Science.gov

Sample records for calcite seed crystals

  1. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated. PMID:21963207

  2. Crystal growth of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solutions at constant PCO2 and 25°C: a test of a calcite dissolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Plummer, L. Neil; Busenberg, E.

    1981-01-01

    A highly reproducible seeded growth technique was used to study calcite crystallization from calcium bicarbonate solutions at 25°C and fixed carbon dioxide partial pressures between 0.03 and 0.3 atm. The results are not consistent with empirical crystallization models that have successfully described calcite growth at low PCO2 (< 10−3 atm). Good agreement was found between observed crystallization rates and those calculated from the calcite dissolution rate law and mechanism proposed by Plummer et al. (1978).

  3. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  4. Monoclinic deformation of calcite crystals at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeniosło, R.; Fabrykiewicz, P.; Sosnowska, I.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation powder diffraction shows that the average crystal structure of calcite at ambient conditions is described with the trigonal space group R 3 bar c but there is a systematic hkl-dependent Bragg peak broadening. A modelling of this anisotropic peak broadening with the microstrain model from Stephens (1999) [15] is presented. The observed lattice parameters' correlations can be described by assuming a monoclinic-type deformation of calcite crystallites. A quantitative model of this monoclinic deformation observed at ambient conditions is described with the space group C 2 / c . The monoclinic unit cell suggested at ambient conditions is related with the monoclinic unit cell reported in calcite at high pressure (Merrill and Bassett (1975) [10]).

  5. On the origin of fiber calcite crystals in moonmilk deposits.

    PubMed

    Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Cuezva, Soledad; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Lario, Javier; Laiz, Leonila; Gonzalez, Juan Miguel; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we show that moonmilk subaerial speleothems in Altamira Cave (Spain) consist of a network of fiber calcite crystals and active microbial structures. In Altamira moonmilks, the study of the typology and distribution of fiber crystals, extracellular polymeric substances, and microorganisms allowed us to define the initial stages of fiber crystal formation in recent samples as well as the variations in the microstructural arrangement in more evolved stages. Thus, we have been able to show the existence of a relationship among the different types of fiber crystals and their origins. This allowed us to outline a model that illustrates the different stages of formation of the moonmilk, developed on different substrata, concluding that microbes influence physicochemical precipitation, resulting in a variety of fiber crystal morphologies and sizes. PMID:16240102

  6. The effect of sulfated polysaccharides on the crystallization of calcite superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Ruth; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2012-01-01

    Calcite with unique morphology and uniform size has been successfully synthesized in the presence of classes of polysaccharides based on carrageenans. In the crystallization of calcite, the choice of different carrageenans, (iota, lambda and kappa), as additives concedes systematic study of the influence of different chemical structures and particularly molecular charge on the formation of CaCO 3 crystals. The uniform calcite superstructures are formed by assemblies and aggregation of calcite crystals. The mechanism for the formation of calcite superstructures was studied by a variety of techniques, SEM, TEM, XRD, time-resolved conductivity and light scattering measurements, focusing on the early stages of crystals' nucleation and aggregation.

  7. Crystallographic orientation inhomogeneity and crystal splitting in biogenic calcite

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio G.; Bonarski, Jan T.; Willinger, Marc G.; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Kania, Bogusz; González-Segura, Alicia; Pina, Carlos M.; Pospiech, Jan; Morawiec, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The calcitic prismatic units forming the outer shell of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera have been analysed using scanning electron microscopy–electron back-scatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In the initial stages of growth, the individual prismatic units are single crystals. Their crystalline orientation is not consistent but rather changes gradually during growth. The gradients in crystallographic orientation occur mainly in a direction parallel to the long axis of the prism, i.e. perpendicular to the shell surface and do not show preferential tilting along any of the calcite lattice axes. At a certain growth stage, gradients begin to spread and diverge, implying that the prismatic units split into several crystalline domains. In this way, a branched crystal, in which the ends of the branches are independent crystalline domains, is formed. At the nanometre scale, the material is composed of slightly misoriented domains, which are separated by planes approximately perpendicular to the c-axis. Orientational gradients and splitting processes are described in biocrystals for the first time and are undoubtedly related to the high content of intracrystalline organic molecules, although the way in which these act to induce the observed crystalline patterns is a matter of future research. PMID:23804442

  8. An assessment of calcite crystal growth mechanisms based on crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth experiments were undertaken to test a recently proposed model that relates crystal growth mechanisms to the shapes of crystal size distributions (CSDs). According to this approach, CSDs for minerals have three basic shapes: (1) asymptotic, which is related to a crystal growth mechanism having constant-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; (2) lognormal, which results from decaying-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; and (3) a theoretical, universal, steady-state curve attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, there is a fourth crystal growth mechanism that does not have a specific CSD shape, but which preserves the relative shapes of previously formed CSDs. This mechanism is attributed to supply-controlled growth. All three shapes were produced experimentally in the calcite growth experiments by modifying nucleation conditions and solution concentrations. The asymptotic CSD formed when additional reactants were added stepwise to the surface of solutions that were supersaturated with respect to calcite (initial Ω = 20, where Ω = 1 represents saturation), thereby leading to the continuous nucleation and growth of calcite crystals. Lognormal CSDs resulted when reactants were added continuously below the solution surface, via a submerged tube, to similarly supersaturated solutions (initial Ω = 22 to 41), thereby leading to a single nucleation event followed by surface-controlled growth. The Ostwald CSD resulted when concentrated reactants were rapidly mixed, leading initially to high levels of supersaturation (Ω >100), and to the formation and subsequent dissolution of very small nuclei, thereby yielding CSDs having small crystal size variances. The three CSD shapes likely were produced early in the crystallization process, in the nanometer crystal size range, and preserved during subsequent growth. Preservation of the relative shapes of the CSDs indicates that a supply-controlled growth mechanism

  9. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius endospores function as nuclei for the formation of single calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Murai, Rie; Yoshida, Naoto

    2013-05-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-(13)C]- and [2-(13)C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  10. Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Endospores Function as Nuclei for the Formation of Single Calcite Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius colonies were placed on an agar hydrogel containing acetate, calcium ions, and magnesium ions, resulting in the formation of single calcite crystals (calcites) within and peripheral to the plating area or parent colony. Microscopic observation of purified calcites placed on the surface of soybean casein digest (SCD) nutrient medium revealed interior crevices from which bacterial colonies originated. Calcites formed on the gel contained [1-13C]- and [2-13C]acetate, demonstrating that G. thermoglucosidasius utilizes carbon derived from acetate for calcite formation. During calcite formation, vegetative cells swam away from the parent colony in the hydrogel. Hard-agar hydrogel inhibited the formation of calcites peripheral to the parent colony. The calcite dissolved completely in 1 M HCl, with production of bubbles, and the remaining endospore-like particles were easily stained with Brilliant green dye. The presence of DNA and protein in calcites was demonstrated by electrophoresis. We propose that endospores initiate the nucleation of calcites. Endospores of G. thermoglucosidasius remain alive and encapsulated in calcites. PMID:23455343

  11. Effects of chitosan on the alignment, morphology and shape of calcite crystals nucleating under Langmuir monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyungil; Uysal, Ahmet; Kewalramani, Sumit; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2009-04-22

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  12. Effects of Chitosan on the Morphology and Alignment of Calcite Crystals Nucleating Under Langmuir Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Uysal, A; Kewalramani, S; Stripe, B; Dutta, P

    2009-01-01

    The growth of calcium carbonate crystals under Langmuir monolayers was investigated in the presence of chitosan, a soluble derivative of chitin added to the subphase to better simulate the polyelectrolyte-containing in vivo environment. Chitosan causes distinct concentration-dependent changes in the orientation, shape and morphology of the calcite crystals nucleating under acid and sulfate monolayers. Our results suggest that polyelectrolytes may play essential roles in controlling the growth of biogenic calcite crystals.

  13. Initial formation of calcite crystals in the thin prismatic layer with the periostracum of Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Nakayama, Seiji; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2013-02-01

    Although the formation mechanism of calcite crystals in the prismatic layer has been studied well in many previous works, the initial state of calcite formation has not been observed in detail using electron microscopes. In this study, we report that the soft prismatic layer with transparent color (the thin prismatic layer) in the tip of the fresh shell of Pinctada fucata was picked up to observe the early calcification phase. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) image showed that the growth tip of the thin prismatic layer was covered by the periostracum, which was also where the initial formation of calcite crystals began. A cross-section containing the thin calcite crystals in the thin prismatic layer with the periostracum was made using a focused ion beam (FIB) system. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, the thin calcite crystal (thickness is about 1μm) on the periostracum was found to be a single crystal with the c-axis oriented perpendicular to the shell surface. On the other hand, many aggregated small particles consisting of bassanite crystals were observed in the periostracum suggesting the possibility that not only organic sulfate but also inorganic sulfates exist in the prismatic layer. These discoveries in the early calcification phase of the thin prismatic layer may help to clarify the mechanism of regulating the nucleation and orientation of the calcite crystal in the shell. PMID:23176816

  14. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-12-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites.

  15. Amelogenin processing by MMP-20 prevents protein occlusion inside calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Thompson, Mitchell; Lokappa, Sowmya B.; Gallon, Victoria A.; Cho, Kang R.; Qiu, S. Roger; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Calcite crystals were grown in the presence of full-length amelogenin and during its proteolysis by recombinant human matrix metalloproteinase 20 (rhMMP-20). Recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) altered the shape of calcite crystals by inhibiting the growth of steps on the {104} faces and became occluded inside the crystals. Upon co-addition of rhMMP-20, the majority of the protein was digested resulting in a truncated amelogenin lacking the C-terminal segment. In rP172-rhMMP-20 samples, the occlusion of amelogenin into the calcite crystals was drastically decreased. Truncated amelogenin (rP147) and the 25-residue C-terminal domain produced crystals with regular shape and less occluded organic material. Removal of the C-terminal diminished the affinity of amelogenin to the crystals and therefore prevented occlusion. We hypothesize that HAP and calcite interact with amelogenin in a similar manner. In the case of each material, full-length amelogenin binds most strongly, truncated amelogenin binds weakly and the C-terminus alone has the weakest interaction. Regarding enamel crystal growth, the prevention of occlusion into maturing enamel crystals might be a major benefit resulting from the selective cleavage of amelogenin at the C-terminus by MMP-20. Our data have important implications for understanding the hypomineralized enamel phenotype in cases of amelogenesis imperfecta resulting from MMP-20 mutations and will contribute to the design of enamel inspired biomaterials. PMID:23226976

  16. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N; Côté, Alexander S; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S; Kulak, Alexander N; Comyn, Timothy P; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J; Duffy, Dorothy M; Robinson, Ian K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates. PMID:27302863

  17. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Robinson, Ian K.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-06-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.

  18. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Robinson, Ian K.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates. PMID:27302863

  19. Control of macromolecule distribution within synthetic and biogenic single calcite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenberg, J.; Weiner, S.; Addadi, L.; Hanson, J.; Koetzle, T.F.

    1997-02-05

    The ability of organisms to exercise control over crystal growth is wonderfully exemplified by skeleton formation in echinoderms. A sea urchin spine is a unique composite of a single crystal of calcite and glycoproteins intercalated inside the crystal during its growth. Here we performed a detailed morphological and high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of the textures of synthetic and biogenic calcite crystals. We show that the intracrystalline macromolecules from sea urchin spines, when allowed to interact with growing calcite crystals in vitro, selectively reduce the coherence lengths and degrees of alignment of the perfect domains in specific crystallographic directions. These directions also correspond to the newly-developed stable faces. In contrast, the defect distribution of young sea urchin spines composed entirely of spongy stereomic structure is much more isotropic. In mature spines containing secondarily filled-in wedges of calcite, the degree of anisotropy is intermediate between that of the synthetic crystals and the young spines. The macromolecules extracted from young and mature spines are, however, very similar. These observations demonstrate the inherent capability of occluded matrix macromolecules to finely differentiate between crystal planes by stereochemical recognition processes. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. In situ AFM crystal growth and dissolution study of calcite in the presence of aqueous fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavouraki, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Koutsoukos, P. G.

    2009-04-01

    Fluoride is naturally abundant, encountered in rocks, soil and fresh and ocean water. Calcite crystals, during crystal growth may incorporate fluoride ions into their lattice (Okumura et al., 1983). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the growth and dissolution of calcite {104} surfaces in aqueous solutions in the presence of fluoride, using a fluid cell in which the supersaturated and the understaturated solutions respectively, flow over a freshly cleaved calcite crystal. For growth experiments, supersaturation index (S.I.) with respect to calcite was equal to 0.89 and the initial solution pH 10.2. The crystal growth rates were measured from the closure of the rhombohedral etch pits along the [010] direction induced by an initial dissolution step using pure water. The spreading rate of 2-dimensional nuclei was also measured along the same direction. In the presence of low fluoride concentrations (≤0.33 mM), the crystal growth rate of calcite was unaffected. At higher concentrations (up to 5 mM) growth rate decreased substantially to 50% of the rate in the absence of fluoride. Potential fluoride sorption over the calcite surface may ascribe the decrease of growth rates. Dissolution experiments were conducted at pH= 7.2 and dissolution rates of calcite were measured from the spreading of rhombohedral etch pits along both [010] and [42] directions. The presence of low concentrations of fluoride (≤1.1 mM) in the undersaturated solutions enhanced the dissolution rate along the [42] direction by 50% in comparison with pure water. The morphology of rhombohedral etch pits changed to hexagonal in the presence of fluoride in the undersaturated solutions. The AFM dissolution experiments suggested that the fluoride ions adsorbed onto the calcite surface. Further increase of fluoride concentrations (up to 1.6 mM) resulted in the decrease of the calcite dissolution rate by 60% in both [010] and [42] directions. Reference: Okumura, M, Kitano, Y

  1. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  2. Calcite Single Crystals as Hosts for Atomic-Scale Entrapment and Slow Release of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Magnabosco, Giulia; Di Giosia, Matteo; Polishchuk, Iryna; Weber, Eva; Fermani, Simona; Bottoni, Andrea; Zerbetto, Francesco; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Pokroy, Boaz; Rapino, Stefania; Falini, Giuseppe; Calvaresi, Matteo

    2015-07-15

    Doxorubicin (DOX)/CaCO3 single crystals act as pH responsive drug carrier. A biomimetic approach demonstrates that calcite single crystals are able, during their growth in the presence of doxorubicin, to entrap drug molecules inside their lattice along specific crystallographic directions. Alterations in lattice dimensions and microstructural parameters are determined by means of high-resolution synchrotron powder diffraction measurements. Confocal microscopy confirms that doxorubicin is uniformly embedded in the crystal and is not simply adsorbed on the crystal surface. A slow release of DOX was obtained preferentially in the proximity of the crystals, targeting cancer cells. PMID:26033854

  3. Crystallization of ikaite and its pseudomorphic transformation into calcite: Raman spectroscopy evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Oehlerich, Markus; Astilleros, José Manuel; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Mayr, Christoph C.; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2016-02-01

    Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) is a metastable phase that crystallizes in nature from alkaline waters with high phosphate concentrations at temperatures close to 0 °C. This mineral transforms into anhydrous calcium carbonate polymorphs when temperatures rise or when exposed to atmospheric conditions. During the transformation in some cases the shape of the original ikaite crystal is preserved as a pseudomorph. Pseudomorphs after ikaite are considered as a valuable paleoclimatic indicator. In this work we conducted ikaite crystal growth experiments at near-freezing temperatures using the single diffusion silica gel technique, prepared with a natural aqueous solution from the polymictic lake Laguna Potrok Aike (51°57‧S, 70°23‧W) in Patagonia, Argentina. The ikaite crystals were recovered from the gels and the transformation reactions were monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy at two different temperatures. The first spectra collected showed the characteristic features of ikaite. In successive spectra new bands at 1072, 1081 and 1086 cm-1 and changes in the intensity of bands corresponding to the OH modes were observed. These changes in the Raman spectra were interpreted as corresponding to intermediate stages of the transformation of ikaite into calcite and/or vaterite. After a few hours, the characteristics of the Raman spectrum were consistent with those of calcite. While ikaite directly transforms into calcite at 10 °C in contact with air, at 20 °C this transformation involves the formation of intermediate, metastable vaterite. During the whole process the external shape of ikaite crystals was preserved. Therefore, this transformation showed the typical characteristics of a pseudomorphic mineral replacement, involving the generation of a large amount of porosity to account for the large difference in molar volumes between ikaite and calcite. A mechanism involving the coupled dissolution of ikaite and crystallization of calcite/vaterite is proposed for this

  4. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites. PMID:26675363

  5. Observation of an Organic-Inorganic Lattice Match during Biomimetic Growth of (001)-Oriented Calcite Crystals under Floating Sulfate Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kewalramani, S.; Kim, K; Stripe, B; Evmenenko, G; Dommett, G; Dutta, P

    2008-01-01

    Macromolecular layers rich in amino acids and with some sulfated polysaccharides appear to control oriented calcite growth in living organisms. Calcite crystals nucleating under floating acid monolayers have been found to be unoriented on average. We have now observed directly, using in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, that there is a 1:1 match between the monolayer unit cell and the unit cell of the (001) plane of calcite. Thus, sulfate head groups appear to act as templates for the growth of (001)-oriented calcite crystals, which is the orientation commonly found in biominerals.

  6. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. PMID:26117783

  7. Trigonal dendritic calcite crystals forming from hot spring waters at Waikite, North Island, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renault, R.W.; Rosen, M.R.

    2000-05-01

    Amorphous silica and calcite form the deposits in the vent and on the discharge apron of Waikite Spring 100 (WS-100), which is located in the Waikite Geothermal area on North Island, New Zealand. These precipitates formed from spring water that has a temperature of >90 C and a pH of 8.1--8.8. The opaline silica is restricted to areas around the vent where cooling and evaporation of the spring water triggered precipitation. The calcite deposits in the spring vent and on the discharge apron are formed of large (up to 15 cm long) asymmetrical dendrite crystals that are characterized by multiple levels of branching. Branches grew preferentially from the downflow side of their parent branch. All branches have a trigonal transverse cross section except in areas where competition for growth space induced merger of neighboring crystals. The primary branches of the dendrite crystals are (sub)perpendicular to the substrate even in areas where the discharge apron slopes at a high angle (up to 80{degree}). On the steeper parts of the discharge apron, the plate-like primary branches form the floors of the small terrace pools whereas their distal edges form the rims of the pools. Growth of these dendrite crystals is attributed to abiotic processes. High levels of saturation with respect to calcite were caused by rapid CO{sub 2} degassing of the sheets of spring water that flowed down the steep discharge apron. Calcite crystals with different crystal morphologies characterize other springs near this spring. The variation in crystal morphologies from spring to spring is attributed to different levels of saturation that are related to the initial PCO{sub 2} of the spring water upon discharge and the rate of CO{sub 2} degassing at each spring.

  8. Swift heavy ion irradiation induced phase transformation in calcite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushana, H.; Nagabhushana, B. M.; Lakshminarasappa, B. N.; Singh, Fouran; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    2009-11-01

    Ion irradiation induced phase transformation in calcite single crystals have been studied by means of Raman and infrared spectroscopy using 120 MeV Au 9+ ions. The observed bands have been assigned according to group theory analysis. For higher fluence of 5×10 12 ion/cm 2, an extra peak on either side of the 713 cm -1 peak and an increase in the intensity of 1085 cm -1 peak were observed in Raman studies. FTIR spectra exhibit extra absorption bands at 674, 1589 cm -1 and enhancement in bands at 2340 and 2374 cm -1 was observed. This might be due to the phase transformation from calcite to vaterite. The damage cross section ( σ) for all the Raman and FTIR active modes was determined. The increase of FWHM, shift in peak positions and appearance of new peaks indicated that calcite phase is converted into vaterite.

  9. Effects of chitosan on the alignment, morphology and shape of calcite crystals nucleating under Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungil

    The mechanisms governing selective CaCO3 crystal nucleation in living organisms remain unclear. For example, nacreous layers from the inner surfaces of shells are built as brick-and-mortar complexes of plate-like aragonite single crystals and organic layers. Unstable [001] surfaces of calcite columns in prismatic layers are also stabilized by organic molecules. Biogenic calcite crystals show different morphologies compared to geological calcite minerals. Langmuir monolayers are used as structured templates in simulated biomineralization from CaCO3 supersaturated subphases. But pure or mixed Langmuir monolayers do not mimic the nucleation sites of aspartic-rich proteins found within real biominerals. It has previously been shown that there is organic-inorganic lattice relaxation in the cases of BaF2 and hydrocerussite (2PbCO3·Pb(OH) 2) nucleation under fatty (carboxylate) acid with preferred orientation of crystals, but no lattice match is observed during CaCO3 crystallization under fatty acid Langmuir monolayers. Overall, geometric influences such as structural match between the interfacial lattices and the interactions between monolayer headgroups and aqueous ions do not guarantee any well-defined orientation of CaCO3 crystallization. CaCO3 mineralization on self-assembled monolayers on metal and alloy substrates have achieved higher degrees of orientations, even though molecules in Langmuir monolayers are better ordered than in self-assembled monolayers. Until now, Langmuir monolayer experiments have emphasized only the function of the acidic proteins. To better mimic the real organic template, it is important to include the hydrophobic and polyelectrolyte characteristics of real organic templates in shells. The organic matrix in actual shells contains hydrophobic silk fibroin (which is hydrophobic) and polyelectrolytes. Some acidic proteins reside on the surface of silk fibroins. There is also semi-crystalline beta-chitin structure whose function has not been

  10. Patterns of distribution of calcite crystals in soft corals sclerites.

    PubMed

    Tentori, Ernestina; van Ofwegen, Leen P

    2011-05-01

    The gross morphology of soft coral surface sclerites has been studied for taxonomic purposes for over a century. In contrast, sclerites located deep in the core of colonies have not received attention. Some soft coral groups develop massive colonies, in these organisms tissue depth can limit light penetration and circulation of internal fluids affecting the physiology of coral tissues and their symbiotic algae; such conditions have the potential to create contrasting calcifying conditions. To test this idea, we analyzed the crystal structure of sclerites extracted from different colony regions in selected specimens of zooxanthellate and azooxanthellate soft corals with different colony morphologies, these were: Sarcophyton mililatensis, Sinularia capillosa, Sinularia flexibilis, Dendronephthya sp. and Ceeceenus levis. We found that the crystals that constitute polyp sclerites differ from those forming stalk sclerites. We also observed different crystals in sclerites located at various depths in the stalk including signs of sclerite breakdown in the stalk core region. These results indicate different modes of calcification within each colonial organism analyzed and illustrate the complexity of organisms usually regarded as repetitive morphological and functional units. Our study indicates that soft corals are ideal material to study natural gradients of calcification conditions. PMID:21433054

  11. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite

    PubMed Central

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, François; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation. PMID:12792020

  12. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, François; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-06-01

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation.

  13. The effect of fluid composition, salinity, and acidity on subcritical crack growth in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, Anne Schad; Røyne, Anja; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Aubry, Jérôme; Renard, François

    2016-03-01

    Chemically activated processes of subcritical cracking in calcite control the time-dependent strength of this mineral, which is a major constituent of the Earth's brittle upper crust. Here experimental data on subcritical crack growth are acquired with a double torsion apparatus to characterize the influence of fluid pH (range 5-7.5) and ionic strength and species (Na2SO4, NaCl, MgSO4, and MgCl2) on the propagation of microcracks in calcite single crystals. The effect of different ions on crack healing has also been investigated by decreasing the load on the crack for durations up to 30 min and allowing it to relax and close. All solutions were saturated with CaCO3. The crack velocities reached during the experiments are in the range 10-9-10-2 m/s and cover the range of subcritical to close to dynamic rupture propagation velocities. Results show that for calcite saturated solutions, the energy necessary to fracture calcite is independent of pH. As a consequence, the effects of fluid salinity, measured through its ionic strength, or the variation of water activity have stronger effects on subcritical crack propagation in calcite than pH. Consequently, when considering the geological sequestration of CO2 into carbonate reservoirs, the decrease of pH within the range of 5-7.5 due to CO2 dissolution into water should not significantly alter the rate of fracturing of calcite. Increase in salinity caused by drying may lead to further reduction in cracking and consequently a decrease in brittle creep. The healing of cracks is found to vary with the specific ions present.

  14. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; et al

    2016-06-15

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. In this study, we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated inmore » conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. In conclusion, this work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.« less

  15. Shaping calcite crystals by means of comb polyelectrolytes having neutral hydrophilic teeth.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Danilo; Fermani, Simona; Galletti, Paola; Goisis, Marco; Tagliavini, Emilio; Falini, Giuseppe

    2013-02-12

    Comb polyelectrolytes (CPs) having neutral hydrophilic teeth, similar to double hydrophilic block copolymers, are a powerful tool to modify the chemical-physical properties of inorganic crystalline materials. One of their main applications is in concrete technology, where they work as superplasticizers, particle-dispersing agents. Here, CPs, having the same poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) backbone chain and differing in the grafting with methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) chains (MPEG) of two molecular weights, were used to investigate the influence of tooth chains in polymer aggregation and in control on morphology and aggregation of calcite particles. These polymers aggregate, forming interpolymer hydrogen bonds between carboxylic groups and ether oxygen functionalities. The presence of calcium ions in solution further enhances aggregation. Crystallization experiments of calcite in the presence of CPs show that the specificity of interactions between polymers and crystal planes and control on aggregation and size of particles is a function of the content and chain length of the MPEG in the PAA backbone. These parameters limit and can make specific the electrostatic interactions with ionic crystalline planes. Moreover, the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical, is addressed by the CP structure and concentration. These findings have implications in the understanding of the complex chemical processes associated to concrete superplasticizers action and in the study of the biomineralization processes, where biological comb polyelectrolytes, the acidic glycoproteins, govern formation of calcitic structures. PMID:23320460

  16. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Experimental study of the effect of mica on pressure solution of single crystal calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Z.; Laronne, L.; Polizzotti, R. S.; Ertas, D.; Aharonov, E.

    2007-12-01

    Field and experimental studies suggest that clays and micas accelerate the rate of pressure solution in various geomaterials. It is not clear however whether the "clay effect" is purely mechanical (i.e., maintaining a thick conduit for fluids at the contact) or whether its surface chemistry plays a critical role. A case in point is the insoluble clay filling of stylolites, which are thought by some to be merely an inert byproduct of dissolution, or by others to be a necessary feature for the propagation of the seam. To study the effect of mica on carbonate pressure solution, the corner of a cleaved calcite single crystal rhomb was polished into a triangular face (edge length ~ 200micron) and pressed against either muscovite or quartz discs to yield a nominal stress of 10-20MPa. Immersing the contact in pre-saturated (with respect to microcrystalline calcite) solutions of distilled water or 0.25M NH4Cl caused axial shortening of the crystal. This axial strain was measured with a capacitance sensor (<0.5nm/h resolution) while the contact morphology was imaged in situ with a confocal microscope (3micron spatial resolution). In pre-saturated water solution the axial shortening of calcite loaded against muscovite is ~1nm/h, and no significant changes in contact morphology are detected. In pre-saturated NH4Cl solution however, both calcite- quartz and calcite-muscovite contacts evolve in two stages: the first stage is characterized by low axial strain rates (<5nm/h) during which the original contact area inside the triangle (as determined by interference fringes) shrinks and its perimeter roughens. The second stage is distinguished by high axial strain rates (~40nm/h) and changes in the size and spatial position of isolated contacts (diameter< 10 microns) in a dynamic channel-island morphology covering the entire triangular region. Post-experiment SEM analysis suggests dissolution in this region and precipitation on the free faces adjacent to it. At this point we see no

  18. Experimental study of the effect of mica on pressure solution of single crystal calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Z.; Laronne, L.; Polizzotti, R. S.; Ertas, D.; Aharonov, E.

