, Mohamed Salah; Fathalla, Diaa

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of calcium along the internal elastic membrane of arteries, accompanied by fibrous thickening of the intima which causes luminal narrowing. Here we are reporting a case of idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy in a Saudi female newborn of non-consanguineous pregnant woman who had polyhydramnios. The newborn baby had severe respiratory distress, systemic hypertension and persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn. She was admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where she was ventilated and proper treatment was provided. Molecular genetic testing was positive for mutations of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase1 gene which is reported in 80% of cases of Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy. The baby died at about 5 month of age because of myocardial ischemia and cardiorespiratory arrest. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy should be considered in any newborn who presented with persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn, severe systemic hypertension and echogenic vessels on any radiological study. Calcifications of large and medium-sized arteries are important diagnostic finding. PMID:27252793

  19. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Attia, Tarek Hamed; Abd Alhamed, Mohamed Maisara; Selim, Mohamed Fouad; Haggag, Mohamed Salah; Fathalla, Diaa

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by deposition of calcium along the internal elastic membrane of arteries, accompanied by fibrous thickening of the intima which causes luminal narrowing. Here we are reporting a case of idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy in a Saudi female newborn of non-consanguineous pregnant woman who had polyhydramnios. The newborn baby had severe respiratory distress, systemic hypertension and persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn. She was admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, where she was ventilated and proper treatment was provided. Molecular genetic testing was positive for mutations of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase1 gene which is reported in 80% of cases of Idiopathic arterial calcification of infancy. The baby died at about 5 month of age because of myocardial ischemia and cardiorespiratory arrest. Idiopathic Arterial Calcification of Infancy should be considered in any newborn who presented with persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn, severe systemic hypertension and echogenic vessels on any radiological study. Calcifications of large and medium-sized arteries are important diagnostic finding. PMID:27252793

  20. Current understanding of coronary artery calcification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yue; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Ji, Qing-Wei; Cai, Meng; Zhao, Ying-Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is highly prevalent in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. There are two recognized type of CAC—intimal and medial calcification, and each of them have specific risk factors. Several theories about the mechanism of vascular calcification have been put forward, and we currently believe that vascular calcification is an active, regulated process. CAC can usually be found in patients with severe CHD, and this asymptomatic phenomenon make early diagnosis of CAC important. Coronary computed tomographic angiography is the main noninvasive tool to detect calcified lesions. Measurement of coronary artery calcification by scoring is a reasonable metric for cardiovascular risk assessment in asymptomatic adults at intermediate risk. To date, effective medical treatment of CAC has not been identified. Several strategies of percutaneous coronary intervention have been applied to CHD patients with CAC, but with unsatisfactory results. Prognosis of CAC is still a major problem of CHD patients. Thus, more details about the mechanisms of CAC need to be elucidated in order to improve the understanding and treatment of CAC. PMID:26788045

  1. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  2. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  3. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Scheiber, Daniel; Veulemans, Verena; Horn, Patrick; Chatrou, Martijn L.; Potthoff, Sebastian A.; Kelm, Malte; Schurgers, Leon J.; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP) is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7) supplementation (100 µg/g diet) on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05) and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05) calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01). MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression (10-fold; p < 0.05). CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures. PMID:26295257

  4. Dark calcification and the daily rhythm of calcification in the scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Horani, F. A.; Tambutté, É.; Allemand, D.

    2007-09-01

    The rate of calcification in the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis was followed during the daytime using 45Ca tracer. The coral began the day with a low calcification rate, which increased over time to a maximum in the afternoon. Since the experiments were carried out under a fixed light intensity, these results suggest that an intrinsic rhythm exists in the coral such that the calcification rate is regulated during the daytime. When corals were incubated for an extended period in the dark, the calcification rate was constant for the first 4 h of incubation and then declined, until after one day of dark incubation, calcification ceased, possibly as a result of the depletion of coral energy reserves. The addition of glucose and Artemia reduced the dark calcification rate for the short duration of the experiment, indicating an expenditure of oxygen in respiration. Artificial hypoxia reduced the rate of dark calcification to about 25% compared to aerated coral samples. It is suggested that G. fascicularis obtains its oxygen needs from the surrounding seawater during the nighttime, whereas during the day time the coral exports oxygen to the seawater.

  5. Evaluation of Left Ventricular Function in Uremic Patients by Speckle Tracking Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen; Liu, Nannan; Tong, Ming; Zhou, Hongli

    2015-11-01

    Here, we tested the suitability of two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (STI) for assessment of left ventricular function in uremic patients. Forty-nine patients and 40 healthy individuals were enrolled for STI evaluation of common echocardiography measurements, as well as twist angles of apical and basal segment rotations. The E/A wave ratio, rotation angle, and twist angles of apical and basal segment rotations were significantly lower in uremic patients (p < 0.05 vs. healthy individuals), while left ventricular interior diameter and left ventricular wall thickness were significantly increased (p < 0.05 vs. healthy individuals). There was no significant difference in the left ventricular ejection fraction between patients and healthy individuals. Thus, two-dimensional STI is suitable for assessment of changes of left ventricular function in uremic patients. PMID:27352356

  6. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  7. Fibroblast involvement in soft connective tissue calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Ivonne; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Cianciulli, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibers and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization. PMID:23467434

  8. Acute calcific periarthritis in a child.

    PubMed

    Mercer, N S; Newman, J H; Watt, I

    1984-10-01

    We wish to present an account of a child who developed acute calcification in his thenar eminence to highlight the difficulty in differentiation between calcific periarthritis, acute infection, on clinical grounds. Calcific periarthritis is due to hydroxyapatite crystal deposits in bursae, tendons and ligaments (Bonavita 1980) with characteristic radiographic appearances of opacities of variable density and shape around joints (Hitchcock 1959). The condition was first described in the shoulder, by Duplay in 1870 (Sandstrom 1938) and this remains the most commonly affected site. The hip, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle may also be involved but involvement of the hand is uncommon. Involvement in this site was first described in 1924 by Cohen (Carroll 1955). The previously reported age span ranged from thirteen years upwards, with an average of forty-five years, both sexes being equally affected (Currey 1970, Hitchcock 1959, Bonavita 1980). PMID:6512382

  9. Vascular Calcification in Uremia: New-Age Concepts about an Old-Age Problem.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward R

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of aging, and major contributor to the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), is the progressive structural and functional deterioration of the arteries and concomitant accrual of mineral. Vascular calcification (VC) was long viewed as a degenerative age-related pathology that resulted from the passive deposition of mineral in the extracellular matrix; however, since the discovery of "bone-related" protein expression in calcified atherosclerotic plaques over 20 years ago, a plethora of studies have evoked the now widely accepted view that VC is a highly regulated and principally cell-mediated phenomenon that recapitulates many features of physiologic ossification. Central to this theory are changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype and viability, thought to be driven by chronic exposure to a number of dystrophic stimuli characteristics of the uremic state. Here, dedifferentiated synthetic VSMCs are seen to spawn calcifying matrix vesicles that actively seed mineralization of the arterial matrix. This review provides an overview of the major epidemiological, histological, and molecular aspects of VC in the context of CKD, and a counterpoint to the prevailing paradigm that emphasizes the primacy of VSMC-mediated mechanisms. Particular focus is given to the import of protein and small molecule inhibitors in regulating physiologic and pathological mineralization and the emerging role of mineral nanoparticles and their interplay with proinflammatory processes. PMID:26676134

  10. [Cardiac valves calcifications in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Klarić, Dragan; Klarić, Vera; Kristić, Ivica

    2011-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, especially those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), are at much higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than the general population. High serum phosphorus (P) level play important role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular calcifications and is a frequent and important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with CKD. We aimed to investigate the association of serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), parathyroid hormon (PTH). calcium phosphorus product (CaxP) with cardiac valves calcifications (VC) in patients on hemodialysis (HD). We investigated for VC using colour Doppler echocardiography. VC were considered present if mitral annular calcifications and/or aortic annular calcifications were visualized. We divided patients in two groups. VC negative group (VC-) were patients with absence of VC. Patients with presence of VC were VC positive (VC+). CRP mean levels in two samples were higher in VC+ group than in VC- group (17.0 vs 3.4mg/L) and (17.1 vs 4.0 mg/L) p<0.0001. CaxP mean level in both samples was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 4.8 vs 4.2 (p=0.0219) and 5.0 vs 4.3 (p=0.0078). We also made analysis of absolute highest levels of three samples of CRP (CRPmax) between groups. CRPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 19.5 vs 9.7 mg/L, (p=0.0045). We made analysis of absolute higher levels of two samples of Ca x P (CaxPmax) between groups. CaxPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 5.2 vs 4.4 (p=0.0014). We found cardiac valve calcifications in 40 percent of patients on hemodialysis. We found that patients with correlation between PTH level, CRP level, CaxP product and cardiac valve calcifications have higher serum levels of PTH and CRP. We also found that CaxP product is higher in patients with cardiac valve calcifications. We didn't find correlation between age, dialysis duration, BMI and cardiac valve calcifications. These findings support careful monitoring of calcium metabolisum in end stage

  11. Where do we stand on vascular calcification?

    PubMed

    Boström, Kristina I

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease, such as atherosclerosis and diabetic vasculopathy, is frequently complicated by vascular calcification. Previously believed to be an end-stage process of unregulated mineral precipitation, it is now well established to be a multi-faceted disease influenced by the characteristics of its vascular location, the origins of calcifying cells and numerous regulatory pathways. It reflects the fundamental plasticity of the vasculature that is gradually being revealed by progress in vascular and stem cell biology. This review provides a brief overview of where we stand in our understanding of vascular calcification, facing the challenge of translating this knowledge into viable preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27260939

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Uremic Pruritus in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vandana S.; Lindberg, Jill; Germain, Michael; Block, Geoffrey; Tumlin, James; Smith, Mark; Grewal, Mandeep

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Although uremic pruritus (UP) is a highly prevalent complication of chronic kidney disease, it remains poorly characterized. There have been no longitudinal studies of natural history, and no health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) instruments have been developed for UP. The objectives of this study were to describe the natural history of UP, to compare rating scales of itching intensity, and to assess usefulness and validity of HR-QOL instruments for UP. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The intensity, severity, and effects of pathologic itching on HR-QOL were assessed prospectively in 103 patients with UP on chronic hemodialysis. Outcome measures were obtained at scheduled intervals over 3.5 months. Results: Itching daily or nearly daily was reported by 84% of patients and had been ongoing for >1 year in 59%. In 83%, pruritus involved large, nondermatomal areas with striking bilateral symmetry. Two thirds of the patients were using medications such as antihistamines, steroids, and various emollients without satisfactory relief of itching. Statistically significant associations were found among itching intensity, severity, and HR-QOL measures in domains such as mood, social relations, and sleep. Among patients with moderate-to-severe UP, changes in itching intensity of 20% or greater were associated with significant reductions in HR-QOL measures. Conclusions: This first longitudinal study of UP describes key features of UP and its effect on HR-QOL. The assessment instruments we have developed are easily used, are responsive to changes in UP intensity, and should facilitate clinical evaluation and research to meet the needs of afflicted patients. PMID:20558560

  13. Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Nayer, Ali; Asif, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare life-threatening disorder characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and ischemic injury to organs, especially the kidneys. Microvascular injury and thrombosis are the dominant histologic findings. Complement activation through the alternative pathway plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atypical HUS. Genetic abnormalities involving complement regulatory proteins and complement components form the molecular basis for complement activation. Endothelial cell dysfunction, probably because of the effects of complement activation, is an intermediate stage in the pathophysiologic cascade. Atypical HUS has a grave prognosis. Although mortality approaches 25% during the acute phase, end-stage renal disease develops in nearly half of patients within a year. Atypical HUS has a high recurrence rate after renal transplantation, and recurrent disease often leads to graft loss. Plasma therapy in the form of plasma exchange or infusion has remained the standard treatment for atypical HUS. However, many patients do not respond to plasma therapy and some require prolonged treatment. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the treatment of atypical HUS, eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks cleavage of complement C5 into biologically active mediators of inflammation and cytolysis. Although case reports have shown the efficacy of eculizumab, randomized clinical trials are lacking. Therapeutic strategies targeting endothelial cells have demonstrated promising results in experimental settings. Therefore, inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme, HMG-CoA reductase, and xanthine oxidase as well as antioxidants, such as ascorbic acid, may have salutary effects in patients with atypical HUS. PMID:24681522

  14. Leptin as a uremic toxin interferes with neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, Luciano; Gnerre, Paola; Bertolotto, Maria; Mancini, Marina; Dapino, Patrizia; Russo, Rodolfo; Garibotto, Giacomo; Barreca, Tommaso; Dallegri, Franco

    2004-09-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic molecule involved in energy homeostasis, hematopoiesis, inflammation, and immunity. Hypoleptinemia characterizing starvation has been strictly related to increased susceptibility to infection secondary to malnutrition. Nevertheless, ESRD is characterized by high susceptibility to bacterial infection despite hyperleptinemia. Defects in neutrophils play a crucial role in the infectious morbidity, and several uremic toxins that are capable of depressing neutrophil functions have been identified. Only a few and contrasting reports about leptin and neutrophils are available. This study provides evidence that leptin inhibits neutrophil migration in response to classical chemoattractants. Moreover, serum from patients with ESRD inhibits migration of normal neutrophils in response to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine with a strict correlation between serum leptin levels and serum ability to suppress neutrophil locomotion. Finally, the serum inhibitory activity can be effectively prevented by immune depletion of leptin. The results also show, however, that leptin by itself is endowed with chemotactic activity toward neutrophils. The two activities-inhibition of the cell response to chemokines and stimulation of neutrophil migration-could be detected at similar concentrations. On the contrary, neutrophils exposed to leptin did not display detectable [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization, oxidant production, or beta(2)-integrin upregulation. The results demonstrate that leptin is a pure chemoattractant devoid of secretagogue properties that are capable of inhibiting neutrophil chemotaxis to classical neutrophilic chemoattractants. Taking into account the crucial role of neutrophils in host defense, the leptin-mediated ability of ERSD serum to inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis appears as a potential mechanism that contributes to the establishment of infections in ERSD. PMID:15339985

  15. Modified Ham test for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilaki, Eleni; Yuan, Xuan; Ye, Zhaohui; Ambinder, Alexander J.; Shanbhag, Satish P.; Streiff, Michael B.; Kickler, Thomas S.; Moliterno, Alison R.; Sperati, C. John

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) characterized by excessive activation of the alternative pathway of complement (APC). Atypical HUS is frequently a diagnosis of exclusion. Differentiating aHUS from other TMAs, especially thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), is difficult due to overlapping clinical manifestations. We sought to develop a novel assay to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs based on the hypothesis that paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria cells are more sensitive to APC-activated serum due to deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol- anchored complement regulatory proteins (GPI-AP). Here, we demonstrate that phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C–treated EA.hy926 cells and PIGA-mutant TF-1 cells are more susceptible to serum from aHUS patients than parental EA.hy926 and TF-1 cells. We next studied 31 samples from 25 patients with TMAs, including 9 with aHUS and 12 with TTP. Increased C5b-9 deposition was evident by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry on GPI-AP–deficient cells incubated with aHUS serum compared with heat-inactivated control, TTP, and normal serum. Differences in cell viability were observed in biochemically GPI-AP–deficient cells and were further increased in PIGA-deficient cells. Serum from patients with aHUS resulted in a significant increase of nonviable PIGA-deficient TF-1 cells compared with serum from healthy controls (P < .001) and other TMAs (P < .001). The cell viability assay showed high reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity in detecting aHUS. In conclusion, we developed a simple, rapid, and serum-based assay that helps to differentiate aHUS from other TMAs. PMID:25862562

  16. Fatal uremic leontiasis ossea in long-lasting uncontrolled hyperparathyroidism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dimkovic, N; Piscevic, V; Jankovic, A; Djuric, P

    2015-01-01

    Background Leontiasis ossea is a rare medical condition, with characteristic overgrowth of the facial and cranial bones. Reports about this uremic complication are less frequently reported, probably due to better dialysis and better medical control of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Description of case We report the case of a 36-year-old female patient who had been treated with chronic hemodialysis and who developed secondary hyperparathyroidism. Conclusion In noncompliant patients with uncontrolled secondary hyperparathyroidism uremic leontiasis may develop in which case the treatment is rarely successful or may even be contraindicated due to other comorbid conditions. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 266-267.

  17. Use of Eculizumab in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, Complicating Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bermea, Rene S; Sharma, Niharika; Cohen, Kenneth; Liarski, Vladimir M

    2016-09-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is characterized by the presence of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and end-organ injury. In this report, we describe two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with findings compatible with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, complicated by acute kidney injury that was refractory to conventional therapies. Both patients exhibited a response to eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody to complement protein C5, with stabilization of their platelet count. On 1-year follow-up from their initial presentation, their hematologic disease remained in remission without recurrence. PMID:27556240

  18. How Does Calcification Influence Plaque Vulnerability? Insights from Fatigue Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baijian; Pei, Xuan; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background. Calcification is commonly believed to be associated with cardiovascular disease burden. But whether or not the calcifications have a negative effect on plaque vulnerability is still under debate. Methods and Results. Fatigue rupture analysis and the fatigue life were used to evaluate the rupture risk. An idealized baseline model containing no calcification was first built. Based on the baseline model, we investigated the influence of calcification on rupture path and fatigue life by adding a circular calcification and changing its location within the fibrous cap area. Results show that 84.0% of calcified cases increase the fatigue life up to 11.4%. For rupture paths 10D far from the calcification, the life change is negligible. Calcifications close to lumen increase more fatigue life than those close to the lipid pool. Also, calcifications in the middle area of fibrous cap increase more fatigue life than those in the shoulder area. Conclusion. Calcifications may play a positive role in the plaque stability. The influence of the calcification only exists in a local area. Calcifications close to lumen may be influenced more than those close to lipid pool. And calcifications in the middle area of fibrous cap are seemly influenced more than those in the shoulder area. PMID:24955401

  19. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon (Gluteus maximus tendinitis)

    SciTech Connect

    Wepfer, J.F.; Reed, J.G.; Cullen, G.M.; McDevitt, W.P.

    1983-02-01

    Seven cases of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon are presented. Awareness of the precise anatomic location of the calcific deposit is essential for the accurate diagnosis of this uncommon site of tendinitis. Clinically, the presenting complaint is that of pain. In some instances, however, the patients are asymptomatic and the calcification is an incidental finding.

  20. Associations between Thyroid Hormones, Calcification Inhibitor Levels and Vascular Calcification in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Christiaan Lucas; Olauson, Hannes; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Ripsweden, Jonaz; Barany, Peter; Vermeer, Cees; Drummen, Nadja; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vascular calcification is a common, serious and elusive complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As a pro-calcifying risk factor, non-thyroidal illness may promote vascular calcification through a systemic lowering of vascular calcification inhibitors such as matrix-gla protein (MGP) and Klotho. Methods and Material In 97 ESRD patients eligible for living donor kidney transplantation, blood levels of thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4 and TSH), total uncarboxylated MGP (t-ucMGP), desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II), and soluble Klotho (sKlotho) were measured. The degree of coronary calcification and arterial stiffness were assessed by means of cardiac CT-scans and applanation tonometry, respectively. Results fT3 levels were inversely associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores and measures of arterial stiffness, and positively with dp-ucMGP and sKlotho concentrations. Subfractions of MGP, PIVKA-II and sKlotho did not associate with CAC scores and arterial stiffness. fT4 and TSH levels were both inversely associated with CAC scores, but not with arterial stiffness. Discussion The positive associations between fT3 and dp-ucMGP and sKlotho suggest that synthesis of MGP and Klotho is influenced by thyroid hormones, and supports a link between non-thyroidal illness and alterations in calcification inhibitor levels. However, the absence of an association between serum calcification inhibitor levels and coronary calcification/arterial stiffness and the fact that MGP and Klotho undergo post-translational modifications underscore the complexity of this association. Further studies, measuring total levels of MGP and membrane bound Klotho, should examine this proposed pathway in further detail. PMID:26147960

  1. Aneurysm strength can decrease under calcification.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y; Aboudi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of vessels in the vascular system that are prone to rupture. Prediction of the aneurysm rupture is a challenging and unsolved problem. Various factors can lead to the aneurysm rupture and, in the present study, we examine the effect of calcification on the aneurysm strength by using micromechanical modeling. The calcified tissue is considered as a composite material in which hard calcium particles are embedded in a hyperelastic soft matrix. Three experimentally calibrated constitutive models incorporating a failure description are used for the matrix representation. Two constitutive models describe the aneurysmal arterial wall and the third one - the intraluminal thrombus. The stiffness and strength of the calcified tissue are simulated in uniaxial tension under the varying amount of calcification, i.e. the relative volume of the hard inclusion within the periodic unit cell. In addition, the triaxiality of the stress state, which can be a trigger for the cavitation instability, is tracked. Results of the micromechanical simulation show an increase of the stiffness and a possible decrease of the strength of the calcified tissue as compared to the non-calcified one. The obtained results suggest that calcification (i.e. the presence of hard particles) can significantly affect the stiffness and strength of soft tissue. The development of refined experimental techniques that will allow for the accurate quantitative assessment of calcification is desirable. PMID:26717251

  2. Role of Vitamin K in Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observational studies are promising in terms of associations between vitamin K (either diet or biochemical measures) and bone health and other conditions of normal calcification in the elderly. The level of evidence from randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with phylloquinone is very ...

  3. Reversible vascular calcifications associated with hypervitaminosis D.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Massimo; Bilancio, Giancarlo; Cirillo, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    A 64-year-old man was hospitalized in 2002 with symptoms of stupor, weakness, and renal colic. The clinical examination indicated borderline hypertension, small masses in the glutei, and polyuria. Laboratory tests evidenced high serum concentrations of creatinine, calcium, and phosphate. Imaging assessments disclosed widespread vascular calcifications, gluteal calcifications, and pelvic ectasia. Subsequent lab tests indicated suppressed serum parathyroid hormone, extremely high serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D, and normal serum 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. Treatment was started with intravenous infusion of saline and furosemide due to the evidence of hypercalcemia. Prednisone and omeprazole were added given the evidence of hypervitaminosis D. The treatment improved serum calcium, kidney function, and consciousness. The medical history disclosed recent treatment with exceptionally high doses of slow-release intra-muscular cholecalciferol and the recent excretion of urinary stones. The patient was discharged when it was possible to stop the intravenous treatment. The post-discharge treatment included oral hydration, furosemide, prednisone and omeprazole for approximately 6 months up to complete resolution of the hypercalcemia. The patient came back 12 years later because of microhematuria. Lab tests were normal for calcium/phosphorus homeostasis and kidney function. Imaging tests indicated only minor vascular calcifications. This is the first evidence of reversible vascular calcifications secondary to hypervitaminosis D. PMID:26318020

  4. [Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and hemolytic-uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Sölder, B; Caprioli, A; Karch, H

    1997-09-19

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are increasingly identified as the cause of diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis in countries with highly developed livestock. In 5-10% of patients, full-blown hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) occurs as a postinfectious life-threatening complication. Up to 1996, 5 out of 39 patients (12.8%) with EHEC O157 infections in Austria developed HUS. Acute complications of HUS such as brain edema may also lead to death; one fatal outcome has been observed so far in Austrian patients. Aside from the cytotoxic Shiga toxins, other different pathogenic factors are often found in clinical EHEC isolates. These include a cytolysin termed EHEC-hemolysin and a low molecular heat-stabile enterotoxin. Furthermore, most EHEC strains express an important surface protein, intimin, which is important for adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. EHEC are heterogeneous in their antigenic structure (O-, H-antigens). In Austria O157:H7 and O157:H- are the dominating serogroups; in 1997 the first Austrian case of HUS due to EHEC O26:H11 was documented. Because there are no known reliable phenotypical markers for EHEC, diagnostic strategies should focus on the demonstration of Shiga toxins or Shiga toxin genes. For epidemiological purposes it is also important to attempt to isolate the causative agent. Cows and other ruminants are reservoirs for EHEC. In the Tyrol 3% of unpasteurised milk samples, up to 10% of minced beef samples, and 6% of calves yield EHEC O157. Aside from transmission via contaminated food, direct transmission from person to person also plays a major role in the chain of EHEC infection. In contrast to Italy and Bavaria, Austria has not experienced a major outbreak due to this organism so far. A nationwide surveillance system of HUS has shown an incidence of 0.37 HUS cases per 100,000 residents in the age group 0-14 years for 1995 (Italy: 0.2 cases per 100,000; Bavaria: approx. 1.5 cases per 100,000). PMID:9381722

  5. Separation of uremic toxins from urine with resorcinarene-based ion chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Tayyebeh; Weaver, Douglas J; Lamb, John D; Harrison, Roger G

    2015-01-01

    People with chronic kidney disease suffer from uremic toxins which accumulate in their bodies. Detection and quantification of uremic toxins help diagnose kidney problems and start patient care. The aim of this research was to seek a new method to assist this diagnosis by trace level detection and separation of guanidine containing uremic toxins in water and urine. To detect and quantify the uremic toxins, new stationary phases for ion chromatography (IC) columns based on glutamic acid functionalized resorcinarenes bound to divinylbenzene macroporous resin were prepared. The new column packing material afforded separation of the five compounds: guanidinoacetic acid, guanidine, methylguanidine, creatinine, and guanidinobenzoic acid in 30min. Peak resolutions ranged from 7.6 to 1.3. Gradient elutions at ambient temperature with methanesulfonic acid (MSA) solution as eluent resulted in detection levels in water from 10 to 47ppb and in synthetic urine from 28 to 180ppb. Limits of quantification for the analytes using pulsed amperometric detection were 30-160ppb in water and 93-590ppb in urine. Trace levels of creatinine (1ppm) were detected in the urine of a healthy individual using the columns. PMID:25537175

  6. Immunohistochemical screening for neurochemical markers in uremic patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Han, S W; Ståhle-Bäckdahl, M; Hägermark, O

    1988-01-01

    The epidermis and dermis of 12 uremic patients on maintenance hemodialysis were investigated utilizing the indirect immunofluorescence technique as a tool to study the distribution of neurochemical markers, such as neuropeptides. No differences between controls and the patients were revealed. PMID:3078417

  7. Uremic Pericarditis: A Report of 30 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sadjadi, Seyed-Ali; Mashhadian, Ardavan

    2015-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 71 • Male, 69 • Female, 49 Final Diagnosis: Uremic pericarditis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Uremic pericarditis, common at one time among dialysis patients, has become a rare entity in recent years. Due to its low incidence, its recognition has gained importance among internists, cardiologists, and nephrologists. It can be seen in predialysis patients and in dialysis patients who are on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Case Report: We report 3 cases of uremic pericarditis and their presenting manifestations and review 30 cases we have treated. Among these patients, the traditional findings among patients with acute pericarditis such as chest pain, fever, electrocardiographic changes, and leukocytosis are uncommon. Pericardial friction rub has a relatively high incidence but its differentiation by an untrained ear, especially by a non-cardiologist, could be a major problem. Not infrequently, it is complicated by pre-tamponade or tamponade, requiring pericardiocentesis or pericardial surgery. Conclusions: Uremic pericarditis is a treatable, but not always a preventable, condition. Timely recognition of its presence and its efficient management are essential elements of successful treatment. PMID:25796283

  8. Skin Autofluorescence Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction in Uremic Subjects on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Yao-Chang; Wang, Guei-Jane; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chang, Yen-Lin; Liou, Show-Yih; Chen, Hung-Chih; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-01-01

    Background Elevated levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) within tissues may contribute to endothelial dysfunction, an early indicator of atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether levels of skin AGEs could be a useful marker to predict endothelial dysfunction in uremic subjects on hemodialysis. Methods and Results One hundred and nineteen uremic patients on hemodialysis and 57 control subjects with moderate-to-high cardiovascular risk factors and without chronic kidney disease (CKD) were enrolled. We used ultrasound to measure flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). An AGE reader measured skin autoflurorescence (AF). We then compared differences in FMD and skin AF values between the two groups. The uremic subjects had significantly higher levels of skin AF (3.47±0.76 AU vs. 2.21±0.45 arbitrary units; P<0.01) and significantly lower levels of FMD (4.79%±1.88% vs. 7.19%±2.17%; P<0.01) than the non-CKD subjects. After adjusting for all potential covariates, we found that skin AF level independently predicted FMD in both the hemodialysis and the non-CKD groups. In the hemodialysis group, skin AF ≥ 3.05 arbitrary units predicted abnormal FMD at a sensitivity of 87.9% and a specificity of 78.6% (P<0.01). Conclusions Skin AF could be a useful marker to predict endothelial dysfunction in uremic subjects on hemodialysis. PMID:26809145

  9. Depressed expression of Klotho and FGF receptor 1 in hyperplastic parathyroid glands from uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Hirotaka; Goto, Shunsuke; Fujii, Hideki; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Shibuya, Koji; Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-Ichi; Nakagawa, Kimie; Tsugawa, Naoko; Okano, Toshio; Kitazawa, Riko; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Kita, Tomoyuki

    2010-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) exerts its effect by binding to its cognate FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) in the presence of its co-receptor Klotho. Parathyroid glands express both FGFR1 and Klotho, and FGF23 decreases parathyroid hormone gene expression and hormone secretion directly. In uremic patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), however, parathyroid hormone secretion remains elevated despite extremely high FGF23 levels. To determine the mechanism of this resistance, we measured the expression of Klotho, FGFR1, and the proliferative marker Ki67 in 7 normal and 80 hyperplastic parathyroid glands from uremic patients by immunohistochemistry. All uremic patients had severe SHPT along with markedly high FGF23 levels. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR showed that the mRNA levels for Klotho and FGFR1correlated significantly with their semi-quantitative immunohistochemical intensity. Compared with normal tissue, the immunohistochemical expression of Klotho and FGFR1 decreased, but Ki67 expression increased significantly in hyperplastic parathyroid glands, particularly in glands with nodular hyperplasia. These results suggest that the depressed expression of the Klotho-FGFR1 complex in hyperplastic glands underlies the pathogenesis of SHPT and its resistance to extremely high FGF23 levels in uremic patients. PMID:19890272

  10. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. PMID:26902864

  11. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Neal X.; O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis; Moe, Sharon M.

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  12. Oxidative consumption of nitric oxide: a potential mediator of uremic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Thuraisingham, R C; Yaqoob, M M

    2003-05-01

    Recent data has drawn our attention to the relationship between altered biomechanical properties of the vasculature and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in uremia. We have been able to show that uremia causes functional changes in the conduit vessels of rats, predating structural changes and independent of blood pressure. As nitric oxide (NO) is a potent modulator of the cardiovascular system, we studied the NO pathway in uremia. The existing data are somewhat confusing, with some suggesting up-regulation of the NO system, and others the opposite. When examined critically, however, a pattern emerges, with studies examining NO release showing increased production, whereas those examining NO bioactivity show it to be attenuated. We hypothesized that there is increased NO release, but excess consumption in uremia. Our own data on NO metabolites (NOx) in the serum of healthy young male hemodialysis patients indicate higher concentrations both pre- and post-dialysis compared to controls. As the endothelium is a potential source of NO, we cultured endothelial cells in uremic plasma. These studies demonstrated increased basal NO release from cells cultured under uremic conditions compared to controls. Furthermore, alterations in arginine metabolism appear to play a role, as there is evidence for reduced arginase activity in these cells, thereby increasing arginine availability for the NO pathway. Given the in vivo data and clinical characteristics of the uremic syndrome suggesting reduced NO bioactivity, we examined the possibility that the excess NO generated is being consumed and rendered bio-inactive. Aortae from uremic and control rats were stained for the presence of nitrotyrosine. All uremic aortae stained positively, but nitrotyrosine was not present in any control aortae. PMID:12694303

  13. Calcification by reef-building sclerobionts.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm(-2) d(-1)). Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles) across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light), exposed (open-horizontal) and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (%) in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317) g m(-2) y(-1). Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27) and 4.0 (SD ±3.6) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Encruster cover (%) on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7) g m(-2) y(-1) and 56.3 (SD ±8.3) g m(-2) y(-1) respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment

  14. Calcification by Reef-Building Sclerobionts

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that deteriorating water quality associated with increased sediment stress has reduced calcification rates on coral reefs. However, there is limited information regarding the growth and development of reef building organisms, aside from the corals themselves. This study investigated encruster calcification on five fore-reefs in Tobago subjected to a range of sedimentation rates (1.2 to 15.9 mg cm−2 d−1). Experimental substrates were used to assess rates of calcification in sclerobionts (e.g. crustose coralline algae, bryozoans and barnacles) across key reef microhabitats: cryptic (low-light), exposed (open-horizontal) and vertical topographic settings. Sedimentation negatively impacted calcification by photosynthesising crustose coralline algae in exposed microhabitats and encrusting foram cover (%) in exposed and cryptic substrates. Heterotrophs were not affected by sedimentation. Fore-reef, turbid water encruster assemblages calcified at a mean rate of 757 (SD ±317) g m−2 y−1. Different microhabitats were characterised by distinct calcareous encruster assemblages with different rates of calcification. Taxa with rapid lateral growth dominated areal cover but were not responsible for the majority of CaCO3 production. Cryptobiont assemblages were composed of a suite of calcifying taxa which included sciaphilic cheilostome bryozoans and suspension feeding barnacles. These calcified at mean rates of 20.1 (SD ±27) and 4.0 (SD ±3.6) g m−2 y−1 respectively. Encruster cover (%) on exposed and vertical substrates was dominated by crustose coralline algae which calcified at rates of 105.3 (SD ±67.7) g m−2 y−1 and 56.3 (SD ±8.3) g m−2 y−1 respectively. Globally, encrusting organisms contribute significant amounts of carbonate to the reef framework. These results provide experimental evidence that calcification rates, and the importance of different encrusting organisms, vary significantly according to topography and sediment

  15. COX2 Inhibition Reduces Aortic Valve Calcification In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Gomez, M. Victoria; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, which affects approximately 1% of the US population and is characterized by calcific nodule formation and stenosis of the valve. Klotho-deficient mice were used to study the molecular mechanisms of CAVD as they develop robust aortic valve (AoV) calcification. Through microarray analysis of AoV tissues from klotho-deficient and wild type mice, increased expression of the gene encoding cyclooxygenase 2/COX2 (Ptgs2) was found. COX2 activity contributes to bone differentiation and homeostasis, thus the contribution of COX2 activity to AoV calcification was assessed. Approach and Results In klotho-deficient mice, COX2 expression is increased throughout regions of valve calcification and is induced in the valvular interstitial cells (VICs) prior to calcification formation. Similarly, COX2 expression is increased in human diseased AoVs. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic VICs with osteogenic media induces bone marker gene expression and calcification in vitro, which is blocked by inhibition of COX2 activity. In vivo, genetic loss of function of COX2 cyclooxygenase activity partially rescues AoV calcification in klotho-deficient mice. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 activity in klotho-deficient mice via celecoxib-containing diet reduces AoV calcification and blocks osteogenic gene expression. Conclusions COX2 expression is upregulated in CAVD and its activity contributes to osteogenic gene induction and valve calcification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25722432

  16. Computed tomographic evaluation of pineal calcification.

    PubMed

    Kohli, N; Rastogi, H; Bhadury, S; Tandon, V K

    1992-04-01

    A prospective study to ascertain the incidence of normally calcified pineal gland, was carried out in 1000 consecutive patients from different parts of Uttar Pradesh (India), undergoing cranial computed tomography for reasons other than a pineal or parapineal pathology. A total of 167 (16.70%) patients were found to have calcified pineals. Of these 128 were males and 39 females. The incidence rose from 1.16 per cent in the first decade to 31.88 per cent above the age of 50 yr. The percentage incidence of normal pineal calcification was lower than that seen in the Western population. No significant difference was found between men and women in any age group. Although calcification appeared as early as the first decade, this percentage was significantly lower than in the higher age groups. Significantly higher incidence rates were seen in the second decade, third decade and sixth decade onwards. PMID:1428055

  17. Dystrophic Calcification of the Prostate after Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses. PMID:25548712

  18. Unusual ganglioglioma with extensive calcification and ossification.

    PubMed

    Kavishwar, Vikas Shashikant; Chadha, Kirti G; Barodawala, Shaikhali Moiz; Murthy, Anuradha Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a slow-growing relatively low-grade mixed glioneuronal tumor with most cases corresponding to the WHO Grade I category. It frequently presents with seizures. The temporal lobe is the most common location followed by frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes. These generally behave in a benign fashion and have a favorable prognosis. We describe a case of a 24-year-old male presenting with convulsions and a calcified parieto-occipital mass. This mass removed from the parietal lobe showed neoplastic glial and dysplastic neuronal tissue amidst extensive areas of calcification and foci of ossification. On immunohistochemistry, the glial component expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein whereas the dysplastic neuronal component expressed synaptophysin and CD34. Epithelial membrane antigen was negative and Ki-67 showed a low proliferative index. After the surgery, the patient is free of neurological symptoms. Widespread calcification and ossification are very unusual in ganglioglioma, which prompted us to report this case. PMID:27510688

  19. Vascular calcification in diabetes: mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Budoff, Matthew J; Hokanson, John E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death among adults with diabetes, and CVD prevention remains a major challenge. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) score measured by electron beam tomography (EBT) or multi-slice detector computed tomography correlates closely with plaque burden and coronary angiography, and predicts coronary events independently of other risk factors. Further, progression of CAC over several years has been shown to predict increased mortality. Coronary calcification is an active process strongly associated with atherosclerotic plaque evolution and is an accepted surrogate endpoint in studies of patients with diabetes older than 30. In this review, recent findings regarding the mechanisms and implications of vascular calcification in diabetes will be discussed. PMID:23526400

  20. Enlarging mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy with calcification.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takashi; Nakahata, Masashi; Moritani, Suzuko; Iida, Hiroatsu; Ogawa, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    A 77-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to enlarging mediastinal/hilar lymphadenopathy with calcification. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and bone marrow aspiration were performed. Subsequently, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) associated with mediastinal amyloidosis was diagnosed. We hereby report a case in which EBUS-TBNA led to a successful diagnosis of amyloidosis. PMID:26862422

  1. Calcification of intraocular implant lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenju; Guan, Xiangying; Tang, Ruikang; Hook, Daniel; Yan, Wenyan; Grobe, George; Nancollas, George H

    2004-02-17

    Calcification of octacalcium phosphate [Ca8H2(PO4)6 x 5H2O, OCP] on differently packaged "Ultem" and "Surefold" intraocular implant lens surfaces has been studied in vitro in solutions supersaturated with respect to OCP at pH = 7.10 and 37 degrees C. No mineral deposition was observed on the lenses packaged in Ultem vials even after treatment with behenic acid, one of the fatty acids identified on explanted lenses. Following treatment with behenic acid, nucleation of OCP occurred on the lenses from Surefold vials, which incorporate silicone gaskets; induction periods preceding calcification were about 6 h. No mineralization was found on the lenses in vials with other gasket materials, including polytetrafluoroethylene, fluorocarbon elastomer, and polypropylene. The results of this study indicate that both silicone and fatty acids such as behenic acid play important roles in inducing the in vivo calcification of OCP on IOL lenses; all of the lens treatment steps were necessary for nucleation induction. PMID:15803719

  2. Aortic Stenosis and Vascular Calcifications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A.; Gahl, William A.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports . We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. PMID:22100375

  3. Klotho and phosphate are modulators of pathologic uremic cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming Chang; Shi, Mingjun; Cho, Han Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Paek, Jean; Hill, Kathy; Shelton, John; Amaral, Ansel P; Faul, Christian; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Wolf, Myles; Brand, Markus; Takahashi, Masaya; Kuro-O, Makoto; Hill, Joseph A; Moe, Orson W

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac dysfunction in CKD is characterized by aberrant cardiac remodeling with hypertrophy and fibrosis. CKD is a state of severe systemic Klotho deficiency, and restoration of Klotho attenuates vascular calcification associated with CKD. We examined the role of Klotho in cardiac remodeling in models of Klotho deficiency-genetic Klotho hypomorphism, high dietary phosphate intake, aging, and CKD. Klotho-deficient mice exhibited cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy before 12 weeks of age followed by fibrosis. In wild-type mice, the induction of CKD led to severe cardiovascular changes not observed in control mice. Notably, non-CKD mice fed a high-phosphate diet had lower Klotho levels and greatly accelerated cardiac remodeling associated with normal aging compared with those on a normal diet. Chronic elevation of circulating Klotho because of global overexpression alleviated the cardiac remodeling induced by either high-phosphate diet or CKD. Regardless of the cause of Klotho deficiency, the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis correlated tightly with plasma phosphate concentration and inversely with plasma Klotho concentration, even when adjusted for all other covariables. High-fibroblast growth factor-23 concentration positively correlated with cardiac remodeling in a Klotho-deficient state but not a Klotho-replete state. In vitro, Klotho inhibited TGF-β1-, angiotensin II-, or high phosphate-induced fibrosis and abolished TGF-β1- or angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, Klotho deficiency is a novel intermediate mediator of pathologic cardiac remodeling, and fibroblast growth factor-23 may contribute to cardiac remodeling in concert with Klotho deficiency in CKD, phosphotoxicity, and aging. PMID:25326585

  4. Acupressure and Transcutaneous Electrical Acupoint Stimulation for Improving Uremic Pruritus: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kılıç Akça, Nazan; Taşcı, Sultan

    2016-03-01

    Context • Uremic pruritus, a frequent and compromising symptom for patients with advanced or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), strongly reduces the patient's quality of life. Pruritus may be extremely difficult to control because therapeutic options are limited. Topical products are frequently used for easing pruritus, but their effects are generally temporary and marginal. Although acupressure and electrical-stimulation methods for the application of acupressure have been evaluated separately in terms of pruritus efficiency in different studies, the existence of any difference between the efficacies of the 2 methods has not been assessed yet. Objective • The study intended to test the effectiveness of acupressure and transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on uremic pruritus in patients who were receiving the routine hemodialysis treatment. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place in hemodialysis units located in hemodialysis centers in Turkey. Participants • Participants were patients in the hemodialysis units who were under hemodialysis treatment and had experienced uremic pruritus. Intervention • Participants were randomly assigned to the acupressure group (intervention group), the TEAS group (intervention group), or the control group. For the 2 intervention groups, the treatment was applied 3 ×/wk during the 4 wk of the study on the large intestine (LI-11) acupuncture points in the arm, for a total of 12 sessions. Outcome Measures • The study measured the severity of participants' pruritus using a patient information form and a visual analogue scale (VAS). The data were collected at baseline and posttreatment. Results • A total of 75 patients participated in the study. The results indicated that patients in the acupressure and TEAS groups had significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment in their levels of discomfort from uremic pruritus compared with patients in the control

  5. Treatment of hypophosphatemic rickets in generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) without worsening of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carlos R; Ziegler, Shira G; Gupta, Ashutosh; Groden, Catherine; Hsu, Kevin S; Gahl, William A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) develop vascular calcifications early in life. About half of them die within the first 6 months despite optimal medical care. A subset of those who survive eventually develop hypophosphatemic rickets. Since hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphaturia have been previously associated with increased survival in GACI patients, physicians often avoid phosphate repletion as treatment for rickets. As a consequence, GACI patients develop severe rachitic complications such as short stature and skeletal deformities. It appears that the recognition of hypophosphatemia later in life in some GACI patients is a consequence of having survived the first few months of life, and not the cause of their survival per se. Here, we report the long-term follow-up of a GACI patient who was phosphate-repleted for his rickets for more than 7 years without worsening of vascular calcification. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857895

  6. Revisiting cardiovascular calcification: A multifaceted disease requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Goettsch, Claudia; Rogers, Maximillian A; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-10-01

    The presence of cardiovascular calcification significantly predicts patients' morbidity and mortality. Calcific mineral deposition within the soft cardiovascular tissues disrupts the normal biomechanical function of these tissues, leading to complications such as heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke. The realization that calcification results from active cellular processes offers hope that therapeutic intervention may prevent or reverse the disease. To this point, however, no clinically viable therapies have emerged. This may be due to the lack of certainty that remains in the mechanisms by which mineral is deposited in cardiovascular tissues. Gaining new insight into this process requires a multidisciplinary approach. The pathological changes in cell phenotype that lead to the physicochemical deposition of mineral and the resultant effects on tissue biomechanics must all be considered when designing strategies to treat cardiovascular calcification. In this review, we overview the current cardiovascular calcification paradigm and discuss emerging techniques that are providing new insight into the mechanisms of ectopic calcification. PMID:26358815

  7. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    PubMed

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton. PMID:25531981

  8. The role of apoptosis in the initiation of vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Skepper, J N; Hegyi, L; Farzaneh-Far, A; Shanahan, C M; Weissberg, P L

    2001-01-01

    The initiation sites for calcification in cartilage and bone are cellular products called matrix vesicles. Similar structures have been found in calcified arteries and recent studies suggest that these may be derived from apoptotic cells. It is well established that there is a link between cell death and calcification but the mechanism involved is not known. Since apoptotic cell death is known to occur in the vasculature, we set out to investigate the role of apoptosis in the initiation of vascular calcification. We used a human vascular calcification model in which postconfluent vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) cultures form nodules spontaneously and calcify after approximately 28 days. Our studies revealed that apoptosis occurred prior to the onset of calcification and that VSMC "blebs" or apoptotic bodies (ABs) could concentrate calcium in a crystallised form. These observations suggest that apoptosis is involved in the development of VSMC calcification and that VSMC-derived ABs have similarities with matrix vesicles. PMID:11374032

  9. Bone morphogenic protein-4 expression in vascular lesions of calciphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Griethe, Wanja; Schmitt, Roland; Jurgensen, Jan Steffen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Schindler, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is characterized by an extensive media-calcification of cutaneous and subcutaneous arterioles and capillaries. Recent studies have provided evidence that vascular calcification is a process with similarities to bone metabolism. Bone morphogenic protein-4 (BMP-4) is physiologically involved in bone development and repair. The presence of BMP-4 in atherosclerosis and in sclerotic heart valves led us to suggest that BMP-4 is also involved in calciphylaxis. A 47-year-old male patient developed end-stage renal failure due to chronic glomerulonephritis. He has had two kidney transplants with an immunosuppressive regimen consisting of cyclosporine A and steroids. He was admitted to our hospital because of an increase in serum creatinine (Cr) and he subsequently developed progressive dermal ulcerations. A skin biopsy led to the diagnosis of calciphylaxis. Immunohistochemistry for BMP-4 of a skin specimen from our patient showed strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of intradermal cells with clear spatial association to arterioles and hair follicles. Whereas there are identified inhibitors and promoters of vascular calcification, the presence of BMP-4 has not been demonstrated in calcific uremic arteriolopathy. In contrast to atherosclerosis, BMP-4 in calciphylaxis cannot be found in vascular media, but in intradermal cells at the border of arterioles and hair follicles. Therefore, in calciphylaxis BMP-4 can play the role of a cytokine, a growth factor or a media-calcification promoter. PMID:14733421

  10. Apoptosis and calcification of vascular endothelial cell under hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kuaifa; Chen, Zhujun; Liu, Meng; Peng, Jian; Wu, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is found that increase in Hcy level in blood can directly or indirectly cause vascular endothelial cell injury and induce vascular calcification. However, the mechanism of vascular endothelial cell injury and vascular calcification has not been studied thoroughly. This paper carried out experiment for research aiming at discussing the effect and action mechanism of Hhcy on endothelial cells and vascular calcification. Firstly, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and then intervened by Hcy of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mmol/L) and at different action time (3, 6, 12, 24 h). Then apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen were detected by flow cytometry. At the same time, the model for the culture of rat vascular calcification was set up and induced into Hhcy so as to detect the total plasma Hcy level and judge vascular calcification degree. The results showed that with the increase in Hcy concentration and extension of action period, the apoptosis rate and generation of reactive oxygen of HUVECs all significantly increased, and the differences were all statistically significant (P < 0.01). In animal calcification model, mass of black particle deposition was seen after Von Kossa staining of rat vessels in calcification group. Compared with the control group, the vascular calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin content in calcification group all increased (P < 0.01). The content of plasma lipid conjugated olefine from highest to lowest wasas follows: calcification plus homoetheionin, homoetheionin, and calcification group. There was no significant difference between the calcification group and control group. All these findings suggested that Hcy could induce the apoptosis of endothelial cells and its effect degree depended on its concentration and action period; Hhcy could promote the calcification of blood vessels, and its mechanism might relate with the strengthening of

  11. Dystrophic calcifications after autologous fat injection on face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dai Hyun; Jang, Hee Won; Kim, Hee Joo; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-06-01

    Autologous fat injection is widely used procedure for various functional and aesthetic purposes. However, it could result in many immediate or delayed complications including dystrophic calcifications. Almost all of the case reports about dystrophic calcification after autologous fat injection were result from the iatrogenic tissue trauma of breast augmentation. This is a report of a 30-year-old patient who developed pathologically proven multiple dystrophic calcifications on the face after autologous fat injection. PMID:24131074

  12. Vascular calcification is dependent on plasma levels of pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lomashvili, Koba A; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose L; O'Neill, W Charles

    2014-06-01

    Plasma levels of pyrophosphate, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular calcification, are reduced in end-stage renal disease and correlate inversely with arterial calcification. However, it is not known whether the low plasma levels are directly pathogenic or are merely a marker of reduced tissue levels. This was tested in an animal model in which aortas were transplanted between normal mice and Enpp1(-/-) mice lacking ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that synthesizes extracellular pyrophosphate. Enpp1(-/-) mice had very low plasma pyrophosphate and developed aortic calcification by 2 months that was greatly accelerated with a high-phosphate diet. Aortas of Enpp1(-/-) mice showed no further calcification after transplantation into wild-type mice fed a high-phosphate diet. Aorta allografts of wild-type mice calcified in Enpp1(-/-) mice but less so than the adjacent recipient Enpp1(-/-) aorta. Donor and recipient aortic calcium contents did not differ in transplants between wild-type and Enpp1(-/-) mice, demonstrating that transplantation per se did not affect calcification. Histology revealed medial calcification with no signs of rejection. Thus, normal levels of extracellular pyrophosphate are sufficient to prevent vascular calcification, and systemic Enpp1 deficiency is sufficient to produce vascular calcification despite normal vascular extracellular pyrophosphate production. This establishes an important role for circulating extracellular pyrophosphate in preventing vascular calcification. PMID:24717293

  13. Sortilin mediates vascular calcification via its recruitment into extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Pham, Tan; Nykjaer, Anders; Kjolby, Mads; Rogers, Maximillian; Michel, Thomas; Shibasaki, Manabu; Hagita, Sumihiko; Kramann, Rafael; Singh, Sasha A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of major cardiovascular diseases. Extracellular vesicles participate in the formation of microcalcifications that are implicated in atherosclerotic plaque rupture; however, the mechanisms that regulate formation of calcifying extracellular vesicles remain obscure. Here, we have demonstrated that sortilin is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) calcification via its recruitment to extracellular vesicles. Sortilin localized to calcifying vessels in human and mouse atheromata and participated in formation of microcalcifications in SMC culture. Sortilin regulated the loading of the calcification protein tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) into extracellular vesicles, thereby conferring its calcification potential. Furthermore, SMC calcification required Rab11-dependent trafficking and FAM20C/casein kinase 2–dependent C-terminal phosphorylation of sortilin. In a murine model, Sort1-deficiency reduced arterial calcification but did not affect bone mineralization. Additionally, transfer of sortilin-deficient BM cells to irradiated atherosclerotic mice did not affect vascular calcification, indicating a primary role of SMC-derived sortilin. Together, the results of this study identify sortilin phosphorylation as a potential therapeutic target for ectopic calcification/microcalcification and may clarify the mechanism that underlies the genetic association between the SORT1 gene locus and coronary artery calcification. PMID:26950419

  14. Role of Glutaraldehyde in Calcification of Porcine Aortic Valve Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kookmin M.; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Battarbee, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve xenografts frequently fail due to calcification. Calcification in the prostheses begins intracellularly. In a previous study, various types of cell injury to canine valvular fibroblasts, including glutaraldehyde treatment, led to calcification. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ into the phosphate-rich cytosol was theorized to be the mechanism of calcification. To test the Ca2+ influx theory, cytosolic Ca2+ and Pi concentrations were assessed in glutaraldehyde-treated porcine aortic valve fibroblasts, and their relationship to a subsequent calcification was studied. Glutaraldehyde caused an immediate and sustained massive cytosolic Ca2+ increase that was dose dependent and a several-fold increase in Pi. Calcification of cells followed within a week. The earliest calcification was observed in blebs formed on glutaraldehyde-treated cells. Live control cells or cells fixed with glutaraldehyde in Ca2+-free solution did not calcify under the same conditions. Concomitant increases in Ca2+ and Pi in glutaraldehyde-treated cells appear to underlie the mechanism of calcification, and the presence of extracellular Ca2+ during glutaraldehyde fixation promotes calcification. PMID:10079262

  15. Uremic pruritus: skin divalent ion content and response to ultraviolet phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Blachley, J D; Blankenship, D M; Menter, A; Parker, T F; Knochel, J P

    1985-05-01

    Pruritus is a frequent and troublesome consequence of end-stage renal disease. We have surveyed 155 chronic dialysis patients and found pruritus to be a significant problem in approximately 70%. Seventeen patients reporting severe pruritus were treated thrice weekly with total body exposure to either UVA or UVB light. UVB light resulted in resolution of pruritus in all cases. UVA light was without significant effect. Skin biopsies obtained before and after UV phototherapy revealed elevated contents of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus in all pruritic patients. The resolution of pruritus following UVB treatment was associated with a reduction of skin phosphorus to values comparable with nonpruritic uremics or healthy volunteers. Uremic pruritus may be due to increased skin divalent ion content resulting in microprecipitation of calcium or magnesium phosphate. PMID:4003393

  16. Randomized, Double-blind Study with Glycerol and Paraffin in Uremic Xerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balaskas, Elias; Szepietowski, Jacek C.; Bessis, Didier; Ioannides, Dimitrios; Ponticelli, Claudio; Ghienne, Corinne; Taberly, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Uremic xerosis is a bothersome condition that is poorly responsive to moisturizing and emollient therapy. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A randomized, double-blind, intraindividual (left versus right comparison), multicentric clinical study was performed on 100 patients with moderate to severe uremic xerosis for 7 days, during which the patients applied twice daily an emulsion combining glycerol and paraffin (test product) on one allocated lower leg, and the emulsion alone (comparator) on the other lower leg. This was followed by an open-labeled use of the test product on all of the xerotic areas for 49 days. The main efficacy parameter was treatment response on each lower leg, as defined by a reduction from baseline of at least two grades in a five-point clinical score on day 7. Results Among the 99 patients analyzed, the test product was highly effective with a treatment response in 72 patients (73%), whereas 44 patients (44%) responded to the comparator (P < 0.0001, intergroup analysis). This was associated with an objective reduction in the density and thickness of the scales on day 7 (P < 0.0001 compared with the comparator) and a substantial improvement of the uremic pruritus (75%) and quality of life of the patients at study end (P < 0.001, intragroup analysis). The test product was very well tolerated, with product-related local intolerance (exacerbated pruritus, local burning, or erythema) occurring in only five patients (5%). Conclusions Uremic xerosis can be managed successfully when an appropriate emollient therapy is used. PMID:21258039

  17. Release of uremic retention solutes from protein binding by hypertonic predilution hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Böhringer, Falko; Jankowski, Vera; Gajjala, Prathibha R; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Protein-bound uremic retention solutes accumulate in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease, and the removal of these solutes by hemodialysis is hampered. Therefore, we developed a dialysis technique where the protein-bound uremic retention solutes are removed more efficiently under high ionic strength. Protein-bound uremic solutes such as phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate were combined with plasma in the presence of increased ionic strength. The protein integrity of proteins and enzymatic activities were analyzed. In vitro dialysis of albumin solution was performed to investigate the clearance of the bound uremic retention solutes. In vitro hemodiafiltrations of human blood were performed to investigate the influence of increased ionic strength on blood cell survival. The protein-bound fraction of phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate was significantly decreased from 59.4% ± 3.4%, 95.7% ± 0.6%, 96.9% ± 1.5% to 36.4% ± 3.7%, 87.8% ± 0.6%, and 90.8% ± 1.3%, respectively. The percentage of phenylacetic acid, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresyl sulfate released from protein was 23.0% ± 5.7%, 7.9% ± 1.1%, and 6.1% ± 0.2%, respectively. The clearance during in vitro dialysis was increased by 13.1% ± 3.6%, 68.8% ± 15.1%, and 53.6% ± 10.2%, respectively. There was no difference in NaCl concentrations at the outlet of the dialyzer using isotonic and hypertonic solutions. In conclusion, this study forms the basis for establishing a novel therapeutic approach to remove protein-bound retention solutes. PMID:25419832

  18. Magnesium intake is inversely associated with coronary artery calcification: the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND: Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying c...

