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Sample records for calcium carbonate crystallization

  1. Alginate hydrogel-mediated crystallization of calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yufei; Feng, Qingling

    2011-05-15

    We documented a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system for the purpose of understanding the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of calcium carbonate. The alginate was involved in the nucleation and the growth process of CaCO{sub 3}. The crystal size, morphology and roughness of crystal surface were significantly influenced by the type of the alginate, which could be accounted for by the length of the G blocks in alginate. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were the chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. This strategic approach revealed the biologically controlled CaCO{sub 3} mineralization within calcium alginate hydrogels via the selective nucleation and the confined crystallization of CaCO{sub 3}. The results presented here could contribute to the understanding of the mineralization process in hydrogel systems. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the growth of calcite aggregates with different morphologies obtained from (a) Low G alginate gels and (b) High G alginate gels. Display Omitted highlights: > We use a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system to understand the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of CaCO{sub 3} crystals. > The crystal size, morphology and crystal surface roughness are influenced by the length of G blocks in alginate. There are chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. > We propose a potential mechanism of CaCO{sub 3} crystallization within High G and Low G calcium alginate hydrogel.

  2. The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite.

    E-print Network

    Benning, Liane G.

    The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite, were studied at a range, the vaterite transforms to calcite via a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism with the reaction rate

  3. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePLUS

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  4. The effect of pigeon yolk sac fluid on the growth behavior of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Cheng, Haixia; Shen, Xinyu; Tong, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Previous experiments have proved that thermodynamically unstable calcium carbonate vaterite can exist for long periods in the yolk sac of a pigeon embryo. The aim of this article was to demonstrate the effect of in vitro mineralization of yolk sac fluid on calcium carbonate by direct precipitation. Experiments were conducted using pigeon yolk sac fluid and using lecithin extracted from pigeon yolk sac fluid as a control to investigate the regulating effects of the organic components in the embryo on the formation of the calcium carbonate precipitate. Multiple characterization methods were employed to study the various morphological patterns, sizes, crystal growth, and crystal phase transformations of the calcium carbonate precipitates as regulated by the yolk sac fluid extracted at different stages of incubation. The experimental results demonstrate that as the incubation proceeds towards the later stages, the composition and environmental features of the yolk sac fluid become more favorable for the formation of relatively unstable calcium carbonate phases with high energies of the vaterite state. The experiments conducted with extracted lecithin as the template for crystal growth yielded similar results. A large amount of organic molecules with polar functional groups carried by the yolk sac fluid have strong effects and can both initially induce the crystallization and regulate the aggregation of calcium carbonate. Furthermore, this regulation process is found to be closely related to the lecithin contained in yolk sac fluid. These observations confirm the changes in yolk sac fluid composition during incubation have significant effects on the production of vaterite, which implicates the calcium transport during embryo growth. PMID:25681477

  5. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29. PMID:16678843

  6. Calcium carbonate crystal growth beneath Langmuir monolayers of acidic ?-hairpin peptides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haofei; Yang, Yi; Pluntke, Manuela; Marti, Othmar; Majer, Zsuzsa; Sewald, Norbert; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-11-28

    Four amphiphilic peptides with designed hairpin structure were synthesized and their monolayers were employed as model systems to study biologically inspired calcium carbonate crystallization. Langmuir monolayers of hairpin peptides were investigated by surface pressure area isotherms, surface potential isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A ?-hairpin conformation was found for all peptides at the air-water interface although their packing arrangements seem to be different. Crystallization of calcium carbonate under these peptide monolayers was investigated at different surface pressures and growth times both by in situ optical microscopy, BAM and ex situ investigations such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An amorphous calcium carbonate precursor was found at the initial crystallization stage. The crystallization process occurred in three stages. It starts from the nucleation of amorphous particles being a kinetically controlled process. Crystal nuclei subsequently aggregate to large particles and vaterite crystals start to form inside the amorphous layer, with the monolayer fluidity exerting an important role. The third process includes the re-crystallization of vaterite to calcite, which is thermodynamically controlled by monolayer structural factors including the monolayer flexibility and packing arrangement of the polar headgroups. Thus, the kinetic factors, monolayer fluidity and flexibility as well as structure factors govern the crystal morphology and polymorph distribution simultaneously and synergistically. PMID:25292256

  7. Results of the TTF-TCNQ and the calcium carbonate crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1992-01-01

    Experiment A0139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and TTF-TCNQ. Although temperature data was lost, the experimental program had been working since the valves in all containers had been opened. All four experiments produced crystals of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals will be presented. Comparisons will be made with our previous space solution growth experiments. The TTF-TCNQ crystals are no longer of the highest interest, so this activity has been terminated in favor of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate crystallizations.

  8. Effect of Hydraulic Activity on Crystallization of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) for Eco-Friendly Paper

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Han, Gi-Chun; Lim, Mihee; You, Kwang-Suk; Ryu, Miyoung; Ahn, Ji-Whan; Fujita, Toyohisa; Kim, Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Wt% of aragonite, a CaCO3 polymorph, increased with higher hydraulic activity (°C) of limestone in precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from the lime-soda process (Ca(OH)2-NaOH-Na2CO3). Only calcite, the most stable polymorph, was crystallized at hydraulic activity under 10 °C, whereas aragonite also started to crystallize over 10 °C. The crystallization of PCC is more dependent on the hydraulic activity of limestone than CaO content, a factor commonly used to classify limestone ores according to quality. The results could be effectively applied to the determination of polymorphs in synthetic PCC for eco-friendly paper manufacture. PMID:20087470

  9. A novel growth process of calcium carbonate crystals in silk fibroin hydrogel system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; Feng, Qingling; Bourrat, Xavier

    2013-05-01

    We report an interesting finding of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystal growth in the silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel with different concentrations by a simple ion diffusion method. The experimental results indicate that the CaCO3 crystals obtained from silk fibroin gels with low and high concentrations are all calcites with unusual morphologies. Time-dependent growth study was carried out to investigate the crystallization process. It is believed that silk fibroin hydrogel plays an important role in the process of crystallization. The possible formation mechanism of CaCO3 crystals is proposed. This study provides a better explanation of the influence of silk fibroin concentration and its structure on CaCO3 crystals growth. PMID:23498277

  10. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. PMID:26117783

  11. Calcium Carbonate Storage in Amorphous Form and Its Template-Induced Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, T Y; Aizenberg, J

    2007-08-31

    Calcium carbonate crystallization in organisms often occurs through the transformation from the amorphous precursor. It is believed that the amorphous phase could be temporarily stabilized and stored, until its templated transition to the crystalline form is induced. Here we develop a bio-inspired crystallization strategy that is based on the above mechanism. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) spherulitic particles are formed and stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hydroxy-terminated alkanethiols on Au surface. The ACC is stored as a reservoir for ions and is induced to crystallize on command by introducing a secondary surface that is functionalized with carboxylic acid-terminated SAM. This secondary surface acts as a template for oriented and patterned nucleation. Various oriented crystalline arrays and micropatterned films are formed. We also show that the ACC phase can be doped with foreign ions (e.g. Mg) and organic molecules (e.g. dyes) and that these dopants later function as growth modifiers of calcite crystals and become incorporated into the crystals during the transformation process of ACC to calcite. We believe that our strategy opens the way of using a stabilized amorphous phase as a versatile reservoir system that can be converted in a highly controlled fashion to a crystalline form upon contacting the nucleating template.

  12. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    Calcium carbonate is an ingredient that is commonly found in antacids (for heartburn) and some dietary supplements. Calcium carbonate overdose occurs when someone accidentally or intentionally takes ...

  13. Effect of hydraulic activity on crystallization of precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) for eco-friendly paper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Han, Gi-Chun; Lim, Mihee; You, Kwang-Suk; Ryu, Miyoung; Ahn, Ji-Whan; Fujita, Toyohisa; Kim, Hwan

    2009-11-01

    Wt% of aragonite, a CaCO(3) polymorph, increased with higher hydraulic activity ( degrees C) of limestone in precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from the lime-soda process (Ca(OH)(2)-NaOH-Na(2)CO(3)). Only calcite, the most stable polymorph, was crystallized at hydraulic activity under 10 degrees C, whereas aragonite also started to crystallize over 10 degrees C. The crystallization of PCC is more dependent on the hydraulic activity of limestone than CaO content, a factor commonly used to classify limestone ores according to quality. The results could be effectively applied to the determination of polymorphs in synthetic PCC for eco-friendly paper manufacture. PMID:20087470

  14. Characterization of calcium carbonate/chitosan composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, K.E.; Zhang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The crystal growth of calcium carbonate on a chitosan substrate was achieved using a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, by using various additives, polyacrylic acid (PAA). Polyacrylic acid modified the chitosan-film surface and promoted the nucleation of calcium carbonate crystals.

  15. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC ? less metastable hydrated ACC?anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC?vaterite ? aragonite ? calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO? sequestration.

  16. Early stages of crystallization of calcium carbonate revealed in picoliter droplets.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Christopher J; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Evans, Stephen D; Meldrum, Fiona C; Christenson, Hugo K

    2011-04-13

    In this work, we studied the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of CaCO(3) within regular arrays of picoliter droplets created on patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The SAMs provide well-defined substrates that offer control over CaCO(3) nucleation, and we used these impurity-free droplet arrays to study crystal growth in spatially and chemically controlled, finite-reservoir environments. The results demonstrate a number of remarkable features of precipitation within these confined volumes. CaCO(3) crystallization proceeds significantly more slowly in the droplets than in the bulk, allowing the mechanism of crystallization, which progresses via amorphous calcium carbonate, to be easily observed. In addition, the precipitation reaction terminates at an earlier stage than in the bulk solution, revealing intermediate growth forms. Confinement can therefore be used as a straightforward method for studying the mechanisms of crystallization on a substrate without the requirement for specialized analytical techniques. The results are also of significance to biomineralization processes, where crystallization typically occurs in confinement and in association with organic matrices, and it is envisaged that the method is applicable to many crystallizing systems. PMID:21425847

  17. Crystallization and assembling behavior of calcium carbonate controlled by Ca-organic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anliang; Ma, Peiyan; Fu, Zhengyi; Wu, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals with different phases were obtained on the basis of one-dimensional Ca-deoxycholate fibers (Ca-DC fibers) under ambient conditions. Ca-DC fibers were prepared by the combination of Ca2+ ions and sodium deoxycholate (SDC) before the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Vaterite dominated mixtures could be easily obtained in the presence of Ca-DC fibers in the aqueous system at 10 °C. As the temperature was increased to 30 and 120 °C, pure vaterite and aragonite with novel morphologies were obtained, respectively. The framework formed by one-dimensional Ca-DC fibers was demonstrated to be the key role in mediating the crystallization and assembling behaviors of calcium carbonate. In this study, Ca-DC fibers, prepared as a novel insoluble organic polymorph controller, could even play an important role in the industrial production of CaCO3 with different polymorphs in future and other similar Ca-organic fibers are believed to have same functions as well.

  18. Peptide Induced Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate on Wrinkle Patterned Substrate: Implications for Chitin Formation in Molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta Ghatak, Anindita; Koch, Marcus; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2013-01-01

    We here present the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate under the influence of synthetic peptides on topographically patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates, which have a controlled density of defects between the wrinkles. Experiments with two lysine-rich peptides derived from the extracellular conserved domain E22 of the mollusc chitin synthase Ar-CS1, AKKKKKAS (AS8) and EEKKKKKES (ES9) on these substrates showed their influence on the calcium carbonate morphology. A transition from polycrystalline composites to single crystalline phases was achieved with the peptide AS8 by changing the pH of the buffer solution. We analyzed three different pH values as previous experiments showed that E22 interacts with aragonite biominerals more strongly at pH 7.75 than at pH 9.0. At any given pH, crystals appeared in characteristic morphologies only on wrinkled substrates, and did not occur on the flat, wrinkle-free PDMS substrate. These results suggest that these wrinkled substrates could be useful for controlling the morphologies of other mineral/peptide and mineral/protein composites. In nature, these templates are formed enzymatically by glycosyltransferases containing pH-sensitive epitopes, similar to the peptides investigated here. Our in vitro test systems may be useful to gain understanding of the formation of distinct 3D morphologies in mollusc shells in response to local pH shifts during the mineralization of organic templates. PMID:23736692

  19. Results of the TTF-TCNQ- and the calcium carbonate-crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1991-01-01

    Experiment AO139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit for five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and tetra thiafulvalene- tetra cyanoquino methane (TTF-TCNQ). The LDEF was in excellent condition after the long orbital stay, and although the temperature data was lost, the experiment program had been working since the valves in all containers were opened. All four experiments produced crystals; however, they were of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X-ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on the long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals are presented, and pictures of the calcium carbonate are shown. Comparisons are made with previous space solution growth experiments on the European Spacelab Mission and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

  20. Influence of Sticky Rice and Anionic Polyacrylamide on the Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate in Chinese Organic Sanhetu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Peng, Changsheng; Dai, Min; Gu, Qingbao; Song, Shaoxian

    2015-09-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in soil controlled by natural organic material was considered a very important reason to enhance the property of ancient Chinese organic Sanhetu (COS), but how the organic material affected the crystallization of CaCO3 in COS is still unclear. In this paper, a natural organic material (sticky rice, SR) and a synthetic organic material (anionic polyacrylamide, APAM) were selected as additives to investigate their effect on the crystallization of CaCO3. The experimental results showed that the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of additives and reaction time, while only the size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of reactant. Although the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals varied greatly with the variation of additive concentration, reactant concentration and reaction time, the polymorph of CaCO3 crystals were always calcite, according to SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR analyses. This study may help us to better understand the mechanism of the influence of organic materials on CaCO3 crystallization and properties of COS.

  1. Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate from a homogeneous precursor solution in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was demonstrated by the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions (pH 10). In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol %) was used as the precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. Thermogravimetric analysis of the obtained xerogels showed that increasing the UV irradiation time increased the amount of CaCO3 formed and the complete conversion of calcium ions to calcite was achieved after 50 min of UV irradiation. Furthermore, solid phase analyses suggested that nanometer-to-micron-sized calcite crystals were formed and dispersed in the obtained PVAPS matrix. Photoinduced crystallization of CaCO3 from homogenous solution was demonstrated. 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid was used as a photoreactive CO2 generator. Partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) worked as a stabilizer in the solution. Complete conversion of Ca2+ to CaCO3 was achieved by UV irradiation for 50 min. Nanometer-to-micron-sized calcites dispersed in the poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix.

  2. Calcium Carbonate Crystal Growth in Porous Media, in the presence of Water Miscible and Non-Miscible Organic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaho, Sofia; Sygouni, Varvara; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of sparingly soluble salts (scaling) within porous media is a major problem encountered in many industrial and environmental applications. In the oil industry scaling causes severe operational malfunctions and, therefore, increasing the total operating and maintenance cost [1]. The most common types of sparingly soluble salts located in oil fields include carbonate and sulfate salts of calcium, strondium and barium[1,2]. Multiple phase flow and tubing surface properties are some of the factors affecting scale formation [3]. The main purpose of the present work was the investigation of the precipitation mechanisms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) through in situ mixing of two soluble salt solutions in a flow granular medium, in the presence of water miscible organic fluid (ethylene glycol) or non-miscible organic fluid (n-dodecane). All series of experiments were carried out in a two dimensional porous medium made of Plexiglas. For all solutions used in the experiments, the contact angles with the surface of the porous medium and the interfacial tensions were measured. During the experiments, the calcium carbonate crystal growth was continuously monitored and recorded through an optical microscope equipped with a digital programmed video camera. The snap-shots were taken within specific time intervals and their detailed procession gave information concerning the crystal growth rate and kinetics. The pH of the effluent was measured and fluids samples were collected for calcium analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). In all experiments effluent calcium concentration decreased as a function of time, suggesting that CaCO3 precipitation took place inside the porous medium. Crystals of the precipitated salt were identified using Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and the morphology of the crystals was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The induction time for precipitation of CaCO3 crystals in the presence of n-dodecane was significantly reduced compared to the induction time where no oil phase was present. The interface of n-dodecane and supersaturated solutions seems to be very active and favored the formation of the CaCO3 crystalline enhancing the heterogeneous nucleation which generally demands a decreased energy barrier. Acknowledgments This research was partially funded by the European Union (European Social Fund-ESF) and Greek National Funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" under the action Aristeia II (Code No4420). References 1. Merdhah A. B. and Yassin A. A., Scale formation in oil reservoir during water injection at high-salinity formation water, Journal of Applied Sciences, 7, 3198-3207 (2007). 2. Moghadasi J., Muller-Steinhagen H., Jamialahmadi M. and Sharif A., Model study on the kinetics of oil field formation damage due to salt precipitation from injection, Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, 43, 201-217 (2004). 3. Nancollas G. H. and Reddy M. M., The crystallization of calcium carbonate II. Calcite growth mechanism, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 37, 824-830 (1971).

  3. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Castro, G. A.; Uad, I.; Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rivadeneyra, A.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Rivadeneyra, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  4. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Rivadeneyra, A; Gonzalez-Lopez, J; Rivadeneyra, M A

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  5. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids, which are medicines that provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone accidentally or ...

  6. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/pyrrolidon blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuzhen; Xie, Anjian; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua

    2014-03-01

    The morphogenesis and growth process of calcium carbonate on the cellulose acetate/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (CA/PVP) blend films in the presence of L-aspartic acid was carefully investigated. The results showed that the concentration of L-aspartic acid, the initial pH value of reaction solution and temperature turned out to be important factors for the control of morphologies and polymorphs of calcium carbonate. Complex morphologies of CaCO3 particles, such as cubes, rose-like spheres, twinborn-spheres, cone-like, bouquet-like, etc. could be obtained under the different experimental conditions. The dynamic process of formation of rose-like sphere crystals was analyzed by monitoring the continuous morphological and structural evolution and components of crystals in different crystal stages. This research may provide a promising method to prepare other inorganic materials with complex morphologies.

  7. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  8. SM50 repeat-polypeptides self-assemble into discrete matrix subunits and promote appositional calcium carbonate crystal growth during sea urchin tooth biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yelin; Satchell, Paul G; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    The two major proteins involved in vertebrate enamel formation and echinoderm sea urchin tooth biomineralization, amelogenin and SM50, are both characterized by elongated polyproline repeat domains in the center of the macromolecule. To determine the role of polyproline repeat polypeptides in basal deuterostome biomineralization, we have mapped the localization of SM50 as it relates to crystal growth, conducted self-assembly studies of SM50 repeat polypeptides, and examined their effect on calcium carbonate and apatite crystal growth. Electron micrographs of the growth zone of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin teeth documented a series of successive events from intravesicular mineral nucleation to mineral deposition at the interface between tooth surface and odontoblast syncytium. Using immunohistochemistry, SM50 was detected within the cytoplasm of cells associated with the developing tooth mineral, at the mineral secreting front, and adjacent to initial mineral deposits, but not in muscles and ligaments. Polypeptides derived from the SM50 polyproline alternating hexa- and hepta-peptide repeat region (SM50P6P7) formed highly discrete, donut-shaped self-assembly patterns. In calcium carbonate crystal growth studies, SM50P6P7 repeat peptides triggered the growth of expansive networks of fused calcium carbonate crystals while in apatite growth studies, SM50P6P7 peptides facilitated the growth of needle-shaped and parallel arranged crystals resembling those found in developing vertebrate enamel. In comparison, SM50P6P7 surpassed the PXX24 polypeptide repeat region derived from the vertebrate enamel protein amelogenin in its ability to promote crystal nucleation and appositional crystal growth. Together, these studies establish the SM50P6P7 polyproline repeat region as a potent regulator in the protein-guided appositional crystal growth that occurs during continuous tooth mineralization and eruption. In addition, our studies highlight the role of species-specific polyproline repeat motifs in the formation of discrete self-assembled matrices and the resulting control of mineral growth. PMID:26194158

  9. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride process”. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  14. Calcium carbonate crystallizations on hypogean mural paintings: a pilot study of monitoring and diagnostics in Roman catacombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapete, D.; Fratini, F.; Mazzei, B.; Camaiti, M.; Cantisani, E.; Riminesi, C.; Manganelli Del Fà, R.; Cuzman, O.; Tiano, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the deterioration processes affecting mural paintings and rock surfaces within manmade hypogea consists in the formation of calcium carbonate crystallizations, which can create thick coverage and incrustations, even in some cases speleothems. These chemical reactions necessarily require the availability of calcium sources, which can be also of anthropogenic origin (e.g., lime-based mortars). Microclimate parameters also represent environmental forcing factors, on which the morphology and the degree of crystallinity of the precipitated carbonates depend. Understanding past/recent dynamics of carbonate precipitation implies a deep knowledge of the relationships between the exposed surfaces and the microclimate conditions, the impacts of external factors (e.g., groundwater infiltration and percolation from the overlying soil) and how they change over time. This is particularly fundamental for the preservation of hypogean sites which have not comparison with other typologies of environment due to their uniqueness, such as the ancient catacombs carved underneath the suburbs of Rome (Italy), since the 2nd century AD. In this paper we present the multidisciplinary methodological approach designed for the instrumental monitoring of the microphysical environment of the Catacombs of Saints Mark, Marcellian and Damasus, in the framework of the co-operation between the Institute for the Conservation and Valorization of Cultural Heritage and Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archaeology, Vatican, on the project HYPOGEA. Temperature inside the catacomb and on the surfaces, air relative humidity and CO2 concentration are the main of the parameters continuously measured by means of data loggers installed within the cubicles. Contemporarily, standardized methods of photographic documentation and digital micro-photogrammetry are used for change detection analysis of the painted surfaces and ancient plasters, as well as of the test areas purposely realized by applying fresh lime mortars simulating the former surfaces. Parallel laboratory investigations (e.g., diamond anvil cell FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thin section observations under polarized light microscope, conventional microbiological investigations) are complementarily employed to characterize the calcite crystallizations, in terms of compositional, textural and mineralogical properties. Hence, it is expected to find a correlation between the microclimate conditions and the degree of crystallinity and morphology of the incrustations developed on the surfaces of the fresh samples. A specific study of the stratigraphic sequence of the calcite crystallizations already formed on the ancient surfaces is also included, to perform a back-analysis of the microclimate variations inside the cubicles through centuries of use and abandonment. In this regard, the precise knowledge of the conservation history of the monitored cubicles is adopted as a temporal guide to hypothesize the time frames, to which the observed strata are presumably to be referred. The main outcome of this pilot study is the establishment of a methodological approach suitable for the monitoring of crystallization phenomena inside catacombs, to be potentially exported to similar contexts. The findings of the research will also constitute the scientific base for the design of the most appropriate measures of environmental conditioning, also in the perspective to open the catacombs to visitors.

  15. DISSOLUTION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFITE PLATELETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO2 abs...

  16. On the role of block copolymer additives for calcium carbonate crystallization: small angle neutron scattering investigation by applying contrast variation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Schwahn, Dietmar; Cölfen, Helmut

    2004-05-15

    The role of the double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly(ethylen glycol)-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEG-b-PMAA) on the morphogenesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was studied by applying the contrast variation small angle neutron scattering technique. The morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals is strongly affected by the addition of PEG-b-PMAA. In order to determine the partial scattering functions of the polymer and CaCO3 mineral, we developed both an experimental and theoretical approach with a sophisticated method of their determination from the scattering intensity. Partial scattering functions give detailed information for each component. In particular, the partial scattering function of the polymer, Spp, shows a monotonic slope with Q(-2 to -3) where the scattering vector Q is low (Q < 0.01 Angstrom(-1)), which is a clear evidence that the polymer within the CaCO3 mineral has a mass fractal dimension. The other partial scattering functions reflected the geometry of the CaCO3 particles or the "interaction" of polymer and CaCO3 on a microscopic scale, which leads to a coherent view with Spp. PMID:15267881

  17. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  18. Control of calcium carbonate crystallization by using anionic polymethylsiloxanes as templates

    SciTech Connect

    Neira-Carrillo, Andronico; Vasquez-Quitral, Patricio; Paz Diaz, Maria; Soledad Fernandez, Maria; Luis Arias, Jose; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad

    2012-10-15

    Sulfonated (SO{sub 3}H-PMS) and carboxylated (CO{sub 2}H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes were synthesized and their effects as anionic template modifier on the CaCO{sub 3} crystal morphologies were evaluated. In vitro crystallization assays of CaCO{sub 3} were performed at room temperature by using gas diffusion method at different concentration, pH and time. SEM images of CaCO{sub 3} showed well-defined short calcite piles (ca. 5 {mu}m) and elongated calcite (ca. 20 {mu}m) when SO{sub 3}H-PMS was used. When CO{sub 2}H-PMS was used, the morphology of CaCO{sub 3} crystals was single-truncated at pH 7-9 and aggregated-modified calcite at pH 10-11. However, at pH 12 the least stable donut-shaped vaterite crystals were formed. EDS and XRD confirmed the presence of Si from anionic PMS templates on the CaCO{sub 3} surfaces and its polymorphism, respectively. Results showed that the selective morphologies of CaCO{sub 3} reflect the electrostatic interaction of anionic groups of functionalized PMS with Ca{sup 2+} adsorbed on CaCO{sub 3} crystals. Rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} was also produced by the inclusion of functionalized PMS into the lattice of CaCO{sub 3} matrix. We demonstrated that the anionic PMS offer a good modifier for polymer-controlled crystallization and a convenient approach for understanding the biomineralization field. - Graphical abstract: Optical photographs of rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} produced by the inclusion of sulfonated (SO{sub 3}H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes into the lattice of CaCO{sub 3} matrix. Insert represents the simulation of modified and fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} crystals using Software JCrystal, (2008). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared two anionic polymethylsiloxanes (PMS) as templates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their modifier capacity on the CaCO{sub 3} crystal morphologies was demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 12, the least stable donut-shaped vaterite, was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDS confirmed the presence of Si from anionic PMS templates on the CaCO{sub 3} surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} was produced by the inclusion of PMS into the CaCO{sub 3} matrix.

  19. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC ? dehydrated ACC ? biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  20. Far infrared (THz) absorption spectra for the quantitative differentiation of calcium carbonate crystal structures: Exemplified in mixtures and in paper coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawuah, Prince; Kiss, Márton Zsolt; Silfsten, Pertti; Tåg, Carl-Mikael; Gane, Patrick A. C.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopic techniques have been employed to detect different calcium carbonate crystal concentrations in powder mixtures. We have compared absorption spectral features of both pure and mixtures of natural ground calcium carbonate (GCC) and synthetic precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). It is evident that the absorbance data differentiate clearly and unequivocally between calcite and aragonite in the spectral range of 2-18 THz. Also, from the absorbance measurement of two sets of mixtures, we have revealed a linear relationship between the ratio of some selected absorbance peaks of the mixtures and concentration of a particular pigment within the mixture. This innovative technique could be a novel, practicable technique for quality control or for analyzing coating and/or filler pigments and extenders in the paper making and printing industries. Finally, we have proven in the case of paper that, surface roughness and print color play no role as far as the locations and magnitudes of the absorbance spectral features are concerned.

  1. CALCIUM CHANNELS INVOLVED IN CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pistia stratiotes L. produces calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals in specialized cells called crystal idioblasts. Druse crystal idioblasts are produced in the adaxial mesophyll and raphide idioblasts are produced in the abaxial aerenchyma of this aquatic plant. Leaves formed on plants grown on 0 Ca medi...

  2. Clonorcis sinensis eggs are associated with calcium carbonate gallbladder stones.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tie; Ma, Rui-hong; Luo, Zhen-liang; Yang, Liu-qing; Luo, Xiao-bing; Zheng, Pei-ming

    2014-10-01

    Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones were easily neglected because they were previously reported as a rare stone type in adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between calcium carbonate stones and Clonorchis sinensis infection. A total of 598 gallbladder stones were studied. The stone types were identified by FTIR spectroscopy. The C. sinensis eggs and DNA were detected by microscopic examination and real-time fluorescent PCR respectively. And then, some egg-positive stones were randomly selected for further SEM examination. Corresponding clinical characteristics of patients with different types of stones were also statistically analyzed. The detection rate of C. sinensis eggs in calcium carbonate stone, pigment stone, mixed stone and cholesterol stone types, as well as other stone types was 60%, 44%, 36%, 6% and 30%, respectively, which was highest in calcium carbonate stone yet lowest in cholesterol stone. A total of 182 stones were egg-positive, 67 (37%) of which were calcium carbonate stones. The C. sinensis eggs were found adherent to calcium carbonate crystals by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Patients with calcium carbonate stones were mainly male between the ages of 30 and 60, the CO2 combining power of patients with calcium carbonate stones were higher than those with cholesterol stones. Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones are not rare, the formation of which may be associated with C. sinensis infection. PMID:24945791

  3. Polymorphs calcium carbonate on temperature reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Kai-Yin; Chia, Chin-Hua; Zakaria, Sarani

    2014-09-03

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) has three different crystal polymorphs, which are calcite, aragonite and vaterite. In this study, effect of reaction temperature on polymorphs and crystallite structure of CaCO{sub 3} was investigated. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) were used to characterize the obtained CaCO{sub 3} particles. The obtained results showed that CaCO{sub 3} with different crystal and particle structures can be formed by controlling the temperature during the synthesis process.