    2004-12-01

    Field and experimental studies suggest that clays and micas accelerate the rate of pressure solution in various geomaterials. It is not clear however whether the "clay effect" is purely mechanical (i.e., maintaining a thick conduit for fluids at the contact) or whether its surface chemistry plays a critical role. A case in point is the insoluble clay filling of stylolites, which are thought by some to be merely an inert byproduct of dissolution, or by others to be a necessary feature for the propagation of the seam. To study the effect of mica on carbonate pressure solution, the corner of a cleaved calcite single crystal rhomb was polished into a triangular face (edge length ~ 200micron) and pressed against either muscovite or quartz discs to yield a nominal stress of 10-20MPa. Immersing the contact in pre-saturated (with respect to microcrystalline calcite) solutions of distilled water or 0.25M NH4Cl caused axial shortening of the crystal. This axial strain was measured with a capacitance sensor (<0.5nm/h resolution) while the contact morphology was imaged in situ with a confocal microscope (3micron spatial resolution). In pre-saturated water solution the axial shortening of calcite loaded against muscovite is ~1nm/h, and no significant changes in contact morphology are detected. In pre-saturated NH4Cl solution however, both calcite- quartz and calcite-muscovite contacts evolve in two stages: the first stage is characterized by low axial strain rates (<5nm/h) during which the original contact area inside the triangle (as determined by interference fringes) shrinks and its perimeter roughens. The second stage is distinguished by high axial strain rates (~40nm/h) and changes in the size and spatial position of isolated contacts (diameter< 10 microns) in a dynamic channel-island morphology covering the entire triangular region. Post-experiment SEM analysis suggests dissolution in this region and precipitation on the free faces adjacent to it. At this point we see no

  19. Morphological tranformation of calcite crystal growth by prismatic "acidic" polypeptide sequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I; Giocondi, J L; Orme, C A; Collino, J; Evans, J S

    2007-02-13

    Many of the interesting mechanical and materials properties of the mollusk shell are thought to stem from the prismatic calcite crystal assemblies within this composite structure. It is now evident that proteins play a major role in the formation of these assemblies. Recently, a superfamily of 7 conserved prismatic layer-specific mollusk shell proteins, Asprich, were sequenced, and the 42 AA C-terminal sequence region of this protein superfamily was found to introduce surface voids or porosities on calcite crystals in vitro. Using AFM imaging techniques, we further investigate the effect that this 42 AA domain (Fragment-2) and its constituent subdomains, DEAD-17 and Acidic-2, have on the morphology and growth kinetics of calcite dislocation hillocks. We find that Fragment-2 adsorbs on terrace surfaces and pins acute steps, accelerates then decelerates the growth of obtuse steps, forms clusters and voids on terrace surfaces, and transforms calcite hillock morphology from a rhombohedral form to a rounded one. These results mirror yet are distinct from some of the earlier findings obtained for nacreous polypeptides. The subdomains Acidic-2 and DEAD-17 were found to accelerate then decelerate obtuse steps and induce oval rather than rounded hillock morphologies. Unlike DEAD-17, Acidic-2 does form clusters on terrace surfaces and exhibits stronger obtuse velocity inhibition effects than either DEAD-17 or Fragment-2. Interestingly, a 1:1 mixture of both subdomains induces an irregular polygonal morphology to hillocks, and exhibits the highest degree of acute step pinning and obtuse step velocity inhibition. This suggests that there is some interplay between subdomains within an intra (Fragment-2) or intermolecular (1:1 mixture) context, and sequence interplay phenomena may be employed by biomineralization proteins to exert net effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  20. In Vitro Calcite Crystal Morphology Is Modulated by Otoconial Proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin-90

    PubMed Central

    Moreland, K. Trent; Hong, Mina; Lu, Wenfu; Rowley, Christopher W.; Ornitz, David M.; De Yoreo, James J.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2014-01-01

    Otoconia are formed embryonically and are instrumental in detecting linear acceleration and gravity. Degeneration and fragmentation of otoconia in elderly patients leads to imbalance resulting in higher frequency of falls that are positively correlated with the incidence of bone fractures and death. In this work we investigate the roles otoconial proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin 90 (OC90) perform in the formation of otoconia. We demonstrate by rotary shadowing and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that Otolin-1 forms homomeric protein complexes and self-assembled networks supporting the hypothesis that Otolin-1 serves as a scaffold protein of otoconia. Our calcium carbonate crystal growth data demonstrate that Otolin-1 and OC90 modulate in vitro calcite crystal morphology but neither protein is sufficient to produce the shape of otoconia. Coadministration of these proteins produces synergistic effects on crystal morphology that contribute to morphology resembling otoconia. PMID:24748133

  1. In vitro effects of recombinant Otoconin 90 upon calcite crystal growth. Significance of tertiary structure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenfu; Zhou, Dan; Freeman, John J.; Thalmann, Isolde; Ornitz, David M.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2010-01-01

    Otoconia are biomineral particles of microscopic size essential for perception of gravity and maintenance of balance. Millions of older Americans are affected in their mobility, quality of life and in their health by progressive demineralization of otoconia. Currently, no effective means to prevent or counteract this process are available. Because of prohibitive anatomical and biological constraints, otoconial research is lagging far behind other systems such as bone and teeth. We have overcome these obstacles by generating otoconial matrix proteins by recombinant techniques. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of recombinant Otoconin 90 (OC90), the principal soluble matrix protein upon calcite crystal growth patterns in vitro. Our findings highlight multiple effects, including facilitation of nucleation, and inhibition of crystal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, OC90 induces morphologic changes characteristic of native otoconia. OC90 is considerably less acidic than the prototypical invertebrate CaCO3 –associated protein, but is nevertheless an effective modulator of calcite crystal growth. Based on homology modeling of the sPLA2-like domains of OC90, we propose that the lower density of acidic residues of the primary sequence is compensated by formation of major anionic surface clusters upon folding into tertiary conformation. PMID:20595020

  2. Incorporating Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles into Calcite Crystals: Do Anionic Carboxylate Groups Alone Ensure Efficient Occlusion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New spherical diblock copolymer nanoparticles were synthesized via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) at 70 °C and 20% w/w solids using either poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) or poly(proline methacrylate) as the steric stabilizer block. Both of these stabilizers contain carboxylic acid groups, but poly(proline methacrylate) is anionic above pH 9.2, whereas poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) has zwitterionic character at this pH. When calcite crystals are grown at an initial pH of 9.5 in the presence of these two types of nanoparticles, it is found that the anionic poly(proline methacrylate)-stabilized particles are occluded uniformly throughout the crystals (up to 6.8% by mass, 14.0% by volume). In contrast, the zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate)-stabilized particles show no signs of occlusion into calcite crystals grown under identical conditions. The presence of carboxylic acid groups alone therefore does not guarantee efficient occlusion: overall anionic character is an additional prerequisite. PMID:27042383

  3. Modification of calcite crystal growth by abalone shell proteins: an atomic force microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, D A; Smith, B L; Belcher, A M; Paloczi, G T; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    1997-01-01

    A family of soluble proteins from the shell of Haliotis rufescens was introduced over a growing calcite crystal being scanned in situ by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Atomic step edges on the crystal surface were altered in shape and speed of growth by the proteins. Proteins attached nonuniformly to the surface, indicating different interactions with crystallographically different step edges. The observed changes were consistent with the habit modification induced by this family of proteins, as previously observed by optical microscopy. To facilitate further studies in this area, AFM techniques and certain AFM imaging artifacts are discussed in detail. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:9138588

  4. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, K.E.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Deyoreo, J.J.; Vital, R.L.

    1999-05-18

    A device is described for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin. 3 figs.

  5. Crystallization and crystal manipulation of the Pterocarpus angolensis seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Loris, Remy; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Bouckaert, Julie; Beeckmans, Sonia; De Greve, Henri; Wyns, Lode

    2005-06-01

    The Man/Glc-specific legume lectin from the seeds of the African bloodwood tree (Pterocarpus angolensis) was crystallized in the presence of the disaccharide ligand Man(alpha1-3)ManMe. Small crystals initially appeared from a preliminary screen, but proved difficult to reproduce. The initial crystals were used to prepare microseeds, leading to a reproducible crystallization protocol. All attempts to obtain crystals directly of the ligand-free protein or of other carbohydrate complexes failed. However, the Man(alpha1-3)ManMe co-crystals withstand soaking with ten other carbohydrates known to bind to the lectin. Soaking for 15 min in 100 mM carbohydrate typically resulted in complete replacement of Man(alpha1-3)ManMe by the desired carbohydrate despite the involvement of lattice contacts at the binding site. Transferring the crystals for two weeks in carbohydrate-free artificial mother liquor resulted in the complete removal of the sugar from one of the two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Additional treatment of these crystals with 100 mM EDTA for two weeks resulted in removal of the structural calcium and manganese ions, which is accompanied by significant structural rearrangements of the loops that constitute the carbohydrate-binding site. PMID:15930620

  6. Experimental observation of effects of seeds on polymer crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng-Wei; Phillips, Andy; Edward, Graham; Nichols, Lance

    2009-11-01

    The effects of two seeds on the melt crystallization of isotactic polypropylene were experimentally investigated. The seed, which has the flat surface full of a nonuniform size distribution, has provided a right surface pattern to activate effectively the heterogeneous nucleation. In contrast, the seed, which has the curved surface full of a uniform size distribution, has failed to induce the heterogeneous nucleation. The results from the present work have also shown that the seed with strong nucleating ability leads to the formation of large crystals but the seed without nucleating ability does not influence much the crystal size.

  7. Temperature-Controlled Support for a Seed Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeve, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A rodlike structure called a sting has been proposed for supporting a seed crystal at center of a body of saturated fluid and for controlling temperature/time profile of seed for experiments on crystal growth. Seed crystal is cooled or heated by thermoelectric modules while surrounding sheath remains at solution temperature. Heat is withdrawn to cooling fins by heat pipe, which replaces solid copper rod in a previous design.

  8. Device for isolation of seed crystals during processing of solution

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Deyoreo, James J.; Vital, Russell L.

    1999-01-01

    A device for isolation of see crystals during processing of solutions. The device enables a seed crystal to be introduced into the solution without exposing the solution to contaminants or to sources of drying and cooling. The device constitutes a seed protector which allows the seed to be present in the growth solution during filtration and overheating operations while at the same time preventing the seed from being dissolved by the under saturated solution. When the solution processing has been completed and the solution cooled to near the saturation point, the seed protector is opened, exposing the seed to the solution and allowing growth to begin.

  9. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure. PMID:27479875

  10. Crystallizing short-read assemblies around seeds

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Sajjad; Azimi, Navid; Skiena, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Background New short-read sequencing technologies produce enormous volumes of 25–30 base paired-end reads. The resulting reads have vastly different characteristics than produced by Sanger sequencing, and require different approaches than the previous generation of sequence assemblers. In this paper, we present a short-read de novo assembler particularly targeted at the new ABI SOLiD sequencing technology. Results This paper presents what we believe to be the first de novo sequence assembly results on real data from the emerging SOLiD platform, introduced by Applied Biosystems. Our assembler SHORTY augments short-paired reads using a trivially small number (5 – 10) of seeds of length 300 – 500 bp. These seeds enable us to produce significant assemblies using short-read coverage no more than 100×, which can be obtained in a single run of these high-capacity sequencers. SHORTY exploits two ideas which we believe to be of interest to the short-read assembly community: (1) using single seed reads to crystallize assemblies, and (2) estimating intercontig distances accurately from multiple spanning paired-end reads. Conclusion We demonstrate effective assemblies (N50 contig sizes ~40 kb) of three different bacterial species using simulated SOLiD data. Sequencing artifacts limit our performance on real data, however our results on this data are substantially better than those achieved by competing assemblers. PMID:19208115

  11. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolthers, Mariëtte; Nehrke, Gernot; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth rate on the cation to anion ratio in solution, we extend the growth model for binary symmetrical electrolyte crystals of Zhang and Nancollas (1998) by combining it with the surface complexation model for the chemical structure of the calcite-aqueous solution interface of Wolthers et al. (2008). To maintain crystal stoichiometry, the rate of attachment of calcium ions to step edges is assumed to equal the rate of attachment of carbonate plus bicarbonate ions. The model parameters are optimized by fitting the model to the step velocities obtained previously by atomic force microscopy (AFM, Teng et al., 2000; Stack and Grantham, 2010). A variable surface roughness factor is introduced in order to reconcile the new process-based growth model with bulk precipitation rates measured in seeded calcite growth experiments. For practical applications, we further present empirical parabolic rate equations fitted to bulk growth rates of calcite in common background electrolytes and in artificial seawater-type solutions. Both the process-based and empirical growth rate equations agree with measured calcite growth rates over broad ranges of ionic strength, pH, solution stoichiometry and degree of supersaturation.

  12. Realisation of four-wave mixing phase matching for frequency components at intracavity stimulated Raman scattering in a calcite crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Fedin, Aleksandr V; Shurygin, Anton S

    2013-06-30

    The possibilities of implementing four-wave mixing (FWM) phase matching at stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a birefringent SRS-active crystal placed in a cavity with highly reflecting mirrors have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Phase-matching angles providing conditions for five types of phase matching are determined for a calcite crystal. These types are characterised by different combinations of polarisation directions for the interacting waves and ensure FWM generation of either an anti-Stokes wave or the second Stokes SRS component. In agreement with the calculation results, low-threshold generation of the second Stokes SRS component with a wavelength 0.602 {mu}m was observed at angles of incidence on a calcite crystal of 4.8 Degree-Sign and 18.2 Degree-Sign , under SRS pumping at a wavelength of 0.532 {mu}m. This generation is due to the FWM coupling of the first and second Stokes SRS components with the SRS-pump wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  14. Controls on the precipitation of barite (BaSO 4) crystals in calcite travertine at Twitya Spring, a warm sulphur spring in Canada's Northwest Territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, Sandy M.; Jones, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Twitya Spring discharges warm (24 °C), anoxic, sulphide-, calcium- (65 ppm) and barium- (≥ 0.78 ppm) rich spring water to a steep flow path that is inhabited by streamer and mat-forming microbes ( Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, Oscillatoria, Spirulina, diatoms, rod shaped bacteria). Oxidation and CO 2 degassing drive precipitation of elemental sulphur, barite, opaline silica, and calcite. A mound of travertine at the base of the flow path, dominantly composed of bedded barium-enriched crystallographic and noncrystallographic dendritic calcite crystals and calcite cements, hosts three types of barite crystals: type 1 (T1) intergrown tabular crystals that formed in solution, type 2 (T2) tabular and rhombic crystals that nucleated on calcite, and type 3 (T3) subhedral and anhedral microcrystals that nucleated on microbial cell surfaces and in microbial extracellular polymeric substances. The formation and distribution of T1, T2, and T3 barite in the Twitya Spring flow path are controlled by physiochemical gradients, calcite precipitation rates, and adsorption of barium to microbial biomass, all of which vary seasonally and episodically at Twitya Spring. The complex physiochemical and biological controls on barite formation at Twitya Spring both suggest that the classification of biogenic or inorganic sedimentary barite on the basis of crystal size and morphology may be oversimplified. There is also the potential that primary and authigenic barite crystals hosted in carbonates may yield information about the microbial ecology and ambient physiochemistry of their depositional environments.

  15. Homoepitaxial meso- and microscale crystal co-orientation and organic matrix network structure in Mytilus edulis nacre and calcite.

    PubMed

    Griesshaber, Erika; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ubhi, Harbinder Singh; Huber, Julia; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Maier, Bernd; Ziegler, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    New developments in high-resolution, low accelaration voltage electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) enable us to resolve and quantify the co-orientation of nanocrystals constituting biological carbonate crystals with a scan step resolution of 125 nm. This allows the investigation of internal structures in carbonate tablets and tower biocrystals in the nacre of mollusc shells, and it provides details on the calcite-aragonite polymorph interface in bivalves. Within the aragonite tablets of Mytilus edulis nacre we find a mesoscale crystallographic mosaic structure with a misorientation distribution of 2° full width at half maximum. Selective etching techniques with critical point drying reveal an organic matrix network inside the nacre tablets. The size scales of the visible aragonite tablet subunits and nanoparticles correspond to those of the open pore system in the organic matrix network. We further observe by EBSD that crystal co-orientation spans over tablet boundaries and forms composite crystal units of up to 20 stacked co-oriented tablets (tower crystals). Statistical evaluation of the misorientation data gives a probability distribution of grain boundary misorientations with two maxima: a dominant peak for very-small-angle grain boundaries and a small maximum near 64°, the latter corresponding to {110} twinning orientations. However, the related twin boundaries are typically the membrane-lined {001} flat faces of the tablets and not {110} twin walls within tablets. We attribute this specific pattern of misorientation distribution to growth by particle accretion and subsequent semicoherent homoepitaxial crystallization. The semicoherent crystallization percolates between the tablets through mineral bridges and across matrix membranes surrounding the tablets. In the "prismatic" calcite layer crystallographic co-orientation of the prisms reaches over more than 50 micrometers. PMID:23896564

  16. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than pcrit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (pcrit=20%) and tourmaline (pcrit=45%), while for lower p (less than pcrit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking sun

  17. Hydration of Cuphea seeds containing crystallized triacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds that exhibit intermediate storage behavior do not appear to survive under conventional -18C storage conditions. Cuphea wrightii, C. laminuligera, C. carthagenensis, and C. aequipetala are considered sensitive to low temperature storage. The seeds of these species have triacylglycerols (TAG) ...

  18. Chemical and physical evolution of dolomite precipitation at 180°C and 220°C from calcite and aragonite seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell-Duivestein, Isaac; Dietzel, Martin; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2016-04-01

    In this present study an experimental approach is taken to gain a better understanding of secondary dolomite formation under diagenetic hydrothermal conditions. A series of 60 experiments were set up in closed bomb reactors with Teflon inserts to simulate exposure of calcium carbonate materials of (i) aragonite and (ii) calcite to hydrothermal conditions. 30 reactors were prepared using calcite as a seed material and 30 using aragonite. In each experiment 330mg of the seed calcium carbonate was placed in 30mL of 0.2M MgCl2 solution along with 252mg NaHCO3 to balance charges. 15 of each the calcite and aragonite prepared reactors were placed in an oven at 180°C and 15 of each at 220°C. Samples were then progressively removed from the ovens beginning in short time intervals and increasing the time apart as the phase transformations became less rapid (ie. after 3, 6, 13, 21, 31, 56 days *ongoing*). Samples were separated into fluid and solid phases by filtration for separate analysis. Fluids were analysed by titration for alkalinity and ICP-OES for elemental concentrations of major cations to determine the migration of major cations between the calcium carbonate seed material and the reaction fluid. Solid samples were analysed with FTIR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of powdered smears on glass loading slides to identify the present mineral phases. Rietveld analysis was conducted on the XRD patterns to quantify the mineral phases and to determine the stoichiometry and the superstructure of the formed magnesite and dolomite. Although experiments are still running, several trends have been identified. Transformation of the aragonite seed material occurs at a much faster rate than transformation of the calcite seed material, with each precursor material first transforming into a Ca-rich magnesite. With increased reaction time the Ca-rich magnesite recrystallizes to purer phases of magnesite, the Ca concentration of the fluid increases as the Ca is liberated into

  19. High surface area calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  20. Cloning polymer single crystals through self-seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianjun; Ma, Yu; Hu, Wenbing; Rehahn, Matthias; Reiter, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In general, when a crystal is molten, all molecules forget about their mutual correlations and long-range order is lost. Thus, a regrown crystal does not inherit any features from an initially present crystal. Such is true for materials exhibiting a well-defined melting point. However, polymer crystallites have a wide range of melting temperatures, enabling paradoxical phenomena such as the coexistence of melting and crystallization. Here, we report a self-seeding technique that enables the generation of arrays of orientation-correlated polymer crystals of uniform size and shape (`clones') with their orientation inherited from an initial single crystal. Moreover, the number density and locations of these cloned crystals can to some extent be predetermined through the thermal history of the starting crystal. We attribute this unique behaviour of polymers to the coexistence of variable fold lengths in metastable crystalline lamellae, typical for ordering of complex chain-like molecules.

  1. Adjustment errors of sunstones in the first step of sky-polarimetric Viking navigation: studies with dichroic cordierite/ tourmaline and birefringent calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, András; Egri, Ádám; Kretzer, Balázs; Hegedüs, Tibor; Jäger, Zoltán; Horváth, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    According to an old but still unproven theory, Viking navigators analysed the skylight polarization with dichroic cordierite or tourmaline, or birefringent calcite sunstones in cloudy/foggy weather. Combining these sunstones with their sun-dial, they could determine the position of the occluded sun, from which the geographical northern direction could be guessed. In psychophysical laboratory experiments, we studied the accuracy of the first step of this sky-polarimetric Viking navigation. We measured the adjustment error e of rotatable cordierite, tourmaline and calcite crystals when the task was to determine the direction of polarization of white light as a function of the degree of linear polarization p. From the obtained error functions e(p), the thresholds p* above which the first step can still function (i.e. when the intensity change seen through the rotating analyser can be sensed) were derived. Cordierite is about twice as reliable as tourmaline. Calcite sunstones have smaller adjustment errors if the navigator looks for that orientation of the crystal where the intensity difference between the two spots seen in the crystal is maximal, rather than minimal. For higher p (greater than p crit) of incident light, the adjustment errors of calcite are larger than those of the dichroic cordierite (p crit=20%) and tourmaline (p crit=45%), while for lower p (less than p crit) calcite usually has lower adjustment errors than dichroic sunstones. We showed that real calcite crystals are not as ideal sunstones as it was believed earlier, because they usually contain scratches, impurities and crystal defects which increase considerably their adjustment errors. Thus, cordierite and tourmaline can also be at least as good sunstones as calcite. Using the psychophysical e(p) functions and the patterns of the degree of skylight polarization measured by full-sky imaging polarimetry, we computed how accurately the northern direction can be determined with the use of the Viking

  2. Uranyl incorporation in natural calcite.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Newville, M. G.; Cheng, L.; Kemner, K. M.; Sutton, S. R.; Fenter, P.; Sturchio, N. C.; Spotl, C.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Illiois at Chicago; Univ. of Innsbruck

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of trace amounts of uranyl in natural calcite has posed a long-standing problem in crystal chemistry because of speculation that the size and shape of the uranyl ion may preclude its incorporation in a stable lattice position in calcite. This also defines an important environmental problem because of its bearing on the transport and sequestration of uranyl released from nuclear facilities and uranium mining operations. Calcite is a nearly ubiquitous mineral in soils and groundwater aquifers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence microprobe studies of uranium in relatively U-rich {approx}13700-year-old calcite from a speleothem in northernmost Italy indicate substitution of uranyl for a calcium and two adjacent carbonate ions in calcite. These new data imply that uranyl has a stable lattice position in natural calcite, indicating that it may be reliably sequestered in calcite over long time scales.

  3. Puzzling calcite-III dimorphism: crystallography, high-pressure behavior, and pathway of single-crystal transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pippinger, T.; Miletich, R.; Merlini, M.; Lotti, P.; Schouwink, P.; Yagi, T.; Crichton, W. A.; Hanfland, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure phase transformations between the polymorphic forms I, II, III, and IIIb of CaCO3 were investigated by analytical in situ high-pressure high-temperature experiments on oriented single-crystal samples. All experiments at non-ambient conditions were carried out by means of Raman scattering, X-ray, and synchrotron diffraction techniques using diamond-anvil cells in the pressure range up to 6.5 GPa. The composite-gasket resistive heating technique was applied for all high-pressure investigations at temperatures up to 550 K. High-pressure Raman spectra reveal distinguishable characteristic spectral differences located in the wave number range of external modes with the occurrence of band splitting and shoulders due to subtle symmetry changes. Constraints from in situ observations suggest a stability field of CaCO3-IIIb at relatively low temperatures adjacent to the calcite-II field. Isothermal compression of calcite provides the sequence from I to II, IIIb, and finally, III, with all transformations showing volume discontinuities. Re-transformation at decreasing pressure from III oversteps the stability field of IIIb and demonstrates the pathway of pressure changes to determine the transition sequence. Clausius-Clapeyron slopes of the phase boundary lines were determined as: Δ P/Δ T = -2.79 ± 0.28 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (I-II); +1.87 ± 0.31 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (II/III); +4.01 ± 0.5 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (II/IIIb); -33.9 ± 0.4 × 10-3 GPa K-1 (IIIb/III). The triple point between phases II, IIIb, and III was determined by intersection and is located at 2.01(7) GPa/338(5) K. The pathway of transition from I over II to IIIb can be interpreted by displacement with small shear involved (by 2.9° on I/II and by 8.2° on II/IIIb). The former triad of calcite-I corresponds to the [20-1] direction in the P21/ c unit cell of phase II and to [101] in the pseudomonoclinic C setting of phase IIIb. Crystal structure investigations of triclinic CaCO3-III at non-ambient pressure

  4. Kinetic and thermodynamic factors controlling the distribution of SO32- and Na+ in calcites and selected aragonites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, E.; Niel, Plummer L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant amounts of SO42-, Na+, and OH- are incorporated in marine biogenic calcites. Biogenic high Mg-calcites average about 1 mole percent SO42-. Aragonites and most biogenic low Mg-calcites contain significant amounts of Na+, but very low concentrations of SO42-. The SO42- content of non-biogenic calcites and aragonites investigated was below 100 ppm. The presence of Na+ and SO42- increases the unit cell size of calcites. The solid-solutions show a solubility minimum at about 0.5 mole percent SO42- beyond which the solubility rapidly increases. The solubility product of calcites containing 3 mole percent SO42- is the same as that of aragonite. Na+ appears to have very little effect on the solubility product of calcites. The amounts of Na+ and SO42- incorporated in calcites vary as a function of the rate of crystal growth. The variation of the distribution coefficient (D) of SO42- in calcite at 25.0??C and 0.50 molal NaCl is described by the equation D = k0 + k1R where k0 and k1 are constants equal to 6.16 ?? 10-6 and 3.941 ?? 10-6, respectively, and R is the rate of crystal growth of calcite in mg??min-1??g-1 of seed. The data on Na+ are consistent with the hypothesis that a significant amount of Na+ occupies interstitial positions in the calcite structure. The distribution of Na+ follows a Freundlich isotherm and not the Berthelot-Nernst distribution law. The numerical value of the Na+ distribution coefficient in calcite is probably dependent on the number of defects in the calcite structure. The Na+ contents of calcites are not very accurate indicators of environmental salinities. ?? 1985.

  5. Growth of silicon carbide crystals on a seed while pulling silicon crystals from a melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schwuttke, G. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A saturated solution of silicon and an element such as carbon having a segregation coefficient less than unity is formed by placing a solid piece of carbon in a body of molten silicon having a temperature differential decreasing toward the surface. A silicon carbide seed crystal is disposed on a holder beneath the surface of the molten silicon. As a rod or ribbon of silicon is slowly pulled from the melt, a supersaturated solution of carbon in silicon is formed in the vicinity of the seed crystal. Excess carbon is emitted from the solution in the form of silicon carbide which crystallizes on the seed crystal held in the cool region of the melt.

  6. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  7. Variations in the Sr/Ca, δ44Ca and δ18O composition of calcite as a function of solution chemistry and crystal growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The trace element and isotopic composition of calcite can be used to probe the temperatures and rates of mineral formation as well as the degree of post-mineralization alteration. The accuracy with which these effects can be interpreted is limited by our ability to distinguish signatures arising from equilibrium partitioning versus kinetic or mass transport effects. Our focus in this work is on mass transport effects in aqueous environments, and specifically, the growth rate-dependence of trace element and isotopic incorporation into calcite. This requires experiments in which the degree of supersaturation, or the solution chemistry, is held constant and the rate of crystal growth can be determined. In our experiments, N2+CO2 gas mixture is bubbled through a beaker containing 1300 mL of solution (30 mM CaCl2 + 5 mM NH4Cl + 0.1 mM SrCl2). The degree of supersaturation with respect to calcite is controlled by the pCO2 of the gas mixture, which is constantly replenished from a gas source. As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls and the pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. During an experiment we control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate. At the same time we monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, the gas outflow rate, and the amount of NaOH added. The rate of calcite precipitation can be determined in three ways: (1) the change in total alkalinity due to Ca2+ removal, mass balance of C in the system, and (3) post-run measurement of [Ca2+] in aliquots of solution taken during an experiment. We present results from experiments where growth rates are estimated to range from 0.5 to 16 mmol/m2/hr. Our experiments thus far have yielded calcite crystals that are out of calcium and oxygen isotopic equilibrium with the parent solution. Crystals are enriched in the light isotope of Ca by 0.4 to 1.8‰. The light isotope

  8. Crystallization of pumpkin seed globulin: growth and dissolution kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    1993-10-01

    Quasi-elastic light scattering was used to investigate the nucleation and crystallization of pumpkin ( Cucurbita) seed globulin. The diameter of the pumpkin globulin monomer was measured to be ≈ 5-6 nm. The supersaturation dependence of critical nucleus size was obtained, and this allowed an estimate of the interfacial free energy to be α ≈ 6.1 x 10 -2 erg/cm 2. The crystallization and dissolution kinetics were investigated for 4.9-16 mg/ml protein solutions containing 1-7% NaCl. The solubility data as a function of precipitant concentration and temperature were obtained and these will be utilized for optimization of the crystallization conditions for the pumpkin globulin.

  9. Isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Mango (Mangifera indica) Almond Seed Fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Fuentes, J. A.; Hernandez-Medel, M. R.; Duran-de-Bazua, M. C.

    In this study, the kinetics of isothermal crystallization of mango (Mangifera indica) almond seed fat var. Manila (MAF) was analyzed, within the theoretical context of the Sestak-Berggren model, the Avrami Equation and its modification by Khanna and Taylor. The results showed that the induction times for the formation of crystalline nuclei increased with the crystallization temperature (3.3 min at 8°C and 10.9 min at 12°C). The supercooling level notably influenced the MAF crystallization rate, since the global constant of crystallization rate, Z, grew 3.3 times from 12 to 8°C (for fractions of fat solids between 0.25 and 0.75, Z was 0.2904, 0.1584 and 0.0879 min-1 at 8, 10 and 12°C, respectively) and the Avrami parameter r was higher than 4; this demonstrates the effect of fat system complexity due to its multi-component nature and the heterogeneous character of this crystallization process, which includes additional participation of nucleation sites. The modified model by Khanna and Taylor provided better parametral values than the other two studied for explaining MAF crystallization kinetic.