  19. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  20. Determination of the binding properties of the uremic toxin phenylacetic acid to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Juliana F; Yi, Dan; Stockler-Pinto, Milena B; Soula, Hédi A; Chambert, Stéphane; Fouque, Denis; Mafra, Denise; Soulage, Christophe O

    2016-06-01

    Uremic toxins are compounds normally excreted in urine that accumulate in patients with chronic kidney disease as a result of decreased renal clearance. Phenylacetic acid (PAA) has been identified as a new protein bound uremic toxin. The purpose of this study was to investigate in vitro the interaction between PAA and human serum albumin (HSA) at physiological and pathological concentrations. We used ultrafiltration to show that there is a single high-affinity binding site for PAA on HSA, with a binding constant on the order of 3.4 × 10(4) M(-1) and a maximal stoichiometry of 1.61 mol per mole. The PAA, at the concentration reported in end-stage renal patients, was 26% bound to albumin. Fluorescent probe competition experiments demonstrated that PAA did not bind to Sudlow's site I (in subdomain IIA) and only weakly bind to Sudlow's site II (in subdomain IIIA). The PAA showed no competition with other protein-bound uremic toxins such as p-cresyl-sulfate or indoxyl sulfate for binding to serum albumin. Our results provide evidence that human serum albumin can act as carrier protein for phenylacetic acid. PMID:26945842

  1. The uremic toxicity of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Schepers, Eva; Pletinck, Anneleen; Nagler, Evi V; Glorieux, Griet

    2014-09-01

    A growing number of publications supports a biologic effect of the protein-bound uremic retention solutes indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate. However, the use of unrealistically high free concentrations of these compounds and/or inappropriately low albumin concentrations may blur the interpretation of these results. Here, we performed a systematic review, selecting only studies in which, depending on the albumin concentration, real or extrapolated free concentrations of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate remained in the uremic range. The 27 studies retrieved comprised in vitro and animal studies. A quality score was developed, giving 1 point for each of the following criteria: six or more experiments, confirmation by more than one experimental approach, neutralization of the biologic effect by counteractive reagents or antibodies, use of a real-life model, and use of dose-response analyses in vitro and/or animal studies. The overall average score was 3 of 5 points, with five studies scoring 5 of 5 points and six studies scoring 4 of 5 points, highlighting the superior quality of a substantial number of the retrieved studies. In the 11 highest scoring studies, most functional deteriorations were related to uremic cardiovascular disease and kidney damage. We conclude that our systematic approach allowed the retrieval of methodologically correct studies unbiased by erroneous conditions related to albumin binding. Our data seem to confirm the toxicity of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate and support their roles in vascular and renal disease progression. PMID:24812165

  2. The Extent of Blockade Following Axillary and Infraclavicular Approaches of Brachial Plexus Block in Uremic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sariguney, Damla; Mahli, Ahmet; Coskun, Demet

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study was aimed to compare the axillary approach performed through multiple injection method and vertical infraclavicular approach performed through single injection method in terms of the sensory and motor block onset, quality, and extent of blocks of brachial plexus in uremic patients who underwent arteriovenous fistula surgery. Methods Forty patients scheduled for creation of arteriovenous fistula with axillary brachial plexus block (group AX, n = 20) or infraclavicular brachial plexus block (IC group, n = 20) were examined. The median, radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves were selectively localized by nerve stimulation. The volume of the local anesthetics was calculated based on the height of each patient, and the volume determined was prepared by mixing 2% lidocaine and 0.5% bupivacaine in equal proportions. Sensory and motor block were assessed at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 30th min and their durations were measured. Results While the adequate sensory and motor block rate with axillary approach was 100% in musculocutaneous, median, radial, ulnar and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves, it was 65% in axillary nerve, 80% in intercostobrachial nerve and 95% in medial brachial cutaneous nerve. This rate was found to be 100% for all the nerves with infraclavicular approach. Conclusion For arteriovenous fistula surgeries in uremic patients, both axillary approach performed through multiple injection method and vertical infraclavicular approach performed through single injection method can be used successfully; however, for the short performance of the procedure, infraclavicular block may be preferred. Keywords Brachial plexus block; Axillary; Infraclavicular; Uremic patients PMID:22383924

  3. H-reflex latency in uremic neuropathy: correlation with NCV and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; Brozovich, F V; Milutinovic, J; Inouye, V L; Becker, V M

    1979-04-01

    Sixty-two uremic patients on dialysis of varying durations were tested bilaterally for posterior tibial nerve H-reflex latency, at 3-month intervals. Bilateral nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) of the peroneal, tibial, and sural nerves were concomitantly determined in all subjects. Proprioception sense, vibration perception threshold at the great toes, and deep tendon reflexes at the knee and ankle were determined in all subjects on the day of electrodiagnostic testing. The sensitivity of the H-reflex latency in detection of the onset and severity of uremic neuropathy was assessed. H-reflex latency changes were compared to NCV and clinical test results. The following was found: (1) of the parameters studied, the H-reflex latency appeared to be the most sensitive indicator of early uremic polyneuropathies, (2) electrodiagnostic tests were more sensitive to the onset of neuropathies than the clinical testing parameters studied, and (3) the sural sensory nerve appeared to be involved earlier than peroneal and tibial motor nerves in neuropathies studied. PMID:224838

  4. Uremic Toxins and Lipases in Haemodialysis: A Process of Repeated Metabolic Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Stegmayr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Severe kidney disease results in retention of uremic toxins that inhibit key enzymes for lipid breakdown such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL). For patients in haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) the LPL activity is only about half of that of age and gender matched controls. Angiopoietin, like protein 3 and 4, accumulate in the uremic patients. These factors, therefore, can be considered as uremic toxins. In animal experiments it has been shown that these factors inhibit the LPL activity. To avoid clotting of the dialysis circuit during HD, anticoagulation such as heparin or low molecular weight heparin are added to the patient. Such administration will cause a prompt release of the LPL and HL from its binding sites at the endothelial surface. The liver rapidly degrades the release plasma compound of LPL and HL. This results in a lack of enzyme to degrade triglycerides during the later part of the HD and for another 3–4 h. PD patients have a similar baseline level of lipases but are not exposed to the negative effect of anticoagulation. PMID:24784324

  5. Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Arsalan; Tariq, Hassan; Abbas, Naeem; Shenoy, Roopalekha

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Atyipcal hemolytic uremic syndrome Symptoms: Delirium • headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction. It is a disease related to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway and has a distinct pathophysiology but is difficult to differentiate from other thrombotic microangiopathies. Case Report: We present a case of a 59-year-old female patient who presented with accelerated hypertension, acute renal failure, hemolysis, and encephalopathy. She was managed with antihypertensive medication, but her encephalopathy did not improve. Evaluation resulted in our impression of the disease being atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The patient continued to be managed with good blood pressure control and later was started on eculizumab, but evaluation of response to therapy was hindered by the patient’s non-compliance with therapy and follow-up appointments. Conclusions: We have a very limited understanding of the genetics and epidemiology of atypical HUS, and the overlapping clinical features sometimes delay diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment of this rare disease. PMID:25708146

  6. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. PMID:19002453

  7. Association between calcifying nanoparticles and placental calcification

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Zhang, Dechun; Lu, He; Luo, Shuang; Shen, Xuecheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the possible contribution of calcifying nanoparticles to the pathogenesis of placental calcification. Methods Calcified placental tissues and distal tissue samples were collected from 36 confirmed placental calcification cases. In addition, 20 normal placental tissue samples were obtained as a control group. All the tissue samples were cultured using special nanobacterial culture methods. The cultured calcifying nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their growth was monitored by optical density (OD) at a wavelength of 650 nm. 16S rRNA gene expression of the cultured calcifying nanoparticles was also isolated and sequenced. Results Novel calcifying nanoparticles wrapped with electron-dense shells between 50 nm to 500 nm in diameter were observed in the extracellular matrix of calcified placental tissues. They were detected in placental villi and hydroxyapatite crystals, and contained “nucleic acid-like materials”. After isolation and four weeks of culture, 28 of 36 calcified placental tissue samples showed white granular precipitates attached to the bottom of the culture tubes. OD650 measurements indicated that the precipitates from the calcified placental tissues were able to grow in culture, whereas no such precipitates from the control tissues were observed. The 16S rRNA genes were isolated from the cultured calcifying nanoparticles and calcified placental tissues, and their gene sequencing results implied that calcifying nanoparticles were novel nanobacteria (GenBank JF823648). Conclusion Our results suggest that these novel calcifying nanoparticles may play a role in placental calcification. PMID:22615531

  8. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-18

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or "minimally invasive" techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  9. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  10. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    ElShewy, Mohamed Taha

    2016-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff tendon is a common shoulder disorder that should be differentiated from dystrophic calcification as the pathogenesis and natural history of both is totally different. Calcific tendinitis usually occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life among sedentary workers. It is classified into formative and resorptive phases. The chronic formative phase results from transient hypoxia that is commonly associated with repeated microtrauma causing calcium deposition into the matrix vesicles within the chondrocytes forming bone foci that later coalesce. This phase may extend from 1 to 6 years, and is usually asymptomatic. The resorptive phase extends from 3 wk up to 6 mo with vascularization at the periphery of the calcium deposits causing macrophage and mononuclear giant cell infiltration, together with fibroblast formation leading to an aggressive inflammatory reaction with inflammatory cell accumulation, excessive edema and rise of the intra-tendineous pressure. This results in a severely painful shoulder. Radiological investigations confirm the diagnosis and suggest the phase of the condition and are used to follow its progression. Although routine conventional X-ray allows detection of the deposits, magnetic resonance imaging studies allow better evaluation of any coexisting pathology. Various methods of treatment have been suggested. The appropriate method should be individualized for each patient. Conservative treatment includes pain killers and physiotherapy, or “minimally invasive” techniques as needling or puncture and aspiration. It is almost always successful since the natural history of the condition ends with resorption of the deposits and complete relief of pain. Due to the intolerable pain of the acute and severely painful resorptive stage, the patient often demands any sort of operative intervention. In such case arthroscopic removal is the best option as complete removal of the deposits is unnecessary. PMID

  11. Calcification of the breasts due to loiasis.

    PubMed

    Lemmenmeier, Eva; Keller, Nicole; Chuck, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old HIV-positive female from Cameroon was diagnosed with loiasis in 2013 due to symptoms of polyarthritis and laboratory confirmed eosinophilia. Because of high microfilaremia primary treatment was given with two courses of albendazol and ivermectin and completed with a course of diethylcarbamazine. Therapy was successful as symptoms, eosinophilia and microfilaremia disappeared. In 2015, she had a gynecology check-up where a screening mammography showed several round and linear, meandering calcifications in both breasts, the latter are typically seen in filariasis. PMID:27051574

  12. Medial vascular calcification revisited: review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lanzer, Peter; Boehm, Manfred; Sorribas, Victor; Thiriet, Marc; Janzen, Jan; Zeller, Thomas; St Hilaire, Cynthia; Shanahan, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications (VCs) are actively regulated biological processes associated with crystallization of hydroxyapatite in the extracellular matrix and in cells of the media (VCm) or intima (VCi) of the arterial wall. Both patterns of VC often coincide and occur in patients with type II diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and other less frequent disorders; VCs are also typical in senile degeneration. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge about the pathology, molecular biology, and nosology of VCm, expand on potential mechanisms responsible for poor prognosis, and expose some of the directions for future research in this area. PMID:24740885

  13. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  14. Liposarcoma of the thigh with mixed calcification and ossification.

    PubMed

    Child, Jeremy R; Young, Colin R; Amini, Behrang

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas. Calcification and ossification can occur in liposarcoma; however, the presence of both ossification and calcification is a very rare entity. We present a case of a partially calcified and ossified dedifferentiated liposarcoma of the thigh in a 76-year-old woman, which contained heterologous elements of chondrosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:27594953

  15. Calcific Aortic Valve Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Daniel Alejandro; Prasad, Sai; Alotti, Nasri

    2016-01-01

    Calcification occurs in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and In the aortic valve. Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a slow, progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening without obstruction of blood flow, termed aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion, termed aortic stenosis. In the past, this process was thought to be ‘degenerative’ because of time-dependent wear and tear of the leaflets, with passive calcium deposition. The presence of osteoblasts in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and in CAVD implies that calcification is an active, regulated process akin to atherosclerosis, with lipoprotein deposition and chronic inflammation. If calcification is active, via pro-osteogenic pathways, one might expect that development and progression of calcification could be inhibited. The overlap in the clinical factors associated with calcific valve disease and atherosclerosis provides further support for a shared disease mechanism. In our recent research we used an in vitro porcine valve interstitial cell model to study spontaneous calcification and potential promoters and inhibitors. Using this model, we found that denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand may, at a working concentration of 50 μg/mL, inhibit induced calcium deposition to basal levels.

  16. Elastin Degradation and Calcification in an Abdominal Aorta Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Basalyga, Dina M.; Simionescu, Dan T.; Xiong, Wanfen; Timothy Baxter, B.; Starcher, Barry C.; Vyavahare, Narendra R.

    2005-01-01

    Background Elastin calcification is a widespread feature of vascular pathology, and circumstantial evidence exists for a correlation between elastin degradation and calcification. We hypothesized that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–mediated vascular remodeling plays a significant role in elastin calcification. Methods and Results In the present studies, we determined that short-term periadventitial treatment of the rat abdominal aorta with low concentrations of calcium chloride (CaCl2) induced chronic degeneration and calcification of vascular elastic fibers in the absence of aneurysm formation and inflammatory reactions. Furthermore, the rate of progression of calcification depended on the application method and concentration of CaCl2 applied periarterially. Initial calcium deposits, associated mainly with elastic fibers, were persistently accompanied by elastin degradation, disorganization of aortic extracellular matrix, and moderate levels of vascular cell apoptosis. Application of aluminum ions (known inhibitors of elastin degradation) before the CaCl2-mediated injury significantly reduced elastin calcification and abolished both extracellular matrix degradation and apoptosis. We also found that MMP-knockout mice were resistant to CaCl2-mediated aortic injury and did not develop elastin degeneration and calcification. Conclusion Collectively, these data strongly indicate a correlation between MMP-mediated elastin degradation and vascular calcification. PMID:15545515

  17. Chest xerotomography: evaluation of calcification within lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Penkrot, R J; Gordon, R

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of a chest phantom and beeswax nodules containing calcium, xerotomography is shown to be a valuable tool in the evaluation of calcifications within lung nodules. The technique gives superior definition of calcium, especially fine calcifications in the 1-2-mm, or less, range. Our results suggest that clinical trials should follow and clinicopathologic correlation be obtained. PMID:7203908

  18. TBS Predict Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Tzyy-Ling; Hsiao, Fu-Tsung; Li, Yi-Da

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study analyzes the association between the bony microarchitecture score (trabecular bone score, TBS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults undergoing health exams. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively collected subjects (N = 81) who underwent coronary computed tomography and bone mineral density studies simultaneously. CAC was categorized to three levels (Group 0, G0, no CAC, score = 0, N = 45; Group 1, G1, moderate CAC, score = 1–100, N = 17; Group 2, G2, high CAC, score ≧ 101, N = 19). Multinomial logistic regression was used to study the association between TBS and CAC levels. Results. CAC is present in 44.4% of the population. Mean TBS ± SD was 1.399 ± 0.090. Per 1 SD increase in TBS, the unadjusted odds ratio (2.393) of moderate CAC compared with no CAC was significantly increased (95% CI, 1.219–4.696, p = 0.011). However, there has been no association of TBS with high CAC (OR: 1.026, 95% CI: 0.586–1.797, p = 0.928). These relationships also existed when individually adjusted for age, sex, and multiple other covariates. Conclusions. Higher TBS was related to moderate CAC, but not high CAC; a possible explanation may be that bone microarchitecture remodeling becomes more active when early coronary artery calcification occurs. However, further researches are needed to clarify this pathophysiology. PMID:27042671

  19. Susceptibility weighted imaging: differentiating between calcification and hemosiderin*

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Jeam Haroldo Oliveira; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a detailed explanation on the processing of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI), demonstrating the effects of echo time and sensitive mask on the differentiation between calcification and hemosiderin. Materials and Methods Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (magnitude and phase) images of six patients (age range 41– 54 years; four men) were retrospectively selected. The SWI images processing was performed using the Matlab’s own routine. Results Four out of the six patients showed calcifications at computed tomography images and their SWI images demonstrated hyperintense signal at the calcification regions. The other patients did not show any calcifications at computed tomography, and SWI revealed the presence of hemosiderin deposits with hypointense signal. Conclusion The selection of echo time and of the mask may change all the information on SWI images, and compromise the diagnostic reliability. Amongst the possible masks, the authors highlight that the sigmoid mask allows for contrasting calcifications and hemosiderin on a single SWI image. PMID:25987750

  20. Mechanisms of ectopic calcification: implications for diabetic vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is the deposition of calcium/phosphate in the vasculature, which portends a worse clinical outcome and predicts major adverse cardiovascular events. VC is an active process initiated and regulated via a variety of molecular signalling pathways. There are mainly two types of calcifications: the media VC and the intima VC. All major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been linked to the presence/development of VC. Besides the risk factors, a genetic component is also operative to determine arterial calcification. Several events take place before VC is established, including inflammation, trans-differentiation of vascular cells and homing of circulating pro-calcific cells. Diabetes is an important predisposing factor for VC. Compared with non-diabetic subjects, patients with diabetes show increased VC and higher expression of bone-related proteins in the medial layer of the vessels. In this review we will highlight the mechanisms underlying vascular calcification in diabetic patients. PMID:26543821

  1. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  2. Late calcification and rupture: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Kural, Cahit; Kirik, Alparslan; Pusat, Serhat; Senturk, Tolga; Izci, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    A 10-year old boy who had undergone a ventriculoperitoneal (V/P) shunt because of hydrocephalus at 10 days of age was doing well until 20 days ago, when he began to experience headache and seizures. CT scan revealed dilated lateral ventricles and calcification at the shunt site. X-rays showed an unusual calcification pattern around the shunt tube and rupture of the tube between the mastoid bone and clavicle. The patient underwent surgery and the shunt was changed completely. The ventricles became small in the follow-up. Even though V/P shunts may induce fibrous tissue formation and calcification around the tube, there are a few cases of shunt rupture and calcification of shunts in the literature. Possible mechanisms of the rupture and calcification are discussed in this paper. PMID:23208915

  3. Mechanisms of ectopic calcification: implications for diabetic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo; Fadini, Gian Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is the deposition of calcium/phosphate in the vasculature, which portends a worse clinical outcome and predicts major adverse cardiovascular events. VC is an active process initiated and regulated via a variety of molecular signalling pathways. There are mainly two types of calcifications: the media VC and the intima VC. All major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been linked to the presence/development of VC. Besides the risk factors, a genetic component is also operative to determine arterial calcification. Several events take place before VC is established, including inflammation, trans-differentiation of vascular cells and homing of circulating pro-calcific cells. Diabetes is an important predisposing factor for VC. Compared with non-diabetic subjects, patients with diabetes show increased VC and higher expression of bone-related proteins in the medial layer of the vessels. In this review we will highlight the mechanisms underlying vascular calcification in diabetic patients. PMID:26543821

  4. Functional Genomic Analysis Identifies Indoxyl Sulfate as a Major, Poorly Dialyzable Uremic Toxin in End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jhawar, Sachin; Singh, Prabhjot; Torres, Daniel; Ramirez-Valle, Francisco; Kassem, Hania; Banerjee, Trina; Dolgalev, Igor; Heguy, Adriana; Zavadil, Jiri; Lowenstein, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure is characterized by progressive renal scarring and accelerated arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease despite what is considered to be adequate hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In rodents with reduced renal mass, renal scarring has been attributed to poorly filtered, small protein-bound molecules. The best studied of these is indoxyl sulfate (IS). Methods We have attempted to establish whether there are uremic toxins that are not effectively removed by hemodialysis. We examined plasma from patients undergoing hemodialysis, employing global gene expression in normal human renal cortical cells incubated in pre- and post- dialysis plasma as a reporter system. Responses in cells incubated with pre- and post-dialysis uremic plasma (n = 10) were compared with responses elicited by plasma from control subjects (n = 5). The effects of adding IS to control plasma and of adding probenecid to uremic plasma were examined. Plasma concentrations of IS were measured by HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography). Results Gene expression in our reporter system revealed dysregulation of 1912 genes in cells incubated with pre-dialysis uremic plasma. In cells incubated in post-dialysis plasma, the expression of 537 of those genes returned to baseline but the majority of them (1375) remained dysregulated. IS concentration was markedly elevated in pre- and post-dialysis plasma. Addition of IS to control plasma simulated more than 80% of the effects of uremic plasma on gene expression; the addition of probenecid, an organic anion transport (OAT) inhibitor, to uremic plasma reversed the changes in gene expression. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that hemodialysis fails to effectively clear one or more solutes that effect gene expression, in our reporter system, from the plasma of patients with uremia. The finding that gene dysregulation was simulated by the addition of IS to control plasma and inhibited by addition of an OAT inhibitor to

  5. Humoral inhibitors of the immune response in uremia. V. Induction of suppressor cells in vitro by uremic serum.

    PubMed Central

    Raskova, J.; Raska, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of inhibition of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) by serum of chronically uremic rats has been studied. The inhibitory activity of the serum has been associated with a discrete subset of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) of Sf 100-400. The degree of the inhibitory activity of uremic serum correlates with the severity of uremia. Spleen cells from normal rats incubated for 20 hours with uremic serum or its VLDL fraction suppress the response of control syngeneic cells in the MLR. Induction of such suppressor activity does not require cell proliferation because it is not inhibited by mitomycin C. although the exact identity of the induced suppressor cells has not been established, they may be macrophages. The suppressor activity of induced spleen cells can be markedly reduced by filtration of spleen cells on glass wool or on nylon wool columns. Reconstruction experiments show that the adherent cell fraction of spleen cells exposed to uremic serum suppresses the response of the nonadherent fraction of control spleen cells. These results indicate that the immunosuppressive effects of rat uremic serum in vitro involve the induction of suppressor cells. PMID:6221666

  6. ENPP1-Fc prevents mortality and vascular calcifications in rodent model of generalized arterial calcification of infancy

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Ronald A.; Stabach, Paul; Cao, Wenxiang; Kavanagh, Dillon; Mullen, Isabelle; Braddock, Alexander A.; Covo, Mariel S.; Tehan, Martin; Yang, Guangxiao; Cheng, Zhiliang; Bouchard, Keith; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Thorn, Stephanie; Wang, Xiangning; Folta-Stogniew, Ewa J.; Negrete, Alejandro; Sinusas, Albert J.; Shiloach, Joseph; Zubal, George; Madri, Joseph A.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Braddock, Demetrios T.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of ectopic calcification of the vascular wall range from lethal orphan diseases such as generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), to common diseases such as hardening of the arteries associated with aging and calciphylaxis of chronic kidney disease (CKD). GACI is a lethal orphan disease in which infants calcify the internal elastic lamina of their medium and large arteries and expire of cardiac failure as neonates, while calciphylaxis of CKD is a ubiquitous vascular calcification in patients with renal failure. Both disorders are characterized by vascular Mönckeburg's sclerosis accompanied by decreased concentrations of plasma inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Here we demonstrate that subcutaneous administration of an ENPP1-Fc fusion protein prevents the mortality, vascular calcifications and sequela of disease in animal models of GACI, and is accompanied by a complete clinical and biomarker response. Our findings have implications for the treatment of rare and common diseases of ectopic vascular calcification. PMID:26624227

  7. Observer study to evaluate the simulation of mammographic calcification clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero

    2016-03-01

    Numerous breast phantoms have been developed to be as realistic as possible to ensure the accuracy of image quality analysis, covering a greater range of applications. In this study, we simulated three different densities of the breast parenchyma using paraffin gel, acrylic plates and PVC films. Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate calcification clusters. From the images acquired with a GE Senographe DR 2000D mammography system, we selected 68 regions of interest (ROIs) with and 68 without a simulated calcification cluster. To validate the phantom simulation, we selected 136 ROIs from the University of South Florida's Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Seven trained observers performed two observer experiments by using a high-resolution monitor Barco mod. E-3620. In the first experiment, the observers had to distinguish between real or phantom ROIs (with and without calcification). In the second one, the observers had to indicate the ROI with calcifications between a pair of ROIs. Results from our study show that the hydroxyapatite calcifications had poor contrast in the simulated breast parenchyma, thus observers had more difficulty in identifying the presence of calcification clusters in phantom images. Preliminary analysis of the power spectrum was conducted to investigate the radiographic density and the contrast thresholds for calcification detection. The values obtained for the power spectrum exponent (β) were comparable with those found in the literature.

  8. Periodontal Disease Is an Independent Predictor of Intracardiac Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Pressman, Gregg S.; Qasim, Atif; Verma, Nitin; Arishiro, Kumiko; Notohara, Yasuhiro; Crudu, Vitalie; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition worldwide and is associated with incident coronary disease. Hypothesis. We hypothesized that periodontal disease would also be associated with cardiac calcification, a condition which shares many risk factors with atherosclerosis and is considered a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods. Cross-sectional study at two sites (USA and Japan) involving subjects with both clinical echocardiograms and detailed dental examinations. Semiquantitative scoring systems were used to assess severity of periodontal disease and echocardiographic calcification. Results. Fifty-six of 73 subjects (77%) had cardiac calcifications, and 51% had moderate to severe periodontal disease (score > 2). In unadjusted analysis, a significant relationship between periodontal score and cardiac calcification (Spearman rho = 0.4, P = 0.001) was noted, with increases in mean calcification score seen across increasing levels of periodontal disease. On multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, race, glomerular filtration rate, and traditional risk factors, this association remained significant (P = 0.024). There was no significant interaction by study site, race, or gender. Conclusions. In a multiracial population, we found a significant association between the degree of periodontal disease, a chronic inflammatory condition, and cardiac calcification. Further, higher periodontal scores were associated with greater degrees of calcification. PMID:24106721

  9. Mechanisms and treatment of extraosseous calcification in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ketteler, Markus; Rothe, Hansjörg; Krüger, Thilo; Biggar, Patrick H; Schlieper, Georg

    2011-09-01

    Strong and unidirectional associations exist between the severity of cardiovascular calcifications and mortality in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. In the past 10 years, a wealth of experimental and clinical information has been published on the key pathophysiological events that contribute to the development and progression of vascular and soft-tissue calcifications. These processes involve a sensitive balance of calcification inhibition, induction and removal. The traditional view of regarding secondary hyperparathyroidism and elevated calcium × phosphate product as the pivotal risk factors for calcification has been challenged by data demonstrating a role for other, more subtle and complex pathomechanisms. These mechanisms include the loss of endogenous calcification inhibitors, deficient clearance of calcified debris, effects of vitamin K and vitamin D, and the action of calcification inducers as in osteogenic transdifferentiation. In this Review, we describe our current knowledge of the factors involved in the passive and active regulation of extraosseous calcification processes, with an assessment of their importance as targets for future diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21769106

  10. Preliminary Study on Composition and Microstructure of Calcification in Craniopharyngiomas

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junxiang; Qi, Songtao; Pan, Jun; Zhang, Xi’an; Huang, Guanglong; Li, Danling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the element composition and microstructure of calcification in craniopharyngiomas and to explore the differences among differing degrees of calcification, 50 consecutive patients with craniopharyngioma were selected. X-ray diffraction analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were performed on the calcified plaques isolated from the tumor specimens. All calcified plaques were constituted of hydroxyapatite crystals and some amorphous materials. The main elements for the analysis were calcium, phosphate, carbon, and oxygen. There were significant differences among groups of differing degrees of calcification in the percentage composition of calcium, phosphorus, and carbon (P < 0.05), in which the element content of calcium and phosphorus had a positive correlation with the extent of calcification (rp = 0.745 and 0.778, respectively, P < 0.01), while the element content of carbon had a negative correlation with the extent of calcification (rp =−0.526, P <0.01). The calcium, phosphorus, and carbon content are different in calcified plaques with different extents of calcification. The element content of calcium, phosphorus, and carbon influences the degree of calcification. PMID:27213742

  11. Adaptation of Coccolith Calcification to Sea Water Carbonate Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziveri, P.; Langer, G.; Probert, I.; Young, J.

    2008-12-01

    Coccolithophores are major calcifiers and through calcification cause feedbacks to atmospheric CO2 cycling. The formation of CaCO3 in seawater, in fact, causes a shift of the carbonate system towards CO2, which in turn affects atmosphere / ocean CO2 exchange. A change in marine calcification provides a concomitant feedback in organic carbon export and would lead to a change in the drawdown of atmospheric CO2. Coccolithophore culture experiments and field observations showed controversial results regarding the response of calcification to high CO2. The three strains of Emiliania huxleyi (the most abundant living coccolithophore species) tested so far show both increased and decreased calcification at high CO2 levels (lower pH). Living E. huxleyi is known to have a large variability in both size and carbonate content. The hypothesis that we want to test in this work is the importance of adaptation of calcification to the seawater carbonate chemistry where coccolithophores calcify. We selected 4 strains of E. huxleyi maintained at the Roscoff culture collection, collected from different oceanographic settings with different carbon speciation. The selected strains are collected from environments with very different water carbonate chemistry and they have different carbonate mass. They have been experimentally grown at different CO2 levels to test the strain calcification response to sea water carbonate chemistry. . With these experiments we test the importance of the calcification strain adaptation to carbonate chemistry. Size and possibly different responses to carbonate chemistry variations will also be discussed.

  12. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  13. Pathological calcifications studied with micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Stuart R.; Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Brooks, Ellen R.; Langman, Craig B.; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2004-10-01

    The microstructure of pathological biomineral deposits has received relatively little attention, perhaps, in part because of the difficulty preparing samples for microscopy. MicroCT avoids these difficulties, and laboratory microCT results are reviewed for aortic valve calcification (human as well as a rabbit model), for human renal calculi (stones) and for calcinoses formed in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). In calcified aortic valves of rabbits, numerical analysis of the data shows statistically significant correlation with diet. In a large kidney stone the pattern of mineralization is clearly revealed and may provide a temporal blueprint for stone growth. In JDM calcified deposits, very different microstructures are observed and may be related to processes unique to this disease.

  14. Intracranial Artery Calcification and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao Hong; Wang, Li Juan; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial arterial calcification (IAC) is an easily identifiable entity on plain head computed tomography scans. Recent studies have found high prevalence rates for IAC worldwide, and this may be associated with ischemic stroke and cognitive decline. Aging, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and chronic kidney disease have been found to be associated with IAC. The severity of IAC can be assessed using different visual grading scales or various quantitative methods (by measuring volume or intensity). An objective method for assessing IAC using consistent criteria is urgently required to facilitate comparisons between multiple studies involving diverse populations. There is accumulating evidence from clinical studies that IAC could be utilized as an indicator of intracranial atherosclerosis. However, the pathophysiology underlying the potential correlation between IAC and ischemic stroke—through direct arterial stenosis or plaque stability—remains to be determined. More well-designed clinical studies are needed to explore the predictive values of IAC in vascular events and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27165425

  15. Pineal and habenula calcification in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    Animal data indicate that melatonin secretion is stimulated by the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and that lesions of the PVN mimic the endocrine effects of pinealectomy. Since the PVN lies adjacent to the third ventricle, I propose that periventricular damage, which is found in schizophrenia and may account for the third ventricular dilatation seen on computed tomographic (CT), may disrupt PVN-pineal interactions and ultimately enhance the process of pineal calcification (PC). To investigate this hypothesis, I conducted CT study on the relationship of PC size to third ventricular width (TVW) in 12 chronic schizophrenic patients (mean age: 33.7 years; SD = 7.3). For comparison, I also studied the relationship of PC size to the ventricular brain ratio and prefrontal cortical atrophy. As predicted, there was a significant correlation between PC size and TVW (r pbi = .61, p < .05), whereas PC was unrelated to the control neuroradiological measures. The findings support the hypothesis that periventricular damage may be involved in the process of PC in schizophrenia and may indirectly implicate damage to the PVN in the mechanisms underlying dysfunction of the pineal gland in schizophrenia. In a second study, I investigated the prevalence of habenular calcification (HAC) on CT in a cohort of 23 chronic schizophrenic-patients (mean age: 31.2 years; SD = 5.95). In this sample HAC was present in 20 patients (87%). Since the prevalence of HAC in a control population of similar age is only 15% these data reveal an almost 6-fold higher prevalence of HAC (X2 = 84.01, p < .0001) in chronic schizophrenia as compared to normal controls. The implications of HAC for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia are discussed in light of the central role of the habenula in the regulation of limbic functions. PMID:1305634

  16. Screening of Cyanobacterial Species for Calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2004-07-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces, which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that although all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that a CaCO3 precipitate was formed. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have a direct effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. Whereas cell density was similar for all strains tested, differences in maximum pH were demonstrated. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Research presented demonstrates that, under the conditions tested, many species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechocystis and Synechococcus are able to calcify but only two species of Synechococcus were able to calcify to an extent that led to the precipitation of calcium carbonate.

  17. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Qun; Dai, Zhenhua; Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury. PMID:27003359

  18. Emodin via colonic irrigation modulates gut microbiota and reduces uremic toxins in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fuhua; Lu, Zhaoyu; Liu, Xusheng; Chen, Cha; Qu, Pinghua; Li, Dingcheng; Hua, Zhengshuang; Qu, Yanni; Zou, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a dual role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is closely linked to production of uremic toxins. Strategies of reducing uremic toxins by targeting gut microbiota are emerging. It is known that Chinese medicine rhubarb enema can reduce uremic toxins and improve renal function. However, it remains unknown which ingredient or mechanism mediates its effect. Here we utilized a rat CKD model of 5/6 nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of emodin, a main ingredient of rhubarb, on gut microbiota and uremic toxins in CKD. Emodin was administered via colonic irrigation at 5ml (1mg/day) for four weeks. We found that emodin via colonic irrigation (ECI) altered levels of two important uremic toxins, urea and indoxyl sulfate (IS), and changed gut microbiota in rats with CKD. ECI remarkably reduced urea and IS and improved renal function. Pyrosequencing and Real-Time qPCR analyses revealed that ECI resumed the microbial balance from an abnormal status in CKD. We also demonstrated that ten genera were positively correlated with Urea while four genera exhibited the negative correlation. Moreover, three genera were positively correlated with IS. Therefore, emodin altered the gut microbiota structure. It reduced the number of harmful bacteria, such as Clostridium spp. that is positively correlated with both urea and IS, but augmented the number of beneficial bacteria, including Lactobacillus spp. that is negatively correlated with urea. Thus, changes in gut microbiota induced by emodin via colonic irrigation are closely associated with reduction in uremic toxins and mitigation of renal injury. PMID:27003359

  19. Study of Uremic Toxin Fluxes Across Nanofabricated Hemodialysis Membranes Using Irreversible Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hedayat, Assem; Peace, Rob; Elmoselhi, Hamdi; Shoker, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The flux of uremic toxin middle molecules through currently used hemodialysis membranes is suboptimal, mainly because of the membranes’ pore architecture. Aim Identifying the modifiable sieving parameters that can be improved by nanotechnology to enhance fluxes of uremic toxins across the walls of dialyzers’ capillaries. Methods We determined the maximal dimensions of endothelin, cystatin C, and interleukin – 6 using the macromolecular modeling software, COOT. We also applied the expanded Nernst-Plank equation to calculate the changes in the overall flux as a function of increased electro-migration and pH of the respective molecules. Results In a high flux hemodialyzer, the effective diffusivities of endothelin, cystatin C, and interleukin – 6 are 15.00 x 10-10 cm2/s, 7.7 x 10-10 cm2/s, and 5.4 x 10-10 cm2/s, respectively, through the capillaries’ walls. In a nanofabricated membrane, the effective diffusivities of endothelin, cystatin C, and interleukin – 6 are 13.87 x 10-7 cm2/s, 5.73 x 10-7 cm2/s, and 3.45 x 10-7 cm2/s, respectively, through a nanofabricated membrane. Theoretical modeling showed that a 96% reduction in the membrane's thickness and the application of an electric potential of 10 mV across the membrane could enhance the flux of endothelin, cystatin C, and interleukin - 6 by a factor of 25. A ΔpH of 0.07 altered the fluxes minimally. Conclusions Nanofabricated hemodialysis membranes with a reduced thickness and an applied electric potential can enhance the effective diffusivity and electro-migration flux of the respective uremic toxins by 3 orders of magnitude as compared to those passing through the high flux hemodialyzer. PMID:24688713

  20. Uremic Pruritus, Dialysis Adequacy, and Metabolic Profiles in Hemodialysis Patients: A Prospective 5-Year Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yuan; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Pai, Mei-Fen; Ju-YehYang; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lu, Hui-Min; Huang, Shu-Chen; Yang, Shao-Yu; Wen, Su-Yin; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Hu, Fu-Chang; Peng, Yu-Sen; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Background Uremic pruritus is a common and intractable symptom in patients on chronic hemodialysis, but factors associated with the severity of pruritus remain unclear. This study aimed to explore the associations of metabolic factors and dialysis adequacy with the aggravation of pruritus. Methods We conducted a 5-year prospective cohort study on patients with maintenance hemodialysis. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the intensity of pruritus. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics, laboratory parameters, dialysis adequacy (assessed by Kt/V), and pruritus intensity were recorded at baseline and follow-up. Change score analysis of the difference score of VAS between baseline and follow-up was performed using multiple linear regression models. The optimal threshold of Kt/V, which is associated with the aggravation of uremic pruritus, was determined by generalized additive models and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results A total of 111 patients completed the study. Linear regression analysis showed that lower Kt/V and use of low-flux dialyzer were significantly associated with the aggravation of pruritus after adjusting for the baseline pruritus intensity and a variety of confounding factors. The optimal threshold value of Kt/V for pruritus was 1.5 suggested by both generalized additive models and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Conclusions Hemodialysis with the target of Kt/V ≥1.5 and use of high-flux dialyzer may reduce the intensity of pruritus in patients on chronic hemodialysis. Further clinical trials are required to determine the optimal dialysis dose and regimen for uremic pruritus. PMID:23940749

  1. Soft-tissue calcification after subcutaneus emphysema in a neonate

    SciTech Connect

    Naidech, H.J.; Chawla, H.S.

    1982-08-01

    Bilateral, almost symmetric, calcifications of the soft tissues after subcutaneous emphysema have not, to our knowledge, been described. Because of the close clinical and radiographic evaluation in our case, the finding of calcinosis was not a diagnostic problem. Several 1.5 mm computed tomographic (CT) sections of the thorax were scanned and they were confirmatory in showing the distribution of the calcifications. Since subcutaneous emphysema is commonplace, and calcification after it is apparently unknown, the literature was reviewed and an additional cause of soft-tissue calcinosis is presented.

  2. Reversible Acute Parkinsonism and Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in a Diabetic Uremic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Sá, Francisca; Capela, Carlos; Ferreira, Fátima; Basílio, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uremic patients is a rare disorder mostly reported in Asians. There are few reports of the syndrome in Caucasians. It manifests as an acute hyperkinetic or hypokinetic extrapyramidal disorder in association with uniform neuroimaging findings of bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia changes in diabetics undergoing hemodialysis. Its pathophysiology remains largely unknown. Thus, we report a typical case of the syndrome in a Caucasian patient who developed an acute and reversible akinetic rigid parkinsonism secondary to bilateral basal ganglia lesions. PMID:23185167

  3. Optimized Metabolomic Approach to Identify Uremic Solutes in Plasma of Stage 3–4 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaers, Henricus A. M.; Engelke, Udo F. H.; Wilmer, Martijn J. G.; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Wevers, Ron A.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the progressive accumulation of various potential toxic solutes. Furthermore, uremic plasma is a complex mixture hampering accurate determination of uremic toxin levels and the identification of novel uremic solutes. Methods In this study, we applied 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, following three distinct deproteinization strategies, to determine differences in the plasma metabolic status of stage 3–4 CKD patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the human renal proximal tubule cell line (ciPTEC) was used to study the influence of newly indentified uremic solutes on renal phenotype and functionality. Results Protein removal via ultrafiltration and acetonitrile precipitation are complementary techniques and both are required to obtain a clear metabolome profile. This new approach, revealed that a total of 14 metabolites were elevated in uremic plasma. In addition to confirming the retention of several previously identified uremic toxins, including p-cresyl sulphate, two novel uremic retentions solutes were detected, namely dimethyl sulphone (DMSO2) and 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA). Our results show that these metabolites accumulate in non-dialysis CKD patients from 9±7 µM (control) to 51±29 µM and from 7 (0–9) µM (control) to 32±15 µM, respectively. Furthermore, exposure of ciPTEC to clinically relevant concentrations of both solutes resulted in an increased protein expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin with more than 10% (p<0.05). Moreover, the loss of epithelial characteristics significantly correlated with a loss of glucuronidation activity (Pearson r = −0.63; p<0.05). In addition, both solutes did not affect cell viability nor mitochondrial activity. Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of sample preparation techniques in the identification of uremic retention solutes using 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and provide insight into the negative impact of

  4. Acute Calcific Tendinitis of the Rectus Femoris: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    IKobayashi, Hideo; Kaneko, Haruka; Homma, Yasuhiro; Baba, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Periarticular calcific tendinitis is a common cause of Orthopedic outpatient referral. Calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris, however, is very rare and not well known. Due to its rarity, correct diagnosis and prompt treatment are not fully understood. Case Report: Two females (38 and 40 years old) of acute calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris with the good clinical course without any operative treatment were presented. The pain was managed with oral non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and/or local steroid injection. Interval radiographic assessment showed complete resorption of the calcification. Conclusion: Establishing the correct diagnosis and initiating prompt treatment are shown to be important in achieving resolution of symptoms and in avoiding unnecessary investigations. PMID:27299063

  5. Genetics Home Reference: generalized arterial calcification of infancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of the mineral calcium (calcification) in the walls of the blood ... characterized by the accumulation of calcium and other minerals (mineralization) in elastic fibers, which are a component ...

  6. Calcification generates protons for nutrient and bicarbonate uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, T. A.; Whelan, J. F.

    1997-03-01

    The biosphere's great carbonate deposits, from caliche soils to deep-sea carbonate oozes, precipitate largely as by-products of autotrophic nutrient acquisition physiologies. Protons constitute the critical link: Calcification generates protons, which plants and photosynthetic symbioses use to assimilate bicarbonate and nutrients. A calcium ATPase-based "trans" mechanism underlies most biological calcification. This permits high calcium carbonate supersaturations and rapid carbonate precipitation. The competitive advantages of calcification become especially apparent in light and nutrient-deficient alkaline environments. Calcareous plants often dominate the lower euphotic zone in both the benthos and the plankton. Geographically and seasonally, massive calcification concentrates in nutrient-deficient environments including alkaline soils, coral reefs, cyanobacterial mats and coccolithophorid blooms. Structural and defensive uses for calcareous skeletons are sometimes overrated.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    MedlinePlus

    ... in regulating phosphate levels within the body (phosphate homeostasis) by transporting phosphate across cell membranes. The SLC20A2 ... link familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification with phosphate homeostasis. Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 12;44(3):254- ...

  8. Effects of. gamma. irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Nijweide, P.J.; Burger, E.H.; van Delft, J.L.; Kawilarange-de Haas, E.W.M.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Mellink, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    The effect of ..gamma.. irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification was studied in vitro. Metatarsal bones of 14- to 17-day-old embryonic mice were dissected and cultured under various conditions. Prior to culture, half of the metatarsal bones received absorbed doses of 1.0 to 30.0 Gy ..gamma.. radiation. Their paired counterparts served as controls. Irradiation inhibited longitudinal growth and calcification of the cartilage matrix during culture. In addition, a number of histological changes were noted. The inhibition of matrix calcification appeared to be due to an inhibition of the intracellular calcium accumulation. The formation of extracellular calcification foci and the growth of the calcified area already present at the moment of explanation were not inhibited during culture.