  4. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  5. Calcium oxalate crystals in eucalypt ectomycorrhizae: morphochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Pylro, Victor Satler; de Freitas, André Luiz Moreira; Otoni, Wagner Campos; da Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Borges, Arnaldo Chaer; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems, benefitting plants principally by increasing the uptake of water and nutrients such as calcium from the soil. Previous work has demonstrated accumulation of crystallites in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas, but detailed morphological and chemical characterization of these crystals has not been performed. In this work, cross sections of acetic acid-treated and cleared ectomycorrhizal fragments were visualized by polarized light microscopy to evaluate the location of crystals within cortical root cells. Ectomycorrhizal sections were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) microprobe analysis. The predominant forms of crystals were crystal sand (granules) and concretions. Calcium, carbon and oxygen were detected by EDS as constituent elements and similar elemental profiles were observed between both crystal morphologies. All analyzed crystalline structures were characterized as calcium oxalate crystals. This is the first report of the stoichiometry and morphology of crystals occurring in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas in tropical soils. The data corroborates the role of ectomycorrhizae in the uptake and accumulation of calcium in the form of calcium oxalate crystals in hybrid eucalypt plants. PMID:23844062

  6. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M. Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33–41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed. PMID:26700479

  20. Influence of calcium ions on the crystallization of sodium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Demilie, Paul; Davoine, Perrine; Cartage, Thierry; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2005-02-01

    In industrial crystallization of sodium bicarbonate (sodium hydrogenocarbonate), the presence of calcium ions in solutions is unavoidable due to the production process. The understanding of the Ca 2+ role in NaHCO 3 crystallization would be helpful for improving the quality of the final products. The influence of calcium ions on NaHCO 3 crystallization was investigated in a 5-l mixed suspension mixed product removal crystallizer under controlled conditions. A density meter was used for continuous supersaturation monitoring. After a steady state had been reached, different CaCl 2 amounts were added at a constant flow rate. It was found that limited calcium ion levels in the system reduce drastically the nucleation frequency of NaHCO 3 and has a limited influence on crystal growth rate. The supersaturation measurements and other methods confirmed this phenomenon. The relationship between the Ca 2+ influence on NaHCO 3 crystallization, the calcium carbonate solubility and its metastable zone in concentrated NaHCO 3 solution was established. In fact, Ca 2+ has a maximum effect on NaHCO 3 crystallization kinetics when the saturation of calcium carbonate in NaHCO 3 solution has been reached, and the effect is constant in the metastable zone. The excess of Ca 2+ precipitates in NaHCO 3 solution as CaCO 3, as observed by energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction. This explained why an increasing Ca 2+ concentration in the solution has a limited influence on NaHCO 3 crystal size distribution and habit, but decreases the crystal purity. It is also confirmed that an impurity as Ca 2+ has no influence on the equilibrium NaHCO 3-Na 2CO 3.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 , CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 , CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 , CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 , CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 , CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared by three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  6. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  7. Biosynthesis of l-Ascorbic Acid and Conversion of Carbons 1 and 2 of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid Occurs within Individual Calcium Oxalate Crystal Idioblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Kostman, Todd A.; Tarlyn, Nathan M.; Loewus, Frank A.; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    2001-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various 14C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of 14C into calcium oxalate crystals. [14C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-14C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-14C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (l-[1-14C]galactose; d-[1-14C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, d-[1-14C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > l-galactose > d-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via d-mannose and l-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments. PMID:11161021

  8. Spinning up the polymorphs of calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Ramiz A.; Zhang, Fei; Tjandra, Edwin S.; Martin, Adam D.; Spagnoli, Dino; Raston, Colin L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the growth of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate is important in understanding the changing environmental conditions in the oceans. Aragonite is the main polymorph in the inner shells of marine organisms, and can be readily converted to calcite, which is the most stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Both of these polymorphs are significantly more stable than vaterite, which is the other naturally occurring polymorph of calcium carbonate, and this is reflected in its limited distribution in nature. We have investigated the effect of high shear forces on the phase behaviour of calcium carbonate using a vortex fluidic device (VFD), with experimental parameters varied to explore calcium carbonate mineralisation. Variation of tilt angle, rotation speed and temperature allow for control over the size, shape and phase of the resulting calcium carbonate. PMID:24448077

  9. Ultrasound influence upon calcium carbonate precipitation on bacterial cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin; Jipa, Iuliana; Dobre, Tanase; Dobre, Loredana

    2012-07-01

    The effect of ultrasonic irradiation (40 kHz) on the calcium carbonate deposition on bacterial cellulose membranes was investigated using calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) and sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3)) as starting reactants. The composite materials containing bacterial cellulose-calcium carbonate were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and color measurements. The polymorphs of calcium carbonate that were deposited on bacterial cellulose membranes in the presence or in the absence of ultrasonic irradiation were calcite and vaterite. The morphology of the obtained crystals was influenced by the concentration of starting solutions and by the presence of ultrasonic irradiation. In the presence of ultrasonic irradiation the obtained crystals were bigger and in a larger variety of shapes than in the absence of ultrasounds: from cubes of calcite to spherical and flower-like vaterite particles. Bacterial cellulose could be a good matrix for obtaining different types of calcium carbonate crystals. PMID:22227555

  10. Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2008-08-06

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

  11. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate....

  13. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  14. CALCIUM SULFITE CRYSTAL SIZING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a reliable experimental method that can be used routinely to determine the crystal size distribution function, a measure that is required for a mathematical representation of the nucleation and growth processes involved in the settling, dewatering, and dispos...

  15. Incorporation of Chromate into Calcium Carbonate Structure during Coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin; Thornton, Edward C.; Yang, J.; Amonette, James E.

    2006-09-08

    To assess treatment technologies and establish regulatory framework for chromate-contaminated site remediation, it is imperative to know the exact chromium speciation in soil matrices. In an earlier study, Thornton and Amonette (1999) reported that some chromate in the bulk particles was not accessible to gaseous reductants or solution-phase extractants, based on XANES studies. We hypothesized that part of this non-extractable chromate may reside in the structure of minerals such as calcium carbonate. To test this hypothesis, a number of calcium carbonate precipitates were prepared in the presence of various concentrations of chromate during the precipitation, which could coprecipitate chromate, or by adding chromate after the precipitation was completed. Hydrochloric acid was used to dissolve calcium carbonate and therefore extract the coprecipitated and surface attached chromate. The results showed that the coprecipitated chromate was non-extractable by hot alkaline solution or phosphate buffer, but could be solubilized by HCl in proportional to the amount of calcium carbonate dissolved. The X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that the coprecipitation of chromate with calcium carbonate had an influence on its crystal structure: the higher the chromate concentration, the greater the ratio of vaterite to calcite.

  16. Single-Crystal Calcium Hexaboride Nanowires: Synthesis and

    E-print Network

    and by reaction of calcium chloride (CaCl2) with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at 500 °C in an autoclave for 8 h.23Single-Crystal Calcium Hexaboride Nanowires: Synthesis and Characterization Terry T. Xu, Jian, Illinois 60612 Received August 17, 2004 ABSTRACT Catalyst-assisted growth of single-crystal calcium

  17. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  18. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (?) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ?, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ?. Calcium concentration and ? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (?) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (? mM/? min) = -0.0026 ? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  19. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this pote...

  20. [Features of calcium crystals and calcium components in 54 plant species in salinized habitats of Tianjin].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Jing; Ci, Hua-Cong; He, Xing-Dong; Xue, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Xue-Lai; Guo, Jian-Tan; Gao, Yu-Bao

    2012-05-01

    Plant calcium (Ca) is composed of dissociated Ca2+ and easily soluble, slightly soluble, and hard soluble combined Ca salts. The hard soluble Ca salts can often engender Ca crystals. To understand the Ca status in different growth form plants in salinized habitats, 54 plant species were sampled from the salinized habitats in Tianjin, with the Ca crystals examined by microscope and the Ca components determined by sequential fractionation procedure. More Ca crystals were found in 38 of the 54 plant species. In 37 of the 38 plant species, drusy and prismatic Ca oxalate crystals dominated, whereas the cystolith of Ca carbonate crystal only appeared in the leaves of Ficus carica of Moraceae. The statistics according to growth form suggested that deciduous arbors and shrubs had more Ca oxalate crystal, liana had lesser Ca oxalate crystal, and herbs and evergreen arbors had no Ca oxalate crystal. From arbor, shrub, liana to herb, the concentration of HCl-soluble Ca decreased gradually, while that of water soluble Ca was in adverse. The concentration of water soluble Ca in herbs was significantly higher than that in arbors and shrubs. This study showed that in salinized habitats, plant Ca crystals and Ca components differed with plant growth form, and the Ca oxalate in deciduous arbors and shrubs played an important role in withstanding salt stress. PMID:22919834

  1. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance. PMID:26505205

  2. Models for Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sourabh

    Many species e.g. sea urchin form amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phases that subsequently transform into crystalline CaCO3. It is certainly possible that the biogenic ACC might have more than 10 wt% Mg and ˜3 wt% of water. The structure of ACC and the mechanisms by which it transforms to crystalline phase are still poorly understood. In this dissertation our goal is to determine an atomic structure model that is consistent with diffraction and IR measurements of ACC. For this purpose a calcite supercell with 24 formula units, containing 120 atoms, was constructed. Various configurations with substitution of Ca by 6 Mg ions (6 wt.%) and insertion of 3-5 H 2O molecules (2.25-3.75 wt.%) in the interstitial positions of the supercell, were relaxed using a robust density function code VASP. The most noticeable effects were the tilts of CO3 groups and the distortion of Ca sub-lattice, especially in the hydrated case. The distributions of Ca-Ca nearest neighbor distance and CO3 tilts were extracted from various configurations. The same methods were also applied to aragonite. Sampling from the calculated distortion distributions, we built models for amorphous calcite/aragonite of size ˜ 1700 nm3 based on a multi-scale modeling scheme. We used these models to generate diffraction patterns and profiles with our diffraction code. We found that the induced distortions were not enough to generate a diffraction profile typical of an amorphous material. We then studied the diffraction profiles from several nano-crystallites as recent studies suggest that ACC might be a random array of nano-cryatallites. It was found that the generated diffraction profile from a nano-crystallite of size ˜ 2 nm3 is similar to that from the ACC.

  3. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from a calcium acetate and ammonium carbamate batch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prah, J.; Ma?ek, J.; Draži?, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for preparing precipitated calcium carbonate using solutions of ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate as the sources of calcium and carbon dioxide, respectively. Two different concentrations of the starting solutions at three different temperatures (15, 25 and 50 °C) were used for the reaction. The influence of temperature and concentration on the polymorphism and the resulting morphology of calcium carbonate are discussed. The most important parameter for controlling a particular crystal structure and precipitate morphology were the concentrations of the initial solutions. When initial solutions with lower concentrations were used, the crystal form of the precipitate changed with time. Regardless the different polymorphism at different temperatures, after one day only the calcite form was detected in all samples, regardless of at which temperature the samples were prepared. At higher concentrations, pure vaterite or a mixture of vaterite and calcite were present at the beginning of the experiment. After one day, pure vaterite was found in the samples that were prepared at 15 and 25 °C. If calcium carbonate precipitated at 50 °C, the XRD results showed a mixture of calcite and vaterite regardless of the time at which the sample was taken. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles prepared at various conditions changed from calcite cubes to spherical particles of vaterite and aragonite needles. When a low starting concentration was used, the morphology at the initial stage was strongly affected by the temperature at which the experiments were conducted. However, after one day only, cubes were present in all cases at low initial concentrations. In contrast, at high concentrations spherical particles precipitated at all three temperatures at the beginning of the reaction. Spherical particles were made up from smaller particles. Over time, the size of the particles was diminishing due to their disintegration into primary particles; after one day, particles of 30-50 nm were obtained. The lower the temperature was during the experiment, the faster the larger particles fell apart. To our knowledge, this behavior has thus far not yet been reported. Moreover, for the first time ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate are used together to prepare calcium carbonate.

  4. tice sites of calcium carbonate and affect Mars' soil geochemistry, and calcium carbonate can

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    tice sites of calcium carbonate and affect Mars' soil geochemistry, and calcium carbonate can cement small soil grains and change the phys- ical properties of the surface of Mars. References al., J. Geophys. Res. 113, 10.1029/ 2008JE003084 (2009). 14. J. H. Hoffman et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass

  5. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A.; Dziuk, J.J. Jr.

    1989-05-09

    This patent describes a method for the accelerated calcination of a calcium carbonate material. It comprises: heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a fused salt catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. CaCO{sub 3}-CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}, wherein M is an alkali metal selected from sodium or potassium and x is 0 to 1 and the salt is formed by fusing M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is sodium and about 1:1 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is potassium. This patent also describes a blend adapted to be heated to form CaO. It comprises: a calcium carbonate material and a catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-CaCO{sub 3}CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}.

  6. Formation of calcium pyrophosphate crystals in vitro: implications for calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout)

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, P. R.; Russell, R. G. G.

    1980-01-01

    Little is known about how calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CaPPD) crystals form in vivo and give rise to chondrocalcinosis or pseudogout (pyrophosphate arthropathy or calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease). In this study a simple method has been devised to define the conditions necessary for the deposition of crystals in vitro. Crystal formation is monitored by 45Ca in the presence of 1·5 mmol/l Ca and increasing concentrations of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) under simulated physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength. Concentrations of PPi required to initiate crystal formation were about 40 mmol/l in the absence and 175 mmol/l in the presence of 0·5 mmol/l Mg2+ at pH 7·4. Less PPi was required at higher pH values. The naturally occurring monoclinic and triclinic forms of CaPPD were produced after prolonged incubation in vitro, but the initial deposits were amorphous or orthorhombic. The physiological significance of these observations is discussed. Since much higher concentrations of PPi are required to form crystals in vitro than are found to occur naturally in synovial fluids from patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy, it is suggested that crystals are more likely to deposit initially within cartilage and that nucleating mechanisms may be important in vivo. Since other workers have observed a slow interconversion of other calcium pyrophosphate crystal forms into monoclinic and triclinic allomorphs under laboratory conditions, the reason why only these 2 forms occur under clinical conditions may reflect the long time available in vivo for the formation of crystals. PMID:6251756

  7. Natural promoters of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization.

    PubMed

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Chung, Jihae; Sosa, Ricardo D; Kwak, Jun Ha; Karande, Pankaj; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2014-09-10

    Crystallization is often facilitated by modifiers that interact with specific crystal surfaces and mediate the anisotropic rate of growth. Natural and synthetic modifiers tend to function as growth inhibitors that hinder solute attachment and impede the advancement of layers on crystal surfaces. There are fewer examples of modifiers that operate as growth promoters, whereby modifier-crystal interactions accelerate the kinetic rate of crystallization. Here, we examine two proteins, lysozyme and lactoferrin, which are observed in the organic matrix of three types of pathological stones: renal, prostatic, and pancreatic stones. This work focuses on the role of these proteins in the crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), the most prominent constituent of human kidney stones. Using a combination of experimental techniques, we show that these proteins, which are rich in l-arginine and l-lysine amino acids, promote COM growth. The synthesis and testing of peptides derived from contiguous segments of lysozyme's primary amino acid sequence revealed subdomains within the protein that operate either as an inhibitor or promoter of COM growth, with the latter exhibiting efficacies that nearly match that of the protein. We observed that cationic proteins promote COM growth over a wide range of modifier concentration, which differs from calcification promoters in the literature that exhibit dual roles as promoters and inhibitors at low and high concentration, respectively. This seems to suggest a unique mechanism of action for lysozyme and lactoferrin. Possible explanations for their effects on COM growth and crystal habit are proposed on the basis of classical colloidal theories and the physicochemical properties of peptide subdomains, including the number and spatial location of charged or hydrogen-bonding moieties. PMID:25119124

  8. Purifications of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, AMoRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, HyangKyu

    2015-08-01

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) collaboration is going to use calcium molybdate crystals to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo isotope. In order to make the crystal, we use calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders as raw materials. Therefore it is highly necessary to reduce potential sources for radioactive backgrounds such as U and Th in the powders. In this talk, we will present our studies for purification of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders.

  9. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, William A.; Dziuk, Jr., Jerome J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for calcination of a calcium carbonate material comprising heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a catalyst; said catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula MCO.sub.3.CaCO.sub.3.CaO.H.sub.2 O.sub.x, wherein M is an alkali metal and x is 0 to 1 and formed by fusing MCO.sub.3 and CaCO.sub.3 in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1, and a blend adapted to be heated to CaO comprising a calcium carbonate material and at least one such fused salt.

  10. CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL MORPHOLOGY MUTANTS FROM MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate in a variety of shapes and sizes. Each plant forms a crystal or set of crystals with a specific morphology. The mechanism(s) through which a plant defines the morphology of its crystals remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating c...

  11. Epitaxial Relationships between Calcium Carbonate and Inorganic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Taewook; Jho, Jae Young; Kim, Il Won

    2014-01-01

    The polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate has been studied in terms of epitaxial relationship between the inorganic substrates and the aragonite/calcite polymorphs with implication in bioinspired mineralization. EpiCalc software was employed to assess the previously published experimental results on two different groups of inorganic substrates: aragonitic carbonate crystals (SrCO3, PbCO3, and BaCO3) and a hexagonal crystal family (?-Al2O3, ?-SiO2, and LiNbO3). The maximum size of the overlayer (aragonite or calcite) was calculated for each substrate based on a threshold value of the dimensionless potential to estimate the relative nucleation preference of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The results were in good agreement with previous experimental observations, although stereochemical effects between the overlayer and substrate should be separately considered when existed. In assessing the polymorph-selective nucleation, the current method appeared to provide a better tool than the oversimplified mismatch parameters without invoking time-consuming molecular simulation\\. PMID:25226539

  12. The expanded amelogenin polyproline region preferentially binds to apatite versus carbonate and promotes apatite crystal elongation

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Gokul; Jin, Tianquan; Liu, Min; Li, Steve; Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Galang, Maria-Therese; Allen, Michael; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.

    2014-01-01

    The transition from invertebrate calcium carbonate-based calcite and aragonite exo- and endoskeletons to the calcium phosphate-based vertebrate backbones and jaws composed of microscopic hydroxyapatite crystals is one of the great revolutions in the evolution of terrestrial organisms. To identify potential factors that might have played a role in such a transition, three key domains of the vertebrate tooth enamel protein amelogenin were probed for calcium mineral/protein interactions and their ability to promote calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate crystal growth. Under calcium phosphate crystal growth conditions, only the carboxy-terminus augmented polyproline repeat peptide, but not the N-terminal peptide nor the polyproline repeat peptide alone, promoted the formation of thin and parallel crystallites resembling those of bone and initial enamel. In contrast, under calcium carbonate crystal growth conditions, all three amelogenin-derived polypeptides caused calcium carbonate to form fused crystalline conglomerates. When examined for long-term crystal growth, polyproline repeat peptides of increasing length promoted the growth of shorter calcium carbonate crystals with broader basis, contrary to the positive correlation between polyproline repeat element length and apatite mineralization published earlier. To determine whether the positive correlation between polyproline repeat element length and apatite crystal growth versus the inverse correlation between polyproline repeat length and calcium carbonate crystal growth were related to the binding affinity of the polyproline domain to either apatite or carbonate, a parallel series of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate/apatite protein binding studies was conducted. These studies demonstrated a remarkable binding affinity between the augmented amelogenin polyproline repeat region and calcium phosphates, and almost no binding to calcium carbonates. In contrast, the amelogenin N-terminus bound to both carbonate and apatite, but preferentially to calcium carbonate. Together, these studies highlight the specific binding affinity of the augmented amelogenin polyproline repeat region to calcium phosphates versus calcium carbonate, and its unique role in the growth of thin apatite crystals as they occur in vertebrate biominerals. Our data suggest that the rise of apatite-based biominerals in vertebrates might have been facilitated by a rapid evolution of specialized polyproline repeat proteins flanked by a charged domain, resulting in apatite crystals with reduced width, increased length, and tailored biomechanical properties. PMID:25426079

  13. Lysozyme mediated calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Hailing; Xia, Yongqing; Chen, Cuixia; Xu, Hai; Shan, Honghong; Lu, Jian R

    2009-04-01

    Lysozyme, a major component of egg white proteins, has been speculated to participate in the calcification of avian eggshells. However, its detailed role during the eggshell formation is not well understood. In this work, the influence of lysozyme on the precipitation of CaCO(3) has been investigated using a combined study of FTIR, XRD, and SEM. The precipitation was produced from (NH(4))(2)CO(3) vapor diffusion into CaCl(2) aqueous solution using a specially built chamber. In the absence of lysozyme, hexagonal platelets of vaterite and their spherical aggregates dominated the precipitates during the first 3-12 h crystallization period studied, with the (001) crystal face well expressed in the hexagonal direction. In contrast, calcite was favored to precipitate in the presence of lysozyme during the same period and the effect was found to be proportional to lysozyme concentration. Furthermore, the (110) face of calcite was expressed in addition to the common (104) face, and the morphological modification was also lysozyme concentration dependent. We attributed these phenomena to the selective adsorption of ammonium ions and lysozyme onto different crystal faces. Our findings have clearly revealed the concentration and face dependent role of lysozyme in CaCO(3) precipitation. This, together with the abundance of lysozyme in the uterine fluid, implies its direct contribution to the hierarchical structures of calcite during the initial stage of eggshell formation. PMID:19167007

  14. Modulation of polyepoxysuccinic acid on crystallization of calcium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqing; Tang, Yongming; Xu, Jinqiu; Zhang, Dongqin; Lu, Gang; Jing, Wenheng

    2015-11-01

    The influence of polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) on the phase composition and crystal morphology of calcium oxalate was investigated in this paper. It was found that the presence of PESA inhibited the growth of the monoclinic calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal and promoted the nucleation of the tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). In addition, with the increase in PESA concentration, the aggregation of COD crystals was reduced but the particle size was increased. Under the conditions of low calcium-to-oxalate ratio and high CaOx concentration, PESA could not effectively stabilize the formation of COD. Based on molecular dynamic simulations, the adsorption of PESA on CaOx crystal faces was confirmed.

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fluoride levels in children, and to reduce high lead levels. Calcium carbonate is used as an antacid for “heartburn.” ... other research suggests that taking calcium reduces blood lead levels by 11%. Endometrial cancer. Taking calcium supplements might reduce the risk of developing endometrial ...

  16. Dark matter search with calcium fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacci, C.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Dai, C. J.; Di Nicolantonio, W.; Ding, L. K.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Gerbier, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Kuang, H. H.; Incicchitti, A.; Mallet, J.; Mosca, L.; Prosperi, D.; Tao, C.; Chambon, B.; Chazal, V.; De Jésus, M.; Drain, D.; Messous, Y.; Pastor, C.; BPRS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    A first result on dark matter direct search with calcium fluoride scintillators is presented. The low and high energy spectra are discussed together with the measurements of the fluorine and calcium recoil scintillation efficiencies. Exclusion plots for axial vector coupled WIMPs are derived and compared with previous measurements with NaI and Ge detectors.

  17. Calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by in vitro cultured mantle cells from Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei; Li, Shiguo; Xiang, Liang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-08-01

    Formation of the molluscan shell is believed to be an extracellular event mediated by matrix proteins. We report calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by Pinctada fucata mantle cells. Crystals only appeared when mantle cells were present in the crystallization solution. These crystals were piled up in highly ordered units and showed the typical characteristics of biomineralization products. A thin organic framework was observed after dissolving the crystals in EDTA. Some crystals had etched surfaces with a much smoother appearance than other parts. Mantle cells were observed to be attached to some of these smooth surfaces. These results suggest that mantle cells may be directly involved in the nucleation and remodeling process of calcium carbonate mineralization. Our result demonstrate the practicability of studying the mantle cell mechanism of biomineralization and contribute to the overall understanding of the shell formation process. PMID:26079887

  18. Bridgman growth of large-aperture yttrium calcium oxyborate crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anhua; Jiang, Linwen; Qian, Guoxing; Zheng, Yanqing; Xu, Jun; Shi, Erwei

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? YCOB is a novel non-linear optical crystal possessing good thermal, mechanical and nonlinear optical properties. ? Large size crystal growth is key technology question for YCOB crystal. ? YCOB crystals 3 in. in diameter were grown with modified vertical Bridgman method. ? It is a more effective growth method to obtain large size and high quality YCOB crystal. -- Abstract: Large-aperture yttrium calcium oxyborate YCa{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (YCOB) crystals with 3 in. in diameter were grown with modified vertical Bridgman method, and the large crystal plate (63 mm × 68 mm × 20 mm) was harvested for high-average power frequency conversion system. The crack, facet growth and spiral growth can be effectively controlled in the as-grown crystal, and Bridgman method displays more effective in obtain large size and high quality YCOB crystal plate than Czochralski technique.

  19. Effect of calcium carbonate on hardening, physicochemical properties, and in vitro degradation of injectable calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Sariibrahimoglu, Kemal; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Wolke, Joop G C; Yubao, Li; Jansen, John A

    2012-03-01

    The main disadvantage of apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) is their slow degradation rate, which limits complete bone regeneration. Carbonate (CO?²?) is the common constituent of bone and it can be used to improve the degradability of the apatitic calcium phosphate ceramics. This study aimed to examine the effect of calcite (CaCO?) incorporation into CPCs. To this end, the CaCO? amount (0-4-8-12 wt %) and its particle size (12.0-?m-coarse or 2.5-?m-fine) were systematically investigated. In comparison to calcite-free CPC, the setting time of the bone substitute was delayed with increasing CaCO? incorporation. Reduction of the CaCO? particle size in the initial powder increased the injectability time of the paste. During hardening of the cements, the increase in calcium release was inversely proportional to the extent of CO?²? incorporation into apatites. The morphology of the carbonate-free product consisted of large needle-like crystals, whereas small plate-like crystals were observed for carbonated apatites. Compressive strength decreased with increasing CaCO? content. In vitro accelerated degradation tests demonstrated that calcium release and dissolution rate from the set cements increased with increasing the incorporation of CO?²?, whereas differences in CaCO? particle size did not affect the in vitro degradation rate under accelerated conditions. PMID:22213632

  20. Use of biopolymers as oriented supports for the stabilization of different polymorphs of biomineralized calcium carbonate with complex shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Dosque, Mario; Aranda, Pilar; Darder, Margarita; Retuert, Jaime; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad; Luis Arias, José; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    This work concerns the use of different biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate or ?-carrageenan as substrates to contribute to the study of the crystallization of calcium carbonate. The experimental biomimetic approach involves the preparation of mixtures of biopolymer solutions with a solution of CaCl 2, which is processed by means of spin-coating and then exposed to CO 2 by a slow diffusion method for the growth of CaCO 3. The obtained crystals show that each biopolymer has different effects on the crystallization habit. Different agglomerations of calcium carbonate crystals are initially the vaterite phase, which is subsequently stabilized as calcite. Biomineralization on each biopolymer gave rise to complex structures very different to those normally found in vitro, but similar to those observed in Nature. This confirms the strong influence of the macromolecules with ionizable groups on the stabilization of a determined polymorph and also on the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystals.

  1. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  2. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  4. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  5. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  7. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory....

  8. In vitro synthesis and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles within liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Chantel C.; Brock, Ryan E.; Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Krejci, Minna R.; Weigand, Steven; Joester, Derk

    2012-02-07

    We show that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) can be synthesized in phospholipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes). Liposome-encapsulated ACC nanoparticles are stable against aggregation, do not crystallize for at least 20 h, and are ideally suited to investigate the influence of lipid chemistry, particle size, and soluble additives on ACC in situ.

  9. Ethanol assisted synthesis of pure and stable amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Feng; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-10-25

    Stable monodispersed amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles can be synthesized in ethanol media by a facile method, and crystallization of ACC is kinetically controlled, resulting in the formation of three polymorphs in a mixed solvent of ethanol-water at different pH values. PMID:24022058

  10. Dopamine-induced mineralization of calcium carbonate vaterite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungjin; Park, Chan Beum

    2010-09-21

    Two biogenic materials from mussels are attracting attention from scientists: calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)), the most widely studied biomineral that composes the shell, or nacre, of mussels, and dopamine, a small catechol-containing biomimetic molecule of adhesive foot proteins secreted by mussels. We have incorporated these two materials into the biomimetic mineralization process to produce stable vaterite microspheres, which are the most unstable crystalline phase of CaCO(3). Spherical vaterite crystals were readily formed within two minutes in the presence of dopamine undergoing polymerization and were preserved for over two months in aqueous solution. The microspheres consisted of nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm and exhibited porous and spherulitic cross sections. The prolonged maintenance of spherical structure is attributed to the affinitive interaction between calcium in the vaterite microspheres and catechols from dopamine retarding the dissolution of vaterite and the growth of calcite crystals. The mussel-inspired inducement of a stable vaterite phase suggests a facile route for the synthesis of complex organic-inorganic hybrid materials utilizing biogenic systems. PMID:20795669

  11. Exploring calcium oxalate crystallization: a constant composition approach.

    PubMed

    Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M; Kleinman, Jack G; Wesson, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Crystal growth rates have been extensively studied in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization, because COM crystals are the principal component in most kidney stones. Constant composition methods are useful for studying growth rates, but fail to differentiate concurrent nucleation and aggregation events. A constant composition method coupled with particle size determinations that addresses this deficiency was previously published for a calcium phosphate system, and this method was extended to COM crystallization in this report. A seeded constant composition experiment was combined with particle size determination and a separate near-equilibrium aggregation experiment to separate effects of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation in COM crystal formation and to test the effects of various inhibitors relevant to stone formation. With no inhibitors present, apparent COM growth rates were heavily influenced by secondary nucleation at low seed crystal additions, but growth-related aggregation increased at higher seed crystal densities. Among small molecule inhibitors, citrate demonstrated growth rate inhibition but enhanced growth-related aggregation, while magnesium did not affect COM crystallization. Polyanions (polyaspartate, polyglutamate, or osteopontin) showed strong growth rate inhibition, but large differences in nucleation and aggregation were observed. Polycations (polyarginine) did not affect COM crystal growth or aggregation. Mixtures of polyanions and polycations produced a complicated set of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation behaviors. These experiments demonstrated the power of combining particle size determinations with constant composition experiments to fully characterize COM crystallization and to obtain detailed knowledge of inhibitor properties that will be critical to understanding kidney stone formation. PMID:26016572

  12. Ubiquitylation Functions in the Calcium Carbonate Biomineralization in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes. PMID:22558208

  13. Calcium carbonate control in highly supersaturated aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.; Yorke, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Calcium carbonate is by far the most common scale in a variety of industrial processes, e.g., cooling waters, mining, oil production, municipal, household appliances and plumbing, and natural processes. Inhibition of calcium carbonate becomes increasingly difficult with increasing calcium carbonate supersaturation. Scarcity of good quality water and tougher water discharge regulations are driving higher reuse of water, which leads to higher cycles in recirculating cooling tower water. In terms of the supersaturation, which is a ratio of the product of free scale forming ions to the equilibrium solubility product, the water treatment industry in the past was able to control calcium carbonate inhibition up to 100--120X calcite supersaturation. This paper reports chemical technology capable of controlling calcium carbonate precipitation under highly alkaline conditions (pH above 9.0) >300X calcite supersaturation. Results of both laboratory and pilot studies are discussed in the paper.

  14. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  15. RECOVERY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE AND SULFUR FROM FGD SCRUBBER WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of key process steps in the proprietary Kel-S process for recovering calcium carbonate and sulfur from lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste. The steps are: reduction of the waste to calcium sulfide (using coal as...

  16. Behaviour of calcium carbonate in sea water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloud, P.E., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    Anomalies in the behaviour of calcium carbonate in natural solutions diminish when considered in context. Best values found by traditional oceanographie methods for the apparent solubility product constant K'CaCO3 in sea water at atmospheric pressure are consistent mineralogically-at 36 parts per thousand salinity and T-25??C, K'aragonlte is estimated as 1.12 ?? 10-6 and K'calcite as 0.61 ?? 10-6. At 30??C the corresponding values are 0.98 ?? 10-6 for aragonite and 0.53 ?? 10-6 for calcite. Because the K' computations do not compensate for ionic activity, however, they cannot give thermodynamically satisfactory results. It is of interest, therefore, that approximate methods and information now available permit the estimation from the same basic data of an activity product constant KCaCO3 close to that found in solutions to which Debye-Hu??ckel theory applies. Such methods indicate approximate Karagonite 7.8 ?? 10-9 for surface sea water at 29??C; Kcalcite would be proportionately lower. Field data and experimental results indicate that the mineralogy of precipitated CaCO3 depends primarily on degree of supersaturation, thus also on kinetic or biologic factors that facilitate or inhibit a high degree of supersaturation. The shallow, generally hypersaline bank waters west of Andros Island yield aragonitic sediments with O18 O16 ratios that imply precipitation mainly during the warmer months, when the combination of a high rate of evaporation, increasing salinity (and ionic strength), maximal temperatures and photosynthetic removal of CO2 result in high apparent supersaturation. The usual precipitate from solutions of low ionic strength is calcite, except where the aragonite level of supersaturation is reached as a result of diffusion phenomena (e.g. dripstones), gradual and marked evaporation, or biologic intervention. Published data also suggest the possibility of distinct chemical milieus for crystallographic variations in skeletal calcium carbonate. It appears that in nature aragonite precipitates from solutions that are supersaturated with respect to both calcite and aragonite and calcite between saturation levels for the two species. Such a relation is consistent with Ostwald's rule of successive reactions. Aragonitc of marine origin persists in contact with supersaturated interstitial solutions at ordinary temperature and pressure. Conversion to calcite follows transfer to solutions undersaturated with respect to aragonite or upon exposure to the moist atmosphere. ?? 1962.

  17. Thermal breakdown of calcium carbonate and constraints on its use as a biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen P.; Parker, Julia E.; Tang, Chiu C.