  10. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni

  11. Seeded crystal growth of pseudobinary systems with large liquidus-solidus separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourret, E. D.; Witt, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    The design and execution of seeded melt growth involving concentrated alloys is strongly dependent on the crystal-melt interface temperature and its change during seeding and growth. Thermodynamic instabilities during the seeding process can be controlled by the choice of the seed and melt composition and by the axial temperature gradient of the growth apparatus. These basic factors controlling seeded melt growth of concentrated alloys are of major importance for planning space experiments.

  12. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-21

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices. PMID:27129106

  13. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation. PMID:26348458

  14. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of macromolecular domain cavities and microstructure of single-crystal calcite tooth plates of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Robach, J S; Stock, S R; Veis, A

    2005-07-01

    The calcite plates and prisms in Lytechinus variegatus teeth form a complex biocomposite and employ a myriad of strengthening and toughening strategies. These crystal elements have macromolecule-containing internal cavities that may act to prevent cleavage. Transmission electron microscopy employing a small objective aperture was used to quantify several characteristics of these cavities. Cavity diameters ranged from 10 to 225 nm, the mean cavity diameter was between 50 and 60 nm, and cavities comprised approximately 20% of the volume of the crystal. Some cavities exhibited faceting and trace analysis identified these planes as being predominately of {1014} type. Through focus series of micrographs show the cavities were homogeneously distributed throughout the foil. The electron beam decomposed a substance within cavities and this suggests that these cavities are filled with a hydrated organic phase. PMID:15890529

  15. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Modification of calcite crystal morphology by designed phosphopeptides and primary structures and substrate specifities of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zhirui

    In order to better understand the mechanism of biomineralization, we have undertaken to synthesize polypeptide model compounds of well-defined structure that can interact with specific faces of calcite and alter its crystal morphology. These peptides were designed based on the structure of alpha-helical winter flounder antifreeze polypeptide HPLC-6. In these peptides, from one to three of the threonine residues in HPLC-6 were substituted by phosphoserine or phosphotyrosine. CD spectra show that all the peptides have virtually the same alpha-helicity, i.e., about 90% at 4°C and 50% at 25°C. However, only peptides which contain at least two phosphate groups spaced 16.8-A apart can modify the crystal morphology of the calcite. The newly developed surface has been tentatively identified as the (001) basal face. Molecular modeling indicates that the spacing of phosphate groups allows for a good match with crystal lattice ions on the (001) plane. Another peptide, CBP-3D, in which the three threonine residues in HPLC-6 were substituted by aspartic acids, appears to bind only to {104} rhombohedral faces of calcite. These experiments suggest that conformation and orientation of the binding ligands in the peptide are important factors governing the mutual recognition of crystal surface and proteins. The complete amino acid sequences of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain, isolated from the latex of the plant Pileus mexicanus , were determined by Edman degradation of proteolytic fragments. Mexicain and chymomexicain show-high sequence homology to the papain family of cysteine protease. Mexicain and chymomexicain are monomeric polypeptides, with molecular masses of 23,762 Da and 23,694 Da, respectively, and both contain three deduced disulfide bonds. The proteolytic substrate specificities of mexicain and chymomexicain were studied by digesting a series of synthetic peptides and analyzing the fragments by mass spectrometry. The two proteases showed virtually

  17. The grinding tip of the sea urchin tooth exhibits exquisite control over calcite crystal orientation and Mg distribution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Aichmayer, Barbara; Paris, Oskar; Fratzl, Peter; Meibom, Anders; Metzler, Rebecca A; Politi, Yael; Addadi, Lia; Gilbert, P U P A; Weiner, Steve

    2009-04-14

    The sea urchin tooth is a remarkable grinding tool. Even though the tooth is composed almost entirely of calcite, it is used to grind holes into a rocky substrate itself often composed of calcite. Here, we use 3 complementary high-resolution tools to probe aspects of the structure of the grinding tip: X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), X-ray microdiffraction, and NanoSIMS. We confirm that the needles and plates are aligned and show here that even the high Mg polycrystalline matrix constituents are aligned with the other 2 structural elements when imaged at 20-nm resolution. Furthermore, we show that the entire tooth is composed of 2 cooriented polycrystalline blocks that differ in their orientations by only a few degrees. A unique feature of the grinding tip is that the structural elements from each coaligned block interdigitate. This interdigitation may influence the fracture process by creating a corrugated grinding surface. We also show that the overall Mg content of the tooth structural elements increases toward the grinding tip. This probably contributes to the increasing hardness of the tooth from the periphery to the tip. Clearly the formation of the tooth, and the tooth tip in particular, is amazingly well controlled. The improved understanding of these structural features could lead to the design of better mechanical grinding and cutting tools. PMID:19332795

  18. The grinding tip of the sea urchin tooth exhibits exquisite control over calcite crystal orientation and Mg distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yurong; Aichmayer, Barbara; Paris, Oskar; Fratzl, Peter; Meibom, Anders; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Politi, Yael; Addadi, Lia; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Weiner, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The sea urchin tooth is a remarkable grinding tool. Even though the tooth is composed almost entirely of calcite, it is used to grind holes into a rocky substrate itself often composed of calcite. Here, we use 3 complementary high-resolution tools to probe aspects of the structure of the grinding tip: X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), X-ray microdiffraction, and NanoSIMS. We confirm that the needles and plates are aligned and show here that even the high Mg polycrystalline matrix constituents are aligned with the other 2 structural elements when imaged at 20-nm resolution. Furthermore, we show that the entire tooth is composed of 2 cooriented polycrystalline blocks that differ in their orientations by only a few degrees. A unique feature of the grinding tip is that the structural elements from each coaligned block interdigitate. This interdigitation may influence the fracture process by creating a corrugated grinding surface. We also show that the overall Mg content of the tooth structural elements increases toward the grinding tip. This probably contributes to the increasing hardness of the tooth from the periphery to the tip. Clearly the formation of the tooth, and the tooth tip in particular, is amazingly well controlled. The improved understanding of these structural features could lead to the design of better mechanical grinding and cutting tools. PMID:19332795

  19. Large single domain 123 material produced by seeding with single crystal rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals

    DOEpatents

    Todt, Volker; Miller, Dean J.; Shi, Donglu; Sengupta, Suvankar

    1998-01-01

    A method of fabricating bulk YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x where compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of Y and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x are heated in the presence of a Nd.sub.1+x Ba.sub.2-x Cu.sub.3 O.sub.y seed crystal to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x while maintaining the seed crystal solid. The materials are slowly cooled to provide a YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x material having a predetermined number of domains between 1 and 5. Crack-free single domain materials can be formed using either plate shaped seed crystals or cube shaped seed crystals with a pedestal of preferential orientation material.

  20. Growth of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals by Controlled Seeding Contactless Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Grasza, K.; Gillies, D.; Jerman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk crystals of cadmium-zinc telluride, 23 mm in diameter and up to 45 grams in weight were grown. Controlled seed formation procedure was used to limit the number of grains in the crystal. Most uniform distribution of ZnTe in the crystals was obtained using excess (Cd + Zn) pressure in the ampoule.

  1. Improved synthesis of fine zinc borate particles using seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürhan, Deniz; Çakal, Gaye Ö.; Eroğlu, İnci; Özkar, Saim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc borate is a flame retardant additive used in polymers, wood applications and textile products. There are different types of zinc borate having different chemical compositions and structures. In this study, the production of zinc borate having the molecular formula of 2ZnO·3B 2O 3·3.5H 2O was reexamined by studying the effects of reaction parameters on the properties of product as well as the reaction kinetics. Production of zinc borate from the reaction of boric acid and zinc oxide in the presence of seed crystals was performed in a continuously stirred, temperature-controlled batch reactor having a volume of 1.5 L. Samples taken in regular time intervals during the experiments were analyzed for the concentration of zinc oxide and boron oxide in the solid as well as for the conversion of zinc oxide to zinc borate versus time. The zinc borate production reaction was fit to the logistic model. The reaction rate, reaction completion time, composition and particle size distribution of zinc borate product were determined by varying the following parameters: the boric acid to zinc oxide ratio (H 3BO 3:ZnO=3:1, 3.5:1, 5:1 and 7:1), the particle size of zinc oxide (10 and 25 μm), stirring rate (275, 400, 800 and 1600 rpm), temperature (75, 85 and 95 °C) and the size of seed crystals (10 and 2 μm). The products were also analyzed for particle size distribution. The experimental results showed that the reaction rate increases with the increase in H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, particle size of zinc oxide, stirring rate and temperature. Concomitantly, the reaction completion time is decreased by increasing the H 3BO 3:ZnO ratio, stirring rate and temperature. The average particle sizes of the zinc borate products are in the range 4.3-16.6 μm (wet dispersion analysis).

  2. Segregation during directional melting and its implications on seeded crystal growth: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourret, E. D.; Favier, J. J.; Witt, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    Directional melting of binary systems, as encountered during seeding in melt growth, is analyzed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-melt interface. It is shown that steady state conditions cannot normally be reached during seeding and that the growth interface temperature at the initial stages of seeded growth is a function of backmelt conditions. The theoretical treatment is numerically applied to Hg1-xCdXTe and Ga-doped Ge.

  3. Truncated tetrahedron seed crystals initiating stereoaligned growth of FeSi nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-in; Yoon, Hana; Seo, Kwanyong; Yoo, Youngdong; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2012-10-23

    We have synthesized epitaxially grown freestanding FeSi nanowires (NWs) on an m-Al(2)O(3) substrate by using a catalyst-free chemical vapor transport method. FeSi NW growth is initiated from FeSi nanocrystals, formed on a substrate in a characteristic shape with a specific orientation. Cross-section TEM analysis of seed crystals reveals the crystallographic structure and hidden geometry of the seeds. Close correlation of geometrical shapes and orientations of the observed nanocrystals with those of as-grown NWs indicates that directional growth of NWs is initiated from the epitaxially formed seed crystals. The diameter of NWs can be controlled by adjusting the composition of Si in a Si/C mixture. The epitaxial growth method for FeSi NWs via seed crystals could be employed to heteroepitaxial growth of other compound NWs. PMID:22966939

  4. Seeding for sirtuins: microseed matrix seeding to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 and Sirt2 suitable for soaking

    SciTech Connect

    Rumpf, Tobias; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-11-18

    In the present study, microseed matrix seeding was successfully applied to obtain a large number of crystals of the human sirtuin isotypes Sirt2 and Sirt3. These crystals appeared predictably in diverse crystallization conditions, diffracted to a higher resolution than reported in the literature and were subsequently used to study the protein–ligand interactions of two indole inhibitors. Sirtuins constitute a family of NAD{sup +}-dependent enzymes that catalyse the cleavage of various acyl groups from the ∊-amino group of lysines. They regulate a series of cellular processes and their misregulation has been implicated in various diseases, making sirtuins attractive drug targets. To date, only a few sirtuin modulators have been reported that are suitable for cellular research and their development has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In this work, microseed matrix seeding (MMS) was used to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 in its apo form and of human Sirt2 in complex with ADP ribose (ADPR). Crystal formation using MMS was predictable, less error-prone and yielded a higher number of crystals per drop than using conventional crystallization screening methods. The crystals were used to solve the crystal structures of apo Sirt3 and of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR at an improved resolution, as well as the crystal structures of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR and the indoles EX527 and CHIC35. These Sirt2–ADPR–indole complexes unexpectedly contain two indole molecules and provide novel insights into selective Sirt2 inhibition. The MMS approach for Sirt2 and Sirt3 may be used as the basis for structure-based optimization of Sirt2/3 inhibitors in the future.

  5. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  6. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this pote...

  7. Zinc isotope fractionation during adsorption on calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.; Wasylenki, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Zinc is an important element as a nutrient in the marine biosphere. However, our understanding of its biogeochemical cycling in the oceans is relatively limited. The Zn stable isotope system holds the promise of providing novel insights, since published Zn isotopic values for various natural samples reveal significant fractionations in the marine environment. Surface seawater, basalts, shales, deep-sea clay sediments, sediment trap material, bulk plankton and zooplankton samples, and eolian dust fall within a tight range (δ66/64Zn from -0.1 to 0.5‰), but modern ferromanganese crusts (δ66/64Zn from 0.5 to 1.2‰), as well as carbonates (δ66/64Zn from 0.3 to 1.4‰), are notably enriched in heavy Zn isotopes [1-4]. In this study we seek to constrain the mechanism by which carbonates are enriched in heavier isotopes. In particular, we have conducted experiments to quantify isotope fractionation during adsorption of Zn onto the surfaces of calcite crystals that are in equilibrium with solution. The adsorption experiments were carried out in a series of small-volume batch reactions in a clean laboratory environment, using high-purity reagents and calcite seed crystals. The calcite was equilibrated with the solution prior to addition of Zn at atmospheric CO2 pressure (i.e., in air) for 5 days until a stable pH of 8.3 was reached. Later, a small aliquot of dissolved ZnCl2 was added such that the solution remained undersaturated with respect to hydrozincite. Experimental duration varied among the replicates from 6 to 144 hours, and then all solids and solutions were separated by filtration, purified by ion exchange chromatography, and analyzed by MC-ICP-MS. Zn adsorbed on calcite is isotopically heavier than in the co-existing solutions, with Δ68/66Zncalcite-solution of approximately 0.3‰. The variation of Δ68/66Zncalcite-solution beyond 24 hours is insignificant, so we infer that isotopic equilibrium is reached by this time. Previous work strongly suggests that a

  8. 'Seeding' with protease to optimize protein crystallization conditions in in situ proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinguang; Gong, Yanmei; Huang, Dan; Haire, Lesley; Liu, Junfeng; Peng, Youliang

    2012-05-01

    In situ proteolysis is one of the most effective rescue strategies for protein crystallization, and optimization of the ratio between the protein and the protease is one of the key steps in the process. Seeding is a very powerful tool to optimize crystallization conditions and can be performed by most crystallization robots. Addition of protease instead of seed stock using a robot can be used to optimize the concentration of protease in in situ proteolysis experiments and has been successfully tested using two proteins. PMID:22691798

  9. Rapid Z-plate seed regeneration of large size KDP crystal from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohui

    2008-01-01

    Regeneration process of a 330×330×20 mm 3 Z-plate seed is carried out in a 1.5 metric tonnage volume crystallizer that placed in a water bath of temperature fluctuation less than ±0.02 °C within 10 days. The surface of the whole crystal was restored by the formation of a box-like structure filled with growth solution, and then the transparent layer of perfect tetragonal KDP crystal without inclusions, crack and milky regions just like those produced by traditional slow cooling technique can be grown from solution. After the regeneration, the height of KDP crystal is merely 0.5 times the side of plate seed. We found it that the optical transmission and laser damage threshold of the KDP crystals we grown are not significantly different from those of KDP crystals grown by traditional method.

  10. The Influence of Kinetic Growth Factors on the Clumped Isotope Composition of Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Tripati, A.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped isotope paleothermometry is based on the association of 13C and 18O within carbonate minerals. Although the influence of temperature on equilibrium 13C-18O bond ordering has been studied, recent oxygen isotope studies of inorganic calcite demonstrate that calcite grown in laboratory experiments and in many natural settings does not form in equilibrium with water. It is therefore likely that the carbon and clumped isotope composition of these calcite crystals are not representative of true thermodynamic equilibrium. To isolate kinetic clumped isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, clumped isotopic equilibrium of DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration of DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic clumped isotope effects during non-equilibrium precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3 in the presence of CA. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is bubbled through a beaker of solution without seed crystals. As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. Results from these experiments are compared to predictions from a recently-developed isotopic ion-by-ion growth model of calcite. The model describes the rate, temperature and pH dependence of oxygen isotope uptake

  11. Characterization of Semi-Insulating CdTe Crystals Grown by Horizontal Seeded Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, K.; Feth, S.; Chen, H.; Burger, A.; Su, Ching-Hua

    1998-01-01

    CdTe crystals were grown by horizontal seeded physical vapor transport technique in uncoated and boron nitride coated fused silica ampoules with the source materials near the congruent sublimation condition. The grown crystals were characterized by current-voltage measurements, low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy, near IR transmission optical microscopy, spark source mass spectroscopy and chemical etching. The measured resistivities of the crystals were in the high-10(exp 8) ohm-cm range. Although the crystal grown in the boron nitride coating was contaminated with boron from the photoluminescence measurements, the coating yielded a single crystal with no inclusions or precipitates.

  12. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  13. Large single domain 123 material produced by seeding with single crystal rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals

    DOEpatents

    Todt, V.; Miller, D.J.; Shi, D.; Sengupta, S.

    1998-07-07

    A method of fabricating bulk YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} where compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of Y and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are heated in the presence of a Nd{sub 1+x}Ba{sub 2{minus}x}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} seed crystal to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} while maintaining the seed crystal solid. The materials are slowly cooled to provide a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} material having a predetermined number of domains between 1 and 5. Crack-free single domain materials can be formed using either plate shaped seed crystals or cube shaped seed crystals with a pedestal of preferential orientation material. 7 figs.

  14. Defect formation in 4H-SiC single crystal grown on the prismatic seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, A. Yu; Lebedev, A. O.; Tairov, Yu M.

    2014-12-01

    The defect structure of 4H silicon carbide single crystals grown by PVT method on three prismatic seeds (10-10), (11-20) and (8.3.-11.0) is considered. The only defects existing in the grown ingots are stacking faults and basal plane dislocations. The type of stacking fault is studied. The dependence of stacking fault morphology on the seed orientation is analyzed.

  15. Seeding for sirtuins: microseed matrix seeding to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 and Sirt2 suitable for soaking

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Tobias; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver; Jung, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins constitute a family of NAD+-dependent enzymes that catalyse the cleavage of various acyl groups from the ∊-amino group of lysines. They regulate a series of cellular processes and their misregulation has been implicated in various diseases, making sirtuins attractive drug targets. To date, only a few sirtuin modulators have been reported that are suitable for cellular research and their development has been hampered by a lack of structural information. In this work, microseed matrix seeding (MMS) was used to obtain crystals of human Sirt3 in its apo form and of human Sirt2 in complex with ADP ribose (ADPR). Crystal formation using MMS was predictable, less error-prone and yielded a higher number of crystals per drop than using conventional crystallization screening methods. The crystals were used to solve the crystal structures of apo Sirt3 and of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR at an improved resolution, as well as the crystal structures of Sirt2 in complex with ADPR and the indoles EX527 and CHIC35. These Sirt2–ADPR–indole complexes unexpectedly contain two indole molecules and provide novel insights into selective Sirt2 inhibition. The MMS approach for Sirt2 and Sirt3 may be used as the basis for structure-based optimization of Sirt2/3 inhibitors in the future. PMID:26625292

  16. Purification, crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Ginkgo biloba 11S seed globulin ginnacin

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Chen, Yu-Wei; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2008-07-01

    The crystallization of ginnacin, the 11S seed storage protein from G. biloba, is reported. Ginkgo biloba, a well known ‘living fossil’ native to China, is grown worldwide as an ornamental shade plant. Medicinal and nutritional uses of G. biloba in Asia have a long history. However, ginkgo seed proteins have not been well studied at the biochemical and molecular level. In this study, the G. biloba 11S seed storage protein ginnacin was purified by sequential anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. A crystallization screen was performed and well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained. There are six protomers in an asymmetric unit. Structure refinement is currently in progress.

  17. Hydrothermal calcite in the Elephant Moraine

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, G.; Taylor, K.S.; Jones, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    In the course of geologic mapping of the Elephant Moraine on the east antarctic ice sheet, Faure and Taylor (1985) collected several specimens of black botryoidal calcite, composed of radiating acicular crystals that resemble stromatolites. Calcite from this and other specimens is significantly enriched in strontium-87 (the strontium-87/strontium-86 ratio equals 0.71417 +/- 0.00002), carbon-12 (delta carbon-13 equals -22.9 parts per thousand, PDB standard) and oxygen-16 (delta oxygen-18 equals -21.1 parts per thousand, standard mean ocean water) compared with calcite of marine origin. The enrichment in carbon-12 is similar to that of calcite associated with coal in the Allan Hills. The enrichment in oxygen-16 indicates that the calcite from the Elephant Moraine could only have precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with glacial melt water. Therefore, the temperature at which the black calcite precipitated from water of that isotope composition was about 85/sup 0/C. A temperature of this magnitude implies that the black calcite formed as a result of volcanic activity under the east antarctic ice sheet. The enrichment of the black calcite in carbon-12 suggests that it formed in part from carbon dioxide derived from the coal seams of the Weller Formation in the Beacon Supergroup. The isotopic composition of strontium in the black calcite is similar to that of carbonate beds and concretions in the Beacon rocks of southern Victoria Land. A volcanic-hydrothermal origin is also consistent with the very low total organic carbon content of 0.15% in the calcite.

  18. Tetravalent uranium in calcite.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Antonio, M. R.; Soderholm, L.; Sutton, S. R.; Brannon, J. C.; Univ. of Chicago; Washington Univ.

    1998-08-14

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence microprobe studies of 35-million-year-old calcite from a Mississippi Valley-type zinc ore deposit indicate substitution of tetravalent uranium for divalent calcium. Thus, tetravalent uranium has a stable location in calcite deposited under reducing conditions. This result validates uranium-series dating methods (including uranium/lead dating) for ancient calcite and shows that calcite provides a sink for uranium in deep groundwater aquifers and anoxic lacustrine and marine basins.

  19. Tetravalent uranium in calcite

    PubMed

    Sturchio; Antonio; Soderholm; Sutton; Brannon

    1998-08-14

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence microprobe studies of 35-million-year-old calcite from a Mississippi Valley-type zinc ore deposit indicate substitution of tetravalent uranium for divalent calcium. Thus, tetravalent uranium has a stable location in calcite deposited under reducing conditions. This result validates uranium-series dating methods (including uranium/lead dating) for ancient calcite and shows that calcite provides a sink for uranium in deep groundwater aquifers and anoxic lacustrine and marine basins. PMID:9703507

  20. A novel crystal growth technique from the melt: Levitation-Assisted Self-Seeding Crystal Growth Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazka, Zbigniew; Uecker, Reinhard; Fornari, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    A novel melt crystal growth technique was developed and applied for growing bulk In2O3 single crystals. In this new method the In2O3 starting material inside an inductively heated metal crucible is subjected to a controlled decomposition in such a way that a certain amount of free metallic indium forms. As a result, the electromagnetic field from an RF coil couples also to the In2O3 starting material, in addition to the metal crucible, which facilitates the melting. Liquid In2O3 has good electrical conductivity so that eddy currents are induced in the melt close to the crucible wall. This in turn induces a counter magnetic field that ultimately leads to levitation of a portion of the molten In2O3. The amount of the levitated material depends on the mutual RF coil-crucible position, their configurations as well as other components of a growth furnace. A consequence of the partial levitation of In2O3 melt is the formation of a liquid neck between the levitated and the quiescent melt portions. This neck is crucial as it acts as a seed during the crystallization process. The neck can be further shaped by controlled overheating or soaking. By cooling down, two single crystals are formed on the opposite sides of the seed. We named this new crystal growth technique “Levitation-Assisted Self-Seeding Crystal Growth Method”. It is in principle applicable to any oxides whose melts are electrically conductive. Thanks to this method we have successfully grown truly bulk In2O3 single crystals from the melt for the first time worldwide.

  1. In-situ growth of calcite at Devils Hole, Nevada: Comparison of field and laboratory rates to a 500,000 year record of near-equilibrium calcite growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Busenberg, E.; Riggs, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite grew continuously for 500,000 years on the submerged walls of an open fault plane (Devils Hole) in southern Nevada, U.S.A. at rates of 0.3 to 1.3 mm/ka, but ceased growing approximately 60,000 years ago, even though the fault plane remained open and was continuously submerged. The maximum initial in-situ growth rate on pre-weighed crystals of Iceland spar placed in Devils Hole (calcite saturation index, SI, is 0.16 to 0.21 at 33.7??C) for growth periods of 0.75 to 4.5 years was 0.22 mm/ka. Calcite growth on seed crystals slowed or ceased following initial contact with Devils Hole groundwater. Growth rates measured in synthetic Ca-HCO3 solutions at 34??C, CO2 partial pressures of 0.101, 0.0156 (similar to Devils Hole groundwater) and 0.00102 atm, and SI values of 0.2 to 1.9 were nearly independent of P(CO)(2), decreased with decreasing saturation state, and extrapolated through the historical Devils Hole rate. The results show that calcite growth rate is highly sensitive to saturation state near equilibrium. A calcite crystal retrieved from Devils Hole, and used without further treatment of its surface, grew in synthetic Devils Hole groundwater when the saturation index was raised nearly 10-fold that of Devils Hole water, but the rate was only 1/4 that of fresh laboratory crystals that had not contacted Devils Hole water. Apparently, inhibiting processes that halted calcite growth in Devils Hole 60,000 years ago continue today.

  2. Crystal structure control in Au-free self-seeded InSb wire growth.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Bernhard; Dick, Kimberly A; Kriegner, Dominik; Keplinger, Mario; Bauer, Günther; Stangl, Julian; Deppert, Knut

    2011-04-01

    In this work we demonstrate experimentally the dependence of InSb crystal structure on the ratio of Sb to In atoms at the growth front. Epitaxial InSb wires are grown by a self-seeded particle assisted growth technique on several different III-V substrates. Detailed investigations of growth parameters and post-growth energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate that the seed particles initially consist of In and incorporate up to 20 at.% Sb during growth. By applying this technique we demonstrate the formation of zinc-blende, 4H and wurtzite structure in the InSb wires (identified by transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction), and correlate this sequential change in crystal structure to the increasing Sb/In ratio at the particle-wire interface. The low ionicity of InSb and the large diameter of the wire structures studied in this work are entirely outside the parameters for which polytype formation is predicted by current models of particle seeded wire growth, suggesting that the V/III ratio at the interface determines crystal structure in a manner well beyond current understanding. These results therefore provide important insight into the relationship between the particle composition and the crystal structure, and demonstrate the potential to selectively tune the crystal structure in other III-V compound materials as well. PMID:21346304

  3. Growth of GaN:Mg crystals by high nitrogen pressure solution method in multi-feed-seed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegory, I.; Boćkowski, M.; łucznik, B.; Weyher, J.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Konczewicz, L.; Sadovyi, B.; Nowakowski, P.; Porowski, S.

    2012-07-01

    Crystallization of GaN by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution method in multi-feed-seed (MFS) configuration without intentional doping [1] results in: (1) Growth of strongly n-type crystals with free electron concentration increasing with growth temperature in ranges of 2-6×1019 cm-3 and 1350-1430 °C, (2) stable growth on Ga-polar surface and unstable growth on N-polar surface, crystals slightly brown, (3) improvement of (0001) crystallographic planes curvature (flattening) with respect to bowing of these planes in the seed crystals. The addition of magnesium into the growth solution causes strong compensation of free electrons in the crystals. Therefore, highly resistive GaN crystals can be grown. In this work, the crystallization of Mg doped GaN on flat ∼1 in. seeds (substrates) grown by HVPE in MFS configuration has been studied. It is shown that: (1) Highly resistive GaN:Mg crystals with resistivity higher than 107 Ω cm were grown, (2) the growth is stable on N-polar surfaces of the seeds whereas it is unstable on the Ga-polar surfaces, which is opposite to the HNPS growth of the n-type crystals. The GaN:Mg crystals are fully transparent with no visible color, (3) shape of (0001) crystallographic planes improves (flattens) with respect to bowing of these planes in the seed crystals (HVPE substrates).

  4. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  5. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of chitinase from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Chaudhary, Anshul; Tomar, Shailly; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-04-01

    A protein with chitinase activity has been isolated and purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis of this protein confirmed it to be an approximately 34 kDa endochitinase which belongs to the acidic class III chitinase family. The protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1), with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.6 A. PMID:19342775

  6. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  7. Multi feed seed (MFS) high pressure crystallization of 1-2 in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockowski, M.; Grzegory, I.; Lucznik, B.; Sochacki, T.; Nowak, G.; Sadovyi, B.; Strak, P.; Kamler, G.; Litwin-Staszewska, E.; Porowski, S.

    2012-07-01

    The growth and physical properties of GaN crystallized in a multi feed-seed (MFS) configuration by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution (HNPS) growth method are presented in detail. The conversion of free standing HVPE-GaN crystals to free standing HNPS-GaN is the basis of the MFS configuration. The influence of the experimental conditions (i.e. growth temperature, temperature gradient, etc.), the c-plane bowing of the initial substrate, the electrical properties of HNPS-GaN, and the rate and mode of growth from solution are analyzed. We show that the HNPS-GaN crystals have better structural quality than their HVPE-GaN seeds. The defect density decreases with increasing growth temperature, reaching 5×105 cm-2 for crystals grown at 1420 °C or higher. In contrast, the free carrier concentration in HNPS-GaN increases with increasing growth temperature, reaching 7×1019 cm-3 for samples crystallized at 1440 °C. Thus the possibility to obtain good quality plasmonic GaN substrates for laser diodes can be realized.