  9. A Review of the Effect of Diet on Cardiovascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Nicoll, Rachel; Howard, John McLaren; Henein, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is known as sub-clinical atherosclerosis and is recognised as a predictor of CV events and mortality. As yet there is no treatment for CV calcification and conventional CV risk factors are not consistently correlated, leaving clinicians uncertain as to optimum management for these patients. For this reason, a review of studies investigating diet and serum levels of macro- and micronutrients was carried out. Although there were few human studies of macronutrients, nevertheless transfats and simple sugars should be avoided, while long chain ω-3 fats from oily fish may be protective. Among the micronutrients, an intake of 800 μg/day calcium was beneficial in those without renal disease or hyperparathyroidism, while inorganic phosphorus from food preservatives and colas may induce calcification. A high intake of magnesium (≥380 mg/day) and phylloquinone (500 μg/day) proved protective, as did a serum 25(OH)D concentration of ≥75 nmol/L. Although oxidative damage appears to be a cause of CV calcification, the antioxidant vitamins proved to be largely ineffective, while supplementation of α-tocopherol may induce calcification. Nevertheless other antioxidant compounds (epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and resveratrol from red wine) were protective. Finally, a homocysteine concentration >12 µmol/L was predictive of CV calcification, although a plasma folate concentration of >39.4 nmol/L could both lower homocysteine and protect against calcification. In terms of a dietary programme, these recommendations indicate avoiding sugar and the transfats and preservatives found in processed foods and drinks and adopting a diet high in oily fish and vegetables. The micronutrients magnesium and vitamin K may be worthy of further investigation as a treatment option for CV calcification. PMID:25906474

  10. A review of the effect of diet on cardiovascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Rachel; Howard, John McLaren; Henein, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is known as sub-clinical atherosclerosis and is recognised as a predictor of CV events and mortality. As yet there is no treatment for CV calcification and conventional CV risk factors are not consistently correlated, leaving clinicians uncertain as to optimum management for these patients. For this reason, a review of studies investigating diet and serum levels of macro- and micronutrients was carried out. Although there were few human studies of macronutrients, nevertheless transfats and simple sugars should be avoided, while long chain ω-3 fats from oily fish may be protective. Among the micronutrients, an intake of 800 μg/day calcium was beneficial in those without renal disease or hyperparathyroidism, while inorganic phosphorus from food preservatives and colas may induce calcification. A high intake of magnesium (≥380 mg/day) and phylloquinone (500 μg/day) proved protective, as did a serum 25(OH)D concentration of ≥75 nmol/L. Although oxidative damage appears to be a cause of CV calcification, the antioxidant vitamins proved to be largely ineffective, while supplementation of α-tocopherol may induce calcification. Nevertheless other antioxidant compounds (epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and resveratrol from red wine) were protective. Finally, a homocysteine concentration >12 µmol/L was predictive of CV calcification, although a plasma folate concentration of >39.4 nmol/L could both lower homocysteine and protect against calcification. In terms of a dietary programme, these recommendations indicate avoiding sugar and the transfats and preservatives found in processed foods and drinks and adopting a diet high in oily fish and vegetables. The micronutrients magnesium and vitamin K may be worthy of further investigation as a treatment option for CV calcification. PMID:25906474

  11. [Neuroimaging findings in cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Diego Alberto; Vargas, Sergio Alberto; Montoya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts is a rare condition characterized by brain, retinal and bone anomalies, as well as a predisposition to gastrointestinal bleeding. There are few reported cases of this condition in adults, among whom the incidence is low. Neuroimaging findings are characteristic, with bilateral calcifications, leukoencephalopathy and intracranial cysts. The purpose of this article was to do a literature survey and illustrate two cases diagnosed with the aid of neuroimaging. PMID:24967922

  12. Non-progressive familial idiopathic intracranial calcification: a family report.

    PubMed Central

    Callender, J S

    1995-01-01

    The clinical features and long term outcome of familial idiopathic intracranial calcification in three members of one family are described. The illness presented as psychiatric disorder in all patients, and in one patient, epilepsy and intellectual deterioration were later manifestations. Skull radiographs and CT were performed sequentially, in one patient, over a 22 year period and, in another, CT was carried out eight years apart. In neither patient was there any evidence of progression of calcification. Images PMID:7561925

  13. Environmental NO2 and CO Exposure: Ignored Factors Associated with Uremic Pruritus in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-08-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP), also known as chronic kidney disease–associated pruritus, is a common and disabling symptom in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). The pathogenesis of UP is multifactorial and poorly understood. Outdoor air pollution has well-known effects on the health of patients with allergic diseases through an inflammatory process. Air pollution–induced inflammation could occur in the skin and aggravate skin symptoms such as pruritus or impair epidermal barrier function. To assess the role of air pollutants, and other clinical variables on uremic pruritus (UP) in HD patients, we recruited 866 patients on maintenance HD. We analyzed the following variables for association with UP: average previous 12-month and 24-month background concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), and suspended particulate matter of <2.5 μm (PM2.5). In a multivariate logistic regression, hemodialysis duration, serum ferritin levels, low-density lipoprotein levels, and environmental NO2/CO levels were positively associated with UP, and serum albumin levels were negatively associated with UP. This cross-sectional study showed that air pollutants such as NO2 and CO might be associated with UP in patients with MHD.

  14. HPLC fractions of human uremic plasma inhibit the RBC membrane calcium pump.

    PubMed

    Lindner, A; Vanholder, R; De Smet, R; Hinds, T R; Vogeleere, P; Sandra, P; Foxall, P; Ringoir, S

    1997-04-01

    We have reported that uremic plasma filtrates (UF) inhibit the red blood cell (RBC) membrane calcium pump. The inhibitor was dialyzable, smaller than 3,000 molecular weight, heat-stable, and protease-resistant. In the present study, we used reverse-phase preparative HPLC, analytical HPLC, and Sephadex G-25 elution to identify inhibitory fractions. Inhibition was confirmed in three different bioassays: (1) Sr2+ efflux in intact RBC, the primary bio-assay; (2) 45Ca efflux in intact RBC; and (3) calcium ATPase activity in isolated RBC membranes. Active fractions were analyzed by mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis, enzymatic analysis, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These demonstrated a number of compounds, including: sugars, polyols, osmolytes like betaine and myoinositol, amino acids, and other metabolites, such as 3-D-hydroxybutyrate, dimethylglycine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, guanidinoacetic acid and glycine. Many individual compounds were then tested for an effect on the calcium pump. Thus, HPLC was able to separate a substantial number of compounds in inhibitory fractions. Efforts are under way for precise identification of the inhibitor, to advance our understanding of uremic toxicity and/or hypertension in CRF. PMID:9083269

  15. Environmental NO2 and CO Exposure: Ignored Factors Associated with Uremic Pruritus in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP), also known as chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus, is a common and disabling symptom in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). The pathogenesis of UP is multifactorial and poorly understood. Outdoor air pollution has well-known effects on the health of patients with allergic diseases through an inflammatory process. Air pollution-induced inflammation could occur in the skin and aggravate skin symptoms such as pruritus or impair epidermal barrier function. To assess the role of air pollutants, and other clinical variables on uremic pruritus (UP) in HD patients, we recruited 866 patients on maintenance HD. We analyzed the following variables for association with UP: average previous 12-month and 24-month background concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), and suspended particulate matter of <2.5 μm (PM2.5). In a multivariate logistic regression, hemodialysis duration, serum ferritin levels, low-density lipoprotein levels, and environmental NO2/CO levels were positively associated with UP, and serum albumin levels were negatively associated with UP. This cross-sectional study showed that air pollutants such as NO2 and CO might be associated with UP in patients with MHD. PMID:27507591

  16. Environmental NO2 and CO Exposure: Ignored Factors Associated with Uremic Pruritus in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP), also known as chronic kidney disease–associated pruritus, is a common and disabling symptom in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). The pathogenesis of UP is multifactorial and poorly understood. Outdoor air pollution has well-known effects on the health of patients with allergic diseases through an inflammatory process. Air pollution–induced inflammation could occur in the skin and aggravate skin symptoms such as pruritus or impair epidermal barrier function. To assess the role of air pollutants, and other clinical variables on uremic pruritus (UP) in HD patients, we recruited 866 patients on maintenance HD. We analyzed the following variables for association with UP: average previous 12-month and 24-month background concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), and suspended particulate matter of <2.5 μm (PM2.5). In a multivariate logistic regression, hemodialysis duration, serum ferritin levels, low-density lipoprotein levels, and environmental NO2/CO levels were positively associated with UP, and serum albumin levels were negatively associated with UP. This cross-sectional study showed that air pollutants such as NO2 and CO might be associated with UP in patients with MHD. PMID:27507591

  17. Uremic Pruritus Is Not Associated with Endocannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Monika; Łaczmański, Łukasz; Reich, Adam; Lwow, Felicja

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a frequent and bothersome symptom in hemodialysis patients. Its etiology is not fully understood and that is why there is no specific treatment. The endocannabinoid system plays a role in many pathological conditions. There is reliable evidence on the association between cannabinoid system and pruritus. In our study, we aimed to evaluate whether genetic variations in the endocannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene can affect UP. The rs12720071, rs806368, rs1049353, rs806381, rs10485170, rs6454674, and rs2023239 polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene were genotyped in 159 hemodialysis patients and 150 healthy controls using two multiplex polymerase chain reactions and the minisequencing technique. No statistically significant relationship was found in any of the evaluated genotypes between patients with and without UP, even after excluding patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. There were no differences between patients with UP and the control group. However, in the group of all HD patients, a significantly higher incidence of GA genotype and lower incidence in GG genotype in the polymorphism rs806381s were revealed versus the control group (p = 0.04). It seems that polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene are not associated with uremic pruritus. PMID:27034934

  18. Handling of Drugs, Metabolites, and Uremic Toxins by Kidney Proximal Tubule Drug Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Bush, Kevin T.; Hoenig, Melanie P.; Blantz, Roland C.; Bhatnagar, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    The proximal tubule of the kidney plays a crucial role in the renal handling of drugs (e.g., diuretics), uremic toxins (e.g., indoxyl sulfate), environmental toxins (e.g., mercury, aristolochic acid), metabolites (e.g., uric acid), dietary compounds, and signaling molecules. This process is dependent on many multispecific transporters of the solute carrier (SLC) superfamily, including organic anion transporter (OAT) and organic cation transporter (OCT) subfamilies, and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. We review the basic physiology of these SLC and ABC transporters, many of which are often called drug transporters. With an emphasis on OAT1 (SLC22A6), the closely related OAT3 (SLC22A8), and OCT2 (SLC22A2), we explore the implications of recent in vitro, in vivo, and clinical data pertinent to the kidney. The analysis of murine knockouts has revealed a key role for these transporters in the renal handling not only of drugs and toxins but also of gut microbiome products, as well as liver-derived phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites, including putative uremic toxins (among other molecules of metabolic and clinical importance). Functional activity of these transporters (and polymorphisms affecting it) plays a key role in drug handling and nephrotoxicity. These transporters may also play a role in remote sensing and signaling, as part of a versatile small molecule communication network operative throughout the body in normal and diseased states, such as AKI and CKD. PMID:26490509

  19. Handling of Drugs, Metabolites, and Uremic Toxins by Kidney Proximal Tubule Drug Transporters.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Sanjay K; Wu, Wei; Bush, Kevin T; Hoenig, Melanie P; Blantz, Roland C; Bhatnagar, Vibha

    2015-11-01

    The proximal tubule of the kidney plays a crucial role in the renal handling of drugs (e.g., diuretics), uremic toxins (e.g., indoxyl sulfate), environmental toxins (e.g., mercury, aristolochic acid), metabolites (e.g., uric acid), dietary compounds, and signaling molecules. This process is dependent on many multispecific transporters of the solute carrier (SLC) superfamily, including organic anion transporter (OAT) and organic cation transporter (OCT) subfamilies, and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. We review the basic physiology of these SLC and ABC transporters, many of which are often called drug transporters. With an emphasis on OAT1 (SLC22A6), the closely related OAT3 (SLC22A8), and OCT2 (SLC22A2), we explore the implications of recent in vitro, in vivo, and clinical data pertinent to the kidney. The analysis of murine knockouts has revealed a key role for these transporters in the renal handling not only of drugs and toxins but also of gut microbiome products, as well as liver-derived phase 1 and phase 2 metabolites, including putative uremic toxins (among other molecules of metabolic and clinical importance). Functional activity of these transporters (and polymorphisms affecting it) plays a key role in drug handling and nephrotoxicity. These transporters may also play a role in remote sensing and signaling, as part of a versatile small molecule communication network operative throughout the body in normal and diseased states, such as AKI and CKD. PMID:26490509

  20. Sclerostin levels in uremic patients: a link between bone and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, Annamaria; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Cernaro, Valeria; Ricciardi, Carlo Alberto; Loddo, Saverio; Romeo, Adolfo; Montalto, Gaetano; Costantino, Giuseppe; Torre, Francesco; Pettinato, Giuseppina; Salamone, Ignazio; Aloisi, Carmela; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a marker of low-turnover bone disease in end stage renal disease patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum sclerostin in uremic patients, analyzing its behavior during a single hemodialysis session. Twenty-one adult patients on intermittent hemodialysis treatment were enrolled. Acetate Free Bio-filtration (AFB) was the technique employed. Uremic patients were characterized by higher levels of serum sclerostin when compared with values observed in healthy subjects. Sclerostin assessed in pre-dialysis samples was 1.4 ± 1.02 ng/mL, whereas, in post dialysis samples, a reduction of sclerostin values was observed (0.8 ± 0.6 ng/mL; p: 0.008). Sclerostin correlated with parameters of dialysis adequacy, such as creatinine levels and Kt/V values, and it was significantly associated with atherosclerotic disease. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed a good diagnostic profile in identifying atherosclerotic disease. Sclerostin, a full dialyzable substance during AFB dialysis, is closely associated with atherosclerotic disease. Its reduction obtained through AFB could represent a defensive mechanism, improving vascular disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:27001371

  1. Reduced capillary density in the myocardium of uremic rats--a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Amann, K; Wiest, G; Zimmer, G; Gretz, N; Ritz, E; Mall, G

    1992-11-01

    Using stereological techniques capillaries, interstitium and myocardial fibers were analyzed in perfusion-fixed hearts of subtotally nephrectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats with uremia of 14 months duration (or their sham-operated controls). Uremic rats had higher systolic blood pressure (140 +/- 20.3 mm Hg vs. 119 +/- 6.61 mm Hg) and left ventricular weight/body weight ratio (3.37 +/- 0.09 mg/kg vs. 2.01 +/- 0.12 mg/kg) than controls, and had slight anemia (Hct 35.0 +/- 3.16% vs. 40.4 +/- 3.3%). Length density (Lv) of capillaries, that is, capillary length per unit myocardial volume, was significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in uremia (2485 +/- 264 mm/mm3 vs. 3329 +/- 194 mm/mm3) versus controls. In parallel, surface density and volume density of the capillary lumina were also reduced (7.95 +/- 1.69 cm3/cm3 vs. 11.4 +/- 1.8 cm3/cm3) in the uremic rats. We conclude that in experimental uremia, cardiac hypertrophy is not accompanied by a commensurate increase in capillaries. PMID:1453595

  2. Dense calcification in a GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ramez; Kalhan, Atul; Lammie, Alistair; Kotonya, Christine; Nannapanenni, Ravindra; Rees, Aled

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 30-year-old female presented with a history of secondary amenorrhoea, acromegalic features and progressive visual deterioration. She had elevated serum IGF1 levels and unsuppressed GH levels after an oral glucose tolerance test. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhancing space-occupying lesion with atypical extensive calcification within the sellar and suprasellar areas. Owing to the extent of calcification, the tumour was a surgical challenge. Postoperatively, there was clinical, radiological and biochemical evidence of residual disease, which required treatment with a somatostatin analogue and radiotherapy. Mutational analysis of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene was negative. This case confirms the relatively rare occurrence of calcification within a pituitary macroadenoma and its associated management problems. The presentation, biochemical, radiological and pathological findings are discussed in the context of the relevant literature. Learning points Calcification of pituitary tumours is relatively rare.Recognising calcification in pituitary adenomas on preoperative imaging is important in surgical decision-making.Gross total resection can be difficult to achieve in the presence of extensive calcification and dictates further management and follow-up to achieve disease control. PMID:24683483

  3. Computed tomography study of pineal calcification in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bersani, G; Garavini, A; Taddei, I; Tanfani, G; Nordio, M; Pancheri, P

    1999-06-01

    Computed tomography studies concerning pineal calcification (PC) in schizophrenia have been conducted mainly by one author who correlated this calcification with several aspects of the illness. On the basis of these findings the aim of the present study was to analyze size and incidence of pineal gland calcification by CT in schizophrenics and healthy controls, and to verify the relationship between pineal calcification and age, and the possible correlation with psychopathologic variables. Pineal calcification was measured on CT scans of 87 schizophrenics and 46 controls divided into seven age subgroups of five years each. No significant differences in PC incidence and mean size between patients and controls were observed as far as the entire group was considered. PC size correlated with age both in schizophrenics and controls. We found a higher incidence of PC in schizophrenics in the age subgroup of 21-25 years, and a negative correlation with positive symptoms of schizophrenia in the overall group. These findings could suggest a premature calcific process in schizophrenics and a probable association with 'non-paranoid' aspects of the illness. Nevertheless the potential role of this process possibly related to some aspects of the altered neurodevelopment in schizophrenia is still unclear. PMID:10572342

  4. Ocean Acidification Reduces Growth and Calcification in a Marine Dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; John, Uwe; Ziveri, Patrizia; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Hoins, Mirja; Sluijs, Appy; Rost, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate Thoracosphaera heimii. We observe a substantial reduction in growth rate, calcification and cyst stability of T. heimii under elevated pCO2. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses reveal CO2 sensitive regulation of many genes, particularly those being associated to inorganic carbon acquisition and calcification. Stable carbon isotope fractionation for organic carbon production increased with increasing pCO2 whereas it decreased for calcification, which suggests interdependence between both processes. We also found a strong effect of pCO2 on the stable oxygen isotopic composition of calcite, in line with earlier observations concerning another T. heimii strain. The observed changes in stable oxygen and carbon isotope composition of T. heimii cysts may provide an ideal tool for reconstructing past seawater carbonate chemistry, and ultimately past pCO2. Although the function of calcification in T. heimii remains unresolved, this trait likely plays an important role in the ecological and evolutionary success of this species. Acting on calcification as well as growth, ocean acidification may therefore impose a great threat for T. heimii. PMID:23776586

  5. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  6. Divergent behavior of hydrogen sulfide pools and of the sulfur metabolite lanthionine, a novel uremic toxin, in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Perna, Alessandra F; Di Nunzio, Annarita; Amoresano, Angela; Pane, Francesca; Fontanarosa, Carolina; Pucci, Piero; Vigorito, Carmela; Cirillo, Giovanni; Zacchia, Miriam; Trepiccione, Francesco; Ingrosso, Diego

    2016-07-01

    Dialysis patients display a high cardiovascular mortality, the causes of which are still not completely explained, but are related to uremic toxicity. Among uremic toxins, homocysteine and cysteine are both substrates of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase in hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis, leading to the formation of two sulfur metabolites, lanthionine and homolanthionine, considered stable indirect biomarkers of its production. Hydrogen sulfide is involved in the modulation of multiple pathophysiological responses. In uremia, we have demonstrated low plasma total hydrogen sulfide levels, due to reduced cystathionine γ-lyase expression. Plasma hydrogen sulfide levels were measured in hemodialysis patients and healthy controls with three different techniques in comparison, allowing to discern the different pools of this gas. The protein-bound (the one thought to be the most active) and acid-labile forms are significantly decreased, while homolanthionine, but especially lanthionine, accumulate in the blood of uremic patients. The hemodialysis regimen plays a role in determining sulfur compounds levels, and lanthionine is partially removed by a single dialysis session. Lanthionine inhibits hydrogen sulfide production in cell cultures under conditions comparable to in vivo ones. We therefore propose that lanthionine is a novel uremic toxin. The possible role of high lanthionine as a contributor to the genesis of hyperhomocysteinemia in uremia is discussed. PMID:27129884

  7. Serum Shiga toxin 2 values in patients during the acute phase of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) produced by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are considered as the main causative agent, leading to the development of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS); these toxins injure endothelial cells mainly the glomeruli. After passing through the intestinal wall, Stxs hav...

  8. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis mimicking a retropharyngeal phlegmon.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Nathalie; Belair, Manon; Ayad, Tareck

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis is a little known but not an uncommon condition. It was first described by Hartley in 1964 as an inflammation of the longus colli muscle secondary to calcium crystals deposition on its insertion. The calcifications are mostly located on the oblique portion of the muscle at the level of C1-C2. Methods. We will describe this disease through 4 cases that presented in our institution. Results. The most common symptoms are severe neck pain, odynophagia, and a painful restriction of neck movement. It is associated with mild fever and inflammatory lab findings such as a slight elevation of white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. CT scan is recommended as the first-line imaging modality to establish a diagnosis. Treatments consist of NSAIDs and analgesics to accelerate the healing process. If symptoms are severe, a course of corticosteroids is required. Conclusion. Since the clinical and laboratory findings of this condition and those of a retropharyngeal abscess overlap, it is important to establish the right diagnosis in order to prevent more invasive procedures. A good knowledge of this clinical entity by otolaryngologists would prevent delays in hospital discharge and unnecessary anxiety. PMID:23862089

  9. Retropharyngeal Calcific Tendinitis Mimicking a Retropharyngeal Phlegmon

    PubMed Central

    Belair, Manon; Ayad, Tareck

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acute retropharyngeal tendinitis is a little known but not an uncommon condition. It was first described by Hartley in 1964 as an inflammation of the longus colli muscle secondary to calcium crystals deposition on its insertion. The calcifications are mostly located on the oblique portion of the muscle at the level of C1-C2. Methods. We will describe this disease through 4 cases that presented in our institution. Results. The most common symptoms are severe neck pain, odynophagia, and a painful restriction of neck movement. It is associated with mild fever and inflammatory lab findings such as a slight elevation of white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein. CT scan is recommended as the first-line imaging modality to establish a diagnosis. Treatments consist of NSAIDs and analgesics to accelerate the healing process. If symptoms are severe, a course of corticosteroids is required. Conclusion. Since the clinical and laboratory findings of this condition and those of a retropharyngeal abscess overlap, it is important to establish the right diagnosis in order to prevent more invasive procedures. A good knowledge of this clinical entity by otolaryngologists would prevent delays in hospital discharge and unnecessary anxiety. PMID:23862089

  10. Vascular Calcification and Renal Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  11. Vascular calcification and renal bone disorders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Wu, Chia-Chao; Yen, Jen-Fen; Liu, Wen-Chih

    2014-01-01

    At the early stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the systemic mineral metabolism and bone composition start to change. This alteration is known as chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). It is well known that the bone turnover disorder is the most common complication of CKD-MBD. Besides, CKD patients usually suffer from vascular calcification (VC), which is highly associated with mortality. Many factors regulate the VC mechanism, which include imbalances in serum calcium and phosphate, systemic inflammation, RANK/RANKL/OPG triad, aldosterone, microRNAs, osteogenic transdifferentiation, and effects of vitamins. These factors have roles in both promoting and inhibiting VC. Patients with CKD usually have bone turnover problems. Patients with high bone turnover have increase of calcium and phosphate release from the bone. By contrast, when bone turnover is low, serum calcium and phosphate levels are frequently maintained at high levels because the reservoir functions of bone decrease. Both of these conditions will increase the possibility of VC. In addition, the calcified vessel may secrete FGF23 and Wnt inhibitors such as sclerostin, DKK-1, and secreted frizzled-related protein to prevent further VC. However, all of them may fight back the inhibition of bone formation resulting in fragile bone. There are several ways to treat VC depending on the bone turnover status of the individual. The main goals of therapy are to maintain normal bone turnover and protect against VC. PMID:25136676

  12. Blood serum atherogenicity and coronary artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Sobenin, Igor A; Myasoedova, Veronica A; Anisimova, Elena V; Pavlova, Xenia N; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Schmermund, Axel; Seibel, Rainer; Berenbein, Sina; Lehmann, Nils; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, KarlHeinz; Orekhov, Alexander N; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of blood serum atherogenicity was described as the ability of human serum to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells. The results of recent two-year prospective study in asymptomatic men provided the evidence for association between the changes in serum atherogenicity and dynamics of carotid intima-media thickness progression. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood serum atherogenicity and its changes in dynamics may be associated with accumulation of coronary calcium in subclinical atherosclerosis. It was performed in 782 CHD-free participants of The Heinz Nixdorf RECALL (Risk Factors, Evaluation of Coronary Calcium and Lifestyle) Study, in whom blood samples have been taken at the baseline and at the end of 5-year follow-up. Opposite to the previous findings, the changes in serum atherogenicity did not correlate neither with the extent of coronary artery calcification, nor with the changes in Agatston CAC score. There was a moderate but significant rise in serum atherogenicity after 5-year followup period, and the same dynamics was observed for Agatston CAC score, but not for convenient lipid-related risk factors. The absence of association of the changes in serum atherogenicity with the changes in Agatston CAC score, along with previous findings, provides a point of view that serum-induced intracellular cholesterol accumulation is not related to the processes of calcium deposition in arterial wall, since the last one reflects the progression of already existing subclinical atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24533940

  13. Elastin Calcification and its Prevention with Aluminum Chloride Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Vyavahare, Narendra; Ogle, Matthew; Schoen, Frederick J.; Levy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Elastin, an abundant structural protein present in the arterial wall, is prone to calcification in a number of disease processes including porcine bioprosthetic heart valve calcification and atherosclerosis. The mechanisms of elastin calcification are not completely elucidated. In the present work, we demonstrated calcification of purified elastin in rat subdermal implants (Ca2+ = 89.73 ± 9.84 μg/mg after 21 days versus control, unimplanted Ca2+ = 0.16 ± 0.04 μg/mg). X-ray diffraction analysis along with resolution enhanced FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated the mineral phase to be a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. We investigated the time course of calcification, the effect of glutaraldehyde crosslinking on calcification, and mechanisms of inhibition of elastin calcification by pretreatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3). Glutaraldehyde pretreatment did not affect calcification (Ca2+ = 89.06 ± 17.93 μg/mg for glutaraldehyde crosslinked elastin versus Ca2+ = 89.73 ± 9.84 μg/mg for uncrosslinked elastin). This may be explained by radioactive (3H) glutaraldehyde studies showing very low reactivity between glutaraldehyde and elastin. Our results further demonstrated that AlCl3 pretreatment of elastin led to complete inhibition of elastin calcification using 21-day rat subdermal implants, irrespective of glutaraldehyde crosslinking (Ca2+ = 0.73–2.15 μg/mg for AlCl3 pretreated elastin versus 89.73 ± 9.84 for untreated elastin). The AlCl3 pretreatment caused irreversible binding of aluminum ions to elastin, as assessed by atomic emission spectroscopy. Moreover, aluminum ion binding altered the spatial configuration of elastin as shown by circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies, suggesting a net structural change including a reduction in the extent of β sheet structures and an increase in coil-turn conformations. Thus, it is concluded that purified elastin calcifies in rat

  14. Computer aided breast calcification auto-detection in cone beam breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2010-03-01

    In Cone Beam Breast CT (CBBCT), breast calcifications have higher intensities than the surrounding tissues. Without the superposition of breast structures, the three-dimensional distribution of the calcifications can be revealed. In this research, based on the fact that calcifications have higher contrast, a local thresholding and a histogram thresholding were used to select candidate calcification areas. Six features were extracted from each candidate calcification: average foreground CT number value, foreground CT number standard deviation, average background CT number value, background CT number standard deviation, foreground-background contrast, and average edge gradient. To reduce the false positive candidate calcifications, a feed-forward back propagation artificial neural network was designed. The artificial neural network was trained with the radiologists confirmed calcifications and used as classifier in the calcification auto-detection task. In the preliminary experiments, 90% of the calcifications in the testing data sets were detected correctly with an average of 10 false positives per data set.

  15. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . The effect of cinacalcet on vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2015-05-01

    Cinacalcet acts on calcium receptors (CaR) expressed on chief cells of the parathyroid gland to inhibit the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) . This drug inhibits PTH secretion without causing an elevation of serum calcium and phosphorus, unlike active vitamin D. Several experimental studies demonstrated an inhibitory effect of calcimimetics on the progression of vascular calcification in animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), in keeping with the expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in vascular tissue. The EVOLVE, evaluated in patients with CKD 5D the effects of the cinacalcet on the progression of vascular calcification and hard cardiovascular outcomes, respectively. The EVOLVE trials missed their respective primary end point by intent-to-treat analysis. However, recently, in order to define the frequency of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events attributable to atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic mechanisms, risk factors for these events, and the effects of cinacalcet, post hoc analysis using adjudicated data collected during the EVOLVE Trial were perfomed. In this trial, combining fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events, randomization to cinacalcet reduced the rates of sudden death and heart failure. Patients randomized to cinacalcet experienced fewer nonatherosclerotic cardiovascular events, while the effect of cinacalcet on atherosclerotic events did not reach statistical significance. PMID:25926577

  16. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Extracellular matrix tenascin-X in calcific aortic valves].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-05-01

    We previously disclosed a novel extracellular matrix tenascin-X (TNX) , the largest member of the tenascin family. So far, we have made efforts to elucidate the roles of TNX. TNX is involved in collagen deposition, collagen fibrillogenesis, and modulation of collagen stiffness. Homozygous mutations in TNXB, the gene encoding TNX, cause a classic-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) , a heritable connective tissue disorder, whereas haploinsufficiency of TNXB and heterozygous mutations in TNXB are associated with hypermobility-type EDS. Recently, we performed proteomic analyses of calcific aortic valves (CAVs) compared with relatively adjacent normal tissues to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms of dystrophic valvular calcification. Interestingly, we found that TNX was the protein with the greatest decrease in expression among the differentially expressed proteins and that expression levels of proteins modulating collagen structure and function, such as type I collagen and decorin, were also decreased in CAVs. In this review, I will discuss about the decreased level of collagen due to the reduction of expression levels of proteins that play regulatory roles in collagen functions such as fibril organization and fibrillogenesis in CAVs. PMID:25926574

  17. Shunt tube calcification as a late complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting.

    PubMed

    Salim, Abubakr Darrag; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Mohamed, Haddab Ahmed; Ibrahim Zayan, Baha Eldin Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Shunt calcification is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunting that occurs years later after the initial operation this condition is rarely reported in literature. Two patients with shunt calcifications were described. The first patient was 17-year-old lady who had congenital hydrocephalus and shunted in the early infancy, she was presented recently complaining of itching of the skin along the shunt track and limitation of neck movement. The patient was then operated with removal of the old peritoneal catheter and replacing it with a new one. The second patient was 17-year-old boy originally was a case of posterior fossa pilocytic astrocytoma associated with obstructive hydrocephalus, he was operated with both shunting for the hydrocephalus and tumor removal, 6 years later he presented with shunt exposure. Calcification of the shunt tube was discovered intraoperatively upon shunt removal. Shunt calcification has been observed mainly in barium-impregnated catheters. Introducing plain silicone-coated shunt tubing may reduce the rate of this condition. The usual complaints of the patients suffering from this condition are pain in the neck and chest wall along the shunt pathway and limitation of the neck movement due to shunt tube tethering, but features of shunt dysfunction and skin irritation above the shunt may be present. In this review, plain X-ray and operative findings showed that the most extensive calcification is present in the neck, where the catheters were subject to heavy mechanical stress. Disturbed calcium and phosphate metabolisms may be involved in this condition. Shunt calcification is a rare condition that occurs due to material aging presenting with features of shunt tethering, dysfunction or overlying skin irritation. Plain X-ray is needed to detect calcification while shunt removal, replacement or endoscopic third ventriculostomy may carry solution for this condition. PMID:26396620

  18. The dark and bright side of atherosclerotic calcification.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Giuseppe; Iacobini, Carla; Blasetti Fantauzzi, Claudia; Menini, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Vascular calcification is an unfavorable event in the natural history of atherosclerosis that predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, increasing evidence suggests that different calcification patterns are associated with different or even opposite histopathological and clinical features, reflecting the dual relationship between inflammation and calcification. In fact, initial calcium deposition in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli results in the formation of spotty or granular calcification ("microcalcification"), which induces further inflammation. This vicious cycle favors plaque rupture, unless an adaptive response prevails, with blunting of inflammation and survival of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). VSMCs promote fibrosis and also undergo osteogenic transdifferentiation, with formation of homogeneous or sheet-like calcification ("macrocalcification"), that stabilizes the plaque by serving as a barrier towards inflammation. Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this adaptive response. The advanced glycation/lipoxidation endproducts (AGEs/ALEs) have been shown to promote vascular calcification and atherosclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that two AGE/ALE receptors, RAGE and galectin-3, modulate in divergent ways, not only inflammation, but also vascular osteogenesis, by favoring "microcalcification" and "macrocalcification", respectively. Galectin-3 seems essential for VSMC transdifferentiation into osteoblast-like cells via direct modulation of the WNT-β-catenin signaling, thus driving formation of "macrocalcification", whereas RAGE favors deposition of "microcalcification" by promoting and perpetuating inflammation and by counteracting the osteoblastogenic effect of galectin-3. Further studies are required to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating transition from "microcalcification" to "macrocalcification", thus allowing to design therapeutic strategies which favor this adaptive process

  19. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  20. Permanent tooth calcification in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): patterns and polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, K L; Conroy, G C

    1996-01-01

    Tooth calcification is an important developmental marker for use in constructing models for early hominid life history, particularly for its application to the fossil record. As chimpanzees are commonly utilized in interspecific comparisons in such research, this study aims to improve available baseline data for tooth calcification patterns in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and to quantify basic patterns and polymorphisms. We present an analysis of developmental patterns for the left mandibular dentition (I1-M3) based on intraoral radiographs obtained from a cross-sectional sample of chimpanzees (58 males, 60 females) housed at LEMSIP (NYU Medical Center) and Yerkes (Emory University). No significant differences with previous descriptions of the basic sequences of tooth calcification in chimpanzees were found, but variation in such patterns was documented for the first time. In the overall sequence, polymorphisms between the canine and the group (M2 P4 P3) reached significant levels. This is due to the relative delay in canine crown formation compared to other teeth. Differences in the basic sequence between males and females were recorded, but are due to minor shifts in the percentages of occurrence for polymorphic sequences which are common to both genders. Perhaps our most important findings are that a) different polymorphic sequences occur in tooth calcification and tooth emergence in chimpanzees, and b) developmental relationships among teeth fluctuate throughout tooth calcification. Thus, characterizations of dental developmental patterns based on particular stages of development cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other stages without supporting data. PMID:8928717

  1. Gaussian weighted projection for visualization of cardiac calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Ke; Gilkeson, Robert; Fei, Baowei

    2008-03-01

    At our institution, we are using dual-energy digital radiography (DEDR) as a cost-effective screening tool for the detection of cardiac calcification. We are evaluating DEDR using CT as the gold standard. We are developing image projection methods for the generation of digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) from CT image volumes. Traditional visualization methods include maximum intensity projection (MIP) and average-based projection (AVG) that have difficulty to show cardiac calcification. Furthermore, MIP can over estimate the calcified lesion as it displays the maximum intensity along the projection rays regardless of tissue types. For AVG projection, the calcified tissue is usually overlapped with bone, lung and mediastinum. In order to improve the visualization of calcification on DRR images, we developed a Gaussian-weighted projection method for this particular application. We assume that the CT intensity values of calcified tissues have a Gaussian distribution. We then use multiple Gaussian functions to fit the intensity histogram. Based on the mean and standard deviation parameters, we incorporate a Gaussian weighted function into the perspective projection and display the calcification exclusively. Our digital and physical phantom studies show that the new projection method can display tissues selectively. In addition, clinical images show that the Gaussian-weighted projection method better visualizes cardiac calcification than either the AVG or MIP method and can be used to evaluate DEDR as a screening tool for the detection of coronary artery diseases.

  2. Molecular mechanisms mediating vascular calcification: role of matrix Gla protein.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Diane; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2006-10-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a higher incidence of vascular calcification and a greatly increased risk of cardiovascular death. The mechanisms involved in the accelerated vascular calcification observed in CKD have recently become clearer, leading to the hypothesis that a lack of natural inhibitors of calcification may trigger calcium deposition. One of these inhibitory factors, matrix Gla protein (MGP), is the focus of the present review. MGP, originally isolated from bone, is a vitamin K-dependent protein that is also highly expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells. MGP has been confirmed as a calcification-inhibitor in numerous studies; however, its mechanism of action is not completely understood. It potentially acts in several ways to regulate calcium deposition including: (i) binding calcium ions and crystals; (ii) antagonizing bone morphogenetic protein and altering cell differentiation; (iii) binding to extracellular matrix components; and (iv) regulating apoptosis. Its expression is regulated by several factors including retinoic acid, vitamin D and extracellular calcium ions, and a reduced form of vitamin K (KH2) is important in maintaining MGP in an active form. Therefore, strategies aimed at increasing its expression and activity may be beneficial in tipping the balance in favour of inhibition of calcification in CKD. PMID:17014561

  3. Efficacy of reversal of aortic calcification by chelating agents

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yang; Sinha, Aditi; Vyavahare, Naren

    2013-01-01

    Elastin specific medial vascular calcification, termed Monckeberg’s sclerosis has been recognized as a major risk factor for various cardiovascular events. We hypothesize that chelating agents, such as disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and sodium thiosulfate (STS) might reverse elastin calcification by directly removing calcium (Ca) from calcified tissues into soluble calcium complexes. We assessed the chelating ability of EDTA, DTPA, and STS on removal of calcium from hydroxyapatite (HA) powder, calcified porcine aortic elastin, and calcified human aorta in vitro. We show that both EDTA and DTPA could effectively remove calcium from HA and calcified tissues, while STS was not effective. The tissue architecture was not altered during chelation. In the animal model of aortic elastin-specific calcification, we further show that local periadventitial delivery of EDTA loaded in to poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles regressed elastin specific calcification in the aorta. Collectively, the data indicate that elastin-specific medial vascular calcification could be reversed by chelating agents. PMID:23963635

  4. Intracranial Cortical Calcifications in a Focal Epilepsy Patient with Pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye Sel; Park, Jihyung; Park, Yoonkyung; Hwang, KyoungJin; Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Daeyoung; Seo, Dae-Won

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic parathyroid dysfunction often have intracranial calcification in deep gray matter (GM) and subcortical white matter (WM) of their brain. Some of them are also epilepsy patients. Although cortical etiologies are main cause of epileptic seizure, cortical calcification has not been reported in these patients. We report a newly diagnosed focal epilepsy patient whose brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial calcifications in cortical as well as subcortical areas. Blood lab revealed that he had hypocalcemia due to pseudohypoparathyroidism. Video EEG monitoring revealed the ictal EEG mainly consist of polymorphic delta to theta waves with maximum at right temporal area followed by background attenuation and muscle artifacts. The interictal EEG showed multiple focal spike-wave discharges. After given oral calcium and calcitriol supplement, his calcium and phosphorous level normalized and he remains seizure free. This is the first case to show cortical calcification in a patient with pseudohypoparathyroidism. Cortical calcification could be an important measure of seizure burden in these patients and thus sophisticated imaging protocols should be used to visualize the extent of calcium deposits. PMID:27390678

  5. Effect of calcium carbonate saturation of seawater on coral calcification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gattuso, J.-P.; Frankignoulle, M.; Bourge, I.; Romaine, S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    The carbonate chemistry of seawater is usually not considered to be an important factor influencing calcium-carbonate-precipitation by corals because surface seawater is supersaturated with respect to aragonite. Recent reports, however, suggest that it could play a major role in the evolution and biogeography of recent corals. We investigated the calcification rates of five colonies of the zooxanthellate coral Stylophora pistillata in synthetic seawater using the alkalinity anomaly technique. Changes in aragonite saturation from 98% to 585% were obtained by manipulating the calcium concentration. The results show a nonlinear increase in calcification rate as a function of aragonite saturation level. Calcification increases nearly 3-fold when aragonite saturation increases from 98% to 390%, i.e., close to the typical present saturation state of tropical seawater. There is no further increase of calcification at saturation values above this threshold. Preliminary data suggest that another coral species, Acropora sp., displays a similar behaviour. These experimental results suggest: (l) that the rate of calcification does not change significantly within the range of saturation levels corresponding to the last glacial-interglacial cycle, and (2) that it may decrease significantly in the future as a result of the decrease in the saturation level due to anthropogenic release of CO2 into the atmosphere. Experimental studies that control environmental conditions and seawater composition provide unique opportunities to unravel the response of corals to global environmental changes.

  6. Epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and oligosymptomatic celiac disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Hugo A; De Rosa, Susana; Ruggieri, Victor; de Dávila, María T G; Fejerman, Natalio

    2002-11-01

    The association of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease has been recognized as a distinct syndrome. The objective of this study was to present the clinical, electrophysiologic, and neuroradiologic features in a series of patients with this syndrome. Thirty-two patients with the constellation of epilepsy, occipital calcifications, and celiac disease were identified in our epilepsy clinic. The mean age was 11 years and the mean length of follow-up was 7.4 years. The 1990 criteria of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition were used to diagnose celiac disease. The Kruskal-Wallis statistics test was employed with a signficance of P < .05. Thirty-one patients had partial seizures, 21 of them with symptoms related to the occipital lobe. In most patients, the epilepsy was controlled or the seizures were sporadic. Three developed severe epilepsy. Occipital calcifications were present in all cases. Computed tomography in 7 patients showed hypodense areas in the white matter around calcifications, which decreased or disappeared after a period of gluten-free diet in 3 patients. A favorable outcome of epilepsy was detected in patients with the earliest dietary therapy. This study presents the largest series of children with this syndrome outside Italy. White-matter hypodensities surrounding calcifications are rarely reported. A prompt diagnosis of celiac disease might improve the evolution of the epilepsy and may improve cognitive status. PMID:12585717

  7. Analysis of breast tissue calcifications using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Rebecca N.; Rogers, Keith D.; Shepherd, Neil; Stone, Nicholas

    2007-07-01

    Microalcifications can be found in both benign and malignant breast lesions and their composition can indicate the disease state. Type I microcalcifications are composed of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) and are associated mainly with benign tissue, whereas hydroxyapatite (HAP) can be present in both tissue types. As current practices such as mammography and histopathology examine the morphology of the specimen, they can not reliably distinguish between the two types of calcification, which frequently are the only mammographic features that indicate the presence of a cancerous lesion. Analysis of tissue by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) allows biochemical information to be achieved from the sample. Spectral maps have been carried out on paraffinized sections of breast tissue from 9 patients of different pathology types containing calcification. The chemical composition of the calcifications and surrounding tissue has been analysed and correlated with tissue pathology. This preliminary study has demonstrated the ability to conduct FTIR in paraffinized sections of breast tissue, and initial observations show a correlation between HAP carbonate substitution and tissue pathology. It is hoped that this and further studies will give insight into how the calcifications are linked to the disease process and will give an increased understanding of the significance of calcifications in breast tissue. If type II microcalcifications can be differentiated in benign and malignant tissue by spectroscopic techniques, this may have positive implications in early diagnosis if the techniques can be applied in vivo and spectroscopy of paraffin sections enables biochemical information to accompany histopathology of the sample.

  8. Recent progress in the treatment of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, W. Charles; Lomashvili, Koba A.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcification is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and is associated with poorer outcomes. Although the pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is clear that it is a multifactorial process involving altered mineral metabolism, as well as changes in systemic and local factors that can promote or inhibit vascular calcification, and all of these are potential therapeutic targets. Current therapy is closely linked to strategies for preventing disordered bone and mineral metabolism in advanced kidney disease and involves lowering the circulating levels of both phosphate and calcium. The efficacy of compounds that specifically target calcification, such as bisphosphonates and thiosulfate, has been shown in animals but only in small numbers of humans, and safety remains an issue. Additional therapies, such as pyrophosphate, vitamin K, and lowering of pH, are supported by animal studies, but are yet to be investigated clinically. As the mineral composition of vascular calcifications is the same as in bone, potential effects on bone must be addressed with any therapy for vascular calcification. PMID:20861819

  9. Tablet fluoridation influences the calcification of primary tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, E A; Hopfenmüller, W; Ammar, S

    2001-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of long-term tablet fluoridation on primary pulp calcification by light microscopy. Twenty-four caries-free primary molars (after continuous postpartally initiated 1- to 10-year tablet fluoridation) were compared to 17 primary molars of children without fluoride prophylaxis. Pulp calcification in children with tablet fluoridation was significantly more frequent and more pronounced than in untreated children (p = 0.001). Besides the known pulp stones, the prophylaxis group evidenced a special form of calcification consisting of fibrodentin-like hard tissue not observed in the untreated children. These hard tissue bodies developed "intramurally" on the pulp floor and the inside of the dental roots with an irregular extramural spread into the coronal and radicular pulp by displacement and fibrotization of the pulp tissue. Moreover, some of the teeth had more or less extensive areas of interglobular dentin. The affected teeth were ankylosed in the area of the bi- and trifurcation and on the inside of the roots and were thus infra-occluded. Although the duration of tablet fluoridation has no statistically significant influence on pulp calcification, there is a correlation between extensive pulp calcification, postnatally initiated fluoride prophylaxis and the infraocclusion of primary molars. PMID:11227204

  10. Hemolytic uremic syndrome and rhabdomyolysis in a patient with succinate coenzyme Q reductase (complex II) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, M V; Lavoratti, G; Gasperini, S; Donati, M A; Pela, I

    2011-07-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Besides diarrhea-associated HUS, due to verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli, in children HUS without prodromal diarrhea may be associated with other infectious and autoimmune diseases, genetic defects of the complement-regulator alternative-pathway, and inborn errors of vitamin B12 metabolism. Rhabdomyolysis is the dissolution of skeletal muscle due to various causes, including inborn errors of metabolism. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis and HUS have been previously described in one patient with a genetic defect of oxidative phosphorylation. We report the case of a 2-year-old boy with recurrent HUS and rhabdomyolysis in whom a succinate coenzyme Q reductase (complex II) deficiency was diagnosed. We hypothesize that defects of oxidative phosphorylation could be another etiological factor in atypical HUS. PMID:21722608

  11. [Education for consumers: one of the tools for decreasing the incidence of hemolitic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Clarisa; Rocha, Marcelo da

    2006-01-01

    In order to guarantee that harmless food is ingested by consumers, it is essential that strict hygienic procedures are followed both during the elaboration of food and during the procedures that range from the purchasing, the cooking and the consumption of food. This is an invaluable and unquestionable tool that should be used in order to decrease the incidence of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) in our country. The State, the enterprise owners, and the consumers should take responsibility for this: the State should guarantee the citizens' access to safe food products through an adequate legislation and a mechanism for it to be controlled and obeyed; the enterprise owners should obey the current regulations and provide their employees with education about the importance of these regulations; and the consumers should take responsibility for how they handle food. PMID:17354477

  12. [Severe course of typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome in a 14-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Adamczuk, Dominika; Ziołkowska, Helena; Leszczyńska, Beata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2009-04-01

    The authors present a 14-year old boy with acute renal failure in the course of hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), preceded by bloody diarrhea of unknown origin. The course of HUS was complicated with hypertensive crisis, pleural effusion. Pleural puncture was complicated with massive hemorrhage which required thoracotomy. Additional risk factor were subendocardial perfusion disorders found in MRI scan of the heart and peripheral peroneal nerve palsy (in neuro-motorical conduction examination--severe neuropathy). Renal replacement therapy was necessary for 11 days (hemodialyses--3 days, continuous hemodiafiltration--9 days). Transfusions of: 3000 mL of packed erythrocyte mass, 2700 mL of fresh frozen plasma, 1000 mL of packed platelet mass were performed. Full parenteric nutrition was needed for 11 days. Full recovery of renal function, gradual improvement of heart muscle function, regression of lung abnormalities have been obtained. PMID:19580203

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Korea.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Hae Il; Jo, Sang Kyung; Yoon, Sung Soo; Cho, Heeyeon; Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Young Ok; Koo, Ja Ryong; Park, Yong; Park, Young Seo; Shin, Jae Il; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Oh, Doyeun

    2016-10-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare syndrome characterized by micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. The major pathogenesis of aHUS involves dysregulation of the complement system. Eculizumab, which blocks complement C5 activation, has recently been proven as an effective agent. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of aHUS can cause death or end-stage renal disease. Therefore, a diagnosis that differentiates aHUS from other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy is very important for appropriate management. These guidelines aim to offer recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aHUS in Korea. The guidelines have largely been adopted from the current guidelines due to the lack of evidence concerning the Korean population. PMID:27550478

  14. Refractory atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy responsive to bortezomib-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev; Gertz, Morie A; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a relatively rare disorder described by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Atypical HUS could be genetic, acquired, or idiopathic (without known genetic changes or environmental triggers). Monoclonal protein has uncommonly been reported as a cause of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). We report a 59-year-old white man who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) with MAHA and was given a diagnosis of aHUS with monoclonal gammopathy. His kidney function and proteinuria worsened with persistent hemolysis despite eculizumab and later cyclophosphamide and prednisone treatment. He responded well to VRD (bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone) regimen. Renal function, proteinuria, and hemolysis all improved, and he was been in remission for more than 15 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment with bortezomib-based regimen for a patient with aHUS and monoclonal protein refractory to eculizumab therapy. PMID:25345382

  15. Campylobacter-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Associated with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Emily Elizabeth; Hangartner, Robert; Macdougall, Iain

    2016-03-01

    Common causes of pulmonary-renal syndrome include anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positive vasculitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. We describe a case of life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage associated with Campylobacter hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which we believe is a new disease entity. We hypothesize that the cause of this pulmonary-renal syndrome was an immunological reaction to Campylobacter; and that the initiation of high-dose steroids was responsible for the rapid reversal of the patient's pulmonary and renal impairment. The aim of this article is to raise awareness of this unusual cause of a pulmonary-renal syndrome, guiding physicians to recognize it as a potential complication, and to consider high-dose steroids in managing the condition. PMID:26001543

  16. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome in a postpartum mare concurrent with encephalopathy in the neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Charles E; Gould, Daniel H; Davidson, Ann H; Avery, Paul R; Legare, Marie E; Hyatt, Doreene R; DebRoy, Chitrita

    2008-03-01

    A postpartum mare and foal were presented for evaluation of fever and lethargy in the mare. The mare was diagnosed with endometritis and initially responded well to treatment. On the second day of hospitalization, the mare developed renal insufficiency characterized by oliguria, azotemia, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia. Concurrently, the foal developed rapidly progressive central nervous system signs culminating in refractory seizures. Both animals failed to respond to treatment and were euthanized. Thrombotic microangiopathy involving glomeruli was evident on microscopic examination of the mare's kidneys. Microscopic evidence of brain edema was the principal postmortem finding in the foal. No specific etiology was confirmed in either case. Notably, Escherichia coli 0103:H2 was isolated from the mare's uterus and the gastrointestinal tracts of both animals. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report in which an organism implicated as a cause of hemolytic-uremic syndrome was isolated from an animal with clinical signs and postmortem findings consistent with the disease. PMID:18319442

  17. Dexmedetomidine controls twitch-convulsive syndrome in the course of uremic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Koichi; Scurlock, Corey; Bronster, David

    2011-12-01

    An 85 year old man with a history of chronic renal insufficiency was admitted to the cardiothoracic intensive care unit after aortic valve replacement. His postoperative course was marked by acute oliguric renal failure for high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and acute hyperactive delirium. At this time he also developed tremors with muscle twitching; he received no other form of sedatives. A neurology consult made the diagnosis of twitch-convulsive syndrome associated with uremic encephalopathy. While the patient was receiving the dexmedetomidine infusion, the signs of the twitch-convulsive syndrome, particularly the twitching and tremors, disappeared. Within 30 minutes of the end of the dexmedetomidine infusion, symptoms of the twitch-convulsive syndrome returned, manifesting as acute tremulousness. After several dialysis treatments, his BUN decreased and the dexmedetomidine was weaned, without return of the symptoms of twitch-convulsive syndrome. PMID:22137518

  18. [New Developments in CKD-MBD. Imbalance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand in CKD patients with cardiovascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Joki, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Toshihide

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is well known as an important factor for poor prognosis in CKD patients. It is not well understood why even no significant narrowing the presence of vascular calcification have a great impact for tissue ischemia, especially myocardial ischemia. Many studies have demonstrated that the presence of coronary calcification, aortic calcification, arterial calcification and aortic valve calcification is susceptible to induce an imbalance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand. PMID:25423922

  19. Is Fluorescence Valid to Monitor Removal of Protein Bound Uremic Solutes in Dialysis?

    PubMed Central

    Luman, Merike; Uhlin, Fredrik; Tanner, Risto; Fridolin, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution and removal dynamics of the main fluorophores during dialysis by analyzing the spent dialysate samples to prove the hypothesis whether the fluorescence of spent dialysate can be utilized for monitoring removal of any of the protein bound uremic solute. A high performance liquid chromatography system was used to separate and quantify fluorophoric solutes in the spent dialysate sampled at the start and the end of 99 dialysis sessions, including 57 hemodialysis and 42 hemodiafiltration treatments. Fluorescence was acquired at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm. The main fluorophores found in samples were identified as indole derivatives: tryptophan, indoxyl glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, indoleacetyl glutamine, and indoleacetic acid. The highest contribution (35 ± 11%) was found to arise from indoxyl sulfate. Strong correlation between contribution values at the start and end of dialysis (R2 = 0.90) indicated to the stable contribution during the course of the dialysis. The reduction ratio of indoxyl sulfate was very close to the decrease of the total fluorescence signal of the spent dialysate (49 ± 14% vs 51 ± 13% respectively, P = 0.30, N = 99) and there was strong correlation between these reduction ratio values (R2 = 0.86). On-line fluorescence measurements were carried out to illustrate the technological possibility for real-time dialysis fluorescence monitoring reflecting the removal of the main fluorophores from blood into spent dialysate. In summary, since a predominant part of the fluorescence signal at excitation 280 nm and emission 360 nm in the spent dialysate originates from protein bound derivatives of indoles, metabolites of tryptophan and indole, the fluorescence signal at this wavelength region has high potential to be utilized for monitoring the removal of slowly dialyzed uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate. PMID:27228162

  20. Attenuation of uremia by orally feeding alpha-lipoic acid on acetaminophen induced uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Shrabani; Mandal, Shreya; Roy, Suchismita; Mandal, Arpita; Das, Koushik; Nandi, Dilip K

    2013-04-01

    Uremia means excess nitrogenous waste products in the blood & their toxic effects. An acute acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl p-aminophenol; APAP) overdose may result into potentially fatal hepatic and renal necrosis in humans and experimental animals. The aims of this present study were to investigate the protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) on oxidative stress & uremia on male albino rats induced by acetaminophen. The study was performed by 24 albino male Wister strain rats which were randomly divided into four groups: Group I, control - receives normal food and water, Groups II, III & IV receive acetaminophen interperitoneally at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day for 10 days, from 11th day Groups III & IV were treated with ALA at the dose of 5 mg & 10 mg/100 g/day for 15 days, respectively. After 25 days of treatment, it was observed that there was a significant increase in plasma urea, creatinine, sodium and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (p < 0.05) but a significant decrease in super oxide dismutase (SOD) & catalase activity & potassium level in uremic group is compared with control group & there was a significant increase in SOD & catalase (p < 0.05) & a significant decrease in serum urea, creatinine & Na and MDA (p < 0.05) in Group III & Group IV is compared with Group II & significant changes were observed in high ALA dose group. In conclusion it was observed that the ALA has nephroprotective activities by biochemical observations against acetaminophen induced uremic rats. PMID:23960834

  1. Antioxidant therapy improves non-thyroidal illness syndrome in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pingping; Li, Yun; Xu, Gaosi

    2016-05-01

    Background The roles of antioxidant therapy on non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) in uremic rats is still unclear. Materials and methods Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into blank, 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx), pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 10 mg/100 g), sodium bicarbonate (SB, 0.1 g/100 g), N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 80 mg/100 g) and thyroid hormones (TH, levothyroxine 2 μg/100 g) groups. The serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), interleukin (IL)-1β, free triiodothyronine (FT3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were detected in the sixth week. The expressions of IL-1β and deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) were assessed by western blotting. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory signal pathway was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results Compared with 5/6 Nx group, PDTC and NAC significantly reduced the levels (p < 0.01, respectively) of serum MDA, AOPP, TSH, and elevated levels of serum SOD (p < 0.01, respectively) and FT3 (p = 0.016 and p < 0.01). Neither had significant effects on serum IL-1β content (p = 0.612 and p = 0.582). PDTC and NAC markedly decreased the protein expression of IL-1β (p < 0.01) and increased the protein expression of DIO1 (p < 0.01), respectively. Both had been considerably blunted NF-κB activity (p < 0.01). Conclusions In uremic rat model, PDTC and NAC can effectively improve oxidative stress level and NTIS. In terms of improving oxidative stress level, NAC is probably superior to PDTC. PMID:26895214

  2. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr's disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly presents with mental damage, convulsion, parkinson-like clinical picture, and neuropsychiatric behavior disorders; however, presentation with impulse control disorder is not a frequent presentation. In the current report, a 43-year-old male patient who has been admitted to psychiatry policlinic with the complaints of aggressive behavior episodes and who has been diagnosed with impulse control disorder and IBGC was evaluated in the light of the literature. PMID:26246920

  3. Atypical localizations of calcific deposits in the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Vinanti, G.B.; Pavan, D.; Rossato, A.; Biz, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Calcific tendinopathies of the shoulder are due to inflammation around deposits of calcium within periarticular tendineal structures. Presentation of cases We present three cases of atypical localization of calcium deposits in the shoulder. All of the cases have been treated with arthroscopic excision, followed by post-operative rehabilitation, regaining excellent results. Patients were evaluated 6 months after surgery using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and the UCLA modified shoulder rating. Discussion Calcific tendinopathy is a self-limiting condition or is successfully treated with conservative therapy especially during the early phases of the pathology. If conservative measures fail, removal of calcium deposits is recommended. Arthroscopic management showed good results in our three cases. Conclusion We suggest that arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis guarantees good results even when calcium deposits are in atypical locations. PMID:25884610

  4. Coconut Atrium: Transmural Calcification of the Entire Left Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Carlos Del; Weinstein, Paul; Kunnelis, Constantine; DiStefano, Peter; Ebers, Gloria M.