    2014-02-01

    Observed differences in the thermal behaviour of calcium carbonates of biogenic and abiogenic origin (phase transformation and breakdown temperatures) are widely cited as potential biomarkers for whether life once existed on Mars. Although seemingly compelling, there has been no systematic investigation into the physical mechanism behind these apparent differences and therefore no direct proof that they are uniquely diagnostic of a biogenic versus abiogenic formation. In this paper we present a laboratory investigation into the thermal behaviour of two high purity calcium carbonates, one of which was produced in the presence of an amino acid as a biomimetic carbonate. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements show the aragonite-to-calcite phase transition and calcite-to-oxide breakdown temperatures are significantly lower in the biomimetic carbonate. The observed thermal differences closely match reported differences between biogenic and geological abiogenic carbonates. The biomimetic carbonate exhibits a modified crystal morphology, with a highly strained internal crystal lattice, similar to biogenic carbonate structures. Since biogenic carbonates are formed in the presence of organic macromolecules such as amino acids, the induced microstrain appears to be the defining common factor as it adds an additional energy term to the carbonate lattice energy, which lowers the activation energy required for structural transformation or decomposition. Although produced via biomimetic means, the carbonate investigated here is nevertheless abiogenic in origin and we propose that given suitable localised conditions such as pooled water and a supply of organic molecules, naturally occurring biomimetic carbonates could have similarly formed on the martian surface and could therefore exhibit the same thermal characteristics as biogenic carbonate. Thus as a limiting case - without other supporting observations - the thermal behaviour of martian calcium carbonate might only be a marker for a pre-biotic organic chemistry having once been present rather than living organisms.

  18. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value in iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.

  19. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore »iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  20. Amorphous calcium carbonate controls avian eggshell mineralization: A new paradigm for understanding rapid eggshell calcification.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Marie, Pauline; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T; Gautron, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Avian eggshell mineralization is the fastest biogenic calcification process known in nature. How this is achieved while producing a highly crystalline material composed of large calcite columnar single crystals remains largely unknown. Here we report that eggshell mineral originates from the accumulation of flat disk-shaped amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles on specific organic sites on the eggshell membrane, which are rich in proteins and sulfated proteoglycans. These structures known as mammillary cores promote the nucleation and stabilization of a amorphous calcium carbonate with calcitic short range order which predetermine the calcite composition of the mature eggshell. The amorphous nature of the precursor phase was confirmed by the diffuse scattering of X-rays and electrons. The nascent calcitic short-range order of this transient mineral phase was revealed by infrared spectroscopy and HRTEM. The ACC mineral deposited around the mammillary core sites progressively transforms directly into calcite crystals without the occurrence of any intermediate phase. Ionic speciation data suggest that the uterine fluid is equilibrated with amorphous calcium carbonate, throughout the duration of eggshell mineralization process, supporting that this mineral phase is constantly forming at the shell mineralization front. On the other hand, the transient amorphous calcium carbonate mineral deposits, as well as the calcite crystals into which they are converted, form by the ordered aggregation of nanoparticles that support the rapid mineralization of the eggshell. The results of this study alter our current understanding of avian eggshell calcification and provide new insights into the genesis and formation of calcium carbonate biominerals in vertebrates. PMID:25934395

  1. Calcium carbonate scaling kinetics determined from radiotracer experiments with calcium-47

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.W.; Smith, D.W.

    1998-02-01

    The deposition of calcium carbonate is one of the principal modes of fouling of the heat-transfer surface of a fresh-water-cooled heat exchanger. The deposition rate of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface has been measured using a calcium-47 radiotracer and compared to the measured rate of thermal fouling. The crystalline phase of calcium carbonate that precipitates depends on the degree of supersaturation at the heat-transfer surface, with aragonite precipitating at higher supersaturations and calcite precipitating at lower supersaturations. Whereas the mass deposition rates were constant with time, the thermal fouling rates decreased throughout the course of each experiment as a result of densification of the deposit. It is proposed that the densification was driven by the temperature gradient across the deposit together with the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate. The temperature dependence of the deposition rate yielded an activation energy of 79 {+-} 4 kJ/mol for the precipitation of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface.

  2. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library-based selection and sequence identification, can be designed to have recognition capability to a given crystal structure, specifically, in this case, of calcium carbonate. Calcite mineralization with the peptides produced vaterite when several of the peptides were used in the synthesis process, many having unique morphologies studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amount of vaterite crystal percentage in these biomineralized mixtures was calculated and it was found to be closely related to peptide concentration for the aragonite-binding peptides. In the aragonite mineralization experiments, a separate solid phase, namely, calcium nitrate hydrate, was produced for one of the peptides along with the other polymorphs of calcite carbonate (ie., aragonite, calcite and vaterite) in the solution in the form of a flat film. These biomineralization results are examined in the light of the effects of peptide sequences and their related solid-binding characteristics

  3. Plant calcium oxalate crystal formation, function, and its impact on human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate have been observed among members from most taxonomic groups of photosynthetic organisms ranging from the smallest algae to the largest trees. The biological roles for calcium oxalate crystal formation in plant growth and development include high capacity calcium regulatio...

  4. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Cellular Biomineralization in Mantle Cell Cultures of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liang; Kong, Wei; Su, Jingtan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    The growth of molluscan shell crystals is generally thought to be initiated from the extrapallial fluid by matrix proteins, however, the cellular mechanisms of shell formation pathway remain unknown. Here, we first report amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precipitation by cellular biomineralization in primary mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata. Through real-time PCR and western blot analyses, we demonstrate that mantle cells retain the ability to synthesize and secrete ACCBP, Pif80 and nacrein in vitro. In addition, the cells also maintained high levels of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase activity, enzymes responsible for shell formation. On the basis of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed intracellular crystals production by mantle cells in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystals to be ACC, and de novo biomineralization was confirmed by following the incorporation of Sr into calcium carbonate. Our results demonstrate the ability of mantle cells to perform fundamental biomineralization processes via amorphous calcium carbonate, and these cells may be directly involved in pearl oyster shell formation. PMID:25405357

  5. Synthesis of calcium antimonate nano-crystals by the 18th dynasty Egyptian glassmakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlil, S.; Biron, I.; Cotte, M.; Susini, J.; Menguy, N.

    2010-01-01

    During the 18th Egyptian dynasty (1570-1292 B.C.), opaque white, blue and turquoise glasses were opacified by calcium antimonate crystals dispersed in a vitreous matrix. The technological processes as well as the antimony sources used to manufacture these crystals remain unknown. Our results shed a new light on glassmaking history: contrary to what was thought, we demonstrate that Egyptian glassmakers did not use in situ crystallization but first synthesized calcium antimonate opacifiers, which do not exist in nature, and then added them to a glass. Furthermore, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the first time in the study of Egyptian opaque glasses, we show that these opacifiers were nano-crystals. Prior to this research, such a process for glassmaking has not been suggested for any kind of ancient opaque glass production. Studying various preparation methods for calcium antimonate, we propose that Egyptian craftsmen could have produced Ca2Sb2O7 by using mixtures of Sb2O3 or Sb2O5 with calcium carbonates (atomic ratio Sb/Ca=1) heat treated between 1000 and 1100°C. We developed an original strategy focused on the investigation of the crystals and the vitreous matrices using an appropriate suite of high-sensitivity and high-resolution micro- and nano-analytical techniques (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), TEM). Synchrotron-based micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (?-XANES) proved to be very well suited to the selective measure of the antimony oxidation state in the vitreous matrix. This work is the starting point for a complete reassessment not only of ancient Egyptian glass studies but more generally of high-temperature technologies used throughout antiquity.

  6. Nanoporous Structure and Medium-Range Order in Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Michel, F. Marc; Phillips, Brian L.; Keen, David A.; Dove, Martin T.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2010-12-03

    We adopt a reverse Monte Carlo refinement approach, using experimental X-ray total scattering data, to develop a structure model for synthetic, hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). The ACC is revealed to consist of a porous calcium-rich framework that supports interconnected channels containing water and carbonate molecules. The existence of a previously unrecognized nanometer-scale channel network suggests mechanisms of how additives can be accommodated within the structure and provide temporary stabilization, as well as influence the crystallization process. Moreover, while lacking long-range order, the calcium-rich framework in the ACC contains similar Ca packing density to that present in calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, yielding clues of how the amorphous material converts into the different crystalline forms. Our results provide a new starting point for advancing our understanding of biomineralization as well as the development of biomimetic approaches to next-generation materials synthesis.

  7. Calcium Acetate or Calcium Carbonate for Hyperphosphatemia of Hemodialysis Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Yang, Bo; Mao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Background High levels of serum phosphorus both at baseline and during follow-up are associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients, and administration of phosphate binders was independently associated with improved survival among hemodialysis population. Calcium-based phosphate binders are the most commonly used phosphate binders in developing countries for their relatively low costs. Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety between calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google scholar and Chinese databases (Wanfang, Weipu, National Knowledge Infrastructure of China) were searched for relevant studies published before March 2014. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks and review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that assessed the effects and adverse events of calcium acetate and calcium carbonate in adult patients with MHD was performed using Review Manager 5.0. Results A total of ten studies (625 participants) were included in this meta-analysis. There was insufficient data in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for meta-analysis. Compared with calcium carbonate group, the serum phosphorus was significantly lower in calcium acetate group after4 weeks’ administration (MD -0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.28 to -0.01) and after 8 weeks’ administration (MD -0.25 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.11). There was no difference in serum calcium levels or the incidence of hypercalcemia between two groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks. No statistical difference was found in parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels or serum calcium by phosphorus (Ca x P) product. There was significantly higher risk of intolerance with calcium acetate treatment (RR 3.46, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.26). Conclusions For hyperphosphatemia treatment, calcium acetate showed better efficacy and with a higher incidence of intolerance compared with calcium carbonate. There are insufficient data to establish the comparative superiority of the two calcium-based phosphate binders on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular end-points in hemodialysis patients. PMID:25799184

  8. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions in presence of ethylene glycol and dodecane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsi, Panagiota D.; Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros G.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in aqueous supersaturated solutions has been intensively studied over the past decades, because of its significance for a number of processes of industrial and environmental interest. In the oil and gas production industry the deposition of calcium carbonate affects adversely the productivity of the wells. Calcium carbonate scale deposits formation causes serious problems in water desalination, CO2 sequestration in subsoil wells, in geothermal systems and in heat exchangers because of the low thermal coefficient of the salt. Amelioration of the operational conditions is possible only when the mechanisms underlying nucleation and crystal growth of calcium carbonate in the aqueous fluids is clarified. Given the fact that in oil production processes water miscible and immiscible hydrocarbons are present the changes of the dielectric constant of the fluid phase has serious impact in the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation, which remains largely unknown. The problem becomes even more complicated if polymorphism exhibited by calcium carbonate is also taken into consideration. In the present work, the stability of aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to all calcium carbonate polymorphs and the subsequent kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation were measured. The measurements included aqueous solutions and solutions in the presence of water miscible (ethylene glycol, MEG) and water immiscible organics (n-dodecane). All measurements were done at conditions of sustained supersaturation using the glass/ Ag/AgCl combination electrode as a probe of the precipitation and pH as the master variable for the addition of titrant solutions with appropriate concentration needed to maintenance the solution supersaturation. Initially, the metastable zone width was determined from measurements of the effect of the solution supersaturation on the induction time preceding the onset of precipitation at free-drift conditions. The rates of crystal growth were measured as a function of the solution supersaturation using the highly accurate and reproducible methodology of constant supersaturation. The dependence of the rates of crystal growth on supersaturation suggested surface diffusion controlled mechanism. At constant supersaturation it was possible to extend the time period for the growth of the initially forming polymorph, in a way that sufficient amount is precipitated for characterization with X-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for the characterization of the morphology of the precipitated solid. In all cases and depending on the solution supersaturation vaterite formed first from solutions of high supersaturation while at low supersaturations calcite formed exclusively. The presence of dodecane reduced the stability of the supersaturated solutions with the crystals forming at the oil-water interface. The presence of ethylene glycol (concentrations between 10-80%) also affected the stability and the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation. The morphology of the formed crystals showed habit modifications: Spherical formations consisting of aggregated nanocrystals and calcite crystals with profound pits on the faces were the characteristic feature in the presence of dodecane. ACKNOWLEDGMENT This research was partially funded by the European Union (European Social Fund-ESF) and Greek National Funds through the Operational program Education and Lifelong Learning under the action Aristeia II( Code No 4420).

  9. Calcium Channels are Involved in Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Specialized Cells of Pistia stratiotes L.

    PubMed Central

    VOLK, GAYLE M.; GOSS, LENORA J.; FRANCESCHI, VINCENT R.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Pistia stratiotes produces large amounts of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals in specialized cells called crystal idioblasts. The potential involvement of Ca2+ channels in Ca oxalate crystal formation by crystal idioblasts was investigated. • Methods Anatomical, ultrastructural and physiological analyses were used on plants, fresh or fixed tissues, or protoplasts. Ca2+ uptake by protoplasts was measured with 45Ca2+, and the effect of Ca2+ channel blockers studied in intact plants. Labelled Ca2+ channel blockers and a channel protein antibody were used to determine if Ca2+ channels were associated with crystal idioblasts. • Key Results 45Ca2+ uptake was more than two orders of magnitude greater for crystal idioblast protoplasts than mesophyll protoplasts, and idioblast number increased when medium Ca was increased. Plants grown on media containing 1–50 µm of the Ca2+ channel blockers, isradipine, nifedipine or fluspirilene, showed almost complete inhibition of crystal formation. When fresh tissue sections were treated with the fluorescent dihydropyridine?type Ca2+ channel blocker, DM?Bodipy?DHP, crystal idioblasts were intensely labelled compared with surrounding mesophyll, and the label appeared to be associated with the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, which is shown to be abundant in idioblasts. An antibody to a mammalian Ca2+ channel ?1 subunit recognized a single band in a microsomal protein fraction but not soluble protein fraction on western blots, and it selectively and heavily labelled developing crystal idioblasts in tissue sections. • Conclusions The results demonstrate that Ca oxalate crystal idioblasts are enriched, relative to mesophyll cells, in dihydropyridine?type Ca2+ channels and that the activity of these channels is important to transport and accumulation of Ca2+ required for crystal formation. PMID:15087302

  10. Influence of maleic acid copolymers on calcium orthophosphates crystallization at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelin, Irina M.; Popescu, Irina; Suflet, Dana M.; Aflori, Magdalena; Bulacovschi, Victor

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the maleic acid copolymers role on calcium orthophosphates crystallization at low temperature. In this respect, two maleic acid copolymers with different structures [poly(sodium maleate-co-vinyl acetate) and poly(sodium maleate-co-methyl methacrylate)] were used. The syntheses of the calcium orthophosphates in the absence and in the presence of the copolymers were performed through the wet chemical method using calcium nitrate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and ammonium hydroxide as reactants. The syntheses were monitored in situ by potentiometric and conductometric measurements. To ensure the transformation of less thermodynamically stable calcium orthophosphates into more stable forms, the samples were aged 30 days in mother solutions, at room temperature. The presence of the copolymers in the final products was evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and laser light scattering measurements gave information about the composites morphology and the size of the formed structures. X-ray diffraction evidenced that, as a function of comonomer structure and of copolymer concentration, the products could contain hydroxyapatite with low crystallinity, calcium-deficient or carbonated hydroxyapatite. At high concentration of poly(sodium maleate-co-methyl methacrylate) the transformation of brushite into apatitic structures was inhibited.

  11. Biomineralization of calcium carbonates and their engineered applications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Navdeep K.; Reddy, M. Sudhakara; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2013-01-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process in which microbes produce inorganic materials as part of their basic metabolic activities. This technology has been widely explored and promising with potential in various technical applications. In the present review, the detailed mechanism of production of calcium carbonate biominerals by ureolytic bacteria has been discussed along with role of bacteria and the sectors where these biominerals are being used. The applications of bacterially produced carbonate biominerals for improving the durability of buildings, remediation of environment (water and soil), sequestration of atmospheric CO2 filler material in rubbers and plastics etc. are discussed. The study also sheds light on benefits of bacterial biominerals over traditional agents and also the issues that lie in the path of successful commercialization of the technology of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from lab to field scale. PMID:24194735

  12. Crystal growth and characterization of calcium metaborate scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Y.; Yanagida, T.; Kawaguchi, N.; Fukuda, K.; Totsuka, D.; Watanabe, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Chani, V.; Nikl, M.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2013-03-01

    Calcium metaborate CaB2O4 single crystals were grown by the Czochralski (CZ) method with the radio-frequency (RF) heating system. In these crystals, a plane cleavage was observed along the growth direction. The crystals had an 80% transparency, and no absorption bands were detected in the 190-900 nm wavelength range. The 241Am 5.5 MeV ?-ray-excited radioluminescence spectrum of CaB2O4 demonstrated a broad intrinsic luminescence peak at 300-400 nm, which originated from the lattice defects or an exciton-based emission. According to the pulse height spectrum, when irradiated by neutrons from a 252Cf source, the scintillation light yielded approximately 3200 photons per neutron (ph/n).

  13. Protein adsorption at calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Sheng, X.; Rimer, J.; Jung, T.; Ward, M.

    2008-03-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals are the dominant inorganic phase in most kidney stones, and kidney stones form as aggregates of COM crystals and organic material, principally proteins, but little is known about the molecular level events at COM surfaces that regulate COM aggregation. We have examined the influence of polyelectrolytes on the force of adhesion between chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and selected COM crystal faces in saturated solution. In general, we found that polyanions bind to COM surfaces and block adhesion of a carboxylate functionalized AFM tip, while polycations had no measureable effect on adhesion force under the same conditions. We did observe a unique absence of interaction between poly(glutamic acid) and the COM (100) face compared to other synthetic polyanions, and some native urinary protein structures also exhibited unique face selective interactions, suggesting that simple electrostatic models will not completely explain the data.

  14. [Gout and and calcium pyrophosphate crystal arthropathies: pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Coiffier, Guillaume; Albert, Jean-David

    2015-05-01

    Microcrystalline arthropathies are consecutive to microcrystals formation and deposition within the joint. The formation of monosodium urate crystals depends on many physico-chemical factors: the concentration of uric acid, the temperature and pH. Beyond 60 mg/L (360 µmol/L), uric acid crystallizes in tissues. Chronic hyperuricemia is a necessary condition for the occurrence of gouty arthropathy. The mechanisms of hyperuricemia and inflammatory access and their therapeutic implications are described. Chondrocalcinosis is a radiographic entity characterized by deposits of calcium pyrophosphate crystals (CPP) within the fibrocartilage or hyalin cartilage. CPP arthropathies symptomatology is polymorphic and likely resemble in primary osteoarthritis, pseudo-gout acute attacks, or chronic mono-, oligo- or polyarthritis. Its pathophysiology remains uncompletely understood, although there is growing knowledge on the place of some actors involved in the pathogenesis of chondrocalcinosis, described in the article. PMID:26165104

  15. Crystallization Kinetics of Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of a calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass with composition relevant for aerospace applications, like air-breathing engines, were evaluated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) in powder and bulk forms. Activation energy and frequency factor values for crystallization of the glass were evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the onset of crystallization and the phases that developed after heat treating bulk glass at temperatures ranging from 690 to 960 deg for various times. Samples annealed at temperatures below 900 deg remained amorphous, while specimens heat treated at and above 900 deg exhibited crystallinity originating at the surface. The crystalline phases were identified as wollastonite (CaSiO3) and aluminum diopside (Ca(Mg,Al) (Si,Al)2O6). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to examine the microstructure and chemical compositions of crystalline phases formed after heat treatment.

  16. Crystal structure of calcium dodecin (Rv0379), from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a unique calcium-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Arockiasamy, Arulandu; Aggarwal, Anup; Savva, Christos G.; Holzenburg, Andreas; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    In eukaryotes, calcium-binding proteins play a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes, and recent findings suggest similar roles for bacterial proteins at different stages in their life cycle. Here, we report the crystal structure of calcium dodecin, Rv0379, from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a dodecameric oligomeric assembly and a unique calcium-binding motif. Structure and sequence analysis were used to identify orthologs of Rv0379 with different ligand-binding specificity

  17. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  18. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  19. Influence of Substrate Mineralogy on Bacterial Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate: Implications for Stone Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed. PMID:22447589

  20. Influence of substrate mineralogy on bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate: implications for stone conservation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-06-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed. PMID:22447589

  1. INTRODUCTION Pedogenic (secondary) calcium carbonate is,

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    (Soil Survey Staff, 1996). The primary sources of cal- cium in such deposits are wind-carried particu). In the southwestern United States, for example, it has been shown that the at- mosphere is the primary source is typically only a minor calcium source (Gardner, 1972; Bachman and Machette, 1977; Machette, 1985

  2. Bacteria can promote calcium oxalate crystal growth and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Sutthimethakorn, Suchitra; Chiangjong, Wararat; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-03-01

    Our previous report showed that uropathogenic bacteria, e.g., Escherichia coli, are commonly found inside the nidus of calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones and may play pivotal roles in stone genesis. The present study aimed to prove this new hypothesis by direct examining CaOx lithogenic activities of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. CaOx was crystallized in the absence (blank control) or presence of 10(5) CFU/ml E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, or Streptococcus pneumoniae. Fragmented red blood cell membranes and intact red blood cells were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The crystal area and the number of aggregates were measured to initially screen for effects of bacteria on CaOx crystal growth and aggregation. The data revealed that all the bacteria tested dramatically increased the crystal area and number of crystal aggregates. Validation assays (spectrophotometric oxalate-depletion assay and an aggregation-sedimentation study) confirmed their promoting effects on both growth (20.17 ± 3.42, 17.55 ± 2.27, 16.37 ± 1.38, and 21.87 ± 0.85 % increase, respectively) and aggregation (57.45 ± 2.08, 51.06 ± 5.51, 55.32 ± 2.08, and 46.81 ± 3.61 % increase, respectively) of CaOx crystals. Also, these bacteria significantly enlarged CaOx aggregates, with the diameter greater than the luminal size of distal tubules, implying that tubular occlusion might occur. Moreover, these bacterial effects were dose-dependent and specific to intact viable bacteria, not intact dead or fragmented bacteria. In summary, intact viable E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. aureus, and S. pneumoniae had significant promoting effects on CaOx crystal growth and aggregation. This functional evidence supported the hypothesis that various types of bacteria can induce or aggravate metabolic stone disease, particularly the CaOx type. PMID:23334195

  3. Ablation mechanisms of calcium carbonate under visible and infrared laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee K.; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and its structural relatives, the phosphates and hydroxyapatites, are natural crystals which are similar to the minerals found in such hard tissues as teeth and bone. We have recently demonstrated that laser- induced material removal in calcium carbonate occurs with high efficiency when irradiating with a free-electron laser at the fundamental asymmetric stretch mode of the carbonate group near 7 micrometers ; related studies show that the same thing is true in the isoelectronic sodium nitrate, and we expect it to operate in the phosphates as well when irradiated near the resonant 9 micrometers band. The mechanism of material removal appears to be the ejection of CO followed by a calcination reaction which produces CaO. Among the features which make CaCO3 such an interesting model material is that it also has a characteristic, temperature-dependent thermoluminescence - thus making it possible, by the study of the light emitted by the crystal prior to and after ablation, to estimate the temperature reached by the crystal in the early stages of laser ablation. Wavelength-dependent photoluminescence, photoacoustic and plume-spectroscopic studies show that efficient evaporative 'hole drilling' occurs at the infrared wavelengths corresponding to carbonate or nitrate vibration modes. However, where electronic or vibrational defects are excited by visible or infrared lasers, respectively, the mechanisms of material removal are photomechanical fracture in the former case and exfoliation or subsurface explosive vaporization in the latter.

  4. Crystallization of calcium oxalates is controlled by molecular hydrophilicity and specific polyanion-crystal interactions.

    PubMed

    Grohe, Bernd; Taller, Adam; Vincent, Peter L; Tieu, Long D; Rogers, Kem A; Heiss, Alexander; Sørensen, Esben S; Mittler, Silvia; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2009-10-01

    To gain more insight into protein structure-function relationships that govern ectopic biomineralization processes in kidney stone formation, we have studied the ability of urinary proteins (Tamm-Horsfall protein, osteopontin (OPN), prothrombin fragment 1 (PTF1), bikunin, lysozyme, albumin, fetuin-A), and model compounds (a bikunin fragment, recombinant-, milk-, bone osteopontin, poly-L-aspartic acid (poly asp), poly-L-glutamic acid (poly glu)) in modulating precipitation reactions of kidney stone-related calcium oxalate mono- and dihydrates (COM, COD). Combining scanning confocal microscopy and fluorescence imaging, we determined the crystal faces of COM with which these polypeptides interact; using scanning electron microscopy, we characterized their effects on crystal habits and precipitated volumes. Our findings demonstrate that polypeptide adsorption to COM crystals is dictated first by the polypeptide's affinity for the crystal followed by its preference for a crystal face: basic and relatively hydrophobic macromolecules show no adsorption, while acidic and more hydrophilic polypeptides adsorb either nonspecifically to all faces of COM or preferentially to {100}/{121} edges and {100} faces. However, investigating calcium oxalates grown in the presence of these polypeptides showed that some acidic proteins that adsorb to crystals do not affect crystallization, even if present in excess of physiological concentrations. These proteins (albumin, bikunin, PTF1, recombinant OPN) have estimated total hydrophilicities from 200 to 850 kJ/mol and net negative charges from -9 to -35, perhaps representing a "window" in which proteins adsorb and coat urinary crystals (support of excretion) without affecting crystallization. Strongest effects on crystallization were observed for polypeptides that are either highly hydrophilic (>950 kJ/mol) and highly carboxylated (poly asp, poly glu), or else highly hydrophilic and highly phosphorylated (native OPN isoforms), suggesting that highly hydrophilic proteins strongly affect precipitation processes in the urinary tract. Therefore, the level of hydrophilicity and net charge is a critical factor in the ability of polypeptides to affect crystallization and to regulate biomineralization processes. PMID:19725562

  5. A critical analysis of calcium carbonate mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Ihli, Johannes; Kulak, Alex N.; Hetherington, Nicola B. J.; Tang, Chiu C.; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.; Griesshaber, Erika; Hyett, Geoffrey; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2014-07-01

    The term mesocrystal has been widely used to describe crystals that form by oriented assembly, and that exhibit nanoparticle substructures. Using calcite crystals co-precipitated with polymers as a suitable test case, this article looks critically at the concept of mesocrystals. Here we demonstrate that the data commonly used to assign mesocrystal structure may be frequently misinterpreted, and that these calcite/polymer crystals do not have nanoparticle substructures. Although morphologies suggest the presence of nanoparticles, these are only present on the crystal surface. High surface areas are only recorded for crystals freshly removed from solution and are again attributed to a thin shell of nanoparticles on a solid calcite core. Line broadening in powder X-ray diffraction spectra is due to lattice strain only, precluding the existence of a nanoparticle sub-structure. Finally, study of the formation mechanism provides no evidence for crystalline precursor particles. A re-evaluation of existing literature on some mesocrystals may therefore be required.

  6. Formation of hollow bone-like morphology of calcium carbonate on surfactant/polymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilaka, M. M. M. G. P. G.; Pitawala, H. M. T. G. A.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Karunaratne, D. G. G. P.; Upul Wijayantha, K. G.

    2014-04-01

    Novel hollow, bone-like structures of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) are fabricated, for the first time, starting from naturally occurring dolomite. The hollow, bone-like structures are prepared by precipitating calcium carbonate on self-assembled poly(acrylic acid)/cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (PAA/CTAC) template. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopic (FE-SEM) studies reveal that the bone-like structure is composed of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles in the center and calcite nanoparticles at the edges. Bone-like PCC particles are in particle length of 2-3 ?m and particle width of 1 ?m. The internal hollow structures of bone-like particles are observed from TEM images. As identified by FE-SEM images, the bone-like structure has been formed through the crystal growth of initially formed ACC nanoparticles. The ACC particles are stabilized in the center while the calcite crystals have been grown from the ACC toward the edges of the structure to form a bone-like morphology. We also propose a possible mechanism for the formation of hollow bone-like PCC in this study. The fabricated hollow, bone-like PCC has potential applications in the preparation of release systems such as drugs, cosmetics and pigments.

  7. Were kinetics of Archean calcium carbonate precipitation related to oxygen concentration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, D. Y.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Archean carbonates commonly contain decimetre- to metre-thick beds consisting entirely of fibrous calcite and neomorphosed fibrous aragonite that precipitated in situ on the sea floor. The fact that such thick accumulations of precipitated carbonate are rare in younger marine carbonates suggests an important change in the modes of calcium carbonate precipitation through time. Kinetics of carbonate precipitation depend on the concentration of inhibitors to precipitation that reduce crystallization rates and crystal nuclei formation, leading to kinetic maintenance of supersaturated solutions. Inhibitors also affect carbonate textures by limiting micrite precipitation and promoting growth of older carbonate crystals on the sea floor. Fe2+, a strong calcite-precipitation inhibitor, is thought to have been present at relatively high concentrations in Archean seawater because oxygen concentrations were low. The rise in oxygen concentration at 2.2-1.9 Ga led to the removal of Fe2+ from seawater and resulted in a shift from Archean facies, which commonly include precipitated beds, to Proterozoic facies, which contain more micritic sediment and only rare precipitated beds.

  8. ATP-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate nanospheres and their application in protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Feng; Wu, Jin

    2014-05-28

    Calcium carbonate is a common substance found in rocks worldwide, and is the main biomineral formed in shells of marine organisms and snails, pearls and eggshells. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is the least stable polymorph of calcium carbonate, which is so unstable under normal conditions that it is difficult to be prepared in vitro because it rapidly crystallizes to form one of the more stable polymorphs in aqueous solution. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of highly stable ACC nanospheres in vitro using adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt (ATP) as a stabilizer. The effect of ATP on the stability of ACC nanospheres is investigated. Our experiments show that ATP plays an unique role in the stabilization of ACC nanospheres in aqueous solution. Moreover, the as-prepared ACC nanospheres are highly stable in phosphate buffered saline for a relatively long period of time (12 days) even under relatively high concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions. The cytotoxicity tests show that the as-prepared highly stable ACC nanospheres have excellent biocompatibility. The highly stable ACC nanospheres have high protein adsorption capacity, implying that they are promising for applications in biomedical fields such as drug delivery and protein adsorption. PMID:24578276

  9. Biomineralization of calcium phosphate crystals on chitin nanofiber hydrogel for bone regeneration material.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Mari; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2016-01-20

    We previously reported a chitin nanofiber hydrogel from squid pen ?-chitin by a simple NaOH treatment. In the present study, a calcium phosphate/chitin nanofiber hydrogel was prepared for bone tissue engineering. Calcium phosphate was mineralized on the hydrogel by incubation in a solution of diammonium hydrogen phosphate solution followed by calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the formation of calcium phosphate crystals. The morphology of the calcium phosphate crystals changed depending on the calcification time. After mineralization, the mechanical properties of the hydrogel improved due to the reinforcement effect of calcium phosphate crystal. In an animal experiment, calcium phosphate/chitin nanofiber hydrogel accelerated mineralization in subcutaneous tissues. Morphological osteoblasts were observed. PMID:26572435

  10. Porphyrin Amphiphiles as Templates for the Nucleation of Calcium Carbonate

    E-print Network

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Porphyrin Amphiphiles as Templates for the Nucleation of Calcium Carbonate Joydeep Lahiri amphiphiles.4-6 Model studies with small amphiphilic molecules at compressed Langmuir interfaces, pioneered associated with protein templates remain unknown at the molecular level. We have synthesized amphiphilic

  11. Preparation, crystal structure and photoluminescence of garnet-type calcium tin titanium aluminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Hisanori; Kawano, Tetsuya

    2011-05-01

    Colorless and transparent single crystals of Ca 3Sn 2.2Ti 0.8Al 2O 12, which emit blue-white light under ultraviolet light, were prepared by heating a mixture of oxides and calcium carbonate with a calcium and aluminum-rich composition at 1500 °C. Single crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structure is the garnet-type with a cubic cell parameter ( a=12.5309(3) Å) and the space group, Ia 3¯ d ( R1=0.0277, wR2=0.0663, and S=1.367 for all data). The structural formula is presented as Ca 3[Sn 0.96Ti 0.04] octa[Al 0.67Ti 0.24Sn 0.09] tetraO 12. Polycrystalline solid solutions of Ca 3Sn 3- xTi xAl 2O 12 were prepared by solid state reaction in air at 1370 °C with nominal titanium contents from x=0.6 to 1.4. The refined unit cell parameter decreased with increasing x. A broad blue-white emission with a peak wavelength of 465 nm was observed for the solid solutions at room temperature.