  8. Tailoring Zeolite ZSM-5 Crystal Morphology/Porosity through Flexible Utilization of Silicalite-1 Seeds as Templates: Unusual Crystallization Pathways in a Heterogeneous System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Peicheng; Shi, Zhangping; Mao, Jianjiang; Zhang, Yahong; Tang, Yi

    2016-05-17

    Diffusion limitation in micropores of zeolites leads to a demand for optimization of zeolite morphology and/or porosity. However, tailoring crystallization processes to realize targeted morphology/porosity is a major challenge in zeolite synthesis. On the basis of previous work on the salt-aided, seed-induced route, the template effect of seeds on the formation of micropores, mesopores and even macropores was further explored to selectively achieve desired hierarchical architectures. By carefully investigating the crystallization processes of two typical samples with distinct crystal morphologies, namely, 1) nanocrystallite-oriented self-assembled ZSM-5 zeolite and 2) enriched intracrystal mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite, a detailed mechanism is proposed to clarify the role of silicalite-1 seeds in the formation of diverse morphologies in a salt-rich heterogeneous system, combined with the transformation of seed-embedded aluminosilicate gel. On the basis of these conclusions, the morphologies/porosities of products were precisely tailored by deliberately adjusting the synthesis parameters (KF/Si, tetrapropylammonium bromide/Si and H2 O/Si ratios and type of organic template) to regulate the kinetics of seed dissolution and seed-induced recrystallization. This work may not only provide a practical route to control zeolite crystallization for tailoring crystal morphology, but also expands the knowledge of crystal growth mechanisms in a heterogeneous system. PMID:27073032

  9. Structural investigation of the seeding process for physical vapor transport growth of 4H-SiC single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Noboru; Ohshige, Chikashi; Katsuno, Masakazu; Fujimoto, Tatsuo; Sato, Shinya; Tsuge, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Wataru; Yano, Takayuki; Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Kitabatake, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Structural investigation of the seeding process for the physical vapor transport (PVT) growth of 4H-SiC single crystals was conducted by high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and synchrotron x-ray topography. Characteristic lattice plane bending behavior was observed in the near-seed regions of the grown crystals. The bending of the (112¯0) lattice plane was localized near the seed/grown crystal interface, and the (0001) basal plane bent convexly in the growth direction near the interface, indicative of the insertion of extra-half planes pointing toward the growth direction during the seeding process for PVT growth. This study discusses a possible mechanism for the observed lattice plane bending and sheds light on defect formation processes during the PVT growth of 4H-SiC single crystals.

  10. Seed crystals with improved properties for melt processing superconductors for practical applications

    DOEpatents

    Veal, B.W.; Paulikas, A.; Balachandran, U.; Zhong, W.

    1997-03-18

    A method of fabricating bulk superconducting material is disclosed including RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} comprising heating compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of R and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} in physical contact with an oxide single crystal seed to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} while maintaining the single crystal seed solid to grow the superconducting material and thereafter cooling to provide a material including RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}. R is a rare earth or Y or La and the single crystal seed has a lattice mismatch with RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} of less than about 2% at the growth temperature. The starting material may be such that the final product contains a minor amount of R{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5}.

  11. Seed crystals with improved properties for melt processing superconductors for practical applications

    DOEpatents

    Veal, Boyd W.; Paulikas, Arvydas; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Zhong, Wei

    1997-01-01

    A method of fabricating bulk superconducting material including RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. comprising heating compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of R and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. in physical contact with an oxide single crystal seed to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. while maintaining the single crystal seed solid to grow the superconducting material and thereafter cooling to provide a material including RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta.. R is a rare earth or Y or La and the single crystal seed has a lattice mismatch with RBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-.delta. of less than about 2% at the growth temperature. The starting material may be such that the final product contains a minor amount of R.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5.

  12. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of a vicilin-type seed storage protein from Pinus koraiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Fu, Tong-Jen; Kothary, Mahendra H.; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method in hanging drops. The cupin superfamily of proteins includes the 7S and 11S seed storage proteins. Many members of this family of proteins are known allergens. In this study, the Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) vicilin-type 7S seed storage protein was isolated from defatted pine-nut extract and purified by sequential gel-filtration and anion-exchange chromatography. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method in hanging drops. The crystals belong to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 148.174 Å. Two vicilin molecules were present in the asymmetric unit and the Matthews coefficient was determined to be 2.90 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, with a corresponding solvent content of ∼58%. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained using the program Phaser. Refinement of the structure is currently under way.

  13. Structure of KTiOPO{sub 4} single crystals grown by the top-seeded solution and spontaneous flux crystallization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, N. E. Verin, I. A.; Sorokina, N. I.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Voronkova, V. I.; Tseitlin, M.; Roth, M.

    2008-11-15

    This paper reports on the results of precision X-ray structural investigations of KTiOPO{sub 4} single crystals grown by one method (crystallization from a solution in the melt) in two variants (the spontaneous formation of crystallization centers or top-seeded solution growth during slow cooling of saturated solution melts). It is shown that spontaneous flux crystallization leads to the formation of a larger number of defects. Potassium atoms are found to be disordered. The splitting of the K1 and K2 potassium positions is equal to 0.347(4) and 0.279(3) A, respectively, for the crystals grown by the top-seeded solution method and 0.308(5) and 0.321(4) A, respectively, for the crystals grown through the spontaneous flux crystallization.

  14. Method and apparatus for inoculating crystallization seeds into a liquid latent heat storage substance

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Scheunemann, K.

    1984-07-24

    A method and apparatus for inoculating a liquid latent heat storage substance of the type convertible to the solid state on cooling is disclosed. A portion of the substance is caused to crystallize on a cooled active surface, immersed in the substance and preferably vertically arranged, whereupon the active surface is heated to fuse-off the formed crystals to release them into the liquid portion of the storage substance to thus form inoculation seeds on which further crystallization of the storage substance takes place on withdrawal of heat from same. In one described embodiment, a pair of active surfaces is provided by using a Peltier element operating with a DC source having selectively reversible polarity whereby one surface is cooled down while the other is heated and vice versa, depending on the instant polarity of the DC source. In another embodiment, the active surface is alternately heated and cooled by heat carrier medium of a heat pump circulation system drawn from the respective sections of the system in alternating fashion. Due to the formation of crystallization seeds from the heat storage substance, problems normally associated with the use of a foreign inoculation substance are avoided.

  15. Crystallization during volume reduction of solutions with a composition corresponding to that in the collecting duct: the influence of hydroxyapatite seed crystals and urinary macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Højgaard, I; Fornander, A M; Nilsson, M A; Tiselius, H G

    1999-12-01

    To examine the effect of hydroxyapatite (HAP) seed crystals and urinary macromolecules on the crystallization under conditions similar to those in the collecting duct, we evaporated 100 ml samples of salt solutions with an ion composition assumed to correspond to that in the collecting duct without and with HAP seed crystals. The crystallization in seeded solutions was assessed both with and without dialysed urine (dU). After evaporation the number and volume of crystals were recorded in a Coulter Multisizer and the crystal morphology examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray crystallography. Addition of HAP crystals was apparently followed by an approximately 15-20% increase in heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate (CaOx). In these experiments SEM and X-ray crystallography showed a high percentage of CaOx in the precipitate. In samples reduced to 40-69 ml, addition of dU to the collecting duct solution containing HAP seed resulted in a greater mean (SD) number of crystals; 3895 (1841) in samples with dU and 1785 (583) in samples without. This was mainly explained by an increased mean (SD) number of small crystals. The mean crystal volume was 17.8 (1.1) and 34.3 (9.1) in samples reduced to 40 69 ml with and without dU, respectively. This might reflect the inhibitory effect of dU on the growth and/or aggregation of the CaOx-CaP precipitate or a promoted nucleation resulting in a large number of small crystals. It is concluded that calcium phosphate formed above the collecting duct might induce heterogeneous nucleation of CaOx at lower levels of the renal collecting system, and that urinary macromolecules are powerful modifiers of these processes. PMID:10651129

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de; Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Cajazeiras, João Batista; Rocha, Bruno Anderson M. da; Rustiguel, Joane Kathelen Rodrigues; Freitas, Beatriz Tupinamba; Canduri, Fernanda; Delatorre, Plínio; Azevedo, Walter Filgueira Jr de; Cavada, Benildo S.

    2005-01-01

    A lectin from C. maritima was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method and crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. A molecular-replacement search found a solution with a correlation coefficient of 69.2% and an R factor of 42.5%, refinement is in progress. A lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds (ConM) was purified and submitted to crystallization experiments. The best crystals were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method at a constant temperature of 293 K and grew in 7 d. A complete structural data set was collected to 2.1 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The ConM crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.15, b = 70.90, c = 97.37 Å. A molecular-replacement search found a solution with a correlation coefficient of 69.2% and an R factor of 42.5%. Crystallographic refinement is under way.

  17. Investigation of iron contamination of seed crystals and its impact on lifetime distribution in Quasimono silicon ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trempa, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Müller, G.; Sylla, L.; Krause, A.; Richter, T.

    2015-11-01

    The use of seed plates during directional solidification (DS) of Quasimono silicon ingots causes additional yield losses compared to standard multi-crystalline ingots due to an increased area of low minority carrier lifetime ("red-zone") in the bottom region. This effect is attributed in literature mainly to iron impurities which are contaminating the seed crystal during heat up and afterwards the as-grown ingot during solidification. However, the contamination mechanisms itself are still not completely understood. Therefore, in this work the seed contamination mechanisms by iron and their effect on the lifetime distribution in the bottom region of Quasimono silicon ingots were investigated. For this purpose special crystal growth experiments in a laboratory-scale DS furnace were carried out by using diffusion barriers at the crucible/seed and seed/melt interfaces in order to separate the different contamination paths. The results show that the iron diffusion path from the crucible into the seed plates plays an important role. But in addition to this it will be demonstrated that an even more important iron contamination path is by gas phase transport from furnace parts via the furnace atmosphere to the seed crystals.

  18. The kinetics of desilication of synthetic spent Bayer liquor seeded with cancrinite and cancrinite/sodalite mixed-phase crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Mark C.; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Gerson, Andrea R.

    1999-04-01

    Isothermal, batch desilication kinetics of synthetic, sodium aluminate solution (spent Bayer liquor) via cancrinite and cancrinite/sodalite mixed-phase crystal growth, have been studied under conditions at which sodium aluminosilicate scale forms at the surfaces of steel heat exchangers of alumina plant. Seeding with the pure cancrinite and mixed-phase crystals results in the suppression of scale formation and a faster rate of liquor desilication in comparison with its sodalite dimorph. Cancrinite seed crystals prepared from NO -3-rich solutions exhibited crystal growth mechanism and kinetic behaviour different from dimorphic mixed-phase crystals prepared from CO 2-3-rich solutions, when both were used to desilicate CO 2-3-rich spent Bayer liquor. The rate of desilication due to crystal growth on CO 2-3-cancrinite/sodalite mixed phase crystals followed a second-order dependence on the relative supersaturation of SiO 2. An activation energy of 52 kJ mol -1 was estimated for the crystal growth process. For desilication kinetics involving NO -3-cancrinite seed crystal growth, a third-order dependence on relative supersaturation of SiO 2 and an activation energy of 63 kJ mol -1 were obtained.

  19. Improving the diffraction of full-length human selenomethionyl metavinculin crystals by streak-seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Izard, Tina

    2012-06-28

    Metavinculin is an alternatively spliced isoform of vinculin that has a 68-residue insert in its tail domain (1134 total residues) and is exclusively expressed in cardiac and smooth muscle tissue, where it plays important roles in myocyte adhesion complexes. Mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in man. Crystals of a DCM-associated mutant of full-length selenomethionine-labeled metavinculin grown by hanging-drop vapor diffusion diffracted poorly and were highly sensitive to radiation, preventing the collection of a complete X-ray diffraction data set at the highest possible resolution. Streak-seeding markedly improved the stability, crystal-growth rate and diffraction quality of DCM-associated mutant metavinculin crystals, allowing complete data collection to 3.9 {angstrom} resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 170, c = 211 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the seed lectin from Parkia platycephala.

    PubMed

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Santos, Claudia F; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Nagano, Celso S; Farias, Creuza M S A; Cavada, Benildo S; Calvete, Juan J

    2002-01-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the seed lectin of Parkia platycephala, a Mimosoideae, regarded as the most primitive group of the Leguminosae plants, are reported. Its amino-acid sequence consists of three tandemly arranged jacalin-related beta-prism domains, which is a novel fold for a leguminous lectin. Furthermore, no other lectin structure with this arrangement of domains has been described. P2(1)2(1)2(1) crystals (unit-cell parameters a = 63.6, b = 68.5, c = 208.5 A), which diffract to a maximum resolution of 2.2 A, were obtained in hanging drops at pH 8 and 293 K by the vapor-diffusion method using 10% 2-propanol and 20% polyethylene glycol 4000 as precipitants. The asymmetric unit contains two lectin molecules and has a solvent content of 46%. Only a single beta-prism domain could be located by molecular replacement using the structure of the Helianthus tuberosus lectin (PDB code 1c3k) as the search model. Isomorphous heavy-atom derivatives are currently being produced to solve the complete structure of the P. platycephala seed lectin. PMID:11752802

  1. Transformation of echinoid Mg calcite skeletons by heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, J. A. D.

    2001-02-01

    Interambularcral plates of echinoid Heterocentrotus trigonarius, composed of Mg calcite 1 (≈14 mol% MgCO 3), were heated in three timed series of experiments at 300°C. Dried plate fragments and fragments with added water were heated separately in pressurized bombs. X-ray powder diffractometry, unit cell dimensions, and phase compositions are used to monitor reaction progress. After 10 h heating in the bombs dolomite (43.5 mol% MgCO 3) and Mg calcite appear (4-7 mol% MgCO 3); by 20 h all Mg calcite 1 is consumed, and at 120 h dolomite composition has evolved to ≈47 mol% MgCO 3 and calcite to ≈2 mol% MgCO 3. Whole plates heated at 300°C in an open muffle furnace develop dolomite (≈42 mol% MgCO 3) and Mg calcite 2 (≈6 mol% MgCO 3) after 10 h and remain compositionally invariant throughout subsequent heating to 620 h. Limited skeletal water catalyzes the early reaction but escapes from the open furnace and consequently reaction ceases after ≈10 h. The experimentally produced dolomite has relative Mg-Ca ordering of 75% to 79%. The stabilization of echinoid Mg calcite by heating at 300°C to a mixture of dolomite and calcite occurs through a dissolution/precipitation reaction. The alteration fabric produced within the stereom consists of irregularly shaped, branched dolomite crystals > 5 μm homoaxially set in a calcite 2 (bomb) or Mg calcite 2 (furnace) matrix. Round and tubular pores 1 to 5 μm are randomly distributed throughout this fabric. The stereom pore system remains intact during furnace heating but is destroyed during heating in bombs. The texture of experimentally stabilized echinoid skeletons is different from that of fossil echinoderms that are composed of microrhomic dolomite homoaxially set in a single calcite crystal.

  2. Magnetization behavior of RE123 bulk magnets bearing twin seed-crystals in pulsed field magnetization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Ogawa, J.; Fukui, S.; Sato, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Langer, M.

    2016-02-01

    Melt-textured Y-Ba-Cu-O high temperature superconducting bulk magnets were fabricated by the cold seeding method with using single or twin-seed crystals composed of Nd-Ba-Cu-O thin films on MgO substrates. The behavior of the magnetic flux penetration into anisotropic-grown bulk magnets thus fabricated was precisely evaluated during and after the pulsed field magnetization operated at 35 K. These seed crystals were put on the top surfaces of the precursors to grow large grains during the melt-processes. Although we know the magnetic flux motion is restricted by the enhanced pinning effect in temperature ranges lower than 77 K, we observed that flux invasion occurred at applied fields of 3.3 T when the twin seeds were used. This is definitely lower than those of 3.7 T when the single-seeds were employed. This means that the magnetic fluxes are capable of invading into twin-seeded bulk magnets more easily than single-seeded ones. The twin seeds form the different grain growth regions, the narrow-GSR (growth sector region) and wide-GSR, according to the different grain growth directions which are parallel and normal to the rows of seed crystals, respectively. The invading flux measurements revealed that the magnetic flux invades the sample from the wide-GSR prior to the narrow-GSR. It suggests that such anisotropic grain growth leads to different distributions of pinning centers, variations of J c values, and the formation of preferential paths for the invading magnetic fluxes. Using lower applied fields definitely contributed to lowering the heat generation during the PFM process, which, in turn, led to enhanced trapped magnetic fluxes.

  3. Combining site-specific mutagenesis and seeding as a strategy to crystallize ‘difficult’ proteins: the case of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Goedele; Brosens, Elke; Wahni, Khadija; Desmyter, Aline; Spinelli, Silvia; Wyns, Lode; Messens, Joris; Loris, Remy

    2006-12-01

    S. aureus thioredoxin was crystallized using a combination of seeding and site-specific mutagenesis. The P31T mutant of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin crystallizes spontaneously in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.7, b = 49.5, c = 55.6 Å. The crystals diffract to 2.2 Å resolution. Isomorphous crystals of wild-type thioredoxin as well as of other point mutants only grow when seeded with the P31T mutant. These results suggest seeding as a valuable tool complementing surface engineering for proteins that are hard to crystallize.

  4. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sø, Helle U.; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Larsen, Flemming

    2008-12-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic concentrations were kept low (<33 μM) to avoid surface precipitation. The results show that little or no arsenite sorbs on calcite within 24 h at an initial As concentration of 0.67 μM. In contrast, arsenate sorbs readily and quickly on calcite. Likewise, desorption of arsenate from calcite is fast and complete within hours, indicating that arsenate is not readily incorporated into the calcite crystal lattice. The degree of arsenate sorption depends on the solution chemistry. Sorption increases with decreasing alkalinity, indicating a competition for sorption sites between arsenate and (bi)carbonate. pH also affects the sorption behavior, likely in response to changes in arsenate speciation or protonation/deprotonation of the adsorbing arsenate ion. Finally, sorption is influenced by the ionic strength, possibly due to electrostatic effects. The sorption of arsenate on calcite was modeled successfully using a surface complexation model comprising strong and weak sites. In the model, the adsorbing arsenate species were HAsO4- and CaHAsO40. The model was able to correctly predict the adsorption of arsenate in the wide range of calcite-equilibrated solutions used in the batch experiments and to describe the non-linear shape of the sorption isotherms. Extrapolation of the experimental results to calcite bearing aquifers suggests a large variability in the mobility of arsenic. Under reduced conditions, arsenite, which does not sorb on calcite, will dominate and, hence, As will be highly mobile. In contrast, when conditions are oxidizing, arsenate is the predominant species and, because arsenate adsorbs strongly on calcite, As mobility will be significantly retarded. The estimated

  5. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  6. Isotopic fractionation of cadmium into calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Tristan J.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Henderson, Gideon M.

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium mimics the distribution of the macronutrient phosphate in the oceans, and has uses as a palaeoproxy of past ocean circulation and nutrient utilization. Isotopic analyses of dissolved Cd in modern seawater show potential as a new tool for disentangling phytoplankton utilization of Cd from abiotic processes, such as ocean mixing. Extending this information into the past requires the Cd isotope signal to be captured and faithfully preserved in a suitable sedimentary archive. However, the role that environmental factors, such as temperature, may play in controlling Cd isotope fractionation into such archives has not been assessed. To this end, we have performed controlled inorganic CaCO 3 precipitation experiments in artificial seawater solutions. We grew calcite under different precipitation rates, temperatures, salinities, and ambient [Mg 2 + ], before measuring Cd isotopic compositions by double spike MC-ICPMS. We find that the isotopic fractionation factor for Cd into calcite ( α-C) in seawater is always less than one (i.e. light isotopes of Cd are preferred in calcite). The fractionation factor has a value of 0.99955 ± 0.00012 and shows no response to temperature, [Mg 2 + ], or precipitation rate across the range studied. The constancy of this fractionation in seawater suggests that marine calcites may provide a record of the local seawater composition, without the need to correct for effects due to environmental variables. We also performed CaCO 3 growth in freshwater and, in contrast to calcite precipitated from artificial seawater solutions, no isotopic offset was recorded between the growth solution and calcite ( α-Cd=1.0000±0.0001). Cadmium isotope fractionation during calcite growth can be explained by a kinetic isotope effect during the largely unidirectional incorporation of Cd at the mineral surface. Further, the rate of Cd uptake and isotopic fractionation can be modulated by increased ion blocking of crystal surface sites at high salinity

  7. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface.

    PubMed

    Bovet, N; Yang, M; Javadi, M S; Stipp, S L S

    2015-02-01

    A clearer understanding of calcite interactions with organic molecules would contribute to a range of fields including harnessing the secrets of biomineralisation where organisms produce hard parts, increasing oil production from spent reservoirs, remediating contaminated soils and drinking water aquifers and improving manufacturing methods for industrial products such as pigments, soft abrasives, building materials and optical devices. Biomineralisation by some species of blue green algae produces beautifully elaborate platelets of calcite where the individual crystals are of nanometer scale. Controlling their growth requires complex polysaccharides. Polysaccharide activity depends on the functionality of OH groups, so to simplify the system in order to get closer to a molecular level understanding, we investigated the interaction of OH from a suite of alcohols with clean, freshly cleaved calcite surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided binding energies and revealed the extent of surface coverage. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supplemented with information about molecule ordering, orientation and packing density. The results show that all alcohols studied bond with the calcite surface through the OH group, with their carbon chains sticking away in a standing-up orientation. Alcohol molecules are closely packed and form a well-ordered monolayer on the surface. PMID:25533590

  8. Dislocation characterization in crystals of potash alum grown by seeded solution growth under conditions of low supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H. L.; Ristić, R. I.; Sherwood, J. N.; Shripathi, T.

    1992-08-01

    An analysis has been carried out of the genesis and character of growth dislocations present in all growth sectors of single crystals of potash alum. The crystals, grown from seeded solutions by the temperature lowering method under conditions of low supersaturation, presented the well-developed forms: {111} dominant, {100} and {110}. Growth dislocations formed predominately during refacetting of the edges and corners of the seed, rounded during preparation and insertion into the supersaturated solution. From here they become refracted into the {111} sectors which proved to be the most defective. Smaller numbers of dislocations form at the {111}, {100} and {110} seed interfaces and propagate in these sectors. In crystals of inferior quality, a number of inclusions were found predominantly in the fast growing {100} sectors which become the source of additional dislocations. Dislocations present in the original seed did not propagate across the interface into the developing crystal. Dislocations of all characters were observed. The principal Burgers vectors were found to be <100>, <110> and <111>.

  9. X-Ray Characterization of Structural Defects in Seeded and Self-Seeded ZnSe Crystal Grown by PVT in Horizontal and Vertical Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Su, C.-H.; Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of a pre-flight ground based investigation of crystal growth of II-VI compound semiconductors, a number of ZnSe boules have been grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) at Marshall Space Flight Center. Boules were grown in both horizontal and vertical configurations and seeded and self-seeded growth techniques were employed. As-grown and/or cleaved boules were examined by a combination of synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution triple axis diffraction (HRTXD) to characterized the structural defects and correlate them with the growth conditions. Horizontal grown boules tend to grow away from the ampoule wall (contactless growth) and generally exhibit large (110) facets parallel to the gravity vector. Vertical grown boules grew to the full diameter of the ampoule and exhibited no faceting. X-ray topography combined with back reflection x-ray diffraction revealed the presence of lamellar twins (180 deg type about the [111] axis) in horizontal grown boules while vertically grown boules contain a few large grains, some of which are twinned. X-ray topographs and reciprocal space maps recorded from the boules show the better crystal quality of horizontal grown boules. The relationship between crystal quality and gravity vector is investigated. Further, an attempt is made to extend the Hurle theory of twin nucleation in Czochralski grown crystals to explain the twinning mechanisms in horizontal grown boules.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a new chitin-binding protein from Parkia platycephala seeds.

    PubMed

    Cavada, Benildo S; Castellón, Rolando E R; Vasconcelos, Georg G; Rocha, Bruno A M; Bezerra, Gustavo A; Debray, Henri; Delatorre, Plínio; Nagano, Celso S; Toyama, Marcos; Pinto, Vicente P T; Moreno, Frederico B M B; Canduri, Fernanda; Azevedo, Walter F de

    2005-09-01

    A chitin-binding protein named PPL-2 was purified from Parkia platycephala seeds and crystallized. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 55.19, b = 59.95, c = 76.60 A, and grew over several days at 293 K using the hanging-drop method. Using synchrotron radiation, a complete structural data set was collected to 1.73 A resolution. The preliminary crystal structure of PPL-2, determined by molecular replacement, presents a correlation coefficient of 0.558 and an R factor of 0.439. Crystallographic refinement is in progress. PMID:16511174

  11. Anisotropic parallel self-diffusion coefficients near the calcite surface: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Luís F M; Castier, Marcelo; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-08-28

    Applying classical molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate the parallel self-diffusion coefficients of different fluids (methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide) confined between two {101̄4} calcite crystal planes. We have observed that the molecules close to the calcite surface diffuse differently in distinct directions. This anisotropic behavior of the self-diffusion coefficient is investigated for different temperatures and pore sizes. The ion arrangement in the calcite crystal and the strong interactions between the fluid particles and the calcite surface may explain the anisotropy in this transport property. PMID:27586936

  12. Microstructures and elastic properties of sheared calcite flowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Ivanka; Grasemann, Bernhard; Plan, Lukas; Tesei, Telemaco; Baron, Ivo

    2016-04-01

    Flowstone is a monomineralic rock precipitated along cave walls and floors, composed of columnar centimeter-scale calcite crystals with strong growth orientation perpendicular to the growth surface. Broken and scratched flowstone can serve as evidence for active faulting and has been found in several alpine caves in Austria. In order to understand the fault mechanics, and associated potential earthquake hazard, experimentally deformed flowstone is studied using microstructural analysis and EBSD-measured physical properties of calcite crystals. For that purpose, we have performed sliding experiments using a rock deformation biaxial apparatus on rectangular blocks of flowstone that were sheared perpendicular to the calcite growth direction. The experiments were performed under room conditions, with sub-seismic sliding velocity (0.001-0.01 mm/s) and constant effective normal stress (3-10 MPa). The deformed samples show diverse brittle features, including high fracture density, the development of calcite-rich fault gouge with Riedel shears within a foliated cataclasite, and drastic grain size reduction down to nm-scale grains. The dominant plastic microstructure is mechanical twinning. Due to the strong growth orientation of calcite in flowstone, crystals can be bent due to shearing. We examine the bending by applying orientation distribution, Schmid factor and elasticity tensor calculations using MTEX Toolbox from EBSD data. In this unique case the flowstone deformation experiments bridge the gap between single crystal and rock powder experiments. This study is supported by the Austrian Science Foundation: SPELEOTECT project (P25884-N29).

  13. Crystal structure of mature 2S albumin from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Anwar; Mariutti, Ricardo Barros; Masood, Rehana; Caruso, Icaro Putinhon; Costa, Gustavo Henrique Gravatim; Millena de Freita, Cristhyane; Santos, Camila Ramos; Zanphorlin, Leticia Maria; Rossini Mutton, Márcia Justino; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2S albumins, the seed storage proteins, are the primary sources of carbon and nitrogen and are involved in plant defense. The mature form of Moringa oleifera (M. oleifera), a chitin binding protein isoform 3-1 (mMo-CBP3-1) a thermostable antifungal, antibacterial, flocculating 2S albumin is widely used for the treatment of water and is potentially interesting for the development of both antifungal drugs and transgenic crops. The crystal structure of mMo-CBP3-1 determined at 1.7 Å resolution demonstrated that it is comprised of two proteolytically processed α-helical chains, stabilized by four disulfide bridges that is stable, resistant to pH changes and has a melting temperature (TM) of approximately 98 °C. The surface arginines and the polyglutamine motif are the key structural factors for the observed flocculating, antibacterial and antifungal activities. This represents the first crystal structure of a 2S albumin and the model of the pro-protein indicates the structural changes that occur upon formation of mMo-CBP3-1 and determines the structural motif and charge distribution patterns for the diverse observed activities. PMID:26505799

  14. Sulfated Macromolecules as Templates for Calcite Nucleation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Passalacqua, K.; Neira, A. C.; Fernandez, M. S.