    2000-01-01

    Massive calcification of the left atrium usually spares the interatrial septum, which provides a cleavage plane for surgical access to the mitral valve. Endoatriectomy with mitral valve replacement is the currently accepted corrective procedure because it affords maximum exposure while decreasing the risk of embolization and intraoperative hemorrhage. We describe a case in which the entire left atrium, including the septum, was thickly calcified and resembled a coconut shell. This condition prevented surgical correction of severe mitral stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the most severe case of left atrial calcification yet reported in the literature. Although it is not possible to establish preoperatively that the atrium is completely calcified and impossible to incise, when predisposing factors and evidence of complete transmural calcification are present, the surgeon should be aware of this possibility and should weigh carefully the decision to operate. PMID:10830629

  5. Leukoencephalopathy, cerebral calcifications and cysts: a family study.

    PubMed

    Karlinger, Kinga; Tárnoki, Ádám Domonkos; Tárnoki, Dávid László; Polvi, Anne; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Kelemen, Andrea; Szegedi, László; Turányi, Eszter; Kamondi, Anita; Szűcs, Anna

    2014-10-01

    We present a clinical, neuro-radiological and genetic study on a family with members suffering from an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome characterised by epilepsy, cerebral calcifications and cysts, bone abnormalities; progressive neuro-cognitive deterioration and paranasal sinusitis. This syndrome shares several features with leukoencephalopathy with calcifications and cysts also called Labrune syndrome and the condition of cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC; Coats plus syndrome). Genetic studies in this family did not reveal mutations in the CTC1 gene defected in CRMCC. We interpret our results as those supporting recent findings that despite clinical similarities, late-onset Labrune and Coats plus syndrome might be distinct entities. This family may have Labrune syndrome or a yet unclassified entity; exploration of similar cases could help classifying this one, and related conditions. PMID:25034270

  6. An Imaging Review of Intra-ocular Calcifications.

    PubMed

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2014-01-01

    Intra-ocular calcifications can occur due to a variety of reasons. In cataract, the lovely lens gets calcified and the bright beautiful world becomes dark and dreadful. Cataract comes in various forms like; congenital, traumatic and senile. Asteroid Hyalosis (AH) occurs because of the accumulation of calcium soaps in vitreous of the eyes. Although it is asymptomatic and unilateral, it is seen more often in diabetic patients. Tumours of eye like retinoblastoma and optic nerve meningioma too are known to show calcifications. This review has focussed on imaging appearances of intra-ocular calcifications, a small process in a small organ that nevertheless has a wide impact on the entire organs. PMID:24596775

  7. Decreased calcification in the Southern Ocean over the satellite record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Natalie M.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.

    2015-03-01

    Widespread ocean acidification is occurring as the ocean absorbs anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, threatening marine ecosystems, particularly the calcifying plankton that provide the base of the marine food chain and play a key role within the global carbon cycle. We use satellite estimates of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), surface chlorophyll, and sea surface temperature to provide a first estimate of changing calcification rates throughout the Southern Ocean. From 1998 to 2014 we observe a 4% basin-wide reduction in summer calcification, with ˜9% reductions in large regions (˜1 × 106 km2) of the Pacific and Indian sectors. Southern Ocean trends are spatially heterogeneous and primarily driven by changes in PIC concentration (suspended calcite), which has declined by ˜24% in these regions. The observed decline in Southern Ocean calcification and PIC is suggestive of large-scale changes in the carbon cycle and provides insight into organism vulnerability in a changing environment.

  8. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria With Calcific Constrictive Pericarditis: A Case Report and Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ujjwal K; Patel, Kartik; Seth, Sandeep; Ray, Ruma; Jagia, Priya; Sahu, Manoj

    2015-10-01

    An 18-year-old boy with congenital erythropoietic porphyria and calcific constrictive pericarditis underwent total pericardiectomy. The cause of pericardial calcification could be deposition of porphyrins in the pericardium. Surgical importance of this rare condition is highlighted. PMID:26467880

  9. Early detection of ocean acidification effects on marine calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyina, T.; Zeebe, R. E.; E. Maier-Reimer; C. Heinze

    2009-02-19

    Ocean acidification is likely to impact calcification rates in many pelagic organisms, which may in turn cause significant changes in marine ecosystem structure. We examine effects of changes in marine CaCO3 production on total alkalinity (TA) in the ocean using the global biogeochemical ocean model HAMOCC. We test a variety of future calcification scenarios because experimental studies with different organisms have revealed a wide range of calcification sensitivities to CaCO3 saturation state. The model integrations start at a preindustrial steady state in the year 1800 and run until the year 2300 forced with anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Calculated trends in TA are evaluated taking into account the natural variability in ocean carbonate chemistry, as derived from repeat hydrographic transects. We conclude that the data currently available does not allow discerning significant trends in TA due to changes in pelagic calcification caused by ocean acidification. Given different calcification scenarios, our model calculations indicate that the TA increase over time will start being detectable by the year 2040, increasing by 5–30 umol/kg compared to the present-day values. In a scenario of extreme reductions in calcification, large TA changes relative to preindustrial conditions would have occurred at present, which we consider very unlikely. However, the time interval of reliable TA observations is too short to disregard this scenario. The largest increase in surface ocean TA is predicted for the tropical and subtropical regions. In order to monitor and quantify possible early signs of acidification effects, we suggest to specifically target those regions during future ocean chemistry surveys.

  10. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.

    PubMed

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; Maclaren, Jana K; Mason, Benjamin M; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-17

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO3(2-)], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth. PMID:26909578

  11. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    PubMed

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process. PMID:27412937

  12. Alkalinity Enrichment Enhances Net Calcification of a Coral Reef Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, R.; Caldeira, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to shift reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution sometime this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale changes in coral calcification over the last several decades, it is not possible to unequivocally link these results to ocean acidification due to confounding factors of temperature and other environmental parameters. Here, we quantified the calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment to test whether reef calcification increases when ocean chemistry is restored to near pre-industrial conditions. We used sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to increase the total alkalinity of seawater flowing over a reef flat, with the aim of increasing carbonate ion concentrations [CO32-] and the aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) to values that would have been attained under pre-industrial atmospheric pCO2 levels. We developed a dual tracer regression method to estimate alkalinity uptake (i.e., calcification) in response to alkalinity enrichment. This approach uses the change in ratios between a non-conservative tracer (alkalinity) and a conservative tracer (a non-reactive dye, Rhodamine WT) to assess the fraction of added alkalinity that is taken up by the reef as a result of an induced increase in calcification rate. Using this method, we estimate that an average of 17.3% ± 2.3% of the added alkalinity was taken up by the reef community. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment performed on a natural coral reef community (without artificial confinement), we demonstrate that, upon increase of [CO32-] and Ωarag to near pre-industrial values, reef calcification increases. Thus, we conclude that, the impacts of ocean acidification are already being felt by coral reefs. This work is the culmination of years of work in the Caldeira lab at the Carnegie Institution for Science, involving many people including Jack Silverman, Kenny Schneider, and Jana Maclaren.

  13. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; MacLaren, Jana K.; Mason, Benjamin M.; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO32‑]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO32‑], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth.

  14. Adipokines, Insulin Resistance and Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Atif; Mehta, Nehal N.; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Wolfe, Megan L.; Rhodes, Thomas; Girman, Cynthia; Reilly, Muredach P

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the hypothesis that plasma levels of adiponectin and leptin are independently but oppositely associated with coronary calcification (CAC), a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. In addition, we assessed which biomarkers of adiposity and insulin resistance are the strongest predictors of CAC beyond traditional risk factors, the metabolic syndrome and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP). Background Adipokines are fat-secreted biomolecules with pleiotropic actions that converge in diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods We examined the association of plasma adipocytokines with CAC in 860 asymptomatic, non-diabetic participants in the Study of Inherited Risk of Coronary Atherosclerosis (SIRCA). Results Plasma adiponectin and leptin levels had opposite and distinct associations with adiposity, insulin resistance and inflammation. Plasma leptin was positively (top vs. bottom quartile) associated with higher CAC after adjusting for age, gender, traditional risk factors and Framingham Risk Scores (FRS) [tobit regression ratio 2.42 (95% CI 1.48–3.95, p=0.002)] and further adjusting for metabolic syndrome and CRP [ratio 2.31 (95% CI 1.36–3.94, p=0.002)]. In contrast, adiponectin levels were not associated with CAC. Comparative analyses suggested that levels of leptin, IL-6 and sol-TNFR2 as well as HOMA-IR predicted CAC scores but only leptin and HOMA-IR provided value beyond risk factors, the metabolic syndrome and CRP. Conclusion In SIRCA, while both leptin and adiponectin levels were associated with metabolic and inflammatory markers, only leptin was a significant independent predictor of CAC. Of several metabolic markers, leptin and the HOMA-IR index had the most robust, independent associations with CAC. Condensed Abstract Adipokines are fat-secreted biomolecules with pleiotropic actions and represent novel markers for cardiovascular risk. We examined the association of plasma adipocytokines with CAC in 860 asymptomatic, non

  15. Breast calcifications following electrical defibrillation: An unusual mammographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Steven M; Jani, Manish; Badve, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 57-year-old woman with a past medical history of end-stage renal disease and a recent history of electrical defibrillation who arrived for her annual mammogram with no breast-related complaints. The mammogram showed interval development of unusual clusters of heterogeneous calcifications. The patient underwent stereotactic core-needle biopsy for definitive diagnosis. The pathologic evaluation revealed fibrosis, abnormal adipocytes, and calcifications with no evidence of malignancy. The constellation of findings was consistent with fat necrosis and fibrosis related to tissue damage sustained during the recent defibrillation. PMID:27307857

  16. Residual Cyst Associated with Calcifications in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sridevi, K; Nandan, S. Ratheesh Kumar; Ratnakar, P.; Srikrishna, K.; Vamsi Pavani, B.

    2014-01-01

    A residual cyst, as the name implies, is a radicular, lateral periodotal, dentigerous or any other cyst that has persisted after it’s associated tooth has been lost. Residual cysts show more predilection in males and they commonly affect the maxillary region. Usually, residual cysts are asymptomatic and calcifications occurring in the residual cysts are quite rare. We are reporting a case of symptomatic residual cyst, associated with calcifications involving the anterior region of the body of the mandible in a 60-year-old male patient. The pathogenesis, clinical, radiological features and differential diagnosis have been discussed. PMID:24701547

  17. Circumferential Calcification of Silicone Implant Misunderstood as a Bony Substitute.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Bin; Min, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    Silicone implant is known to be safe and easy to handle, and frequently used in Asian rhinoplasty. Compared with breast implant, complication studies about silicone calcification used in rhinoplasty are very limited. Recently, the authors experienced an interesting patient who underwent revision rhinoplasty in our institution. Based on preoperative images, previously inserted dorsal augmentation material was identified. It was circumferentially enclosed with bony material and hypertrophied bony lesion induced hump on the mid portion of nasal dorsum. During operation, the authors found it was the calcified capsule of silicone implant, and the calcification was surrounding the whole implant material. PMID:26703034

  18. PLASMA VITAMIN K LEVELS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH CORONARY CALCIFICATION IN OLDER ADULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin K is involved in regulation of vascular calcification, as mediated by '-carboxylation of matrix Gla protein (MGP), which inhibits calcification in vivo.Associations between MGP and calcification are equivocal in humans; less is known about interrelationships among vitamin K, MGP, and calcifi...

  19. Intraepidermal neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-immunoreactive nerve fibres: evidence for sprouting in uremic patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Ståhle-Bäckdahl, M

    1989-05-01

    The use of indirect immunohistochemistry in 12 patients on maintenance hemodialysis has shown weak or moderately strong neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-immunoreactive nerve terminals and fibres sprouting throughout the layers of the epidermis. No such terminals or fibres were found in any of 15 controls. There was no difference between uremic patients with pruritus and those without. Furthermore, NSE-positive nerve fibres with a normal appearance were seen in the dermis, at the epidermal-dermal junctional zone and sometimes entering the stratum basale in both patients and controls. The immunoreactive nerves were thin, smooth and, at their terminal fields, varicose. The immunoreactivity seemed to be associated chiefly with sensory nerves. Thus, our results suggest that uremic patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis develop an abnormal pattern of cutaneous innervation. PMID:2657508

  20. CKD impairs barrier function and alters microbial flora of the intestine: a major link to inflammation and uremic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with oxidative stress and inflammation which contribute to progression of kidney disease and its numerous complications. Until recently, little attention had been paid to the role of the intestine and its microbial flora in the pathogenesis of CKD-associated inflammation. This article is intended to provide an over view of the impact of uremia on the structure and function of the gut and its microbial flora and their potential link to the associated systemic inflammation. Recent findings Recent studies conducted in the author’s laboratories have demonstrated marked disintegration of the colonic epithelial barrier structure and significant alteration of the colonic bacterial flora in humans and animals with advanced CKD. The observed disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier complex can play an important part in the development of systemic inflammation by enabling influx of endotoxin and other noxious luminal contents into the systemic circulation. Similarly via disruption of the normal symbiotic relationship and production, absorption and retention of noxious products, alteration of the microbial flora can contribute to systemic inflammation and uremic toxicity. In fact recent studies have documented the role of colonic bacteria as the primary source of several well known pro-inflammatory/pro-oxidant uremic toxins as well as many as-yet unidentified retained compounds. Summary CKD results in disruption of the intestinal barrier structure and marked alteration of its microbial flora –events that play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammation and uremic toxicity. PMID:23010760

  1. Intracranial physiological calcifications in adults on computed tomography in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Daghighi, M H; Rezaei, V; Zarrintan, S; Pourfathi, H

    2007-05-01

    Intracranial physiological calcifications are unaccompanied by any evidence of disease and have no demonstrable pathological cause. They are often due to calcium and sometimes iron deposition in the blood vessels of different structures of the brain. Computed tomography (CT) is the most sensitive means of detection of these calcifications. The aim of this study was the assessment of intracranial physiological calcifications in adults. We studied 1569 cases ranging in age from 15 to 85 in Tabriz Imam Khomeini Hospital, Iran. These patients had a history of head trauma and their CT scan did not show any evidence of pathological findings. The structures evaluated consisted of (A) the pineal gland, (B) the choroid plexus, (C) the habenula, (D) the basal ganglia, (E) the tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus and falx cerebri, (F) vessels and (G) lens and other structures which could be calcified. Of the 1569 subjects, 71.0% had pineal calcification, 66.2% had choroid plexus calcification, 20.1% had habenular calcification, 7.3% had tentorium cerebelli, sagittal sinus or falx cerebri calcifications, 6.6% had vascular calcification, 0.8% had basal ganglia calcification and 0.9% had lens and other non-defined calcifications. In general, the frequency of intracranial physiological calcifications was greater in men than in women. All types of calcification increased at older ages except for lens and other non-defined calcifications. We evaluated all the cranial structures and determined percentages for all types of intracranial physiological calcification. These statistics can be used for comparing physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. Moreover, these statistics may be of interest from the clinical perspective and are potentially of clinical use. PMID:17594669

  2. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  3. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr’s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr’s disease. PMID:24983277

  4. Endothelial microparticles mediate inflammation-induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Paula; Montes de Oca, Addy; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Merino, Ana; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Mariano; Carracedo, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells (ECs) with TNF-α causes an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and the production of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). BMP-2 is known to produce osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It was found that EMPs from TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells (HUVECs) contained a significant amount of BMP-2 and were able to enhance VSMC osteogenesis and calcification. Calcium content was greater in VSMCs exposed to EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs than EMPs from nontreated HUVECs (3.56 ± 0.57 vs. 1.48 ± 0.56 µg/mg protein; P < 0.05). The increase in calcification was accompanied by up-regulation of Cbfa1 (osteogenic transcription factor) and down-regulation of SM22α (VSMC lineage marker). Inhibition of BMP-2 by small interfering RNA reduced the VSMC calcification induced by EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Similar osteogenic capability was observed in EMPs from both patients with chronic kidney disease and senescent cells, which also presented a high level of BMP-2 expression. Labeling of EMPs with CellTracker shows that EMPs are phagocytized by VSMCs under all conditions (with or without high phosphate, control, and EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs). Our data suggest that EC damage results in the release of EMPs with a high content of calcium and BMP-2 that are able to induce calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. PMID:25342130

  5. Premature Calcifications of Costal Cartilages: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Walter; Schuster, Antonius

    2014-01-01

    Background. Calcifications of the costal cartilages occur, as a rule, not until the age of 30 years. The knowledge of the clinical significance of early and extensive calcifications is still incomplete. Materials and Methods. A search was made to find patients below the age of 30 years who showed distinct calcifications of their lower costal cartilages by viewing 360 random samples of intravenous pyelograms and abdominal plain films. The histories, and clinical and laboratory findings of these patients were analyzed. Results. Nineteen patients fulfilled the criteria of premature calcifications of costal cartilages (CCCs). The patients had in common that they were frequently referred to a hospital and were treated by several medical disciplines. Nevertheless many complaints of the patients remained unsolved. Premature CCCs were often associated with rare endocrine disorders, inborn errors of metabolism, and abnormal hematologic findings. Among the metabolic disorders there were 2 proven porphyrias and 7 patients with a suspected porphyria but with inconclusive laboratory findings. Conclusion. Premature CCCs are unlikely to be a normal variant in skeletal radiology. The findings in this small group of patients call for more intensive studies, especially in regard to the putative role of a porphyria. PMID:25587444

  6. Sturge-Weber syndrome with bilateral intracranial calcification.

    PubMed Central

    Boltshauser, E; Wilson, J; Hoare, R D

    1976-01-01

    Four children affected by Sturge-Weber syndrome and demonstrating bilateral intracranial calcification are described, bringing up to 21 the number of similar reported cases. The frequency of bilateral hemisphere involvement in this syndrome is not known, but it might be as high as 15%. If present, neurosurgical intervention is, in our opinion, contraindicated. Images PMID:932761

  7. Vascular diseases: aortitis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ladich, Elena; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Romero, Maria E; Virmani, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the aorta broadly include noninfectious and infectious aortitis, periaortitis, atherosclerosis, and inflammatory atherosclerotic aneurysms. Aortitis is uncommon but is increasingly recognized as an important cause of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Abdominal (AAA) and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) have different pathologies and etiologies. AAAs are the most common type of aortic aneurysm, and the vast majority of these are atherosclerotic. The causes of TAA vary depending on the site of involvement, but medial degeneration is a common pathologic substrate, regardless of etiology, and genetic influences play a prominent role in TAA expression. Standardized classification schemes for inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the aorta have only recently been added to the pathology literature. A brief overview of the new histopathologic classifications for aortic inflammatory and degenerative diseases has recently been published by the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology as a consensus document on the surgical pathology of the aorta. Vascular calcification is a highly regulated biologic process, and the mechanisms leading to vascular calcification are under investigation. Calcification may occur in the intima (atherosclerotic) or in the media secondary to metabolic disease. Rarely, vascular calcification may be associated with genetic disorders. PMID:27526100

  8. Inflammatory, metabolic, and genetic mechanisms of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2014-01-01

    This review centers on updating the active research area of vascular calcification. This pathology underlies substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, through adverse mechanical effects on vascular compliance, vasomotion, and, most likely, plaque stability. Biomineralization is a complex, regulated process occurring widely throughout nature. Decades ago, its presence in the vasculature was considered a mere curiosity and an unregulated, “dystrophic” process that does not involve biological mechanisms. While it remains controversial whether the process has any adaptive value or past evolutionary advantage, substantial advances have been made in understanding the biological mechanisms driving the process. Different types of calcific vasculopathy, such as inflammatory vs. metabolic, have parallel mechanisms in skeletal bone calcification, such as intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Recent work has identified important regulatory roles for inflammation, oxidized lipids, elastin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprogenitor cells, matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein (MGP), transglutaminase, osteoclastic regulatory factors, phosphate regulatory hormones and receptors, apoptosis, prelamin A, autophagy, and microvesicles or microparticles similar to the matrix vesicles of skeletal bone. Recent work has uncovered fascinating interactions between MGP, vitamin K, warfarin and transport proteins. And, lastly, recent breakthroughs in inherited forms of calcific vasculopathy, have identified the genes responsible as well as an unexpected overlap of phenotypes. PMID:24665125

  9. Low calcification in corals in the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-10-01

    Reef-building coral communities in the Great Barrier Reef—the world's largest coral reef—may now be calcifying at only about half the rate that they did during the 1970s, even though live coral cover may not have changed over the past 40 years, a new study finds. In recent decades, coral reefs around the world, home to large numbers of fish and other marine species, have been threatened by such human activities as pollution, overfishing, global warming, and ocean acidification; the latter affects ambient water chemistry and availability of calcium ions, which are critical for coral communities to calcify, build, and maintain reefs. Comparing data from reef surveys during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s with present-day (2009) measurements of calcification rates in One Tree Island, a coral reef covering 13 square kilometers in the southern part of the Great Barrier Reef, Silverman et al. show that the total calcification rates (the rate of calcification minus the rate of dissolution) in these coral communities have decreased by 44% over the past 40 years; the decrease appears to stem from a threefold reduction in calcification rates during nighttime.

  10. Evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow in patient with atypical senile dementia with asymmetrical calcification.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Masaru; Ukai, Satoshi; Shinosaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We report an 83-year-old woman with atypical senile dementia with Fahr-type calcification. Brain computed tomography demonstrated asymmetrical calcification predominant in the basal ganglia on the right side and pronounced diffuse cortical atrophy in the frontotemporal areas. The patient was clinically diagnosed with diffuse neurofibrillary tangles with calcification. Brain single photon emission computed tomography findings revealed that cerebral blood flow was reduced on the right side, as compared with the left side, in widespread areas. Hemispheric asymmetry in both calcification and cerebral blood flow suggests a relationship between calcification and vascular changes. PMID:25737312

  11. Msx2 promotes cardiovascular calcification by activating paracrine Wnt signals.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jian-Su; Cheng, Su-Li; Pingsterhaus, Joyce M; Charlton-Kachigian, Nichole; Loewy, Arleen P; Towler, Dwight A

    2005-05-01

    In diabetic LDLR-/- mice, an ectopic BMP2-Msx2 gene regulatory program is upregulated in association with vascular calcification. We verified the procalcific actions of aortic Msx2 expression in vivo. CMV-Msx2 transgenic (CMV-Msx2Tg(+)) mice expressed 3-fold higher levels of aortic Msx2 than nontransgenic littermates. On high-fat diets, CMV-Msx2Tg(+) mice exhibited marked cardiovascular calcification involving aortic and coronary tunica media. This corresponded to regions of Msx2 immunoreactivity in adjacent adventitial myofibroblasts, suggesting a potential paracrine osteogenic signal. To better understand Msx2-regulated calcification, we studied actions in 10T1/2 cells. We found that conditioned media from Msx2-transduced 10T1/2 cells (Msx2-CM) is both pro-osteogenic and adipostatic; these features are characteristic of Wnt signaling. Msx2-CM stimulated Wnt-dependent TCF/LEF transcription, and Msx2-transduced cells exhibited increased nuclear beta-catenin localization with concomitant alkaline phosphatase induction. Msx2 upregulated Wnt3a and Wnt7a but downregulated expression of the canonical inhibitor Dkk1. Dkk1 treatment reversed osteogenic and adipostatic actions of Msx2. Teriparatide, a PTH1R agonist that inhibits murine vascular calcification, suppressed vascular BMP2-Msx2-Wnt signaling. Analyses of CMV-Msx2Tg(+) mice confirmed that Msx2 suppresses aortic Dkk1 and upregulates vascular Wnts; moreover, TOPGAL(+) (Wnt reporter); CMV-Msx2Tg(+) mice exhibited augmented aortic LacZ expression. Thus, Msx2-expressing cells elaborated an osteogenic milieu that promotes vascular calcification in part via paracrine Wnt signals. PMID:15841209

  12. Chronic Hypoparathyroidism Due to Partial Thyroidectomy with Intracranial Calcification.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, Indra

    2016-01-01

    A 57 year old female came with the complaint of recurrent headache, often fatigue, and sometimes feel numbs and rigid in her extremities, no other symptom was noted. Her body weight is stable and she was in menopausal state. She had a history of partial thyroidectomy 20 years ago and continues thiamazole 2.5 mg with seldom regular consult to physician. From the physical examination, the patient had a scar from thyroid surgery and other organs were in the normal condition. From laboratory examination, there was slight normocytic normochromic anemia (Hb: 10.7 gr/dL), normal fT4: 1.21 ng/dL (0.7-1.48 ng/dL), slightly low Calcium: 8.3 mg/dL (8.5-10.2 mg/dL), others were within normal limit but there was no Phosphorus level data. She was currently on medication: thiamazole 2.5 mg once daily, CaCO3 500 mg once daily, and alfacalcidol 1 mcg once daily, to prevent the rigid and numbness that she felt before. For further investigation, we performed a PTH test with result of hypoparathyroidism with parathyroid hormone 7 pg/mL (15-65 pg/mL) and brain CT-scan with result there was a symmetrical bilateral calcification in radiate corona, frontal lobes, temporal lobes, basal ganglia, thalamic, and dentate nuclei of cerebelli. There was no data about the histopathology examination of the thyroid tumor because the patient did not keep the data. The mechanism of intracranial calcification in hypoparathyroidism, more often seen in pseudohypoparathyroidism than in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, has not been completely elucidated. It may be related more to the duration of hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia than parathyroid hormone itself. Hyperphosphataemia promotes ectopic calcification in brain tissue in hypoparathyroidism. Intracranial calcification is one of the features of chronic hypocalcemia, and the calcifications typically involve basal ganglia, thalami, and the cerebellum. PMID:27241548

  13. Mammographic calcification cluster detection and threshold gold thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R.; Wallis, M. G.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2012-03-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify acceptable and achievable standards of image quality (IQ) in terms of threshold gold thickness using the CDMAM test object. However, there is little evidence relating such measurements to cancer detection. This work investigated the relationship between calcification detection and threshold gold thickness. An observer study was performed using a set of 162 amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) detector images (81 no cancer and 81 with 1-3 inserted calcification clusters). From these images four additional IQs were simulated: different digital detectors (computed radiography (CR) and DR) and dose levels. Seven observers marked and rated the locations of suspicious regions. DBM analysis of variances was performed on the JAFROC figure of merit (FoM) yielding 95% confidence intervals for IQ pairs. Automated threshold gold thickness (Tg) analysis was performed for the 0.25mm gold disc diameter on CDMAM images at the same IQs (16 images per IQ). Tg was plotted against FoM and a power law fitted to the data. There was a significant reduction in FoM for calcification detection for CR images compared with DR; FoM decreased from 0.83 to 0.63 (p<=0.0001). Detection was also sensitive to dose. There was a good correlation between FoM and Tg (R2=0.80, p<0.05), consequently threshold gold thickness was a good predictor of calcification detection at the same IQ. Since the majority of threshold gold thicknesses for the various IQs were above the acceptable standard despite large variations in calcification detection by radiologists, current EU guidelines may need revising.

  14. A gender bias in the calcification response to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, M.; Cohen, A. L.; McCorkle, D. C.

    2011-08-01

    The effects of nutrients and pCO2 on zooxanthellate and azooxanthellate colonies of the temperate scleractinian coral Astrangia poculata (Ellis and Solander, 1786) were investigated at two different temperatures (16 °C and 24 °C). Corals exposed to elevated pCO2 tended to have lower relative calcification rates, as estimated from changes in buoyant weights. No nutrient effect was observed. At 16 °C, gamete release was not observed, and no gender differences in calcification rate were observed. However, corals grown at 24 °C spawned repeatedly and male and female corals exhibited two different growth rate patterns. Female corals grown at 24 °C and exposed to CO2 had calcification rates 39 % lower than females grown at ambient CO2, while males showed only a 5 % decline in calcification under elevated CO2. At 16 °C, female and male corals showed similar reductions in calcification rates in response to elevated CO2 (15 % and 19 % respectively). At 24 °C, corals spawned repeatedly, while no spawning was observed at 16 °C. The increased sensitivity of females to elevated pCO2 may reflect a greater investment of energy in reproduction (egg production) relative to males (sperm production). These results suggest that both gender and spawning are important factors in determining the sensitivity of corals to ocean acidification and their inclusion in future research may be critical to predicting how the population structures of marine calcifiers will change in response to ocean acidification.

  15. Calcification by juvenile corals under heterotrophy and elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenkard, E. J.; Cohen, A. L.; McCorkle, D. C.; de Putron, S. J.; Starczak, V. R.; Zicht, A. E.

    2013-09-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) threatens the existence of coral reefs by slowing the rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) production of framework-building corals thus reducing the amount of CaCO3 the reef can produce to counteract natural dissolution. Some evidence exists to suggest that elevated levels of dissolved inorganic nutrients can reduce the impact of OA on coral calcification. Here, we investigated the potential for enhanced energetic status of juvenile corals, achieved via heterotrophic feeding, to modulate the negative impact of OA on calcification. Larvae of the common Atlantic golf ball coral, Favia fragum, were collected and reared for 3 weeks under ambient (421 μatm) or significantly elevated (1,311 μatm) CO2 conditions. The metamorphosed, zooxanthellate spat were either fed brine shrimp (i.e., received nutrition from photosynthesis plus heterotrophy) or not fed (i.e., primarily autotrophic). Regardless of CO2 condition, the skeletons of fed corals exhibited accelerated development of septal cycles and were larger than those of unfed corals. At each CO2 level, fed corals accreted more CaCO3 than unfed corals, and fed corals reared under 1,311 μatm CO2 accreted as much CaCO3 as unfed corals reared under ambient CO2. However, feeding did not alter the sensitivity of calcification to increased CO2; ∆ calcification/∆Ω was comparable for fed and unfed corals. Our results suggest that calcification rates of nutritionally replete juvenile corals will decline as OA intensifies over the course of this century. Critically, however, such corals could maintain higher rates of skeletal growth and CaCO3 production under OA than those in nutritionally limited environments.

  16. Evidence for effectiveness of Extracorporal Shock-Wave Therapy (ESWT) to treat calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huisstede, Bionka M A; Gebremariam, Lukas; van der Sande, Renske; Hay, Elaine M; Koes, Bart W

    2011-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) is suggested as a treatment alternative for calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis (RC-tendinosis), which may decrease the need for surgery. In this study we assessed the evidence for effectiveness of ESWT for these disorders. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Pedro, and Cinahl were searched for relevant systematic reviews and RCTs. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. Seventeen RCTs (11 calcific, 6 non-calcific) were included. For calcific RC-tendinosis, strong evidence was found for effectiveness in favour of high-ESWT versus low-ESWT in short-term. Moderate evidence was found in favour of high-ESWT versus placebo in short-, mid- and long-term and versus low-ESWT in mid- and long-term. Moreover, high-ESWT was more effective (moderate evidence) with focus on calcific deposit versus focus on tuberculum major in short- and long-term. RSWT was more effective (moderate evidence) than placebo in mid-term. For non-calcific RC-tendinosis, no strong or moderate evidence was found in favour of low-, mid- or high-ESWT versus placebo, each other, or other treatments. This review shows that only high-ESWT is effective for treating calcific RC-tendinosis. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of ESWT to treat non-calcific RC-tendinosis. PMID:21396877

  17. Detection of Calcifications In Vivo and Ex Vivo After Brain Injury in Rat Using SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Sierra, Alejandra; Corum, Curtis Andrew; Zhang, Jinjin; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Pitkänen, Asla; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Calcifications represent one component of pathology in many brain diseases. With MRI, they are most often detected by exploiting negative contrast in magnitude images. Calcifications are more diamagnetic than tissue, leading to a magnetic field disturbance that can be seen in phase MR images. Most phase imaging studies use gradient recalled echo based pulse sequences. Here, the phase component of SWIFT, a virtually zero acquisition delay sequence, was used to detect calcifications ex vivo and in vivo in rat models of status epilepticus and traumatic brain injury. Calcifications were detected in phase and imaginary SWIFT images based on their dipole like magnetic field disturbances. In magnitude SWIFT images, calcifications were distinguished as hypointense and hyperintense. Hypointense calcifications showed large crystallized granules with few surrounding inflammatory cells, while hyperintense calcifications contained small granules with the presence of more inflammatory cells. The size of the calcifications in SWIFT magnitude images correlated with that in Alizarin stained histological sections. Our data indicate that SWIFT is likely to better preserve signal in the proximity of a calcification or other field perturber in comparison to gradient echo due to its short acquisition delay and broad excitation bandwidth. Furthermore, a quantitative description for the phase contrast near dipole magnetic field inhomogeneities for the SWIFT pulse sequence is given. In vivo detection of calcifications provides a tool to probe the progression of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, it appears to provide a surrogate marker for inflammatory cells around the calcifications after brain injury. PMID:22425671

  18. Differential Effects of Ocean Acidification on Coral Calcification: Insights from Geochemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, M.; Decarlo, T. M.; Venn, A.; Tambutte, E.; Gaetani, G. A.; Tambutte, S.; Allemand, D.; McCulloch, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Although ocean acidification is expected to negatively impact calcifying animals due to the formation of CaCO3 becoming less favorable, experimental evidence is mixed. Corals have received considerable attention in this regard; laboratory culture experiments show there to be a wide array of calcification responses to acidification. Here we will show how relationships for the incorporation of various trace elements and boron isotopes into synthetic aragonite can be used to reconstruct carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification. In turn the chemistry at the site of calcification can be determined under different ocean acidification scenarios and differences in the chemistry at the site of calcification linked to different calcification responses to acidification. Importantly we will show that the pH of the calcifying fluid alone is insufficient to estimate calcification responses, thus a multi-proxy approach using multiple trace elements and isotopes is required to understand how the site of calcification is affected by ocean acidification.

  19. The Sensitivity of Marine Calcification to carbonate ion concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langdon, C.

    2006-12-01

    It is now well established that the rate of calcification of biogenic calcification is a function of the carbonate ion concentration. This relationship has been best established in the case of corals. Data is now available for twelve species. For the purpose of comparison it is convenient to normalize the calcification rates to the rate achieved at the pre-industrial carbonate ion concentration of the surface tropical ocean taken for the purposes of this analysis to be 255 μmol kg-1. If the rates from all the available studies are processed in this way and then regressed against the carbonate ion concentration one obtains that the normalized calcification = -24.5+0.47[CO32-], r#2=0.74. From this relationship one can calculate that at the present time the rate of coral calcification may have declined by 19% relative to the pre-industrial rate and by the end of the century, if pCO2 reaches 700 μatm, it could decline by 54%. This assumes that any rise in sea surface temperature does not have a significant effect on coral calcification. At the present time this is a major source of uncertainty. Several studies show that corals are adapted to the mean annual temperature that they experience and the rate of calcification during the summer is depressed relative to the maximal rates observed during the spring and fall. In this scenario any increase in the mean annual temperature will result in a reduced annual rate of calcification. These studies show that the rate of calcification falls off at the rate of 24±17 % per °C once the temperature exceeds the species thermal optimum. Other studies based on long-lived massive corals widely used in paleo-climate reconstructions exhibit a linear relationship with temperature that shows no sign of tapering off at the highest temperatures for which data are available. At this time we do not know which pattern is more representative of the aggregate response of corals on a typical coral reef. It should not be forgotten that

  20. Gas chromatographic determination of guanidino compounds in uremic patients using glyoxal as derivatizing reagent.

    PubMed

    Majidano, S A; Khuhawar, M Y

    2012-05-01

    The guanidino compounds guanidine, methylguanidine, guanidinoacetic acid, guanidinopropionic acid, guanidinobutyric acid and guanidinosuccinic acid were eluted and separated after pre-column derivatization with glyoxal from an HP-5 column (30 m × 0.32 mm i.d.) with film thickness 0.25 µm at an initial column temperature of 100 °C for 2 min, with ramping of 20°C/min up to 250 °C and a nitrogen flow rate of 3 mL/min. Detection was by flame ionization detection. Linear calibrations were observed within 0.1-20.0 µmol/L, with limit of detection within 0.024-0.034 µmol/L for each compound. The separation was repeatable with relative standard deviation (RSD) (n = 6) within 1.2-1.8 and 1.1-1.6% in terms of retention time and peak height/peak area, respectively. The method was applied for the determination of the guanidino compounds from serum of uremic patients (n = 7) and healthy volunteers (n = 8), and amounts were observed within 1.33-11.71 and 0.07-0.39 µmol/L with RSD 1.1-3.5 and 1.1-3.0%, respectively. The results were further supported by the standard addition method. PMID:22392369

  1. Effect of Auricular Acupressure on Uremic Pruritus in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cui-Na; Yao, Wei-Guo; Bao, Yi-Jie; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Hui; Yin, Pei-Hao; Liu, Gui-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Uremic pruritus (UP) is a common symptom in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the clinical efficacy of auricular acupressure therapy on pruritus in hemodialysis patients and to explore possible underlying mechanisms. Methods. Patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis at a referral medical center were recruited and assigned to intervention (n = 32) and control (n = 30) groups. The intervention group underwent auricular acupressure treatment three times a week for six weeks. Auricular acupressure was not applied to patients in the control group. However, tape without Vaccaria seeds was applied to the same six auricular acupoints as the intervention group. Pruritus scores were assessed using VAS scores, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure levels of other possible contributory biochemical factors. Results. There was a significant difference in mean VAS scores between the postintervention and control groups during follow-up (3.844 ± 1.687 versus 5.567 ± 2.285, F = 22.32, P < 0.0001). Compared to the control group, serum histamine levels in the postintervention group at the six-week follow-up had decreased significantly (F = 5.01, P = 0.0290). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that auricular acupressure may be a useful treatment in the multidisciplinary management of UP in ESRD patients. PMID:26495017

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Kibriya; Kandur, Yasar; Ucar, Murat; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Soylemezoglu, Oguz

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological syndrome, composed of symptoms such as headache, seizures, visual disturbances, lethargy, confusion, stupor, focal neurologic findings and radiological findings of bilateral gray and white matter abnormalities suggestive of edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. PRES is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if it is not expeditiously recognized. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) represents the most sensitive imaging technique for recognizing PRES. PRES has been seen in various clinical settings including renal disorders such as acute glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and drug usage such as calcineurin inhibitors. We aimed to present two study cases for such clinical setting. In this report, we present two patients with PRES in whom the primary diagnosis was hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). Both of them were treated with anticonvulsant and proper antihypertensive drugs. A repeated MRI scan of the head, an ophthalmologic assessment, and a follow-up electroencephalogram produced normal results with no sequelae. Early recognition of PRES as a complication during different diseases and therapies in childhood may facilitate the appropriate treatment, so that intensive treatment should be performed as soon as possible to avoid neurological sequelae. PMID:27298664

  3. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO): more than just the correction of uremic anemia.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Aloisi, Carmela; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Corica, Francesco; Floccari, Fulvio; Grasso, Giovanni; Lasco, Antonino; Pettinato, Giuseppina; Ruello, Antonella; Sturiale, Alessio; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is controlled by numerous interdependent humoral and endocrine factors. Erythropoietin (EPO), a hydrophobic sialoglycoproteic hormone, plays a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, and induces proliferation, maturation and differentiation of the erythroid cell line precursors. Thanks to recombinant DNA techniques, different recombinant hormones can now be produced at low cost and in large amounts. This has led to greater understanding of the pathophysiological factors regulating hematopoiesis. This in turn, hasprompted the search for new therapeutic approaches. EPO might also be used to treat patients with different types of anemia: uremics, newborns, patients with anemia from cancer or myeloproliferative disease, thalassemia, bone marrow transplants, chronic infectious diseases. Besides erythroid cells, EPO affects other blood cell lines, such as myeloid cells, lymphocytes and megakaryocytes. It can also enhance polymorphonuclear cell phagocytosis and reduce macrophage activation, thus modulating the inflammatory process. Hematopoietic and endothelial cells probably have the same origin, and the discovery of eyrthropoietin receptors also on mesangial, myocardial and smooth muscle cells has prompted research into the non-erythropoietic function of the hormone. EPO has an important, direct, hemodynamic and vasoactive effect, which does not depend only on an increase in hematocrit and viscosity. Moreover, EPO and its receptors have been found in the brain, suggesting a role in preventing neuronal death. Finally, the recently discovered interaction between EPO and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the ability of EPO to stimulate endothelial cell mitosis and motility may be of importance in neovascularization and wound healing. PMID:12018644

  4. Protein-bound uremic toxins: a long overlooked culprit in cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Kompa, Andrew R; Krum, Henry

    2016-07-01

    Protein-bound uremic toxins (PBUTs) accumulate once renal excretory function declines and are not cleared by dialysis. There is increasing evidence that PBUTs exert toxic effects on many vital organs, including the kidney, blood vessels, and heart. It has been suggested that PBUTs are likely to be a potential missing link in cardiorenal syndrome, based on the high incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality in the dialysis population, which are dramatically reduced in successful kidney transplant recipients. These data have led the call for more effective dialysis or additional adjunctive therapy to eradicate these toxins and their adverse biological effects. Indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate are the two most problematic PBUTs, conferring renal and cardiovascular toxicity, and are derived from dietary amino acid metabolites by colonic microbial organisms. Therefore, targeting the colon where these toxins are initially produced appears to be a potential therapeutic alternative for patients with chronic kidney disease. This strategy, if approved, is likely to be applicable to predialysis patients, thereby potentially preventing progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage renal disease as well as preventing the development of cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:27147674

  5. Eculizumab is a safe and effective treatment in pediatric patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Larry A; Fila, Marc; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Al-Akash, Samhar I; Evans, Jonathan; Henning, Paul; Lieberman, Kenneth V; Maringhini, Silvio; Pape, Lars; Rees, Lesley; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Vande Walle, Johan; Ogawa, Masayo; Bedrosian, Camille L; Licht, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by alternative complement pathway dysregulation, leading to systemic thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and severe end-organ damage. Based on 2 prospective studies in mostly adults and retrospective data in children, eculizumab, a terminal complement inhibitor, is approved for aHUS treatment. Here we prospectively evaluated efficacy and safety of weight-based dosing of eculizumab in eligible pediatric patients with aHUS in an open-label phase II study. The primary end point was complete TMA response by 26 weeks. Twenty-two patients (aged 5 months-17 years) were treated; 16 were newly diagnosed, 12 had no prior plasma exchange/infusion during current TMA symptomatology, 11 received baseline dialysis, and 2 had prior renal transplants. By week 26, 14 achieved a complete TMA response, 18 achieved hematologic normalization, and 16 had 25% or better improvement in serum creatinine. Plasma exchange/infusion was discontinued in all, and 9 of the 11 patients who required dialysis at baseline discontinued, whereas none initiated new dialysis. Eculizumab was well tolerated; no deaths or meningococcal infections occurred. Bone marrow failure, wrist fracture, and acute respiratory failure were reported as unrelated severe adverse events. Thus, our findings establish the efficacy and safety of eculizumab for pediatric patients with aHUS and are consistent with proposed immediate eculizumab initiation following diagnosis in children. PMID:26880462

  6. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Chilean children.