  12. CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION IS NOT ESSENTIAL FOR GROWTH OF MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. A number of roles for crystal formation in plant growth and development have been assigned based on the prevalence of crystals, their spatial distribution, and the variety of crystal shapes. ...

  13. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  14. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  15. A critical analysis of calcium carbonate mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Ihli, Johannes; Kulak, Alex N.; Hetherington, Nicola B. J.; Tang, Chiu C.; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.; Griesshaber, Erika; Hyett, Geoffrey; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2014-01-01

    The term mesocrystal has been widely used to describe crystals that form by oriented assembly, and that exhibit nanoparticle substructures. Using calcite crystals co-precipitated with polymers as a suitable test case, this article looks critically at the concept of mesocrystals. Here we demonstrate that the data commonly used to assign mesocrystal structure may be frequently misinterpreted, and that these calcite/polymer crystals do not have nanoparticle substructures. Although morphologies suggest the presence of nanoparticles, these are only present on the crystal surface. High surface areas are only recorded for crystals freshly removed from solution and are again attributed to a thin shell of nanoparticles on a solid calcite core. Line broadening in powder X-ray diffraction spectra is due to lattice strain only, precluding the existence of a nanoparticle sub-structure. Finally, study of the formation mechanism provides no evidence for crystalline precursor particles. A re-evaluation of existing literature on some mesocrystals may therefore be required. PMID:25014563

  16. A critical analysis of calcium carbonate mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S; Ihli, Johannes; Kulak, Alex N; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Tang, Chiu C; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Griesshaber, Erika; Hyett, Geoffrey; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-01-01

    The term mesocrystal has been widely used to describe crystals that form by oriented assembly, and that exhibit nanoparticle substructures. Using calcite crystals co-precipitated with polymers as a suitable test case, this article looks critically at the concept of mesocrystals. Here we demonstrate that the data commonly used to assign mesocrystal structure may be frequently misinterpreted, and that these calcite/polymer crystals do not have nanoparticle substructures. Although morphologies suggest the presence of nanoparticles, these are only present on the crystal surface. High surface areas are only recorded for crystals freshly removed from solution and are again attributed to a thin shell of nanoparticles on a solid calcite core. Line broadening in powder X-ray diffraction spectra is due to lattice strain only, precluding the existence of a nanoparticle sub-structure. Finally, study of the formation mechanism provides no evidence for crystalline precursor particles. A re-evaluation of existing literature on some mesocrystals may therefore be required. PMID:25014563

  17. Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-05-27

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  18. Sulfate in foraminiferal calcium carbonate : investigating a potential proxy for sea water carbonate ion concentration

    E-print Network

    Berry, Jeffrey Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    The sulfur content of planktonic and benthic foraminifera was measured in specimens recovered from deep-sea sediment cores and individuals grown in culture. A new method for measuring sulfur in foraminiferal calcium carbonate ...

  19. Using MRI to detect and differentiate calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in air-bubble-free phantom.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Peng, Bo; Foxley, Sean; Palgen, Jeremy; Newstead, Gillian M

    2015-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOX) crystals and calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) crystals were commonly associated with breast benign and malignant lesions, respectively. In this research, CaOX (n?=?6) and CaHA (n?=?6) crystals in air-bubble-free agarose phantom were studied and characterized by using MRI at 9.4?T scanner. Calcium micro-crystals, with sizes that ranged from 200 to 500?µm, were made with either 99% pure CaOX or CaHA powder and embedded in agar to mimic the dimensions and calcium content of breast microcalcifications in vivo. MRI data were acquired with high spatial resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images and gradient echo images with five different echo times (TEs). The crystal areas were determined by setting the threshold relative to agarose signal. The ratio of crystal areas was calculated by the measurements from gradient echo images divided by T2W images. Then the ratios as a function of TE were fitted with the radical function. The results showed that the blooming artifacts due to magnetic susceptibility between agar and CaHA crystals were more than twice as large as the susceptibility in CaOX crystals (p?crystals compared to CaOX crystals. Our results suggest that MRI may provide useful information regarding breast microcalcifications by evaluating the apparent area of crystal ratios obtained between gradient echo and T2W images. PMID:26392170

  20. Effect of indigenous plant extracts on calcium oxalate crystallization having a role in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Fauzia; Waqar, Muhammad A

    2011-10-01

    Crystallization process has a major role in urolithiasis. In the present study, effect of two indigenous plants extracts namely Boerhavia diffusa and Bryophyllum pinnatum extract was determined on the crystallization of calcium oxalate crystals. Effect on the number, size and type of calcium oxalate crystals was observed. Results showed significant activity of both extracts against calcium oxalate crystallization at different concentrations (P < 0.05). Size of the crystals gradually reduced with the increasing concentration of both extracts. The number of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals which are injurious to epithelial cells gradually reduced and at the highest concentration of extracts (100 mg/ml) completely disappeared (P < 0.05). These results confirm that B. diffusa and B. pinnatum extracts have antiurolithic activity and have the ability to reduce crystal size as well as to promote the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals rather than monohydrate (COM) crystals. Control of crystal size and formation of COD rather than COM crystals, in combination with the diuretic action of extracts is an important way to control urolithiasis. PMID:21643743

  1. CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

  2. Birefringence simulation of annealed ingot of calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, H.; Miyazaki, N.; Mabuchi, T.; Nawata, T.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a method for simulating birefringence of an annealed ingot of calcium fluoride single crystal caused by the residual stress after annealing process. The method comprises the heat conduction analysis that provides the temperature distribution during the ingot annealing, the elastic thermal stress analysis using the assumption of the stress-free temperature that provides the residual stress after annealing, and the birefringence analysis of an annealed ingot induced by the residual stress. The finite element method was applied to the heat conduction analysis and the elastic thermal stress analysis. In these analyses, the temperature dependence of material properties and the crystal anisotropy were taken into account. In the birefringence analysis, the photoelastic effect gives the change of refractive indices, from which the optical path difference in the annealed ingot is calculated by the Jones calculus. The relation between the Jones calculus and the approximate method using the stress components averaged along the optical path is discussed theoretically. It is found that the result of the approximate method agrees very well with that of the Jones calculus in birefringence analysis. The distribution pattern of the optical path difference in the annealed ingot obtained from the present birefringence calculation methods agrees reasonably well with that of the experiment. The calculated values also agree reasonably well with those of the experiment, when a stress-free temperature is adequately selected.

  3. Calcium carbonate scale control, effect of material and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Macadam, J; Parsons, S A

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a reproducible method for reducing calcium carbonate scale formation on heated surfaces where scaling can cause serious problems. It is known that calcium carbonate precipitation is sensitive to impurity ions, such as iron and zinc, even at trace concentration levels. In this paper two sets of experiments are reported. The first experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of zinc, copper and iron dosing on CaCO3 nucleation and precipitation. Results from the experiments showed that the most effective inhibitor of CaCO3 precipitation was zinc and the effect was linked to dose levels and temperature. Copper and iron had little effect on precipitation in the dose range investigated. The second trial was undertaken to translate the precipitation data to scale formation. These tests were undertaken at 70 degrees C. 5 mg x L(-1) zinc dose reduced the scale formation by 35%. The effect of iron on calcium carbonate scaling rate was not significant. The physical nature of the material on which the scale is formed also influences the scaling. The scaling experiment was also used to investigate the effect of different surface material (stainless steel, copper and aluminium) on CaCO3 scale formation. Copper surface scaled the most. PMID:14982176

  4. Divalent Europium Doped and Un-doped Calcium Iodide Scintillators: Scintillator Characterization and Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  5. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-06-01

    The alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was initially discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. As in the case of the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles-so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.

  6. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacka-?yskawa, Donata; Ko?cielska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  7. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi, Mohammad Daoud; Zhao, Wei; Tan, Wen Feng

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO{sub 3}{sup 2?}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3?} and Ca{sup 2+} solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2} cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO{sub 4}{sup 3} inhibited the activity of CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} during bound with Ca{sup 2+}. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} and Ca{sup 2+} distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} shows that the CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm{sup ?1} are assigned to the vibrations of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?} in HAp. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the formation and infiltration events of calcium-phosphate surface precipitates, and are subsequently enclosed during HAp formation.

  8. Cogrinding significance for calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement. II. Effect on cement properties.

    PubMed

    Tadier, Solène; Bolay, Nadine Le; Fullana, Sophie Girod; Cazalbou, Sophie; Charvillat, Cédric; Labarrère, Michel; Boitel, Daniel; Rey, Christian; Combes, Christèle

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we aim to evaluate the contribution of the cogrinding process in controlling calcium carbonate-dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement properties. We set a method designed to evaluate phase separation, usually occurring during paste extrusion, which is quantitative, reliable, and discriminating and points out the determining role of cogrinding to limit filter-pressing. We show that solid-phase cogrinding leads to synergistic positive effects on cement injectability, mechanical properties, and radio-opacity. It allows maintaining a low (<0.4 kg) and constant load during the extrusion of paste, and the paste's composition remains constant and close to that of the initial paste. Analogous behavior was observed when adding a third component into the solid phase, especially SrCO(3) as a contrasting agent. Moreover, the cement's mechanical properties can be enhanced by lowering the L/S ratio because of the lower plastic limit. Finally, unloaded or Sr-loaded cements show uniform and increased optical density because of the enhanced homogeneity of dry component distribution. Interestingly, this study reveals that cogrinding improves and controls essential cement properties and involves processing parameters that could be easily scaled up. This constitutes a decisive advantage for the development of calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cements and, more generally, of injectable multicomponent bone cements that meet a surgeon's requirements. PMID:21953727

  9. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  10. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyuan; Bua, Peter; Capodice, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg calcium) versus a single serving of calcium carbonate powder (one packet of powder=1,000 mg calcium) was performed in healthy women aged between 25 and 45. All subjects were on a calcium-restricted diet 7 days prior to testing and fasted for 12 h before being evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after oral administration of the test agents. Blood measurements for total and ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone were performed and adverse events were monitored. Results Twenty-three women were evaluable with a mean age of 33.2±8.71. Results showed that administration of a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder resulted in greater absorption in total and ionized calcium versus a single serving of calcium citrate tablets at 4 h (4.25±0.21 vs. 4.16±0.16, p=0.001). There were minimal side effects and no reported serious adverse events. Conclusions This study shows that a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder is more bioavailable than a single serving of calcium citrate tablets. This may be beneficial for long-term compliance. PMID:24772062

  11. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  12. ADVANCES IN OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND FUNCTION IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation in plants appears to play a central role in a variety of important functions, including tissue calcium regulation, protection from herbivory, and metal detoxification. Evidence is mounting to support ascorbic acid as the primary precursor to oxalate biosynthesis. ...

  13. ISOLATED MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS WITH INCREASED CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL ACCUMULATION HAVE DECREASED ASCORBIC ACID LEVELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms controlling oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation in plants remains largely unknown. As an initial step toward gaining insight into these regulatory mechanisms we initiated a mutant screen to identify plants that over-accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Four new mut...

  14. Application of pulsed spark discharge for calcium carbonate precipitation in hard water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Kim, Hyoungsup; Starikovskiy, Andrey; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Young I

    2010-06-01

    The effect of underwater pulsed spark discharge on the precipitation of dissolved calcium ions was investigated in the present study. Water samples with different calcium hardness were prepared by continuous evaporation of tap water using a laboratory cooling tower. It was shown that the concentration of calcium ions dropped by 20-26% after 10-min plasma treatment, comparing with no drop for untreated cases. A laser particle counting method demonstrated that the total number of solid particles suspended in water increased by over 100% after the plasma treatment. The morphology and the crystal form of the particles were identified by both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Calcite with rhombohedron morphology was observed for plasma treated cases, comparing with the round structure observed for no-treatment cases. It was hypothesized that the main mechanisms for the plasma-assisted calcium carbonate precipitation might include electrolysis, local heating in the vicinity of plasma channel and a high electric field at the tip of plasma streamers, inducing structural changes in the electric double layer of hydrated ions. PMID:20494397

  15. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate under diffusion controlled mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet; James R. Henriksen; Luanjing Guo; Don T. Fox; Hai Huang; Lee Tu; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith; George Redden

    2014-07-01

    Multi-component mineral precipitation in porous, subsurface environments is challenging to simulate or engineer when in situ reactant mixing is controlled by diffusion. In contrast to well-mixed systems, the conditions that favor mineral precipitation in porous media are distributed along chemical gradients, which evolve spatially due to concurrent mineral precipitation and modification of solute transport in the media. The resulting physical and chemical characteristics of a mixing/precipitation zone are a consequence of coupling between transport and chemical processes, and the distinctive properties of individual chemical systems. We examined the spatial distribution of precipitates formed in “double diffusion” columns for two chemical systems, calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. Polyacrylamide hydrogel was used as a low permeability, high porosity medium to maximize diffusive mixing and minimize pressure- and density-driven flow between reactant solutions. In the calcium phosphate system, multiple, visually dense and narrow bands of precipitates were observed that were reminiscent of previously reported Liesegang patterns. In the calcium carbonate system, wider precipitation zones characterized by more sparse distributions of precipitates and a more open channel structure were observed. In both cases, formation of precipitates inhibited, but did not necessarily eliminate, continued transport and mixing of the reactants. A reactive transport model with fully implicit coupling between diffusion, chemical speciation and precipitation kinetics, but where explicit details of nucleation processes were neglected, was able to qualitatively simulate properties of the precipitation zones. The results help to illustrate how changes in the physical properties of a precipitation zone depend on coupling between diffusion-controlled reactant mixing and chemistry-specific details of precipitation kinetics.

  16. Single particle composition measurements of artificial Calcium Carbonate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorn, S. R.; Mentel, T. F.; Schwinger, T.; Croteau, P. L.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Trimborn, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust, with an estimated total source from natural and anthropogenic emissions of up to 2800 Tg/yr, is one of the two largest contributors to total aerosol mass, with only Sea salt having a similar source strength (up to 2600 Tg/yr). The composition of dust particles varies strongly depending on the production process and, most importantly, the source location. Therefore, the composition of single dust particles can be used both to trace source regions of air masses as well as to identify chemical aging processes. Here we present results of laboratory studies on generating artificial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles, a model compound for carbonaceous mineral dust particles. Particles were generated by atomizing an aqueous hydrogen carbonate solution. Water was removed using a silica diffusion dryer., then the particles were processed in an oven at temperatures up to 900°C, converting the hydrogen carbonate to its anhydrous form. The resulting aerosol was analyzed using an on-line single particle laser ablation aerosol particle time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LAAPTOF). The results confirm the conversion to calcium carbonate, and validate that the produced particles indeed can be used as a model compound for carbonaceous dust aerosols.

  17. Plants defective in calcium oxalate crystal formation have more bioavailable calcium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 Medicago mutant was identified which contains wild-type amounts o...

  18. Electrospinning of calcium carbonate fibers and their conversion to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jani; Santala, Eero; Heikkilä, Mikko; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-12-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) fibers were prepared by electrospinning followed by annealing. Solutions consisting of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (Ca(NO3)2·4H2O) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) dissolved in ethanol or 2-methoxyethanol were used for the fiber preparation. By varying the precursor concentrations in the electrospinning solutions CaCO3 fibers with average diameters from 140 to 290 nm were obtained. After calcination the fibers were identified as calcite by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The calcination process was studied in detail with high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The initially weak fiber-to-substrate adhesion was improved by adding a strengthening CaCO3 layer by spin or dip coating Ca(NO3)2/PVP precursor solution on the CaCO3 fibers followed by annealing of the gel formed inside the fiber layer. The CaCO3 fibers were converted to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) fibers by treatment in a dilute phosphate solution. The resulting hydroxyapatite had a plate-like crystal structure with resemblance to bone mineral. The calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite fibers are interesting materials for bone scaffolds and bioactive coatings. PMID:25491852

  19. New agent to treat elevated phosphate levels: magnesium carbonate/calcium carbonate tablets.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Caitlin; Cameron, Karen; Battistella, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    In summary, Binaphos CM, a magnesium carbonate/calcium carbonate combination phosphate binder, is marketed for treating elevated phosphate levels in dialysis patients. Although studies using magnesium/calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder are short term with small numbers of patients, this phosphate binder has shown some promising results and may provide clinicians with an alternative for phosphate binding. Using a combination phosphate binder may reduce pill burden and encourage patient compliance. In addition to calcium and phosphate, it is imperative to diligently monitor magnesium levels in patients started on this medication, as magnesium levels may increase with longer duration of use. Additional randomized controlled trials are necessary to evaluate long-term efficacy and safety of this combination phosphate binder. PMID:23413537

  20. Multi-Functions of Carbonated Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite (CDHA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huan

    Natural bone is a complex composite mainly constituted of inorganic minerals and organic collagen molecules. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based materials have been proposed as the predominant bone substitute for bone tissue engineering applications due to their chemical similarity to bone mineral. Amorphous carbonated calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) is an important compound among CaP materials because of the amorphous crystallite structure. The presence of extra ions in its lattice structure not only influences cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts, but also helps in bone metabolism. Biomimetic coating approach is the most widely used approach to produce CDHA coatings to implant. It is a process using simulated body fluid (SBF) to deposit bone-like CDHA coating to various material surfaces. The CDHA formation mechanism, SBF compositions and reacting conditions of biomimetic coating have already been sufficiently studied and compared in the past 20 years. It is an attempt in this thesis to explore new applications of SBF in biomedical research, focusing on different biomaterial applications: 1) based on the low temperature reaction condition of SBF, bisphosphonate incorporated CDHA coatings were deposited onto Ti6Al4V surface for the treatment of osteoporosis; 2) amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres with extra elements in the lattice structure were prepared by a novel microwave assisted approach, providing a new potential of CaP materials production; 3) CDHA particles formed in SBF can be used as great fillers with biopolymers for preparing biocomposites for biomedical applications; 4) based on the high activity of CDHA amorphous structure and the stabilization ability of ethanol, yttrium and europium doped calcium phosphates were prepared using CDHA as a sacrificing template. In the end, future work based on these observations in the thesis is addressed, including areas of drug delivery, biocomposite fabrication and preparation of functionalized calcium phosphate materials.

  1. From "loose" to "dense" crystalline phases of calcium carbonate through "repulsive" interactions: an experimental charge-density study.

    PubMed

    Nelyubina, Yulia V; Lyssenko, Konstantin A

    2012-10-01

    Anion-anion interactions in an eggshell: experimental electron density analysis for two polymorphs of calcium carbonate revealed why the less stable form, aragonite, has higher density than the most stable form, calcite. Although believed to be exclusively repulsive, the interactions between anions cause them to bind more tightly in a crystal and thus make the aragonite phase denser than its calcite counterpart. PMID:22915456

  2. Characterization of bacteria isolated from palaeoproterozoic metasediments for sequestration of carbon dioxide and formation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shaili; Bharti, Randhir K; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial community of palaeoproterozoic metasediments was enriched in the chemostat in the presence of different concentrations of NaHCO3. Six bacterial isolates were isolated from the chemostat on nutrient agar plates on the basis of distinct morphology. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) proved the presence of six operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 50 and 100 mM NaHCO3. The OTU was reduced to three and one at enrichment concentration of 150 and 200 mM NaHCO3 respectively. These six isolates were tested for sequestration of carbon dioxide by (14)C metabolic labeling of NaH(14)CO3. Among the six isolates, one of the bacterium showed better potency to fix radiolabeled NaH(14)CO3. The isolate (ISTD04) was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) sequence analysis and was found to be same as the DGGE OTU sequence at 200-mM NaHCO3 concentration. The bacterium was tested for product formation in form of calcite crystals in presence of 5 % CO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of product formed by the bacterium revealed defined faceted rhombohedral structure which resembled calcite and vaterite phases of the crystal. Formation of calcium carbonate crystals was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as carbonate group showing strong vibration at 1,456 cm(-1). Major calcite phase diffraction peaks were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed the presence of CaO (72 %) and carbon (18 %). Bacterium use bicarbonate as carbon source for their growth as well as by-product formation in form of calcite shows carbon circulation and storage. PMID:25163561

  3. Effects of nano calcium carbonate and nano calcium citrate on toxicity in ICR mice and on bone mineral density in an ovariectomized mice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sherry; Chen, Jin Ching; Hsu, Chin Wei; Chang, Walter H.

    2009-09-01

    Taking calcium supplements can reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis, but they are not readily absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Nanotechnology is expected to resolve this problem. In the present study, we examined whether the bioavailability of calcium carbonate and calcium citrate can be improved by reducing the particle size. The morphology of nano calcium carbonate and nano calcium citrate was characterized by dynamic laser-light scattering (DLS), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The measurements obtained from DLS, FE-SEM and TEM were comparable. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity tests were performed to establish the safety of these products after oral administration. The no-observed-adverse-effect levels of nano calcium carbonate and nano calcium citrate were 1.3 and 2.3 g kg-1 body weight, respectively. The results of our in vivo studies indicate that administering nano calcium carbonate and nano calcium citrate can enhance the serum calcium concentration and maintain the whole-body bone mineral density in ovariectomized mice. These data suggest that nano calcium carbonate and nano calcium citrate are more bioavailable than micro calcium carbonate and micro calcium citrate, respectively.

  4. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    Pore fluid calcium isotope, calcium concentration and strontium concentration data are used to measure the rates of diagenetic dissolution and precipitation of calcite in deep-sea sediments containing abundant clay and organic material. This type of study of deep-sea sediment diagenesis provides unique information about the ultra-slow chemical reactions that occur in natural marine sediments that affect global geochemical cycles and the preservation of paleo-environmental information in carbonate fossils. For this study, calcium isotope ratios (? 44/40Ca) of pore fluid calcium from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 984 (North Atlantic) and 1082 (off the coast of West Africa) were measured to augment available pore fluid measurements of calcium and strontium concentration. Both study sites have high sedimentation rates and support quantitative sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation. The pattern of change of ? 44/40Ca of pore fluid calcium versus depth at Sites 984 and 1082 differs markedly from that of previously studied deep-sea Sites like 590B and 807, which are composed of nearly pure carbonate sediment. In the 984 and 1082 pore fluids, ? 44/40Ca remains elevated near seawater values deep in the sediments, rather than shifting rapidly toward the ? 44/40Ca of carbonate solids. This observation indicates that the rate of calcite dissolution is far lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites. The data are fit using a numerical model, as well as more approximate analytical models, to estimate the rates of carbonate dissolution and precipitation and the relationship of these rates to the abundance of clay and organic material. Our models give mutually consistent results and indicate that calcite dissolution rates at Sites 984 and 1082 are roughly two orders of magnitude lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites, and the rate correlates with the abundance of clay. Our calculated rates are conservative for these sites (the actual rates could be significantly slower) because other processes that impact the calcium isotope composition of sedimentary pore fluid have not been included. The results provide direct geochemical evidence for the anecdotal observation that the best-preserved carbonate fossils are often found in clay or organic-rich sedimentary horizons. The results also suggest that the presence of clay minerals has a strong passivating effect on the surfaces of biogenic carbonate minerals, slowing dissolution dramatically even in relation to the already-slow rates typical of carbonate-rich sediments.

  5. Leaf calcium oxalate crystal structure and its role in defense against a chewing insect in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate are common in plants and widely distributed among many plant families. These hard and largely insoluble crystals take on many shapes and sizes depending on the tissue and species. In Medicago truncatula, calcium oxalate crystals are abundant in leaves and accumulate in sh...

  6. Spectral features of biogenic calcium carbonates and implications for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, B. L.; Ronholm, J.; Applin, D. M.; Mann, P.; Izawa, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Whyte, L. G.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to discriminate biogenic from abiogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3) would be useful in the search for extant or extinct life, since CaCO3 can be produced by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. Bioprecipitated CaCO3 material was produced during the growth of heterotrophic microbial isolates on medium enriched with calcium acetate or calcium citrate. These biologically produced CaCO3, along with natural and synthetic non-biologically produced CaCO3 samples, were analysed by reflectance spectroscopy (0.35-2.5 ?m), Raman spectroscopy (532 and 785 nm), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (365 and 405 nm excitation). Optimal instruments for the discrimination of biogenic from abiogenic CaCO3 were determined to be reflectance spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Multiple absorption features in the visible light region occurred in reflectance spectra for most biogenic CaCO3 samples, which are likely due to organic pigments. Multiple fluorescence peaks occurred in emission spectra (405 nm excitation) of biogenic CaCO3 samples, which also are best attributed to the presence of organic compounds; however, further analyses must be performed in order to better determine the cause of these features to establish criteria for confirming the origin of a given CaCO3 sample. Raman spectroscopy was not useful for discrimination since any potential Raman peaks in spectra of biogenic carbonates collected by both the 532 and 785 nm lasers were overwhelmed by fluorescence. However, this also suggests that biogenic carbonates may be identified by the presence of this organic-associated fluorescence. No reliable spectroscopic differences in terms of parameters such as positions or widths of carbonate-associated absorption bands were found between the biogenic and abiogenic carbonate samples. These results indicate that the presence or absence of organic matter intimately associated with carbonate minerals is the only potentially useful spectral discriminator for the techniques that were examined, and that multiple spectroscopic techniques are capable of detecting the presence of associated organic materials. However, the presence or absence of intimately associated organic matter is not, in itself, an indicator of biogenicity.

  7. CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS IN LEAVES OF GLYCINE SPECIES AND RELATED TAXA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals occur in about three-fourths of all the flowering plants. The location and structure of the crystals have been used in some systematic studies. The Genus Glycine includes the cultivated soybean, the wild annual soybean, and about 22 wild perennial species. Our obje...

  8. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2003-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  9. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-12-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  10. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-07-09

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  11. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2001-12-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  12. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-04-26

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  13. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2003-07-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  14. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-04-05

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  15. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J.Fabry

    2004-01-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  16. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2001-09-10

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  17. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2003-04-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  18. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2001-07-01

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  19. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  20. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2005-04-29

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  1. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  2. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2005-01-24

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids ? single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate ? to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  3. Calcium Carbonate Produced by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2007-06-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO2 through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids - single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate - to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  4. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-06-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  5. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Alge in Long Term Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  6. Uptake of chloride and carbonate ions by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2012-08-15

    Decommissioning of old nuclear reactors may produce waste streams containing chlorides and carbonates, including radioactive {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Their insolubilization by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate was investigated. Carbonates were readily depleted from the solution, giving at thermodynamic equilibrium monocarboaluminate, monocarboaluminate + calcite, or calcite only, depending on the initial ratio between the anion and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate. Chloride ions reacted more slowly and were precipitated as Kuzel's salt, Kuzel's and Friedel's salts, or Friedel's salt only. Rietveld refinement of X-Ray powder diffraction patterns was successfully used to quantify the phase distributions, which were compared to thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, analysing the lattice parameters of Kuzel's salt as a function of its chloride content showed the occurrence of a restricted solid solution towards the sulfate side with general formula 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}xCaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}(1 - x)CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}(12 - 2x){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (0.36 {<=} x {<=} 0.50).

  7. Effect of calcium carbonate saturation of seawater on coral calcification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gattuso, J.-P.; Frankignoulle, M.; Bourge, I.; Romaine, S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    The carbonate chemistry of seawater is usually not considered to be an important factor influencing calcium-carbonate-precipitation by corals because surface seawater is supersaturated with respect to aragonite. Recent reports, however, suggest that it could play a major role in the evolution and biogeography of recent corals. We investigated the calcification rates of five colonies of the zooxanthellate coral Stylophora pistillata in synthetic seawater using the alkalinity anomaly technique. Changes in aragonite saturation from 98% to 585% were obtained by manipulating the calcium concentration. The results show a nonlinear increase in calcification rate as a function of aragonite saturation level. Calcification increases nearly 3-fold when aragonite saturation increases from 98% to 390%, i.e., close to the typical present saturation state of tropical seawater. There is no further increase of calcification at saturation values above this threshold. Preliminary data suggest that another coral species, Acropora sp., displays a similar behaviour. These experimental results suggest: (l) that the rate of calcification does not change significantly within the range of saturation levels corresponding to the last glacial-interglacial cycle, and (2) that it may decrease significantly in the future as a result of the decrease in the saturation level due to anthropogenic release of CO2 into the atmosphere. Experimental studies that control environmental conditions and seawater composition provide unique opportunities to unravel the response of corals to global environmental changes.

  8. Isolated Medicago truncatula mutants with increased calcium oxalate crystal accumulation have decreased ascorbic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A; McConn, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation in plants remain largely unknown. As an initial step toward gaining insight into these regulatory mechanisms we initiated a mutant screen to identify plants that over-accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Four new mutants were identified, from an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-mutagenized Medicago truncatula (cv. Jemalong genotype A17) population, that over-accumulated calcium oxalate crystals. The increased calcium oxalate content of these new mutants, as with the previously isolated mutant cod4, resulted from an increase in druse crystals accumulated within the mesophyll cells of leaves. Complementation and segregation analysis revealed that each mutant was affected at a different locus. This was confirmed through the genetic mapping of each mutation to different linkage groups. Together, these findings emphasize the complexity of factors that can contribute to oxalate biosynthesis and crystal formation in these plants. In addition, each mutant showed a common decrease in ascorbic acid content providing genetic support for ascorbic acid as a precursor in the oxalate biosynthetic pathway for druse crystal formation. Further support was obtained by the ability of an exogenous supply of ascorbate to induce druse crystal formation while other tested organic acids did not induce crystal production. PMID:17400466

  9. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than young adults. Older women need plenty of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. People who do not eat enough high-calcium foods should take a calcium supplement. NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

  10. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent saturation was measured, precipitation may not even be predicted but we see local, pore-scale behavior dictating system behavior in this case. The flow cell is 1 cm in length and the porous media elements are 100 ?m.

  11. Sulfur dioxide inhibits calcium carbonate precipitation: Implications for early Mars and Earth

    E-print Network

    Schrag, Daniel

    Sulfur dioxide inhibits calcium carbonate precipitation: Implications for early Mars and Earth I. Schrag (2009), Sulfur dioxide inhibits calcium carbonate precipitation: Implications for early Mars; published 2 December 2009. [1] Recent studies have suggested a role for sulfur dioxide (SO2) in maintaining

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fundamental research is proposed to investigate the role of calcium carbonate grain coatings on the vadose zone chemical reactivity of key Hanford contaminants (i.e., 60Co2+, 90Sr2+, CrO42-, and 99TcO4-). Calcium carbonate is widely distributed through the Hanford vadose zone as...

  13. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Zhaofeng; Huang Jianhua

    2007-02-15

    The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.

  14. Organizing Carbon Nanotubes with Liquid Crystals

    E-print Network

    Patrick, David L.