    2003-12-01

    Mineralization of egg and seashells is controlled by an intimate association of inorganic materials with organic macromolecules. Among them, particular polyanionic sulfated macromolecules referred to as proteoglycans have been described to be involved in the calcification of these biominerals. The sulfated moieties of the proteoglycans are part of polymer chains constituted of building-blocks of disaccharide units, referred to as sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are covalently attached to a protein core. By using a sitting drop crystallization assay under controlled conditions of time, pH and reactants concentration, we have tested several sulfated and non-sulfated GAGs (i.e.: dermatan and keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid and heparin), differing in their sulfonate and carboxylate degree and pattern, in their ability to modify calcium carbonate crystal morphology as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Without the addition of GAGs, regular \\{104\\} rhombohedral calcite crystals were obtained. When hyaluronic acid (HA), a non-sulfated but carboxylated GAG, was added, 20 mm long piles of unmodified calcite crystals were observed. When desulfated dermatan, which is an epimeric form of HA but shorter polymer, having their carboxylate groups in an inverted configuration, was added, isolated rhombohedral \\{104\\} calcite crystals showing rounded corners with planes oriented parallel to the c axis were observed. When dermatan sulfated was added, isolated calcite crystals exhibit a columnar morphology as a \\{hk0\\} cylinder with three \\{104\\} faces forming a cap at both ends. Heparin activity depends on the fraction added. Fast-moving heparin fraction (FM), is an undersulfated, low-molecular-weight heterogeneous polymer, while slow-moving heparin fraction (SM) is an high-molecular-weight homogeneous polymer rich in trisulfated-disaccharide units. When FM was added, isolated calcite crystals displayed rhombohedrical \\{104\\} faces but flat corners of

  15. Oxygen isotope fractionation in synthetic magnesian calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-López, Concepción; Romanek, Christopher S.; Huertas, F. Javier; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Caballero, Emilia

    2004-08-01

    Mg-bearing calcite was precipitated at 25°C in closed system free-drift experiments from solutions containing NaHCO 3, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2. The chemical and isotope composition of the solution and precipitate were investigated during time course experiments of 24-h duration. Monohydrocalcite and calcite precipitated early in the experiments (<8 h), while Mg-calcite was the predominant precipitate (>95%) thereafter. Solid collected at the end of the experiments displayed compositional zoning from pure calcite in crystal cores to up to 23 mol% MgCO 3 in the rims. Smaller excursions in Mg were superimposed on this chemical record, which is characteristic of oscillatory zoning observed in synthetic and natural solid-solution carbonates of differing solubility. Magnesium also altered the predominant morphology of crystals over time from the {104} to {100} and {110} growth forms. The oxygen isotope fractionation factor for the magnesian-calcite-water system (as 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O ) displayed a strong dependence on the mol% MgCO 3 in the solid phase, but quantification of the relationship was difficult due to the heterogeneous nature of the precipitate. Considering only the Mg-content and δ 18O values for the bulk solid, 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O increased at a rate of 0.17 ± 0.02 per mol% MgCO 3; this value is a factor of three higher than the single previous estimate (Tarutani T., Clayton R.N., and Mayeda T. K. (1969) The effect of polymorphims and magnesium substitution on oxygen isotope fractionation between calcium carbonate and water. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 33, 987-996). Nevertheless, extrapolation of our relationship to the pure calcite end member yielded a value of 27.9 ± 0.02, which is similar in magnitude to published values for the calcite-water system. Although no kinetic effect was observed on 10 3lnα Mg-cl-H 2O for precipitation rates that ranged from 10 3.21 to 10 4.60 μmol · m -2 · h -1, it was impossible to disentangle the potential effect(s) of

  16. Physicochemical characteristics of drip waters: Influence on mineralogy and crystal morphology of recent cave carbonate precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechelmann, Sylvia; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Schreuer, Jürgen; Richter, Detlev K.; Riechelmann, Dana F. C.; Terente, Mihai; Constantin, Silviu; Mangini, Augusto; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    corners of the crystal seed, (ii) crystal habit tend to elongate along [0 0 1] due to slower growth of faces with high Mg2+ densities, (iii) reconstitution of crystal faces with low Mg2+ densities, and (iv) occurrence of calcite crystals with bended faces and edges due to very high Mg2+ (Mg/Ca ratios of 0.009-0.051) incorporation. Growth rates and possibly also organic compounds, however, may also affect the morphology of calcite crystals. Based on the data shown here, the relation of Mg2+ incorporation and the resulting changes in calcite crystal morphologies as well as the conditions of aragonite precipitation are now clearly better understood. Further work should aim at linking the calcite crystal morphology of watch glass precipitates with calcite crystal fabrics in speleothems in order to exploit the petrographic archive of speleothem deposits.

  17. Improved techniques for growth of large-area single-crystal Si sheets over SiO2 using lateral epitaxy by seeded solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaur, B.-Y.; Fan, J. C. C.; Geis, M. W.; Silversmith, D. J.; Mountain, R. W.

    1981-10-01

    Continuous single-crystal Si sheets over SiO2 with areas of several square centimeters have been produced from poly-Si films by the LESS technique (lateral epitaxy by seeded solidification). Seeding is achieved either with a narrow stripe opening in a recessed SiO2 layer on a single-crystal Si substrate or with an external single-crystal Si seed. N-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's) fabricated in these films exhibit surface electron mobilities as high as 700 sq cm/V s.

  18. Relative growth rates and compositions of aragonite and MG calcite cements in seawater: effects of temperature and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.A.; Walter, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental work shows that carbonate cement compositions and relative growth rates are controlled by changes in temperature and chemical composition of seawater. Substrate mineralogy controls cement mineralogy. Low-Mg calcite cements are favored at low temperatures. As temperature rises, aragonite precipitation becomes progressively more favored and the mole % MgCO/sub 3/ in calcite increases. Aragonite and calcite seeds of known surface area were added to natural seawater at 5, 25 and 37/sup 0/C and a p/sub CO/sup 2// of 0.01 atm. Runs were conducted at 10 times calcite saturation. Saturation state was held constant during each run by injection of titrants to replace calcium and carbonate ions lost by precipitation. Overgrowth compositions were analyzed by XRD. In all experiments, aragonite seeds had only aragonite overgrowths. Only calcite cements grew on calcite seeds. Sulfate also effects calcite precipitation rates and cement compositions. Preliminary results at 25/sup 0/C indicate that, at the same saturation state, calcite growth rates are 10 times faster in sulfate-free seawater-like solutions (Mg/Ca=5) than in normal seawater. Cements grown in sulfate-free media were enriched by 2 to 3 mole % over the calcite cements from natural seawater. This suggests that sulfate depletion of seawater should lead to a more rapid precipitation of progressively more Mg-rich calcites.

  19. Large piezoelectric properties in KNN-based lead-free single crystals grown by a seed-free solid-state crystal growth method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Yang, Qunbao; Liu, Zhifu; Li, Yongxiang; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Qiming

    2016-05-01

    We report lead-free single crystals with a nominal formula of (K0.45Na0.55)0.96Li0.04NbO3 grown using a simple low-cost seed-free solid-state crystal growth method (SFSSCG). The crystals thus prepared can reach maximum dimensions of 6 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm and exhibit a large piezoelectric coefficient d33 of 689 pC/N. Moreover, the effective piezoelectric coefficient d33 * , obtained under a unipolar electric field of 30 kV/cm, can reach 967 pm/V. The large piezoelectric response plus the high Curie temperature (TC) of 432 °C indicate that SFSSCG is an effective approach to synthesize high-performance lead-free piezoelectric single crystals.

  20. Chemistry and petrography of calcite in the KTB pilot borehole, Bavarian Oberpfalz, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    The KTB pilot borehole in northeast Bavaria, Germany, penetrates 4000 m of gneiss, amphibolite, and subordinate calc-silicate, lamprophyre and metagabbro. There are three types of calcite in the drilled section: 1) metamorphic calcite in calc-silicate and marble; 2) crack-filling calcite in all lithologies; and 3) replacement calcite in altered minerals. Crack-filling and replacement calcite postdate metamorphic calcite. Multiple calcite generations in individual cracks suggest that different generations of water repeatedly flowed through the same cracks. Crack-filling mineral assemblages that include calcite originally formed at temperatures of 150-350??C. Presently, crack-filling calcite is in chemical and isotopic equilibrium with saline to brackish water in the borehole at temperatures of ???120??C. The saline to brackish water contains a significant proportion of meteoric water. Re-equilibration of crack-filling calcite to lower temperatures means that calcite chemistry tells us little about water-rock interactions in the crystal section of temperatures higher than ~120??C. -from Author

  1. Catalytic Biomineralization of Fluorescent Calcite by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naoto; Higashimura, Eiji; Saeki, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The thermophilic Geobacillus bacterium catalyzed the formation of 100-μm hexagonal crystals at 60°C in a hydrogel containing sodium acetate, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. Under fluorescence microscopy, crystals fluoresced upon excitation at 365 ± 5, 480 ± 20, or 545 ± 15 nm. X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystals were magnesium-calcite in calcite-type calcium carbonate. PMID:20851984

  2. Gamma-linolenic acid enrichment from Borago officinalis and Echium fastuosum seed oils and fatty acids by low temperature crystallization.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Juan Carlos; Campra-Madrid, Pablo; Guil-Guerrero, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Solvent winterization of seed oil and free fatty acids (FFAs) was employed to obtain gamma-linolenic acid (GLA; 18:3omega6) concentrates from seed oils of two Boraginaceae species, Echium fastuosum and Borago officinalis. Different solutions of seed oils and FFAs from these two oils at 10%, 20% and 40% (w/w) were crystallized at 4 degrees C, -24 degrees C and -70 degrees C, respectively, using hexane, acetone, diethyl ether, isobutanol and ethanol as solvents. Best results were obtained for B. officinalis FFAs in hexane, reaching a maximum GLA concentration of 58.8% in the liquid fraction (LF). In E. fastuosum, the highest GLA concentration (39.9%) was also achieved with FFAs in hexane. PMID:16233632

  3. Micro-mechanical model of calcium oxalate monohydrate aggregation in supersaturated solutions: Effect of crystal form and seed concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, K.; Mitchell, G. P.; Ray, A.; Heywood, B. R.; Hounslow, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we report crystal growth and aggregation behaviour for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in a stirred tank for two differing seed types - rounded and well defined - at various seed loadings. Initially we used our previously developed model [1] to study the growth and aggregation. In this model a dimensionless strength, termed the Mumtaz number, has been formulated, which accounts for the effects of stirring, supersaturation and particle size on the aggregation rate of COM. Subtle differences in growth and aggregation rates were observed between the two populations of crystals; the model was unable to describe this behaviour. These differences were attributed to their different surface characteristics. Growth and aggregation kinetic parameters were also seen to be highly dependent on seed loading. This is attributed to poisoning by an unknown trace impurity, the effect of which is dependent on seed loading. This has led to the development of a new model to account for both surface characteristics and the presence of a trace impurity that adsorbs onto the surface of crystals pinning growth steps. At low seeds loadings, surface coverage by the impurity is higher and so growth rates are reduced. These results are very well described by an extension of the approach of Weaver et al. [2]. We use Liew et al.'s [1] model to represent aggregation by a collision efficiency that depends on a modified Mumtaz number. This model requires the determination of a simple group of parameters that we term the 'aggregation tendency'. The relationship between aggregation tendency and growth rate constant suggests that aggregation is in fact controlled by the growth rate of some high-energy facets not expressed macroscopically. The fact that aggregation tendency increases with surface coverage of impurity further suggests that the presence of impurity gives rise to longer or more numerous linear features along which initial contact between crystals takes place. The combined

  4. Top-seeded solution crystal growth of noncentrosymmetric and polar Zn2TeMoO7 (ZTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguo; Halasyamani, P. Shiv

    2016-04-01

    A top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method was used to grow large, centimeter size, crystals of Zn2TeMoO7 (ZTM) - a noncentrosymmetric and polar material. A TeO2-MoO3 mixture in combination with the parent compound was used as a flux. The morphologies of the crystals can be controlled by different rotation speeds. Optical spectra indicate that ZTM is transparent up to 5.25 μm with a UV absorption edge of 300 nm. In addition, the refractive index along the optical x, y, and z axes was measured at different wavelengths.

  5. Improving batch cooling seeded crystallization of an organic weed-killer using on-line ATR FTIR measurement of supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewiner, F.; Févotte, G.; Klein, J. P.; Puel, F.

    2001-06-01

    In previous papers, a method for the calibration of ATR FTIR measurement of dissolved solid concentration during cooling crystallizations was presented, and efficient basic procedures for the determination of solubility and metastability curves were described. The present paper reports new experimental results. The crystallization of an organic product is studied thanks to on-line FTIR measurements of supersaturation and off-line crystal size distribution (CSD) determinations. The obtained information is shown to potentially allow a deeper examination of major industrial issues such as the reduction of batch-to-batch variations and the improvement of the CSD of the final particles. A particular attention is focused on the determination of appropriate seeding parameters such as the cooling rate of seeded slurries, the temperature of introduction and the amount of seed. The results obtained demonstrate that, although any modelling approach is outside the scope of this paper, the analysis of the measured supersaturation profiles allows some interpretation of mechanisms governing the final CSD, and consequently, the proposal of improved operating parameters.

  6. Human 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-ligand complexes: crystals of different space groups with various cations and combined seeding and co-crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.-W.; Han, Q.; Qiu, W.; Campbell, R. L.; Xie, B.-X.; Azzi, A.; Lin, S.-X.

    1999-01-01

    Human estrogenic 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD1) is responsible for the synthesis of active estrogens that stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells. The enzyme has been crystallized using a Mg 2+/PEG (3500)/β-octyl glucoside system [Zhu et al., J. Mol. Biol. 234 (1993) 242]. The space group of these crystals is C2. Here we report that cations can affect 17β-HSD1 crystallization significantly. In the presence of Mn 2+ instead of Mg 2+, crystals have been obtained in the same space group with similar unit cell dimensions. In the presence of Li + and Na + instead of Mg 2+, the space group has been changed to P2 12 12 1. A whole data set for a crystal of 17ß-HSD1 complex with progesterone grown in the presence of Li + has been collected to 1.95 Å resolution with a synchrotron source. The cell dimensions are a=41.91 Å, b=108.21 Å, c=117.00 Å. The structure has been preliminarily determined by molecular replacement, yielding important information on crystal packing in the presence of different cations. In order to further understand the structure-function relationship of 17β-HSD1, enzyme complexes with several ligands have been crystallized. As the steroids have very low aqueous solubility, we used a combined method of seeding and co-crystallization to obtain crystals of 17β-HSD1 complexed with various ligands. This method provides ideal conditions for growing complex crystals, with ligands such as 20α-hydroxysteroid progesterone, testosterone and 17β-methyl-estradiol-NADP +. Several complex structures have been determined with reliable electronic density of the bound ligands.

  7. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  8. Atomistic simulation of the differences between calcite and dolomite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Titiloye, J.O.; Leeuw, N.H. de; Parker, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    Atomistic simulation methods have been used to calculate and compare the surface structures and energies of the {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace}, {l_brace}0001{r_brace}, {l_brace}10{bar 1}0{r_brace}, {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} and {l_brace}10{bar 1}1{r_brace} surfaces of calcite and dolomite and to evaluate their equilibrium morphologies. The calcite {l_brace}10{bar 1}4{r_brace} and the dolomite {l_brace}10{bar 1}0{r_brace} and {l_brace}11{bar 2}0{r_brace} surfaces are the most stable crystal planes. Investigation of the segregation of Mg and Ca ions in the dolomite crystal shows a clear preference for Ca{sup 2+} ions at the surface sites and for Mg{sup 2+} ions in the bulk sites and hence growth onto dolomite results in calcium carbonate or high magnesian calcite crystals which helps explain the difficulty in crystallizing dolomite vs. calcite under laboratory conditions.

  9. Calcite precipitation rates in the field: Measurement and prediction for a travertine-depositing stream

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.S.; Lorah, M.M. )

    1988-10-01

    Rates of calcite precipitation from a travertine-depositing stream were determined from changes in stream composition between consecutive sampling points and were compared with rates predicted from a laboratory-derived rate law. The agreement in rates was generally within an order of magnitude and routinely within a factor of 3. Least agreement between measured and predicted rates was obtained for sections of flowpath where relatively little change in bulk chemical composition occurred, which were the sections with the greatest mass transfer calculation error, and for the stream segment including a waterfall, which was the section with the greatest error in estimated surface area. Reaction rate obtained from the mass of calcite precipitated onto seed crystals placed in the stream significantly underestimated the mass transfer rate. For the travertine-depositing stream of Warm River Cave and Falling Spring Creek, Virginia, the coupling of equilibrium speciation models with mass balance calculations and simple field measurements allowed successful field-based quantification of reaction rates.

  10. Calcite sealing in a fractured geothermal reservoir: Insights from combined EBSD and chemistry mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, David D.; Lister, Aaron; Prior, Dave J.

    2016-09-01

    Fractures play an important role as fluid flow pathways in geothermal resources hosted in indurated greywacke basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, including the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Over time, the permeability of such geothermal reservoirs can be degraded by fracture sealing as minerals deposit out of transported geothermal fluids. Calcite is one such fracture sealing mineral. This study, for the first time, utilises combined data from electron backscatter diffraction and chemical mapping to characterise calcite vein fill morphologies, and gain insight into the mechanisms of calcite fracture sealing in the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Two calcite sealing mechanisms are identified 1) asymmetrical syntaxial growth of calcite, inferred by the presence of single, twinned, calcite crystals spanning the entire fracture width, and 2) 3D, interlocking growth of bladed vein calcite into free space as determined from chemical and crystallographic orientation mapping. This study also identifies other potential uses of combined EBSD and chemical mapping to understand geothermal field evolution including, potentially informing on levels of fluid supersaturation from the study of calcite lattice distortion, and providing information on a reservoir's history of stress, strain, and deformation through investigation of calcite crystal deformation and twinning patterns.

  11. Effect of dietary fenugreek seeds on biliary proteins that influence nucleation of cholesterol crystals in bile.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghunatha R L; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-04-01

    Formation of cholesterol gallstones in gallbladder is controlled by procrystallising and anticrystallising factors present in bile. Dietary fenugreek seed has been recently observed to possess anti-lithogenic potential in experimental mice. In the current animal study, we evaluated the effect of dietary fenugreek on the compositional changes in the bile, particularly its effect on glycoproteins, low-molecular-weight (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins, cholesterol nucleation time and cholesterol crystal growth. Groups of Wistar rats were fed for 10 weeks with diets: (1) basal control (C), (2) C+fenugreek (12%), (3) high cholesterol diet (HCD) and (4) HCD+fenugreek (12%). Feeding of HCD containing 0.5% cholesterol for 10 weeks rendered the bile lithogenic. Incorporation of fenugreek into HCD decreased the cholesterol content (70.5%), total protein (58.3%), glycoprotein (27.5%), lipid peroxides (13.6%) and cholesterol saturation index (from 1.98 to 0.75) in bile, increased the bile flow rate (19.5%), prolonged the cholesterol nucleation time and reduced the vesicular form of cholesterol (65%), which was accompanied with an increase in smaller vesicular form (94%). There was an increase in biliary phospholipid (33%) and total bile acid (49%) contents in the HCD+fenugreek group as compared with the HCD group. Electrophoretic separation of biliary LMW proteins showed the presence of a high concentration of 28-kDa protein, which might be responsible for the prolongation of cholesterol nucleation time in the fenugreek-fed groups. These findings indicate that the beneficial anti-lithogenic effect of dietary fenugreek, which primarily is due to reduction in the cholesterol content in bile, was additionally affected through a modulation of the nucleating and anti-nucleating proteins, which, in turn, affect cholesterol crystallisation. PMID:21215764

  12. Biotic Control of Skeletal Growth by Scleractinian Corals in Aragonite–Calcite Seas

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Yuyama, Ikuko; Harii, Saki; Agostini, Sylvain; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2014-01-01

    Modern scleractinian coral skeletons are commonly composed of aragonite, the orthorhombic form of CaCO3. Under certain conditions, modern corals produce calcite as a secondary precipitate to fill pore space. However, coral construction of primary skeletons from calcite has yet to be demonstrated. We report a calcitic primary skeleton produced by the modern scleractinian coral Acropora tenuis. When uncalcified juveniles were incubated from the larval stage in seawater with low mMg/Ca levels, the juveniles constructed calcitic crystals in parts of the primary skeleton such as the septa; the deposits were observable under Raman microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed different crystal morphologies of aragonite and calcite in a single juvenile skeleton. Quantitative analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the majority of the skeleton was composed of aragonite even though we had exposed the juveniles to manipulated seawater before their initial crystal nucleation and growth processes. Our results indicate that the modern scleractinian coral Acropora mainly produces aragonite skeletons in both aragonite and calcite seas, but also has the ability to use calcite for part of its skeletal growth when incubated in calcite seas. PMID:24609012

  13. Time and metamorphic petrology: Calcite to aragonite experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.; Bohlen, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    Although the equilibrium phase relations of many mineral systems are generally well established, the rates of transformations, particularly in polycrystalline rocks, are not. The results of experiments on the calcite to aragonite transformation in polycrystalline marble are different from those for earlier experiments on powdered and single-crystal calcite. The transformation in the polycrystalline samples occurs by different mechanisms, with a different temperature dependence, and at a markedly slower rate. This work demonstrates the importance of kinetic studies on fully dense polycrystalline aggregates for understanding mineralogic phase changes in nature. Extrapolation of these results to geological time scales suggests that transformation of calcite to aragonite does not occur in the absence of volatiles at temperatures below 200??C. Kinetic hindrance is likely to extend to higher temperatures in more complex transformations.

  14. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mineral forms within isolated compartments, in a time and position dependent manner, allow direct investigation of the timing of crystallization of the calcite primary plates. Living teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, in their native coelomic fluid, were examined by high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The diffraction data show that calcite is present in the most aboral portions of the plumula, representing the very earliest stages of mineralization, and that this calcite has the same crystal orientation as in the more mature adoral portions of the same tooth. Raman spectroscopy of the aboral plumula confirms the initial primary plate mineral material is calcite and does not detect amorphous calcium carbonate; in the more mature adoral incisal flange, it does detect a broader calcite peak, consistent with two or more magnesium compositions. We hypothesize that some portion of each syncytial membrane in the plumula provides the information for nucleation of identically oriented calcite crystals that subsequently develop to form the complex geometry of the single crystal sea urchin tooth. PMID:22940703

  15. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G; Kunitake, Miki E; Tang, Chiu C; Duer, Melinda J; Freeman, Colin L; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H; Estroff, Lara A; Baker, Shefford P; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit-mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules-remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules. PMID:27135858

  16. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D.; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G.; Kunitake, Miki E.; Tang, Chiu C.; Duer, Melinda J.; Freeman, Colin L.; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H.; Estroff, Lara A.; Baker, Shefford P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit--mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules--remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-07-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 A. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%. PMID:19574654

  18. Enhancing mechanical properties of calcite by Mg substitutions: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elstnerova, Pavlina; Friak, Martin; Hickel, Tilmann; Fabritius, Helge Otto; Lymperakis, Liverios; Petrov, Michal; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Joerg; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Zigler, Andreas; Hild, Sabine

    2011-03-01

    Arthropoda representing a majority of all known animal species are protected by an exoskeleton formed by their cuticle. The cuticle represents a hierarchically structured multifunctional bio-composite based on chitin and proteins. Some groups like Crustacea reinforce the load-bearing parts of their cuticle with calcite. As the calcite sometimes contains Mg it was speculated that Mg may have a stiffening impact on the mechanical properties of the cuticle. We present a theoretical parameter-free quantum-mechanical study of thermodynamic, structural and elastic properties of Mg-substituted calcite. Our results show that substituting Ca by Mg causes an almost linear decrease in the crystal volume with Mg concentration and of substituted crystals. As a consequence the calcite crystals become stiffer giving rise e.g. to substantially increased bulk moduli.

  19. Studies on shell formation. VIII. Electron microscopy of crystal growth of the nacreous layer of the oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    WATABE, N; SHARP, D G; WILBUR, K M

    1958-05-25

    Electron microscope observations have been made by means of the replica method on growth processes of calcite crystals of the nacreous layer of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Layer formation is initiated by the secretion of a conchiolin matrix and the deposition of rounded crystal seeds on or in this material. In some areas crystal seeds are elongate and within a given area show a similar orientation, probably due to slower deposition. The seeds appear to increase in size by dendritic growth, and smaller seeds become incorporated into larger ones which come into contact to form a single layer. With further growth, crystals overlap, forming a step-like arrangement. The direction of growth is frequently different in neighboring regions. Crystal seeds deposited on crystal surfaces are usually elongate and oriented. Well developed crystals have a tabular idiomorphic form and are parallel in their growth. Rounded and irregular crystals were also observed. The crystals show reticular structure with units of the order of 100 A and striations corresponding with the rhombohedral axes of the crystals. The role of the mantle is discussed in relation to the growth patterns of crystals and shell structure. PMID:13549499

  20. Computer simulation of growth process in synthetic quartz crystals grown from X-bar, Y-bar and rectangular Z-plate seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, F.; Yokokawa, H.; Kurashige, M.; Oba, K.

    2002-02-01

    The growth simulations of synthetic quartz crystals grown on seeds with industrialized sizes and orientations were shown on the procedure by means of the setting of virtual lengths between the seed center and principal crystal faces to be grown. The virtual lengths needed for simulations are calculated on the given sizes and shapes of seeds, X-bar, Y-bar and rectangular Z-plate. The simulations of growth processes are executed as a function of growth time under the model values of growth rates on principal crystal faces, m, R, r, Z, and the so-called S. By the comparison of geometrical sizes of as-grown crystal faces with simulated faces, the growth rates of principal faces are quantitatively evaluated in the commercially produced quartz crystals grown from the rectangular Z-plate seeds. The growth rates of R- and r-faces at the upper and lower sides of grown crystals show somewhat different values which may be due to the direction of convection flow in autoclave.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a new chitin-binding protein from Parkia platycephala seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Cavada, Benildo S. Castellón, Rolando E. R.; Vasconcelos, Georg G.; Rocha, Bruno A. M.; Bezerra, Gustavo A.; Debray, Henri; Delatorre, Plínio; Nagano, Celso S.; Toyama, Marcos; Pinto, Vicente P. T.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Canduri, Fernanda; Azevedo, Walter F. Jr de

    2005-09-01

    Crystals of P. platycephala chintinase/lectin (PPL-2) belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.19, b = 59.95, c = 76.60 Å. The preliminary cystal structure of PPL-2 was solved at a resolution of 1.73 Å by molecular replacement, presenting a correlation coefficient of 0.558 and an R factor of 0.439. A chitin-binding protein named PPL-2 was purified from Parkia platycephala seeds and crystallized. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.19, b = 59.95, c = 76.60 Å, and grew over several days at 293 K using the hanging-drop method. Using synchrotron radiation, a complete structural data set was collected to 1.73 Å resolution. The preliminary crystal structure of PPL-2, determined by molecular replacement, presents a correlation coefficient of 0.558 and an R factor of 0.439. Crystallographic refinement is in progress.

  2. Calcite formation in soft coral sclerites is determined by a single reactive extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-09-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called "calcite and aragonite seas." Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that -OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  3. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  4. Design of a diamond-crystal monochromator for the LCLS hard x-ray self-seeding project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, D.; Shvyd'ko, Y.; Amann, J.; Emma, P.; Stoupin, S.; Quintana, J.

    2013-03-01

    As the result of collaborations between the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory, and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we have designed and constructed a diamond crystal monochromator for the LCLS hard x-ray self-seeding project. The novel monochromator is ultrahigh-vacuum compatible to meet the LCLS linear accelerator vacuum environmental requirement. A special graphite holder was designed for strain-free mount of the 110-μm thin synthetic diamond crystal plate provided by Technological Institute for Super-hard and Novel Carbon Materials of Russia (TISNCM). An in-vacuum multi-axis precision positioning mechanism is designed to manipulate the thin-film diamond holder with resolutions and stabilities required by the hard x-ray self-seeding physics. Optical encoders, limit switches, and hardware stops are established in the mechanism to ensure system reliability and to meet the accelerator personal and equipment safety interlock requirements. Molybdenum shields are installed in the monochromator to protect the encoders and associated electronics from radiation damage. Mechanical specifications, designs, and preliminary test results of the diamond monochromator are presented in this paper.

  5. Experimental Study of Sr Partitioning into Calcite at Various Linear Growth Rates and Temperatures: Preliminary Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabitov, R. I.; Watson, B. E.