    PubMed Central

    Cordovéz, A; Prado, V; Maggi, L; Cordero, J; Martinez, J; Misraji, A; Rios, R; Soza, G; Ojeda, A; Levine, M M

    1992-01-01

    A clinicoepidemiological study was undertaken to determine if enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) was associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in children in Santiago, Valdivia, and Temuco, Chile. Prospective surveillance detected 20 hospitalized cases of HUS in children less than 4 years of age in these cities from March 1988 to March 1989. Each HUS patient was matched (by sex and age) with two control children (hospitalized elective-surgery patients). To detect EHEC, DNA from stool culture isolates of E. coli was detected by hybridization with biotin-labelled DNA probes specific for the EHEC virulence plasmid, Shiga-like toxin I (SLT-I) or SLT-II. Stool cultures from 6 of 20 cases (30%) and from 2 of 38 controls (5.3%) yielded EHEC (P = 0.0158). EHEC isolates from all HUS cases hybridized with the EHEC plasmid probe and with probes for SLT-I or -II (or both). The serogroups of the isolates included O157, O26, and O111. EHEC causes HUS in Chile, and the biotinylated gene probes are practical diagnostic tools for epidemiologic studies. PMID:1500525

  7. Gain-of-function mutations in complement factor B are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Jorge, Elena Goicoechea; Harris, Claire L.; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Carreras, Luis; Arranz, Elena Aller; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an important cause of acute renal failure in children. Mutations in one or more genes encoding complement-regulatory proteins have been reported in approximately one-third of nondiarrheal, atypical HUS (aHUS) patients, suggesting a defect in the protection of cell surfaces against complement activation in susceptible individuals. Here, we identified a subgroup of aHUS patients showing persistent activation of the complement alternative pathway and found within this subgroup two families with mutations in the gene encoding factor B (BF), a zymogen that carries the catalytic site of the complement alternative pathway convertase (C3bBb). Functional analyses demonstrated that F286L and K323E aHUS-associated BF mutations are gain-of-function mutations that result in enhanced formation of the C3bBb convertase or increased resistance to inactivation by complement regulators. These data expand our understanding of the genetic factors conferring predisposition to aHUS, demonstrate the critical role of the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of aHUS, and provide support for the use of complement-inhibition therapies to prevent or reduce tissue damage caused by dysregulated complement activation. PMID:17182750

  8. Complement Factor B Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome—Disease-Relevant or Benign?

    PubMed Central

    Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Vergoz, Laura; Rybkine, Tania; Ngo, Stephanie; Bettoni, Serena; Pashov, Anastas; Cayla, Mathieu; Tabarin, Fanny; Jablonski, Mathieu; Hue, Christophe; Smith, Richard J.; Noris, Marina; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Donadelli, Roberta; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic ultrarare renal disease associated with overactivation of the alternative pathway of complement. Four gain-of-function mutations that form a hyperactive or deregulated C3 convertase have been identified in Factor B (FB) ligand binding sites. Here, we studied the functional consequences of 10 FB genetic changes recently identified from different aHUS cohorts. Using several tests for alternative C3 and C5 convertase formation and regulation, we identified two gain-of-function and potentially disease-relevant mutations that formed either an overactive convertase (M433I) or a convertase resistant to decay by FH (K298Q). One mutation (R178Q) produced a partially cleaved protein with no ligand binding or functional activity. Seven genetic changes led to near-normal or only slightly reduced ligand binding and functional activity compared with the most common polymorphism at position 7, R7. Notably, none of the algorithms used to predict the disease relevance of FB mutations agreed completely with the experimental data, suggesting that in silico approaches should be undertaken with caution. These data, combined with previously published results, suggest that 9 of 15 FB genetic changes identified in patients with aHUS are unrelated to disease pathogenesis. This study highlights that functional assessment of identified nucleotide changes in FB is mandatory to confirm disease association. PMID:24652797

  9. An international consensus approach to the management of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Loirat, Chantal; Fakhouri, Fadi; Ariceta, Gema; Besbas, Nesrin; Bitzan, Martin; Bjerre, Anna; Coppo, Rosanna; Emma, Francesco; Johnson, Sally; Karpman, Diana; Landau, Daniel; Langman, Craig B; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Licht, Christoph; Nester, Carla; Pecoraro, Carmine; Riedl, Magdalena; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Van de Walle, Johan; Vivarelli, Marina; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) emerged during the last decade as a disease largely of complement dysregulation. This advance facilitated the development of novel, rational treatment options targeting terminal complement activation, e.g., using an anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab). We review treatment and patient management issues related to this therapeutic approach. We present consensus clinical practice recommendations generated by HUS International, an international expert group of clinicians and basic scientists with a focused interest in HUS. We aim to address the following questions of high relevance to daily clinical practice: Which complement investigations should be done and when? What is the importance of anti-factor H antibody detection? Who should be treated with eculizumab? Is plasma exchange therapy still needed? When should eculizumab therapy be initiated? How and when should complement blockade be monitored? Can the approved treatment schedule be modified? What approach should be taken to kidney and/or combined liver-kidney transplantation? How should we limit the risk of meningococcal infection under complement blockade therapy? A pressing question today regards the treatment duration. We discuss the need for prospective studies to establish evidence-based criteria for the continuation or cessation of anticomplement therapy in patients with and without identified complement mutations. PMID:25859752

  10. Discontinuation of eculizumab maintenance treatment for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: a report of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Ardissino, Gianluigi; Testa, Sara; Possenti, Ilaria; Tel, Francesca; Paglialonga, Fabio; Salardi, Stefania; Tedeschi, Silvana; Belingheri, Mirco; Cugno, Massimo

    2014-10-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy, and as many as 70% of patients with aHUS have mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins. Eculizumab, a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody targeting C5, has been used successfully in patients with aHUS since 2009. The standard maintenance treatment requires life-long eculizumab therapy, but the possibility of discontinuation has not yet been tested systematically. We report the safety of discontinuing eculizumab treatment in 10 patients who stopped treatment with the aim of minimizing the risk of adverse reactions, reducing the risk of meningitis, and improving quality of life while also reducing the considerable treatment costs. Disease activity was monitored closely at home by means of urine dipstick testing for hemoglobin. During the cumulative observation period of 95 months, 3 of the 10 patients experienced relapse within 6 weeks of discontinuation, but then immediately resumed treatment and completely recovered. Our experience supports the possibility of discontinuing eculizumab therapy with strict home monitoring for early signs of relapse in patients with aHUS who achieve stable remission. PMID:24656451

  11. Postoperative atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with complement c3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Matsukuma, Eiji; Imamura, Atsushi; Iwata, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Fan, Xinping; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Kuwahara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) can be distinguished from typical or Shiga-like toxin-induced HUS. The clinical outcome is unfavorable; up to 50% of affected patients progress to end-stage renal failure and 25% die during the acute phase. Multiple conditions have been associated with aHUS, including infections, drugs, autoimmune conditions, transplantation, pregnancy, and metabolic conditions. aHUS in the nontransplant postsurgical period, however, is rare. An 8-month-old boy underwent surgical repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Neurological disturbances, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia developed 25 days later, and aHUS was diagnosed. Further evaluation revealed that his complement factor H (CFH) level was normal and that anti-FH antibodies were not detected in his plasma. Sequencing of his CFH, complement factor I, membrane cofactor protein, complement factor B, and thrombomodulin genes was normal. His ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin-1 repeats 13) activity was also normal. However, he had a potentially causative mutation (R425C) in complement component C3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that his father and aunt also had this mutation; however, they had no symptoms of aHUS. We herein report a case of aHUS that developed after cardiovascular surgery and was caused by a complement C3 mutation. PMID:25431709

  12. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beyers, Rebekah; Baldwin, Michael; Dalabih, Sevilay; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC) database) infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU) for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS. PMID:24891968

  13. Correlations between Plasma Levels of Anionic Uremic Toxins and Clinical Parameters in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Yuichi; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Ideuchi, Hideki; Oda, Masako; Takeda, Kiyotaka; Saitoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    When the kidney is seriously impaired, various uremic toxins (UTs) accumulate in the body, often exerting unfavorable effects on physiological functions and drug pharmacokinetics. To prevent this, it is important to determine plasma UT levels accurately in chronic kidney disease patients. Although attempts to predict plasma UT levels using biomarkers have been made, the correlation between UT levels and the markers is not yet fully understood. In this study, we assessed the correlations among plasma levels of indoxyl sulfate (IS), indoleacetic acid (IA), and 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF) in 20 hemodialysis patients and evaluated the relationship between the plasma levels of UTs and clinical parameters, such as serum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), with special focus on IS. There were no correlations among the plasma levels of the three UTs before and immediately after hemodialysis. However, a significant correlation was observed between plasma IS levels and Scr before hemodialysis (r=0.643, p=0.002), with the correlation becoming much stronger when using the data obtained immediately after hemodialysis (r=0.744, p<0.001). Further, plasma IS levels showed a significant negative correlation with eGFR (r=-0.558, p=0.011). However, no correlations were observed for IA or CMPF. The results obtained from this study suggest that plasma IS levels can be predicted from Scr values, although the precise mechanism behind the correlation remains to be clarified. PMID:27477735

  14. No association between dysplasminogenemia with p.Ala620Thr mutation and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Uchida, Yumiko; Yoshida, Yoko; Kato, Hideki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Kokame, Koichi; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2016-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a form of thrombotic microangiopathy, is caused by the uncontrolled activation of the alternative pathway of complement on the cell surface that leads to microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. A recent genetic analysis of aHUS patients identified deleterious mutations not only in complement or complement regulatory genes but also in the plasminogen gene, suggesting that subnormal plasminogen activity may be related to the degradation of thrombi in aHUS. Dysplasminogenemia, which is caused by a genetic variant in the plasminogen gene, PLG:p.Ala620Thr, is commonly observed in the northeast Asian populations, including Japanese. To examine the association between dysplasminogenemia and aHUS, we genotyped PLG:p.Ala620Thr in 103 Japanese patients with aHUS. We identified five aHUS patients with PLG:p.Ala620Thr; the minor allele frequency (MAF) was thus 0.024. The MAF in the patient group was not significantly different from those obtained from a general Japanese population (MAF = 0.020) and the Japanese genetic variation HGDV database (MAF = 0.021) (P = 0.62 and 0.61, respectively). We concluded that, although carriers with PLG:p.Ala620Thr show low plasminogen activity, this is not a predisposing variant for aHUS and that individuals of dysplasminogenemia are not at significantly increased risk of aHUS. PMID:27194432

  15. Effect of Auricular Acupressure on Uremic Pruritus in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Cui-na; Yao, Wei-guo; Bao, Yi-jie; Shi, Xiao-jing; Yu, Hui; Yin, Pei-hao; Liu, Gui-zhen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Uremic pruritus (UP) is a common symptom in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Objective. To determine the clinical efficacy of auricular acupressure therapy on pruritus in hemodialysis patients and to explore possible underlying mechanisms. Methods. Patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis at a referral medical center were recruited and assigned to intervention (n = 32) and control (n = 30) groups. The intervention group underwent auricular acupressure treatment three times a week for six weeks. Auricular acupressure was not applied to patients in the control group. However, tape without Vaccaria seeds was applied to the same six auricular acupoints as the intervention group. Pruritus scores were assessed using VAS scores, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure levels of other possible contributory biochemical factors. Results. There was a significant difference in mean VAS scores between the postintervention and control groups during follow-up (3.844 ± 1.687 versus 5.567 ± 2.285, F = 22.32, P < 0.0001). Compared to the control group, serum histamine levels in the postintervention group at the six-week follow-up had decreased significantly (F = 5.01, P = 0.0290). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that auricular acupressure may be a useful treatment in the multidisciplinary management of UP in ESRD patients. PMID:26495017

  16. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Pediatric Intensive Care Units in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Renato Lopes; Abreu Carvalhaes, João Tomás; Sanae Nishimura, Lucilia; de Andrade, Maria Cristina; Cabilio Guth, Beatriz Ernestina

    2011-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is one of the most frequent causes of pediatric acute renal failure. The aim of this study was to report the clinic and microbiologic features associated with 13 post-diarrheal HUS cases identified in pediatric intensive care units in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, from January 2001 to August 2005. Epidemiologic, clinic, and laboratorial information, along with fecal and serum samples, were collected for identifying the genetic sequences of Stx and for studying antibodies directed against LPS O26, O111 and O157. STEC was isolated from three patients, and serotypes O26:H11, O157:H7 and O165:H- were identified. In nine patients, high levels of IgM against LPS O111 (n=2) and O157 (n=7) were detected. Dialysis was required in 76.9% of the patients; arterial hypertension was present in 61.5%, neurological complications were observed in 30.7%, and only one patient died. During a 5–year follow-up period, one patient developed chronic kidney disease. The combined use of microbiologic and serologic techniques provided evidence of STEC infection in 92.3% of the HUS cases studied, and the importance of O157 STEC as agents of HUS in São Paulo has not been previously highlighted. PMID:21804902

  17. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Griffiths, Heidi; Miyashita, Yosuke; Bhatt, Riha; Jaffe, Ronald; Moritz, Michael; Hofer, Johannes; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic microangiopathy of the kidney and usually results from Shiga-toxin induced activation of the alternative complement pathway. Gastroenteritis is a common feature of the Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli HUS, referred to as STEC-HUS. An inherited or acquired complement dysregulation may lead to HUS referred to as non-STEC or atypical (a)HUS. Although gastroenteritis is not a common presentation of aHUS, some patients develop ischemic colitis and may be misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis or acute ulcerative colitis (UC). Case Diagnosis –Treatment We present a patient with low circulating complement (C) 3 levels who developed aHUS in the course of chronic active UC. Resolution of renal and gastrointestinal manifestations in response to treatment with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against terminal C5 protein suggests the role of alternative complement in the pathogenesis of both, aHUS and UC. Conclusion This case illustrates that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway may manifest in other organs besides the kidney and that the circulating C3 levels do not correlate with the disease activity or the clinical response to eculizumab. PMID:27135055

  18. Serum prolactin levels in a uremic child: effects of bilateral nephrectomy and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Geneviève; Merouani, Aïcha; Phan, Véronique; Deal, Cheri; Robitaille, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Elevated levels of serum prolactin (PRL) are common and well described in patients with chronic renal failure. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who also presented with premature thelarche and transient galactorrhea. Neither peritoneal dialysis nor hemodialysis reduced her extremely elevated levels of PRL, which fluctuated from time to time, probably reflecting variations in lactotroph secretion rate. Bilateral nephrectomy (BN) was eventually followed by a progressive and significant rise in PRL levels, suggesting that even uremic kidneys can eliminate PRL through tubular breakdown. Kidney transplantation was responsible for a very abrupt normalization of PRL serum levels, much faster than that observed for creatinine. This confirms animal studies suggesting that elimination of PRL occurs both through glomerular filtration and tubular breakdown. We hypothesized that the seemingly precocious puberty may have resulted from a combination of growth hormone therapy, elevated PRL and a rise in estrogens through the aromatization of adrenal androgens. This case illustrates the impact of dialysis, BN and kidney transplantation on PRL, providing new knowledge on renal PRL metabolism. PMID:25984175

  19. Efficacy of plasma therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with complement factor H mutations.

    PubMed

    Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Wagner, Eric; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aïcha; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Goodship, Timothy H J; Robitaille, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) frequently results in end-stage renal failure and can be lethal. Several studies have established an association between quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in complement factor H and aHUS. Although plasma infusion and exchange are often advocated, guidelines have yet to be established. Long-term outcome for patients under treatment is still unknown. We describe a patient who, at 7 months of age, presented with aHUS associated with combined de novo complement factor H mutations (S1191L and V1197A) on the same allele. Laboratory investigations showed normal levels of complements C4, C3 and factor H. Plasma exchanges and large-dose infusion therapy resulted in a resolution of hemolysis and recovery of renal function. Three recurrences were successfully treated by intensification of the plasma infusion treatment to intervals of 2 or 3 days. This patient showed good response to large doses of plasma infusions and her condition remained stable for 30 months with weekly plasma infusions (30 ml/kg). Long-term tolerance and efficacy of such intensive plasma therapy are still unknown. Reported secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency warrants the search for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:18425537

  20. Uremic Conditions Drive Human Monocytes to Pro-Atherogenic Differentiation via an Angiotensin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowicz, Bogusz; Ulrich, Christof; Seibert, Eric; Fiedler, Roman; Girndt, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated expression levels of monocytic-ACE have been found in haemodialysis patients. They are not only epidemiologically linked with increased mortality and cardiovascular disease, but may also directly participate in the initial steps of atherosclerosis. To further address this question we tested the role of monocytic-ACE in promotion of atherosclerotic events in vitro under conditions mimicking those of chronic renal failure. Methods and Results Treatment of human primary monocytes or THP-1 cells with uremic serum as well as PMA-induced differentiation led to significantly up-regulated expression of ACE, further increased by additional treatment with LPS. Functionally, these monocytes revealed significantly increased adhesion and transmigration through endothelial monolayers. Overexpression of ACE in transfected monocytes or THP-1 cells led to development of more differentiated, macrophage-like phenotype with up-regulated expression of Arg1, MCSF, MCP-1 and CCR2. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFa and IL-6 were also noticeably up-regulated. ACE overexpression resulted in significantly increased adhesion and transmigration properties. Transcriptional screening of ACE-overexpressing monocytes revealed noticeably increased expression of Angiotensin II receptors and adhesion- as well as atherosclerosis-related ICAM-1 and VCAM1. Inhibition of monocyte ACE or AngII-receptor signalling led to decreased adhesion potential of ACE-overexpressing cells. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that uremia induced expression of monocytic-ACE mediates the development of highly pro-atherogenic cells via an AngII-dependent mechanism. PMID:25003524

  1. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  2. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Warren, L M; Mackenzie, A; Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image. PMID:23470559

  3. Atherosclerotic Calcification Detection: A Comparative Study of Carotid Ultrasound and Cone Beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Jashari, Fisnik; Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Johansson, Elias; Ahlqvist, Jan; Arnerlöv, Conny; Garoff, Maria; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Wester, Per; Henein, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Arterial calcification is often detected on ultrasound examination but its diagnostic accuracy is not well validated. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of carotid ultrasound B mode findings in detecting atherosclerotic calcification quantified by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: We analyzed 94 carotid arteries, from 88 patients (mean age 70 ± 7 years, 33% females), who underwent pre-endarterectomy ultrasound examination. Plaques with high echogenic nodules and posterior shadowing were considered calcified. After surgery, the excised plaques were examined using CBCT, from which the calcification volume (mm3) was calculated. In cases with multiple calcifications the largest calcification nodule volume was used to represent the plaque. Carotid artery calcification by the two imaging techniques was compared using conventional correlations. Results: Carotid ultrasound was highly accurate in detecting the presence of calcification; with a sensitivity of 88.2%. Based on the quartile ranges of calcification volumes measured by CBCT we have divided plaque calcification into four groups: <8; 8–35; 36–70 and >70 mm3. Calcification volumes ≥8 were accurately detectable by ultrasound with a sensitivity of 96%. Of the 21 plaques with <8 mm3 calcification volume; only 13 were detected by ultrasound; resulting in a sensitivity of 62%. There was no difference in the volume of calcification between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Conclusion: Carotid ultrasound is highly accurate in detecting the presence of calcified atherosclerotic lesions of volume ≥8 mm3; but less accurate in detecting smaller volume calcified plaques. Further development of ultrasound techniques should allow better detection of early arterial calcification. PMID:26307978

  4. Coccolithophore calcification response to past ocean acidification and climate change

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Sarah A.; Gibbs, Samantha J.; Bown, Paul R.; Young, Jeremy R.; Poulton, Alex J.; Newsam, Cherry; Wilson, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are forcing rapid ocean chemistry changes and causing ocean acidification (OA), which is of particular significance for calcifying organisms, including planktonic coccolithophores. Detailed analysis of coccolithophore skeletons enables comparison of calcite production in modern and fossil cells in order to investigate biomineralization response of ancient coccolithophores to climate change. Here we show that the two dominant coccolithophore taxa across the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) OA global warming event (~56 million years ago) exhibited morphological response to environmental change and both showed reduced calcification rates. However, only Coccolithus pelagicus exhibits a transient thinning of coccoliths, immediately before the PETM, that may have been OA-induced. Changing coccolith thickness may affect calcite production more significantly in the dominant modern species Emiliania huxleyi, but, overall, these PETM records indicate that the environmental factors that govern taxonomic composition and growth rate will most strongly influence coccolithophore calcification response to anthropogenic change. PMID:25399967

  5. [The secret of the pyramids ... or calcifications in Meckel's diverticulum].

    PubMed

    Desmonts, F; Convard, J P; Capdeville, R; Berthelot, G

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 59 year-old patient with numerous stratified stercoliths within a large Meckel's diverticulum. An abdominal X-ray without contrast material, done while the patient was in acute abdominal pain showed a liquid-density mass. The diagnosis was considered because of the presence, within the mass, of a fluid level and several unusual calcifications. Ultrasound ruled out a gall-bladder or urinary origin. Surgical excision of the mass confirmed the diagnosis; the X-ray of the specimen allowed a comparison with the previous abdominal X-rays. The authors review the literature on the subject and suggest a gamut for the differential diagnosis of stratified calcifications of the abdomen. PMID:3612618

  6. Toward automated detection and segmentation of aortic calcifications from radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauze, François; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2007-03-01

    This paper aims at automatically measuring the extent of calcified plaques in the lumbar aorta from standard radiographs. Calcifications in the abdominal aorta are an important predictor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accurate and reproducible measurement of the amount of calcified deposit in the aorta is therefore of great value in disease diagnosis and prognosis, treatment planning, and the study of drug effects. We propose a two-step approach in which first the calcifications are detected by an iterative statistical pixel classification scheme combined with aorta shape model optimization. Subsequently, the detected calcified pixels are used as the initialization for an inpainting based segmentation. We present results on synthetic images from the inpainting based segmentation as well as results on several X-ray images based on the two-steps approach.

  7. Prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis of generalized arterial calcification of infancy.

    PubMed

    Corbacioglu Esmer, Aytul; Kalelioglu, Ibrahim; Omeroglu, Rukiye Eker; Kayserili, Hulya; Gulluoglu, Mine; Has, Recep; Yuksel, Atıl

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 19-year-old nulliparous pregnant woman was referred to our clinic because of fetal pericardial effusion and ascites. The sonographic examination performed at 28 weeks' gestation revealed scalp edema, severe skin edema, bilateral hydrocele, ascites, and pleural and pericardial effusion. Fetal echocardiographic examination showed that both ventricles were dilated with severely depressed contractility. The aortic annulus, ascending aorta, aortic arch, descending aorta, common iliac arteries, main pulmonary artery, tricuspid valve, and mitral chordae tendinae were hyperechogenic. Right ventricular outflow tract was narrow with decreased blood flow. There was tricuspid and mitral valve regurgitation and tricuspid valve stenosis. On the basis of these findings, we made the diagnosis of generalized arterial calcification, which is characterized by extensive calcification of internal elastic lamina and intimal proliferation of medium-sized and large arteries. This diagnosis was confirmed histologically after the termination of pregnancy. PMID:24420383

  8. Coccolithophore calcification response to past ocean acidification and climate change.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Sarah A; Gibbs, Samantha J; Bown, Paul R; Young, Jeremy R; Poulton, Alex J; Newsam, Cherry; Wilson, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions are forcing rapid ocean chemistry changes and causing ocean acidification (OA), which is of particular significance for calcifying organisms, including planktonic coccolithophores. Detailed analysis of coccolithophore skeletons enables comparison of calcite production in modern and fossil cells in order to investigate biomineralization response of ancient coccolithophores to climate change. Here we show that the two dominant coccolithophore taxa across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) OA global warming event (~56 million years ago) exhibited morphological response to environmental change and both showed reduced calcification rates. However, only Coccolithus pelagicus exhibits a transient thinning of coccoliths, immediately before the PETM, that may have been OA-induced. Changing coccolith thickness may affect calcite production more significantly in the dominant modern species Emiliania huxleyi, but, overall, these PETM records indicate that the environmental factors that govern taxonomic composition and growth rate will most strongly influence coccolithophore calcification response to anthropogenic change. PMID:25399967

  9. Low Florida coral calcification rates in the Plio-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachert, T. C.; Reuter, M.; Krüger, S.; Klaus, J. S.; Helmle, K.; Lough, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In geological outcrops and drill cores from reef frameworks, the skeletons of scleractinian corals are usually leached and more or less completely transformed into sparry calcite because the highly porous skeletons formed of metastable aragonite (CaCO3) undergo rapid diagenetic alteration. Upon alteration, ghost structures of the distinct annual growth bands may be retained allowing for reconstructions of annual extension (= growth) rates, but information on skeletal density needed for reconstructions of calcification rates is invariably lost. Here we report the first data of calcification rates of fossil reef corals which escaped diagenetic alteration. The corals derive from unlithified shallow water carbonates of the Florida platform (southeastern USA), which formed during four interglacial sea level highstands dated 3.2, 2.9, 1.8, and 1.2 Ma in the mid Pliocene to early Pleistocene. With regard to the preservation, the coral skeletons display smooth growth surfaces with minor volumes of marine aragonite cement within intra-skeletal porosity. Within the skeletal structures, dissolution is minor along centers of calcification. Mean extension rates were 0.44 ± 0.19 cm yr-1 (range 0.16 to 0.86 cm yr-1) and mean bulk density was 0.86 ± 0.36 g cm-3 (range 0.55 to 1.22 g cm-3). Correspondingly, calcification rates ranged from 0.18 to 0.82 g cm-2 yr-1 (mean 0.38 ± 0.16 g cm-2 yr-1), values which are 50 % of modern shallow-water reef corals. To understand the possible mechanisms behind these low calcification rates, we compared the fossil calcification with modern zooxanthellate-coral (z-coral) rates from the Western Atlantic (WA) and Indo-Pacific (IP) calibrated against sea surface temperature (SST). In the fossil data, we found an analogous relationship with SST in z-corals from the WA, i.e. density increases and extension rate decreases with increasing SST, but over a significantly larger temperature window during the Plio-Pleistocene. With regard to the

  10. Low Florida coral calcification rates in the Plio-Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachert, Thomas C.; Reuter, Markus; Krüger, Stefan; Klaus, James S.; Helmle, Kevin; Lough, Janice M.

    2016-08-01

    In geological outcrops and drill cores from reef frameworks, the skeletons of scleractinian corals are usually leached and more or less completely transformed into sparry calcite because the highly porous skeletons formed of metastable aragonite (CaCO3) undergo rapid diagenetic alteration. Upon alteration, ghost structures of the distinct annual growth bands often allow for reconstructions of annual extension ( = growth) rates, but information on skeletal density needed for reconstructions of calcification rates is invariably lost. This report presents the bulk density, extension rates and calcification rates of fossil reef corals which underwent minor diagenetic alteration only. The corals derive from unlithified shallow water carbonates of the Florida platform (south-eastern USA), which formed during four interglacial sea level highstands dated approximately 3.2, 2.9, 1.8, and 1.2 Ma in the mid-Pliocene to early Pleistocene. With regard to the preservation, the coral skeletons display smooth growth surfaces with minor volumes of marine aragonite cement within intra-skeletal porosity. Within the skeletal structures, voids are commonly present along centres of calcification which lack secondary cements. Mean extension rates were 0.44 ± 0.19 cm yr-1 (range 0.16 to 0.86 cm yr-1), mean bulk density was 0.96 ± 0.36 g cm-3 (range 0.55 to 1.83 g cm-3) and calcification rates ranged from 0.18 to 0.82 g cm-2 yr-1 (mean 0.38 ± 0.16 g cm-2 yr-1), values which are 50 % of modern shallow-water reef corals. To understand the possible mechanisms behind these low calcification rates, we compared the fossil calcification rates with those of modern zooxanthellate corals (z corals) from the Western Atlantic (WA) and Indo-Pacific calibrated against sea surface temperature (SST). In the fossil data, we found a widely analogous relationship with SST in z corals from the WA, i.e. density increases and extension rate decreases with increasing SST, but over a significantly larger

  11. Stone formation and calcification by nanobacteria in the human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Bjorklund, Michael; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1998-07-01

    The formation of discrete and organized inorganic crystalline structures within macromolecular extracellular matrices is a widespread biological phenomenon generally referred to as biomineralization. Recently, bacteria have been implicated as factors in biogeochemical cycles for formation of many minerals in aqueous sediments. We have found nanobacterial culture systems that allow for reproducible production of apatite calcification in vitro. Depending on the culture conditions, tiny nanocolloid-sized particles covered with apatite, forming various size of aggregates and stones were observed. In this study, we detected the presence of nanobacteria in demineralized trilobit fossil, geode, apatite, and calcite stones by immunofluorescence staining. Amethyst and other quartz stones, and chalk gave negative results. Microorganisms are capable of depositing apatite outside the thermodynamic equilibrium in sea water. We bring now evidence that this occurs in the human body as well. Previously, only struvite kidney stones composed of magnesium ammonium phosphate and small amounts of apatite have been regarded as bacteria related. 90 percent of demineralized human kidney stones now screened, contained nanobacteria. At least three different distribution patterns of nanobacteria were conditions, and human kidney stones that are formed from small apatite units. Prerequisites for the formation of kidney stones are the supersaturation of urine and presence of nidi for crystallization. Nanobacteria are important nidi and their presence might be of special interest in space flights where supersaturation of urine is present due to the loss of bone. Furthermore, we bring evidence that nanobacteria may act as crystallization nidi for the formation of biogenic apatite structures in tissue calcification found in e.g., atherosclerotic plaques, extensive metastatic and tumoral calcification, acute periarthritis, malacoplakia, and malignant diseases. In nanaobacteria-infected fibroblasts

  12. Vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease: Pathogenesis and clinical implication

    PubMed Central

    Disthabanchong, Sinee

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vascular calcification (VC) is one of the independent risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality in both the general population and CKD patients. Earlier evidence revealed substantially higher prevalence of VC in young adults on chronic hemodialysis compared to the general population in the same age range, indicating the influence of CKD-related risk factors on the development of VC. Pathogenesis of VC involves an active, highly organized cellular transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells to bone forming cells evidenced by the presence of bone matrix proteins in the calcified arterial wall. VC occurs in both the intima and the media of arterial wall with medial calcification being more prevalent in CKD. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risks, risk factors specific to CKD such as phosphate retention, excess of calcium, history of dialysis, active vitamin D therapy in high doses and deficiency of calcification inhibitors play important roles in promoting the development of VC. Non-contrast multi-slice computed tomography has often been used to detect coronary artery calcification. Simple plain radiographs of the lateral lumbar spine and pelvis can also detect VC in the abdominal aorta and femoral and iliac arteries. Currently, there is no specific therapy to reverse VC. Reduction of calcium load, lowering phosphate retention using non-calcium containing phosphate binders, and moderate doses of active vitamin D may attenuate progression. Parenteral sodium thiosulfate has also been shown to delay VC progression. PMID:24175241

  13. Consideration of coastal carbonate chemistry in understanding biological calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Sabine, Christopher L.; Feifel, Kirsten M.

    2016-05-01

    Correlations between aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and calcification have been identified in many laboratory manipulation experiments aiming to assess biological responses to ocean acidification (OA). These relationships have been used with projections of ΩAr under continued OA to evaluate potential impacts on marine calcifiers. Recent work suggests, however, that calcification in some species may be controlled by the ratio of bicarbonate to hydrogen ion, or the substrate-to-inhibitor ratio (SIR), rather than ΩAr. SIR and ΩAr are not always positively correlated in the natural environment, which means that ΩAr can be a poor indicator of the calcifying environment when ΩAr->1. Highly variable carbonate chemistry in the coastal zone challenges our ability to monitor fluctuations in ΩAr, SIR, and the ΩAr-SIR relationship making it difficult to assess biological OA exposures and vulnerability. Careful consideration of natural variability throughout ocean environments is required to accurately determine the influence of OA on biological calcification.

  14. An Integrative Predictive Model of Coronary Artery Calcification in Arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McGeachie, Michael; Ramoni, Rachel L Badovinac; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Furie, Karen L; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Liu, Yongmei; Herrington, David; Guo, Xiuqing; Lima, João A.; Post, Wendy; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rich, Stephen; Sale, Michèle; Ramoni, Marco F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many different genetic and clinical factors have been identified as causes or contributors to atherosclerosis. We present a model of preclinical atherosclerosis based on genetic and clinical data that predicts the presence of coronary artery calcification in healthy Americans of European descent aged 45 to 84 in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods and Results: We assessed 712 individuals for the presence or absence of coronary artery calcification, and their genotypes for 2882 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Using these SNPs and relevant clinical data, a Bayesian network that predicts the presence of coronary calcification was constructed. The model contains 13 SNPs (from genes AGTR1, ALOX15, INSR, PRKAB1, IL1R2, ESR2, KCNK1, FBLN5, PPARA, VEGFA, PON1, TDRD6, PLA2G7, and one ancestry informative marker) and 5 clinical variables (sex, age, weight, smoking, and diabetes) and achieves 85% predictive accuracy, as measured by area under the ROC curve (AUC). This is a significant (p < 0.001) improvement upon models using just the SNP data or using just the clinical variables. Conclusions: We present an investigation of joint genetic and clinical factors associated with atherosclerosis that shows predictive results for both cases, and enhanced performance for the combination. PMID:19948975

  15. [Pathogenesis and treatment of vascular calcification in CKD].

    PubMed

    Brancaccio, D; Gallieni, M; Pasho, S; Fallabrino, G; Olivi, L; Volpi, E; Ciceri, P; Missaglia, E; Ronga, C; Brambilla, C; Butti, A; Rocca-Rey, L; Chiarelli, G; Cozzolino, M

    2009-01-01

    Increased vascular calcification is a major cause of cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is the result of an active ossification process counteracted by ''bone'' proteins such as osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoprotegerin, and osteocalcin. Chronic kidney disease - mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism that occurs in CKD. In addition to abnormalities in the serum calcium and phosphate profile, CKD-MBD is characterized by abnormalities of bone turnover, mineralization, volume and growth as well as vascular calcification. Considering that the presence and extent of vascular calcification in CKD portend a poor prognosis, many efforts have been made to shed light on this complicated phenomenon to prevent vascular calcium deposition and its progression. Indeed, careful control of calcium load, serum phosphate and parathyroid hormone along with the use of calcium-free phosphate binders and vitamin D receptor activators represent a new therapeutic armamentarium to improve quality of life and reduce mortality in CKD. PMID:19382090

  16. Peripheral arterial calcification: Prevalence, mechanism, detection, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, Krishna J; Zeller, Thomas; Jaff, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC), particularly medial (Mönckeberg's medial sclerosis) arterial calcification, is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and genetic pathways of VC are not fully known, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and the suppression of parathyroid hormone activity are central to the development of vessel mineralization and, consequently, bone demineralization. In addition to preventive measures, such as the modification of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors, current treatment strategies include the use of calcium-free phosphate binders, vitamin D analogs, and calcium mimetics that have shown promising results, albeit in small patient cohorts. The impact of intimal and medial VC on the safety and effectiveness of endovascular devices to treat symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains poorly defined. The absence of a generally accepted, validated vascular calcium grading scale hampers clinical progress in assessing the safety and utility of various endovascular devices (e.g., atherectomy) in treating calcified vessels. Accordingly, we propose the peripheral arterial calcium scoring system (PACSS) and a method for its clinical validation. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and the development of optimal medical and endovascular treatment strategies are crucial as the population ages and presents with more chronic comorbidities. PMID:24402839

  17. In vitro Models of Aortic Valve Calcification: Solidifying a System

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Meghan A.; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone [1]. As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  18. ARTHROSCOPY FOR TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY CALCIFIC TENDONITIS OF THE SHOULDER

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from arthroscopic treatment in patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. Methods: Between September 2001 and June 2006, 55 patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder that was resistant to conservative treatment were evaluated, with follow-up of 12 to 70 months. The mean age was 42 years, ranging from 30 to 64 years; 44 patients were female (80%). There were 37 right shoulders, and 63.63% of the cases were on the dominant side. Pain was the main symptom, and the mean time between onset of symptoms and arthroscopy was 38 months (range: five to 120 months). The tendon affected was the supraspinatus in 42 cases, the infraspinatus in 11 cases and an association between these in two cases. Acromioplasty was carried out in 12 patients (21.82%) and subacromial bursectomy was performed in all cases. Results: According to the UCLA criteria, 46 cases were excellent and six were good, making a total of 52 satisfactory results (94.54%). Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis of the shoulder appears to be an effective method, with high rates of satisfactory results. Associated acromioplasty is not necessary. PMID:27019839

  19. Osteoprotegerin and Vascular Calcification: Clinical and Prognostic Relevance.

    PubMed

    Makarović, Sandra; Makarović, Zorin; Steiner, Robert; Mihaljević, Ivan; Milas-Ahić, Jasminka

    2015-06-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a key regulator in bone metabolism, that also has effect in vascular system. Studies suggest that osteoprotegerin is a critical arterial calcification inhibitor, and is released by endothelial cells as a protective mechanism for their survival in certain pathological conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and other metabolic disorders. That has been shown in studies in vitro and in animal models. The discovery that OPG deficient mice (OPG -/- mice) develop severe osteoporosis and arterial calcification, has led to conclusion that osteoprotegerin might be mulecule linking vascular and bone system. Paradoxically however, clinical trials have shown recently that OPG serum levels is increased in coronary artery disease and correlates with its severity, ischemic cardial decompensation, and future cardiovascular events. Therefore it is possible that osteoprotegerin could have a new function as a potential biomarker in early identification and monitoring patients with cardiovascular disease. Amongst that osteoprotegerin is in association with well known atherosclerosis risc factors: undoubtedly it is proven its relationship with age, smoking and diabetes mellitus. There is evidence regarding presence of hyperlipoproteinemia and increased serum levels of osteoprotegerin. Also the researches have been directed in genetic level, linking certain single nucleotid genetic polymorphisms of osteoprotegerin and vascular calcification appearance. This review emphasises multifactorial role of OPG, presenting numerous clinical and experimental studies regarding its role in vascular pathology, suggesting a novel biomarker in cardiovascular diseases, showing latest conclusions about this interesting topic that needs to be further explored. PMID:26753467

  20. Calcification provides mechanical reinforcement to whale baleen α-keratin

    PubMed Central

    Szewciw, L. J.; de Kerckhove, D. G.; Grime, G. W.; Fudge, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Hard α-keratins such as hair, nail, wool and horn are stiff epidermal appendages used by mammals in a variety of functions including thermoregulation, feeding and intraspecific competition. Hard α-keratins are fibre-reinforced structures consisting of cytoskeletal elements known as ‘intermediate filaments’ embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. Recent research has shown that intermediate filaments are soft and extensible in living keratinocytes but become far stiffer and less extensible in keratinized cells, and this stiffening may be mediated by air-drying. Baleen, the keratinous plates used by baleen whales during filter feeding, is an unusual mammalian keratin in that it never air dries, and in some species, it represents the most heavily calcified of all the hard α-keratins. We therefore tested the hypothesis that whale baleen is stiffened by calcification. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first comprehensive description of baleen material properties and show that calcification contributes to overcoming the shortcomings of stiffening this hard α-keratin without the benefit of air-drying. We also demonstrate striking interspecies differences in the calcification patterns among three species of baleen whales and provide novel insights into the function and evolution of this unusual biomaterial. PMID:20392736

  1. Reduced calcification in modern Southern Ocean planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Andrew D.; Howard, William R.; Bray, Stephen G.; Trull, Thomas W.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide has been accumulating in the oceans, lowering both the concentration of carbonate ions and the pH (ref. 1), resulting in the acidification of sea water. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that decreased carbonate ion concentrations cause many marine calcareous organisms to show reduced calcification rates. If these results are widely applicable to ocean settings, ocean acidification could lead to ecosystem shifts. Planktonic foraminifera are single-celled calcite-secreting organisms that represent between 25 and 50% of the total open-ocean marine carbonate flux and influence the transport of organic carbon to the ocean interior. Here we compare the shell weights of the modern foraminifer Globigerina bulloides collected from sediment traps in the Southern Ocean with the weights of shells preserved in the underlying Holocene-aged sediments. We find that modern shell weights are 30-35% lower than those from the sediments, consistent with reduced calcification today induced by ocean acidification. We also find a link between higher atmospheric carbon dioxide and low shell weights in a 50,000-year-long record obtained from a Southern Ocean marine sediment core. It is unclear whether reduced calcification will affect the survival of this and other species, but a decline in the abundance of foraminifera caused by acidification could affect both marine ecosystems and the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  2. In vitro models of aortic valve calcification: solidifying a system.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Meghan A; Merryman, W David

    2015-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) affects 25% of people over 65, and the late-stage stenotic state can only be treated with total valve replacement, requiring 85,000 surgeries annually in the US alone (University of Maryland Medical Center, 2013, http://umm.edu/programs/services/heart-center-programs/cardiothoracic-surgery/valve-surgery/facts). As CAVD is an age-related disease, many of the affected patients are unable to undergo the open-chest surgery that is its only current cure. This challenge motivates the elucidation of the mechanisms involved in calcification, with the eventual goal of alternative preventative and therapeutic strategies. There is no sufficient animal model of CAVD, so we turn to potential in vitro models. In general, in vitro models have the advantages of shortened experiment time and better control over multiple variables compared to in vivo models. As with all models, the hypothesis being tested dictates the most important characteristics of the in vivo physiology to recapitulate. Here, we collate the relevant pieces of designing and evaluating aortic valve calcification so that investigators can more effectively draw significant conclusions from their results. PMID:25249188

  3. Massive Diffuse Calcification of the Ascending Aorta and Minimal Focal Calcification of the Abdominal Aorta in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William C; Won, Vera S; Weissenborn, Matthew R; Khalid, Adnan; Lima, Brian

    2016-04-15

    A 41-year-old woman, the mother of 3 offspring, with likely heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, had been asymptomatic until age 38 when angina pectoris and exertional dyspnea appeared leading to the discovery of severe multivessel coronary artery disease and a massively calcified ascending aorta. Coronary bypass grafting using the right and left internal mammary arteries did not alleviate the symptoms. Evidence of overt heart failure subsequently appeared and that led to heart transplantation at age 41. She died 22 days later. The occurrence of massive diffuse calcification of the ascending aorta and minimal focal calcification of the abdominal aorta is rare and in the patient described it appears to be the consequence of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26920080

  4. Effect of 16% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel and Dentin Surface Micromorphology and Roughness of Uremic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Salah Hasab; Elembaby, Abeer El Sayed; Zaher, Ahmed Ragheb; Grawish, Mohammed El-Awady; Elsabaa, Heba M; El-Negoly, Salwa Abd El-Raof; Sobh, Mohamed Abdel Kader

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on surface micromorphology and roughness of enamel and root dentin of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: A total of 20 sound molars were collected from healthy individuals (n=10) and uremic patients (n=10). The roots were separated from their crowns at the cemento-enamel junction. Dental slabs (3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) were obtained from the buccal surface for enamel slabs and the cervical third of the root surface for dentin slabs. Dental slabs were then flattened and serially polished up to #2500-grit roughness using silicon carbide abrasive papers. Half of the slabs obtained from healthy individuals and uremic patients were stored in artificial saliva and left without bleaching for control and comparison. The remaining half was subjected to a bleaching treatment using 16% carbamide peroxide gel (Polanight, SDI Limited) 8 h/day for 14 days and stored in artificial saliva until AFM analysis was performed. Statistical analysis of the roughness average (Ra) results was performed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparisons test. Results: The micromorphological observation of bleached, healthy enamel showed exaggerated prism irregularities more than non-bleached specimens, and this observation was less pronounced in bleached uremic enamel specimens with the lowest Ra. Bleached healthy dentin specimens showed protruded peritubular dentin and eroded intertubular dentin with the highest Ra compared to bleached uremic dentin. Conclusions: The negative effects of the bleaching gel on uremic tooth substrates are less dramatic and non-destructive compared to healthy substrates because uremia confers different micromorphological surface changes. PMID:20396450

  5. High-phosphorus diet maximizes and low-dose calcitriol attenuates skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; López, Ignacio; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; Pineda, Carmen; Chamizo, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2016-05-01

    Although disorders of mineral metabolism and skeletal muscle are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), their potential relationship remains unexplored. Elevations in plasma phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblastic growth factor 23 together with decreased calcitriol levels are common features of CKD. High-phosphate intake is a major contributor to progression of CKD. This study was primarily aimed to determine the influence of high-phosphate intake on muscle and to investigate whether calcitriol supplementation counteracts negative skeletal muscle changes associated with long-term uremia. Proportions and metabolic and morphological features of myosin-based muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of uremic rats (5/6 nephrectomy, Nx) and compared with sham-operated (So) controls. Three groups of Nx rats received either a standard diet (0.6% phosphorus, Nx-Sd), or a high-phosphorus diet (0.9% phosphorus, Nx-Pho), or a high-phosphorus diet plus calcitriol (10 ng/kg 3 day/wk ip, Nx-Pho + Cal) for 12 wk. Two groups of So rats received either a standard diet or a high-phosphorus diet (So-Pho) over the same period. A multivariate analysis encompassing all fiber-type characteristics indicated that Nx-Pho + Cal rats displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes intermediate between Nx-Pho and So-Pho rats and that uremia-induced skeletal muscle changes were of greater magnitude in Nx-Pho than in Nx-Sd rats. In uremic rats, treatment with calcitriol preserved fiber-type composition, cross-sectional size, myonuclear domain size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity of muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that a high-phosphorus diet potentiates and low-dose calcitriol attenuates adverse skeletal muscle changes in long-term uremic rats. PMID:26869708

  6. Absent effect of zinc deficiency on the oxidative stress of erythrocytes in chronic uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chu; Lin, Fanny; Young, Tze-Kong

    2002-03-31

    Both anemia and zinc deficiency are commonly observed in patients with chronic uremia. Oxidative stress of red blood cells (RBC) has been suggested to participate in the development of anemia in these patients with chronic uremia due to reduced life span of RBC. Whether zinc deficiency aggravates the effect of oxidative stress on RBC of chronic uremia is still not understood. We thus performed the study to determine the influence of zinc deficiency on the oxidative stress of RBC in uremic rats. Zinc deficiency was induced by long-term dietary zinc deficiency. Five-sixth nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) was used to produce chronic uremia. Experiment was carried out in the following five groups: normal control (NL), chronic uremia (Nx), chronic uremia + dietary zinc deficiency (Nx-D), Nx-D + zinc supplement (Nx-DZ) and Chronic uremia + pair-fed (Nx-PF). Osmotic fragility and lipid peroxidation of RBC were used to evaluate the oxidative stress of RBC. Five weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx), 5/6 Nx rats present a syndrome of uremia to elevate the levels of plasma creatinine and urea, and reduce the level of plasma zinc (1.12 +/- 0.08 vs 1.35 +/- 0.05 ug/ml). But they does not find to produce anemia and to increase osmotic fragility and lipid peroxidation in RBC. Dietary zinc deficiency in Nx-D group produced severe anorexia and reduced plasma zinc and selenium levels and the activity of RBC-GPX. Yet in Nx-D rats, osmotic fragility and susceptibility of lipid peroxidation in red cells did not increase, because of the increase of plasma copper level (1.85 +/- 0.3 vs 1.41 +/- 0.05 microg/ml) and RBC-SOD activity (1.95 +/- 0.27 vs 0.78 +/- 0.05 unit/g Hb). Zinc supplement in Nx-D rats (Nx-DZ group) recovered the appetite and normalized the levels of plasma zinc, copper and selenium. Food restriction in 5/6 Nx rats (Nx-PF group) decreased plasma copper level and increased osmotic fragility of RBC and elevated the susceptibility of lipid peroxidation after stressing RBC with H2O2 Because

  7. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Clara T.; Hernández-Sánchez, María T.; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone εp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity.