    Organizing Carbon Nanotubes with Liquid Crystals Michael D. Lynch and David L. Patrick* Department with organization controlled using well-established methods of LC alignment, including grooved surfaces, magnetic blocks, offering a general route for controlled assembly of organized nanomaterials and devices. Over

  15. Tuning calcium carbonate growth through physical confinement and templating with amyloid-like polypeptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaco, Martin Francis

    The creation of useful composite materials requires precise control of the interface between the components in order to tune the overall shape and material properties. Despite the current research into nanotechnology, our ability to create materials with nanoscale precision is nascent. However, nature has a paradigm for the creation of finely structured composites under mild conditions called biomineralization. Through control of protein template assembly, solution conditions, and physical confinement, organisms are able to create useful optical and structural materials, such as bones, teeth, and mollusk shells. The objective of this thesis is to elucidate the importance of these various controls in synthetic systems to further our ability to create nanostructured materials. We begin by examining the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilanes on silica oxides. The formation of functionalized surfaces can help control the mineralization of amorphous or crystalline calcium carbonate. Long-chained organosilanes organize on surfaces to form dense, solid-like films, with the terminal groups determining the hydrophobicity and stereochemistry of the film. Our work has shown that uniform hydrophobic and hydrophilic films can be formed by using cleaned silica over glass or mica and through a vapor phase reaction over a liquid one. Additionally, we showed that mixed SAMs with phase-separated domains could be created through the selection of organosilanes and reaction conditions. We have built on these functionalized surfaces through the use of microfabrication and a gas permeable polymer to create three-dimensionally confined microcrystallizers. Other researchers have shown that one-dimensional confinement with a multi-functional surface (patterned with a small nucleating ordered region in a disordered SAM) can stabilize the creation of an amorphous calcium carbonate film before a single, large, micropatterned crystal is grown. Our work has determined that this methodology does not extend to three-dimensional confined systems, as the water has no method of escape. Through the addition of an insoluble hydroscopic polymer to our microreactors, amorphous calcium carbonate of controllable sizes can be grown. However, crystalline calcium carbonate cannot be grown without some type of templating. Studies of calcium carbonate templating have predominantly been performed on SAMs or in poorly characterized gels or protein films. The use of ordered protein or polypeptide aggregates for templating permits both geometry and charge surface density to be varied. We have studied the kinetics and final morphology of ordered aggregates of poly-L-glutamic acid and a copolymer of glutamic acid and alanine through experiments and simulations. Electrostatics, not structure, of the monomer appeared to be the dominating factor in the aggregation, as pH and salt concentration changes led to dramatic changes in the kinetics. Examining our experimental with existing models provided inconsistent results, so we developed a new model that yielded physically realistic rate constants, while generating better fits with longer lag phases and faster growths. However, despite the similarity of aggregation conditions, the two polypeptides yielded vastly different morphologies, with the PEA forming typical amyloid-like fibrils and PE forming larger, twisted lamellar aggregates. Templating with these aggregates also yielded dramatically different patterns. Polycrystalline rhombohedral calcite with smooth faces and edges grew on PEA fibrils, with minimal templating in evidence. However, on PE, numerous calcite crystals with triangular projections tracked the surface of the aggregate. The PE lamellae are characterized by extensive beta-sheet structure. In this conformation, the glutamic acid spacings on the surface of the aggregates can mimic the spacings of the carboxylates in the calcite lattice. In addition, the high negative charge density on the polypeptide surface led to a large number of nucleation sites. As the crystals grow, they impinge on

  16. Crystal growth of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solutions at constant PCO2 and 25°C: a test of a calcite dissolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Plummer, L. Neil; Busenberg, E.

    1981-01-01

    A highly reproducible seeded growth technique was used to study calcite crystallization from calcium bicarbonate solutions at 25°C and fixed carbon dioxide partial pressures between 0.03 and 0.3 atm. The results are not consistent with empirical crystallization models that have successfully described calcite growth at low PCO2 (< 10?3 atm). Good agreement was found between observed crystallization rates and those calculated from the calcite dissolution rate law and mechanism proposed by Plummer et al. (1978).

  17. Calcium absorbability from milk products, an imitation milk, and calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, R.R.; Bammi, A.; Barger-Lux, M.J.; Heaney, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Whole milk, chocolate milk, yogurt, imitation milk (prepared from dairy and nondairy products), cheese, and calcium carbonate were labeled with /sup 45/Ca and administered as a series of test meals to 10 healthy postmenopausal women. Carrier Ca content of the test meals was held constant at 250 mg and subjects fasted before each meal. The absorbability of Ca from the six sources was compared by measuring fractional absorption by the double isotope method. The mean absorption values for all six sources were tightly clustered between 21 and 26% and none was significantly different from the others using one-way analysis of variance. We conclude that none of the sources was significantly superior or inferior to the others.

  18. Growth and characterization of a novel nonlinear optical borate crystal - Yttrium calcium borate (YCB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Kumar, R.; Arivanandhan, M.; Dhanasekaran, R.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2013-06-01

    A new nonlinear optical single crystal yttrium calcium borate Y2CaB10O19 (YCB) was grown for the first time from its melt. The starting materials were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. The melting point of the synthesized material was identified to be 967 °C. YCB crystal exhibits monoclinic crystal structure with the space group C2. The crystalline perfection of the grown YCB crystal was found to be good. From the UV-VIS-NIR studies, the lower cutoff wavelength of the crystal occurs below 200 nm. The functional groups of the grown crystal were assigned using the FTIR data. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of the YCB crystal was observed using a Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The laser damage threshold value of the YCB crystal was found to be very high - 10.5 GW/cm2.

  19. Efficient calcium lactate production by fermentation coupled with crystallization-based in situ product removal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Xu, Ping

    2014-07-01

    Lactic acid is a platform chemical with various industrial applications, and its derivative, calcium lactate, is an important food additive. Fermentation coupled with in situ product removal (ISPR) can provide more outputs with high productivity. The method used in this study was based on calcium lactate crystallization. Three cycles of crystallization were performed during the fermentation course using a Bacillus coagulans strain H-1. As compared to fed-batch fermentation, this method showed 1.7 times higher average productivity considering seed culture, with 74.4% more L-lactic acid produced in the fermentation with ISPR. Thus, fermentation coupled with crystallization-based ISPR may be a biotechnological alternative that provides an efficient system for production of calcium lactate or lactic acid. PMID:24780270

  20. Formate Oxidation-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    PubMed Central

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such as ammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2?1 calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 109 cells ml?1 and 5 g of calcium formate liter?1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry. PMID:24837386

  1. Fasudil prevents calcium oxalate crystal deposit and renal fibrogenesis in glyoxylate-induced nephrolithic mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiyan; Chen, Wei; Ding, Jiarong; Jia, Meng; Yin, Jingjing; Guo, Zhiyong

    2015-04-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common kidney disease and one of the major causes of chronic renal insufficiency. We develop and utilize a glyoxylate induced mouse model of kidney calcium oxalate crystal deposition for studying the pharmacological effects of fasudil, a Rho associated protein kinase (ROCK) specific inhibitor, on the kidney injury and fibrosis caused by calcium oxalate crystallization and deposition. Glyoxylate was administrated intraperitoneally to C57BL/6J mice for five consecutive days to establish a mouse model of kidney calcium oxalate crystal formation and deposition. The results showed that the protein expression levels of E-cad and Pan-ck were lower, and the protein expression levels of ?-SMA and Vim were higher, in the kidney tissue of the glyoxylate induced model mice compared with the control mice. The changes in protein expression were weakened when the animals were pretreated with fasudil before glyoxylate administration. Expression of ROCK, PAI-1, and p-Smad proteins in the kidney tissue increased in response to glyoxylate treatment, and the increase was eased when the animals were pretreated with fasudil. Expression of Smad2 and Smad3 in the kidney tissue remained unchanged after glyoxylate administration. Cell apoptosis and proliferation in the kidney cortex and medulla were enhanced in response to the glyoxylate induced calcium oxalate crystal formation and deposition, and fasudil pre-treatment was able to attenuate the enhancement. The results suggest that Fasudil reduces the glyoxylate induced kidney calcium crystal formation and deposition and slows down the kidney fibrogenesis caused by calcium crystal deposition. The possible mechanism may be related the regulatory effects on Rho/ROCK signal transduction and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:25697583

  2. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  3. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage cheese are good sources of ... or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look ...

  4. The Influence of pH on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation between calcium carbonate and water is temperature-dependent and can therefore be used as a paleothermometer. Although oxygen isotope fractionation is expected from principles of equilibrium isotopic partitioning, the temperature-dependence remains uncertain because other factors, such as slow exchange between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and water, can obscure the temperature signal. Oxygen isotopic equilibrium between aqueous solution and calcium carbonate includes two distinct equilibria: equilibrium of the DIC species in solution (i.e., CO2(aq), H2CO3, HCO3-, and CO32-) with water, and equilibrium between the dissolved inorganic carbon with the precipitated carbonate. To isolate kinetic isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, isotopic equilibrium among DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration between DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic oxygen isotope effects during precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is constantly bubbled through a beaker containing ~1300 mL of solution (30 mM CaCl2 + 5 mM NH4Cl + 0.1 mM SrCl2). As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. We will present results from this set of experiments and discuss kinetic oxygen isotope effects in the context of a recently-developed ion-by-ion growth model of calcite.

  5. Controlling calcium carbonate precipitation in the presence of biological and organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Kathryn M.; Barker, Michael F.; Dickinson, Steven R.; Henderson, G.; MacKenzie, Callum R.; Wilbanks, Sigurd M.

    2001-11-01

    Biomineralisation arises due to a partnership between the biological and inorganic components of a living system. The final structure and form of the inorganic material is in some way controlled by the nature of the specific organic entities present. This manifests itself in the initiation of the growth, by providing the appropriate matrix in which the inorganic material forms and/or by providing a defect base such that the inorganic crystal packing may be appropriately perturbed. Working with proteins is not necessarily the best or easiest way to understand a physical process and over past years people have turned to simple organic molecules, surfactants, small biological moieties and organic substrates in order to determine, at least in part, the import of organic/inorganic interactions during the growth of the inorganic material. As one example of these additives, surfactants, which represent approximately 50% of the cell membrane, display a diverse and vast array of geometrical forms in aqueous solution, many of which bare striking resemblance to biominerals, albeit on considerably smaller length scales. They also have the ability to associate in solution with inorganic material precursors, such as calcium ions. Hence, while they may not be the main driving force in the formation of biominerals, they are certainly present during the process and may, when used as model systems, allow us some way into the world of nanomaterials. Surfactants, a series of simple alcohols and carboxylic acids, and proteins extracted from the spines of adult sea urchins, have been used by our group to study the formation of calcium carbonate based inorganic materials. The growth of the calcium carbonate is significantly affected by the inclusions, with deviations varying from simple stepped growth to the formation of curved surfaces.

  6. Morphology and polymorphic phase changes of calcium carbonate micro/nanocrystals using fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad

    2011-05-01

    This study reveals the morphology and polymorphic phase changes of calcium carbonate crystals into a mixture of calcite and aragonite micro/nanocrystals of interesting morphology at room temperature by a simple reaction with fruit extracts of Tamarindus indica and Emblica officinalis respectively by mixing CaCO3 solutions with their corresponding extracts. The control experiments were carried out to establish the plausible role of tartaric acid from Tamarindus indica and ascorbic acid from Emblica officinalis in this regard. The quantitative determination of CaCO3 phases was done based on the use of intensities obtained from corresponding XRD spectrum. The molar % of aragonite was found to be more in case of TA and AA rather than TI and EO respectively, however the calcite was observed to be the predominant phase in all four reactions. Interestingly, the TI changes the rhombohedral morphology of calcite to elongated rods, whereas EO induces a great polymorphic phase change. PMID:21780397

  7. Molecular mechanism of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    SciTech Connect

    Giocondi, J L; El-Dasher, B S; Nancollas, G H; Orme, C A

    2009-05-31

    In summary, SPM data has shown that (1) Mg inhibits growth on all steps but relatively high Mg/Ca ratios are needed. Extracting the mechanism of interaction requires more modeling of the kinetic data, but step morphology is consistent with incorporation. (2) Citrate has several effects depending on the citrate/Ca ratio. At the lowest concentrations, citrate increases the step free energy without altering the step kinetics; at higher concentrations, the polar step is slowed. (3) Oxalate also slows the polar step but additionally stabilizes a new facet, with a [100]{sub Cc} step. (4) Etidronate has the greatest kinetic impact of the molecules studied. At 7{micro}M concentrations, the polar step slows by 60% and a new polar step appears. However, at the same time the [10-1]{sub Cc} increases by 67%. It should be noted that all of these molecules complex calcium and can effect kinetics by altering the solution supersaturation or the Ca to HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. For the SPM data shown, this effect was corrected for to distinguish the effect of the molecule at the crystal surface from the effect of the molecule on the solution speciation. The goal of this paper is to draw connections between fundamental studies of atomic step motion and potential strategies for materials processing. It is not our intent to promote the utility of SPM for investigating processes in cement dynamics. The conditions are spectacularly different in many ways. The data shown in this paper are fairly close to equilibrium (S=1.6) whereas the nucleation of cements is initiated at supersaturation ratios in the thousands to millions. Of course, after the initial nucleation phase, the growth will occur at more modest supersaturations and as the cement evolves towards equilibrium certainly some of the growth will occur in regimes such as shown here. In addition to the difference in supersaturation, cements tend to have lower additive to calcium ratios. As an example, the additive to Ca ratio is {approx}10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} for a pyrophosphate based cement (Grover et al., 2006). Where the in situ SPM approach provides unique insights is in providing details of where and how molecules inhibit or accelerate kinetics. This has the potential to aid in designing molecules to target specific steps and to guide synergistic combinations of additives. For example, it is unlikely that bulk techniques could deduce the simultaneous acceleration and inhibition effects of etidronate; or that citrate reduced growth rate by altering step density rather than step speed. In addition, SPM data translates to tractable questions for modelers. The questions changes from 'How does etidronate inhibit brushite growth?' to 'Why does etidronate bind strongly to the [101]{sub Cc} step while it doesn't to the [10-1]{sub Cc} step?' This is still a challenging question but it is far better defined. Given that step chemistries are generally different, it seems reasonable to expect that the greatest inhibition will be achieved not with one, but with several synergistically chosen additives. For example, the most effective growth inhibitors for brushite would target the two fast steps, namely the non-polar, [10-1]{sub Cc} and the polar, [101]{sub Cc} steps. Several molecules have been shown to slow the polar step, with etidronate as the most dramatic example. By contrast, only Mg was observed to slow the [10-1]{sub Cc} step. Thus, a combination of high concentrations of Mg to target the [10-1]{sub Cc} step with low concentrations of etidronate to target the polar steps, should be a more effective combination than either alone. However Mg is not a particularly good inhibitor in the sense that high concentrations are needed, and it is not specific. More ideally, an inhibitor would be designed to interact specifically with the [10-1] step, which would allow the two steps to be independently modified. Again, this provides an opportunity for tighter coupling with theoretical modeling. The question changes from 'What types of molecules will inhibit brushite growth' to 'What type of molecule

  8. Textural properties of synthetic nano-calcite produced by hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide

    E-print Network

    Montes-Hernandez, German; Charlet, L; Tisserand, Delphine; Renard, F

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 1/4 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used to synthesize fine particles of calcite. This method allows a high carbonation efficiency (about 95% of Ca(OH)2-CaCO3 conversion), a significant production rate (48 kg/m3 h) and high purity of product (about 96%). However, the various initial physicochemical conditions have a strong influence on the crystal size and surface area of the synthesized calcite crystals. The present study is focused on the estimation of the textural properties of synthesized calcite (morphology, specific surface area, average particle size, particle size distribution and particle size evolution with reaction time), using Rietveld refinements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. This study demonstrate that the pressure, the temperatu...

  9. Controlled synthesis of crystalline calcium carbonate aggregates with unusual morphologies involving the phase transformation from amorphous calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Hua; Yu Jiaguo Zhao Xiufeng

    2009-04-02

    Peanut-shaped CaCO{sub 3} aggregates, featured of two dandelion-like heads built up from rod-like subunits, have been synthesized via a facile precipitation reaction between Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCl{sub 2} at ambient temperature in the presence of magnesium ions and ethanol solvent. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that a high magnesium concentration and ethanol solvent are necessary for the formation of the unusual peanut-like aggregates. In addition, a multistep phase transformation process from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) to a mixture of ACC and calcite and ultimately to calcite and aragonite was observed in the formation process of the unusual structures. A possible mechanism for the formation of the unusual peanut-shape aggregates has been proposed and discussed.

  10. Biomimetic growth of calcium oxalate crystals: synchrotron X-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2010-03-01

    Oriented crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) form one of the major constituents of kidney stones in humans, and these crystals are also found in many plants. It is widely accepted that an organic matrix of lipids and proteins is involved in the crystallization of COM, though their role is not well-understood [1]. Langmuir monolayers of lipids on supersaturated aqueous solutions can be used to mimic the lipid-crystal interface during mineralization. We have studied nucleation and growth of COM crystals under heneicosanoic acid monolayers at the air-water interface. We used synchrotron x-rays in the grazing incidence geometry to determine the structure of the organic monolayer and the orientation of COM crystals in-situ during crystallization. We see that the (-101) faces of COM crystals are parallel to the organic matrix. There is a commensurate relationship between the heneicosanoic acid monolayer and the (-101) crystal face that may be responsible from the oriented growth. Evolution of the monolayer structure with time will be described. [1]S. R. Khan, Calcium Oxalate in Biological Systems, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995

  11. Calcium oxalate crystals: an integral component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Uloth, Margaret B; Clode, Peta L; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (< 0.5 ?m) to large (up to 40 ?m) highly organized arrangements. Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals. PMID:25816022

  12. Calcium Oxalate Crystals: An Integral Component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Uloth, Margaret B.; Clode, Peta L.; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (< 0.5 ?m) to large (up to 40 ?m) highly organized arrangements. Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals. PMID:25816022

  13. An Unusual Association: Iliopsoas Bursitis Related to Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Di Carlo, Marco; Draghessi, Antonella; Carotti, Marina; Salaffi, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with osteoarthritis and chondrocalcinosis came to our observation developing a swelling in the groin region after a recent left colectomy for adenocarcinoma. The imaging techniques revealed the presence of an iliopsoas bursitis in connection with the hip. The synovial fluid analysis detected the presence of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals and allowed the final and unusual diagnosis of iliopsoas bursitis related to acute CPP crystal hip arthritis. PMID:26550514

  14. Effects of Mg/Ca ratio and temperature on the mineralogy of calcium carbonate precipitates and their paleooceanographic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoi, M.Y.; Belli, S.

    1996-10-01

    Because of the importance of the global carbon cycle throughout the life of the Earth, scientists have tried to use components of it to find out past conditions of the Earth`s atmosphere, oceans, and climate. However, lack of knowledge about past conditions makes it difficult to paint a complete picture of the chemistry of ancient oceans and atmospheres. One approach is to use the mineralogy of ancient sedimentary carbonates to examine the problem from the standpoint that certain conditions dictate the formation of particular crystal structures. Thus, we need to more completely understand the conditions which influence the precipitation of carbonate minerals. We examine the effects of both seawater Mg/Ca ratio and temperature on the mineralogy of calcium carbonate precipitated from seawater. This will refine our knowledge of paleo-ocean chemistry.

  15. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++CO3-- molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  16. Co-effects of amines molecules and chitosan films on in vitro calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jifei; Kennedy, John F; Nie, Jun; Ma, Guiping

    2015-11-20

    Amines monomers, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), N,N-dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMEDA) and N-methiyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were used to induce the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals on chitosan films, by using (NH4)2CO3 diffusion method at ambient temperature. The obtained CaCO3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The influence of reaction variables, such as the additive concentration and their types were also investigated on the products. The morphologies of CaCO3 crystals, inter-grown in cube-shape, were controlled by DMAEMA and DMEA. It was observed that the morphologies of CaCO3 changed from the cube grown arms to massive calcite with a hole on the face by increasing the concentrations of DMEDA and MDEA. While the precipitation grew on chitosan film without any organic additive, only single cube-shaped crystals were obtained. By these results the possible mechanisms can be proposed that electronic movement of the groups on the monomer effected ions configuration and molecules absorbed on the exposed surface, resulted the change of the surface energy, which caused the change in the morphology of CaCO3. PMID:26344256

  17. Physical characteristics of Medicago truncatula calcium oxalate crystals determine their effectiveness in insect defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structural traits can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feeding. They ar...

  18. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  19. Characterization of the terbium-doped calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznov, Dmitry S.; Starobor, Aleksey V.; Palashov, Oleg V.

    2015-08-01

    Optical, thermo-optical and magneto-optical characteristics of the terbium-doped (10 at.%) calcium fluoride sample were investigated. It was made the analysis, confirmed the possibility of development of a Faraday isolator and a cryogenic Faraday isolator based on the studied medium, which will provide more than 30 dB isolation ratio of laser radiation in the "eye-safe" wavelength range (1530-1620 nm) at the 5 and 20 kW power, respectively.

  20. New and unusual forms of calcium oxalate raphide crystals in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Raman, Vijayasankar; Horner, Harry T; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-11-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals in higher plants occur in five major forms namely raphides, styloids, prisms, druses and crystal sand. The form, shape and occurrence of calcium oxalate crystals in plants are species- and tissue-specific, hence the presence or absence of a particular type of crystal can be used as a taxonomic character. So far, four different types of needle-like raphide crystals have been reported in plants. The present work describes two new and unusual forms of raphide crystals from the tubers of Dioscorea polystachya--six-sided needles with pointed ends (Type V) and four-sided needles with beveled ends (Type VI). Both of these new types of needles are distinct from the other four types by each having a surrounding membrane that envelopes a bundle of 10-20 closely packed thin crystalline sheets. The previously known four types of needles have solid or homogenous crystalline material, surrounded by a membrane or lamellate sheath called a crystal chamber. Only the Type VI crystals have beveled ends and the needles of the other five types have pointed ends. PMID:25139563

  1. Calcium carbonate corrosivity in an Alaskan inland sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W.; Mathis, J. T.; Cross, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean acidification is the hydrogen ion increase caused by the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2, and is a focal point in marine biogeochemistry, in part, because this chemical reaction reduces calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation states (?) to levels that are corrosive (i.e. ? ? 1) to shell-forming marine organisms. However, other processes can drive CaCO3 corrosivity; specifically, the addition of tidewater glacier melt. To highlight this process, we present carbonate system data collected in May (spring) and September (autumn) starting 2009 through 2012 from Prince William Sound (PWS), a semi-enclosed inland sea located on the south-central coast of Alaska that is ringed with fjords containing tidewater glaciers. Initial sampling in PWS covered limited stations in the western sound, and ? levels corrosive to aragonite, a form of CaCO3, were observed in association with glacial melt during autumn. Beginning in September 2011, expanded sampling spanned the western and central sound, and included two fjords proximal to tidewater glaciers: Icy Bay and Columbia Bay. The observed conditions in these fjords affected CaCO3 corrosivity in the upper water column (< 50 m) in PWS in two ways: (1) as spring-time formation sites of mode water with near-corrosive ? levels seen below the mixed layer depth across the sound, and (2) as point sources for surface plumes of glacial melt with corrosive ? levels (? for aragonite and calcite down to 0.60 and 1.02, respectively) and carbon dioxide partial pressures (pCO2) well below atmospheric levels. The cumulative effect of glacial melt is likely responsible for the seasonal widespread reduction of ? in PWS; however, glacial melt-driven CaCO3 corrosivity is poorly reflected by pCO2 or pHT, indicating that any one of those carbonate parameters alone would inadequately track corrosive conditions in PWS. The unique conditions of the carbonate system in the surface glacial melt plumes enhances atmospheric CO2 uptake, which, if not offset by mixing or primary productivity, would exacerbate CaCO3 corrosivity in a positive feedback via ocean acidification. These effects from glacial melt make PWS highly sensitive to climate change and susceptible to amplified CaCO3 corrosivity.

  2. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  3. Growth Rate of Calcite Steps as a Function of Aqueous Calcium-to-Carbonate Ratio: Independent Attachment and Detachment of Calcium and Carbonate Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G; Grantham, Ms. Meg

    2010-01-01

    Growth rates of monolayer-height steps on the {1014} calcite surface have been measured as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio. The maximum growth rates of the two common crystallographic orientations were found to deviate from the ideal stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, and dissolution features were observed under supersaturated solutions containing high calcium-to-carbonate ratios. To explain these phenomena, a theory is applied that treats the rates of attachment and detachment of aqueous calcium and carbonate ions separately. The resultant attachment rate constants are 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the water exchange rate of the constituent aqueous ions, suggesting that ligand-exchange processes may directly drive attachment. The broader implication is that the saturation state alone is not adequate to fully describe the rates of the multiple, independent reactions that occur on mineral surfaces under these conditions.

  4. Energies of the adsorption of functional groups to calcium carbonate polymorphs: the importance of -OH and -COOH groups.

    PubMed

    Okhrimenko, D V; Nissenbaum, J; Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of calcium carbonate is an important factor in many processes in nature, industry, and biological systems. We determined and compared the adsorption energies for a series of small molecules of different sizes and polarities (i.e., water, several alcohols, and acetic acid) on three synthetic CaCO3 polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite). We measured isosteric heats of adsorption from vapor adsorption isotherms for 273 < T < 293 K, and we used XRD and SEM to confirm that samples did not change phase during the experiments. Density functional calculations and molecular dynamics simulations complemented the experimental results and aided interpretation. Alcohols with molecular mass greater than that of methanol bind more strongly to the calcium carbonate polymorphs than water and acetic acid. The adsorption energies for the alcohols are typical of chemisorption and indicate alcohol displacement of water from calcium carbonate surfaces. This explains why organisms favor biomolecules that contain alcohol functional groups (-OH) to control which polymorph they use, the crystal face and orientation, and the particle shape and size in biomineralization processes. This new insight is also very useful in understanding organic molecule adsorption mechanisms in soils, sediments, and rocks, which is important for predicting the behavior of mineral-fluid interactions when the challenge is to remediate contaminated groundwater aquifers or to produce oil and gas from reservoirs. PMID:23919655

  5. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial group P21/a (monoclinic system) after about 4 days. At the same time, the most important fall of cobalt content takes place, but pH and alkalinity values do not show significant changes. The evolution of the aqueous solutions is closely related to the increases of crystallinity degree. TEM study confirms the evolution of the shape of crystals, which exhibit platelet morphology at the end of aging time.

  6. Synthesis of calcium carbonate nanocrystals and their potential application as vessels for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Viviana; Carata, Elisabetta; Panzarini, Elisa; Baldassare, Francesca; Dini, Luciana; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Pure and stable calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocrystals were synthesized by spray drying method. We exploited the opportunity to use them as vessels for drug delivery studying the biocompatibility and the internalization in HeLa cells.

  7. Effects of calcium carbonate particulate releasing surgical anchors on bone and tendon healing

    E-print Network

    Medeiros, Jordan-Ryan J. I. K

    2007-01-01

    The Calaxo ® screw, developed by Smith and Nephew, is a novel biomedical composite composed of poly-DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLLA:PGA) 85:15 and calcium carbonate particulates. Comparisons to an identical surgical anchor ...

  8. Solubility, inhibition of crystallization and microscopic analysis of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of fractions from Humulus lupulus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fr?ckowiak, Anna; Ko?lecki, Tomasz; Skibi?ski, Przemys?aw; Gawe?, Wies?aw; Zaczy?ska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-11-01

    Procedures for obtaining noncytotoxic and nonmutagenic extracts from Humulus lupulus L. of high potency for inhibition and dissolving of model (calcium oxalate crystals) and real kidney stones, obtained from patients after surgery, are presented. Multistep extraction procedures were performed in order to obtain the preparations with the highest calcium complexing properties. The composition of obtained active fractions was analyzed by GC/MS and NMR methods. The influence of preparations on inhibition of formation and dissolution of model and real kidney stones were evaluated based on conductrometric titration, flame photometry and microscopic analysis. The "fraction soluble in methanol" obtained from water-alkaline extracts contains sugar alcohols and organic acids, and is effective in dissolving the kidney stones. The "fraction insoluble in methanol" contains only sugar derivatives and it changes the morphology of the crystals, making them "jelly-like". Both fractions are potentially effective in kidney stone therapy.

  9. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guidance system, ChooseMyPlate . Where can I find ... on food sources of calcium: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for calcium ( ...

  10. Thermodynamic properties of synthetic calcium-free carbonate cancrinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurdakova, S. V.; Grishchenko, R. O.; Druzhinina, A. I.; Ogorodova, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-free carbonate cancrinite with formula unit Na8.28[Al5.93Si6.07O24](CO3)0.93(OH)0.49·3.64H2O (CAN) has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The product has been characterized by the methods of scanning electronic microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis with FTIR of evolved gases (TGA-FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction. The heat capacity of CAN has been measured from 6 to 259 K via low-temperature adiabatic calorimetry. A linear combination of Einstein functions has been used to approximate the obtained data on the heat capacity. The thermal contributions to the entropy and enthalpy of CAN in the temperature range 0-300 K have been calculated from these data. The heat capacity and third-law absolute entropy of CAN at 298.15 K are 1,047 ± 30 and 1,057 ± 35 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. High-temperature oxide-melt solution calorimetry has been used to determine the enthalpy of formation from elements of CAN at 298.15 K; the value equals -14,684 ± 50 kJ mol-1. The Gibbs energy of formation from elements at 298.15 K has been calculated and totaled -13,690 ± 51 kJ mol-1.

  11. Characterization of calcium carbonate sorbent particle in furnace environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee; Keel, Sang In; Yun, Jin Han; Min, Tai Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2012-07-01

    The oxy-fuel combustion system is a promising technology to control CO? and NO(x) emissions. Furthermore, sulfation reaction mechanism under CO?-rich atmospheric condition in a furnace may lead to in-furnace desulfurization. In the present study, we evaluated characteristics of calcium carbonate (CaCO?) sorbent particles under different atmospheric conditions. To examine the physical/chemical characteristics of CaCO?, which is used as a sorbent particle for in-furnace desulfurization in the oxy-fuel combustion system, they were injected into high temperature drop tube furnace (DTF). Experiments were conducted at varying temperatures, residence times, and atmospheric conditions in a reactor. To evaluate the aerosolizing characteristics of the CaCO? sorbent particle, changes in the size distribution and total particle concentration between the DTF inlet and outlet were measured. Structural changes (e.g., porosity, grain size, and morphology) of the calcined sorbent particles were estimated by BET/BJH, XRD, and SEM analyses. It was shown that sorbent particles rapidly calcined and sintered in the air atmosphere, whereas calcination was delayed in the CO? atmosphere due to the higher CO? partial pressure. Instead, the sintering effect was dominant in the CO? atmosphere early in the reaction. Based on the SEM images, it was shown that the reactions of sorbent particles could be explained as a grain-subgrain structure model in both the air and CO? atmospheres. PMID:22578525

  12. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  13. Calcium carbonate nucleation driven by ion binding in a biomimetic matrix revealed by in situ electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Paul J M; Cho, Kang Rae; Kempen, Ralph G E; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; De Yoreo, James J

    2015-04-01

    The characteristic shapes, structures and properties of biominerals arise from their interplay with a macromolecular matrix. The developing mineral interacts with acidic macromolecules, which are either dissolved in the crystallization medium or associated with insoluble matrix polymers, that affect growth habits and phase selection or completely inhibit precipitation in solution. Yet little is known about the role of matrix-immobilized acidic macromolecules in directing mineralization. Here, by using in situ liquid-phase electron microscopy to visualize the nucleation and growth of CaCO3 in a matrix of polystyrene sulphonate (PSS), we show that the binding of calcium ions to form Ca-PSS globules is a key step in the formation of metastable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), an important precursor phase in many biomineralization systems. Our findings demonstrate that ion binding can play a significant role in directing nucleation, independently of any control over the free-energy barrier to nucleation. PMID:25622001

  14. Powder XRD and dielectric studies of gel grown calcium pyrophosphate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Bharat; Parikh, Ketan; Joshi, Mihir

    2013-06-01

    Formation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in soft tissues such as cartilage, meniscus and synovial tissue leads to CPPD deposition diseases. The appearance of these crystals in the synovial fluid can give rise to an acute arthritic attack with pain and inflammation of the joints, a condition called pseudo-gout. The growth of CPP crystals has been carried out, in the present study, using the single diffusion gel growth technique, which can broadly mimic in vitro the condition in soft tissues. The crystals were characterized by different techniques. The FTIR study revealed the presence of various functional groups. Powder XRD study was also carried out to verify the crystal structure. The dielectric study was carried out at room temperature by applying field of different frequency from 500 Hz to 1 MHz. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and a.c. resistivity decreased as frequency increased, whereas the a.c. conductivity increased as frequency increased.