    2004-05-01

    The surface of a crystal in equilibrium with surrounding fluid can have a composition that differs from the bulk crystal. If growth rate of the crystal exceeds a minimum value at which partitioning-equilibrium can be maintained, then the crystal surface composition may be "captured" by the newly-formed lattice. The degree of this entrapment increases with increasing crystal growth rate. Non-equlibrium partitioning of Sr into calcite probably occurs by this entrapment mechanism. Sr and calcite are geochemically significant in understanding the thermal history of the ocean because the substitution of Sr for Ca in calcite is temperature dependent. To improve our understanding of the partitioning of Sr into calcite, we conducted two different types of experiment: 1) calcite growth from Sr-bearing solution with analysis of the crystal cross-section by electron microprobe (bulk crystal-liquid runs); and 2) treatment of calcite cleavage surfaces with Sr-bearing solutions and examination of the top few nm surface layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (surface-liquid runs). In the series of bulk-liquid experiments crystals were grown by three different procedures: 1) precipitation on glass slide (pre-coated with calcite), where a steady flow of CaCl2 - SrCl2 and Na2CO3 solutions were mixed just before passage through a tube and allowed to drip onto a slide ("cave"-type experiments, ionic strength I=0.01); 2) growth from a CaCl2 - NH4Cl - SrCl2 solution by diffusion of CO2 from an ammonium carbonate source ("drift" experiments, I=0.52); 3) coarsening of small calcite crystals in the CaCO3-SrCO3-NaCl-H2O system at 800-950° C and 0.5-1 kb in a cold seal apparatus. The growth rate of individual crystals was determined by periodic monitoring of crystal size with time or roughly by comparison of final size with duration of the experiment. Surface-liquid experiments were performed by treatment of cleavage surfaces of natural calcite fragments in a Sr(ClO4)2 solution for 1

  6. Low limit of Mn 2+-activated cathodoluminescence of calcite: state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, Dirk; Neuser, Rolf D.; Richter, Detlev K.

    1998-02-01

    In the literature, the lower limit for Mn 2+-activated cathodoluminescence (CL) of calcite is variously reputed to over a very wide range of values above 10 ppm Mn. Our spectroscopic investigations of the CL response in natural calcite reveal that below 10 ppm manganese content Mn 2+-activation is also present. Using the Quantitative High Resolution Spectral analysis of CL (QHRS-CL) an activation by Mn 2+ in the range of 700 ppb is proved, which cannot be determined visually. So, if not quenched, the minimum Mn 2+ content for Mn 2+-activation is one atom in the irradiated calcite crystal lattice volume. As the intrinsic (background blue) luminescence is used to determine non-altered biogenic calcite, the limit of Mn 2+-activation plays an important role in the interpretation of diagenetic processes. Our results of spectroscopic analyses require a revision of current opinions about the diagenesis of calcite as revealed by CL investigation.

  7. Noncrystallographic calcite dendrites from hot-spring deposits at Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.

    1995-01-02

    Complex calcite crystals are an integral component of precipitates that form around the orifices of the Loburu and Mawe Moto hot springs on the shores of Lake bogoria, Kenya. Two types of large (up to 4 cm long) noncrystallographic dendrites are important components of these deposits. Feather dendrites are characterized by multiple levels of branching with individual branches developed through crystal splitting and spherulitic growth. Scandulitic (from Latin meaning shingle) dendrites are formed of stacked calcite crystals and are generally more compact than feather dendrites. These developed through the incremental stacking of rectangular-shaped calcite crystals that initially grew as skeletal crystals. Feather and scandulitic dendrites precipitated from the same waters in the same springs. The difference in morphology is therefore related to microenvironments in which they grew. Feather dendrites grew in any direction in pools of free-standing water provided that they were in constant contact with the solute. Conversely, scandulitic dendrites grew on rims of dams where water flowed over the surface in concert with the pulses of spring water. Thus, each calcite crystal in these dendrites represents one episode of crystal growth. The orientation of the component crystals in scandulitic dendrites is controlled by the topography of the dam or surface, not crystallographic criteria. The noncrystallographic dendrites formed from spring waters with initial temperatures of 90--99 C. Surficial water cooling, loss of CO{sub 2}, and presence of other elements that can interfere with crystal growth contributed to the formation of these unusual crystals.

  8. Barium recovery by crystallization in a fluidized-bed reactor: effects of pH, Ba/P molar ratio and seed.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Chi; Reano, Resmond L; Dalida, Maria Lourdes P; Lu, Ming-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of process conditions, including upward velocity inside the column, the amount of added seed and seed size, the pH value of the precipitant or the phosphate stream and the Ba/P molar ratio in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) were studied with a view to producing BaHPO₄ crystals of significant size and maximize the removal of barium. XRD were used to identify the products that were collected from the FBR. Experimental results show that an upward velocity of 48 cmmin(-1) produced the largest BaHPO₄ crystals with a size of around 0.84-1.0mm. The addition of seed crystals has no effect on barium removal. The use of a seed of a size in the ranges unseeded<0.149-0.29 mm<0.149 mm<0.29-0.42 mm produced increasing amounts of increasingly large crystals. The largest BaHPO₄ crystals were obtained at pH 8.4-8.8 with a Ba/P molar ratio of 1.0. In the homogeneous and heterogeneous processes, around 98% of barium was removed at pH 8.4-8.6 and [Ba]/[P]=1.0. The XRD results show that a significant amount of barium phosphate (Ba₃(PO₄)₂) was obtained at pH 11. The compounds BaHPO₄ and BaO were present at a pH of below 10. PMID:24462085

  9. Low-temperature (˜180 °C) position-controlled lateral solid-phase crystallization of GeSn with laser-anneal seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Ryo; Chikita, Hironori; Kai, Yuki; Sadoh, Taizoh; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Miyao, Masanobu

    2015-12-01

    To realize next-generation flexible thin-film devices, solid-phase crystallization (SPC) of amorphous germanium tin (GeSn) films on insulating substrates combined with seeds formed by laser annealing (LA) has been investigated. This technique enables the crystallization of GeSn at controlled positions at low temperature (˜180 °C) due to the determination of the starting points of crystallization by LA seeding and Sn-induced SPC enhancement. The GeSn crystals grown by SPC from LA seeds showed abnormal lateral profiles of substitutional Sn concentration. These lateral profiles are caused by the annealing time after crystallization being a function of distance from the LA seeds. This observation of a post-annealing effect also indicates that GeSn with a substitutional Sn concentration of up to ˜10% possesses high thermal stability. These results will facilitate the fabrication of next-generation thin-film devices on flexible plastic substrates with low softening temperatures (˜250 °C).

  10. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  11. Nickel and manganese interaction with calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Doner, H; Zavarin, M

    1999-08-09

    Many divalent metal cations sorb to calcite surfaces and incorporate into calcite to varying degrees. Since calcite may sorb trace elements in the environment, the factors controlling metal-calcite interactions are critical to understanding element cycling. The interaction of divalent metal cations with calcite can be critical to toxic metal immobilization, nutrient cycling, interpretation of past redox conditions, tracing fluid flow, for example. Sorption of Ni and Mn on calcite surfaces was studied by Zachara et al.. At any particular pH, the sorption of Mn on calcite was greater than Ni. This was attributed in part to the similarity of divalent Mn and Ca with respect to ion size. Although direct spectroscopic evidence was not available, sorption/desorption results suggested that Mn quickly forms a surface precipitate or solid solution while Ni forms a hydrated surface complex that may incorporate into calcite much more slowly via recrystallization. Because Mn(II) ionic radius is similar to that of Ca(II) (0.80 versus 1.0{angstrom}), and because MnCO{sub 3} has a structure similar to calcite, it is likely that Mn can substitute directly for Ca in the calcite structure. The ionic radius of Ni(II) is significantly smaller (0.69{angstrom}) and Ni(OH){sub 2} precipitation is likely to be favored in most systems. For Ni, direct substitution for Ca is less likely or may require more significant calcite lattice deformation.

  12. Evidence of a stable uranyl site in ancient organic-rich calcite.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shelly D; Rasbury, E Troy; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kropf, A Jeremy; Kemner, Kenneth M

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of uranium (U) incorporation into calcite (calcium carbonate) is of fundamental importance to the fate and transport of U at the surface and in the shallow subsurface and has implications for (a) the accuracy of U-Pb and U-series isotope ratio methods used to determine the ages of ancient deposits and (b) potential remediation strategies based on sequestration of U in the subsurface. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is uniquely suited to the study of U-calcite systems. The sensitivity of the EXAFS spectrum to the local atomic Ca coordination about U(VI) in the calcite structure results in an increase in the number and amplitude of Ca signals as the U(VI) becomes more ordered within the crystal structure. Our X-ray microprobe (10-microm) measurements of an ancient 298 million-year-old organic-rich calcite (calcrete) clearly revealed three coordination shells of Ca atoms, defining a well-ordered calcite structure about uranyl to a distance of approximately 6.5 angstroms. These results indicate that uranyl is incorporated at the Ca2+ site in calcite and that the uranyl environment may evolve over long time scales, becoming more calcite-like and more stable for long-term sequestration of uranium. These results therefore validate U-related dating methods and show that calcite can be effective at sequestering U in vadose zone sediments. PMID:16646462

  13. Magnesium stable isotope fractionation in marine biogenic calcite and aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wombacher, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Böhm, F.; Gussone, N.; Regenberg, M.; Dullo, W.-Chr.; Rüggeberg, A.

    2011-10-01

    activation energy required for cation incorporation, which probably reflects the dehydration of the cation and the crystal surface and bond formation at the incorporation site. This kinetic incorporation model predicts (i) no intrinsic dependence on growth rate, unless significant back reaction upon slow growth reduces the isotope fractionation towards that characteristic for equilibrium isotope partitioning (this may be observed for Ca isotopes in calcites), (ii) a small decrease of isotope fractionation with increasing temperature that may be amplified if higher temperatures promote back reaction and (iii) a sensitivity to changes in the activation barrier caused by additives such as anions or biomolecules or by the initial formation of amorphous CaCO 3.

  14. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions.

    PubMed

    Hellebrandt, S E; Hofmann, S; Jordan, N; Barkleit, A; Schmidt, M

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu(3+) occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na(+). These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site. PMID:27618958

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lectin from Dioclea rostrata Benth seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Delatorre, Plínio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Melo, Luciana Magalhães; Souza, Emmanuel Prata de; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias da; Benevides, Raquel G.; Oliveira, Taiana Maia de; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Bezerra, Maria Júlia Barbosa; Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva da; Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra da; Freire, Valder Nogueira; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2006-02-01

    D. rostrata lectin was crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222 and diffracted to 1.87 Å resolution. Lectins from the Diocleinae subtribe (Leguminosae) are highly similar proteins that promote various biological activities with distinctly differing potencies. The structural basis for this experimental data is not yet fully understood. Dioclea rostrata lectin was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapour diffusion at 293 K. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.51, b = 88.22, c = 87.76 Å. Assuming the presence of one monomer per asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be about 47.9%. A complete data set was collected at 1.87 Å resolution.

  16. Growth of SiC single crystals on patterned seeds by a sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianglong; Chen, Xiufang; Peng, Yan; Xu, Xiangang; Hu, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds with the vertical sidewalls composed of {11-20} and {1-100} faces by a sublimation method at 1700-2000 °C was studied. Anisotropy in lateral growth rates was observed, i.e the growth rate towards <11-20> was faster than that along <1-100>. It was found that free lateral growth on mesas was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the density of threading dislocation. The dependence of lateral growth rate on growth conditions such as reactor pressure and growth temperature was investigated. The factors governing the process of lateral growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds were discussed.

  17. Effect of heating conditions on flow patterns during the seeding stage of Kyropoulos sapphire crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Vladimir V.; Kalaev, Vladimir V.; Ivanov, Vadim G.

    2016-07-01

    We apply numerical simulation to understand the effect of heating conditions on melt convection in an industrial Ky furnace. The direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach was used to investigate the features of melt flow during the seeding stage. Two different cases of Kyropoulos furnace hot zone design were studied numerically, and results were compared with experimental data to understand the effect of modifications on melt convection.

  18. Seed Crystal Homogeneity Controls Lateral and Vertical Heteroepitaxy of Monolayer MoS2 and WS2.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Degregorio, Zachary P; Johns, James E

    2015-11-18

    Heteroepitaxy between transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers can fabricate atomically thin semiconductor heterojunctions without interfacial contamination, which are essential for next-generation electronics and optoelectronics. Here we report a controllable two-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for lateral and vertical heteroepitaxy between monolayer WS2 and MoS2 on a c-cut sapphire substrate. Lateral and vertical heteroepitaxy can be selectively achieved by carefully controlling the growth of MoS2 monolayers that are used as two-dimensional (2D) seed crystals. Using hydrogen as a carrier gas, we synthesize ultraclean MoS2 monolayers, which enable lateral heteroepitaxial growth of monolayer WS2 from the MoS2 edges to create atomically coherent and sharp in-plane WS2/MoS2 heterojunctions. When no hydrogen is used, we obtain MoS2 monolayers decorated with small particles along the edges, inducing vertical heteroepitaxial growth of monolayer WS2 on top of the MoS2 to form vertical WS2/MoS2 heterojunctions. Our lateral and vertical atomic layer heteroepitaxy steered by seed defect engineering opens up a new route toward atomically controlled fabrication of 2D heterojunction architectures. PMID:26488069

  19. In-Situ Partial Pressure Measurements and Visual Observation during Crystal Growth of ZnSe by Seeded Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Feth, Shari; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1999-01-01

    An in-situ monitoring furnace was constructed with side windows to perform partial pressure measurements by optical absorption and visual observation of the growing crystal. A fused silica -rowth ampoule with a 4.5 cm long square tube between the source and the seed was prepared for the optical absorption measurements. A ZnSe crystal was grown by the seeded physical vapor transport (PVT) technique in the horizontal configuration. The growth temperature was 1120 C and the furnace translation rate was 3nmVday. Partial pressures of Se2, P(sub Se2), at three locations along the length of the growth ampoule were measured at 90 min intervals during the growth process. The measured P (sub Se2) were in the range of 2.0 to 6.5 x 10(exp -3) atm. The P(sub Se2) results indicated that the partial pressure profile was inconsistent with the results of the one-dimensional diffusion mass transport model and that the source composition shifted toward Se-rich during the run, i.e. the grown crystal was more Zn-rich than the source. The visual observation showed that the seed crystal first etched back, with greater thermal etching occurring along the edges of the seed crystal. Once the growth started, the crystal crew in a predominately contactless mode and facets were evident during growth. The crystal did not grow symmetrically which is believed to be due to the unintentional asymmetry of the radial thermal profile in the furnace.

  20. Microstructural control of calcite via incorporation of intracrystalline organic molecules in shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Taiga; Suzuki, Michio; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2013-10-01

    It is widely accepted that organic substances regulate or influence the structure of biominerals, but its direct evidences are not plenty. Here we show that the crystallographic microstructures in biotic calcites arise from incorporated intracrystalline organic molecules (IOMs), through a comparison between biotic calcites in shells and synthetic ones with the IOMs extracted from the shells. Although the prismatic layers of a pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata) and a pen shell (Atrina pectinata) morphologically resemble each other, the crystallographic features of constituent calcites are considerably different; in Pinctada, the IOMs are distributed inhomogeneously to form small-angle grain boundaries and associated crystal defects, whereas in Atrina, the IOMs are distributed almost homogeneously and defects are rare in the calcite crystals. We conducted in vitro calcite syntheses in the presence of the IOMs in EDTA-soluble extracts from the prisms. The IOMs in the extracts from Pinctada and Atrina were incorporated into synthetic calcites in a different manner, exhibiting defect-rich/free features as observed in the natural shells. With regard to amino acid compositions of the IOMs, the extract from Atrina has a higher proportion of acidic amino acids than that from Pinctada, implying that acidic proteins do not correlate directly to their affinity for calcium carbonate crystals.

  1. Alternative origins for nannobacteria-like objects in calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, Brenda L.; Lynch, F. Leo; Rahnis, Michael A.; Folk, Robert L.; Molineux, Ian J.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    1999-04-01

    More than 40 calcite-precipitation experiments were performed under sterile conditions in order to investigate the origins of 25 300 nm spherical-, rod-, and ovoid-shaped objects that have been widely interpreted as evidence of nanometer-scale life (i.e., nannobacteria). Individual experiments included the addition of soluble organic compounds, common species of eubacteria, or phage-induced eubacterial lysates. These experiments indicate that many of the nanometer-scale objects have inorganic or nonnannobacterial origins. In the precipitation experiments, calcite formed euhedral crystals 50 800 nm in diameter and smaller (<50 nm) anhedral or rounded particles or protocrystals. The small anhedral or rounded solids resembled nannobacteria. The relative amount of anhedral or rounded calcite was greatest in experiments with a dissolved organic component. These controlled experiments are in accord with observations that rounded nanometer-scale objects are more common in minerals formed in organic-rich environments. Bacterial fragments occur as rounded to irregularly shaped particles that included cell-wall fragments, expulsed cytoplasm, and relict capsules that also closely resembled nannobacteria. Acid etching of the large euhedral crystals produced in the precipitation experiments also resulted in the formation of nanometer-scale features that resembled nannobacteria in natural carbonates. The shapes of the etching artifacts vary as a function of the strength of the acid and the duration of etching. Much caution is advisable in interpreting the origin of rounded features <50 nm.

  2. Effects of the method of apatite seed crystals addition on setting reaction of α-tricalcium phosphate based apatite cement.

    PubMed

    Tsuru, Kanji; Ruslin; Maruta, Michito; Matsuya, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate setting time is an important parameter that determines the effectiveness of apatite cement (AC) for clinical application, given the issues of crystalline inflammatory response phenomena if AC fails to set. To this end, the present study analyzes the effects of the method of apatite seed crystals addition on the setting reaction of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based AC. Two ACs, both consisting of α-TCP and calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp), were analyzed in this study. In one AC, cdHAp was added externally to α-TCP and this AC was abbreviated as AC(EA). In the other AC, α-TCP was partially hydrolyzed to form cdHAp on the surface of α-TCP. This AC was referred to as AC(PH). Results indicate a decrease in the setting time of both ACs with the addition of cdHAp. Among them, for the given amount of added cdHAp, AC(PH) showed relatively shorter setting time than AC(EA). Besides, the mechanical strength of the set AC(PH) was also higher than that of set AC(EA). These properties of AC(PH) were attributed to the predominant crystal growth of cdHAp in the vicinity of the α-TCP particle surface. Accordingly, it can be concluded that the partial hydrolysis of α-TCP may be a better approach to add low crystalline cdHAp onto α-TCP based AC. PMID:26411440

  3. Stabilities of calcite and aragonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christ, C.L.; Hostetler, P.B.; Siebert, R.M.

    1974-01-01

    A revaluation of the 25° C activity-product constants of calcite (KC) and aragonite (KA) was made on the basis of the known solubilities of these phases for which the activity of total dissolved calcium was corrected for the presence of the ion pair CaHCO3+ in the aqueous phase. The value of the dissociation constant of CaHCO3+ was taken to be 10-1.225±0.02. This value, combined with values of the analytical concentrations in solutions with partial pressure PCO2 =0.97 atmosphere, leads to KC=l0-8.52±0.04 and KA= 10-8.36±0.04. Based on these K values, standard free energies of formation of calcite and aragonite were calculated to be -270,144±375 and -269,926±375 calories mole-1, (-1,130,282±1,569 and -1,129,370±1,569 joules mole-1), respectively. From the 25°C K values, using appropriate entropy and heat capacity data, values of KC and KA were calculated over the temperature range 0° to 200°C. Possible errors in interpretation of measured pH values and inferred PCO2values and the bearing of these errors on calculations of K values are discussed.

  4. Synthetic Calcite as a Scaffold for Osteoinductive Bone Substitutes.

    PubMed

    Chróścicka, Anna; Jaegermann, Zbigniew; Wychowański, Piotr; Ratajska, Anna; Sadło, Jarosław; Hoser, Grażyna; Michałowski, Sławomir; Lewandowska-Szumiel, Malgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Although a wide variety of biomaterials have been already proposed for use in bone tissue engineering, there is still need for man-made materials, which would combine support for osteogenesis with simplicity desirable for upscaling and costs reduction. In this study we have shown that synthetic calcite may serve as a scaffold for human osteoblasts transplantation. A simple dynamic system allows uniform and effective cell distribution. Cell viability and osteogenic phenotype were confirmed by XTT assay, alkaline phosphatase activity and selected osteoblast-specific genes expression. Extracellular matrix deposited by cells improved elasticity and made the whole system similar to the flexible composite material rather than to the brittle ceramic implants. It was revealed in the compression tests and also by the improved samples handling. Subcutaneous implantation of the cell-seeded calcite scaffolds to immunodeficient mice resulted in mineralized bone formation, which was confirmed histologically and by EPR analysis. The latter we propose as a method supplementary to histological analysis, for bone regeneration investigations. It specifically confirms the presence of bone mineral with a unique sensitivity and using bulk samples, which eliminates the risk of missing the material in the preparation. Our study resulted in development of a new osteogenic tissue engineered product based on man-made calcite. PMID:26666226

  5. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    signals occur with characteristics consistent with phosphate monoesters. The results of this study indicate that trace- to minor concentrations of dissolved organic molecules can be effectively taken up during calcite precipitation and incorporated in the structure, leaving a resilient record of materials present during crystallization.

  6. Uranium Isotope Fractionation During Coprecipitation with Aragonite and Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Romaniello, S. J.; Herrmann, A. D.; Wasylenki, L. E.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Natural variations in the 238U/235U ratio of marine carbonates may provide a useful way of constraining past variations in ocean redox conditions. However, before applying this novel redox proxy, it is essential to explore possible isotopic fractionation during U coprecipitation with aragonite and calcite. We investigated these effects in laboratory experiments. Aragonite and calcite coprecipitation experiments were conducted at pH 8.5±0.1 using a constant addition method [1]. More than 90% of the U was incorporated into the solid phase at the end of each experiment. Samples were purified using UTEVA chemistry and δ238/235U was measured using 233U-236U double-spike MC-ICP-MS with a precision of ±0.10‰ [2]. The aragonite experiment demonstrated a 238U/235U Rayleigh fractionation factor of α=1.00008±0.00002 with the 238U preferentially incorporated. In contrast, the calcite experiment demonstrated no resolvable U isotope fractionation (α=1.00001±0.00003). To determine if U isotopes are affected during the early diagenetic conversion of aragonite to calcite, natural carbonate samples were collected along an aragonite-calcite transition across a single coral head in the Key Largo limestone, and characterized for U concentration and δ238/235U [3]. We found that the mean δ238/235U in aragonite (-0.33±0.07‰ 2se) was slightly heavier than that in calcite (-0.37±0.02‰ 2se). Further work is needed to address the mechanisms leading to differential isotopic fractionation of U(VI) during incorporation into aragonite and calcite. Possible drivers include differences in coordination in the crystal structure or equilibrium isotopic fractionation between various aqueous U(VI) species prior to incorporation. [1] Reeder et al. (2001) GCA 65, 3491-3503. [2] Weyer et al., (2008) GCA 72, 345-359. [3] Gill et al., (2008) GCA 72, 4699-4722.

  7. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model. PMID:26852350

  8. Controls of carbonate mineralogy and solid-solution of Mg in calcite: evidence from spelean systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, L.A.; Lohmann, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation of carbonate minerals in spelean systems occurs under a wide range of fluid chemistry, Mg-Ca ratios, alkalinities, pH and temperatures; thus, spelean systems provide ideal settings to determine factors controlling the mineralogy of precipitated carbonates and solid-solution of Mg in calcite. Cave waters and actively-precipitating carbonate speleothems were collected from Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico and the Mammoth-Flint Cave System, Kentucky. Carbonate mineralogy of precipitated phases was determined by x-ray diffraction, and major and minor element composition of waters and accompanying minerals were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Results demonstrate that at a constant CO3 concentration the precipitation threshold for calcite to aragonite is controlled dominantly by the Mg/Ca ratio of the ambient fluid. Aragonite precipitation is favored by high Mg/Ca ratios. Conversely, with increasing CO3 concentration at constant fluid Mg/Ca ratios, calcite is preferentially precipitated. Solid-solution of Mg in calcite is positively correlated with both increased Mg/Ca ratios and CO3 concentrations. These data suggest that Mg contents of calcite can not be defined solely in terms of a homogeneous distribution coefficient. Rather, Mg concentrations can be also be affected by the CO3 concentration and degree of calcite saturation, suggesting that the rate of crystal growth also plays and important role in Mg solid-solution in calcites.

  9. Self-Assembly of Protein Nanofibrils Orchestrates Calcite Step Movement through Selective Nonchiral Interactions.

    PubMed

    So, Christopher R; Liu, Jinny; Fears, Kenan P; Leary, Dagmar H; Golden, Joel P; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2015-06-23

    The recognition of atomically distinct surface features by adsorbed biomolecules is central to the formation of surface-templated peptide or protein nanostructures. On mineral surfaces such as calcite, biomolecular recognition of, and self-assembly on, distinct atomic kinks and steps could additionally orchestrate changes to the overall shape and symmetry of a bulk crystal. In this work, we show through in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that an acidic 20 kDa cement protein from the barnacle Megabalanus rosa (MRCP20) binds specifically to step edge atoms on {101̅4} calcite surfaces, remains bound and further assembles over time to form one-dimensional nanofibrils. Protein nanofibrils are continuous and organized at the nanoscale, exhibiting striations with a period of ca. 45 nm. These fibrils, templated by surface steps of a preferred geometry, in turn selectively dissolve underlying calcite features displaying the same atomic arrangement. To demonstrate this, we expose the protein solution to bare and fibril-associated rhombohedral etch pits to reveal that nanofibrils accelerate only the movement of fibril-forming steps when compared to undecorated steps exposed to the same solution conditions. Calcite mineralized in the presence of MRCP20 results in asymmetric crystals defined by frustrated faces with shared mirror symmetry, suggesting a similar step-selective behavior by MRCP20 in crystal growth. As shown here, selective surface interactions with step edge atoms lead to a cooperative regime of calcite modification, where templated long-range protein nanostructures shape crystals. PMID:25970003

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lectin from Canavalia boliviana Piper seeds

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Tales Rocha; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Bezerra, Maria Julia Barbosa; Teixera, Cícero Silvano; Bezerra, Eduardo Henrique Salviano; Benevides, Raquel Guimarães; da Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; de Souza, Luiz Augusto Gomes; Delatorre, Plínio; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Plant lectins are the most studied group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Despite the high similarity between the members of the Diocleinae subtribe (Leguminosae) group, they present differing biological activities. Canavalia boliviana lectin (Cbol) was purified using a Sephadex G-50 column and crystallized in the presence of X-Man by hanging-drop vapour diffusion at 293 K. After optimization, crystals suitable for diffraction were obtained under the condition 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5 and 3.0 M sodium formate. The crystal belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.70, b = 66.64, c = 64.99 Å, α = 90.0, β = 120.8, γ = 90.0°. Assuming the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be about 46%. A complete data set was collected at 1.5 Å resolution. PMID:19255467

  11. (U-Th)/He dating and He diffusion in calcite from veins and breccia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, C.; Cros, A.; Pagel, M.; Berthet, P.; Tassan-Got, L.; Douville, E.; Pinna-Jamme, R.; Sarda, P.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of He retention in crystalline calcite is mandatory to estimate the possibility of (U-Th)/He dating of calcite. To this aim, fault-filling calcite crystals from the Eocene/Oligocene Gondrecourt graben, Paris Basin, Eastern France, have been sampled, based on their relatively old, Eocene-Oligocene, precipitation age and cold thermal history (<40°C since precipitation). The samples were sorted into three main tectonic and morphological groups, including successively (1) micro-fracture calcites, (2) breccia and associated geodic calcites, and (3) vein and associated geodic calcites. (U-Th)/He dating of 63 calcite fragments yields ages dispersed from 0.2×0.02 to 35.8×2.7 Ma, as well as two older dates of 117×10 and 205×28 Ma (1s). These He ages correlate to grain chemistry, such as to Sr and ΣREE concentrations or (La/Yb)N ratios, and these correlations probably reflect the evolution of parent fluid. Only the oldest He ages are in agreement with the He-retentive character of calcite as determined by Copeland et al. (2007), and these ages were obtained for the most recently precipitated crystals. To better understand the large He-age scatter and why calcites precipitated earlier show younger ages, He diffusion experiments have been conducted on 10 Gondrecourt calcite fragments from 3 samples with He ages of 0.2 to 6 Ma. In addition, a crystallographic investigation by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) performed on similar samples reveals that the crystal structure evolves with increasing temperature, showing with micro-cracks and cleavage opening. These XRD results indicate that, in fault-filling calcite, He retention is controlled by multiple diffusion domains (MDD, Lovera et al., 1991) with various sizes, and therefore, evolves through time with strong consequences on (U-Th)/He age. We thus interpret the Gondrecourt calcite (U-Th)/He age scatter of older samples as a consequence of cleavage opening due to a succession of calcite crystallization phases related to

  12. Influence of temperature on the composition of magnesian calcite overgrowths precipitated from sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Mucci, A.