  8. Diffuse Hepatic Calcifications in a Transfusion-Dependent Patient with Beta-Thalassemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Forough; Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Karimi, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic calcification is usually associated with infectious, vascular, or neoplastic processes in the liver. We report the first case of beta-thalassemia major with isolated diffuse hepatic calcification in a 23 year old woman, who had been transfusion-dependent since the age of 6 months. She was referred to our center with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed diffuse hepatic calcification in the right, left, and caudate lobes of the liver. Her medical history disclosed hypoparathyroidism as well as chronic hepatitis C virus infection, which was successfully treated but led to early micronodular cirrhosis on liver biopsy. Other studies done to search for the cause of hepatic calcification failed to reveal any abnormalities. We suspect that hypoparathyroidism caused liver calcification, and should be, therefore, considered in the differential diagnosis of hepatic calcification if other causative factors have been ruled out. PMID:24174700

  9. Metastatic pulmonary calcification misdiagnosed as a fungal infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, ZHIXIN; QIU, TIAN; ZHAO, ZHIGANG; CHEN, LIANG'AN; SHE, DANYANG

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a rare lesion, characterized by calcium salt depositing in normal lung tissue. The clinical profile of a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification following renal transplantation was described. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed ground-glass opacities in bilateral lungs and a node exhibiting a halo in the right upper lobe, which were suspected aspergillus infection. Following examination and therapy, the results of lung biopsy revealed metastatic pulmonary calcification. Although metastatic pulmonary calcification was reported in renal failure patients previously, metastatic pulmonary calcification with cavity lesions has never, to the best of our knowledge, been previously reported. The aim of the present report was to improve the understanding of metastatic pulmonary calcification. PMID:26998293

  10. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Clara T.; Hernández-Sánchez, María T.; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone ɛp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity. PMID:26762469

  11. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Clara T; Hernández-Sánchez, María T; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone ɛp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity. PMID:26762469

  12. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  13. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  14. Magnesium Intake Is Inversely Associated With Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, Adela; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Jacques, Paul F.; Meigs, James B.; Hoffmann, Udo; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to examine whether magnesium intake is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). BACKGROUND Animal and cell studies suggest that magnesium may prevent calcification within atherosclerotic plaques underlying cardiovascular disease. Little is known about the association of magnesium intake and atherosclerotic calcification in humans. METHODS We examined cross-sectional associations of self-reported total (dietary and supplemental) magnesium intake estimated by food frequency questionnaire with CAC and AAC in participants of the Framingham Heart Study who were free of cardiovascular disease and underwent Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) of the heart and abdomen (n = 2,695; age: 53 ± 11 years), using multivariate-adjusted Tobit regression. CAC and AAC were quantified using modified Agatston scores (AS). Models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, total-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, use of hormone replacement therapy (women only), menopausal status (women only), treatment for hyperlipidemia, hypertension, cardiovascular disease prevention, or diabetes, as well as self-reported intake of calcium, vitamins D and K, saturated fat, fiber, alcohol, and energy. Secondary analyses included logistic regressions of CAC and AAC outcomes as cut-points (AS >0 and AS ≥90th percentile for age and sex), as well as sex-stratified analyses. RESULTS In fully adjusted models, a 50-mg/day increment in self-reported total magnesium intake was associated with 22% lower CAC (p < 0.001) and 12% lower AAC (p = 0.07). Consistent with these observations, the odds of having any CAC were 58% lower (p trend: <0.001) and any AAC were 34% lower (p trend: 0.01), in those with the highest compared to those with the lowest magnesium intake. Stronger inverse associations were observed in women than in men. CONCLUSIONS In

  15. A Case of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Successfully Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Thajudeen, B.; Sussman, A.; Bracamonte, E.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) characterized by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Eculizumab, a monoclonal complement C5 antibody which prevents the induction of the terminal complement cascade, has recently emerged as a therapeutic option for aHUS. We report a case of aHUS successfully treated with eculizumab. A 51-year-old male was admitted to the hospital following a mechanical fall. His past medical history was significant for rheumatic valve disease and mitral valve replacement; he was on warfarin for anticoagulation. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed a right-sided subdural hematoma due to coagulopathy resulting from a supratherapeutic international normalized ratio (INR). Following treatment with prothrombin complex concentrate to reverse the INR, urine output dropped and his serum creatinine subsequently increased to 247.52 μmol/l from the admission value of 70.72 μmol/l. Laboratory evaluation was remarkable for hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), low haptoglobin, and low complement C3. A renal biopsy was consistent with TMA, favoring a diagnosis of aHUS. Treatment with eculizumab was initiated which resulted in the stabilization of his hemoglobin, platelets, and LDH. Hemodialysis was terminated after 2.5 months due to improvement in urine output and solute clearance. The interaction between thrombin and complement pathway might be responsible for the pathogenesis of aHUS in this case. Eculizumab is an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of aHUS. Early targeting of the complement system may modify disease progression and thus treat aHUS more effectively. PMID:24570684

  16. THE ROLE OF THE SKIN BIOPSY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ATYPICAL HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Cynthia M.; Momtahen, Shabnam; Mulvey, J. Justin; Yassin, Aminah H.; Kaplan, Robert B.; Laurence, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a prototypic thrombotic microangiopathy attributable to complement dysregulation. In the absence of complement inhibition, progressive clinical deterioration occurs. We postulated that a biopsy of normal skin could corroborate the diagnosis of aHUS via the demonstration of vascular deposits of C5b-9. Materials and methods Biopsies of normal skin from 22 patients with and without aHUS were processed for routine light microscopy as well as immunofluorescent studies. An assessment was made for vascular C5b-9 deposition immunohistochemically and by immunofluorescence. The biopsies were obtained primarily from the forearm and or deltoid. Results Patients with classic features of atypical HUS showed insidious microvascular changes including loose luminal platelet thrombi except in two patients in whom a striking thrombogenic vasculopathy was apparent in biopsied digital ulcers. Extensive microvascular deposits of the membrane attack complex (MAC)/ C5b-9 were identified excluding one patient in whom eculizumab was initiated prior to biopsy. In 5 of the 7 patients where follow-up was available, the patients exhibited an excellent treatment response to eculizumab. Patients without diagnostic clinical features of atypical HUS failed to show significant vascular deposits of complement except two patients with TTP including one in whom a Factor H mutation was identified. Conclusion In a clinical setting where aHUS is an important diagnostic consideration, extensive microvascular deposition of C5b-9 supports the diagnosis of either aHUS or a subset of TTP patients with concomitant complement dysregulation; significant vascular C5b-9 deposition predicts clinical responsiveness to eculizumab. PMID:25893747

  17. Genetics and Outcome of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Nationwide French Series Comparing Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Fakhouri, Fadi; Garnier, Arnaud; Bienaimé, Frank; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Ngo, Stéphanie; Moulin, Bruno; Servais, Aude; Provot, François; Rostaing, Lionel; Burtey, Stéphane; Niaudet, Patrick; Deschênes, Georges; Lebranchu, Yvon; Zuber, Julien; Loirat, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare complement-mediated kidney disease that was first recognized in children but also affects adults. This study assessed the disease presentation and outcome in a nationwide cohort of patients with aHUS according to the age at onset and the underlying complement abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A total of 214 patients with aHUS were enrolled between 2000 and 2008 and screened for mutations in the six susceptibility factors for aHUS and for anti–factor H antibodies. Results Onset of aHUS occurred as frequently during adulthood (58.4%) as during childhood (41.6%). The percentages of patients who developed the disease were 23%, 40%, 70%, and 98% by age 2, 18, 40, and 60 years, respectively. Mortality was higher in children than in adults (6.7% versus 0.8% at 1 year) (P=0.02), but progression to ESRD after the first aHUS episode was more frequent in adults (46% versus 16%; P<0.001). Sixty-one percent of patients had mutations in their complement genes. The renal outcome was not significantly different in adults regardless of genetic background. Only membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and undetermined aHUS were less severe in children than adults. The frequency of relapse after 1 year was 92% in children with MCP-associated HUS and approximately 30% in all other subgroups. Conclusion Mortality rate was higher in children than adults with aHUS, but renal prognosis was worse in adults than children. In children, the prognosis strongly depends on the genetic background. PMID:23307876

  18. The etiological relation between serum iron level and infection incidence in hemodialysis uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Galić, Gordan; Tomić, Monika; Galesić, Kresimir; Kvesić, Ante; Soljić, Martina; Londar, Zdravka; Valencić, Maksim; Martinović, Zeljko; Vuckov, Sime

    2011-03-01

    Through the treatment of anaemia in dialysis patients part of the iron ions remain free in the serum which is at the bacterias disposal for growth and the strengthening of their virulence. The linear relation of the increased serum iron level and tissue iron stores in the body and the infection incidence in dialysed patients has become more emphasised. The need of a clearly defined upper threshold of the serum iron concentration limit has been mentioned in scientific journals intensely, and consequently the demand for more precise professional instructions for anaemia treatment. For the purpose of participating in these professional and scientific discussions, we have observed the relation between the iron overload of the organism and complication incidence in 120 of our haemodialysis uremic patients, with special emphasis on infections. It has been established that the sepses incidence is much higher in patients with a serum ferritin concentration above 500 microg/L, than in those patients with a ferritin level lower than the mentioned value ( 2 = 7.857, p = 0.005). The incidence of vascular access infection is significantly higher in those patients with a serum ferritin level above 500 microg/L than in those patients with a ferritin level lower than the mentioned value (Chi2 = 23.186, p = 0.001). Furthermore, it has been determined that the incidence of total infection in patients is 3.8 episodes per 100 patients months, which is in accordance to the referral values of other authors. CONCLUSION--In the analysis of the achieved results, it has been determined that the infection incidence is significantly higher in dialysed patients with a serum iron level higher than 500 g/L, than in those patients with lower values. PMID:21667534

  19. Successful treatment of neonatal atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with C5 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Anastaze Stelle, K; Gonzalez, E; Wilhelm-Bals, A; Michelet, P-R; Korff, C M; Parvex, P

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is rare in neonates. We report the case of atypical HUS (aHUS) revealed by neonatal seizures. This 18-day-old baby presented with repeated clonus of the left arm and eye deviation. Four days earlier, she had suffered from gastroenteritis (non-bloody diarrhea and vomiting without fever). Her work-up revealed hemolytic anemia (120 g/L), thrombocytopenia (78 g/L), and impaired renal function (serum creatinine=102 μmol/L) compatible with the diagnosis of HUS. Levels of C3 and C4 in the serum were normal. Shiga-toxin in the stools as well as the IgM and IgG against Escherichia coli O157 were negative. ADAMTS 13 deficiency, inborn error of the cobalamin pathway, deficiency in the H and I protein, and factor H antibodies were excluded and we concluded in aHUS. Genetic screening of the alternative complement pathway was normal. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging performed after 24 h and 1 week showed restricted diffusion areas with periventricular white matter ischemic-hemorrhagic lesions. Extensive infectious work-up was negative. Upon admission the baby received antiepileptic drugs and 2 days later C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab) and two transfusions of packed erythrocytes because the hemoglobin value had dropped to 55 g/L. The platelet value was minimal at 30 g/L. Renal function normalized in 48 h without dialysis and neurological examination was normal in 1 week. She was discharged from the hospital at day 10 with eculizumab perfusions (300 mg) planned every 3 weeks. After 24 months, she was relapse-free and seizure-free, with a normal neurological examination. PMID:26775886

  20. Case report: Benefits and challenges of long-term eculizumab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, Noelle; Gorman, Kathleen Mary; Riordan, Michael; Waldron, Mary; Goodship, Timothy H J; Awan, Atif

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by dysregulation of the complement system, leading to complement overactivation. A humanized anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, eculizumab, has been available for the treatment of aHUS since 2011. The long-term safety and efficacy of this novel drug in the pediatric population remain under review. We present a child with a hybrid CFH/CFHR3 gene who, having had multiple disease relapses despite optimal treatment with plasma exchange, commenced eculizumab therapy in August 2010. She remains relapse free in follow-up at 52 months, and treatment has been well tolerated. The risk of meningococcal disease during this treatment is recognized. Despite vaccination against meningococcal disease and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis, our patient developed meningococcal bacteremia 30 months into treatment. She presented with nonspecific symptoms but recovered without sequelae with appropriate treatment. We recommend that children be vaccinated against invasive meningococcal infection before beginning eculizumab therapy and take appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis during treatment, and we suggest that vaccine responses should be checked and followed annually. Clinicians need to maintain a high index of suspicion for invasive meningococcal disease. Neither vaccination nor antibiotic prophylaxis provides complete protection in patients on eculizumab therapy. The appropriate dosage of eculizumab needed to achieve remission in aHUS in the pediatric population is unknown. Having achieved remission in our patient, we monitor eculizumab and CH50 levels to evaluate ongoing blockade of the terminal complement cascade. Such information may help guide dosing intervals in the future. PMID:25941307

  1. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis from TTP/HUS and Management.

    PubMed

    Yenerel, Mustafa N

    2014-09-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). It has an unfavorable outcome with death rates as high as 25% during the acute phase and up to 50% of cases progressing to end-stage renal failure. Uncontrolled complement activation through the alternative pathway is thought to be the main underlying pathopysiology of aHUS and corresponds to all the deleterious findings of the disease. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and Shiga toxin-associated HUS are the 2 other important TMA diseases. Although differentiating HUS from TTP is relatively easy in children with a preceding diarrheal illness or invasive S. pneumoniae, differentiating aHUS from TTP or other microangiopathic disorders can present a major diagnostic challenge in adults. ADAMTS13 analysis is currently the most informative diagnostic test for differentiating TTP, congenital TTP, and aHUS. Today empiric plasma therapy still is recommended by expert opinion to be used as early as possible in any patient with symptoms of aHUS. The overall treatment goal remains restoration of a physiological balance between activation and control of the alternative complement pathway. So it is a reasonable approach to block the terminal complement complex with eculizumab in order to prevent further organ injury and increase the likelihood organ recovery. Persistence of hemolysis or lack of improvement of renal function after 3-5 daily plasmaphereses have to be regarded as the major criteria for uncontrolled TMA even if platelet count has normalized and as an indication to switch the treatment to eculizumab. Eculizumab has changed the future perspectives of patients with aHUS and both the FDA and the EMA have approved it as life-long treatment. However, there are still some unresolved issues about the follow-up such as the optimal duration of eculizumab treatment and whether it can be stopped or how to stop the therapy. PMID:25319590

  2. Uremic Retention Solute Indoxyl Sulfate Level Is Associated with Prolonged QTc Interval in Early CKD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Chao-Ping; Chung, Fu-Mei; Huang, Lynn L. H.; Yu, Teng-Hung; Hung, Wei-Chin; Lu, Li-Fen; Chen, Po-Yuan; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-01-01

    Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS) is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc) prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK) was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD) and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients. PMID:25893644

  3. Serum Hepcidin Predicts Uremic Accelerated Atherosclerosis in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Feng, Su-Juan; Su, Lu-Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Shi-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepcidin, as a regulator of body iron stores, has been recently discovered to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most common complication and the leading cause of death in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients. In the current study, we aimed to explore the relationship between serum hepcidin and uremic accelerated atherosclerosis (UAAS) in CHD patients with diabetic nephropathy (CHD/DN). Methods: A total of 78 CHD/DN and 86 chronic hemodialyzed nondiabetic patients with chronic glomerulonephritis (CHD/non-DN) were recruited in this study. The level of serum hepcidin-25 was specifically measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: High serum level of hepcidin-25 was seen in CHD patients. Serum hepcidin-25 in CHD/DN was significantly higher than that in CHD/non-DN patients. Serum hepcidin-25 was positively correlated with ferritin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), TNF-α, and IL-6 in CHD/DN patients. CHD/DN patients exhibited higher common carotid artery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT), hs-CRP, and hepcidin-25 levels than that in CHD/non-DN patients. Moreover, in CHD/DN patients, CCA-IMT was positively correlated with serum hepcidin, hs-CRP, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. On multiple regression analysis, serum hepcidin and hs-CRP level exhibited independent association with IMT in CHD/DN patients. Conclusions: These findings suggest possible linkage between iron metabolism and hepcidin modulation abnormalities that may contribute to the development of UAAS in CHD/DN patients. PMID:25963357

  4. Combined Complement Gene Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Influence Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bresin, Elena; Rurali, Erica; Caprioli, Jessica; Sanchez-Corral, Pilar; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Pinto, Sheila; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Alberti, Marta; Ribes, David; Valoti, Elisabetta; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Several abnormalities in complement genes reportedly contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), but incomplete penetrance suggests that additional factors are necessary for the disease to manifest. Here, we sought to describe genotype–phenotype correlations among patients with combined mutations, defined as mutations in more than one complement gene. We screened 795 patients with aHUS and identified single mutations in 41% and combined mutations in 3%. Only 8%–10% of patients with mutations in CFH, C3, or CFB had combined mutations, whereas approximately 25% of patients with mutations in MCP or CFI had combined mutations. The concomitant presence of CFH and MCP risk haplotypes significantly increased disease penetrance in combined mutated carriers, with 73% penetrance among carriers with two risk haplotypes compared with 36% penetrance among carriers with zero or one risk haplotype. Among patients with CFH or CFI mutations, the presence of mutations in other genes did not modify prognosis; in contrast, 50% of patients with combined MCP mutation developed end stage renal failure within 3 years from onset compared with 19% of patients with an isolated MCP mutation. Patients with combined mutations achieved remission with plasma treatment similar to patients with single mutations. Kidney transplant outcomes were worse, however, for patients with combined MCP mutation compared with an isolated MCP mutation. In summary, these data suggest that genotyping for the risk haplotypes in CFH and MCP may help predict the risk of developing aHUS in unaffected carriers of mutations. Furthermore, screening patients with aHUS for all known disease-associated genes may inform decisions about kidney transplantation. PMID:23431077

  5. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus. PMID:26031589

  6. Alternative Pathway of Complement in Children with Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Marians, Russell; Emlen, Woodruff; Wood, Susan; Smith, Christopher; Akana, Hillary; Holers, V. Michael; Lesser, Martin; Kline, Myriam; Hoffman, Cathy; Christen, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) is a common cause of acute kidney injury in children. Mutations in alternative pathway (AP) complement regulatory proteins have been identified in severe cases of thrombotic microangiopathy, but the role of the AP in D+HUS has not been studied. Therefore, we determined whether plasma levels of markers of activation of the AP are increased in D+HUS and are biomarkers of the severity of renal injury that predict the need for dialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Patients were randomly selected from among participants in the HUS-SYNSORB Pk trial. Plasma samples were collected on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 after enrollment and day 28 after discharge from the hospital. Levels of two complement pathway products, Bb and SC5b-9, were determined by ELISA. Results: Seventeen children (6 boys and 11 girls; age, 5.4 ± 3.5 yr) were studied. Eight (47%) required dialysis support, and two had serious extrarenal events. On the day of enrollment, plasma levels of Bb and SC5b-9 were significantly increased in all patients compared with healthy controls (P < 0.01). The elevated concentrations normalized by day 28 after discharge. Circulating levels of complement pathway fragments did not correlate with severity of renal injury or occurrence of complications. Conclusions: Patients with acute-onset D+HUS manifest activation of the AP of complement that is temporally related to the onset of disease and that resolves within 1 mo. Therapies to inhibit the AP of complement may be useful in attenuating the severity of renal injury and extrarenal complications. PMID:19820137

  7. Hemorrhagic colitis in postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome: retrospective analysis of 54 children.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ricardo C; Cobeñas, Carlos J; Drut, Ricardo; Amoreo, Oscar R; Ruscasso, Javier D; Spizzirri, Ana P; Suarez, Angela Del C; Zalba, Javier H; Ferrari, Celia; Gatti, Marcela C

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis (HC) is a severe manifestation of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with HC with the following aims: (1) to characterize the clinicopathologic features; (2) to evaluate mortality rate; (3) to analyze severity of renal and central nervous system (CNS) disease. Patients with HC assisted between 1981-2009 were evaluated and compared with a control group of 137 patients without HC. Among 987 patients with diarrheal prodrome (D) + HUS, 54 (5.5%) presented HC. Clinical findings included abdominal pain (96%), distension (93%), hematochezia (44%), and abdominal mass (11%). Surgery was indicated in 35 patients (65%), and 17 (48.5%) required bowel resection. Transverse and ascending colon were most frequently affected. Macroscopic evaluation showed bowel necrosis (18) and perforation (12). Histologic evaluation (29) showed that 25 (86.2%) had necrosis of the affected segment (transmural in 21). A leukocyte count >20,000/mm(3) and hematocrit >30% were more common in HC patients than in controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Mortality rate was higher in HC patients (33.3%) than in controls (1.4%; p < 0.0001). Dialysis >10 days, seizures, and coma were more frequent in HC patients than in controls (p < 0.0001). In summary, most patients had prominent abdominal findings, and almost 2/3 patients required surgery. Transverse/ascending colon was most affected, and the main histologic finding was transmural necrosis. Higher hematocrit and leukocytosis were frequent. Mortality rate was extremely high, and most had long-lasting anuria and severe neurologic involvement. PMID:21809003

  8. End-Stage Renal Disease from Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the United States, 1995 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Donal J.; Reule, Scott; Solid, Craig A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Foley, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has evolved rapidly, and optimal treatment strategies are controversial. However, it is unknown whether the burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from HUS has changed, and outcomes on dialysis in the US are not well described. Methods We retrospectively examined data for patients initiating maintenance renal replacement therapy (RRT) (n = 1,557,117), 1995–2010, to define standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and outcomes of ESRD from HUS) (n = 2241). Results Overall ESRD rates from HUS in 2001–2002 were 0.5 cases/million per year; and were higher for patients characterized by age 40–64 years (0.6), ≥ 65 years (0.7), female sex (0.6), and non-Hispanic African American race (0.7). SIRs remained unchanged (P ≥ 0.05) between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010 in the overall population. Compared with patients with ESRD from other causes, patients with HUS were more likely to be younger, female, white, and non-Hispanic. Over 5.4 years of follow-up, HUS patients differed from matched controls with ESRD from other causes by lower rates of death (8.3 per 100 person-years in cases vs. 10.4 in controls, P < 0.001), listing for renal transplant (7.6 vs. 8.6 per 100 person-years, P = 0.04), and undergoing transplant (6.9 vs. 9 per 100 person-years, P < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of ESRD from HUS appears not to have risen substantially in the last decade. However, given that HUS subtypes could not be determined in this study, these findings should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25689876

  9. Hemolytic uremic syndrome: late renal injury and changing incidence-a single centre experience in Canada.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Pierre; Clermont, Marie-José; Mérouani, Aïcha; Phan, Véronique; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure

    2012-01-01

    Aims. To assess trends in the incidence of pediatric diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D(+) HUS) and document long-term renal sequelae. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children with D(+) HUS admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital in Montreal, Canada, from 1976 to 2010. In 2010, we recontacted patients admitted before 2000. Results. Of 337 cases, median age at presentation was 3.01 years (range 0.4-14). Yearly incidence peaked in 1988 and 1994-95, returning to near-1977 levels since 2003. Twelve patients (3.6%) died and 19 (5.6%) experienced long-term renal failure. Almost half (47%) The patients required dialysis. Need for dialysis was the best predictor of renal sequelae, accounting for 100% of severe complications. Of children followed ≥1 year (n = 199, mean follow-up 8.20 ± 6.78 years), 19 had severe and 18 mild-to-moderate kidney injury, a total sequelae rate, of 18.6%. Ten years or more after-HUS (n = 85, mean follow-up 15.4 ± 5.32 years), 8 (9.4%) patients demonstrated serious complications and 22 (25.9%) mild-to-moderate, including 14 (16%) microalbuminuria: total sequelae, 35.3%. Conclusions. Patients with D(+) HUS should be monitored at least 5 years, including microalbuminuria testing, especially if dialysis was required. The cause of the declining incidence of D(+)HUS is elusive. However, conceivably, improved public health education may have played an important role in the prevention of food-borne disease. PMID:24278685

  10. Age-related incidence of pineal calcification detected by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-03-01

    The age-related incidence of detectable pineal calcification in 725 patients (age range, newborn-20 yrs) suggests that there is a relationship between calcification and the hormonal role played by the pineal gland in the regulation of sexual development. Pineal calcification (demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) on 8-mm-thick sections) in patients less than 6 years old should be looked upon with suspicion, and follow-up CT should be considered to exclude the possible development of a pineal neoplasm.

  11. Dual-energy digital mammography for calcification imaging: Scatter and nonuniformity corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Shaw, Chris C.

    2005-11-15

    Mammographic images of small calcifications, which are often the earliest signs of breast cancer, can be obscured by overlapping fibroglandular tissue. We have developed and implemented a dual-energy digital mammography (DEDM) technique for calcification imaging under full-field imaging conditions using a commercially available aSi:H/CsI:Tl flat-panel based digital mammography system. The low- and high-energy images were combined using a nonlinear mapping function to cancel the tissue structures and generate the dual-energy (DE) calcification images. The total entrance-skin exposure and mean-glandular dose from the low- and high-energy images were constrained so that they were similar to screening-examination levels. To evaluate the DE calcification image, we designed a phantom using calcium carbonate crystals to simulate calcifications of various sizes (212-425 {mu}m) overlaid with breast-tissue-equivalent material 5 cm thick with a continuously varying glandular-tissue ratio from 0% to 100%. We report on the effects of scatter radiation and nonuniformity in x-ray intensity and detector response on the DE calcification images. The nonuniformity was corrected by normalizing the low- and high-energy images with full-field reference images. Correction of scatter in the low- and high-energy images significantly reduced the background signal in the DE calcification image. Under the current implementation of DEDM, utilizing the mammography system and dose level tested, calcifications in the 300-355 {mu}m size range were clearly visible in DE calcification images. Calcification threshold sizes decreased to the 250-280 {mu}m size range when the visibility criteria were lowered to barely visible. Calcifications smaller than {approx}250 {mu}m were usually not visible in most cases. The visibility of calcifications with our DEDM imaging technique was limited by quantum noise, not system noise.

  12. Spontaneous resorption of calcification at the long head of the biceps tendon

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Adriansyah; Nakai, Sho; Hara, Michiharu; Yamanaka, Issei; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare cause of shoulder pain. Calcium deposits are often spontaneously resorbed or reduced in size in the rotator cuff tendons, which represent the most common sites of calcific tendinitis around the shoulder. To our knowledge, no case of spontaneous resorption of calcification in the long head of the biceps tendon has been reported in the literature. Here, we report one such case and describe its successful treatment using a conservative approach.

  13. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  14. Imaging of diffuse metastatic and dystrophic pulmonary calcification in children after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guermazi, A; Espérou, H; Selimi, F; Gluckman, E

    2005-08-01

    The authors describe three cases of diffuse pulmonary calcification; two metastatic in children with acute transitory renal failure and the other dystrophic in a child with leukaemia. All three patients underwent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Chest radiographs disclosed diffuse calcification within the lungs. The distribution of this calcification was bilateral but asymmetric. Diagnosis was made in two cases by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and in one case by HRCT and bone scan. Radiological characteristics, scintigraphic features, pathological mechanism and clinical outcome of such pulmonary calcification are discussed. PMID:16046422

  15. Warfarin-induced artery calcification is accelerated by growth and vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Price, P A; Faus, S A; Williamson, M K

    2000-02-01

    The present studies demonstrate that growth and vitamin D treatment enhance the extent of artery calcification in rats given sufficient doses of Warfarin to inhibit gamma-carboxylation of matrix Gla protein, a calcification inhibitor known to be expressed by smooth muscle cells and macrophages in the artery wall. The first series of experiments examined the influence of age and growth status on artery calcification in Warfarin-treated rats. Treatment for 2 weeks with Warfarin caused massive focal calcification of the artery media in 20-day-old rats and less extensive focal calcification in 42-day-old rats. In contrast, no artery calcification could be detected in 10-month-old adult rats even after 4 weeks of Warfarin treatment. To directly examine the importance of growth to Warfarin-induced artery calcification in animals of the same age, 20-day-old rats were fed for 2 weeks either an ad libitum diet or a 6-g/d restricted diet that maintains weight but prevents growth. Concurrent treatment of both dietary groups with Warfarin produced massive focal calcification of the artery media in the ad libitum-fed rats but no detectable artery calcification in the restricted-diet, growth-inhibited group. Although the explanation for the association between artery calcification and growth status cannot be determined from the present study, there was a relationship between higher serum phosphate and susceptibility to artery calcification, with 30% higher levels of serum phosphate in young, ad libitum-fed rats compared with either of the groups that was resistant to Warfarin-induced artery calcification, ie, the 10-month-old rats and the restricted-diet, growth-inhibited young rats. This observation suggests that increased susceptibility to Warfarin-induced artery calcification could be related to higher serum phosphate levels. The second set of experiments examined the possible synergy between vitamin D and Warfarin in artery calcification. High doses of vitamin D are known to

  16. Adsorption mechanism at the molecular level between polymers and uremic octapeptide by the 2D 1H NMR Technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Li, Jihong; Wang, Wei; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Yuanwei; Sun, Pingchuan; Yuan, Zhi; He, Binglin; Yu, Yaoting

    2006-06-01

    To remove uremic octapeptide from the blood stream of uremic patients, various modified polyacylamide cross-linked absorbents were prepared. Adsorption experiments showed these absorbents have significant differences in adsorption capacity to the target peptide. In this paper, two-dimension proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D 1H NMR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the interaction mechanism between the peptide and the adsorbents. Because of the insolubility of the absorbent, some soluble linear polymers with the same functional groups as the absorbents were employed as the model adsorbents in 2D 1H NMR. The preferred binding site for the peptide and polymers was identified to be at the C-terminal carboxyl group of the octapeptide via chemical shift perturbation effects. In this study, we found that hydrogen bonding, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions all play a role in the interaction force but had different contributions. Especially, the great chemical shift changes of the aromatic amino acid residues (Trp) during the interaction between butyl-modified polyacrylamide and octapeptide suggested the hydrophobic interaction, incorporated with the electrostatic force, played an important role in the binding reaction in aqueous solutions. This information not only rationally explained the results of the adsorption experiments, but also identified the effective binding site and mechanism, and shall provide a structural basis for designing better affinity-type adsorbents for the target peptide. PMID:16768402

  17. In vivo kinetics of the uremic toxin p-cresyl sulfate in mice with variable renal function.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jingwei; Zhang, Wenli; Zhu, Zhengbin; Zhu, Jinzhou; Du, Run; Jing, Yajun; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Ruiyan

    2014-12-01

    Uremic toxins such as p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) are associated with increased mortality for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, but in vivo PCS toxicity studies are limited due to the lack of a standard animal model. To establish such a model, we measured the pharmacokinetics of PCS in mice with variable renal function. Male Balb/c mice subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy (CRF), unilateral nephrectomy (UNX), or no surgery (controls) were given PCS (po, 50 mg/kg). Blood samples were collected over time and plasma PCS concentrations were measured. Over 4 h, PCS was significantly higher in the plasma of CRF mice (63.28 ± 2.76 mg/L), compared to UNX mice (3.11 ± 0.64 mg/L) and controls (0.39 ± 0.12 mg/L). The PCS half-life was greatest in CRF mice (12.07 ± 0.12 h), compared to 0.79 ± 0.04 h in UNX mice and 0.48 ± 0.02 h in control mice. However, the potential presence of additional uremic toxins along with PCS in CRF mice and rapid PCS clearance in control mice suggest that the UNX mouse would be a better PCS model to study toxicity. PMID:25256665

  18. Exploring Protein Binding of Uremic Toxins in Patients with Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease and during Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Deltombe, Olivier; Van Biesen, Wim; Glorieux, Griet; Massy, Ziad; Dhondt, Annemieke; Eloot, Sunny

    2015-10-01

    As protein binding of uremic toxins is not well understood, neither in chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression, nor during a hemodialysis (HD) session, we studied protein binding in two cross-sectional studies. Ninety-five CKD 2 to 5 patients and ten stable hemodialysis patients were included. Blood samples were taken either during the routine ambulatory visit (CKD patients) or from blood inlet and outlet line during dialysis (HD patients). Total (CT) and free concentrations were determined of p-cresylglucuronide (pCG), hippuric acid (HA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresylsulfate (pCS), and their percentage protein binding (%PB) was calculated. In CKD patients, %PB/CT resulted in a positive correlation (all p < 0.001) with renal function for all five uremic toxins. In HD patients, %PB was increased after 120 min of dialysis for HA and at the dialysis end for the stronger (IAA) and the highly-bound (IS and pCS) solutes. During one passage through the dialyzer at 120 min, %PB was increased for HA (borderline), IAA, IS and pCS. These findings explain why protein-bound solutes are difficult to remove by dialysis: a combination of the fact that (i) only the free fraction can pass the filter and (ii) the equilibrium, as it was pre-dialysis, cannot be restored during the dialysis session, as it is continuously disturbed. PMID:26426048

  19. Differential expression and regulation of Klotho by paricalcitol in the kidney, parathyroid and aorta of uremic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Cynthia S.; Zhang, Sarah; Delmez, James; Finch, Jane L; Slatopolsky, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Klotho plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Klotho is highly expressed in the kidney and parathyroid glands, but its presence in the vasculature is debated. Renal Klotho is decreased in CKD, but the effect of uremia on Klotho in other tissues is not defined. The effect of vitamin D receptor activator therapy in CKD on expression of Klotho in various tissues is also in debate. In uremic rats (surgical 5/6th nephrectomy model), we compared 3-months of treatment with and without paricalcitol on Klotho immunostaining in the kidney, parathyroid glands and aorta. With uremia, Klotho was unchanged in the parathyroid, significantly decreased in the kidney (66%) and the intimal-medial area of the aorta (69%), and significantly increased in the adventitial area of the aorta (67%) compared with controls. Paricalcitol prevented the decrease in Klotho in the kidney, increased expression in the parathyroid (31%), had no effect in the aortic media, but blunted the increase of Klotho in aortic adventitia. We propose that fibroblasts are responsible for expression of Klotho in the adventitia. In hyperplastic human parathyroid tissue from uremic patients, Klotho was higher in oxyphil compared with chief cells. Thus, under our conditions of moderate CKD and mild-to-moderate hyperphosphatemia in rats, the differential expression of Klotho and its regulation by paricalcitol in uremia is tissue-dependent. PMID:25692955

  20. Sensitivity of Calcification to Thermal Stress Varies among Genera of Massive Reef-Building Corals

    PubMed Central

    Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P.; Cabanillas-Terán, Nancy; Cruz-Ortega, Israel; Blanchon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Reductions in calcification in reef-building corals occur when thermal conditions are suboptimal, but it is unclear how they vary between genera in response to the same thermal stress event. Using densitometry techniques, we investigate reductions in the calcification rate of massive Porites spp. from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and P. astreoides, Montastraea faveolata, and M. franksi from the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (MBR), and correlate them to thermal stress associated with ocean warming. Results show that Porites spp. are more sensitive to increasing temperature than Montastraea, with calcification rates decreasing by 0.40 g cm−2 year−1 in Porites spp. and 0.12 g cm−2 year−1 in Montastraea spp. for each 1°C increase. Under similar warming trends, the predicted calcification rates at 2100 are close to zero in Porites spp. and reduced by 40% in Montastraea spp. However, these predictions do not account for ocean acidification. Although yearly mean aragonite saturation (Ωar) at MBR sites has recently decreased, only P. astreoides at Chinchorro showed a reduction in calcification. In corals at the other sites calcification did not change, indicating there was no widespread effect of Ωar changes on coral calcification rate in the MBR. Even in the absence of ocean acidification, differential reductions in calcification between Porites spp. and Montastraea spp. associated with warming might be expected to have significant ecological repercussions. For instance, Porites spp. invest increased calcification in extension, and under warming scenarios it may reduce their ability to compete for space. As a consequence, shifts in taxonomic composition would be expected in Indo-Pacific reefs with uncertain repercussions for biodiversity. By contrast, Montastraea spp. use their increased calcification resources to construct denser skeletons. Reductions in calcification would therefore make them more susceptible to both physical and biological breakdown, seriously

  1. Spatial and seasonal reef calcification in corals and calcareous crusts in the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roik, Anna; Roder, Cornelia; Röthig, Till; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-06-01

    The existence of coral reef ecosystems critically relies on the reef carbonate framework produced by scleractinian corals and calcareous crusts (i.e., crustose coralline algae). While the Red Sea harbors one of the longest connected reef systems in the world, detailed calcification data are only available from the northernmost part. To fill this knowledge gap, we measured in situ calcification rates of primary and secondary reef builders in the central Red Sea. We collected data on the major habitat-forming coral genera Porites, Acropora, and Pocillopora and also on calcareous crusts (CC) in a spatio-seasonal framework. The scope of the study comprised sheltered and exposed sites of three reefs along a cross-shelf gradient and over four seasons of the year. Calcification of all coral genera was consistent across the shelf and highest in spring. In addition, Pocillopora showed increased calcification at exposed reef sites. In contrast, CC calcification increased from nearshore, sheltered to offshore, exposed reef sites, but also varied over seasons. Comparing our data to other reef locations, calcification in the Red Sea was in the range of data collected from reefs in the Caribbean and Indo-Pacific; however, Acropora calcification estimates were at the lower end of worldwide rates. Our study shows that the increasing coral cover from nearshore to offshore environments aligned with CC calcification but not coral calcification, highlighting the potentially important role of CC in structuring reef cover and habitats. While coral calcification maxima have been typically observed during summer in many reef locations worldwide, calcification maxima during spring in the central Red Sea indicate that summer temperatures exceed the optima of reef calcifiers in this region. This study provides a foundation for comparative efforts and sets a baseline to quantify impact of future environmental change in the central Red Sea.

  2. Sensitivity of calcification to thermal stress varies among genera of massive reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P; Cabanillas-Terán, Nancy; Cruz-Ortega, Israel; Blanchon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Reductions in calcification in reef-building corals occur when thermal conditions are suboptimal, but it is unclear how they vary between genera in response to the same thermal stress event. Using densitometry techniques, we investigate reductions in the calcification rate of massive Porites spp. from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and P. astreoides, Montastraea faveolata, and M. franksi from the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (MBR), and correlate them to thermal stress associated with ocean warming. Results show that Porites spp. are more sensitive to increasing temperature than Montastraea, with calcification rates decreasing by 0.40 g cm(-2) year(-1) in Porites spp. and 0.12 g cm(-2) year(-1) in Montastraea spp. for each 1°C increase. Under similar warming trends, the predicted calcification rates at 2100 are close to zero in Porites spp. and reduced by 40% in Montastraea spp. However, these predictions do not account for ocean acidification. Although yearly mean aragonite saturation (Ω(ar)) at MBR sites has recently decreased, only P. astreoides at Chinchorro showed a reduction in calcification. In corals at the other sites calcification did not change, indicating there was no widespread effect of Ω(ar) changes on coral calcification rate in the MBR. Even in the absence of ocean acidification, differential reductions in calcification between Porites spp. and Montastraea spp. associated with warming might be expected to have significant ecological repercussions. For instance, Porites spp. invest increased calcification in extension, and under warming scenarios it may reduce their ability to compete for space. As a consequence, shifts in taxonomic composition would be expected in Indo-Pacific reefs with uncertain repercussions for biodiversity. By contrast, Montastraea spp. use their increased calcification resources to construct denser skeletons. Reductions in calcification would therefore make them more susceptible to both physical and biological breakdown

  3. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-07-01

    Bivalve calcification, particularly of the early larval stages, is highly sensitive to the change in ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no effects and [HCO3-] and pH had only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. An equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the mechanisms that limit or facilitate adaptation to future ocean acidification, it is necessary to better

  4. Quantification of breast arterial calcification using full field digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, Sabee; Xu Tong; Ducote, Justin; Iribarren, Carlos

    2008-04-15

    Breast arterial calcification is commonly detected on some mammograms. Previous studies indicate that breast arterial calcification is evidence of general atherosclerotic vascular disease and it may be a useful marker of coronary artery disease. It can potentially be a useful tool for assessment of coronary artery disease in women since mammography is widely used as a screening tool for early detection of breast cancer. However, there are currently no available techniques for quantification of calcium mass using mammography. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is possible to quantify breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital mammography. An anthropomorphic breast phantom along with a vessel calcification phantom was imaged using a full field digital mammography system. Densitometry was used to quantify calcium mass. A calcium calibration measurement was performed at each phantom thickness and beam energy. The known (K) and measured (M) calcium mass on 5 and 9 cm thickness phantoms were related by M=0.964K-0.288 mg (r=0.997 and SEE=0.878 mg) and M=1.004K+0.324 mg (r=0.994 and SEE=1.32 mg), respectively. The results indicate that accurate calcium mass measurements can be made without correction for scatter glare as long as careful calcium calibration is made for each breast thickness. The results also indicate that composition variations and differences of approximately 1 cm between calibration phantom and breast thickness introduce only minimal error in calcium measurement. The uncertainty in magnification is expected to cause up to 5% and 15% error in calcium mass for 5 and 9 cm breast thicknesses, respectively. In conclusion, a densitometry technique for quantification of breast arterial calcium mass was validated using standard full field digital mammography. The results demonstrated the feasibility and potential utility of the densitometry technique for accurate quantification of breast arterial calcium mass using standard digital

  5. Absence of gallium-67 avidity in diffuse pulmonary calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Foster, R.W.

    1985-09-01

    Diffuse pulmonary uptake by bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals has been reported previously but, in the same patient, would pulmonary uptake of Ga-67 citrate yield clinically meaningful results. A patient with hypercalcemia and renal failure in whom bone scintigraphy demonstrated striking diffuse bilateral pulmonary uptake, but subsequent gallium imaging demonstrated no evidence of pulmonary uptake greater than body background, is discussed. We conclude that pulmonary uptake of gallium cannot be attributed to calcium deposition and should carry the same clinical significance in regard to inflammatory and malignant lesions as would be assigned to patients without pulmonary calcific deposits.

  6. Aortic Root Calcification: A Possible Imaging Biomarker of Coronary Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Nafakh, Hasan A; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer A

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that coronary atherosclerosis risk assessment using coronary artery calcium and thoracic aorta calcium quantification may improve risk stratification as it can lead to the reclassification of persons at increased risk. The aortic root has been characterized by its close anatomical proximity to the ostial origins of the right and left coronary arteries, and it can be evaluated using multi-detector computed tomography without additional radiation exposure and the use of contrast. The correlations between aortic root calcification and coronary atherosclerotic markers as well as cardiac risk factors have been analyzed. PMID:27195236

  7. Percutaneous tattoo pigment simulating calcific deposits in axillary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Yactor, Amy R; Michell, Michael N; Koch, Meghan S; Leete, Tyler G; Shah, Zeeshan A; Carter, Brett W

    2013-01-01

    The isolated finding of calcific deposits within axillary lymph nodes on mammography suggests a broad range of differential diagnoses, from benign causes such as granulomatous reaction secondary to previous histoplasmosis infection to malignancies such as breast cancer and metastatic disease from extramammary primary malignancies. Therefore, the isolated finding of intranodal calcium may warrant biopsy for a definitive diagnosis when a benign etiology is not apparent. We present a patient with isolated axillary lymph node densities on mammography and chest computed tomography, which were subsequently proven to represent deposition of tattoo pigment. PMID:23382606

  8. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. PMID:26590729

  9. Aortic Root Calcification: A Possible Imaging Biomarker of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nafakhi, Hussein; Al-Nafakh, Hasan A.; Al-Mosawi, Abdulameer A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that coronary atherosclerosis risk assessment using coronary artery calcium and thoracic aorta calcium quantification may improve risk stratification as it can lead to the reclassification of persons at increased risk. The aortic root has been characterized by its close anatomical proximity to the ostial origins of the right and left coronary arteries, and it can be evaluated using multi-detector computed tomography without additional radiation exposure and the use of contrast. The correlations between aortic root calcification and coronary atherosclerotic markers as well as cardiac risk factors have been analyzed. PMID:27195236

  10. Treatment of severe metastatic calcification and calciphylaxis in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Goel, Saurabh K; Bellovich, Keith; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic calcification is a frequent complication encountered in patients undergoing maintenance dialysis and has a complex pathogenesis. It is often difficult to treat and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and prompt initiation of treatment is vital. Local wound care and aggressive metabolic control remain the cornerstones of the therapy. Various novel treatment strategies including sodium thiosulfate and hyperbaric oxygen therapy have been utilized and reviewed in this paper. The response rate to treatment is poor and prevention is the best approach. PMID:21423552

  11. The Uremic Toxin Adsorbent AST-120 Abrogates Cardiorenal Injury Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Kumfu, Sirinart; Wang, Bing H.; Manabe, Minako; Nishijima, Fuyuhiko; Kelly, Darren J.; Krum, Henry; Kompa, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    An accelerated progressive decline in renal function is a frequent accompaniment of myocardial infarction (MI). Indoxyl sulfate (IS), a uremic toxin that accumulates from the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is contributory to both renal and cardiac fibrosis. IS levels can be reduced by administration of the oral adsorbent AST-120, which has been shown to ameliorate pathological renal and cardiac fibrosis in moderate to severe CKD. However, the cardiorenal effect of AST-120 on less severe renal dysfunction in the post-MI setting has not previously been well studied. MI-induced Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive either AST-120 (MI+AST-120) or were untreated (MI+Vehicle) for 16 weeks. Serum IS levels were measured at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks. Echocardiography and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed prior to sacrifice. Renal and cardiac tissues were assessed for pathological changes using histological and immunohistochemical methods, Western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Compared with sham, MI+Vehicle animals had a significant reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction (by 42%, p<0.001) and fractional shortening (by 52%, p<0.001) as well as lower GFR (p<0.05) and increased serum IS levels (p<0.05). A significant increase in interstitial fibrosis in the renal cortex was demonstrated in MI+Vehicle animals (p<0.001). Compared with MI+Vehicle, MI+AST-120 animals had increased GFR (by 13.35%, p<0.05) and reduced serum IS (p<0.001), renal interstitial fibrosis (p<0.05), and renal KIM-1, collagen-IV and TIMP-1 expression (p<0.05). Cardiac function did not change with AST-120 treatment, however gene expression of TGF-β1 and TNF-α as well as collagen-I and TIMP-1 protein expression was decreased in the non-infarcted myocardium (p<0.05). In conclusion, reduction of IS attenuates cardio-renal fibrotic processes in the post-MI kidney. KIM-1 appears to be a sensitive renal injury biomarker in this setting and is correlated with serum

  12. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli as Causes of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Marejková, Monika; Bláhová, Květa; Janda, Jan; Fruth, Angelika; Petráš, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) worldwide, but no systematic study of EHEC as the causative agents of HUS was performed in the Czech Republic. We analyzed stools of all patients with D+ HUS in the Czech Republic between 1998 and 2012 for evidence of EHEC infection. We determined virulence profiles, phenotypes, antimicrobial susceptibilities and phylogeny of the EHEC isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Virulence loci were identified using PCR, phenotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using standard procedures, and phylogeny was assessed using multilocus sequence typing. During the 15-year period, EHEC were isolated from stools of 39 (69.4%) of 56 patients. The strains belonged to serotypes [fliC types] O157:H7/NM[fliCH7] (50% of which were sorbitol-fermenting; SF), O26:H11/NM[fliCH11], O55:NM[fliCH7], O111:NM[fliCH8], O145:H28[fliCH28], O172:NM[fliCH25], and Orough:NM[fliCH25]. O26:H11/NM[fliCH11] was the most common serotype associated with HUS (41% isolates). Five stx genotypes were identified, the most frequent being stx2a (71.1% isolates). Most strains contained EHEC-hlyA encoding EHEC hemolysin, and a subset (all SF O157:NM and one O157:H7) harbored cdt-V encoding cytolethal distending toxin. espPα encoding serine protease EspPα was found in EHEC O157:H7, O26:H11/NM, and O145:H28, whereas O172:NM and Orough:NM strains contained espPγ. All isolates contained eae encoding adhesin intimin, which belonged to subtypes β (O26), γ (O55, O145, O157), γ2/θ (O111), and ε (O172, Orough). Loci encoding other adhesins (efa1, lpfAO26, lpfAO157OI-141, lpfAO157OI-154, iha) were usually associated with particular serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated nine sequence types (STs) which correlated with serotypes. Of these, two STs (ST660 and ST1595) were not found in HUS-associated EHEC before. Conclusions/Significance EHEC strains, including O157:H7 and non

  13. Interventions for preventing diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) may follow infection with Shiga-toxin-producing organisms, principally E. coli O157: H7 (STEC), causing high morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify interventions to prevent diarrhea-associated HUS. Methods Systematic search of the literature for relevant systematic reviews (SRs), randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and public health guidelines. Results Of 1097 animal and 762 human studies, 18 animal studies (2 SRs, 2 reviews, plus 14 RCTs) and 6 human studies (3 SRs, plus 3 RCTs) met inclusion criteria. E. coli O157: H7 Type III secreted protein vaccination decreased fecal E. coli O157 shedding in cattle (P = 0.002). E. coli O157: H7 siderophore receptor and porin proteins (SRP) vaccines reduced fecal shedding in cows (OR 0.42 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.73) and increased anti-E. coli 0157: H7 SRP antibodies in their calves (P < 0.001). Bacterin vaccines had no effect. Probiotic or sodium chlorate additives in feeds reduced fecal E. coli O157 load as did improved farm hygiene (P < 0.05). Solarization of soil reduced E. coli O157: H7 contamination in the soil (P < 0.05). In an RCT examining the role of antibiotic treatment of E. coli O157: H7 diarrhea, HUS rates were similar in children treated with Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and controls (RR 0.57; 95% CI 0.11 to 2.81). In another RCT, HUS rates were similar in children receiving Synsorb-Pk and placebo (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.39 to 2.22). In one SR, hand washing reduced diarrhea by 39% in institutions (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.40 to 0.92) and 32% in community settings (IRR 0.68; 95% CI 0.52 to 0.90) compared to controls. Guidelines contained recommendations to prevent STEC transmission from animals and environments to humans, including appropriate food preparation, personal hygiene, community education, and control of environmental contamination, food and water quality. Conclusions Animal carriage of STEC is decreased by vaccination and improved farm practices

  14. Sevelamer as a phosphate binder in adult hemodialysis patients: an evidence-based review of its therapeutic value

    PubMed Central

    Nadin, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Patients on hemodialysis require phosphate binders to reduce dietary phosphate absorption and control serum phosphate. The standard therapy, calcium salts, can be associated with elevated serum calcium (hypercalcemia). Concern has been raised that hypercalcemia, especially combined with elevated serum phosphate, may be associated with arterial calcification, and this may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Sevelamer is a nonmetal, nonabsorbed phosphate binder. Aims: This review assesses the evidence for the therapeutic value of sevelamer as a phosphate binder in adult hemodialysis patients. Evidence review: Strong evidence shows that sevelamer is as effective as calcium salts in controlling serum phosphate and calcium–phosphate product, has less risk of inducing hypercalcemia and is more effective at lowering lipid levels. Some evidence indicates that sevelamer reduces arterial calcification progression and loss of bone mineral density, but it may be more likely to induce metabolic acidosis, compared with calcium salts. Sevelamer-containing regimens may improve calcific uremic arteriolopathy, although the evidence is weak. Evidence is divided on whether the incidence of gastrointestinal adverse events with sevelamer is similar to or higher than that with calcium salts. Retrospective and modeling studies suggest lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with sevelamer than with calcium salts, with incremental cost-effectiveness of $US1100–2200 per life-year gained. Further direct evidence is needed on mortality, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Place in therapy: Sevelamer is effective in controlling serum phosphate and lowering lipid levels in hemodialysis patients without inducing hypercalcemia, and may have beneficial effects on arterial calcification. PMID:22496676

  15. [The role of calcium ions in the pathomechanism of the artery calcification accompanying atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Małecki, Rafał; Adamiec, Rajmund

    2005-01-01

    Artery calcification occurring in atherosclerosis is connected with a high risk of cardiovascular events. Quantitative calcification evaluation using electron beam tomography indicated a correlation between artery calcification and well-known cardiovascular risk factors, i.e. smoking, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Elevated calcium scores are especially observed in diabetic patients, which may even explain the higher mortality in this group. Calcification leads to increased blood vessel rigidity and, consequently, elevated arterial vascular resistance and left ventricular hypertrophy. An increased risk of plaque rupture in relation to calcium-rich atherosclerotic lesions was not proved. Plaque rupture and thromboembolitic complications are probably higher in the case of lipid-rich lesions. Atherosclerotic calcification is an active process in which many cells (monocytes/macrophages, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells) participate. Many substances and transcription factors normally participating in the bone remodeling process are found in calcified atherosclerotic lesions (e.g. Cbfa-1, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, BMP-2, osteopontin, osteoprotegrin, and RANKL). On monocytes, cells playing an important role in atherosclerosis progression, the presence of a calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) has been demonstrated. Increase in monocyte chemotaxis and increased interleukin 6 secretion in response to extracellular calcium were observed. Monocytes also directly and indirectly enhance vascular calcification. Immune cells and cytokines participating in vascular calcification are connected in one pathogenetic mechanism, i.e. atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease and calcification. PMID:15761385

  16. Generalized arterial calcification of infancy--Findings at post-mortem computed tomography and autopsy.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Ali, Zabiullah; Southall, Pamela; Fowler, David

    2015-09-01

    Generalized arterial calcification in infancy is a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal calcification of large and medium sized arteries and marked myointimal proliferation resulting in arterial stenosis. The condition is often fatal secondary to complications of cardiac ischemia, hypertension and cardiac failure. In this report we describe the findings at post mortem computed tomography, histology and autopsy. PMID:26165490

  17. Advanced glycation endproducts regulate smooth muscle cells calcification in cultured HSMCs

    PubMed Central

    He, Hu-Qiang; Liu, Yong; Zeng, Hong; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Lin; Liao, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Xiang-Yu; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promoting the calcification of smooth muscle cells. Methods: The successfully cultured smooth muscle cells were divided into three groups: normal culture group (group A), calcified culture group (group B), calcification + AGEs group (group C); the concentration of intracellular calcium ion was detected in each group; the promotion of AGEs on the calcification of HSMCs was confirmed by VON KOSSA staining; and the expressions of β-catenin, RAGE, β-catenin, OPG and E-cadherin protein were detected by immunofluorescence and western blot. Results: The morphology of the cells in each group showed that the amount of calcified plaques in calcification + AGES group were significantly higher than the calcification group. VON KOSSA staining showed that with increasing concentrations of AGE-BSA, the amount of its calcification gradually increased. Calcium concentration in Calcification + 20 mg/L AGEs group was significantly higher, followed by 40 mg/L AGEs group. The expression of β-catenin increased with the increasing concentrations of AGEs. Conclusion: AGEs can promote the calcification of human femoral artery smooth muscle cells, with a concentration gradient effect. With increasing concentrations of AGEs, the expression of RAGE increased, indicating that AGEs-induced HSMCs proliferation was correlated with RAGE expression. PMID:26722411

  18. Matrix Gla Protein is Associated with Risk Factors for Atherosclerosis but not with Coronary Artery Calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Atherosclerotic coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is an inhibitor of calcification in vivo. However, little is known regarding the distribution of circulating MGP, and its associations with CHD...