  15. SURVEY OF NUMBER AND ARRANGEMENT OF CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS IN LEAVES OF ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL SOYBEAN AND ALLIED TAXA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is only one of many flowering plants that contain calcium oxalate crystals in its plant organs, especially in the leaves. Even though the functional significance of the crystals is still not understood, the sometimes massive amount, location and structure of crystals have been used in syste...

  16. Influence of eggshell matrix proteins on the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Hernández, A.; Vidal, M. L.; Gómez-Morales, J.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A. B.; Labas, V.; Gautron, J.; Nys, Y.; García Ruiz, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    To understand the role of eggshell organic matrix on the biomineralization process, we have tested the influence of different purified fractions of the eggshell organic matrix on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) precipitation. Purification was carried out after successive anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and gel filtration chromatography of two different prepurified eggshell extracts (A) and (B); the purified fractions (named g, h, n and r) and ( c', g', i', k') respectively were diluted to 50 ?g/ml before being tested in vitro and analysed by the sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) procedure and mass spectrometry. The precipitation experiments were carried out by the method of vapour diffusion on crystallization mushrooms. Each purified fraction showed a different effect on CaCO 3 precipitation. Some of them exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on nucleation, thus suppressing the precipitation of CaCO 3 almost totally while the others did not produce any notable effect. However, all fractions favoured the precipitation of calcite over the other CaCO 3 polymorphs. Additionally, all fractions modified in a different manner the size and morphology of the precipitated calcite crystals.

  17. Anhydrous Amorphous Calcium Oxalate Nanoparticles from Ionic Liquids: Stable Crystallization Intermediates in the Formation of Whewellite.

    PubMed

    Gehl, Aaron; Dietzsch, Michael; Mondeshki, Mihail; Bach, Sven; Häger, Tobias; Panthöfer, Martin; Barton, Bastian; Kolb, Ute; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are not well understood. To test the viability and the limits of the classical crystallization, new model systems for crystallization are needed. With a view to elucidating the formation of an amorphous precursor and its subsequent crystallization, the crystallization of calcium oxalate, a biomineral widely occurring in plants, is investigated. Amorphous calcium oxalate (ACO) precipitated from an aqueous solution is described as a hydrated metastable phase, as often observed during low-temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. In the presence of water, ACO rapidly transforms into hydrated whewellite (monohydrate, CaC2 O4 ?H2 O, COM). The problem of fast crystallization kinetics is circumvented by synthesizing anhydrous ACO from a pure ionic liquid (IL-ACO) for the first time. IL-ACO is stable in the absence of water at ambient temperature. It is obtained as well-defined, non-agglomerated particles with diameters of 15-20?nm. When exposed to water, it crystallizes to give (hydrated) COM through a dissolution/recrystallization mechanism. PMID:26549793

  18. The effect of alginates, fucans and phenolic substances from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora in calcium carbonate mineralization in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, L. T.; Amado Filho, G. M.; Fernandez, M. S.; Arias, J. L.; Farina, M.

    2011-04-01

    The mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) in the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora is a biologically induced process and is restricted to the cell wall surface. It has been suggested that the CaCO 3 crystallization that occurs over the thallus cell wall surface is induced by changes in the surface pH caused by a local efflux of OH -, Ca ++ and HCO3- ions. However, no studies on the roles of the P. gymnospora cell wall components in this mineralization process had been performed. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of a subset of P. gymnospora cell wall molecules on CaCO 3 crystallization in vitro. The molecules tested were the anionic polysaccharides alginates and fucans (with potential nucleation activity) and phenolic substances (secondary metabolites with amphipathic property). The crystallization assays were performed using polystyrene microbridges as the crystallization apparatus. Crystals formed in the microbridges were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the results confirmed that the phenolic substances have the specific capability of changing the morphology of calcite crystals grown in vitro by inducing an elongated morphology in the direction of the c-axis. This morphology is similar to that induced by molecules that attach to { h k 0}-crystal planes. It was also shown that the alginates and the fucans do not specifically modulate the morphology of the growing crystals. In fact, these crystals exhibited a rounded shape due to the slower growth rates of several new crystal planes that appeared in the place of the original corners and edges.

  19. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent falls in women, but not in men. Metabolic syndrome. Some evidence suggests that consuming more calcium from ... with vitamin D, lowers the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Vitamin B12 deficiency caused by the drug metformin. ...

  20. Pore-size-dependent calcium carbonate precipitation controlled by surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stack, Andrew G; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Allard, Lawrence F; Bañuelos, José L; Rother, Gernot; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Cole, David R; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2014-06-01

    Induced mineral precipitation is potentially important for the remediation of contaminants, such as during mineral trapping during carbon or toxic metal sequestration. The prediction of precipitation reactions is complicated by the porous nature of rocks and soils and their interaction with the precipitate, introducing transport and confinement effects. Here X-ray scattering measurements, modeling, and electron microscopies were used to measure the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in a porous amorphous silica (CPG) that contained two discrete distributions of pore sizes: nanopores and macropores. To examine the role of the favorability of interaction between the substrate and precipitate, some of the CPG was functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) similar to those known to enhance nucleation densities on planar substrates. Precipitation was found to occur exclusively in macropores in the native CPG, while simultaneous precipitation in nanopores and macropores was observed in the functionalized CPG. The rate of precipitation in the nanopores estimated from the model of the X-ray scattering matched that measured on calcite single crystals. These results suggest that the pore-size distribution in which a precipitation reaction preferentially occurs depends on the favorability of interaction between substrate and precipitate, something not considered in most studies of precipitation in porous media. PMID:24815551

  1. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate: Implications for their use as paleoclimatic proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodler, A.; Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Fernández-Díaz, L.; Frei, R.

    2015-09-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during the Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation of chromate into the calcite lattice to investigate isotopic changes facilitated by the coprecipitation process. Our experiments indicate enrichment in Cr concentration in the precipitates compared to the solutions, consistent with previous reports of Cr enrichment in chemical sediments compared to ambient seawater. The fractionation of Cr isotopes during calcium carbonate coprecipitation was assumed to be small, based on previously published data of modern seawater and modern non-skeletal marine carbonates. However, results from this study for rapidly precipitated calcium carbonate in the presence of chromate show a tendency for preferential incorporation of heavy Cr isotopes in the precipitates resulting in increasing relative isotope difference between precipitate and initial solution (?53Cr[p-is]) from +0.06‰ to +0.18‰, with increasing initial Cr concentration of the solution. Sample precipitation in the presence of chromate also showed the presence of vaterite. Calcium carbonate crystals were also precipitated in a double diffusion silica hydrogel over a longer period of time resulting in samples consisting of micrometric-millimetric calcite crystals, which were again significantly enriched in heavy Cr isotopes compared to the initial solutions. They average, irrespective of the initial Cr concentration, a relative isotope difference (?53Cr[p-is]) of +0.29 ± 0.08‰ (2?), whereas silica hydrogel samples show a preferential retention of light Cr isotopes. These results imply that in previous studies the ?53Cr seawater signals inferred from carbonates may be too positive or, at lower Cr concentrations typical for seawater, marginal to no Cr isotope fractionation can be expected; this might have implications for the use of Cr isotopic signals recorded in ancient marine carbonates in relation to ambient seawater and pave the way for future work to enable a reliable application of the Cr isotope proxy.

  2. Sulfur Cycling Mediates Calcium Carbonate Geochemistry in Modern Marine Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, P. T.; Hoeft, S. E.; Bebout, B. M.; Reid, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Modem marine stromatolites forming in Highborne Cay, Exumas (Bahamas), contain microbial mats dominated by Schizothrix. Although saturating concentrations of Ca2+ and CO32- exist, microbes mediate CaCO3 precipitation. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis in these stromatolites aids calcium carbonate precipitation by removal of HS+ through CO2 use. Photorespiration and exopolymer production predominantly by oxygenic phototrophs fuel heterotrophic activity: aerobic respiration (approximately 60 umol/sq cm.h) and sulfate reduction (SR; 1.2 umol SO42-/sq cm.h) are the dominant C- consuming processes. Aerobic microbial respiration and the combination of SR and H2S oxidation both facilitate CaCO3 dissolution through H+ production. Aerobic respiration consumes much more C on an hourly basis, but duel fluctuating O2 and H2 depth profiles indicate that overall, SR consumes only slightly less (0.2-0.5) of the primary production. Moreover, due to low O2 concentrations when SR rates are peaking, reoxidation of the H2S formed is incomplete: both thiosulfate and polythionates are formed. The process of complete H2S oxidation yields H+. However, due to a low O2 concentration late in the day and relatively high O2 concentrations early in the following morning, a two-stage oxidation takes place: first, polythionates are formed from H2S, creating alkalinity which coincides with CaCO3 precipitation; secondly, oxidation of polythionates to sulfate yields acidity, resulting in dissolution, etc. Vertical profiles confirmed that the pH peaked late in the afternoon (greater than 8.8) and had the lowest values (less than 7.4) early in the morning. Thus, the effect of this S-cycling through alkalinity production, followed by acidification during H2S oxidation, results in a six times stronger fluctuation in acidity than photosynthesis plus aerobic respiration accomplish. This implies that anaerobic processes play a pivotal role in stromatolite formation.

  3. The role of prenucleation clusters in surface-induced calcium phosphate crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Archan; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Müller, Frank A.; Will, Julia; Frederik, Peter M.; de With, Gijsbertus; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Unravelling the processes of calcium phosphate formation is important in our understanding of both bone and tooth formation, and also of pathological mineralization, for example in cardiovascular disease. Serum is a metastable solution from which calcium phosphate precipitates in the presence of calcifiable templates such as collagen, elastin and cell debris. A pathological deficiency of inhibitors leads to the uncontrolled deposition of calcium phosphate. In bone and teeth the formation of apatite crystals is preceded by an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) precursor phase. ACP formation is thought to proceed through prenucleation clusters-stable clusters that are present in solution already before nucleation-as was recently demonstrated for CaCO3 (refs 15,16). However, the role of such nanometre-sized clusters as building blocks for ACP has been debated for many years. Here we demonstrate that the surface-induced formation of apatite from simulated body fluid starts with the aggregation of prenucleation clusters leading to the nucleation of ACP before the development of oriented apatite crystals.

  4. Improved calcium sulfate recovery from a reverse osmosis retentate using eutectic freeze crystallization.

    PubMed

    Randall, D G; Mohamed, R; Nathoo, J; Rossenrode, H; Lewis, A E

    2013-01-01

    A novel low temperature crystallization process called eutectic freeze crystallization (EFC) can produce both salt(s) and ice from a reverse osmosis (RO) stream by operating at the eutectic temperature of a solution. The EFC reject stream, which is de-supersaturated with respect to the scaling component, can subsequently be recycled back to the RO process for increased water recovery. This paper looks at the feasibility of using EFC to remove calcium sulfate from an RO retentate stream and compares the results to recovery rates at 0 and 20 °C. The results showed that there was a greater yield of calcium sulfate obtained at 0 °C as compared with 20 °C. Operation under eutectic conditions, with only a 20% ice recovery, resulted in an even greater yield of calcium sulfate (48%) when compared with yields obtained at operating temperatures of 0 and 20 °C (15% at 0 °C and 13% at 20 °C). The theoretical calcium recoveries were found to be 75 and 70% at 0 and 20 °C respectively which was higher than the experimentally determined values. The EFC process has the added advantage of producing water along with a salt. PMID:23128631

  5. Exotic behavior and crystal structures of calcium under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Oganov, Artem R.; Ma, Yanming; Xu, Ying; Errea, Ion; Bergara, Aitor; Lyakhov, Andriy O.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental studies established that calcium undergoes several counterintuitive transitions under pressure: fcc ? bcc ? simple cubic ? Ca-IV ? Ca-V, and becomes a good superconductor in the simple cubic and higher-pressure phases. Here, using ab initio evolutionary simulations, we explore the behavior of Ca under pressure and find a number of new phases. Our structural sequence differs from the traditional picture for Ca, but is similar to that for Sr. The ?-tin (I41/amd) structure, rather than simple cubic, is predicted to be the theoretical ground state at 0 K and 33–71 GPa. This structure can be represented as a large distortion of the simple cubic structure, just as the higher-pressure phases stable between 71 and 134 GPa. The structure of Ca-V, stable above 134 GPa, is a complex host-guest structure. According to our calculations, the predicted phases are superconductors with Tc increasing under pressure and reaching approximately 20 K at 120 GPa, in good agreement with experiment. PMID:20382865

  6. A simple method for quantitating the propensity for calcium oxalate crystallization in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wabner, C. L.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the propensity for spontaneous crystallization of calcium oxalate in urine, the permissible increment in oxalate is calculated. The previous method required visual observation of crystallization with the addition of oxalate, this warranted the need for a large volume of urine and a sacrifice in accuracy in defining differences between small incremental changes of added oxalate. Therefore, this method has been miniaturized and spontaneous crystallization is detected from the depletion of radioactive oxalate. The new "micro" method demonstrated a marked decrease (p < 0.001) in the permissible increment in oxalate in urine of stone formers versus normal subjects. Moreover, crystallization inhibitors added to urine, in vitro (heparin or diphosphonate) or in vivo (potassium citrate administration), substantially increased the permissible increment in oxalate. Thus, the "micro" method has proven reliable and accurate in discriminating stone forming from control urine and in distinguishing changes of inhibitory activity.

  7. Thermal-Diffusivity Dependence on Temperature of Gadolinium Calcium Oxoborate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.; ?ukasiewicz, T.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal diffusivities of pure and doped gadolinium calcium oxoborate (GdCOB) single crystals were measured as a function of the temperature along optical indicatrix axes X, Y, and Z. Three GdCOB samples were investigated, chemically pure single crystal, the one doped with 4 at% of Nd and the next one doped with 7 at% of Yb. Measurements were carried out for temperature range 40 °C to 300 °C. Determination of the thermal diffusivity based on an analysis of thermal wave propagation in the sample. For a detection of temperature disturbance propagating in the sample the mirage effect was used. Obtained results show that the thermal diffusivity decreases with the increase of sample temperature for all investigated crystals. The GdCOB single crystals reveal a strong anisotropy. The thermal diffusivity along Y direction has the highest value while values obtained in X and Z axes are much lower. Dopants cause decrease in the thermal diffusivity for all investigated directions.

  8. Isolation and metagenomic characterization of bacteria associated with calcium carbonate and struvite precipitation in a pure moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Leyva-Díaz, J C; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A; Muñoz-Palazon, B; Rivadeneyra, A; Poyatos, J M; Rivadeneyra, M A; Martinez-Toledo, M V

    2015-01-01

    A bench-scale pure moving bed bioreactor-membrane bioreactor (MBBR-MBR) used for the treatment of urban wastewater was analyzed for the identification of bacterial strains with the potential capacity for calcium carbonate and struvite biomineral formation. Isolation of mineral-forming strains on calcium carbonate and struvite media revealed six major colonies with a carbonate or struvite precipitation capacity in the biofouling on the membrane surface and showed that heterotrophic bacteria with the ability to precipitate calcium carbonate and struvite constituted ~7.5% of the total platable bacteria. These belonged to the genera Lysinibacillus, Trichococcus, Comamomas and Bacillus. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial communities in the suspended cells and membrane biofouling showed a high degree of similarity in all the samples collected with respect to bacterial assemblage. The study of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified through pyrosequencing suggested that ~21% of the total bacterial community identified in the biofouling could potentially form calcium carbonate or struvite crystals in the pure MBBR-MBR system used for the treatment of urban wastewater. PMID:26000766

  9. Ion-implanted optical-stripe waveguides in neodymium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Chen, Feng; Jaque, Daniel; Gao, Wen-Lan; Zhang, Huai-Jin; Solé, Jose Garcia; Ma, Hong-Ji

    2009-05-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical-stripe waveguides in neodymium-doped calcium barium niobate (Nd:CBN) crystals by using He ion implantation assisted with a mask. The guided-mode profiles are successfully modeled through numerical simulations. After annealing at 200 degrees C for 30 min, the waveguide propagation loss could be reduced down to ~3 dB/cm. Room-temperature microluminescence and micro-Raman investigations reveal that the crystal bulk features are well preserved in the active volume of the waveguide, suggesting possible applications as integrated photonic devices. PMID:19412298

  10. Concave Urinary Crystallines: Direct Evidence of Calcium Oxalate Crystals Dissolution by Citrate In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yun-Feng; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Guang-Na; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The changes in urinary crystal properties in patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) calculi after oral administration of potassium citrate (K3cit) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), and zeta potential analyzer. The AFM and SEM results showed that the surface of urinary crystals became concave, the edges and corners of crystals became blunt, the average size of urinary crystallines decreased significantly, and aggregation of urinary crystals was reduced. These changes were attributed to the significant increase in concentration of excreted citrate to 492 ± 118?mg/L after K3cit intake from 289 ± 83?mg/L before K3cit intake. After the amount of urinary citrate was increased, it complexed with Ca2+ ions on urinary crystals, which dissolved these crystals. Thus, the appearance of concave urinary crystals was a direct evidence of CaOx dissolution by citrate in vivo. The XRD results showed that the quantities and species of urinary crystals decreased after K3cit intake. The mechanism of inhibition of formation of CaOx stones by K3cit was possibly due to the complexation of Ca2+ with citrate, increase in urine pH, concentration of urinary inhibitor glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and the absolute value of zeta potential after K3cit intake. PMID:24363634

  11. Surface roughness and packaging tightness affect calcium lactate crystallization on Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, P; Kindstedt, P S

    2014-01-01

    Calcium lactate crystals that sometimes form on Cheddar cheese surfaces are a significant expense to manufacturers. Researchers have identified several postmanufacture conditions such as storage temperature and packaging tightness that contribute to crystal formation. Anecdotal reports suggest that physical characteristics at the cheese surface, such as roughness, cracks, and irregularities, may also affect crystallization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of surface roughness and packaging tightness on crystal formation in smoked Cheddar cheese. Four 20-mm-thick cross-section slices were cut perpendicular to the long axis of a retail block (~300g) of smoked Cheddar cheese using a wire cutting device. One cut surface of each slice was lightly etched with a cheese grater to create a rough, grooved surface; the opposite cut surface was left undisturbed (smooth). The 4 slices were vacuum packaged at 1, 10, 50, and 90kPa (very tight, moderately tight, loose, very loose, respectively) and stored at 1°C. Digital images were taken at 1, 4, and 8 wk following the first appearance of crystals. The area occupied by crystals and number of discrete crystal regions (DCR) were quantified by image analysis. The experiment was conducted in triplicate. Effects of storage time, packaging tightness, surface roughness, and their interactions were evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. Surface roughness, packaging tightness, storage time, and their 2-way interactions significantly affected crystal area and DCR number. Extremely heavy crystallization occurred on both rough and smooth surfaces when slices were packaged loosely or very loosely and on rough surfaces with moderately tight packaging. In contrast, the combination of rough surface plus very tight packaging resulted in dramatic decreases in crystal area and DCR number. The combination of smooth surface plus very tight packaging virtually eliminated crystal formation, presumably by eliminating available sites for nucleation. Cut-and-wrap operations may significantly influence the crystallization behavior of Cheddar cheeses that are saturated with respect to calcium lactate and thus predisposed to form crystals. PMID:24485685

  12. A facile magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterial as potential bone graft.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xiumei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-12-01

    The calcium carbonate is the main composition of coral which has been widely used as bone graft in clinic. Herein, we readily prepared novel magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterials (MCCs) under the low-temperature conditions based on the dissolution-recrystallization reaction between unstable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and metastable vaterite-type calcium carbonate with water involved. The content of magnesium in MCCs was tailored by adjusting the proportion of ACC starting material that was prepared using magnesium as stabilizer. The phase composition of MCCs with various amounts of magnesium was composed of one, two or three kinds of calcium carbonates (calcite, aragonite, and/or magnesian calcite). The different MCCs differed in topography. The in vitro degradation of MCCs accelerated with increasing amount of introduced magnesium. The MCCs with a certain amount of magnesium not only acquired higher compressive strength, but also promoted in vitro cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the facile MCCs shed light on their potential as bone graft. PMID:26539810

  13. Summary of ENDF/B-V evaluations for carbon, calcium, iron, copper, and lead and ENDF/B-V Revision 2 for calcium and iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y

    1982-09-01

    This report, together with documents already published, describes the ENDF/B-V evaluations of the neutron and gamma-ray-production cross sections for carbon, calcium, iron, copper, and lead and the ENDF/B-V Revision 2 evaluations for calcium and iron.

  14. pH control in biological systems using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; van Turnhout, A G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-05-01

    Due to its abundance, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has high potentials as a source of alkalinity for biotechnological applications. The application of CaCO3 in biological systems as neutralizing agent is, however, limited due to potential difficulties in controlling the pH. The objective of the present study was to determine the dominant processes that control the pH in an acid-forming microbial process in the presence of CaCO3. To achieve that, a mathematical model was made with a minimum set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions that was able to reproduce the experimental data of a batch fermentation experiment using finely powdered CaCO3. In the model, thermodynamic equilibrium was assumed for all speciation, complexation and precipitation reactions whereas, rate limited reactions were included for the biological fatty acid production, the mass transfer of CO2 from the liquid phase to the gas phase and the convective transport of CO2 out of the gas phase. The estimated pH-pattern strongly resembled the measured pH, suggesting that the chosen set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions were establishing the experimental pH. A detailed analysis of the reaction system with the aid of the model revealed that the pH establishment was most sensitive to four factors: the mass transfer rate of CO2 to the gas phase, the biological acid production rate, the partial pressure of CO2 and the Ca(+2) concentration in the solution. Individual influences of these factors on the pH were investigated by extrapolating the model to a continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) case. This case study indicates how the pH of a commonly used continuous biotechnological process could be manipulated and adjusted by altering these four factors. Achieving a better insight of the processes controlling the pH of a biological system using CaCO3 as its neutralizing agent can result in broader applications of CaCO3 in biotechnological industries. PMID:25425281

  15. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition. PMID:25411524

  16. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8807

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady D.; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Microcosm experiments were performed in which Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and bicarbonate concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Disappearance of soluble calcium was used as an indicator of CaCO3 formation; results from metabolically active microcosms were compared to controls with no cells or no carbonate added. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment with approximately 18.6 mg of calcium in the solid phase. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of calcium was removed in the solid phase. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. Removal of inorganic carbon by fixation into biomass was insignificant compared to the mass of inorganic carbon removed by incorporation into the growing CaCO3 solid.

  17. Crystal structure of complex natural aluminum magnesium calcium iron oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2010-07-15

    The structure of a new natural oxide found near the Tashelga River (Eastern Siberia) was studied by X-ray diffraction. The pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell parameters are a = 5.6973(1) A, b = 17.1823(4) A, c = 23.5718(5) A, {beta} = 90{sup o}, sp. gr. Pc. The structure was refined to R = 0.0516 based on 4773 reflections with vertical bar F vertical bar > 7{sigma}(F) taking into account the twin plane perpendicular to the z axis (the twin components are 0.47 and 0.53). The crystal-chemical formula (Z = 4) is Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}{sup IV}Fe{sub 2}{sup (2+)IV}[Al{sub 14}{sup VI}O{sub 31}(OH)][Al{sub 2}{sup IV}O][Al{sup IV}]AL{sup IV}(OH)], where the Roman numerals designate the coordination of the atoms. The structure of the mineral is based on wide ribbons of edge-sharing Al octahedra (an integral part of the spinel layer). The ribbons run along the shortest x axis and are inclined to the y and z axes. The adjacent ribbons are shifted with respect to each other along the y axis, resulting in the formation of step-like layers in which the two-ribbon thickness alternates with the three-ribbon thickness. Additional Al octahedra and Mg and Fe{sup 2+} tetrahedra are located between the ribbons. The layers are linked together to form a three-dimensional framework by Al tetrahedra, Ca polyhedra, and hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups.

  18. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE AND CALCIUM CARBONATE PARTICLE SIZE EFFECTS ON REACTIVITY WITH SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of measurements of the effect of in situ calcium-based sorbent particle size upon reactivity with 3000 ppm SO2 in an 1100 c drop-tube furnace, using on-line collection of the reacted sorbent with a particle cascade impactor. Significant agglomeration occ...

  19. Basic calcium phosphate crystal-induced Egr-1 expression stimulates mitogenesis in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiao R.; Sun Yubo; Wenger, Leonor; Cheung, Herman S. . E-mail: hcheung@med.miami.edu

    2005-05-13

    Previously, we have reported that basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals stimulate mitogenesis and synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases in cultured human foreskin and synovial fibroblasts. However, the detailed mechanisms involved are still unclear. In the present study, using RT-PCR and Egr-1 promoter analysis we showed that BCP crystals could stimulate early growth response gene Egr-1 transcription through a PKC{alpha}-dependent p44/p42 MAPK pathway. Using a retrovirus gene expression system (Clontech) to overexpress Egr-1 in human fibroblast BJ-1 cells resulted in promotion of mitogenesis measured either by MTT cell proliferation analysis or by direct cell counting. The results demonstrate that Egr-1 may play a key role in mediating BCP crystal-induced synovial fibroblast mitogenesis.

  20. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  1. MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS DEMONSTRATE THE ROLE OF PLANT CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS AS AN EFFECTIVE DEFENSE AGAINST CHEWING INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate is the most abundant insoluble mineral found in plants and its crystals have been reported in over 200 plant families. In the barrel medic, Medicago truncatula Gaertn., these crystals accumulate predominantly in a sheath surrounding secondary veins of leaves. Mutants of M. truncatul...

  2. Immobilization of Pseudomonas sp. DG17 onto sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Qi; Hua, Fei; Zhao, Yi Cun; Li, Yi; Wang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. DG17, capable of degrading crude oil, was immobilized in sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate for biodegradation of crude oil contaminated soil. In this work, proportion of independent variables, the laboratory immobilization parameters, the micromorphology and internal structure of the immobilized granule, as well as the crude oil biodegradation by sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate immobilized cells and sodium alginate–attapulgite immobilized cells were studied to build the optimal immobilization carrier and granule-forming method. The results showed that the optimal concentrations of sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate and calcium chloride were 2.5%–3.5%, 0.5%–1%, 3%–7% and 2%–4%, respectively. Meanwhile, the optimal bath temperature, embedding cell amount, reaction time and multiplication time were 50–60 °C, 2%, 18 h and 48 h, respectively. Moreover, biodegradation was enhanced by immobilized cells with a total petroleum hydrocarbon removal ranging from 33.56% ± 3.84% to 56.82% ± 3.26% after 20 days. The SEM results indicated that adding calcium carbonate was helpful to form internal honeycomb-like pores in the immobilized granules. PMID:26019567

  3. Preservation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: effect of Mayer's haematoxylin staining period

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, T; Ishikawa, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To clarify the deleterious effects of Mayer's haematoxylin staining procedure which result in a decrease in, or complete loss of, the number of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals, and to determine the proper staining period for preserving the crystals in a histological paraffin section of articular tissues.?METHODS—Paraffin sections of CPPD crystal-bearing articular tissues of six patients were stained with Mayer's haematoxylin for 3, 8, or 15 minutes, and subsequently with eosin for one minute. The specimens were examined with an Olympus BHS polarised light microscope. The pH of Mayer's haematoxylin solution was measured with a TOA pH meter.?RESULTS—Positive birefringent CPPD crystals were seen clearly in all specimens stained with Mayer's haematoxylin for three minutes. The specimens stained for eight minutes showed a reduced number of crystals. No crystals were seen in the specimens stained for 15 minutes. Ordinary light microscopy showed no notable differences in the stainability of nucleus, cell membrane, and their surrounding tissues among specimens when stained with Mayer's haematoxylin for either 3, 8, or 15 minutes. The pH of Mayer's haematoxylin solution was 2.31.?CONCLUSIONS—To find CPPD crystals in the paraffin sections of articular tissues, the staining period with Mayer's haematoxylin should be limited to three minutes. The longer the staining period, the greater the reduction in the number of crystals owing to the strong acidity of the haematoxylin solution. A staining period of 15 minutes causes a complete loss of CPPD crystals.?? PMID:11114290

  4. Reinforcement of calcium phosphate cement with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and bovine serum albumin for injectable bone substitute applications.

    PubMed

    Chew, Kean-Khoon; Low, Kah-Ling; Sharif Zein, Sharif Hussein; McPhail, David S; Gerhardt, Lutz-Christian; Roether, Judith A; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the development of novel alternative injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composites for orthopaedic applications. The new CPC composites comprise ?-tri-calcium phosphate (?-TCP) and di-calcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) mixed with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and incorporated with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or functionalized MWCNTs (MWCNTs-OH and MWCNTs-COOH). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), compressive strength tests, injectability tests, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to evaluate the properties of the final products. Compressive strength tests and SEM observations demonstrated particularly that the concomitant admixture of BSA and MWCNT improved the mechanical properties, resulting in stronger CPC composites. The presence of MWCNTs and BSA influenced the morphology of the hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in the CPC matrix. BSA was found to act as a promoter of HA growth when bounded to the surface of CPC grains. MWCNT-OH-containing composites exhibited the highest compressive strengths (16.3 MPa), being in the range of values for trabecular bone (2-12 MPa). PMID:21316621

  5. Calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal induced changes in glycoproteome of distal renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chiangjong, Wararat; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2011-06-01

    Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals can adhere onto the apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells. This process is associated with crystal growth and aggregation, resulting in kidney stone formation. Glycoproteins have been thought to play roles in response to crystal adhesion. However, components of the glycoproteome that are involved in this cellular response remain largely unknown. Our present study therefore aimed to identify altered glycoproteins upon COD crystal adhesion onto tubular epithelial cells representing distal nephron, the initiating site of kidney stone formation. Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells were maintained in culture medium with or without COD crystals for 48 h (n = 5 flasks per group). Cellular proteins were extracted, resolved by 2-DE and visualized by SYPRO Ruby total protein stain, whereas glycoproteins were detected by Pro-Q Emerald glycoprotein dye. Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed 16 differentially expressed glycoprotein spots, whose corresponding total protein levels were not changed by COD crystal adhesion. These altered glycoproteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses, and potential glycosylation sites were identified by the GlycoMod tool. For example, glycoforms of three proteasome subunits (which have a major role in regulating cell-cell dissociation) were up-regulated, whereas a glycoform of actin-related protein 3 (ARP3) (which plays an important role in cellular integrity) was down-regulated. These coordinated changes implicate that COD crystal adhesion induced cell dissociation and declined cellular integrity in the distal nephron. Our findings provide some novel insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of kidney stone disease at the molecular level, particularly cell-crystal interactions. PMID:21491055

  6. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  7. Calcium carbonate precipitation by strain Bacillus licheniformis AK01, newly isolated from loamy soil: a promising alternative for sealing cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Ali; Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Vali, Hojatollah; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2015-01-01

    The relevant experiments were designed to determine the ability of indigenous bacterial strains isolated from limestone caves, mineral springs, and loamy soils to induce calcium carbonate precipitation. Among all isolates examined in this study, an efficient carbonate-precipitating soil bacterium was selected from among the isolates and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences as Bacillus licheniformis AK01. The ureolytic isolate was able to grow well on alkaline carbonate-precipitation medium and precipitate calcium carbonate more than 1?g?L(-1). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) examinations were performed in order to confirm the presence of calcium carbonate in the precipitate and to determine which polymorphs were present. The selected isolate was determined to be an appropriate candidate for application in a surface treatment of cement-based material to improve the properties of the mortar. Biodeposition of a layer of calcite on the surface of cement specimens resulted in filling in pore spaces. This could be an alternative method to improve the durability of the mortar. The kind of bacterial culture and medium composition had a profound impact on the resultant CaCO(3) crystal morphology. PMID:25590872

  8. Effect of a new functional double-hydrophilic block copolymer PAAL on the morphology of calcium carbonate particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, M. . E-mail: leiming@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Tang, W.H.; Yu, J.G.