    1987-07-01

    A constant disequilibrium technique was used to determine the composition of magnesian calcite overgrowths precipitated on pure calcite seeds from artificial sea water at 5, 25 and 40/sup 0/C. The amount of magnesium incorporated in the overgrowths at a given temperature is independent of the precipitation rate over a wide range of saturation states and is believed to correspond to a composition in true equilibrium with sea water. The distribution coefficient of magnesium, D/sub Mg/sup 2 +///sup c/, in the magnesian calcite overgrowths increases almost linearly with temperature, being 0.0121 +- 0.0013 at 5/sup 0/C, 0.0172 +- 0.0022 at 25/sup 0/C, and 0.0271 +- 0.0013 at 40/sup 0/C. These values apply only to magnesian calcites precipitated from standard composition sea water, since a previous study has shown D/sub Mg/sup 2 +///sup c/ to be a function of the (Mg/sup 2 +/)(Ca/sup 2 +/) ratio in the parent solution. Results of this study are compared with values reported previously by other workers, and with the compositional distribution of naturally occurring magnesian calcite cements and ooids found in sea water. It appears that variations in temperature are not sufficient to account for the compositional variability of naturally occurring inorganic marine magnesian calcite cements.

  13. Intracrystalline alteration of low-magnesian calcite cement in the Devonian Pillara Formation, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Pedone, V.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Dickson, J.A.D. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Meyers, W.J. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Intracrystalline alteration is present in approximately 25% of the low-Mg calcite cement throughout the lowermost 160 m of the Middle to Upper Devonian Pillara Formation in the Emanuel Range, Canning Basin, Western Australia. A younger, luminescently and chemically distinct calcite phase disrupts primary zonation in older cement and results in irregular, mottled cathodoluminescence (CL). The younger calcite is always in optical continuity with host calcite. Continuous records of Mg, Fe, Mn, and Sr abundances were measured across concentrically zoned, non-CL and yellow-CL cement altered by orange-CL calcite using a new microprobe method designed for high spatial resolution and rapid collection of minor-element abundances in calcite cement. Low-Mg calcite traditionally is regarded as a stable carbonate phase with little tendency toward intracrystalline alteration of chemistry or microstructure. Significant elemental variations measured over small-scale intervals within time-equivalent zones in cement VIa indicate that some parts of the crystal have different chemical potential, which could provide the thermodynamic drive for intracrystalline alteration. Alteration could take place either by a one-step, iterative process of recrystallization or by a two-step, dissolution-cementation process. Lack of micro-collapse features in host calcite, in combination with lack of minor-element memory between host and secondary calcite, support alteration by recrystallization at a high water-rock ratio.

  14. Structural Characterization of Lateral-grown 6H-SiC am-plane Seed Crystals by Hot Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Woodworth, Andrew A.; Spry, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) power devices is limited due to inherently high density of screw dislocations (SD), which are necessary for maintaining polytype during boule growth and commercially viable growth rates. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently proposed a new bulk growth process based on axial fiber growth (parallel to the c-axis) followed by lateral expansion (perpendicular to the c-axis) for producing multi-faceted m-plane SiC boules that can potentially produce wafers with as few as one SD per wafer. In order to implement this novel growth technique, the lateral homoepitaxial growth expansion of a SiC fiber without introducing a significant number of additional defects is critical. Lateral expansion is being investigated by hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) growth of 6H-SiC am-plane seed crystals (0.8mm x 0.5mm x 15mm) designed to replicate axially grown SiC single crystal fibers. The post-growth crystals exhibit hexagonal morphology with approximately 1500 m (1.5 mm) of total lateral expansion. Preliminary analysis by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) confirms that the growth was homoepitaxial, matching the polytype of the respective underlying region of the seed crystal. Axial and transverse sections from the as grown crystal samples were characterized in detail by a combination of SWBXT, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy to map defect types and distribution. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the seed crystal contained stacking disorders and this appears to have been reproduced in the lateral growth sections. Analysis of the relative intensity for folded transverse acoustic (FTA) and optical (FTO) modes on the Raman spectra indicate the existence of stacking faults. Further, the density of stacking faults is higher in the seed than in the grown crystal. Bundles of dislocations are observed propagating from the seed in m-axis lateral directions

  15. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically <0.1 wt %). The excess Mg was taken up by the calcite grains in between, stabilizing them and causing a few volume percent rodlike relicts of Mg-enriched calcite (up to 10 wt % MgO) to be left behind by the advancing reaction front. The aragonite growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  16. Auger spectroscopy analysis of magnesian calcite overgrowths precipitated from seawater and solutions of similar composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mucci, A.; Morse, J.W.; Kaminsky, M.S.

    1985-04-01

    Novel procedures were developed to determine the composition of magnesian calcite overgrowths precipitated on calcite crystals from seawater solutions. A surface sensitive analytical technique, Scanning Auger Microanalysis (SAM), was used to determine the composition of very thin overgrowths (< 0.5 ..mu..m) which could not be analyzed by more conventional techniques. Thin magnesian calcite overgrowths were precipitated by exposing Iceland spar calcite crystals to slightly supersaturated (Omega similarly ordered 1.2) synthetic seawater solutions of various Mg to Ca ratios, at 25/sup 0/C, for various lengths of time. The SAM analysis of these thin overgrowths (30-300 A) reveals that their composition is identical to the composition of much thicker overgrowths (approx. = 4000 A) which were precipitated from highly supersaturated solutions (3 less than or equal to Omega less than or equal to 17) on reagent grade calcite powder. These results strongly suggest that the magnesian calcite overgrowth is in exchange equilibrium with the solution from which it precipitates and that it is representative of the solubility controlling phase. A magnesian calcite overgrowth containing 8 +/- 1 mol percent magnesium carbonate will precipitate from standard composition seawater ((Mg/sup 2 +/)/(Ca/sup 2 +/) = 5.13) under their experimental conditions. The SAM analysis of the surface-most adsorbed layer (approx. = 10 A) on the overgrowths precipitated from seawater solutions of various magnesium-to-calcium concentration ratios reveals that the magnesium-to-calcium concentration ratio in the surface-most region follows a typical Langmuir adsorption isotherm profile. Since it appears that the composition of the surface-most adsorbed layer of a magnesian calcite does not play an active role in determining the composition of the precipitating solid, they speculate that the adsorbed layers on the overgrowth may be viewed as a porous region within which the growth process takes place.

  17. Growth and Dissolution of Calcite in the Presence of Adsorbed Stearic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria; Segura, Juan José; Erickson, Blake W; Fantner, Georg; Stellacci, Francesco; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2015-07-14

    The interaction of organic molecules with the surface of calcite plays a central role in many geochemical, petrochemical, and industrial processes and in biomineralization. Adsorbed organics, typically fatty acids, can interfere with the evolution of calcite when immersed in aqueous solutions. Here we use atomic force microscopy in liquid to explore in real-time the evolution of the (1014) surface of calcite covered with various densities of stearic acid and exposed to different saline solutions. Our results show that the stearic acid molecules tend to act as "pinning points" on the calcite's surface and slow down the crystal's restructuring kinetics. Depending on the amount of material adsorbed, the organic molecules can form monolayers or bilayer islands that become embedded into the growing crystal. The growth process can also displaces the organic molecules and actively concentrate them into stacked multilayers. Our results provide molecular-level insights into the interplay between the adsorbed fatty acid molecules and the evolving calcite crystal, highlighting mechanisms that could have important implications for several biochemical and geochemical processes and for the oil industry. PMID:26087312

  18. Mechanism of Calcite Co-Orientation in the Sea Urchin Tooth

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, Christopher; Metzler, Rebecca; Gong, Y. U. T.; Olson, Ian; Aizenberg, Joanna; Politi, Yael; Wilt, Fred; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sea urchin teeth are remarkable and complex calcite structures, continuously growing at the forming end and self-sharpening at the mature grinding tip. The calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) crystals of tooth components, plates, fibers, and a high-Mg polycrystalline matrix, have highly co-oriented crystallographic axes. This ability to co-orient calcite in a mineralized structure is shared by all echinoderms. However, the physico-chemical mechanism by which calcite crystals become co-oriented in echinoderms remains enigmatic. Here, we show differences in calcite c-axis orientations in the tooth of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and microbeam X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD). All plates share one crystal orientation, propagated through pillar bridges, while fibers and polycrystalline matrix share another orientation. Furthermore, in the forming end of the tooth, we observe that CaCO{sub 3} is present as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). We demonstrate that co-orientation of the nanoparticles in the polycrystalline matrix occurs via solid-state secondary nucleation, propagating out from the previously formed fibers and plates, into the amorphous precursor nanoparticles. Because amorphous precursors were observed in diverse biominerals, solid-state secondary nucleation is likely to be a general mechanism for the co-orientation of biomineral components in organisms from different phyla.

  19. Heterogeneous growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases at the (101¯4) calcite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Man; Ilton, Eugene S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of surface precipitates to form heteroepitaxially is an important factor that controls the extent of heterogeneous growth. In this work, the growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases on (10-14) calcite surfaces is compared for a range of initial saturation states with respect to otavite (CdCO3) and sphaerocobaltite (CoCO3), two isostructural metal carbonates that exhibit different lattice misfits with respect to calcite. Calcite single crystals were reacted in static conditions for 16 hours with CdCl2 and CoCl2 aqueous solutions with initial concentrations 0.3 ≤ [Cd2+]0 ≤ 100 μM and 25 ≤ [Co2+]0 ≤ 200 μM. The reacted crystals were imaged in situ with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed ex situ with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images of Cd-reacted crystals showed the formation of large islands elongated along the direction, clear evidence of heteroepitaxial growth, whereas surface precipitates on Co-reacted crystals were small round islands. Deformation of calcite etch pits in both cases indicated the incorporation of Cd and Co at step edges. XPS analysis pointed to the formation of a Cd-rich (Ca,Cd)CO3 solid solution coating atop the calcite substrate. In contrast, XPS measurements of the Co-reacted crystals provided evidence for the formation of a mixed hydroxy-carbonate cobalt phase. The combined AFM and XPS results suggest that the lattice misfit between CoCO3 and CaCO3 ( 15% based on surface areas) is too large to allow for heteroepitaxial growth of a pure cobalt carbonate phase on calcite surfaces in aqueous solutions and at ambient conditions. The use of the satellite structure of the Co 2p3/2 photoelectron line as a tool for determining the nature of cobalt surface precipitates is also discussed.

  20. Dramatic reduction of dislocations on a GaN point seed crystal by coalescence of bunched steps during Na-flux growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Masayuki; Todoroki, Yuma; Murakami, Kosuke; Matsuo, Daisuke; Imabayashi, Hiroki; Takazawa, Hideo; Maruyama, Mihoko; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2015-10-01

    In our study, we found that threading dislocation density (TDD) in GaN crystals naturally reduced from ~109 cm-2 in a seed to less than ~103 cm-2, just by using the small-sized seed called a "point seed". However, the mechanism of the dramatic reduction was unclear. In order to reveal the mechanism of this substantial reduction of TDD, we investigated the relationship between TDD and the crystal habit during the growth. Cathodoluminescence (CL) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that TDD was dramatically reduced after the c face became small (<50×50 μm2) in the habit-change process caused by changes of supersaturation during growth, in which bunched steps growing from the edge of the c face coalesced at the center. It is thought that the shrinking of the c face in the growth process enabled the coalescence of bunched steps, which led to the gathering of threading dislocations (TDs), and resulted in the dramatic reduction of TDD. We concluded that the natural reduction of TDs was caused by coalescence of bunched steps, which easily occurs in during the Na-flux growth on small-sized "point seeds", and which allowed fabrication of low-dislocation-density GaN wafers.

  1. Project Explorer: Get Away Special #007. [alloy solidification, seed germination, crystal growth, and radio transmission of payload data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, A. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Tentatively scheduled to fly on STS-17 (41G), this get away special aims to demonstrate amateur radio transmissions to global ground stations in the English language. Experiments No. 1, 2, and 3 use the micro-gravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the germination of radish seeds, and the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution. Flight results are to be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 (the Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment - MARCE) features radio transmissions and also provides timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor obtains real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements within the GAS canister. These data are to be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they are converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception. The support structure for the G #007 experiments consists of two primary plates and four bumper assemblies.

  2. Intercalation of sea urchin proteins in calcite: Study of a crystalline composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, A.; Addadi, L.; Leiserowitz, L.; Weiner, S. ); Kvick, A.; Nelson, M. )

    1990-11-02

    Sea urchin skeletal elements are composed of single crystals of calcite. Unlike their synthetic counterparts, these crystals do not have well-developed cleavage and are consequently much more resistant to fracture. This phenomenon is due in part to the presence of acidic glycoproteins occluded within the crystals. By means of x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation, it is shown that the presence of the protein in synthetic calcite only slightly decreases the coherence length but significantly increases the angular spread of perfect domains of the crystals. In biogenic calcite, the coherence length is 1/3 to 1/4 as much as that in synthetic calcite and the angular spread is 20 to 50 times as wide. It is proposed that the presence of macromolecules concentrated at mosaic boundaries that are oblique to cleavage planes is responsible for the change in fracture properties. These results may be important in the material sciences, because of the unusual nature of this material, namely, a composite based on the controlled intercalation of macromolecules inside single-crystal lattices. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Simulating Succinate-Promoted Dissolution at Calcite {104} Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhonto, D.; Sahai, N.

    2008-12-01

    Organic molecules of a wide range of molecular weights from small organic acids, amino-acids, acidic peptides and acidic proteins to humic and fulvic acids play a key role in modulating nucleation, crystal growth and dissolution of calcium carbonate polymorphs. In general, these acidic molecules inhibit calcite growth and, promote dissolution preferentially along specific crystallographic directions, in the process, regulating crystal shape and size, and even whether a metastable polymorph (e.g., vaterite or aragonite) is nucleated first. For example, chiral faces of calcite are selected by chiral amino-acids and the unusual {hk0} faces are expressed in the presence of amino-acids [Orme et al., 2001], and unusual heptagonal dissolution etch-pit are seen in the presence of succinate compared to the normal rhombohedral pits in water alone [Teng et al., 2006]. Thus, the presence of unusual crystal morphologies may indicate organic-mediated growth, thus serving as a biosignature. We have conducted the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the Consistent Valence Force Field (CVFF) as implemented in the FORCITE© module of the Materials Studio © software package (Accelrys, Inc. TM) to model the adsorption of succinate, a dicarboxylic acid, and charge- balancing Na+ ions on dry and hydrated steps in different directions on the {104} cleavage face of calcite [Mkhonto and Sahai, in prep.]. At the site of succinate adsorption, we find elongation of the interatomic distances (Ca-OCO3,i) between surface Ca2+ cation and the oxygen of the underlying inorganic CO32- anion the first surface layer of calcite, compared to the corresponding distances in the presence of water alone, suggesting greater ease of surface Ca2+ detachment. This result is consistent with the empirically observed increase in overall dissolution rate with succinate [Teng et al., 2006]. Furthermore, succinate adsorption lowers the step energies, which explains the appearance of steps in the unsusual [42

  4. Calcite mylonites in the Central Alpine ``root zone''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzmann, Peter

    1987-04-01

    North of the Insubric line, in the Central Alpine "root zone", carbonate rocks are concentrated in very narrow zones and have been metamorphosed under amphibolite facies conditions by the Tertiary Lepontine metamorphism (grain size ~1 mm). Post-metamorphic deformation under greenschist facies conditions produced calcite mylonite bands a few millimeters to tens of meters wide in these marble zones. Microstructural development begins with twin formation, bending of twin boundaries, grain and twin boundary migration and recrystallization in high stress regions. Progressive mylonitization—by dynamic recrystallization—results in a microstructure with elongated calcite crystals (long axis 20-50 μm, axial ration 1:4). In this fine-grained matrix, porphyroclasts of calcite, quartz, white mica, biotite, diopside, tremolite, scapolite and plagioclase are preserved. Ultra-mylonite bands in pure calcite rocks show an even finer grain size of 5-10 μm. Lattice preferred orientation is not present in the undeformed marbles, but it develops during mylonitization. The c-axis orientation in the mylonites forms an asymmetric point maximum. In the ultra-mylonite no preferred orientation is left. It is concluded from microstructural and textural aspects, that during mylonitization, dislocation creep accompanied by dynamic recrystallization were the most important processes, whilst grain-boundary sliding was the dominant mechanism during the formation of the ultra-mylonites. Shear-sense determinations indicate a horizontal right-lateral strike-slip shear system. This is in good agreement with evidence regarding other movements along the Insubric line which can be observed in ductile and brittle shear zones.

  5. Alginic Acid Accelerates Calcite Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, T. D.; Duckworth, O. W.; McNamara, C. J.; Martin, S. T.; Mitchell, R.

    2003-12-01

    Accelerated carbonate weathering through biological activity affects both geochemical cycling and the local pH and alkalinity of terrestrial and marine waters. Microbes affect carbonate dissolution through metabolic activity, production of acidic or chelating exudates, and cation binding by cell walls. Dissolution occurs within microbial biofilms - communities of microorganisms attached to stone in an exopolymer matrix. We investigated the effect of alginic acid, a common biological polymer produced by bacteria and algae, on calcite dissolution using a paired atomic force microscopy/flow-through reactor apparatus. The alginic acid caused up to an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate at 3 < pH < 12. Additionally, the polymer preferentially binds to the obtuse pit steps and increases step velocity. We propose that the polymer is actively chelating surficial cations reducing the activation energy and increasing dissolution rate. The role of biologically produced polymers in mineral weathering is important in the protection of cultural heritage materials and understanding of marine and terrestrial systems.

  6. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  7. Calcite saturation in eastern UK rivers.

    PubMed

    Neal, Colin

    2002-01-23

    Calcite saturation in eastern UK rivers is assessed in relation to the potential kinetic inhibition of calcite precipitation. Two well established inhibitors are considered: soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP, i.e. inorganic monomeric phosphorus); and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The rivers show a range of calcite saturation levels from approximately 1hundredth to approximately 100-fold. The greatest range occurs for the northernmost river considered, the Tweed, where the waters range from highly unsaturated to highly oversaturated. The lowest range occurs for the most southerly rivers (the Great Ouse and the Thames) where the waters are consistently oversaturated with respect to calcite. The contrasting patterns relate to a greater diversity of water quality within the northern regions. Thus, during the winter, the main waters are derived from the upland areas with acidic soils and low weathering rates. During the summer baseflow periods, groundwater inputs are more important and high photosynthesis results in particularly high pHs and calcite oversaturation. In contrast, for the southern rivers, the main source of water during both the summer baseflow and the winter highflow periods comes from calcium carbonate rich aquifer sources. Statistical analysis of pH vs. the logarithm of the calcite saturation index for each river indicates strong linear features with individual gradients of approximately 1. This linearity results from an autocorrelation (the logarithm of the saturation index is calculated from the pH) and this indicates that calcite solubility controls are not operative in any of the rivers examined. A comparison of calcite saturation levels and SRP and DOC concentrations show a pattern inconsistent with kinetic hindrance, although some structure is observed, probably due to the mixing reactions between point and diffuse sources of water with contrasting chemistry. PMID:11846076

  8. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with Needle Fibre Calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this manuscript the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically-influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of Fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented at present

  9. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschedler, S.; Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Millière, L.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2014-05-01

    Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i) purely physicochemical processes, (ii) mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii) crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic) or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with needle fibre calcite (NFC), another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this paper the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented. Moreover, on a global

  10. The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Colin

    This paper examines the potential for calcium carbonate to reduce phosphate pollution in freshwaters by co-precipitation, a process known as a "self cleansing mechanism". Calcium carbonate saturation levels and phosphate concentrations (SRP - soluble reactive phosphate) across the major eastern UK river basins are examined to test for solubility controls. The study shows that calcite saturation varies for each catchment as a function of flow and biological activity rather than by direct regulation by SRP. Indeed, there is no evidence, for any of the rivers studied, that calcite solubility controls hold. However, for groundwater and groundwater-fed springs in the Chalk of the Thames basin, calcite saturation is observed with associated low SRP levels. A self-cleansing mechanism may well be operative within the Chalk due to two factors. Firstly, there is a high potential for nucleation on the calcite micro-crystals in the aquifer. Secondly, there are within aquifer reactions that remove the calcite nucleating inhibitors (SRP and dissolved organic carbon, DOC) to levels lower than those occurring within the rivers do. These inhibitors enter the catchment at very high concentrations in association with agricultural pollution (fertilizer application and animal slurry) and household contamination (e.g. sewage sources from septic tanks). Under low flow conditions, when the saturation index for calcite is at its highest, so too is the concentration of the nucleation inhibitor SRP. Companion work shows that calcite precipitation can occur at the water-sediment interface of the river and this may involve SRP removal. The data, as a whole, define an apparent bound for calcite solubility control where in the presence of nucleating centres, SRP must be less than 4 mM-P l-1 and DOC must be less than 150 mM-C l-1: a condition that does not seem to pertain within most UK rivers.

  11. Timing and mechanism of late-Pleistocene calcite vein formation across the Dead Sea Fault Zone, northern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, Perach; Weinberger, Ram; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Golding, Suzanne D.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Tonguc Uysal, I.; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Gross, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    The emplacement of calcite-filled veins perpendicular to the Dead Sea Fault Zone in northern Israel reflects strain partitioning during transpression. We present structural, geochemical, and U-Th geochronological data that constrain the mechanism, conditions and timing of vein formation. Vein walls are strongly brecciated and commonly cemented with coarsely crystalline calcite, whereas calcite-filled veins are composed of wall-parallel bands of calcite crystals. Elongated blocky and fibrous calcite crystals grew perpendicular to the vein walls and are characterised by a truncate sealing-hiatus morphology, indicating episodes of partial or complete sealing of the fractures during calcite precipitation. Stable isotope and rare-earth element and yttrium (REY) analyses indicate that calcite-filled veins precipitated by karst processes, involving meteoric water and limited fluid-rock interactions. U-Th dating results show a prolonged history of vein growth. While some veins initiated prior to 500 ka, the majority of the veins were active between 358 and 17 ka. Age constraints on vein activity correspond to an ˜E-W regional shortening phase in this sector of the Dead Sea Fault Zone, associated with an increased component of convergence during the late-Pleistocene.

  12. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, D. A.; Lakshtanov, L. Z.; Carneiro, J. F.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi = - 1.12 on calcite and log KNi = - 0.43 and - 0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface.

  13. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite.

    PubMed

    Belova, D A; Lakshtanov, L Z; Carneiro, J F; Stipp, S L S

    2014-12-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi=-1.12 on calcite and log KNi=-0.43 and -0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts of polysaccharides and clay nanoparticles on the chalk surface. PMID:25300061

  14. High-Performance Ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12 Single Crystals Grown by Top-Seeded Solution Growth Method under High-Pressure Oxygen Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanaka, Yuuki; Noguchi, Yuji; Miyayama, Masaru

    2010-09-01

    The top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method under high oxygen pressure (PO2 ) atmosphere has been developed to obtain large high-performance single crystals of ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12. Crystals grown at 960 °C at a PO2 of 0.9 MPa exhibited well-saturated hysteresis with a remanent polarization of 48 µC/cm2 and a coercive field of 29 kV/cm. The results of piezoresponse force microscopy indicate that polarization switching is accomplished throughout the crystals. Electric-field-induced strain measurements along the a axis yield a piezoelectric constant d11* of 37 pm/V for Bi4Ti3O12.

  15. Hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Laura; Mueller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The transport of heat and mass through the Earth's crust is coupled to mineral reactions and the exchange of isotopes and elements between different phases. Carbonate minerals are a major constituent of the Earth's crust and play an important role in different physical, chemical and even biological processes. In this experimental study, the element exchange reaction between calcite (CaCO3) and a Mg-rich fluid phase is investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Single crystals of calcite (2x2x2 mm) react with 1 ml of a 1 M MgCl2 solution at 200° C in a Teflon-lined steel autoclave for different times between one day and four weeks. The reaction leads to the formation of a porous reaction front and the pseudomorphic replacement of calcite by dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] and magnesite (MgCO3). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the reaction rim consists of small Mg-carbonate rhombs closely attached to each other, suggesting that the replacement reaction takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Typically, the observed reaction front can be divided into two different domains. The outer part of the reaction rim, i.e. from the mineral surface in contact to the fluid inwards, consists of magnesite, whereas the inner part of the rim surrounding the unreacted calcite core consists of Ca-rich dolomite. The formation of a porous microstructure that varies in different parts of the reaction rim is a direct result of the large molar volume change induced by the replacement of calcite by magnesite and dolomite. The developing porosity therefore creates fluid pathways that promote the progress of the reaction front towards the unreacted core of the single crystal. Compositional profiles measured perpendicular to the mineral surface across the reactions rims using electron microprobe (EMPA) further revealed a compositional gradient within the reaction rim with regard to the structure-forming elements Mg and Ca. Here, the amount of Mg incorporated in both product

  16. Acceleration of calcite kinetics by abalone nacre proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G; Qiu, S R; Orme, C A; Morse, D E; De Yoreo, J J

    2005-06-09

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures have long been an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over synthesis of crystalline materials. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineral surfaces. Indeed, numerous studies have demonstrated that bio-organic additives can dramatically alter crystal shapes and growth-rates in vitro. However, previous molecular-scale studies revealing mechanisms of growth modification focused on small molecules such as amino acids or peptides and always observed growth inhibition. In contrast, studies using full proteins were non-quantitative and underlying sources of growth modification were ill-defined. Here we investigate interactions between proteins isolated from abalone shell nacre and growing surfaces of calcite. We find that these proteins significantly accelerate the molecular-scale kinetics and, though much larger than atomic steps, alter growth morphology through step-specific interactions that lower their free energies. We propose that these proteins act as surfactants to promote ion attachment at calcite surfaces.

  17. Upscaling Calcite Growth Rates From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N; Stack, Andrew G; Steefel, Carl I

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative prediction of mineral reaction rates in the subsurface remains a daunting task partly because a key parameter for macroscopic models, the reactive site density, is poorly constrained. Here we report atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements on the calcite surface of monomolecular step densities, treated as equivalent to the reactive site density, as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index. Data for the obtuse step orientation are combined with existing step velocity measurements to generate a model that predicts overall macroscopic calcite growth rates. The model is quantitatively consistent with several published macroscopic rates under a range of alkaline solution conditions, particularly for two of the most comprehensive data sets without the need for additional fit parameters. The model reproduces peak growth rates and its functional form is simple enough to be incorporated into reactive transport or other macroscopic models designed for predictions in porous media. However, it currently cannot model equilibrium, pH effects, and may overestimate rates at high aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratios. The discrepancies in rates at high calcium-to-carbonate ratios may be due to differences in pre-treatment, such as exposing the seed material to SI 1.0 to generate/develop growth hillocks, or other factors.

  18. Channel Flow Cell Studies of the Inhibiting Action of Gypsum on the Dissolution Kinetics of Calcite: A Laboratory Approach with Implications for Field Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Shelley J.; Compton, Richard G.; Taylor, Mark A.; Viles, Heather A.

    2001-04-15

    The rate of dissolution of surface-treated calcite crystals in aqueous acidic solution has been studied using an adaptation of the channel flow cell method with microdisc electrode detection. Surface treatments of calcite with sulfuric acid lead to the nucleation of gypsum overgrowths, which reduce the rate of dissolution of calcite. Rate constants for untreated calcite and calcite pretreated with sulfuric acid conditions of 0.01 M for 1 h, 0.05 M for 5 h, and 0.1 M for 21 h are found to be 0.035, 0.018, 0.006, and 0.004 cm s(-1), respectively. Deterioration of calcite materials caused by acid deposition was investigated by field exposure of untreated and sulfate pretreated calcite rocks under urban conditions for 12 months. The rate constant for both pretreated and untreated calcite exposed to weathering is 0.003 cm s(-1). This suggests that calcite self-passivates the surface from further reaction when exposed to acid deposition. However, surface studies indicate that the surface undergoes erosion and dissolution before passivation. Pretreatment of the surface with sulfate protects the surface from acid deposition so it remains less reactive toward acid compared with untreated calcite. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11401383

  19. 4He behavior in calcite filling viewed by (U-Th)/He dating, 4He diffusion and crystallographic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Alexandre; Gautheron, Cécile; Pagel, Maurice; Berthet, Patrick; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Douville, Eric; Pinna-Jamme, Rosella; Sarda, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Fault-filling calcite crystals sampled from the Eocene/Oligocene Gondrecourt graben, Paris Basin, Eastern France, have been studied in order to test the potentiality of calcite (U-Th)/He dating, based on recognized He retention behavior in crystal lattice at surface temperature (Copeland et al., 2007). The samples have been selected because of their relatively old Eocene to Oligocene precipitation age and cold thermal history (<40 °C since precipitation). They were sorted into three main tectonic and morphological groups in order of precipitation, including (1) micro-fracture calcites, (2) breccia and associated geodic calcites, and (3) vein and associated geodic calcites. (U-Th)/He dating of 63 calcite fragments yields ages dispersed from 0.2 ± 0.02 to 35.8 ± 2.7 Ma, as well as two older dates of 117 ± 10 and 205 ± 28 Ma (1σ). These He ages correlate with grain chemistry, such as Sr, ΣREE concentrations or (La/Yb)N ratios, likely reflecting parent fluid evolution. Only the oldest He ages, which correspond to the most recently precipitated crystals, have preserved the total 4He budget since precipitation. To better understand both the age dispersion and why calcites precipitated earlier show younger ages, 4He diffusion experiments have been conducted on 10 Gondrecourt calcite fragments from 3 samples with He ages of ∼0.2-6 Ma. Additionally, a crystallographic investigation by X-ray diffraction (XRD) performed on similar samples reveals that crystal structure evolves with increasing temperature, beginning with micro-cracks and cleavage opening. These XRD results shed light on the (U-Th)/He data, indicating that, in fault-filling calcite, He retention is controlled by multiple diffusion domains (MDD) with various sizes, and therefore, evolves through time with strong consequences on (U-Th)/He age. We thus interpret the Gondrecourt calcite (U-Th)/He age scatter as a consequence of the production of defects due to successive calcite crystallization phases

  20. Calcite dissolution in two deep eutrophic lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramisch, F.; Dittrich, M.; Mattenberger, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wueest, A.