  19. Compression-induced changes on physical structures and calcification of the aromatic polyether polyurethane composite.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z G; Teoh, S H; McFarlane, W; Poole-Warren, L; Umezu, M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally accepted that stress causes calcification in both bio-prosthetic and polyurethane heart valves. However, simple uni-axially- and bi-axially-stretched samples did not yield a feasible model for the elaboration of the stress-induced calcification. In this study, heat compaction combined with the incorporation of polyethylene has been explored. Specimens of polyurethane were solution cast onto a porous bi-axially-drawn ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene film and then heat compacted under a pressure of 18 MPa at a chosen temperature for 1.5 h. The heat-compaction-induced calcification and physical changes of the polyurethane composite were evaluated using a 28-day in vitro calcification model and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform-Infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy. The calcification results indicated that heat-compaction-induced calcification was double that achieved without heat compaction. Heat-compacted polyurethane composite showed higher affinity to calcium ions than the non-heat compacted sample. The ATR-FT-IR results showed that the heat-compaction-induced physical changes include distortions of polymeric molecules and permanent changes of microstructures. The distortions of polymeric molecules could be deteriorated in contact with different media. The relaxation of the stressed structures of the polyether moiety might serve as a calcium trap and a heterogeneous nucleation site for calcification. The permanent changes of microstructures resulted from high distortions also served as affinity sites attracting calcification. PMID:14661883

  20. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  1. Abdominal aortic calcification is not superior over other vascular calcification in predicting mortality in hemodialysis patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) guidelines recommend that a lateral abdominal radiograph should be performed to assess vascular calcification (VC) in dialysis patients. However, abdominal aortic calcification is a prevalent finding, and it remains unclear whether other anatomical areas of VC can predict mortality more accurately. Methods A total of 217 maintenance hemodialysis patients were enrolled at the Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital between July 2010 and March 2011. Radiographs of the abdomen, pelvis and hands were evaluated by a radiologist to evaluate the presence of VC. The correlation between different areas of VC and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality was analyzed using univariate and multivariate models. Results The prevalence of VC was 70.0% (152 patients), and most had abdominal aortic calcification (90.1%). During 26 ± 7 months of follow-up, 37 patients died. The VC score was independently associated with patient mortality. VC observed on abdominal radiographs (abdominal aortic calcification) was associated with all-cause mortality in models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (HR, 4.69; 95%CI, 1.60-13.69) and dialysis factors (HR, 3.38; 95%CI, 1.18-9.69). VC in the pelvis or hands was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for dialysis factors. When three combinations of VC in different radiographs were included in models, the presence of abdominal VC was only significantly associated with all-cause mortality in the integrated model. VC in the abdomen and pelvis was associated with all-cause mortality in the model adjusted for cardiovascular factors and the integrated model, but neither was significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. VC in all radiographs was significantly associated with a more than 6-fold risk of all-cause mortality and a more than 5-fold risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to patients without VC. Conclusions VC in different arteries as shown on

  2. The role of coccolithophore calcification in bioengineering their environment.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kevin J; Clark, Darren R; Wheeler, Glen

    2016-06-29

    Coccolithophorids are enigmatic plankton that produce calcium carbonate coccoliths, which over geological time have buried atmospheric CO2 into limestone, changing both the atmosphere and geology of the Earth. However, the role of coccoliths for the proliferation of these organisms remains unclear; suggestions include roles in anti-predation, enhanced photosynthesis and sun-screening. Here we test the hypothesis that calcification stabilizes the pH of the seawater proximate to the organisms, providing a level of acidification countering the detrimental basification that occurs during net photosynthesis. Such bioengineering provides a more stable pH environment for growth and fits the empirical evidence for changes in rates of calcification under different environmental conditions. Under this scenario, simulations suggest that the optimal production ratio of inorganic to organic particulate C (PIC : POCprod) will be lower (by approx. 20%) with ocean acidification and that overproduction of coccoliths in a future acidified ocean, where pH buffering is weaker, presents a risk to calcifying cells. PMID:27358373

  3. The role of coccolithophore calcification in bioengineering their environment

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darren R.; Wheeler, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Coccolithophorids are enigmatic plankton that produce calcium carbonate coccoliths, which over geological time have buried atmospheric CO2 into limestone, changing both the atmosphere and geology of the Earth. However, the role of coccoliths for the proliferation of these organisms remains unclear; suggestions include roles in anti-predation, enhanced photosynthesis and sun-screening. Here we test the hypothesis that calcification stabilizes the pH of the seawater proximate to the organisms, providing a level of acidification countering the detrimental basification that occurs during net photosynthesis. Such bioengineering provides a more stable pH environment for growth and fits the empirical evidence for changes in rates of calcification under different environmental conditions. Under this scenario, simulations suggest that the optimal production ratio of inorganic to organic particulate C (PIC : POCprod) will be lower (by approx. 20%) with ocean acidification and that overproduction of coccoliths in a future acidified ocean, where pH buffering is weaker, presents a risk to calcifying cells. PMID:27358373

  4. Growth and calcification of marine bryozoans in a changing ocean.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abigail M

    2014-06-01

    Bryozoans are colonial benthic marine invertebrate calcifiers, important and especially abundant and diverse in southern hemisphere shelf environments. Large heavily calcified colonies can be up to 50 years old, but most longer-lived bryozoans are limited to 10-20 y. Many smaller species are annual. Radial extension in flat encrusting bryozoans is generally on the order of 1-5 mm/y. Erect calcified species generally grow vertically 2-15 mm/y, though articulated species such as Cellaria may reach rates of 40 mm/y. Corresponding calcification rates are generally 10(1)-10(2) mg/y, but there can be an order of magnitude variation in rate among years in high-latitude bryozoans. Multi-branched bryozoans produce up to 24 g of CaCO3/y. The carbonate produced by bryozoans varies from calcite to aragonite and mixtures of both. Skeletal carbonate mineralogy of bryozoans is complex and appears to be strongly genetically controlled. Global climate change, leading to increasing water temperatures, will generally increase marine bryozoan metabolic rates, and may increase Mg in calcite. On the other hand, decreasing pH (ocean acidification) causes corrosion, changes in mineralogy, and decreased survival. This review of bryozoan growth and calcification allows a general perspective, but also reveals gaps in our knowledge which need to be addressed. PMID:25070865

  5. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: a review.

    PubMed

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-07-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non - operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non - steroidal anti - inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non - operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short - wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non - steroidal and steroid anti - inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  6. Meningial blood vessel calcification in the brain of the cat.

    PubMed

    Mandara, Maria Teresa

    2003-03-01

    Mineralization in the wall of central nervous system blood vessels is sporadically encountered in aged horses and cattle as in man, generally as an age-related change. This phenomenon has not to date been located in the meninges in dogs or cats. The present study reports a retrospective histological examination of 50 feline brains from 40-day- to 13-year-old cats. Histological examination using routine staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, Luxol fast blue-periodic acid-Schiff) and special stains (Von Kossa and Pearl's method) showed substantial blood vessel calcification (BVC) in 29 cases which, except for 1 case, was present only in the leptomeninges. In 72% of cases BVC was not related to nervous tissue lesions. For this reason it was considered an incidental finding, producing no morphological or clinical signs. However, BVC should not be considered merely an age-related finding since it is also quite common in very young animals (35%), suggesting that its pathogenesis needs to be investigated further and compared to BVC observed in children affected by acquired immune deficiency and idiopathic arterial calcification. PMID:12557010

  7. Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-01-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non – operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non – steroidal anti – inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non – operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short – wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non – steroidal and steroid anti – inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences. PMID:23998102

  8. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  9. Primary familial brain calcification: update on molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Taglia, Ilaria; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Mignarri, Andrea; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Primary familial brain calcification is a neuropsychiatric disorder with calcium deposits in the brain, especially in basal ganglia, cerebellum and subcortical white matter. The disease is characterized by a clinical heterogeneity, with a various combination of symptoms that include movement disorders and psychiatric disturbances; asymptomatic patients have been also reported. To date, three causative genes have been found: SLC20A2, PDGFRB and PDGFB. SLC20A2 gene codes for the 'sodium-dependent phosphate transporter 2' (PiT-2), a cell membrane transporters of inorganic phosphate, involved in Pi uptake by cells and maintenance of Pi body levels. Over 40 pathogenic variants of SLC20A2 have been reported, affecting the regulation of Pi homeostasis. It was hypothesized that SLC20A2 mutations cause brain calcification most likely through haploinsufficiency. PDGFRB encodes for the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ), a cell-surface tyrosine-kinase (RTK) receptor that regulates cell proliferation, migration, survival and differentiation. PDGFB encodes for the 'platelet-derived growth factor beta' (PDGFβ), the ligand of PDGFRβ. The loss of function of PDGFRβ and PDGFβ could lead to the impairment of the pericytes function and blood brain barrier integrity, causing vascular and perivascular calcium accumulation. SLC20A2 accounts for about 40 % of familial form and 14 % of sporadic cases, while PDGFRB and PDGFB mutations are likely rare. However, approximately 50 % of patients are not genetically defined and there should be at least another causative gene. PMID:25686613

  10. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  11. Approaches to chronological age assessment based on dental calcification.

    PubMed

    Bolanos, M V; Manrique, M C; Bolanos, M J; Briones, M T

    2000-05-15

    The aim of the present study was to find an accurate estimation of chronological age using a small number of selected teeth. For this purpose, the method devised by Nolla [C. Nolla, The development of the permanent teeth, J. Dent. Child. 27 (1960) 254-266.] was used: the development of each of the teeth was determined according to this method on 374 radiographs, 195 of boys (mean age 8.59) and 179 of girls (mean age 8.75). The 28 variables representing the calcification stages were analyzed using cluster analysis followed by multivariate analysis (multiple linear regression model). Patient age was considered to be a dependent variable. Our study showed that antimere teeth are the most homogeneous as regards stages of development. The prediction was more accurate for boys and girls below 10 years of age, using teeth 21, 43 and 46 from boys and teeth 21, 46 and 47 from girls. These teeth accounted for 80% total variance of chronological age for dental calcification. Standard error was +/-1.4 years for boys and +/-1.2 years for girls. When the age of the children remained completely unknown, the best estimates were provided by teeth 43, 47, 46 and 44 from boys and teeth 44, 47 and 43 from girls. PMID:10808098

  12. Choroid plexus calcification: clinical, neuroimaging and histopathological correlations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Ileana; Udriştoiu, I; Marinescu, D

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is recognized as a psychiatric disorder that causes the most pronounced disturbances of cognition and social integration. In the etiopathogenesis of the disease, genetic, neurobiological and vascular factors are involved. Functional integrity of the brain can be correlated with the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the dysfunction of this barrier is an indicator that suggests neurodevelopmental abnormalities, injuries of various etiologies and dysfunctions within the small vessels of the brain that disrupt the calcium homeostasis. Neuroimaging shows that in patients with poor evolution, cognitive dysfunction and therapeutic resistance, the presence of choroid plexus calcification associated with hippocampal, frontal, temporoparietal and cerebellar atrophies. Antipsychotics with high capacity to block D2 dopamine receptors (haloperidol model) can aggravate apoptotic mechanisms of the brain areas involved in cognition and disrupts the functional integrity of the BBB due to decreased of choroid plexus blood flow because of the narrowing of cerebral small vessels. Choroid plexus calcification may be a predictive indicator of poor evolution or of a neurodegenerative type. PMID:23771083

  13. Mineral and bone disorder and vascular calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Pércio, Pedro Paulo Verona

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications has been associated with bone and mineral disorders. The alterations in the serum level of calcium concentrations and phosphate are importants factors implicated in the arterial calcification in chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of vascular calcification is a complex mechanism and not completely clear, being able to correspond to an active process of cellular transformation and heterotopic ossification. Beyond the hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, they are involved in this process changes in the metabolism of inhibitors and promoters of calcification such as fetuin A, osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, and matrix gla protein. For the diagnosis of the calcified arterial injury are available several complementary methods, a method of estimate of the cardiovascular risk based on plain radiographs of the lumbar column and another method based on simple x-rays of the pelvis and hands. Below, we will present a review approching the link between vascular calcifications and mineral disorders. PMID:25055361

  14. Nano-analytical electron microscopy reveals fundamental insights into human cardiovascular tissue calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L.; Chester, Adrian H.; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of calcified material in cardiovascular tissue is thought to involve cytochemical, extracellular matrix and systemic signals; however, its precise composition and nanoscale architecture remain largely unexplored. Using nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques, we examined valves, aortae and coronary arteries from patients with and without calcific cardiovascular disease and detected spherical calcium phosphate particles, regardless of the presence of calcific lesions. We also examined lesions after sectioning with a focused ion beam and found that the spherical particles are composed of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite that crystallographically and structurally differs from bone mineral. Taken together, these data suggest that mineralized spherical particles may play a fundamental role in calcific lesion formation. Their ubiquitous presence in varied cardiovascular tissues and from patients with a spectrum of diseases further suggests that lesion formation may follow a common process. Indeed, applying materials science techniques to ectopic and orthotopic calcification has great potential to lend critical insights into pathophysiological processes underlying calcific cardiovascular disease.

  15. [Serpiginous calcifications in breast filariasis: A descriptor not included in the BI-RADS classification system].

    PubMed

    Mora-Encinas, J P; Martín-Martín, B; Martín-Martín, L; Mora-Monago, R

    2015-01-01

    Filariasis is a parasitic disease with a benign course caused by nematodes. Filariasis is endemic in some tropical regions, and immigration has made it increasingly common in some centers in Spain. The death of the parasites can lead to calcifications that are visible in mammograms; these calcifications have specific characteristics and should not be confused with those arising in other diseases. However, the appearance of calcifications due to filariasis is not included in the most common systems used for the classification of calcifications on mammograms (BI-RADS), and this can lead to confusion. In this article, we discuss the need to update classification systems and warn radiologists about the appearance of these calcifications to ensure their correct diagnosis and avoid confusion with other diseases. PMID:25682995

  16. PPARγ COUNTERACTS LRP1-INDUCED VASCULAR CALCIFICATION BY INHIBITING A WNT5A SIGNALING PATHWAY

    PubMed Central

    Woldt, Estelle; Terrand, Jérome; Mlih, Mohamed; Matz, Rachel L.; Bruban, Véronique; Coudane, Fanny; Foppolo, Sophie; El Asmar, Zeina; Chollet, Maria Eugenia; Ninio, Ewa; Bednarczyk, Audrey; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Boudier, Christian; Wahli, Walter; Chambon, Pierre; Metzger, Daniel; Herz, Joachim; Boucher, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a hallmark of advanced atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show that deletion of the nuclear receptor PPARγ in vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) of Low Density Lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) deficient mice fed an atherogenic high-cholesterol diet results in accelerated vascular calcification with chondrogenic metaplasia within the lesions. We demonstrate that vascular calcification in the absence of PPARγ requires the transmembrane receptor Low Density Lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1). LRP1 promotes a previously unknown Wnt5a dependent prochondrogenic pathway that activates the chondrogenic program. PPARγ protects against vascular calcification by activating sFRP2, which we show functions as a Wnt5a antagonist. Thus, targeting this signaling pathway has important clinical implications, impacting on common complications of atherosclerosis including coronary artery calcification and valvular sclerosis. PMID:23011131

  17. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  18. Calcifications Are Potential Surrogates for Prostate Localization in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Grace G. McGowan, Tom S.; Larsen, Tessa M.; Bruce, Lisa M.; Moran, Natasha K.; Tsao, Jonathan R.; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using calcifications as surrogates for the prostate position during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The twice-weekly CBCT images taken during the treatment course of 4 patients were retrospectively studied for the stability of the calcifications. The geometric center of three fiducial markers was used as the reference. The planning CT images of 131 prostate patients recently treated with external beam radiotherapy at our center were reviewed to estimate the calcification occurrence rate. Analysis was conducted using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Two patients were treated using prostate calcifications as the landmark in on-line registration. Both the Varian standard and the low-dose CBCT modes were used for imaging. Results: The calcifications were found to be stable during the treatment course. At the 95% confidence interval, the difference between the distance from an identified calcification to the fiducial markers on CBCT and the distance on the planning CT scans was 0.2 {+-} 2.0 mm, 0.8 {+-} 2.2 mm, and 0.4 {+-} 2.4 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior direction, respectively. Of the 131 patients, 46 (35%) had well-defined calcifications either inside the prostate or near the borders. Our experience in treating the first 2 patients demonstrated that the calcifications are easily distinguished on low-dose scans and that calcification registration can be precisely performed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that calcifications can be reliable markers of prostate position and allow for precise image guidance with a low-imaging dose. With this approach, potentially about one-third of prostate patients could benefit from precise image guidance without the invasive use of markers.

  19. Gelatinases promote calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells by up-regulating bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meng, Fan-Xing; Li, Bing-Wei; Sheng, You-Ming; Liu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Bing; Li, Hong-Wei; Xiu, Rui-Juan

    2016-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), also known as gelatinase A, is involved in vascular calcification. Another member of gelatinases is MMP-9 (gelatinase B). However, the role of gelatinases in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification is not well understood. The current study aims to clarify the relationship between gelatinases and vascular calcification and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) was used to induce calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with or without 2-[[(4-Phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane (SB-3CT), a specific gelatinases inhibitor. Levels of calcification were determined by assessing calcium content and calcification area of VSMCs. Phenotype transition of VSMCs was observed by assessing expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) and desmin. Gelatin zymography was applied to determine the activities of gelatinases, and western blot was applied to determine expressions of gelatinases, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and msh homeobox homolog 2 (Msx-2). Gelatinases inhibition by SB-3CT alleviated calcification and phenotype transition of VSMCs induced by β-GP. Increased gelatinases expression and active MMP-2 were observed in calcifying VSMCs. Gelatinases inhibition reduced expression of RUNX2, Msx-2 and BMP-2. BMP-2 treatment increased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2, while noggin, an antagonist of BMP-2, decreased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2. Gelatinases promote vascular calcification by upregulating BMP-2 which induces expression of RUNX2 and Msx-2, two proteins associated with phenotype transition of VSMCs in vascular calcification. Interventions targeting gelatinases inhibition might be a proper candidate for ameliorating vascular calcification. PMID:26797522

  20. Direct comparison of regulators of calcification between bone and vessels in humans.

    PubMed

    Schweighofer, N; Aigelsreiter, A; Trummer, O; Graf-Rechberger, M; Hacker, N; Kniepeiss, D; Wagner, D; Stiegler, P; Trummer, C; Pieber, T; Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Müller, H

    2016-07-01

    Calcification is not only physiologically present in bone but is a main pathophysiological process in vasculature, favouring cardiovascular diseases. Our aim was to investigate changes in the expression of calcification regulators during vascular calcification in bone and vasculature. Levels of gene expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), osteopontin (OPN), matrix gla protein (MGP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), SMAD6, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were determined in bone, aorta, and external iliac artery tissue samples of transplant donors. Histological stages of atherosclerosis (AS) in vessels are defined as "no changes", "intima thickening", or "intima calcification". Patients' bone samples were subgrouped accordingly. We demonstrate that in vessels BSP and OPN expression significantly increased during intima thickening and decreased during intima calcification, whereas the expression of regulators of calcification did not significantly change in bone during intima thickening and intima calcification. At the stage of intima thickening, MGP, OPG, and SMAD6 expression and at stage of intima calcification only MGP expression was lower in bone than in vessel. The expression of BSP and RANKL was regulated in opposite ways in bone and vessels, whereas the expression of MGP, OC, RUNX2, and OPN was regulated in a tissue-specific manner. Our study is the first direct comparison of gene expression changes during AS progression in bone and vessels. Our results indicate that changes in the expression of regulators of calcification in the vessel wall as well as in bone occur early in the calcification process, even prior to deposition of calcium/phosphate precipitation. PMID:27108945

  1. Arterial and Aortic Valve Calcification Abolished by Elastolytic Cathepsin S Deficiency in Chronic Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Elena; Aikawa, Masanori; Libby, Peter; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Rusanescu, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Kohler, Rainer H.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinical studies have demonstrated that 50% of individuals with chronic renal disease (CRD) die of cardiovascular causes, including advanced calcific arterial and valvular disease; however, the mechanisms of accelerated calcification in CRD remain obscure, and no therapies can prevent disease progression. We recently demonstrated in vivo that inflammation triggers cardiovascular calcification. In vitro evidence also indicates that elastin degradation products may promote osteogenesis. Here, we used genetically modified mice and molecular imaging to test the hypothesis in vivo that cathepsin S (catS), a potent elastolytic proteinase, accelerates calcification in atherosclerotic mice with CRD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein-deficient (apoE−/−)/catS+/+ (n = 24) and apoE−/−/catS−/− (n = 24) mice were assigned to CRD and control groups. CRD mice had significantly higher serum phosphate, creatinine, and cystatin C levels than those without CRD. To visualize catS activity and osteogenesis in vivo, we coadministered catS-activatable and calcification-targeted molecular imaging agents 10 weeks after nephrectomy. Imaging coregistered increased catS and osteogenic activities in the CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ cohort, whereas CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− mice exhibited less calcification. Quantitative histology demonstrated greater catS-associated elastin fragmentation and calcification in CRD apoE−/−/catS+/+ than CRD apoE−/−/catS−/− aortas and aortic valves. Notably, catS deletion did not cause compensatory increases in RNA levels of other elastolytic cathepsins or matrix metalloproteinases. Elastin peptide and recombinant catS significantly increased calcification in smooth muscle cells in vitro, a process further amplified in phosphate-enriched culture medium. Conclusions The present study provides direct in vivo evidence that catS-induced elastolysis accelerates arterial and aortic valve calcification in CRD

  2. Mammographic parasitic calcifications in South West Nigeria: prospective and descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji-Sofoluwe, Adenike Temitayo; Obajimi, Millicent Olubunmi; Oluwasola, Abideen Olayiwola; Soyemi, Temitope O

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lymphatic filariasis caused by nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia Malayi is endemic in the tropics. In Nigeria, 25% of the population is infected. Lymph edema and elephantiasis are the predominant manifestations. Its infrequent manifestation is in the breast. This paper discusses the epidemiology, reviews literature, imaging options and mammographic appearances of these parasitic nematodes. Methods This prospective descriptive study reports on 39 cases of parasitic calcifications seen during mammography in the Radiology Department, University College Hospital between 2006 and 2012 in Ibadan, South West Nigeria. Each mammogram was reported by MO and ATS: assigned a final Bi-RADs category. Parasitic calcifications were further evaluated for distribution, and types of calcification. Results A total of 527 women had mammography done between 2006 and 2012. Thirty-nine women (7.4%) had parasitic breast calcifications. The ages of the women ranged between 38-71 years - mean of 52.36±8.72 SD. Twenty-three (59%) were post-menopausal, 16(41%) were pre-menopausal. The majority (31; 79.5%) were screeners while 8(20.5%) were follow up cases. Approximately half (51.3%) of the women had no complaints. Pain (23.1%) was the commonest presentation in the remaining half. Solitary calcifications were predominant (20) while only 3 cases had 10 calcifications. Left sided calcifications (53.8%) were the majority. Calcifications were subcutaneous in 2/3rds of the women (66.7%) while the Yoruba tribe (84.6%) was principal. Conclusion Parasitic breast calcifications can be misdiagnosed on mammography for suspicious micro-calcification. This publication should alert radiologists in a tropical country like Nigeria to increase diagnostic vigilance thereby preventing unnecessary anxiety and invasive work-up procedures. PMID:24255732

  3. Vitamin K2 regression aortic calcification induced by warfarin via Gas6/Axl survival pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Tao, Huiren; Qiu, Cuiting; Ma, Xiaolei; Li, Shan; Guo, Xian; Lv, Anlin; Li, Huan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of vitamin K2 on aortic calcification induced by warfarin via Gas6/Axl survival pathway in rats. A calcification model was established by administering 3mg/g warfarin to rats. Rats were divided into 9 groups: control group (0W, 4W, 6W and 12W groups), 4W calcification group, 6W calcification group, 12W calcification group, 6W calcification+6W normal group and 6W calcification+6W vitamin K2 group. Alizarin red S staining measured aortic calcium depositions; alkaline phosphatase activity in serum was measured by a kit; apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL assay; protein expression levels of Gas6, Axl, phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), and Bcl-2 were determined by western blotting. The calcium content, calcium depositions, ALP activity and apoptosis were significantly higher in the calcification groups than control group. Gas6, Axl, p-Akt and Bcl-2 expression was lower in the calcification group than control group. 100μg/g vitamin K2 treatment decreased calcium depositions, ALP activity and apoptosis significantly, but increased Gas6, Axl, p-Akt and Bcl-2 expression. 100μg/g vitamin K2 reversed 44% calcification. Pearson correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between formation calcification and apoptosis (R(2)=0.8853, P<0.0001). In conclusion, we established a warfarin-induced calcification model and showed vitamin K2 can inhibit warfarin-induced aortic calcification and apoptosis. The regression of aortic calcification by vitamin K2 involved the Gas6/Axl axis. This data may provide a theoretical basis for future clinical treatments for aortic calcification. PMID:27212383

  4. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome of the midbrain and hypothalamus - a case report of uremic encephalopathy presenting with hypersomnia].

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting with hypersomnia and loss of appetite. She suffered from diabetic nephropathy without receiving dialysis, in addition to hypertension, which was well controlled without marked fluctuation. There were no objective neurological findings. Her laboratory findings showed renal failure with 3.7 mg/dl of serum creatinine and decreased serum sodium and potassium. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) with vasogenic edema, which was distributed in the dorsal midbrain, medial thalamus, and hypothalamus. After we addressed the electrolyte imbalance and dehydration, her symptoms and MRI findings gradually improved, but faint high signals on MRI were still present 3 months later. Orexin in the cerebrospinal fluid was decreased on admission, but improved 6 months later. We diagnosed uremic encephalopathy with atypical form PRES showing functional disturbance of the hypothalamus. PMID:26640128

  5. Efficiency of substitution of 2-ketoisocaproic acid and 2-ketoisovaleric acid in the diet of normal and uremic growing rats.

    PubMed

    Laouari, D; Kamoun, P P; Rocchiccioli, F; Dodu, C; Kleinknecht, C; Broyer, M

    1986-12-01

    Effects of various intakes of the ketoanalogues of leucine (KICA) and valine (KIVA) on growth, nitrogen, and urea excretion were examined and compared to those of an optimal intake (A) of the corresponding amino acids. Diet KICA and KIVA contents varied from 1 to 4 times A. In controls, growth was significantly reduced with equimolar substitution, corrected with twice A, and unchanged at higher levels. Doubling KICA corrected growth except with substantial anorexia. In uremic rats fed KIVA, growth was corrected at twice A. Low-KICA diets reduced plasma-leucine level; higher KICA diets normalized plasma leucine and revealed branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) antagonism. Changes in 2-ketoacids were unrelated to those of BCAA. In uremia, KICA decreased plasma and urinary urea without changing nitrogen retention. Ketoacid substitution for amino acids was 50% efficient in normal rats and not altered by uremia. BCKAs, specifically KICA, could modify urea metabolism. PMID:3788832

  6. First evidence for accumulation of protein-bound and protein-free pyrraline in human uremic plasma by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Odani, H; Shinzato, T; Matsumoto, Y; Takai, I; Nakai, S; Miwa, M; Iwayama, N; Amano, I; Maeda, K

    1996-07-01

    Glucose-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) cross-link proteins and cause various biological tissue damage. One of them, pyrraline [epsilon-2-(formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-pyrrol-1-yl) -L-norleucine], has been demonstrated by utilizing antibody to accumulate in plasma and sclerosed matrix of diabetic individuals, suggesting responsibility for diabetic complications. To elucidate the involvement of pyrraline in uremia, we examined the pyrraline levels in patients with chronic renal failure by a mass spectrometric approach. Here we show that protein-free pyrraline as well as pyrraline with binding protein are significantly increased in non-diabetic uremic plasma compared to healthy subjects. Our results suggest that circulating pyrraline could be a substance contributing to complications in uremia. PMID:8694819

  7. Dysregulation of Angiopoietin 1 and 2 in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection and the Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrea V.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Watkins, Sandra L.; Rajwans, Nimerta; Petruzziello-Pellegrini, Tania N.; Marsden, Philip A.; Kain, Kevin C.; Liles, W. Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by profound prothrombotic abnormalities. Endothelial dysfunction, manifested as dysregulation of angiopoietins 1 and 2 (Ang-1/2), could underlie HUS pathophysiology. We measured Ang-1/2 in 77 children with E. coli O157:H7 infection. Ang-1, Ang-2, and the Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio were significantly different in HUS vs the pre-HUS phase of illness or uncomplicated infection. Angiopoietin dysregulation preceded HUS and worsened as HUS developed. In vitro exposure of human microvascular endothelial cells to Shiga toxin recapitulated the in vivo observations. Angiopoietin regulation is profoundly affected before and during HUS, reflecting that subclinical endothelial dysfunction precedes overt microangiopathy. PMID:23801605

  8. Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification: The Pivotal Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification, abnormal mineralization of the vessel wall, is frequently associated with aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is a key risk factor for many adverse clinical outcomes, including ischemic cardiac events and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Vascular calcification was long considered to be a passive degenerative process, but it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process similar to bone formation. However, despite numerous studies on the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, the mechanisms driving this process remain poorly understood. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. Recent studies show that PDK4 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of vascular calcification and describe the role of PDK4 in the osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells and development of vascular calcification. Further studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification will be critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26996423

  9. Role of osteoprotegerin and its ligands and competing receptors in atherosclerotic calcification.

    PubMed

    Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda

    2006-11-01

    Vascular calcification significantly impairs cardiovascular physiology, and its mechanism is under investigation. Many of the same factors that modulate bone osteogenesis, including cytokines, hormones, and lipids, also modulate vascular calcification, acting through many of the same transcription factors. In some cases, such as for lipids and cytokines, the net effect on calcification is positive in the artery wall and negative in bone. The mechanism for this reciprocal relation is not established. A recent series of reports points to the possibility that two bone regulatory factors, receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and its soluble decoy receptor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), govern vascular calcification and may explain the phenomenon. Both RANKL and OPG are widely accepted as the final common pathway for most factors and processes affecting bone resorption. Binding of RANKL to its cognate receptor RANK induces NF-kappaB signaling, which stimulates osteoclastic differentiation in preosteoclasts and induces bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) expression in chondrocytes. A role for RANKL and its receptors in vascular calcification is spported by several findings: a vascular calcification phenotype in mice genetically deficient in OPG; an increase in expression of RANKL, and a decrease in expression of OPG, in calcified arteries; clinical associations between coronary disease and serum OPG and RANKL levels; and RANKL induction of calcification and osteoblastic differentiation in valvular myofibroblasts. PMID:17169261

  10. Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification: The Pivotal Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jaechan; Lee, In Kyu

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification, abnormal mineralization of the vessel wall, is frequently associated with aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is a key risk factor for many adverse clinical outcomes, including ischemic cardiac events and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Vascular calcification was long considered to be a passive degenerative process, but it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process similar to bone formation. However, despite numerous studies on the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, the mechanisms driving this process remain poorly understood. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. Recent studies show that PDK4 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of vascular calcification and describe the role of PDK4 in the osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells and development of vascular calcification. Further studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification will be critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26996423

  11. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:26838480

  12. On the effect of calcification volume and configuration on the mechanical behaviour of carotid plaque tissue.

    PubMed

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex molecular process that exhibits a number of relatively characteristic morphology patterns in atherosclerotic plaques. Treatment of arterial stenosis by endovascular intervention, involving forceful circumferential expansion of the plaque, can be unpredictable in calcified lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical stretching mechanisms and define the mechanical limits for circumferentially expanding carotid plaque lesions under the influence of distinct calcification patterns. Mechanical and structural characterisation was performed on 17 human carotid plaques acquired from patients undergoing endarterectomy procedures. The mechanical properties were determined using uniaxial extension tests that stretch the lesions to complete failure along their circumferential axis. Calcification morphology of mechanically ruptured plaque lesions was characterised using high resolution micro computed tomography imaging. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the mechanically induced failure sites and to identify the interface boundary conditions between calcified and non-calcified tissue. The mechanical tests produced four distinct trends in mechanical behaviour which corresponded to the calcification patterns that structurally defined each mechanical group. Each calcification pattern produced unique mechanical restraining effects on the plaque tissue stretching properties evidenced by the variation in degree of stretch to failure. Resistance to failure appears to rely on interactions between calcification and non-calcified tissue. Scanning electron microscopy examination revealed structural gradations at interface boundary conditions to facilitate the transfer of stress. This study emphasises the mechanical influence of distinct calcification configurations on plaque expansion properties and highlights the importance of pre-operative lesion characterisation to optimise treatment outcomes. PMID:26655460

  13. The Role of AGE/RAGE Signaling in Diabetes-Mediated Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AGE/RAGE signaling has been a well-studied cascade in many different disease states, particularly diabetes. Due to the complex nature of the receptor and multiple intersecting pathways, the AGE/RAGE signaling mechanism is still not well understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight key areas of AGE/RAGE mediated vascular calcification as a complication of diabetes. AGE/RAGE signaling heavily influences both cellular and systemic responses to increase bone matrix proteins through PKC, p38 MAPK, fetuin-A, TGF-β, NFκB, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in both hyperglycemic and calcification conditions. AGE/RAGE signaling has been shown to increase oxidative stress to promote diabetes-mediated vascular calcification through activation of Nox-1 and decreased expression of SOD-1. AGE/RAGE signaling in diabetes-mediated vascular calcification was also attributed to increased oxidative stress resulting in the phenotypic switch of VSMCs to osteoblast-like cells in AGEs-induced calcification. Researchers found that pharmacological agents and certain antioxidants decreased the level of calcium deposition in AGEs-induced diabetes-mediated vascular calcification. By understanding the role the AGE/RAGE signaling cascade plays diabetes-mediated vascular calcification will allow for pharmacological intervention to decrease the severity of this diabetic complication. PMID:27547766

  14. A Genomics-Based Model for Prediction of Severe Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve Calcification.

    PubMed

    Ponasenko, Anastasia V; Khutornaya, Maria V; Kutikhin, Anton G; Rutkovskaya, Natalia V; Tsepokina, Anna V; Kondyukova, Natalia V; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E; Barbarash, Leonid S

    2016-01-01

    Severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification is a significant problem in cardiovascular surgery. Unfortunately, clinical markers did not demonstrate efficacy in prediction of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. Here, we examined whether a genomics-based approach is efficient in predicting the risk of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. A total of 124 consecutive Russian patients who underwent mitral valve replacement surgery were recruited. We investigated the associations of the inherited variation in innate immunity, lipid metabolism and calcium metabolism genes with severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. Genotyping was conducted utilizing the TaqMan assay. Eight gene polymorphisms were significantly associated with severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification and were therefore included into stepwise logistic regression which identified male gender, the T/T genotype of the rs3775073 polymorphism within the TLR6 gene, the C/T genotype of the rs2229238 polymorphism within the IL6R gene, and the A/A genotype of the rs10455872 polymorphism within the LPA gene as independent predictors of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. The developed genomics-based model had fair predictive value with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.73. In conclusion, our genomics-based approach is efficient for the prediction of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. PMID:27589735

  15. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-02-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  16. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:26838480

  17. Typical nodal calcifications in the maxillofacial region: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guomin; Sun, Xiumei; Ni, Shilei; Zhang, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple nodal calcifications in the maxillofacial region are very rare. This case report described a 49-year-old female patient diagnosed with calcified lymph nodes due to chronic inflammation of the lymphatic nodes, including the parotid lymphatic nodes, the posterior auricular lymphatic nodes and submandibular lymphatic nodes in the right maxillofacial region. In clinical practice, we conducted ultrasonography, three-dimensional reconstruction of CT and sialography make a preliminary diagnosis. Then we took surgery, while removing the calcified blocks within the lymphatic node and cleaning the wound cavity. After surgery, we used anti-inflammatory therapy for one week. Six months follow-up indicated no evidence of other calcified lymph nodes infection. PMID:25356188

  18. Computed tomographic evaluation of gallstone calcification for biliary lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Caslowitz, P L; Fishman, E K; Kafonek, D R; Lillemoe, K D; Mitchell, S; Widlus, D M; Saba, G P

    1991-04-01

    As the Food and Drug Administration trials for biliary lithotripsy in the United States near completion, future criteria for patient eligibility remain to be defined. Gallstone calcification greater than 3-mm partial rim on plain film (KUB) or oral cholecystogram (OCG) has excluded patients thus far, since early results of gallstone clearance (lithotripsy plus chemodissolution) were suboptimal with calcified stones. To evaluate the usefulness of these criteria for gallstone fragmentation, computed tomographic (CT) scans were performed on 20 patients immediately prior to lithotripsy to evaluate gallstone density and 24 hours after lithotripsy to observe the CT appearance of fragmentation. The adequacy of fragmentation was determined by pre- and post-lithotripsy sonography. This report constitutes the results of these investigations. PMID:10149158

  19. Calcification-carbonation method for red mud processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Lv, Guozhi; Xie, Liqun

    2016-10-01

    Red mud, the Bayer process residue, is generated from alumina industry and causes environmental problem. In this paper, a novel calcification-carbonation method that utilized a large amount of the Bayer process residue is proposed. Using this method, the red mud was calcified with lime to transform the silicon phase into hydrogarnet, and the alkali in red mud was recovered. Then, the resulting hydrogarnet was decomposed by CO2 carbonation, affording calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, and aluminum hydroxide. Alumina was recovered using an alkaline solution at a low temperature. The effects of the new process were analyzed by thermodynamics analysis and experiments. The extraction efficiency of the alumina and soda obtained from the red mud reached 49.4% and 96.8%, respectively. The new red mud with <0.3% alkali can be used in cement production. Using a combination of this method and cement production, the Bayer process red mud can be completely utilized. PMID:27214002

  20. Roles of aldosterone in vascular calcification: An update.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingwei; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Jie; Wang, Mong-Heng; Wang, Jingfeng; Liu, Pinming; Huang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Both clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that vascular calcification (VC) is a common pathology shared in many chronic diseases such as chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. It's an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. Since the pathogenesis of VC is complicated, current therapies have limited effects on the regression of VC. Therefore, it is urgent to investigate the potential mechanisms and find new targets for the treatment of VC. Aldosterone (Aldo), a mineralocorticoid hormone, is the metabolite of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activation, which can exert genomic and non-genomic effects on the cardiovascular system. Recent data suggests that Aldo can promote VC. Here, we summarized the roles of Aldo in the process of VC and a series of findings indicated that Aldo could act as a potentially therapeutic target for treating VC. PMID:27238972

  1. Methods for monitoring corals and crustose coralline algae to quantify in-situ calcification rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Jennifer M.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don

    2013-01-01

    The potential effect of global climate change on calcifying marine organisms, such as scleractinian (reef-building) corals, is becoming increasingly evident. Understanding the process of coral calcification and establishing baseline calcification rates are necessary to detect future changes in growth resulting from climate change or other stressors. Here we describe the methods used to establish a network of calcification-monitoring stations along the outer Florida Keys Reef Tract in 2009. In addition to detailing the initial setup and periodic monitoring of calcification stations, we discuss the utility and success of our design and offer suggestions for future deployments. Stations were designed such that whole coral colonies were securely attached to fixed apparati (n = 10 at each site) on the seafloor but also could be easily removed and reattached as needed for periodic weighing. Corals were weighed every 6 months, using the buoyant weight technique, to determine calcification rates in situ. Sites were visited in May and November to obtain winter and summer rates, respectively, and identify seasonal patterns in calcification. Calcification rates of the crustose coralline algal community also were measured by affixing commercially available plastic tiles, deployed vertically, at each station. Colonization by invertebrates and fleshy algae on the tiles was low, indicating relative specificity for the crustose coralline algal community. We also describe a new, nonlethal technique for sampling the corals, used following the completion of the monitoring period, in which two slabs were obtained from the center of each colony. Sampled corals were reattached to the seafloor, and most corals had completely recovered within 6 months. The station design and sampling methods described herein provide an effective approach to assessing coral and crustose coralline algal calcification rates across time and space, offering the ability to quantify the potential effects of

  2. MicroRNA in cardiovascular calcification: Focus on targets and extracellular vesicle delivery mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular calcification is a prominent feature of chronic inflammatory disorders — such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), type 2 diabetes (T2D), and atherosclerosis — that associate with significant morbidity and mortality. The concept that similar pathways control both bone remodeling and vascular calcification is widely accepted, but the precise mechanisms of calcification remain largely unknown. The central role of microRNAs (miRNA) as fine-tune regulators in the cardiovascular system and bone biology has gained acceptance and has raised the possibility for novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, circulating miRNAs have been proposed as biomarkers for a wide range of cardiovascular diseases, but knowledge of miRNA biology in cardiovascular calcification is very limited. This review focuses on the role of miRNA in cardiovascular disease, with emphasis on osteogenic processes. Herein, we discuss the current understanding of miRNAs in cardiovascular calcification. Furthermore, we identify a set of miRNAs common to diseases associated with cardiovascular calcification (CKD, T2D, and atherosclerosis), and we hypothesize that these miRNAs may provide a molecular signature for calcification. Finally, we discuss this novel hypothesis with emphasis on known biological and pathological osteogenic processes (e.g. osteogenic differentiation, release of calcifying matrix vesicles). The aim of this review is to provide an organized discussion of the known links between miRNA and calcification that provide emerging concepts for future studies on miRNA biology in cardiovascular calcification, which will be critical for developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23538277

  3. Effect of CO2 on coccolithophorid calcification, past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather; Mejia, Luz Maria; Bolton, Clara; Gonzalez Lemos, Saul; Paytan, Adina; Eisenhauer, Anton; Abel Flores, Jose; Fuertes, Miguel Angel; Probert, Ian; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez Vicente, Ana

    2015-04-01

    The calcite production of coccolithophores plays a key role in the ocean carbon cycle through ballasting of organic carbon, but may be affected by future changes in CO2 and ocean conditions. From our cellular process models ACTI-CO and CaSri-CO, we show how stable Ca and C isotopes in coccolith calcite elucidate the carbon and Ca allocations to calcification and how these allocations change under different CO2 concentrations. From our culture study across the modern diversity of strains of Gephyrocapsa and E. huxleyi we show that coccolith thickness variations are an excellent indicator of cellular calcification per surface area or PIC/POC, which can be used to ascertain the variation in cellular calcification to CO2 changes in the past. In modern culture experiments, cellular process modeling of carbon isotopes reveals that calcification and photosynthesis compete for intracellular bicarbonate allocation. At low CO2, photosynthesis is prioritized, and less bicarbonate is allocated to calcification. In response to decreasing atmospheric CO2 over the last 15 Ma, coccolithophorids decreased allocation of bicarbonate to the calcification beginning at about 8 Ma. This shift in carbon allocation was accompanied by major changes in the degree of calcification, as estimated from the evolution of coccolith thickness in the dominant Noelrhabdaceae coccoliths. Likewise, Ca isotopes in coccoliths suggest a change in the efficiency of Ca allocation to calcification at this time. The results suggest that on evolutionary timescales, within the full diversity of the natural ocean population, periods of high CO2 and low pH do not correspond to decreased cellular calcification.

  4. Calcification in bleached and unbleached Montastraea faveolata: evaluating the role of oxygen and glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo-Pallotta, M. F.; Rodríguez-Román, A.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.

    2010-12-01

    All reef-building corals are symbiotic with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium, which influences many aspects of the host’s physiology including calcification. Coral calcification is a biologically controlled process performed by the host that takes place several membranes away from the site of photosynthesis performed by the symbiont. Although it is well established that light accelerates CaCO3 deposition in reef-building corals (commonly referred to as light-enhanced calcification), the complete physiological mechanism behind the process is not fully understood. To better comprehend the coral calcification process, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted in the major Caribbean reef-building species Montastraea faveolata, to evaluate the effect of glycerol addition and/or the super-saturation of oxygen in the seawater. These manipulations were performed in bleached and unbleached corals, to separate the effect of photosynthesis from calcification. The results suggest that under normal physiological conditions, a 42% increase in seawater oxygen concentration promotes a twofold increase in dark-calcification rates relative to controls. On the other hand, the results obtained using bleached corals suggest that glycerol is required, as a metabolic fuel, in addition to an oxygenic environment in a symbiosis that has been disrupted. Also, respiration rates in symbiotic corals that were pre-incubated in light conditions showed a kinetic limitation, whereas corals that were pre-incubated in darkness were oxygen limited, clearly emphasizing the role of oxygen in this regard. These findings indicate that calcification in symbiotic corals is not strictly a “light-enhanced” or “dark-repressed” process, but rather, the products of photosynthesis have a critical role in calcification, which should be viewed as a “photosynthesis-driven” process. The results presented here are discussed in the context of the current knowledge of the coral

  5. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification. PMID:18336102

  6. Identification of breast calcification using magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fatemi-Ardekani, Ali; Boylan, Colm; Noseworthy, Michael D.

    2009-12-15

    MRI phase and magnitude images provide information about local magnetic field variation ({Delta}B{sub 0}), which can consequently be used to understand tissue properties. Often, phase information is discarded. However, corrected phase images are able to produce contrast as a result of magnetic susceptibility differences and local field inhomogeneities due to the presence of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances. Three-dimensional (3D) susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) can be used to probe changes in MRI phase evolution and, subsequently, result in an alternate form of contrast between tissues. For example, SWI has been useful in the assessment of negative phase induced {Delta}B{sub 0} modulation due to the presence of paramagnetic substances such as iron. Very little, however, has been done to assess positive phase induced contrast changes resulting from the presence of diamagnetic substances such as precipitated calcium. As ductal carcinoma in situ, which is the precursor of invasive ductal cancer, is often associated with breast microcalcification, the authors proposed using SWI as a possible visualization technique. In this study, breast phantoms containing calcifications (0.4-1.5 mm) were imaged using mammography, computed tomography (CT), and SWI. Corrected phase and magnitude images acquired using SWI allowed identification and correlation of all calcifications seen on CT. As the approach is a 3D technique, it could potentially allow for more accurate localization and biopsy and maybe even reduce the use of gadolinium contrast. Furthermore, the approach may be beneficial to women with dense breast tissue where the ability to detect microcalcification with mammography is reduced.

  7. The Effect of Micro-Gravity on in vitro Calcification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskey; Stiner; Binderman; Mendelsohn; Doty, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment focuses on mineral deposition or calcification of cartilage. The experiments were used to compare the mineral formed in the microgravity of space with that formed on earth. Results of these experiments were anticipated to provide direct insight into how calcification in cartridge and bone may be controlled in space. In the C-2 experiment (STS 66), we found that mineralization started later in the cartridges (both on the ground and in hypo-gravity) than in plastic, and that mineralization appeared to be retarded in hypo-gravity. The flight experiments also showed that the cells differentiated normally, but more slowly than the ground controls, and that the matrix produced was not different from that made on the ground. The purpose of the C-5 experiment was to confirm these findings. The C-5 experiment was flown on STS-72. Because of a computer problem, cells received no gases and no nutrition. The C-7 was flown on STS-77. Ground controls were repeated a week later, however, because there was a problem with the temperature control during the flight, the concurrent ground controls were performed at a different temperature. Despite these problems, the results of the C-2 experiment were confirmed. The cells in the flight cultures did not mature, formed few cartilage nodules, and showed no evidence of mineral deposition up to a culture age of 28 days. Ground controls showed the presence of mineral (based on chemical, spectroscopic, and histochemical analyses) by 21 days. The mineral in these cultures was analogous to that found in calcifying cartilage of young chicks.

  8. Association of Big Endothelin-1 with Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Yi-Lin; Xu, Rui-Xia; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Li, Sha; Wu, Na-Qiong; Li, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background The coronary artery calcification (CAC) is clinically considered as one of the important predictors of atherosclerosis. Several studies have confirmed that endothelin-1(ET-1) plays an important role in the process of atherosclerosis formation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether big ET-1 is associated with CAC. Methods and Results A total of 510 consecutively admitted patients from February 2011 to May 2012 in Fu Wai Hospital were analyzed. All patients had received coronary computed tomography angiography and then divided into two groups based on the results of coronary artery calcium score (CACS). The clinical characteristics including traditional and calcification-related risk factors were collected and plasma big ET-1 level was measured by ELISA. Patients with CAC had significantly elevated big ET-1 level compared with those without CAC (0.5±0.4 vs. 0.2±0.2, P<0.001). In the multivariate analysis, big ET-1 (Tertile 2, HR = 3.09, 95% CI 1.66–5.74, P <0.001, Tertile3 HR = 10.42, 95% CI 3.62–29.99, P<0.001) appeared as an independent predictive factor of the presence of CAC. There was a positive correlation of the big ET-1 level with CACS (r = 0.567, p<0.001). The 10-year Framingham risk (%) was higher in the group with CACS>0 and the highest tertile of big ET-1 (P<0.01). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the big ET-1 level in predicting CAC was 0.83 (95% CI 0.79–0.87, p<0.001), with a sensitivity of 70.6% and specificity of 87.7%. Conclusions The data firstly demonstrated that the plasma big ET-1 level was a valuable independent predictor for CAC in our study. PMID:26565974

  9. Bilateral basal ganglia calcification and recurrent generalized seizures as initial presentation of idiopathic hypoparathyroidism in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Manzoor Ahmad; Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Mustafa, Farhat

    2015-01-01

    Pathological calcification of basal ganglia has been encountered in children since long back and is associated with various disease entities both acute and chronic. Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of basal ganglia calcification and can account for up to 73.8% of cases. The pathogenesis of basal ganglia calcification in hypoparathyroidism is not clear, however, a high calcium-phosphorus product and poor calcium control are believed to be directly related to calcification. Besides, a direct correlation is seen with the duration of hypocalcemia; the critical duration being ≥4 years. In the presented patient, basal ganglia calcification was seen at a very young age of 6 months. To best of our knowledge, this is probably the youngest case of bilateral basal ganglia calcification in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism in literature. This suggests that besides duration of hypocalcemia, certain genetic factors and the intrauterine milieu may have a role in the pathogenesis of basal ganglia calcification. PMID:26167230

  10. Physiological controls on seawater uptake and calcification in the benthic foraminifer Ammonia tepida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nooijer, L. J.; Langer, G.; Nehrke, G.; Bijma, J.