    2005-04-20

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) particles with various shapes were prepared by the reaction of sodium carbonate with calcium chloride in the presence of a new functional double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (acrylic acid)-block-(acrylic hydroxy lactide) (PAAL) at room temperature. The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of pH, concentration of PAAL and CaCO{sub 3} on the crystal form and morphologies of the as-prepared CaCO{sub 3} were investigated. The results show that pH, concentration of PAAL and CaCO{sub 3} are important parameters for the control of morphologies of CaCO{sub 3}. Depending on the experimental conditions, various morphologies of CaCO{sub 3}, such as plate-like aggregates, poly-nucleated spheres, ellipsoids, monodispersed spheres, rhombohedras, etc., can be obtained. Especially, the optimal experimental conditions for the production of monodispersed spherical CaCO{sub 3} particles were determined.

  9. Factors affecting ex-situ aqueous mineral carbonation using calcium and magnesium silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonation of magnesium- and calcium-silicate minerals to form their respective carbonates is one method to sequester carbon dioxide. Process development studies have identified reactor design as a key component affecting both the capital and operating costs of ex-situ mineral sequestration. Results from mineral carbonation studies conducted in a batch autoclave were utilized to design and construct a unique continuous pipe reactor with 100% recycle (flow-loop reactor). Results from the flow-loop reactor are consistent with batch autoclave tests, and are being used to derive engineering data necessary to design a bench-scale continuous pipeline reactor.

  10. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change. PMID:24892495

  11. Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jun Young

    This paper focuses on the fabrication via simple melt blending of thermotropic liquid crystal polyester (TLCP) nanocomposites reinforced with a very small quantity of modified carbon nanotube (CNT) and the unique effects ...

  12. Structural and chemical characteristics and maturation of the calcium-phosphate crystals formed during the calcification of the organic matrix synthesized by chicken osteoblasts in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rey, C; Kim, H M; Gerstenfeld, L; Glimcher, M J

    1995-10-01

    The calcium-phosphate (CA-P) crystals formed in the extracellular organic matrix synthesized by chicken osteoblasts in cell culture were examined after 30, 40, and 60 days of culture by a number of physical and chemical techniques including chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy of isolated crystals, and resolution-enhanced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The data reveal that the solid inorganic calcium-phosphate phase consists of a very poorly crystalline apatite, having a low carbonate content and containing acid phosphate groups. The chemical and structural characteristics are generally similar to the apatite crystals found in young newly synthesized bone but there were small but significant differences found. The major significant differences noted were the rate at which maturational changes occurred in the crystals formed in cell culture compared with those noted in vivo and in synthetic carbonate apatite crystals equilibrated with the same cell culture medium, and the persistence of labile groups, especially HPO4(-2) ions during a relatively long period of incubation. Despite extensive chemical efforts to degrade the organic constituents and to disperse the individual crystals isolated from the organic matrix constituents, a large proportion of the crystals were found to be organized in both loosely and densely packed relatively large roughly spherical aggregates. A few of the aggregates were organized in the form of fibrils with the crystals oriented with their c-axes roughly parallel to the long axes of the crystal aggregate. With briefer periods of chemical treatment, larger aggregates of crystals were occasionally observed in which there was a distinct axial periodicity of approximately 70 nm. In such collagen-crystal fragments, the crystals were well-oriented with their c-axis roughly parallel to the long axes of the aggregate similar to the organization and relationships between crystals and collagen fibrils in native bone. Isolated crystals were in the shape of thin plates. At the end of 30 days of culture, many of the crystals were clearly larger than those observed in native chick bone, except for those in the very youngest (7- to 8-day-old) embryos. At the end of 40 and 60 days of culture, the crystal habit remained as thin plates but the crystals were predominantly smaller, similar to those found in older embryo and postnatal chicken bone. The marked tendency of the crystals to form relatively large aggregates that resist dispersion by techniques that readily disperse the crystals of bone, and the presence of a significant number of larger crystals has also been observed in studies of calcified cartilage. Resolution enhanced FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of a high concentration of labile phosphate groups, especially after 30 days of culture and just after the plateau of mineralization is reached. PMID:8686515

  13. [Study on solid dispersion of precipitated calcium carbonate-based oleanolic acid].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Jia, Xiao-bin; Jiang, Yan-rong; Sun, E

    2015-05-01

    Oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate solid dispersion was prepared by using solvent evaporation method. The microscopic structure and physicochemical properties of solid dispersion were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). And its in vitro release also was investigated. The properties of the precipitated calcium carbonate was studied which was as a carrier of oleanolic acid solid dispersion. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested that oleanolic acid may be present in solid dispersion as amorphous substance. The in vitro release determination results of oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate (1: 5) solid dispersion showed accumulated dissolution rate of.oleanolic acid was up to 90% at 45 min. Accelerating experiment showed that content and in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid solid dispersion did not change after storing over 6 months. The results indicated that in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid was improved greatly by the solid dispersion with precipitated calcium carbonate as a carrier. The solid dispersion is a stabilizing system which has actual applied value. PMID:26390651

  14. A model for calcium carbonate neutralization in the presence of armoring

    E-print Network

    Primicerio, Mario

    A model for calcium carbonate neutralization in the presence of armoring L. Fusia , M. Primicerioa (CaSO4 ) which, in turn, may accumulate on the reaction surface, hindering the neutralizing process (armoring). We suppose that neutralization is governed by a first order reaction, with the reaction rate

  15. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    E-print Network

    Falkowski, Paul G.

    Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro Yael by Paul G. Falkowski, November 8, 2007 (sent for review September 15, 2007) The evolution cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i

  16. Otoliths are crystalline structures com-posed of calcium carbonate and are ideal

    E-print Network

    1 Otoliths are crystalline structures com- posed of calcium carbonate and are ideal structures). Otoliths grow throughout the life of fish, are metabolically inert, and are typically available as a his and Cas- selman, 1993). Linear and shape morphometrics of otoliths have been widely used for fish stock

  17. Coexistence of three calcium carbonate polymorphs in the shell of the Antarctic clam Laternula elliptica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrke, Gernot; Poigner, Harald; Wilhelms-Dick, Dorothee; Brey, Thomas; Abele, Doris

    2012-05-01

    We analyzed shell cuts of five individuals of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica from three locations along the Antarctic Peninsula by means of Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) as well as Electron Microprobe (EMP). The shell of L. elliptica has been previously described as being composed of aragonite exclusively. Now, CRM mapping reveals that three polymorphs of calcium carbonate - aragonite, calcite, and vaterite - are present in the chondrophore region of the examined individuals. Annual shell growth layers continue through aragonite and vaterite, suggesting simultaneous mineralization of both polymorphs. Spatially congruent EMP scans showed that the calcium carbonate polymorph affects the distribution of magnesium and strontium within the chondrophore. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the coexistence of these three calcium carbonate polymorphs within the mineralized structures of a marine calcifying organism. Particularly the presence of vaterite is unexpected, but shows striking similarities to some fish otoliths. The strong effect of the calcium carbonate polymorph on trace element incorporation restrict the suitability of magnesium and strontium based proxies for the chondrophore area of L. elliptica.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION STATES OF WATER SYSTEMS (TECHNICAL NOTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emphasis is given to the fact that saturation indexes only indicate the tendency of a water to dissolve or precipitate calcium carbonate (CaCo3). The rate at which a given water attains equilibrium cannot be derived from the saturation index value.

  19. ANNUAL REPORT. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project is to investigate the role of calcium carbonate grain coatings on adsorption and heterogeneous reduction reactions of key chemical and radioactive contaminants in sediments on the Hanford Site. Research will ascertain whether these coatings p...

  20. PROGRESS REPORT. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project explores the behavior of calcium carbonate grain coatings, including how they form and dissolve, their reactivity toward key Hanford contaminants, their impact (as surface coatings) on the reactivity of other mineral substrates, and on their in-ground composition and...

  1. CO.sub.2 Pretreatment prevents calcium carbonate formation

    DOEpatents

    Neavel, Richard C. (Baytown, TX); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL); Chaback, Joseph J. (Worthington, OH)

    1980-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 14 to about 68 atmospheres and a carbon dioxide partial pressure within the range from about 14 to about 34 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 100.degree. to about 200.degree. C.

  2. Rapid hydrothermal flow synthesis and characterisation of carbonate- and silicate-substituted calcium phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Jonathan C; Rehman, Ihtesham; Darr, Jawwad A

    2013-01-01

    A range of crystalline and nano-sized carbonate- and silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite has been successfully produced by using continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis technology. Ion-substituted calcium phosphates are better candidates for bone replacement applications (due to improved bioactivity) as compared to phase-pure hydroxyapatite. Urea was used as a carbonate source for synthesising phase pure carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO3-HA) with ?5?wt% substituted carbonate content (sample 7.5CO3-HA) and it was found that a further increase in urea concentration in solution resulted in biphasic mixtures of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the particle size of hydroxyapatite decreased with increasing urea concentration. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy result revealed a calcium deficient apatite with Ca:P molar ratio of 1.45 (±0.04) in sample 7.5CO3-HA. For silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiO4-HA) silicon acetate was used as a silicate ion source. It was observed that a substitution threshold of ?1.1?wt% exists for synthesis of SiO4-HA in the continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis system, which could be due to the decreasing yields with progressive increase in silicon acetate concentration. All the as-precipitated powders (without any additional heat treatments) were analysed using techniques including Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Differential scanning calorimetry, Thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:22983020

  3. Hot alkali carbonation of sodium metaphosphate modified fly ash/calcium aluminate blend hydrothermal cements

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1996-11-01

    Sodium metaphosphate-modified fly ash/calcium aluminate blend (SFCB) cements were prepared by autoclaving for 1 day at 300 C and their resistance was evaluated in a highly concentrated Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at 300 C. The hydroxyapatite and analcime phases formed in the autoclaved SFCB cements played an essential role in conferring resistance to the degradation of cements caused by alkali carbonation. Although the carbonating reaction of the analcime phase led to the formation of cancrinite, this analcime cancrinite transformation did not show any influence on the changes in the mechanical and physical properties of the cements. Additionally, there was no formation of the water-soluble calcium bicarbonate in the cements exposed for 28 days. Contrarily, the conventional class G cement systems were very vulnerable to a hot alkali carbonation. The major reason for the damage caused by carbonation of the cements was the fact that the xonotlite phase formed in the 300{degree} autoclaved cements was converted into two carbonation products, calcite and pectolite. Furthermore, the reaction between calcite and carbonic acid derived from Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} led to the formation of water-soluble calcium bicarbonate, thereby causing the alteration of dense structures into porous ones and the loss of strength of cements.

  4. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein GCaMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Akerboom, Jasper; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-07-01

    The genetically encoded fluorescent calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. Fluorescent proteins and their engineered variants have played an important role in the study of biology. The genetically encoded calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 comprises a circularly permuted fluorescent protein coupled to the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and a calmodulin target peptide, M13, derived from the intracellular calmodulin target myosin light-chain kinase and has been used to image calcium transients in vivo. To aid rational efforts to engineer improved variants of GCaMP2, this protein was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.1, b = 47.1, c = 68.8 Å, ? = 100.5° and one GCaMP2 molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure was phased by molecular replacement and refinement is currently under way.

  6. Evidence for Calcium Carbonate at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Arvidson, R. E.; Hoffman, J.; Niles, P. B.; Smith, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Phoenix mission has recently finished its study of the north polar environment of Mars with the aim to help understand both the current climate and to put constraints on past climate. An important part of understanding the past climate is the study of secondary minerals, those formed by reaction with volatile compounds such as H2O and CO2. This work describes observations made by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix Lander related to carbonate minerals. Carbonates are generally considered to be products of aqueous processes. A wet and warmer climate during the early history of Mars coupled with a much denser CO2 atmosphere are ideal conditions for the aqueous alteration of basaltic materials and the subsequent formation of carbonates. Carbonates (Mg- and Ca-rich) are predicted to be thermodynamically stable minerals in the present martian environment, however, there have been only a few indications of carbonates on the surface by a host of orbiting and landed missions to Mars. Carbonates (Mg-rich) have been suggested to be a component (2-5 wt %) of the martian global dust based upon orbital thermal emission spectroscopy. The identifications, based on the presence of a 1480 cm-1 absorption feature, are consistent with Mgcarbonates. A similar feature is observed in brighter, undisturbed soils by Mini-TES on the Gusev plains. Recently, Mg-rich carbonates have been identified in the Nili Fossae region by the CRISM instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Carbonates have also been confirmed as aqueous alteration phases in martian meteorites so it is puzzling why there have not been more discoveries of carbonates by landers, rovers, and orbiters. Carbonates may hold important clues about the history of liquid water and aqueous processes on the surface of Mars.

  7. Laser ablation MC-ICP-MS U/Pb geochronology of ocean basement calcium carbonate veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Parrish, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Given the vast areas of mid ocean ridge flanks, even small chemical changes dues to fluid-rock interaction on the flanks may significantly influence global geochemical cycles. A conductive heat flow anomaly associated with hydrothermal circulation in ocean crust exists until on average 65Ma, but it is not known whether the thermal signature is accompanied by continued fluid-rock chemical exchange. Constraining the duration of fluid-rock chemical exchange is critical for calculating robust chemical fluxes associated with ridge flank hydrothermal circulation. Calcium carbonate veins form during relatively late-stage hydrothermal alteration and can be used to estimate the duration of ridge flank hydrothermal circulation. LA-MC-ICP-MS U/Pb geochronology provides a novel and independent approach to date calcium carbonate veins, and is advantageous over using the seawater Sr isotope curve that is in part non-unique and requires assumptions about the contribution of MORB Sr from fluid-rock exchange. LA-MC-ICP-MS U/Pb analyses have been undertaken on a suite of calcium carbonate veins from a range of basement ages (1.6 - 170 Ma), spreading rates and sediment thickness. Preliminary results indicate that the temperature of formation of calcium carbonate veins place a strong control on achieving a successful U/Pb isochron. This is likely related to the temperature dependent geochemical evolution of basement fluids due to fluid-rock reaction, and the partitioning of U and Pb into calcite/aragonite. Successful U/Pb isochrons have been achieved for a range of crustal ages and spreading rates, and indicate that calcium carbonate precipitation occurs within 25Myrs of crustal formation. This is substantially shorter than 65Ma, the average extent of the conductive heat flow anomaly, and will allow for more robust estimates of the contribution of hydrothermal chemical fluxes to global geochemical cycles.

  8. Nanoscale confinement controls the crystallization of calcium phosphate: relevance to bone formation.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Bram; Beniash, Elia; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2013-10-25

    A key feature of biomineralization processes is that they take place within confined volumes, in which the local environment can have significant effects on mineral formation. Herein, we investigate the influence of confinement on the formation mechanism and structure of calcium phosphate (CaP). This is of particular relevance to the formation of dentine and bone, structures of which are based on highly mineralized collagen fibrils. CaP was precipitated within 25-300?nm diameter, cylindrical pores of track etched and anodised alumina membranes under physiological conditions, in which this system enables systematic study of the effects of the pore size in the absence of a structural match between the matrix and the growing crystals. Our results show that the main products were polycrystalline hydroxapatite (HAP) rods, together with some single crystal octacalcium phosphate (OCP) rods. Notably, we demonstrate that these were generated though an intermediate amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase, and that ACP is significantly stabilised in confinement. This effect may have significance to the mineralization of bone, which can occur through a transient ACP phase. We also show that orientation of the HAP comparable, or even superior to that seen in bone can be achieved through confinement effects alone. Although this simple experimental system cannot be considered, a direct mimic of the in vivo formation of ultrathin HAP platelets within collagen fibrils, our results show that the effects of physical confinement should not be neglected when considering the mechanisms of formation of structures, such as bones and teeth. PMID:24115275

  9. Shear-mediated crystallization from amorphous calcium phosphate to bone apatite.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xufeng; Wang, Liyang; Tian, Feng; Wang, Lizhen; Li, Ping; Feng, Qingling; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of fluid shear stress (FSS) on the conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to bone apatite is investigated. The ACP precursors are prepared by using a wet-chemistry method and further exposed to the constant FSS environment with values of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0Pa. At the designated time points, the apatites are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The results show that, the low FSS (?1.0Pa) has positive effects on the transition of ACP, characterized by the accelerated crystallization velocity and the well-organized calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) structure, whereas the high FSS (>1.0Pa) has negative effects on this conversion process, characterized by the poor CDHA crystal morphologies and the destroyed structures. The bioactivity evaluations further reveal that, compared with the FSS-free group, the CDHA prepared under 1.0Pa FSS for 9h presents the more biocompatible features with pre-osteoblast cells. These results are helpful for understanding the mechanism of apatite deposition in natural bone tissue. PMID:26454356

  10. Calcium oxalate crystals induce renal inflammation by NLRP3-mediated IL-1? secretion

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Shrikant R.; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Migliorini, Adriana; Darisipudi, Murthy N.; Vilaysane, Akosua; Muruve, Daniel; Shi, Yan; Munro, Fay; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Nephrocalcinosis, acute calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephropathy, and renal stone disease can lead to inflammation and subsequent renal failure, but the underlying pathological mechanisms remain elusive. Other crystallopathies, such as gout, atherosclerosis, and asbestosis, trigger inflammation and tissue remodeling by inducing IL-1? secretion, leading us to hypothesize that CaOx crystals may induce inflammation in a similar manner. In mice, intrarenal CaOx deposition induced tubular damage, cytokine expression, neutrophil recruitment, and renal failure. We found that CaOx crystals activated murine renal DCs to secrete IL-1? through a pathway that included NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1. Despite a similar amount of crystal deposits, intrarenal inflammation, tubular damage, and renal dysfunction were abrogated in mice deficient in MyD88; NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1; IL-1R; or IL-18. Nephropathy was attenuated by DC depletion, ATP depletion, or therapeutic IL-1 antagonism. These data demonstrated that CaOx crystals trigger IL-1?–dependent innate immunity via the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis in intrarenal mononuclear phagocytes and directly damage tubular cells, leading to the release of the NLRP3 agonist ATP. Furthermore, these results suggest that IL-1? blockade may prevent renal damage in nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23221343

  11. Investigation of self-frequency doubling crystals, yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB), doped with neodymium or ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing

    1999-09-01

    There is a need for low cost red, green, and blue (RGB) lasers for a number of commercial applications such as high-resolution laser printing, full color laser display. While semiconductor lasers still have both availability (green and blue) and beam quality (red) problems, nonlinear frequency conversion of diode-pumped solid state lasers are good alternatives. Among them, self- frequency doubling is an attractive approach because of its simpler design and lower cost. Unfortunately, few known crystals possess self-frequency doubling property. A newly discovered yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) can fill in the role because it has adequate lasing and nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency. More importantly, YCOB crystal melts congruently so that high quality, large size single crystals can be grown using conventional Czochralski melt pulling technique. The thermal mechanical properties, linear and nonlinear optical properties of YCOB, laser properties of Nd:YCOB and Yb:YCOB crystals were investigated. Based on the calculated second harmonic phase matching angles, Nd:YCOB laser rods were fabricated. Self-frequency doubled green emission with 62 mW output power and red emission with 16 mW output power were successfully demonstrated using diode-pumping. It is the first time to achieve the continuous wave (cw) red lasing in Nd doped rare-earth calcium oxyborates. Rare-earth ions doping in YCOB crystal can not only achieve lasing, but also affect the physical and chemical properties of the crystal. The stability field of YCOB is reduced in proportion to both the ionic size differences from yttrium and doping concentrations of the rare-earth ions. The doping also changes the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the material. For example, the second harmonic conversion efficiency of 20% Yb doped YCOB was enhanced by more than 15% compared to undoped YCOB. The absorption cutoff edge of 20% Yb:YCOB was red- shift by more than 60 nm. Similar effects were observed in Ce, or Pr, or Eu doped YCOB crystals. It is proposed that the rare-earth ions with variable oxidation states can serve as either donor or acceptor to the conjugated ?-orbits formed by the (BO3)3- planar groups in the YCOB structure to increase the delocalization of electron clouds, and thus increase the nonlinearity and result in the red-shift of the energy band-gap. In summary, the YCOB is the first nonhygroscopic nonlinear crystal with high damage threshold that can provide both large aperture and long nonlinear conversion length for high power laser applications. The Nd:YCOB shows promising features as a diode-pumped self-frequency doubling laser material to generate efficient, compact, low cost cw red and green emissions. Investigation of the whole rare-earth calcium oxyborate family compounds is just at the early stage. It is expected that these crystals would have a great impact on nonlinear optical device market in the very near future.

  12. The Properties and Characteristics of Concretes Containing Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3) and Synthetic Lightweight Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Matthew J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of precipitated calcium carbonate as a means for enhancing the mechanical and environmental favorability of concretes containing synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLA), which are comprised of recycled mixed plastic and fly ash. Compressive strength tests show that 2% calcium carbonate additions are able to mitigate strength decreases induced by SLA as well as decrease concrete density when compared to NWA concretes. SLA concretes containing 5% calcium carbonate do not show the same trend. Instead, strength decreases and density increases are observed. Furthermore, increases in aluminum trisulphate (AFt) phase mineralization are observed through scanning electron microscopy. Results suggest that calcium carbonate additions increase early hydration and stabilize AFt minerals thaumasite and ettringite throughout hydration. It is proposed that increased AFt phase mineralization causes reductions in concrete density. However, a limit to this relationship was observed as additions of greater than 2% calcium carbonate exceed the potential for increased hydration, causing a threshold effect that resulted in calcium carbonate acting as filler, which increases density. Improved mechanical properties and the ability to stabilize waste plastics, fly ash, and CO2 emissions make the use of 2% calcium carbonate in conjunction with SLA a favorable alternative to ordinary concretes.

  13. Climatically driven loss of calcium in steppe soil as a sink for atmospheric carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapenis, A.G.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Aparin, B.F.; Shiklomanov, A.I.; Speranskaya, N.A.; Torn, M.S.; Calef, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last several thousand years the semi-arid, cold climate of the Russian steppe formed highly fertile soils rich in organic carbon and calcium (classified as Chernozems in the Russian system). Analysis of archived soil samples collected in Kemannaya Steppe Preserve in 1920, 1947, 1970, and fresh samples collected in 1998 indicated that the native steppe Chernozems, however, lost 17-28 kg m-2 of calcium in the form of carbonates in 1970-1998. Here we demonstrate that the loss of calcium was caused by fundamental shift in the steppe hydrologic balance. Previously unleached soils where precipitation was less than potential evapotranspiration are now being leached due to increased precipitation and, possibly, due to decreased actual evapotranspiration. Because this region receives low levels of acidic deposition, the dissolution of carbonates involves the consumption of atmospheric CO2. Our estimates indicate that this climatically driven terrestrial sink of atmospheric CO2 is ???2.1-7.4 g C m-2 a-1. In addition to the net sink of atmospheric carbon, leaching of pedogenic carbonates significantly amplified seasonal amplitude of CO2 exchange between atmosphere and steppe soil. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Isotopic tracer evidence for the amorphous calcium carbonate to calcite transformation by dissolution-reprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, Anthony J.; Gagnon, Alexander C.; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2015-09-01

    Observations that some biogenic and sedimentary calcites grow from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) raise the question of how this mineralization process influences composition. However, the detailed pathway and geochemical consequences of the ACC to calcite transformation are not well constrained. This experimental study investigated the formation of calcite from ACC by using magnesium and calcium stable isotope labeling to directly probe the transformation pathway and controls on composition. Four processes were considered: dissolution-reprecipitation, solid state transformation, and combinations of these end-members. To distinguish between these scenarios, ACC was synthesized from natural isotope abundance solutions and subsequently transferred to spiked solutions that were enriched in 43Ca and 25Mg for the transformation to calcite. Isotope measurements by NanoSIMS determined the 43Ca/40Ca, and 25Mg/24Mg ratios of the resulting calcite crystals. Analysis of the data shows the transformation is best explained by a dissolution-reprecipitation process. We find that when a small amount of ACC is transferred, the isotopic signals in the resulting calcite are largely replaced by the composition of the surrounding spiked solution. When larger amounts of ACC are transferred, calcite compositions reflect a mixture between the ACC and initial solution end-member. Comparisons of the measurements to the predictions of a simple mixing model indicate that calcite compositions (1) are sensitive to relative amounts of ACC and the surrounding solution reservoir and (2) are primarily governed by the conditions at the time of ACC transformation rather than the initial ACC formation. Shifts in calcite composition over the duration of the transformation period reflect the progressive evolution of the local solution conditions. This dependence indicates the extent to which there is water available would change the end point composition on the mixing line. While these findings have significant geochemical implications, the question remains whether this transformation pathway is generally followed when biomineralization involves ACC or is particular to these inorganic experiments. Insights from this study nonetheless suggest that some types of compositional variability, such as 'vital effects', may be explained in-part by a co-evolution of reservoir and products over the duration of the transformation.

  15. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    Sekkal, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2013-01-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99?J/m2) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2?J/m2, i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images. PMID:23545842

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate reduces inflammation induced by calcium pyrophosphate crystals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Francesca; Sfriso, Paolo; Scanu, Anna; Fiocco, Ugo; Spinella, Paolo; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) is defined as a cartilage disease, synovitis involving mononuclear cell infiltration and overexpression of proinflammatory mediators is common in early and late OA. Calcium crystals deposition is thought to be a factor that likely contributes to synovial inflammation. In recent years, significant interest has emerged in the beneficial health effects attributed to the green tea polyphenols and in particular to epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). It has been demonstrated that some of the actions of EGCG are linked to its ability to interfere with cell membranes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of EGCG in some inflammatory aspects of OA and whether EGCG is able to interfere with membrane organization. We assessed the effect of EGCG on the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines released by human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and THP-1 cells stimulated with calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in presence of methyl-?-cyclodextrin (M?CD), a cholesterol-removing agent that disturbs lipid raft structures. The chemotactic effect of culture supernatants was also evaluated. EGCG inhibited interleukin (IL)-1?, transforming growth factor beta, IL-8, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) release by stimulated FLS and/or THP-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Supernatants of CPP-stimulated cells induced the migration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells which decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of EGCG. EGCG increased cell viability when added to THP-1 cells treated with M?CD. Furthermore, M?CD enhanced the inflammatory response to CPP crystals increasing IL-8 and CCL2 secretion which was inhibited by EGCG in a dose-dependent manner. This study showed that EGCG is able to reduce the inflammatory response induced by CPP crystals in vitro. The identification of EGCG as dietary supplement capable of affording protection or modulating the inflammatory response to CPP crystals may have important implications in the prevention and treatment of OA and crystal-related arthropathies. PMID:23616769

  17. Complexation/encapsulation of green tea polyphenols in mixed calcium carbonate and phosphate micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Elabbadi, Amal; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P; Ouali, Lahoussine

    2011-01-01

    We used a double-jet mixer to encapsulate water-soluble polyphenols, green tea extract (GTE), with calcium-based inorganic materials. The device mixed calcium chloride solutions with a solution of carbonate and phosphate in the presence of a GTE solution, and formed micro-particles which capture the GTE molecules. The micro-particles were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the encapsulation yield and loading of the different GTE components. We established correlations between (1) the efficiency of the GTE encapsulation and the composition of the mixed anion solutions and (2) the protonation degree of the ions and the molar ratio of calcium cations and carbonate/phosphate anions. An optimal and reproducible GTE loading of about 40% with an encapsulation yield of 65% was observed for a carbonate/phosphate molar composition of 4?:?1. In addition, our experimental results showed that the process is selective and favours the encapsulation of gallated species which form stronger complexes with calcium cations. PMID:20945969

  18. Antioxidant Properties of Polysaccharide from the Brown Seaweed Sargassum graminifolium (Turn.), and Its Effects on Calcium Oxalate Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao-Yan; Wu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Jue; Lan, Min-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Sargassum graminifolium (Turn.) (SGP) on calcium oxalate crystallization, and determined its antioxidant activities. To examine the effects of SGP on calcium oxalate crystallization, we monitored nucleation and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, using trisodium citrate as a positive control. We assessed antioxidant activities of SGP by determining its reducing power, its ability to scavenge superoxide radicals, and its activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The nucleation inhibition ratio of trisodium citrate and SGP was 58.5 and 69.2%, respectively, and crystal aggregation was inhibited by 71.4 and 76.8%, respectively. Increasing concentrations of SGP resulted in increased scavenging of superoxide anions and DPPH radicals (IC50 = 1.9 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively). These results suggest that SGP could be a candidate for treating urinary stones because of its ability to inhibit calcium oxalate crystallization and its antioxidant properties. PMID:22363225

  19. Polyelectrolyte effects on the crystallization phenomena of the lithium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watamura, Hiroto; Marukawa, Hironobu; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2013-06-01

    Anionic polyelectrolyte effects on the lithium carbonate crystallization phenomena were investigated. Li2CO3 crystals were obtained by reactive crystallization with seed crystals. Polyelectrolytes were dissolved into the reactive field before the reaction. Obtained crystals were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and crystal size and agglomeration degree were measured by the SEM images. The results show that Li2CO3 crystallized different shape and size from absence of polyelectrolyte in those reactive fields. Especially polyacrylic acid (PAA) improved on the agglomeration of the crystals and shaped them high aspect needles. Thus other experimental conditions including PAA molecular weight and concentration, reaction time, supersaturation by Li concentration were investigated in addition. As a result, obtained crystals were not different in each PAA molecular weight reactive fields. Meanwhile PAA concentration has optimum range. Li2CO3 formed less agglomeration and higher aspect around 1 g/l. In the concentration, Li2CO3 did not agglomerate regardless of aging time and Li concentration. Moreover crystals became rectangle shape in higher Li concentration.(020) face intensity of the rectangle shape crystals increased according to XRD pattern. PAA affected the facial growth. These results may provide a method of morphological change and clearly crystallization of Li2CO3.

  20. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies. PMID:22626627

  1. Electrochemically assisted co-deposition of calcium phosphate/collagen coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueni; Hu, Tao; Li, Hejun; Chen, Mengdi; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Leilei; Hou, Xianghui

    2011-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)/collagen coatings were prepared on the surface of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by electrochemically assisted co-deposition technique. The effects of collagen concentration in the electrolyte on morphology, structure and composition of the coatings were systematically investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesive strength of the coatings was also evaluated by scratch tests and tensile bond tests. It was demonstrated that the coatings of three-dimensional collagen network structure was formed on the C/C composites from the electrolyte containing collagen. The surface of the collagen network was covered by uniform CaP aggregates. The coatings were actually composites of CaP and collagen. Hydroxyapatite (HA) was a favorable composition in the coatings with the increase of the collagen concentration in the electrolyte. The formed collagen network increased the cohesive and adhesive strength of the coatings. The adhesive strength between the coatings and substrates increased as the collagen concentration in the electrolyte increased. The coatings prepared at the collagen concentration of 500 mg/L in the electrolyte were not scraped off until the applied load reached 32.0 ± 2.2 N and the average tensile adhesive strength of the coatings was 4.83 ± 0.71 MPa. After C/C coated with composite coatings (500 mg/L) being immersed in a 10-3 M Ca (OH)2 solution at 30-33 °C for 96 h, nano-structured HA/collagen coatings similar to the natural human bone were obtained on the C/C.