    1999-10-01

    The calcium cycle, in particular carbonate dissolution, was analyzed in two deep eutrophic lakes, Lago di Lugano (288 m maximum depth) and Sempachersee (87 m) located in Switzerland. A box model approach was used to calculate calcite dissolution in the water column and at the sediment-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water interface based on various lake monitoring data such as sediment traps, sediment cores, water and pore-water analysis. A model for stationary conditions allowing the calculation of calcite dissolution in the water column for a given particle size distribution was developed. The relative values of the simulated flux were consistent with sediment trap observations. The best fit of the dissolution rate constant of sinking calcite in Lago di Lugano was on the same order of magnitude (3 {center{underscore}dot} 10{sup {minus}10} kg{sup 1/3} s{sup {minus}1}) as published laboratory values for this surface controlled process. Both lakes show a similar specific calcite precipitation rate of 170 g Ca m{sup {minus}2} a{sup {minus}1}. The diffusive flux across the sediment-water interface amounts to about 15 and 10% of total calcite precipitation in Sempachersee and Lago di Lugano, respectively. However, 61% of the precipitated calcite is dissolved in the water column of Lago di Lugano compared to only 13% in Sempachersee. These results point towards the importance of grain size distributions and settling times in stratified deep waters as the two most important factors determining calcite retention in sediments of hard water lakes.

  1. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires--Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Caroline; Whiticar, Alexander; Dick, Kimberly A; Sköld, Niklas; Nygård, Jesper; Bolinsson, Jessica

    2016-04-13

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45-50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  2. Silver as Seed-Particle Material for GaAs Nanowires—Dictating Crystal Phase and Growth Direction by Substrate Orientation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the feasibility of silver as seed-particle material to synthesize GaAs nanowires and show that both crystal phase and growth direction can be controlled by choice of substrate orientation. A (111)B substrate orientation can be used to form vertically aligned wurtzite GaAs nanowires and a (100) substrate orientation to form vertically aligned zinc blende GaAs nanowires. A 45–50% yield of vertical nanowire growth is achieved on the (100) substrate orientation without employing any type of surface modification or nucleation strategy to promote a vertical growth direction. In addition, photoluminescence measurements reveal that the photon emission from the silver seeded wurtzite GaAs nanowires is characterized by a single and narrow emission peak at 1.52 eV. PMID:26998550

  3. Hydro-gel environment and solution additives modify calcite growth mechanism to an accretion process of amorphous nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, A.; Kahil, K.; Habraken, W.; Gur, D.; Fratzl, P.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    2013-12-01

    Various biominerals form via the transformation of a transient amorphous precursor phase into a mature crystalline phase. The mature biominerals usually exhibit morphology reminiscent of aggregated nanoparticles. Although these observations suggest an accretion-based growth process consisting on nanoparticles, the key factors that control the accretion process are unknown. We investigated the transformation of solid amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite. When plant cystoliths, a biogenic stable ACC phase, are transformed into calcite in vitro by immersion in water, calcite crystals grow in two distinct steps (Gal et al., Angewandte Chemie, 2013). First, rhombohedral crystals grow that show flat facets as expected from ion-by-ion growth. These crystals then grow by the aggregation and crystallization of the original ACC nanospheres leading to a surface morphology dominated by aggregated spheres. The transformation process occurs within an organic hydro-gel that originates from inside the cystoliths. We tested the importance of the gel phase to the transformation process by transforming synthetic ACC into calcite inside various gels. In all the investigated systems: in gelatin, agarose, and pectin gels, calcite crystals grew that showed the nanosphere aggregation morphology. In additional experiments we demonstrated that also other additives, such as phosphate ions and biogenic macromolecules, that slow down ACC dissolution and calcite precipitation from ions can induce the accretion process dominance (see figure attached). These experiments show that although in solution the dominant process is dissolution to ions of the ACC and crystal growth by ion-by-ion mechanism, the presence of an additive that slows the ion-mediated processes makes the ACC nanospheres stable long enough to interact with the crystal surface. As a result, the metastable ACC nanospheres undergo secondary nucleation on the crystal surface without dissolving. These experiments highlight

  4. Eu3+ uptake by calcite: preliminary results from coprecipitation experiments and observations with surface-sensitive techniques.

    PubMed

    Stipp, S L S; Lakshtanov, L Z; Jensen, J T; Baker, J A

    2003-03-01

    A lack of information in databases for contamination risk assessment about the transport behaviour of the trivalent f-orbital elements in groundwater systems where calcite is at equilibrium motivated this study of Eu(3+) uptake. The free drift technique was used to examine the effects of Eu(3+) concentration, presence of Na(+) or K(+) and temperature, as well as calcite nucleation and precipitation kinetics, on the partitioning of calcite. Changes in surface composition and morphology resulting from exposure of single crystals of Iceland spar to Eu(3+)-bearing solutions were observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). First results confirm that calcite has high affinity for Eu(3+). Rates of nucleation and precipitation strongly affect the extent of uptake but the presence of Na(+) and K(+) has no effect, suggesting formation of solid solution as CaCO(3)-EuOHCO(3). Surface-sensitive techniques prove that Eu(3+) is adsorbed to calcite even when the surface is dissolving and adsorption is not accompanied by precipitation of a separate Eu(3+)-solid phase. Adsorbed Eu modifies calcite's dissolution behaviour, roughening terraces and rounding step edges, and producing surface morphology where some surface sites appear blocked. Results imply that Eu(3+) concentrations in natural calcites are limited by Eu(3+) availability rather than by a lack of ability to fit into calcite's atomic structure. This behaviour can probably be expected for other trivalent rare Earth elements (REE), actinides and fission products whose behaviour is similar to that of Eu(3+). These elements are likely to be incorporated within the calcite bulk in systems where it is precipitating and the demonstrated strong partitioning ensures some uptake even where calcite is at or under saturation. PMID:12598092

  5. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  6. The Crystal Hotel: A Microfluidic Approach to Biomimetic Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wang, Yun-Wei; Ihli, Johannes; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Li, Shunbo; Walshaw, Richard; Chen, Li; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2015-12-01

    A "crystal hotel" microfluidic device that allows crystal growth in confined volumes to be studied in situ is used to produce large calcite single crystals with predefined crystallographic orientation, microstructure, and shape by control of the detailed physical environment, flow, and surface chemistry. This general approach can be extended to form technologically important, nanopatterned single crystals. PMID:26479157

  7. Oxygen isotopes in calcite grown under cave-analogue conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, C. C.; Henderson, G. M.

    2011-07-01

    Speleothem oxygen isotopes and growth rates are valuable proxies for reconstructing climate history. There is debate, however, about the conditions that allow speleothems to grow in oxygen isotope equilibrium, and about the correct equilibrium fractionation factors. We report results from a series of carbonate growth experiments in karst-analogue conditions in the laboratory. The setup closely mimics natural processes (e.g. precipitation driven by CO 2-degassing, low ionic strength solution, thin solution film) but with a tight control on growth conditions (temperature, pCO 2, drip rate, calcite saturation index and the composition of the initial solution). Calcite is dissolved in water in a 20,000 ppmV pCO 2 environment. This solution is dripped onto glass plates (coated with seed-carbonate) in a lower pCO 2 environment (<2500 ppmV), where degassing leads to calcite growth. Experiments were performed at 7, 15, 25 and 35 °C. At each temperature, calcite was grown at three drip rates (2, 6 and 10 drips per minute) on separate plates. The mass of calcite grown in these experiments varies with temperature ( T in K) and drip rate ( d_ r in drips min -1) according to the relationship daily growth mass = 1.254 + 1.478 ∗ 10 -9 ∗ e0.0679 T + ( e0.00248 T - 2) ∗ (-0.779 d_ r2 + 10.05 d_ r + 11.69). This relationship indicates a substantial increase of growth mass with temperature, a smaller influence of drip rate on growth mass at low temperature and a non-linear relationship between drip rate and growth mass at higher temperatures. Low temperature, fast dripping conditions are found to be the most favourable for reducing effects associated with evaporation and rapid depletion of the dissolved inorganic carbon reservoir (rapid DIC-depletion). The impact of evaporation can be large so caves with high relative humidity are also preferable for palaeoclimate reconstruction. Even allowing for the maximum offsets that may have been induced by evaporation and rapid DIC

  8. The Alkaline Dissolution Rate of Calcite.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Due to the widespread presence of calcium carbonate on Earth, several geochemical systems, among which is the global CO2 cycle, are controlled to a large extent by the dissolution and precipitation of this mineral. For this reason, the dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated for decades. Despite this intense activity, a consensual value of the dissolution rate of calcite has not been found yet. We show here that the inconsistency between the reported values stems mainly from the variability of the chemical and hydrodynamic conditions of measurement. The spreading of the values, when compared in identical conditions, is much less than expected and is interpreted in terms of sample surface topography. This analysis leads us to propose benchmark values of the alkaline dissolution rate of calcite compatible with all the published values, and a method to use them in various chemical and hydrodynamic contexts. PMID:27282839

  9. Biosequestration of copper by bacteria isolated from an abandoned mine by using microbially induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Anbu, Periasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-09-12

    Abandoned mine sites are frequently polluted with high concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, 25 calcite-forming bacteria were newly isolated from the soil of an abandoned metal mine in Korea. Based on their urease activity, calcite production, and resistance to copper toxicity, four isolates were selected and further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the isolates, Sporosarcina soli B-22 was selected for subsequent copper biosequestration studies, using the sand impermeability test by production of calcite and extracellular polymeric substance. High removal rates (61.8%) of copper were obtained when the sand samples were analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer following 72 h of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the copper carbonate precipitates had a diameter of approximately 5-10 μm. X-ray diffraction further confirmed the presence of copper carbonate and calcium carbonate crystals. PMID:27488956

  10. Selective adsorption of L- and D-amino acids on calcite: Implications for biochemical homochirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Filley, T. R.; Goodfriend, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of biochemical homochirality was a key step in the origin of life, yet prebiotic mechanisms for chiral separation are not well constrained. Here we demonstrate a geochemically plausible scenario for chiral separation of amino acids by adsorption on mineral surfaces. Crystals of the common rock-forming mineral calcite (CaCO(3)), when immersed in a racemic aspartic acid solution, display significant adsorption and chiral selectivity of d- and l-enantiomers on pairs of mirror-related crystal-growth surfaces. This selective adsorption is greater on crystals with terraced surface textures, which indicates that d- and l-aspartic acid concentrate along step-like linear growth features. Thus, selective adsorption of linear arrays of d- and l-amino acids on calcite, with subsequent condensation polymerization, represents a plausible geochemical mechanism for the production of homochiral polypeptides on the prebiotic Earth.

  11. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H.; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40–200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism. PMID:18987314

  12. Low-magnesium calcite produced by coralline algae in seawater of Late Cretaceous composition.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Steven M; Ries, Justin B; Hardie, Lawrence A

    2002-11-26

    Shifts in the MgCa ratio of seawater driven by changes in midocean ridge spreading rates have produced oscillations in the mineralogy of nonskeletal carbonate precipitates from seawater on time scales of 10(8) years. Since Cambrian time, skeletal mineralogies of anatomically simple organisms functioning as major reef builders or producers of shallow marine limestones have generally corresponded in mineral composition to nonskeletal precipitates. Here we report on experiments showing that the ambient MgCa ratio actually governs the skeletal mineralogy of some simple organisms. In modern seas, coralline algae produce skeletons of high-Mg calcite (>4 mol % MgCO(3)). We grew three species of these algae in artificial seawaters having three different MgCa ratios. All of the species incorporated amounts of Mg into their skeletons in proportion to the ambient MgCa ratio, mimicking the pattern for nonskeletal precipitation. Thus, the algae calcified as if they were simply inducing precipitation from seawater through their consumption of CO(2) for photosynthesis; presumably organic templates specify the calcite crystal structure of their skeletons. In artificial seawater with the low MgCa ratio of Late Cretaceous seas, the algae in our experiments produced low-Mg calcite (<4 mol % MgCO(3)), the carbonate mineral formed by nonskeletal precipitation in those ancient seas. Our results suggest that many taxa that produce high-Mg calcite today produced low-Mg calcite in Late Cretaceous seas. PMID:12399549

  13. Calcite microcrystals in the pineal gland of the human brain: first physical and chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Baconnier, Simon; Lang, Sidney B; Polomska, Maria; Hilczer, Bozena; Berkovic, Garry; Meshulam, Guilia

    2002-10-01

    A new form of biomineralization has been studied in the pineal gland of the human brain. It consists of small crystals that are less than 20 microm in length and that are completely distinct from the often observed mulberry-type hydroxyapatite concretions. A special procedure was developed for isolation of the crystals from the organic matter in the pineal gland. Cubic, hexagonal, and cylindrical morphologies have been identified using scanning electron microscopy. The crystal edges were sharp whereas their surfaces were very rough. Energy dispersive spectroscopy showed that the crystals contained only the elements calcium, carbon, and oxygen. Selected area electron diffraction and near infrared Raman spectroscopy established that the crystals were calcite. With the exception of the otoconia structure of the inner ear, this is the only known nonpathological occurrence of calcite in the human body. The calcite microcrystals are probably responsible for the previously observed second harmonic generation in pineal tissue sections. The complex texture structure of the microcrystals may lead to crystallographic symmetry breaking and possible piezoelectricity, as is the case with otoconia. It is believed that the presence of two different crystalline compounds in the pineal gland is biologically significant, suggesting two entirely different mechanisms of formation and biological functions. Studies directed toward the elucidation of the formation and functions, and possible nonthermal interaction with external electromagnetic fields are currently in progress. PMID:12224052

  14. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, A.; Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Lomenech, C.; Jordan, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Barkleit, A.; Marmier, N.; Brendler, V.; Surblé, S.; Giffaut, E.

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO3). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10-3 to 10-5 mol L-1 for Eu and 10-3 mol L-1 for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  15. The coordination and distribution of B in foraminiferal calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, Oscar; Kaczmarek, Karina; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Misra, Sambuddha; Langer, Gerald; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bijma, Jelle; Elderfield, Henry

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic ratio and concentration of B in foraminiferal calcite appear to reflect the pH and bicarbonate concentration of seawater. The use of B as a chemical proxy tracer has the potential to transform our understanding of the global carbon cycle, and ocean acidification processes. However, discrepancies between the theory underpinning the B proxies, and mineralogical observations of B coordination in biomineral carbonates call the basis of these proxies into question. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to show that B is hosted solely as trigonal BO3 in the calcite test of Amphistegina lessonii, and that B concentration exhibits banding at the micron length scale. In contrast to previous results, our observation of trigonal B agrees with the predictions of the theoretical mechanism behind B palaeoproxies. These data strengthen the use of B for producing palaeo-pH records. The observation of systematic B heterogeneity, however, highlights the complexity of foraminiferal biomineralisation, implying that B incorporation is modulated by biological or crystal growth processes.

  16. Anisotropic Transverse Stress in Calcite and Sapphire Measured Using Birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tear, Gareth R.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.; Proud, William G.

    2015-06-01

    Many significant geological minerals have anisotropic crystal structures leading to material properties that are anisotropic, including compressive elastic behaviour. A non-invasive approach to investigate the directional dependence of transverse stress in these materials during shock compression would supplement current understanding. As many geological minerals are transparent and hence optically anisotropic, measuring the change in birefringence induced by transverse stress in the material offers the possibility of a fast, non-invasive approach to probe transverse behaviour. Shock compression experiments have been performed on a-cut calcite and a-cut sapphire for strain rates of order 105 s-1 and up to longitudinal stresses of 2 GPa for calcite and 12 GPa for sapphire. We present measured changes in birefringence for these materials under shock compression, comparing with current and past literature as well as an in house optical model. The authors would like to thank Mr Steve Johnson and Mr David Pittman for technical support. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the continued support of AWE and Imperial College London.

  17. Functionalization of biomineral reinforcement in crustacean cuticle: Calcite orientation in the partes incisivae of the mandibles of Porcellio scaber and the supralittoral species Tylos europaeus (Oniscidea, Isopoda).

    PubMed

    Huber, Julia; Griesshaber, Erika; Nindiyasari, Fitriana; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Ziegler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In arthropods the cuticle forms an exoskeleton with its physical and chemical properties adapted to functions of distinct skeletal elements. The cuticle of the partes incisivae (PI) in mandibles of terrestrial isopods is a composite of chitin-protein fibrils/fibres and minerals. It consists of an unmineralized tip, a middle region with organic fibrils reinforced mainly with amorphous calcium phosphate and a base region mineralized with amorphous calcium carbonate and calcite. In this study we extend our work on the structure and material properties of the incisive cuticle employing electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and investigate calcite orientation patterns in the PI of two terrestrial isopod species from different habitats. We trace small-scale differences in texture sharpness and calcite microstructure, and compare calcite organization and orientation patterns in the PI with those in the tergites of the same isopod species. We observe that in the PI calcite orientation, the degree of crystal alignment, and mode of crystalline domain assemblage is highly varied within short length scales. This contrasts to calcite organization in the tergite cuticle, where calcite has only one specific texture pattern. Such a large range in the variation of calcite organization has not been observed in other carbonate biological hard tissues, such as shells and teeth, where one specific texture and microstructure prevails. Thus, the investigated isopod species are able to control crystallization of the amorphous carbonate precursor in a differential way, most probably related to the function of the individual skeletal element and the animals' behavior. PMID:25818510

  18. Ultra-high-speed lateral solid phase crystallization of GeSn on insulator combined with Sn-melting-induced seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikita, H.; Matsumura, R.; Kai, Y.; Sadoh, T.; Miyao, M.

    2014-11-01

    To produce high-performance devices on flexible plastic substrates, it is essential to form Ge-based group IV semiconductors on insulating substrates at low temperatures (≤250 °C). We have developed a technique for solid phase crystallization of amorphous GeSn (≤220 °C) enhanced by Sn doping, and combined with a seeding technique induced by Sn melting (˜250 °C). This combination produces lateral crystallization of amorphous GeSn from seed arrays with no incubation time. As a result, extremely high growth velocities at 220 °C, depending on Sn concentration, e.g., 0.13 μm/h (14% Sn) and 1100 μm/h (23% Sn), are achieved. These velocities are 104-108 times higher than that of pure Ge. This technique enables growth of crystalline GeSn island arrays (diameters: 50-150 μm) at low temperatures (≤250 °C) at controlled positions on insulating substrates.

  19. Carbon isotope fractionation in synthetic magnesian calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepción; Romanek, Christopher S.; Caballero, Emilia

    2006-03-01

    Mg-calcite was precipitated at 25 °C in closed system, free-drift experiments, from solutions containing NaHCO 3, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2. The carbon stable isotope composition of bulk solid and solution were analyzed from subsamples collected during time course experiments of 24 h duration. Considering only the Mg-content and δ 13C values for the bulk solid, the carbon isotope fractionation factor for the Mg-calcite-HCO 3(aq)- system (as 103lnα) increased with average mol percentage of Mg (X Mg) in the solid at a rate of (0.024 ± 0.011) per mol% MgCO 3. Extrapolation of this relationship to the pure calcite end member yields a value of 0.82 ± 0.09, which is similar to published values for the calcite-HCO 3(aq)- system. Although 103lnα did not vary for precipitation rates that ranged from 10 3.21 to 10 4.60 μmol m -2 h -1, it was not possible to hold Mg-content of the solid constant, so kinetic effect on 10 3 ln α could not be evaluated from these experiments.

  20. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  1. Growing spherulitic calcite grains in saline, hyperalkaline lakes: experimental evaluation of the effects of Mg-clays and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes-Martín, R.; Rogerson, M. R.; Brasier, A. T.; Vonhof, H. B.; Prior, T. J.; Fellows, S. M.; Reijmer, J. J. G.; Billing, I.; Pedley, H. M.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of spherical-radial calcite bodies - spherulites - in sublacustrine, hyperalkaline and saline systems is unclear, and therefore their palaeoenvironmental significance as allochems is disputed. Here, we experimentally investigate two hypotheses concerning the origin of spherulites. The first is that spherulites precipitate from solutions super-saturated with respect to magnesium-silicate clays, such as stevensite. The second is that spherulite precipitation happens in the presence of dissolved, organic acid molecules. In both cases, experiments were performed under sterile conditions using large batches of a synthetic and cell-free solution replicating waters found in hyperalkaline, saline lakes (such as Mono Lake, California). Our experimental results show that a highly alkaline and highly saline solution supersaturated with respect to calcite (control solution) will precipitate euhedral to subhedral rhombic and trigonal bladed calcite crystals. The same solution supersaturated with respect to stevensite precipitates sheet-like stevensite crystals rather than a gel, and calcite precipitation is reduced by ~ 50% compared to the control solution, producing a mixture of patchy prismatic subhedral to euhedral, and minor needle-like, calcite crystals. Enhanced magnesium concentration in solution is the likely the cause of decreased volumes of calcite precipitation, as this raised equilibrium ion activity ratio in the solution. On the other hand, when alginic acid was present then the result was widespread development of micron-size calcium carbonate spherulite bodies. With further growth time, but falling supersaturation, these spherules fused into botryoidal-topped crusts made of micron-size fibro-radial calcite crystals. We conclude that the simplest tested mechanism to deposit significant spherical-radial calcite bodies is to begin with a strongly supersaturated solution that contains specific but environmentally-common organic acids. Furthermore, we found

  2. [In situ experimental study of phase transition of calcite by Raman spectroscopy at high temperature and high pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-jiang; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-02-01

    The phase transitions of calcite at high temperature and high pressure were investigated by using hydrothermal diamond anvil cell combined with Raman spectroscopy. The result showed that the Raman peak of 155 cm(-1) disappeared, the peak of 1 087 cm(-1) splited into 1083 and 1 090 cm(-1) peaks and the peak of 282 cm(-1) abruptly reduced to 231 cm(-1) at ambient temperature when the system pressure increased to 1 666 and 2 127 MPa respectively, which proved that calcite transformed to calcite-II and calcite-III. In the heating process at the initial pressure of 2 761 MPa and below 171 degrees C, there was no change in Raman characteristic peaks of calcite-III. As the temperature increased to 171 degrees C, the color of calcite crystal became opaque completely and the symmetric stretching vibration peak of 1 087 cm(-1), in-plane bending vibration peak of 713 cm(-1) and lattice vibration peaks of 155 and 282 cm(-1) began to mutate, showing that the calcite-III transformed to a new phase of calcium carbonate at the moment. When the temperature dropped to room temperature, this new phase remained stable all along. It also indicated that the process of phase transformation from calcite to the new phase of calcium carbonate was irreversible. The equation of phase transition between calcite-III and new phase of calcium carbonate can be determined by P(MPa) = 9.09T x (degrees C) +1 880. The slopes of the Raman peak (v1 087) of symmetrical stretching vibration depending on pressure and temperature are dv/dP = 5.1 (cm(-1) x GPa(-1)) and dv/dT = -0.055 3(cm(-1) x degrees C(-1)), respectively. PMID:22512172

  3. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability-implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M P; Dideriksen, K; Sakuma, H; Stipp, S L S

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase. PMID:27352933

  4. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability–implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-06-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase.

  5. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability–implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase. PMID:27352933

  6. Inhibition of calcite precipitation by natural organic material: Kinetics, mechanism, and thermodynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Y.-P.; Singer, P.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The inhibition of calcite precipitation by natural organic material (NOM) in solutions seeded with calcite was investigated using a pH-stat system. Experiments were carried out using three NOMs with different physical/chemical properties. For each of the materials, inhibition was found to be more effective at lower carbonate/calcium ratios and lower pH values. The reduction in the precipitation rate could be explained by a Langmuir adsorption model using a conditional equilibrium constant. By identification of the type of site on the NOM molecules that is involved in the adsorption reaction, the "conditional" equilibrium constants obtained at different solution compositions converged to a single "nonconditional" value. The thermodynamic data determined at 25??C and 1 atm suggest that the interaction between NOM molecules and the calcite surface is chemisorptive in nature and that adsorption is an endothermic reaction driven by the entropy change. The greatest degree of inhibition was observed for the NOM with the highest molecular weight and aromatic carbon content. For a given type of NOM, the degree of inhibition of calcite precipitation was dictated by the balance between the enthalpy change and the entropy change of the adsorption reaction. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  7. Isotopic tracer evidence for the amorphous calcium carbonate to calcite transformation by dissolution-reprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, Anthony J.; Gagnon, Alexander C.; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2015-09-01

    Observations that some biogenic and sedimentary calcites grow from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) raise the question of how this mineralization process influences composition. However, the detailed pathway and geochemical consequences of the ACC to calcite transformation are not well constrained. This experimental study investigated the formation of calcite from ACC by using magnesium and calcium stable isotope labeling to directly probe the transformation pathway and controls on composition. Four processes were considered: dissolution-reprecipitation, solid state transformation, and combinations of these end-members. To distinguish between these scenarios, ACC was synthesized from natural isotope abundance solutions and subsequently transferred to spiked solutions that were enriched in 43Ca and 25Mg for the transformation to calcite. Isotope measurements by NanoSIMS determined the 43Ca/40Ca, and 25Mg/24Mg ratios of the resulting calcite crystals. Analysis of the data shows the transformation is best explained by a dissolution-reprecipitation process. We find that when a small amount of ACC is transferred, the isotopic signals in the resulting calcite are largely replaced by the composition of the surrounding spiked solution. When larger amounts of ACC are transferred, calcite compositions reflect a mixture between the ACC and initial solution end-member. Comparisons of the measurements to the predictions of a simple mixing model indicate that calcite compositions (1) are sensitive to relative amounts of ACC and the surrounding solution reservoir and (2) are primarily governed by the conditions at the time of ACC transformation rather than the initial ACC formation. Shifts in calcite composition over the duration of the transformation period reflect the progressive evolution of the local solution conditions. This dependence indicates the extent to which there is water available would change the end point composition on the mixing line. While these findings have

  8. Understanding control of calcitic biomineralization-proteomics to the rescue.

    PubMed

    Hincke, Maxwell T

    2013-12-01

    The avian eggshell is one of the fastest calcifying processes known and represents a unique model for studying biomineralization. Eggshell strength is a crucial economic trait for table egg production, and ensures that a safe egg reaches the consumer kitchen. However, a common toolkit for eggshell mineralization has not yet been defined. In this issue, label-free MS-based protein quantification technology has been used by Sun et al. (Proteomics 2013, 13, 3523-3536) to detect differences in protein abundance between eggshell matrix from strong and weak eggs and between the corresponding uterine fluids bathing strong and weak eggs. Proteins associated with the formation of strong eggshells are identified, which are now candidates for further investigations to define the regulatory relationship between specific eggshell matrix proteins and calcite crystal texture. PMID:24307661

  9. Shock-induced effects in calcite from Cactus Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizgirda, J.; Ahrens, T. J.; Tsay, F.-D.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses shock metamorphism of calcite from coralline limestone samples retrieved from a borehole drilled into rocks beneath Cactus Crater, a nuclear explosion crater at Eniwetok Atoll. The metamorphism was detected and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR); the ESR spectra of Mn(+) present as a trace constituent in the coral samples, show a consistent decrease in hyperfine peak splitting with decreasing depth of sample. It is suggested that the decrease in hyperfine peak splitting reflects a decrease in crystal field splitting, and therefore, small increases on cation-anion distances produced by mechanical energy input during the shock process. Two alternative crater models suggested by the ESR results are a depiction of a steady decay of the shock wave, and a delineation of a breccia lens with a breccia-bedrock interface at 20 plus or minus 5 m.

  10. Calcite and dolomite in intrusive carbonatites. I. Textural variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmouradian, Anton R.; Reguir, Ekaterina P.; Zaitsev, Anatoly N.

    2016-04-01

    Carbonatites are nominally igneous rocks, whose evolution commonly involves also a variety of postmagmatic processes, including exsolution, subsolidus re-equilibration of igneous mineral assemblages with fluids of different provenance, hydrothermal crystallization, recrystallization and tectonic mobilization. Petrogenetic interpretation of carbonatites and assessment of their mineral potential are impossible without understanding the textural and compositional effects of both magmatic and postmagmatic processes on the principal constituents of these rocks. In the present work, we describe the major (micro)textural characteristics of carbonatitic calcite and dolomite in the context of magma evolution, fluid-rock interaction, or deformation, and provide information on the compositional variation of these minerals and its relation to specific evolutionary processes.