    2009-11-01

    To analyze the relation between seawater uptake and calcification, we incubated juveniles of the benthic foraminifer Ammonia tepida with various fluorescent probes and visualised them afterwards with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Vesicle membranes, Ca ions and vacuole fluids were followed with various tracers and showed for the first time that endocytosis of seawater is part of the calcification process in Ammonia tepida. Data on the intracellular Ca ion cycling allowed for calculating a preliminary cellular Ca budget during foraminiferal calcification. This showed that the free calcium involved in the production of a new chamber cannot be sufficient and suggests that foraminifera may precipitate their calcite from an amorphous precursor.

  11. Acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Arvin; Zoga, Adam; McClure, Kristen

    2014-10-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a common source of musculoskeletal pain in adults; however, it is rarely encountered in children. Calcific tendinitis is the most commonly encountered manifestation of hydroxyapatite deposition disease, in which calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition occurs in tendons. It may cause acute or chronic pain, or may be entirely asymptomatic. We describe a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the flexor pollicis longus tendon in an 8-year-old boy, who initially presented to our department for workup of a mass felt along the volar aspect of the right wrist. PMID:24867130

  12. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve calcification, particular of the early larval stages is highly sensitive to the change of ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no and [HCO3-] and pH only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. Therefore, the availability of [HCO3-] combined with favorable environmental pH determines calcification rate and an equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the

  13. Comment on "Coral reef calcification and climate change: The effect of ocean warming"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleypas, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Eakin, C.M.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Guinotte, J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.; Jokiel, P.L.; Langdon, C.; Skirving, W.; Strong, A.E.

    2005-01-01

    McNeil et al. [2004] attempt to address an important question about the interactions of temperature and carbonate chemistry on calcification, but their projected values of reef calcification are based on assumptions that ignore critical observational and experimental literature. Certainly, more research is needed to better understand how changing temperatures and carbonate chemistry will affect not only coral reef calcification, but coral survival. As discussed above, the McNeil et al. [2004] analysis is based on assumptions that exclude potentially important factors and therefore needs to be viewed with caution. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Calcific aortic valve disease: A consensus summary from the Alliance of Investigators on Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yutzey, Katherine E.; Demer, Linda L.; Body, Simon C.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Towler, Dwight A.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.; Hofmann-Bowman, Marion A.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Rogers, Melissa B.; Sadeghi, Mehran M.; Aikawa, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Calcific Aortic Valve Disease (CAVD) is increasingly prevalent worldwide with significant morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic options beyond surgical valve replacement are currently limited. In 2011, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute assembled a working group on aortic stenosis. This group identified CAVD as an actively regulated disease process in need of further study. As a result, the Alliance of Investigators on CAVD was formed to coordinate and promote CAVD research, with the goals of identifying individuals at risk, developing new therapeutic approaches, and improving diagnostic methods. The group is composed of cardiologists, geneticists, imaging specialists, and basic science researchers. This report reviews the current status of CAVD research and treatment strategies with identification of areas in need of additional investigation for optimal management of this patient population. PMID:25189570

  15. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions.

    PubMed

    Kutikhin, Anton G; Velikanova, Elena A; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Glushkova, Tatiana V; Borisov, Vadim V; Matveeva, Vera G; Antonova, Larisa V; Filip'ev, Dmitriy E; Golovkin, Alexey S; Shishkova, Daria K; Burago, Andrey Yu; Frolov, Alexey V; Dolgov, Viktor Yu; Efimova, Olga S; Popova, Anna N; Malysheva, Valentina Yu; Vladimirov, Alexandr A; Sozinov, Sergey A; Ismagilov, Zinfer R; Russakov, Dmitriy M; Lomzov, Alexander A; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V; Gutakovsky, Anton K; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A; Demidov, Evgeniy A; Peltek, Sergey E; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F; Babich, Olga O; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V; Brusina, Elena B; Barbarash, Olga L; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease. PMID:27251104

  16. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutikhin, Anton G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Borisov, Vadim V.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Filip’Ev, Dmitriy E.; Golovkin, Alexey S.; Shishkova, Daria K.; Burago, Andrey Yu.; Frolov, Alexey V.; Dolgov, Viktor Yu.; Efimova, Olga S.; Popova, Anna N.; Malysheva, Valentina Yu.; Vladimirov, Alexandr A.; Sozinov, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.; Russakov, Dmitriy M.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V.; Gutakovsky, Anton K.; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A.; Demidov, Evgeniy A.; Peltek, Sergey E.; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F.; Babich, Olga O.; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V.; Brusina, Elena B.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.

    2016-06-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease.

  17. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions

    PubMed Central

    Kutikhin, Anton G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Borisov, Vadim V.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Filip’ev, Dmitriy E.; Golovkin, Alexey S.; Shishkova, Daria K.; Burago, Andrey Yu.; Frolov, Alexey V.; Dolgov, Viktor Yu.; Efimova, Olga S.; Popova, Anna N.; Malysheva, Valentina Yu.; Vladimirov, Alexandr A.; Sozinov, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.; Russakov, Dmitriy M.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V.; Gutakovsky, Anton K.; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A.; Demidov, Evgeniy A.; Peltek, Sergey E.; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F.; Babich, Olga O.; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V.; Brusina, Elena B.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease. PMID:27251104

  18. The Association Between Serum Magnesium Concentrations and Coronary Artery Calcification Scores in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betcher, Jenna; Zwart, Sara; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium is a natural calcium antagonist, and is inversely associated with coronary heart disease, cardiovascular mortality rates, and vascular calcification. Coronary artery calcification score is a tool used to evaluate the prognosis of coronary artery disease in individuals. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower coronary artery calcification scores (CACS), and recent studies have found a significant inverse relationship between serum magnesium concentrations and CACS in Korean and Mexican-mestizo populations. The correlation between serum magnesium concentrations and CACS is not well researched, so our aim was to examine this relationship in astronauts. We found that a higher serum magnesium concentration is significantly related to a higher coronary artery calcification score (p=.0217), and that there is a significant difference in magnesium concentrations of subjects who have a CACS greater than 100 and a CACS less than 100.

  19. Intracranial calcification in a neonate with the Sturge Weber syndrome and additional problems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Taboada, D; Ceres, L; Beltran, J; Olague, R; Nogues, A

    1979-02-26

    The neonate in this report had severe encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis with intracranial calcification, cranial hemiatrophy, microcephaly and generalised severe cerebral atrophy. Such findings are not common in the newborn with this syndrome. PMID:431990

  20. Evaluation of the relationship between periodontal risk and carotid artery calcifications on panoramic radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Gulen; Yildirim, Eren; Rencber, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate if there is a relationship between findings of carotid artery calcification (CAC) and periodontal risk in nonsmoker subjects by using panoramic radiographs (DPR). Materials and Methods: A total of 1146 DPRs were investigated. Gender, age, severity of bone loss, tooth loss, periodontal risk, and findings of carotid calcification were recorded. The periodontal risk was evaluated and classified according to the degree of alveolar bone loss. Results: CAC was diagnosed in %13.6 (n: 156) of DPRs. Of 1146 patients, 338 (29.5%) had low, 668 (60%) had moderate, and 120 (10.5%) had high periodontal risk. A statistically significant relation was observed between carotid calcification and periodontal risk. Conclusion: Positive findings of carotid calcification may be related with periodontal problems. Clinicians must be careful about diagnosing CACs on DPRs during routine examinations. In the case of positive findings of CAC and periodontitis together, the patient may be consulted to a specialist for further investigation. PMID:26929685

  1. Evidence for Rhythmicity Pacemaker in the Calcification Process of Scleractinian Coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutner-Hoch, Eldad; Schneider, Kenneth; Stolarski, Jaroslaw; Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Yam, Ruth; Meibom, Anders; Shemesh, Aldo; Levy, Oren

    2016-02-01

    Reef-building scleractinian (stony) corals are among the most efficient bio-mineralizing organisms in nature. The calcification rate of scleractinian corals oscillates under ambient light conditions, with a cyclic, diurnal pattern. A fundamental question is whether this cyclic pattern is controlled by exogenous signals or by an endogenous ‘biological-clock’ mechanism, or both. To address this problem, we have studied calcification patterns of the Red Sea scleractinian coral Acropora eurystoma with frequent measurements of total alkalinity (AT) under different light conditions. Additionally, skeletal extension and ultra-structure of newly deposited calcium carbonate were elucidated with 86Sr isotope labeling analysis, combined with NanoSIMS ion microprobe and scanning electron microscope imaging. Our results show that the calcification process persists with its cyclic pattern under constant light conditions while dissolution takes place within one day of constant dark conditions, indicating that an intrinsic, light-entrained mechanism may be involved in controlling the calcification process in photosymbiotic corals.

  2. Pathological calcification and replicating calcifying-nanoparticles: general approach and correlation.

    PubMed

    Ciftçioğlu, Neva; McKay, David S

    2010-05-01

    Calcification, a phenomenon often regarded by pathologists little more than evidence of cell death, is becoming recognized to be important in the dynamics of a variety of diseases from which millions of beings suffer in all ages. In calcification, all that is needed for crystal formation to start is nidi (nuclei) and an environment of available dissolved components at or near saturation concentrations, along with the absence of inhibitors for crystal formation. Calcifying nanoparticles (CNP) are the first calcium phosphate mineral containing particles isolated from human blood and were detected in numerous pathologic calcification related diseases. Controversy and critical role of CNP as nidi and triggering factor in human pathologic calcification are discussed. PMID:20094006

  3. [Soft tissue calcifications in panoramic radiography. A risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents?].

    PubMed

    Ariayi, Ayesha Shekeba; Berndt, Dorothea; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Panoramic radiography is a basic diagnostic tool in the dental field where calcifications are seen occasionally in the lateral parts of the x-ray. The differential diagnosis are carotid artery atheromas, calcified submandibular lymphnodes and sialoliths of the submandibular gland. 4007 panoramic radiographs (100%) from patients >40 years were scanned retrospectively. Special emphasis was given to the carotid artery territory (CAT). 225 soft tissue calcifications were found (5.6%). 144 patients had calcifications in the CAT (3.6%), 73 showed calcified submandibular lymphnodes (1.8%), and 8 (0.2%) sialoliths. The female to male ratio was 54.7%:45.3%. Pneumatic diseases were beside hypertension and smoking a risk factor for CAT calcification. Carotid artery atheromas are the main risk for cerebrovascular insults. Dentists can help to detect patients at risk for stroke. Their patients can be referred for further diagnostics (ultrasound). PMID:19954131

  4. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tatlı, Ali Murat; Göksu, Sema Sezgin; Arslan, Deniz; Başsorgun, Cumhur İbrahim; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient's history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage. PMID:23956898

  5. Study of calcification formation and disease diagnostics utilising advanced vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerssens, Marleen Maartje

    The accurate and safe diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant societal issue, with annual disease incidence of 48,000 women and around 370 men in the UK. Early diagnosis of the disease allows more conservative treatments and better patient outcomes. Microcalcifications in breast tissue are an important indicator for breast cancers, and often the only sign of their presence. Several studies have suggested that the type of calcification formed may act as a marker for malignancy and its presence may be of biological significance. In this work, breast calcifications are studied with FTIR, synchrotron FTIR, ATR FTIR, and Raman mapping to explore their disease specific composition. From a comparison between vibrational spectroscopy and routine staining procedures it becomes clear that calcium builds up prior to calcification formation. Raman and FTIR indicate the same size for calcifications and are in agreement with routine staining techniques. From the synchrotron FTIR measurements it can be proven that amide is present in the centre of the calcifications and the intensity of the bands depends on the pathology. Special attention is paid to the type of carbonate substitution in the calcifications relating to different pathology grades. In contrast to mammography, Raman spectroscopy has the capability to distinguish calcifications based on their chemical composition. The ultimate goal is to turn the acquired knowledge from the mapping studies into a clinical tool based on deep Raman spectroscopy. Deep Raman techniques have a considerable potential to reduce large numbers of normal biopsies, reduce the time delay between screening and diagnosis and therefore diminish patient anxiety. In order to achieve this, a deep Raman system is designed and after evaluation of its performance tested on buried calcification standards in porcine soft tissue and human mammary tissue. It is shown that, when the calcification is probed through tissue, the strong 960 cm-1 phosphate band

  6. Decreased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor density is associated with a more severe form of parathyroid hyperplasia in chronic uremic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, N; Tanaka, H; Tominaga, Y; Fukagawa, M; Kurokawa, K; Seino, Y

    1993-01-01

    The resistance of parathyroid cells to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) in uremic hyperparathyroidism is thought to be caused, in part, by a 1,25(OH)2D3 receptor (VDR) deficiency in the parathyroids. However, results of biochemical studies addressing VDR numbers in the parathyroids are controversial. Several studies have found VDR content to be decreased in the parathyroids of uremic patients and animals, while others have found no such decrease in the parathyroids of uremic animals. To clarify the role of VDR, we investigated VDR distribution in surgically-excised parathyroids obtained from chronic dialysis patients by immunohistochemistry. We classified the parathyroids as exhibiting nodular or diffuse hyperplasia. Our studies demonstrated a lower density of VDR in the parathyroids showing nodular hyperplasia than in those showing diffuse hyperplasia. Even in the parathyroids showing diffuse hyperplasia, nodule-forming areas were present; these areas were virtually negative for VDR staining. A significant negative correlation was found between VDR density and the weight of the parathyroids. These findings indicate that the conflicting results of biochemical studies may be caused by the heterogeneous distribution of VDR; the decreased VDR density in parathyroids may contribute to the progression of secondary hyperparathyroidism and to the proliferation of parathyroid cells that is seen in uremia. Images PMID:8397225

  7. Improving the imaging of calcifications in CT by histogram-based selective deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollano-Hijarrubia, Empar; van der Meer, Frits; van der Lugt, Add; Weinans, Harrie; Vrooman, Henry; Vossepoel, Albert; Stokking, Rik

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of small high-density structures, such as calcifications, with computed tomography (CT) is limited by the spatial resolution of the system. Blur causes small calcifications to be imaged with lower contrast and overestimated volume, thereby hampering the analysis of vessels. The aim of this work is to reduce the blur of calcifications by applying three-dimensional (3D) deconvolution. Unfortunately, the high-frequency amplification of the deconvolution produces edge-related ring artifacts and enhances noise and original artifacts, which degrades the imaging of low-density structures. A method, referred to as Histogram-based Selective Deblurring (HiSD), was implemented to avoid these negative effects. HiSD uses the histogram information to generate a restored image in which the low-intensity voxel information of the observed image is combined with the high-intensity voxel information of the deconvolved image. To evaluate HiSD we scanned four in-vitro atherosclerotic plaques of carotid arteries with a multislice spiral CT and with a microfocus CT (μCT), used as reference. Restored images were generated from the observed images, and qualitatively and quantitatively compared with their corresponding μCT images. Transverse views and maximum-intensity projections of restored images show the decrease of blur of the calcifications in 3D. Measurements of the areas of 27 calcifications and total volumes of calcification of 4 plaques show that the overestimation of calcification was smaller for restored images (mean-error: 90% for area; 92% for volume) than for observed images (143%; 213%, respectively). The qualitative and quantitative analyses show that the imaging of calcifications in CT can be improved considerably by applying HiSD.

  8. Modified Surgical Intervention for Extensive Mitral Valve Endocarditis and Posterior Mitral Annular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwan Sic; Beom, Min Sun; Kim, Sung Ryong; Kim, Na Rae; Jang, Ji Wook; Jang, Mi Hee; Ryu, Sang Wan

    2016-01-01

    The concomitant presence of posterior mitral annular calcification and infectious mitral valve lesions poses a technical challenge with considerable perioperative risk when using previously proposed techniques for mitral valve surgery. Herein, we report a case of the use of a modified surgical technique to successfully treat a patient with mitral infective endocarditis complicated by a subendocardial abscess and extensive posterior mitral annular calcification. PMID:26889447

  9. A case of bilateral testicular calcifications in a bicycle motocross rider accompanied by bulbar urethral injury.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kouji; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Seto, Chikashi; Komatsu, Kazuto; Yokoyama, Osamu; Namiki, Mikio

    2006-05-01

    A 21-year-old Japanese man who was a professional bicycle motocross rider injured his perineum during a competition. Chief complaints were gross hematuria, perineal pain, and subcutaneous ecchymosis of the scrotum. Urethrocystography revealed a torn bulbar urethra and extravasation in the same region. Scrotal ultrasonography revealed small calcifications in the bilateral testes. Here, we report a case of bilateral testicular calcifications caused by the continuous shock and vibration of the saddle in an off-road bicycle rider. PMID:16758731

  10. [Intracardiac mass: Why not a liquefaction necrosis of a mitral annulus calcification?].

    PubMed

    Leddet, P; Couppié, P; De Poli, F; Uhry, S; Hanssen, M

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic 70-year-old woman with a liquefaction necrosis of mitral annulus calcification. This mass was discovered incidentally during an echocardiographic examination. Additional treatment was not performed because liquefaction necrosis of mitral calcification usually has a benign prognosic. A scheduled clinical review with an echocardiographic examination and cardiac MRI was planified. The patient is actually healthy without any complication. PMID:26482628

  11. Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy in patients with calcification within the cardiac silhouette.

    PubMed Central

    Wald, R W; Sternberg, L; Huckell, V F; Staniloff, H M; Feiglin, D H; Morch, J E

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintiscanning was performed in 22 patients with radiographically detected calcification within the cardiac silhouette. All but one of these scintigrams showed a localised area of increased activity similar to that ordinarily seen in acute myocardial infarction. Scintiscans in 3 patients after removal of the calcified aortic valve reverted to negative. It was concluded that this technique for acute infarct detection may yield false positive results in the presence of cardiac calcification. Images PMID:207292

  12. Osteogenic differentiation of human lens epithelial cells might contribute to lens calcification.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Enikő; Tóth, Andrea; Tolnai, Emese; Bodó, Tímea; Bányai, Emese; Szabó, Dóra Júlia; Petrovski, Goran; Jeney, Viktória

    2016-09-01

    Calcification of the human lens has been described in senile cataracts and in young patients with congenital cataract or chronic uveitis. Lens calcification is also a major complication of cataract surgery and plays a role in the opacification of intraocular lenses. A cell-mediated process has been suggested in the background of lens calcification, but so far the exact mechanism remained unexplored. Lens calcification shares remarkable similarities with vascular calcification; in both pathological processes hydroxyapatite accumulates in the soft tissue. Vascular calcification is a regulated, cell-mediated process in which vascular cells undergo osteogenic differentiation. Our objective was to investigate whether human lens epithelial cells (HuLECs) can undergo osteogenic transition in vitro, and whether this process contributes to lens calcification. We used inorganic phosphate (Pi) and Ca to stimulate osteogenic differentiation of HuLECs. Osteogenic stimuli (2.5mmol/L Pi and 1.2mmol/L Ca) induced extracellular matrix mineralization and Ca deposition in HuLECs with the critical involvement of active Pi uptake. Osteogenic stimuli almost doubled mRNA expressions of osteo-/chondrogenic transcription factors Runx2 and Sox9, which was accompanied by a 1.9-fold increase in Runx2 and a 5.5-fold increase in Sox9 protein expressions. Osteogenic stimuli induced mRNA and protein expressions of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin in HuLEC. Ca content was higher in human cataractous lenses, compared to non-cataractous controls (n=10). Osteocalcin, an osteoblast-specific protein, was expressed in 2 out of 10 cataractous lenses. We conclude that osteogenic stimuli induce osteogenic differentiation of HuLECs and propose that this mechanism might play a role in lens calcification. PMID:27318027

  13. Microenvironmental changes support evidence of photosynthesis and calcification inhibition in Halimeda under ocean acidification and warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinutok, S.; Hill, R.; Doblin, M. A.; Kühl, M.; Ralph, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on photosynthesis and calcification of two important calcifying reef algae ( Halimeda macroloba and Halimeda cylindracea) were investigated with O2 microsensors and chlorophyll a fluorometry through a combination of two pCO2 (400 and 1,200 μatm) and two temperature treatments (28 and 32 °C) equivalent to the present and predicted conditions during the 2100 austral summer. Combined exposure to pCO2 and elevated temperature impaired calcification and photosynthesis in the two Halimeda species due to changes in the microenvironment around the algal segments and a reduction in physiological performance. There were no significant changes in controls over the 5-week experiment, but there was a 50-70 % decrease in photochemical efficiency (maximum quantum yield), a 70-80 % decrease in O2 production and a threefold reduction in calcification rate in the elevated CO2 and high temperature treatment. Calcification in these species is closely coupled with photosynthesis, such that a decrease in photosynthetic efficiency leads to a decrease in calcification. Although pH seems to be the main factor affecting Halimeda species, heat stress also has an impact on their photosystem II photochemical efficiency. There was a strong combined effect of elevated CO2 and temperature in both species, where exposure to elevated CO2 or temperature alone decreased photosynthesis and calcification, but exposure to both elevated CO2 and temperature caused a greater decline in photosynthesis and calcification than in each stress individually. Our study shows that ocean acidification and ocean warming are drivers of calcification and photosynthesis inhibition in Halimeda. Predicted climate change scenarios for 2100 would therefore severely affect the fitness of Halimeda, which can result in a strongly reduced production of carbonate sediments on coral reefs under such changed climate conditions.

  14. Automated aortic calcification detection in low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Htwe, Yu Maw; Padgett, Jennifer; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The extent of aortic calcification has been shown to be a risk indicator for vascular events including cardiac events. We have developed a fully automated computer algorithm to segment and measure aortic calcification in low-dose noncontrast, non-ECG gated, chest CT scans. The algorithm first segments the aorta using a pre-computed Anatomy Label Map (ALM). Then based on the segmented aorta, aortic calcification is detected and measured in terms of the Agatston score, mass score, and volume score. The automated scores are compared with reference scores obtained from manual markings. For aorta segmentation, the aorta is modeled as a series of discrete overlapping cylinders and the aortic centerline is determined using a cylinder-tracking algorithm. Then the aortic surface location is detected using the centerline and a triangular mesh model. The segmented aorta is used as a mask for the detection of aortic calcification. For calcification detection, the image is first filtered, then an elevated threshold of 160 Hounsfield units (HU) is used within the aorta mask region to reduce the effect of noise in low-dose scans, and finally non-aortic calcification voxels (bony structures, calcification in other organs) are eliminated. The remaining candidates are considered as true aortic calcification. The computer algorithm was evaluated on 45 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Using linear regression, the automated Agatston score is 98.42% correlated with the reference Agatston score. The automated mass and volume score is respectively 98.46% and 98.28% correlated with the reference mass and volume score.

  15. Susceptibility-Based Differentiation of Intracranial Calcification and Hemorrhage in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Kazim; Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Dogan, Mehmet S; Canpolat, Mehmet; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Bilgen, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    Differential diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage versus calcification on conventional magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is often challenging. Although computed tomography (CT) confirms calcification, phase information obtained during susceptibility-weighted imaging can be useful in distinguishing between 2 pathologies. Fourteen patients previously diagnosed to have hemorrhage or calcification with imaging were included in the study retrospectively. Phase shift values of hemorrhage and calcification were compared by using Student t test. The pathologies identified were tuberous sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, craniopharyngioma, congenital cytomegalovirus, subependymal hemorrhages, and hemorrhagic microembolic infarction. Calcifications appeared hypointense whereas hemorrhages were hyperintense on phase maps (left-handed magnetic resonance system). Statistical comparison of phase shift values yielded significant difference between hemorrhage versus calcification (P < .01). Phase maps were found to offer valuable data to differentiate 2 pathologies when used complementary to conventional magnetic resonance images. Considering the relatively higher risks of radiation exposure in children, susceptibility-weighted imaging with phase maps may help to waive radiation exposure from CT. PMID:25348417

  16. Acute symptomatic calcific discitis in adults: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Botchu, R; Grainger, M F; Davies, A M; James, S L

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic calcific discitis has been reported in the paediatric population but is a rare entity in adults with only eight cases reported in the English literature. We present a case of adult calcific discitis presenting with acute onset back pain. Radiographs and CT demonstrated central T11-T12 disc calcification with diffuse marrow oedema on subsequent MRI. The patient was referred to our spinal oncology unit due to the extensive marrow oedema as a possible underlying primary bone tumour. Review of the CT confirmed an end-plate defect with herniated calcific nucleus pulposus with no underlying bone lesion. Features were in keeping with acute calcific discitis. The patient was treated symptomatically and made an uneventful recovery. We discuss the characteristic imaging features seen on radiograph, CT and MRI and review the current literature. Calcific discitis is a self-limiting pathology requiring symptomatic management only. Radiologists need to be aware of this rare entity as it can occur in adults and may be mistaken for a more sinister pathology such as infective discitis or a bone tumour and lead to further unnecessary imaging or invasive procedures. PMID:26160461

  17. Calcification, a physiological process to be considered in the context of the whole organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, H. S.; Wood, H. L.; Kendall, M. A.; Spicer, J. I.; Twitchett, R. J.; Widdicombe, S.

    2009-02-01

    Marine organisms that produce calcium carbonate structures are predicted to be most vulnerable to a decline in oceanic pH (ocean acidification) based on the understanding that calcification rates will decrease as a result of changes in the seawater carbonate chemistry thereby reducing carbonate ion concentration (and associated saturation states). Coastal seas are critical components of the global carbon cycle yet little research has been conducted on acidification impacts on coastal benthic organisms. Here, a critical appraisal of calcification in six benthic species showed, contrary to popular predictions, calcification can increase, and not decrease, in acidified seawater. Measuring the changes in calcium in isolated calcium carbonate structure as well as structures from live animals exposed to acidified seawater allowed a comparison between a species' ability to calcify and the dissolution affects across decreasing levels of pH. Calcium carbonate production is dependant on the ability to increase calcification thus counteracting an increase in dissolution. Comparison with paleoecological studies of past high carbon dioxide (CO2) events presents a similar picture. This conclusion implies that calcification may not be the critical process impacted by ocean acidification; particularly as all species investigated displayed physiological trade offs including reduced metabolism, health, and behavioural responses, in association with this calcification upregulation, which possess as great a threat to survival as an inability to calcify.

  18. Pathological Calcification and Ossification in Relation to Leriche and Policard's Theory

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Watson; Roberts, R. E.

    1933-01-01

    (1) Pathology of calcification and ossification.—The Leriche-Policard theories. Hyperæmia of bone causes decalcification. Reduced blood supply causes sclerosis. Diminution of vascularity of fibrous tissue causes calcification. Excess of calcium, adequate blood supply and fibroblasts give rise to bone anywhere. Subperiosteal ossification. “Myositis ossificans.” (2) Radiological significance of density of bone shadows.—Decalcification of disuse, of infections, of neoplasms. Traumatic and infective scquestra. Evidence that a fragment of bone is avascular. (3) Hyperæmic decalcification of bone.—Delayed and non-union of fractures. Kummel's disease. Spontaneous hyperæmic dislocation of the atlas. Hyperæmic decalcification and nephrolithiasis. (4) Anæmic sclerosis of bone.—Syphilitic bone disease. Malignant bone disease. Fragility of sclerosed bone—Paget's, Kienboch's, Kohler's and Panner's, Albers-Schönberg's diseases. (5) Pathological calcification.—Calcification of supraspinatus tendon. Calcification of tumours—angioma, hæmatoma, and thrombosed vessels, lipoma, cysts, etc. Calcification of semilunar cartilages and intervertebral discs. (6) Pathological ossification.—Ossification of tendons. Ossification of semilunar cartilages. PMID:19989304

  19. Comparison of Therapeutic Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave in Calcific Versus Noncalcific Lateral Epicondylopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Wook; Hwang, Ji Hye; Choi, Yoo Seong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in lateral epicondylopathy with calcification, and compare it to the effect of ESWT in lateral epicondylopathy without calcification. Methods A retrospective study was conducted. Forty-three patients (19 with calcific and 24 with noncalcific lateral epicondylopathy in ultrasound imaging) were included. Clinical evaluations included the 100-point score, Nirschl Pain Phase scale before and after ESWT, and Roles and Maudsley (R&M) scores after ESWT. ESWT (2,000 impulses and 0.06–0.12 mJ/mm2) was performed once a week for 4 weeks. Results The 100-point score and Nirschl Pain Phase scale changed significantly over time (p<0.001), but there was no significant difference between groups (p=0.555). The R&M scores at 3 and 6 months after ESWT were not significantly different between groups. In the presence of a tendon tear, those in the calcific lateral epicondylopathy group showed poor improvement of 100-point scores compared to the noncalcific group (p=0.004). Conclusion This study demonstrated that the therapeutic effect of ESWT in calcific lateral epicondylopathy was not significantly different from that in noncalcific lateral epicondylopathy. When a tendon tear is present, patients with calcific lateral epicondylopathy might show poor prognosis after ESWT relative to patients with noncalcific lateral epicondylopathy. PMID:27152280

  20. Insulin resistance in uremia. Characterization of lipid metabolism in freshly isolated and primary cultures of hepatocytes from chronic uremic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Caro, J F; Lanza-Jacoby, S

    1983-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism(s) of hyperlipidemia and liver insulin sensitivity in a rat model of severe chronic uremia (U). Basal lipid synthesis was decreased in freshly isolated hepatocytes from U when compared with sham-operated ad lib.-fed controls (alfC). Basal lipid synthesis in pair-fed controls (pfC) was in between U and alfC. Similarly, the activity of liver acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthetase, citrate cleavage enzyme, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was diminished in U. Muscle and adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase was also decreased. Insulin stimulated lipid synthesis in freshly isolated hepatocytes from alfC. Hepatocytes from U and pfC were resistant to this effect of insulin. To ascertain if the insulin resistance in U was due to starvation (chow intake 50% of alfC) or to uremia itself, the U and pfC were intragastrically fed an isocaloric diet via a Holter pump the last week of the experimental period. Hepatocytes from orally fed U and pfC were also cultured for 24 h in serum-free medium. While freshly isolated and cultured U hepatocytes remained insulin resistant, those from pfC normalized, in vivo and in vitro, when they were provided with enough nutrients. Conclusions: (a) Hyperlipidemia in uremia is not due to increased synthesis, but to defect(s) in clearance. (b) Insulin does not stimulate lipid synthesis in uremia. This finding, along with our recent demonstration that insulin binding and internalization are not decreased in the uremic liver, suggests that a post-binding defect(s) in the liver plays an important role in the mechanism(s) of insulin resistance in uremia. (c) Cultured hepatocytes from uremic rats remain insulin resistant. This quality renders these cells useful in studying the postinsulin binding events responsible for the insulin-resistant state in the absence of complicating hormonal and substrate changes that occur in vivo. PMID:6350367

  1. From the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) to the kidneys: live bacterial cultures (probiotics) mediating reductions of uremic toxin levels via free radical signaling.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Linnane, Anthony W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2013-11-01

    A host of compounds are retained in the body of uremic patients, as a consequence of progressive renal failure. Hundreds of compounds have been reported to be retention solutes and many have been proven to have adverse biological activity, and recognized as uremic toxins. The major mechanistic overview considered to contribute to uremic toxin overload implicates glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, hexosamine, increased polyol pathway activity and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Until recently, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and its associated micro-biometabolome was a neglected factor in chronic disease development. A systematic underestimation has been to undervalue the contribution of GIT dysbiosis (a gut barrier-associated abnormality) whereby low-level pro-inflammatory processes contribute to chronic kidney disease (CKD) development. Gut dysbiosis provides a plausible clue to the origin of systemic uremic toxin loads encountered in clinical practice and may explain the increasing occurrence of CKD. In this review, we further expand a hypothesis that posits that environmentally triggered and maintained microbiome perturbations drive GIT dysbiosis with resultant uremia. These subtle adaptation responses by the GIT microbiome can be significantly influenced by probiotics with specific metabolic properties, thereby reducing uremic toxins in the gut. The benefit translates to a useful clinical treatment approach for patients diagnosed with CKD. Furthermore, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different anatomical locales is highlighted as a positive process. Production of ROS in the GIT by the epithelial lining and the commensal microbe cohort is a regulated process, leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide which acts as an essential second messenger required for normal cellular homeostasis and physiological function. Whilst this critical review has focused on end-stage CKD (type 5), our aim was to build a plausible hypothesis

  2. Pineal calcification in relation to menopause in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    I have suggested that critical changes in melatonin secretion, as mediated by the pineal gland, may exert a crucial role in the onset and pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Since pineal calcification (PC) is thought to reflect the metabolic and secretory activity of the gland, I investigated in 29 randomly selected chronic institutionalized female schizophrenic patients the association of PC on CT scan with premenopausal (prior to age 40) versus menopausal (ages 40-55) onset of illness. The premenopausal patients were found to show a significantly higher prevalence of PC than the menopausal patients (55.5% vs. 18.1%; X2 = 3.93, df = 1, p < .05). Since PC was unrelated to historical, demographic, and treatment variables, these findings highlight the importance of the pineal gland for the timing of the onset of schizophrenia, particularly in relation to the female reproductive state. The results carry theoretical implications on the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and suggest that the pineal gland may exert a protective effect against its onset. PMID:1305625

  3. Abnormal EEG and calcification of the pineal gland in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Kay, S R

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) studies of the brain in schizophrenic patients have demonstrated a variety of structural abnormalities. We reported recently an association between pineal calcification (PC) and cortical and prefrontal cortical atrophy, and third ventricular size on CT scan in chronic schizophrenic patients. These findings indicate that in schizophrenia PC is associated with the morphological brain abnormalities associated with the disease. If PC is, indeed, related to organic cerebral pathology, then one would expect a higher prevalence of pineal gland pathology among patients with electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities by comparison to those with a normal EEG. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the prevalence of PC on CT scan in a sample of 52 neuroleptic-treated schizophrenic patients (29 men, 23 women, mean age: 51.3 years SD = 9.1), of whom 10 (19.2%) had an abnormal EEG. The prevalence of PC in patients with EEG abnormalities was significantly greater by comparison to those with a normal EEG (90.0% vs. 54.8%, X2 = 4.24, p < .05). Since both groups did not differ on any of the historical and demographic data, and since PC was unrelated to neuroleptic exposure, these findings suggest that in schizophrenia PC may be related to the disease process and that it may be a marker of subcortical pathology. PMID:1342008

  4. Inverse Associations Between Perceived Racism and Coronary Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    EVERAGE, NICHOLAS J.; GJELSVIK, ANNIE; MCGARVEY, STEPHEN T.; LINKLETTER, CRYSTAL D.; LOUCKS, ERIC B.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether racial discrimination is associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC) in African-American participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. METHODS: The study included American Black men (n = 571) and women (n = 791) aged 33 to 45 years in the CARDIA study. Perceived racial discrimination was assessed based on the Experiences of Discrimination scale (range, 1–35). CAC was evaluated using computed tomography. Primary analyses assessed associations between perceived racial discrimination and presence of CAC using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age, gender, socioeconomic position (SEP), psychosocial variables, and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. RESULTS: In age- and gender-adjusted logistic regression models, odds of CAC decreased as the perceived racial discrimination score increased (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90–0.98 per 1-unit increase in Experiences of Discrimination scale). The relationship did not markedly change after further adjustment for SEP, psychosocial variables, or CHD risk factors (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87–0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Perceived racial discrimination was negatively associated with CAC in this study. Estimation of more forms of racial discrimination as well as replication of analyses in other samples will help to confirm or refute these findings. PMID:22365645

  5. Potential drug targets for calcific aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Elena; Merryman, W. David

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and, given its association with age, the prevalence of CAVD is expected to continue to rise as global life expectancy increases. No drug strategies currently exist to prevent or treat CAVD. Given that valve replacement is the only available clinical option, patients often cope with a deteriorating quality of life until diminished valve function demands intervention. The recognition that CAVD results from active cellular mechanisms suggests that the underlying pathways might be targeted to treat the condition. However, no such therapeutic strategy has been successfully developed to date. One hope was that drugs already used to treat vascular complications might also improve CAVD outcomes, but the mechanisms of CAVD progression and the desired therapeutic outcomes are often different from those of vascular diseases. We, therefore, discuss the benchmarks that must be met by a CAVD treatment approach, and highlight advances in the understanding of CAVD mechanisms to identify potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24445487

  6. PVAL breast phantom for dual energy calcification detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Velissarakos, K.; Gkremos, D.; Fountzoula, C.; Bakas, A.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Microcalcifications are the main indicator for breast cancer. Dual energy imaging can enhance the detectability of calcifications by suppressing the tissue background. Two digital images are obtained using two different spectra, for the low- and high-energy respectively, and a weighted subtracted image is produced. In this study, a dual energy method for the detection of the minimum breast microcalcification thickness was developed. The used integrated prototype system consisted of a modified tungsten anode X-ray tube combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor. The breast equivalent phantom used was an elastically compressible gel of polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL). Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate microcalcifications with thicknesses ranging from 50 to 500 μm. The custom made phantom was irradiated with 40kVp and 70kVp. Tungsten (W) anode spectra filtered with 100μm Cadmium and 1000pm Copper, for the low- and high-energy, respectively. Microcalcifications with thicknesses 300μm or higher can be detected with mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.62mGy.

  7. Calcification of the aortic wall in hypercalcemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rokita, E; Cichocki, T; Divoux, S; Gonsior, B; Höfert, M; Jarczyk, L; Strzałkowski, A

    1992-10-01

    The mineralization process was investigated in the aortic wall of hypercalcemic rabbits. The elevated calcium level in serum was induced by intramuscular injection of vitamin D3. The animals were killed at different times of the experiment (max. 246 d). The freeze-dried tissue homogenates were used for elemental composition studies by means of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The structural information was obtained from infrared (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. Moreover, the ascending part of the aortic arch was separated and used for micro-PIXE (PIXE in combination with proton microprobe) and histochemical examinations. It was found that hypercalcemia (blood serum Ca content elevated by about 20%) induced calcification of the aortic wall. The mineral phase within the aortic wall consisted of Ca-P salts. The Ca/P ratio continuously increased during the experiment and approached 2 after 246 d of the vitamin D3 treatment. The IR and XRD studies made possible the identification of the complex phase composition of the samples. The hydroxyapatite crystals were detected after 196 days, however, in earlier phases of the experiment, amorphous calcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and octacalcium phosphate were also observed. On the basis of the data obtained, the mechanism of the precipitation and growth of inorganic deposits in the tunica media of the aortic wall was discussed. PMID:1333314

  8. Role of proteoglycans in the onset of calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Tellone, C.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to inquire if the presence or absence of proteoglycans or their chemical subunits had a direct effect on the onset of calcification. High density spot cultures of limb bud mesenchyme obtained from mouse embryos on the 12th day of gestation were exposed to medium containing 30 mM phosphate. Calcium deposits observed after staining by the von Kossa method were confined to the non-cartilagenous intenodular areas. Electron microscopy illustrated that a large proportion of the calcium deposits were associated with collagen fibrils. A significant increase in the uptake of /sup 45/Ca was observed in cultures supplemented with 30 mM phosphate. Atomic absorption analysis of the cultures showed that they contained 2.00 ng calcium/ug DNA. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-glucosamine into glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly reduced by phosphate and both extruded and cell associated GAG were affected. Exposure of mineralizing cultures to a biologically active anticalculus agent, ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate, resulted in a significant reduction in /sup 45/Ca uptake, providing confidence that the culture did response as a biological system. These data suggest that under the conditions employed, proteoglycans in the extracellular environment of limb bud mesenchyme inhibit calcium deposition. The inhibitory effect was observed only when proteoglycans were added as polymeric aggregates. The culture system employed was unable to detect the inhibitory effects, if any, of proteoglycan monomers or the subunits of proteoglycans, hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate.

  9. Progression of coronary artery calcification by cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mahabadi, Amir A; Lehmann, N; Dykun, I; Müller, T; Kälsch, H; Erbel, R

    2015-09-01

    The presence and extent of coronary artery calcification (CAC) is established in primary prevention since the CAC score is the single best predictor of future cardiovascular events. While CAC progresses with increasing age, individual CAC progression can be estimated based on the subject's age, gender, and CAC percentile at first examination. To date, several algorithms and methods for the definition of CAC progression are available in the literature. Increased CAC progression is associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, and smoking status. Also, lipid-lowering therapy may influence the progression of CAC. Epicardial adipose tissue is a further cardiovascular risk marker that may lead to intensified CAC progression if its volume increases. In terms of clinical implications, initial data suggest that extensive CAC progression is linked to worse outcome; however, further studies are needed to establish this relationship and to define appropriate time intervals between repetitive examinations. This review article gives an overview of the existing literature with an emphasis on various definitions of CAC progression, predictors of increased CAC progression, as well as clinical implications. PMID:26259731

  10. Emiliania huxleyi increases calcification but not expression of calcification-related genes in long-term exposure to elevated temperature and pCO2

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Ina; Diner, Rachel E.; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; Li, Dian; Komada, Tomoko; Carpenter, Edward J.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased atmospheric pCO2 is expected to render future oceans warmer and more acidic than they are at present. Calcifying organisms such as coccolithophores that fix and export carbon into the deep sea provide feedbacks to increasing atmospheric pCO2. Acclimation experiments suggest negative effects of warming and acidification on coccolithophore calcification, but the ability of these organisms to adapt to future environmental conditions is not well understood. Here, we tested the combined effect of pCO2 and temperature on the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi over more than 700 generations. Cells increased inorganic carbon content and calcification rate under warm and acidified conditions compared with ambient conditions, whereas organic carbon content and primary production did not show any change. In contrast to findings from short-term experiments, our results suggest that long-term acclimation or adaptation could change, or even reverse, negative calcification responses in E. huxleyi and its feedback to the global carbon cycle. Genome-wide profiles of gene expression using RNA-seq revealed that genes thought to be essential for calcification are not those that are most strongly differentially expressed under long-term exposure to future ocean conditions. Rather, differentially expressed genes observed here represent new targets to study responses to ocean acidification and warming. PMID:23980248

  11. Modeling pH Regulation During Coral Calcification: Implications for Predicting Coral Calcification Responses to Ocean Acidification and for Interpreting Geochemical Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.

    2014-12-01

    Coral, like many other carbonate-secreting organisms, exerts strong control over its calcification process, resulting in an internal calcifying environment that departs from the ambient seawater. Most notably, pH of the coral calcifying fluid has been shown to be significantly elevated relative to seawater. Such pH regulation not only determines coral calcification responses to environmental changes (e.g. ocean acidification and rising temperature), but also affects the elemental and isotopic compositions of coral skeleton and complicates the interpretation of various geochemical proxies. Based on existing models of coral calcification and geochemical constraints on its pH regulation, I simulated the chemistry, especially pH, of the coral calcifying fluid, and evaluated the calcification responses to changing seawater chemistry among different coral species. Predictions from these simulations compare favorably with results from laboratory manipulation experiments, and suggest different coral species can exhibit different responses to ocean acidification depending on their respective capabilities to regulate the calcifying environment. The implication of these model results for interpreting geochemical proxies will also be discussed at the meeting.

  12. Catastrophic relapse of Evans syndrome five years after allogeneic BMT notwithstanding full donor chimerism. Terminal hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marmont, A M; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Morandi, F; Ferretti, E; Pezzolo, A; Strada, P; Ravetti, J L; Pistoia, V; Falanga, A; Bacigalupo, A

    2006-09-01

    A patient with severe Evans syndrome received an allo-BMT from his HLA-identical sister on November, 2000. Full marrow and blood donor chimerism were achieved only after 5 donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI), and coincided with complete clinical remission and disappearence of auto-antibodies. Five years later, hemolytic anemia recurred with rapid increase of serum bilirubin to over 50 mg%: he responded to combined therapy, but died on day +17 from admission of an acute hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). All circulating blood cells, including erythrocytes, were 100% donor. Ex vivo cultured and expanded T and B cells from the peripheral blood were also 100% donor. The supernatants from B cell cultures, containing either IgM or IgG, did not react with a panel of erythrocytes. Thus in this typical autoimmune disease with a predominant B cell pathogenesis the donor immune system resulted "innocent of autoimmunity". The persistence of long-lived recipient autoreactive plasma-cell lines in survival niches, still producing autoantibodies, may be hypothesized for this and similar cases. The postulated graft-versus-autoimmunity (GVA) effect was apparently not sufficient to eradicate autoimmunity in this patient. PMID:17060030

  13. Pre-, Pro-, and Synbiotics: Do They Have a Role in Reducing Uremic Toxins? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Megan; Klein, Kerenaftali; Johnson, David W.; Campbell, Katrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This paper assessed the effectiveness of pre-, pro-, and synbiotics on reducing two protein-bound uremic toxins, p-cresyl sulphate (PCS) and indoxyl sulphate (IS). Methods. English language studies reporting serum, urinary, or fecal PCS and/or IS (or their precursors) following pre-, pro-, or synbiotic interventions (>1 day) in human adults were included. Population estimates of differences in the outcomes between the pre- and the postintervention were estimated for subgroups of studies using four meta-analyses. Quality was determined using the GRADE approach. Results. 19 studies met the inclusion criteria, 14 in healthy adults and five in haemodialysis patients. Eight studies investigated prebiotics, six probiotics, one synbiotics, one both pre- and probiotics, and three studies trialled all three interventions. The quality of the studies ranged from moderate to very low. 12 studies were included in the meta-analyses with all four meta-analyses reporting statistically significant reductions in IS and PCS with pre- and probiotic therapy. Conclusion. There is a limited but supportive evidence for the effectiveness of pre- and probiotics on reducing PCS and IS in the chronic kidney disease population. Further studies are needed to provide more definitive findings before routine clinical use can be recommended. PMID:23316359

  14. Shiga Toxin Promotes Podocyte Injury in Experimental Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome via Activation of the Alternative Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Monica; Buelli, Simona; Pezzotta, Anna; Corna, Daniela; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Rizzo, Paola; Conti, Debora; Thurman, Joshua M.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli is the offending agent of postdiarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disorder of glomerular ischemic damage and widespread microvascular thrombosis. We previously documented that Stx induces glomerular complement activation, generating C3a responsible for microvascular thrombosis in experimental HUS. Here, we show that the presence of C3 deposits on podocytes is associated with podocyte damage and loss in HUS mice generated by the coinjection of Stx2 and LPS. Because podocyte adhesion to the glomerular basement membrane is mediated by integrins, the relevance of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signals in podocyte dysfunction was evaluated. Podocyte expression of ILK increased after the injection of Stx2/LPS and preceded the upregulation of Snail and downregulation of nephrin and α-actinin-4. Factor B deficiency or pretreatment with an inhibitory antibody to factor B protected mice against Stx2/LPS-induced podocyte dysregulation. Similarly, pretreatment with a C3a receptor antagonist limited podocyte loss and changes in ILK, Snail, and α-actinin-4 expression. In cultured podocytes, treatment with C3a reduced α-actinin-4 expression and promoted ILK-dependent nuclear expression of Snail and cell motility. These results suggest that Stx-induced activation of the alternative pathway of complement and generation of C3a promotes ILK signaling, leading to podocyte dysfunction and loss in Stx-HUS. PMID:24578132

  15. The molecular and structural bases for the association of complement C3 mutations with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; López-Perrote, Andrés; Tortajada, Agustin; Pinto, Sheila; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; Morgan, B. Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) associates with complement dysregulation caused by mutations and polymorphisms in complement activators and regulators. However, the reasons why some mutations in complement proteins predispose to aHUS are poorly understood. Here, we have investigated the functional consequences of three aHUS-associated mutations in C3, R592W, R161W and I1157T. First, we provide evidence that penetrance and disease severity for these mutations is modulated by inheritance of documented “risk” haplotypes as has been observed with mutations in other complement genes. Next, we show that all three mutations markedly reduce the efficiency of factor I-mediated C3b cleavage when catalyzed by membrane cofactor protein (MCP), but not when catalyzed by factor H. Biacore analysis showed that each mutant C3b bound sMCP (recombinant soluble MCP; CD46) at reduced affinity, providing a molecular basis for its reduced cofactor activity. Lastly, we show by electron microscopy structural analysis a displacement of the TED domain from the MG ring in C3b in two of the C3 mutants that explains these defects in regulation. As a whole our data suggest that aHUS-associated mutations in C3 selectively affect regulation of complement on surfaces and provide a structural framework to predict the functional consequences of the C3 genetic variants found in patients. PMID:25879158

  16. Quiescent complement in nonhuman primates during E coli Shiga toxin-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin C; Mayer, Chad L; Leibowitz, Caitlin S; Stearns-Kurosawa, D J; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-08-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) produce ribosome-inactivating Shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2) responsible for development of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Some patients show complement activation during EHEC infection, raising the possibility of therapeutic targeting of complement for relief. Our juvenile nonhuman primate (Papio baboons) models of endotoxin-free Stx challenge exhibit full spectrum HUS, including thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and AKI with glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy. There were no significant increases in soluble terminal complement complex (C5b-9) levels after challenge with lethal Stx1 (n = 6) or Stx2 (n = 5) in plasma samples from T0 to euthanasia at 49.5 to 128 hours post-challenge. d-dimer and cell injury markers (HMGB1, histones) confirmed coagulopathy and cell injury. Thus, complement activation is not required for the development of thrombotic microangiopathy and HUS induced by EHEC Shiga toxins in these preclinical models, and benefits or risks of complement inhibition should be studied further for this infection. PMID:23733336

  17. Acute Progression of Adult-Onset Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome due to CFH Mutation: A Case Report