  2. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1990-09-01

    This research effort is designed to investigate the technical feasibility of a high-temperature, high-pressure process for the bulk separation of CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gases. The two-year contract was awarded in September 1989. This report describes the research effort and results obtained during the first year of the effort. The overall project consists of 6 tasks, four of which were active during year 01. Tasks 1 and 2 were completed during the year while activity in Tasks 3 and 6 will carry over into year 02. Tasks 4 and 5 will be initiated during year 02. Three primary objectives were met in Task 1. A literature search on the calcination-carbonation reactions of CO{sub 2} with calcium-based sorbents was completed. A high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) electrobalance reactor suitable for studying the calcination and carbonation reactions was constructed. This reactor system is now fully operable and we are routinely collecting kinetics data at temperatures in the range of 550-900{degree}C and pressures of 1 to 15 atm. Samples of nine candidate calcium-based sorbents were acquired and tested. These samples were subjected to reaction screening tests as part of Task 2. As a result of these screening tests, chemically pure calcium carbonate, chemically pure calcium acetate, and the commercial dolomite were selected for more detailed kinetic testing. In Task 3, the HTHP electrobalance reactor is being used to study the calcination-carbonation behavior of the three base sorbents as a function of calcination temperature, carbonation temperature, carbonation pressure, and CO{sub 2} concentration.

  3. High Sodium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Poor Anticrystallization Defense Aggravate Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Rat Hyperoxaluric Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sodium excretion is associated with intrarenal oxidative stress. The present study evaluated whether oxidative stress caused by high sodium (HS) may be involved in calcium oxalate crystal formation. Male rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet. Normal-sodium and HS diets were achieved by providing drinking water containing 0.3% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet with 5% hydroxyl-L-proline (HP) for 7 and 42 days to induce hyperoxaluria and/or calcium oxalate deposition. Compared to normal sodium, HS slightly increased calcium excretion despite diuresis; however, the result did not reach statistical significance. HS did not affect the hyperoxaluria, hypocalciuria or supersaturation caused by HP; however, it increased calcium oxalate crystal deposition soon after 7 days of co-treatment. Massive calcium oxalate formation and calcium crystal excretion in HS+HP rats were seen after 42 days of treatment. HP-mediated hypocitraturia was further exacerbated by HS. Moreover, HS aggravated HP-induced renal injury and tubular damage via increased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Increased urinary malondialdehyde excretion, in situ superoxide production, NAD(P)H oxidase and xanthine oxidase expression and activity, and decreased antioxidant enzyme expression or activity in the HS+HP kidney indicated exaggerated oxidative stress. Interestingly, this redox imbalance was associated with reduced renal osteopontin and Tamm-Horsfall protein expression (via increased excretion) and sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC-1 upregulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a HS diet induces massive crystal formation in the hyperoxaluric kidney; this is not due to increased urinary calcium excretion but is related to oxidative injury and loss of anticrystallization defense. PMID:26241473

  4. All three Ca[superscript 2+]-binding loops of photoproteins bind calcium ions: The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apo-aequorin and apo-obelin

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lu; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Lee, John; Rose, John; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2010-07-13

    The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apoaequorin and apo-obelin have been determined at resolutions 1.7 {angstrom} and 2.2 {angstrom}, respectively. A calcium ion is observed in each of the three EF-hand loops that have the canonical calcium-binding sequence, and each is coordinated in the characteristic pentagonal bipyramidal configuration. The calcium-loaded apo-proteins retain the same compact scaffold and overall fold as the unreacted photoproteins containing the bound substrate, 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, and also the same as the Ca{sup 2+}-discharged obelin bound with the product, coelenteramide. Nevertheless, there are easily discerned shifts in both helix and loop regions, and the shifts are not the same between the two proteins. It is suggested that these subtle shifts are the basis of the ability of these photoproteins to sense Ca{sup 2+} concentration transients and to produce their bioluminescence response on the millisecond timescale. A mechanism of intrastructural transmission of the calcium signal is proposed.

  5. Effect of Fluoride on the Morphology of Calcium Phosphate Crystals Grown on Acid-Etched Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Y.; Sun, Z.; Moradian-Oldak, J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride ion concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on acid-etched enamel as a model for tooth enamel erosion. Samples were immersed in calcification solution for 16 h and changes in crystal morphology were monitored by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Without fluoride, plate-like octacalcium phosphate crystals (20 nm thick, 2–10 ?m wide) were formed. With 1–10 mg/l fluoride, arrays of denser needle-like nanocrystals (20–30 nm wide, >500 nm in length) were formed. We conclude that there is a minimal fluoride concentration (1 mg/l) that dramatically affects the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals grown on etched enamel in vitro. PMID:19321991

  6. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  7. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  8. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Takuo; Ishida, Hiromi; Fujii, Yoshio; Ohue, Mutsumi; Kaji, Hiroshi; Hirai, Midori; Kakumoto, Mikio; Abrams, Steven A

    2010-07-01

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In 10 postmenopausal women volunteers aged 59 to 77 years (mean ± S.D., 67 ± 5.3), the fractional calcium absorption of AAACa and CaCO(3) was measured by a dual stable isotope method. (44)Ca-enriched CaCO(3) and AAACa were administered in all subjects one month apart. After a fixed-menu breakfast and pre-test urine collection (Urine 0), (42)Ca-enriched CaCl(2) was intravenously injected, followed by oral administration of (44)Ca-enriched CaCO(3) without carrier 15 minutes later, and complete urine collection for the next 24 hours (Urine 24). The fractional calcium absorption was calculated as the ratio of Augmentation of (44)Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24/ augmentation of (42)Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24. Differences and changes of (44)Ca and (42)Ca were corrected by comparing each with (43)Ca. Fractional absorption of AAACa (mean ± S.D., 23.1 ± 6.4), was distinctly and significantly higher than that of CaCO(3 )(14.7 ± 6.4; p = 0.0060 by paired t-test). The mean fractional absorption was approximately 1.57-times higher for AAACa than for CaCO(3). The serum 25(OH) vitamin D level was low (mean ± S.D., 14.2 ± 4.95 ng/ml), as is common in this age group in Japan. Among the parameters of the bone and mineral metabolism measured, none displayed a significant correlation with the fractional absorption of CaCO(3) and AAACa. Higher fractional absorption of AAACa compared with CaCO(3) supports previous reports on the more beneficial effect of AAACa than CaCO(3) for osteoporosis. PMID:22254052

  9. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, J.; Hackley, K.; Dagamac, M.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1993-09-01

    This research is an investigation of calcium hydroxide, a sulfur-capturing sorbent, as a binder for coal fines. The reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, referred to as carbonation, is being studied as a method of improving pellet quality. Carbonation forms a cementitious matrix of calcium carbonate. The effect of particle size and compaction pressure on pellet strength was studied using a laboratory hydraulic press. Particle distributions with mean sizes of 200, 90 and 40 microns were tested. The results indicate that pellet strength increased with decreasing particle size and increasing compaction pressure when calcium hydroxide was used as a binder. Pellets containing 10 wt% calcium hydroxide increased in strength by approximately 40% when air dried for one day. This increase in strength is attributed to carbonation of the calcium hydroxide via atmospheric carbon dioxide. Corn starch, an adhesive binder, was tested at the finest particle size. Pellet strength did not increase as a function of increasing compaction pressure. At the finest particle size and highest compaction pressure (18,750 psi), dried pellets formed with 2 wt% corn starch were equivalent in strength to pellets containing 5 wt% calcium hydroxide.

  10. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  11. Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2011-09-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4+ production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  12. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4+ production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface. PMID:21943229

  13. Investigating the Role of Carbonate Ion Concentration on the Magnesium Content of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, C.; Dove, P. M.; Han, N.

    2011-12-01

    The fields of biomineralization and carbonate geochemistry are undergoing a paradigm shift with the realization that the formation of calcite with diverse compositions and textures can be understood within the framework of multiple pathways to mineralization. Many organisms do not form their skeletons via the classical step-growth process, but instead mineralization occurs through a mesocrystal pathway that begins with the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which subsequently transforms to calcite. Little is known about factors that regulate this type of calcification because the last 50 years of research have focused almost entirely on step-growth processes. In particular, new findings indicate that the chemical signatures and properties of calcites that form via an amorphous pathway are significantly different. Variable temperature has been shown to influence the amount of magnesium that is incorporated into ACC, but the effect of alkalinity has not been constrained. Here, a flow-through method was developed to produce ACC within a geochemically relevant pH range and with a constant supersaturation, and to determine the effect of carbonate ion concentration on magnesium uptake. The experimental approach uses a high precision syringe pump to prepare ACC under specified and constant chemical conditions. This study used two syringes that contained: 1) 100 ml of MgCl2?6H2O and CaCl2?2H2O such that the Mg/Ca ratio is fixed at 5:1 (modern seawater), and 2) 100 ml of 60mM - 400mM NaHCO3. The initial sodium bicarbonate solutions were buffered to a pH of 9.75 using NaOH, and upon mixing with the 5:1 Mg/Ca solution the resulting pH range was 9.2 - 9.7. All experiments were performed at temperatures between 21.5 and 23 degrees Celsius. Solution and solids were collected on 0.20 micron filter paper with a vacuum pump running continuously. Experiments were typically conducted for an hour and a half and all samples were rinsed with distilled deionized water before collection. The final ACC samples were characterized using a combination of SEM, Raman Spectroscopy, and ICP-OES. Preliminary results indicate that the Mg content of ACC increases with the carbonate ion concentration of the input solution. This shift in composition corresponds with measurements of a smaller average particle size. Future work will determine if the ACC that forms at these different carbonate concentrations subsequently influences the composition and structure of the final crystalline products. Findings from this work may lead to better predictions of how biological calcification processes will respond to the shifts in carbonate chemistry that accompany ocean acidification.

  14. A geospatial assessment of the relationship between reef flat community calcium carbonate production and wave energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamylton, S. M.; Pescud, A.; Leon, J. X.; Callaghan, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of benthic communities inhabiting coral reefs to produce calcium carbonate underpins the development of reef platforms and associated sedimentary landforms, as well as the fixation of inorganic carbon and buffering of diurnal pH fluctuations in ocean surface waters. Quantification of the relationship between reef flat community calcium carbonate production and wave energy provides an empirical basis for understanding and managing this functionally important process. This study employs geospatial techniques across the reef platform at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, to (1) map the distribution and estimate the total magnitude of reef community carbonate production and (2) empirically ascertain the influence of wave energy on community carbonate production. A World-View-2 satellite image and a field data set of 364 ground referencing points are employed, along with data on physical reef characteristics (e.g. bathymetry, rugosity) to map and validate the spatial distribution of the four major community carbonate producers (live coral, carbonate sand, green calcareous macroalgae and encrusting calcified algae) across the reef platform. Carbonate production is estimated for the complete reef platform from the composition of these community components. A synoptic model of wave energy is developed using the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) two-dimensional model for the entire reef platform. The relationship between locally derived measures of carbonate production and wave energy is evaluated at both the global scale and local scale along spatial gradients of wave energy traversing the reef platform. A wave energy threshold is identified, below which carbonate production levels appear to increase with wave energy and above which mechanical forcing reduces community production. This implies an optimal set of hydrodynamic conditions characterized by wave energy levels of approximately 300 J m-2, providing an empirical basis for management of potential changes in community carbonate production associated with climate change-driven increases in wave energy.

  15. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    SciTech Connect

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-09-21

    Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

  16. Construction of two ureolytic model organisms for the study of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James; Kaufman, Megan; Rothman, Adam; Gupta, Rashmi; Redden, George; Schuster, Martin; Colwell, Frederick; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-09-01

    Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MJK1 and Escherichia coli MJK2, were constructed that both express green fluorescent protein (GFP) and carry out ureolysis. These two novel model organisms are useful for studying bacterial carbonate mineral precipitation processes and specifically ureolysis-driven microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP). The strains were constructed by adding plasmid-borne urease genes (ureABC, ureD and ureFG) to the strains P. aeruginosa AH298 and E. coli AF504gfp, both of which already carried unstable GFP derivatives. The ureolytic activities of the two new strains were compared to the common, non-GFP expressing, model organism Sporosarcina pasteurii in planktonic culture under standard laboratory growth conditions. It was found that the engineered strains exhibited a lower ureolysis rate per cell but were able to grow faster and to a higher population density under the conditions of this study. Both engineered strains were successfully grown as biofilms in capillary flow cell reactors and ureolysis-induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation was observed microscopically. The undisturbed spatiotemporal distribution of biomass and calcium carbonate minerals were successfully resolved in 3D using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Observations of this nature were not possible previously because no obligate urease producer that expresses GFP had been available. Future observations using these organisms will allow researchers to further improve engineered application of MICP as well as study natural mineralization processes in model systems. PMID:23835134

  17. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation/Dissolution in Salt Water - Fresh Water Mixing Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, B.; Singurindy, O.; Lowell, R. P.

    2001-12-01

    Mineral precipitation and dissolution in subsurface environments can have a dramatic effect on the permeability and porosity of formations and hence exert a feedback on the fluid flow. Many parameters influence mineral precipitation and dissolution, but the one addressed here concerns precipitation or dissolution that arises from mixing of saturated solutions with different salinities (or temperatures). This effect arises because the solubility of a mineral in solution depends non-linearly on salinity (or temperature). Examples include calcite precipitation and/or dissolution resulting from mixing of fresh and saline waters in coastal carbonate formations, or the precipitation of anhydrite (CaSO4) upon mixing of hydrothermal solutions with seawater. The present preliminary study focuses on flow, precipitation and dissolution along a salt water-fresh water interface in a porous medium. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative evolution of the flow field in both time and space, under different flow regimes and chemical compositions. Flow experiments were performed in a 2D flow cell packed with 1 mm diameter glass beads. Salt water and fresh water, both saturated with CaCO3, were injected simultaneously at equal flow rates at two inlets. The effluent acid from the outlets was collected and analyzed for Ca2+ concentration, in order to calculate precipitated/dissolved calcium carbonate (based on molar volume of the component) during the experiments. The equilibrium concentration of dissolved calcium carbonate in salt water was found to be higher than in fresh water. Calcium carbonate tended to precipitate in the mixing zone because the resulting mixture became supersaturated. The precipitation rate of calcium carbonate, and the forms of precipitation and subsequent dissolution, are highly dependent on the flow rate, the chemical composition of the injected fluids, and the salinity gradient.

  18. Interaction of Er{sup 3+} ions in Er-doped calcium - niobium - gallium garnet crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Malov, A V; Popov, A V; Ryabochkina, P A; Bol'shakov, E V

    2010-08-03

    The processes of nonradiative energy transfer in calcium - niobium - gallium garnet (CNGG) crystals doped with Er{sup 3+} ions are studied. It is found that the energy of erbium ions in the Er:CNGG crystal with the erbium atomic concentrations C{sub Er}=6% and 11% is transferred via the nonradiative co-operative processes {sup 4}I{sub 11/2{yields}} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11/2{yields}} {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 11/2{yields}} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 13/2{yields}} {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}; and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2{yields}} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 13/2{yields}} {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, whose efficiency increases with increasing intensity of exciting radiation. It is shown that the cross-relaxation processes {sup 4}S{sub 3/2{yields}}{sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 15/2{yields}}{sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, whose intensity depends on the concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions, are characteristic for Er:CNGG crystals with the Er atomic concentration above 1%. (active media)

  19. Calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) analysis for the identification of decayed tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Huang, Linpei

    2014-01-01

    The history of tea is poorly known, mainly due to the questionable identification of decayed tea plants in archaeological samples. This paper attempts to test the utility of calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) for the identification of tea in archaeological samples. It provides the first survey of the macropatterns of calciphytoliths in several species of Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants. Crystals were extracted from 45 samples of tea, Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants, and detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. In tea plants, druse and trichome base are the most distinctive crystals. Druses have the smallest diameter (11.65 ± 3.64??m), and trichome bases have four distinctive straight and regular cracks, similar to a regular extinction cross. The results provide morphological criteria for distinguishing tea from other plants, specifically the presence of identifiable druses together with calcified trichome bases. The implications are significant for understanding the history of tea and plant exploitation, especially for plants for which the preservation of macrofossils is poor. PMID:25342006

  20. Calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) analysis for the identification of decayed tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Huang, Linpei

    2014-01-01

    The history of tea is poorly known, mainly due to the questionable identification of decayed tea plants in archaeological samples. This paper attempts to test the utility of calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) for the identification of tea in archaeological samples. It provides the first survey of the macropatterns of calciphytoliths in several species of Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants. Crystals were extracted from 45 samples of tea, Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants, and detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. In tea plants, druse and trichome base are the most distinctive crystals. Druses have the smallest diameter (11.65 ± 3.64??m), and trichome bases have four distinctive straight and regular cracks, similar to a regular extinction cross. The results provide morphological criteria for distinguishing tea from other plants, specifically the presence of identifiable druses together with calcified trichome bases. The implications are significant for understanding the history of tea and plant exploitation, especially for plants for which the preservation of macrofossils is poor. PMID:25342006

  1. 10 / JOURNAL OF MATERIALS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2001 INHIBITING ACTION OF CALCIUM NITRITE ON CARBON STEEL REBARS

    E-print Network

    10 / JOURNAL OF MATERIALS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2001 INHIBITING ACTION OF CALCIUM on carbon steel rebar samples under different pH conditions and in the presence and absence of chloride ions in solution. A known amount of calcium nitrite was added as an inhibitor and the mechanism of inhibition

  2. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Shelly D; Kemner, Kenneth M; Brooks, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy identifies calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at environmental concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Brooks, S. C.; Biosciences Division; ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 {micro}M uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  4. CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL MACROPATTERN IN LEAVES OF SPECIES FROM GROUPS GLYCINE AND SHUTERIA (GLYCININAE; PHASEOLEAE; PAPILIONOIDEAE; FABACEAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystals associated with leaf veins and mesophyll was determined for taxa in two groups Glycine and Shuteria of subtribe Glycininae. Trichomes and veins were identified as additional characters. The annual and wild perennial Glycine species have the most reduced characters by gener...

  5. Physical characteristics of calcium oxalate crystals as determinants in structural defense against chewing insects in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to the numerous chemical defenses that plants employ to fend off insect herbivores, simple structural components can also play important roles in effective protection. Our investigations have shown that plant crystals of calcium oxalate can function in insect defense. The isolation of ca...

  6. Medicago truncatula-derived calcium oxalate crystals have a negative impact on chewing insect performance via their physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structural traits often act as defenses against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Fabaceae) leaves have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feedi...

  7. Carbonic Anhydrase-8 Regulates Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting the ITPR1-Cytosolic Free Calcium Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Gerald Z.; Keeler, Benjamin; Grant, Jeff; Bianchi, Laura; Fu, Eugene S.; Zhang, Yan Ping; Erasso, Diana M.; Cui, Jian-Guo; Wiltshire, Tim; Li, Qiongzhen; Hao, Shuanglin; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Candiotti, Keith; Wishnek, Sarah M.; Smith, Shad B.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Martin, Eden R.; Levitt, Roy C.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium dysregulation is causally linked with various forms of neuropathology including seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s, spinal cerebellar ataxia (SCA) and chronic pain. Carbonic anhydrase-8 (Car8) is an allosteric inhibitor of inositol trisphosphate receptor-1 (ITPR1), which regulates intracellular calcium release fundamental to critical cellular functions including neuronal excitability, neurite outgrowth, neurotransmitter release, mitochondrial energy production and cell fate. In this report we test the hypothesis that Car8 regulation of ITPR1 and cytoplasmic free calcium release is critical to nociception and pain behaviors. We show Car8 null mutant mice (MT) exhibit mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from MT also demonstrate increased steady-state ITPR1 phosphorylation (pITPR1) and cytoplasmic free calcium release. Overexpression of Car8 wildtype protein in MT nociceptors complements Car8 deficiency, down regulates pITPR1 and abolishes thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. We also show that Car8 nociceptor overexpression alleviates chronic inflammatory pain. Finally, inflammation results in downregulation of DRG Car8 that is associated with increased pITPR1 expression relative to ITPR1, suggesting a possible mechanism of acute hypersensitivity. Our findings indicate Car8 regulates the ITPR1-cytosolic free calcium pathway that is critical to nociception, inflammatory pain and possibly other neuropathological states. Car8 and ITPR1 represent new therapeutic targets for chronic pain. PMID:25734498

  8. Analysis of Perforin Assembly by Quartz Crystal Microbalance Reveals a Role for Cholesterol and Calcium-independent Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; Bird, Catherina H; Tabor, Rico F; D'Angelo, Michael E; Piantavigna, Stefania; Whisstock, James C; Trapani, Joseph A; Martin, Lisandra L; Bird, Phillip I

    2015-12-25

    Perforin is an essential component in the cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated cell death pathway. The traditional view holds that perforin monomers assemble into pores in the target cell membrane via a calcium-dependent process and facilitate translocation of cytotoxic proteases into the cytoplasm to induce apoptosis. Although many studies have examined the structure and role of perforin, the mechanics of pore assembly and granzyme delivery remain unclear. Here we have employed quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to investigate binding and assembly of perforin on lipid membranes, and show that perforin monomers bind to the membrane in a cooperative manner. We also found that cholesterol influences perforin binding and activity on intact cells and model membranes. Finally, contrary to current thinking, perforin efficiently binds membranes in the absence of calcium. When calcium is added to perforin already on the membrane, the QCM-D response changes significantly, indicating that perforin becomes membranolytic only after calcium binding. PMID:26542805

  9. Chemistry of calcium carbonate-rich shallow water sediments in the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.W.; Zullig, J.J.; Bernstein, L.D.; Millero, F.J.; Milne, P.; Mucci, A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The geochemistry of calcium carbonate-rich sediments from a variety of environments throughout the Bahamas was investigated with particular emphasis on the factors that control the pore water chemistry. Most sediments are supersaturated with respect to aragonite, the most abundant carbonate component. Experimental studies indicate that the observed in situ calcium carbonate ion activity products can often be produced as reversible metastable equilibria between the sediments and seawater. This is interpreted as being the result of interactions between the solutions and the minor high Mg-calcite component present in these sediments. Although the overlying waters are more supersaturated than the pore waters, carbonate dissolution, not precipitation, dominates in these sediments as a result of organic matter oxidation and the resulting increase in P/sub CO/sub 2//. The carbonate sediments of the Bahamas are remarkable for their purity, with the exception of special environments such as mangrove swamps and tidal flats with algal mats. Organic matter and heavy metal content is extremely low. Only minor sulfate reduction is occurring in most sediments. Phosphate is undetectable in all pore waters, probably as a result of adsorption on carbonate mineral surfaces. Other dissolved pore water components such as ammonia and DOC are much lower than typically found in shallow water fine-grained terrigeneous sediments.

  10. Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties

    SciTech Connect

    Syslo, S.K.; Myhre, D.L.; Harris, W.G.

    1988-02-01

    The authors observed euhedral crystals in Manatee soil in a citrus grove in St. Lucie County, Florida. The material was identified as gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ /times/ 2H/sub 2/O) using x-ray diffraction and infrared spectra. Photomicrography and scanning electron microscopy revealed that gypsum accumulated both in old root channels and within citrus root tissue of the Btg horizon. The subsurface horizons had elevated sulfate levels, a low initial pH, a drop (0.5 unit) in pH upon air-drying. Electrical conductivity paralleled the concentration of water-soluble sulfate. High levels of calcium and sulfate occurred for horizons above the water table. This accumulation is attributed to groundwater bearing these ions and subsequently discharging them to the overlying soil. Dead citrus roots appear to act as wicks to aid water transfer from lower to higher horizons. The roots and their empty channels provide spaces in which the gypsum can precipitate if the concentrations of calcium and sulfate in the evaporating groundwater exceed the solubility product of gypsum.

  11. Development of antimicrobial water filtration hybrid material from bio source calcium carbonate and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalangya, Vitus; Rangari, Vijaya; Tiimob, Boniface; Jeelani, Shaik; Samuel, Temesgen

    2014-03-01

    Biobased calcium carbonate and silver hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple mechanochemical milling technique. The XRD spectrum showed that the hybrid materials is composed of crystalline calcite and silver nanoparticles. The TEM results indicated that the silver nanoparticles are discrete, uncapped and well stabilized in the surface of the eggshell derived calcium carbonate particles. The silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape and 5-20 nm in size. The SEM studies indicated that the eggshells are in micron size with the silver nanoparticle embedded in their surface. The hybrid eggshell/silver nanocomposite exhibited superior inhibition of E. coli growth using the Kirby-Bauer discs diffusion assay and comparing the zone of inhibition around the filter paper disc impregnated with the hybrid particles against pristine silver nanoparticles.

  12. Targeted delivery of EV peptide to tumor cell cytoplasm using lipid coated calcium carbonate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyoon; Foote, Michael B; Huang, Leaf

    2013-07-01

    Intracellular-acting peptide drugs are effective for inhibiting cytoplasmic protein targets, yet face challenges with penetrating the cancer cell membrane. We have developed a lipid nanoparticle formulation that utilizes a pH-sensitive calcium carbonate complexation mechanism to enable the targeted delivery of the intracellular-acting therapeutic peptide EEEEpYFELV (EV) into lung cancer cells. Lipid-calcium-carbonate (LCC) nanoparticles were conjugated with anisamide, a targeting ligand for the sigma receptor which is expressed on lung cancer cells. LCC EV nanoparticle treatment provoked severe apoptotic effects in H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro. LCC NPs also mediated the specific delivery of Alexa-488-EV peptide to tumor tissue in vivo, provoking a high tumor growth retardation effect with minimal uptake by external organs and no toxic effects. PMID:22796364

  13. Cooperation of phosphates and carboxylates controls calcium oxalate crystallization in ultrafiltered urine.

    PubMed

    Grohe, Bernd; Chan, Brian P H; Sørensen, Esben S; Lajoie, Gilles; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2011-10-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is one of a group of proteins found in urine that are believed to limit the formation of kidney stones. In the present study, we investigate the roles of phosphate and carboxylate groups in the OPN-mediated modulation of calcium oxalate (CaOx), the principal mineral phase found in kidney stones. To this end, crystallization was induced by addition of CaOx solution to ultrafiltered human urine containing either human kidney OPN (kOPN; 7 consecutive carboxylates, 8 phosphates) or synthesized peptides corresponding to residues 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD; pOPAR) or 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK; P3) of rat bone OPN. Sequence 65-80 was also synthesized without the phosphate group (OPAR). Effects on calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) formation were studied by scanning electron microscopy. We found that controls form large, partly intergrown COM platelets; COD was never observed. Adding any of the polyelectrolytes was sufficient to prevent intergrowth of COM platelets entirely, inhibiting formation of these platelets strongly, and inducing formation of the COD phase. Strongest effects on COM formation were found for pOPAR and OPAR followed by kOPN and then P3, showing that acidity and hydrophilicity are crucial in polyelectrolyte-affected COM crystallization. At higher concentrations, OPAR also inhibited COD formation, while P3, kOPN and, in particular, pOPAR promoted COD, a difference explainable by the variations of carboxylate and phosphate groups present in the molecules. Thus, we conclude that carboxylate groups play a primary role in inhibiting COM formation, but phosphate and carboxylate groups are both important in initiating and promoting COD formation. PMID:21234554

  14. Tribological and Antioxidation Synergistic Effect Study of Sulfonate-Modified Nano Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Zhongyi, He; Liping, Xiong; Sheng, Han; Aixi, Chen; Jianwei, Qiu; Xisheng, Fu

    2013-01-01

    A middle base number sulphonate-modified nano calcium carbonate (SMC) with an average size of 35 nm was synthesized, and its tribological and antioxidation synergistic behaviors with ashless antioxidant N-phenyl-?-naphthylamine (T531) in hydrogenated oil (5Cst) were evaluated. The results demonstrate that adding this synethesized additive even at a low amount (<2.0 wt.%) can evidently improve its load-carrying capacity by 1.5 times and enhance its antiwear performance; in addition, the friction-reducing effect of additive in the high load was better than that in low load. The SMC have a good synergistic antioxidation effect with T531, which verifies the nano calcium carbonate compound was a kind of multifunctional and high-performance additive. The chemical composition of the rubbing surface which formed on the boundary film was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicating that the excellent antiwear and load-carrying performance could be attributed to the forming of boundary lubrication film which composed of calcium carbonate, oxides, ferrites, sulphide and FeSO4, and so on. Its ability to increase oxidation free energy of base oil is the main reason for increasing its antioxidant collaboration property with ashless antioxidant T531. PMID:23658705

  15. Carbonation acceleration of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles: induced by yeast fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, Paula; Zornoza-Indart, Ainara

    2015-09-01

    Carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles and consolidation of limestone are accelerated by high humidity and a yeast fermentation system that supplies a saturated atmosphere on CO2, H2O vapor and ethanol during 28 days. Nanoparticles were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analyses with thermogravimetry. Spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and hydric and mechanical tests were also performed in stones specimens. Samples exposed to the yeast environment achieve 100 % relative CaCO3 yield, whereas at high humidity but without the yeast and under laboratory environment, relative yields of 95 % CaCO3 and 15 % CaCO3 are, respectively, reached, with white crusts and glazing left on the stone surfaces when the nanoparticles are applied at a concentration of 25 g/l. The largest increase in the drilling resistance and surface hardness values with slight increase in the capillarity absorption and desorption coefficients and with lesser stone color changes are produced at a concentration of 5 g/l, in the yeast system environment. This especially happens in stone specimens initially with bimodal pore size distributions, more amounts of pores with diameters between 0.1 and 1 µm, higher open porosity values and faster capillary coefficients. An inexpensive and reliable method based on water and yeast-sugar solution is presented to speed up carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used as a consolidating product to improve the mechanical properties of decayed limestone from archaeological and architectural heritage.

  16. High-throughput platform for design and screening of peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Chung, Jihae; Chandra, Divya; Sosa, Ricardo D.; Karande, Pankaj; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Crystal growth modifiers present a versatile tool for controlling crystal shape and size. Our work described here focuses on the design and screening of short peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals using high-throughput approaches. We designed a small library of 13 peptides containing Ala and Asp amino acids arranged in varying sequences that mimic ubiquitous motifs in natural calcium-binding proteins. Peptides were screened using a quick assay to measure their efficacy for inhibiting COM crystallization. Our results show that subtle variations in the placement of Ala and Asp residues in the peptide sequence can have a profound effect on their inhibition potential. We were able to discover peptide sequences that inhibit COM crystallization more effectively than some of the well-known COM inhibitors, such as citrate. Our results also demonstrate that peptides can be engineered to bind to specific faces of COM crystals. Peptide sequences identified in this work are promising candidates for further development as therapies for biomineral-related diseases, such as kidney stone disease. Collectively, our work establishes new paradigms for the design, synthesis, and screening of peptides for controlling crystal habit with the potential to impact a variety of fields, including drug discovery, advanced materials, catalysis and separations.

  17. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo Zhong, Chongli

    2014-05-28

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid?liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  18. Green backlighting for TV liquid crystal display using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delepierre, Gabriel; Mahfouz, Rami; Cadete Santos Aires, Francisco J.; Dijon, Jean

    2010-08-01

    A methodology to evaluate the emission characteristics of carbon nanotube layers in the context of liquid crystal display backlighting has been elaborated. Carbon nanotube layers with emission characteristics compatible with backlighting have been demonstrated for growth temperature as low as 400 °C, thanks to the use of plasma pretreatment before growth. This very low growth temperature allows to use soda lime glass for the backlight unit and thus to expect very low cost and very low power consumption devices with this technology.

  19. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected joint. CPPD ... using a microscope to see small calcium pyrophosphate crystals in joint fluid. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce pain ...

  20. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Hackley, K.; Dagamac, M.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1993-05-01

    Pelletization of fine coal with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur capturing sorbent, represents a method to produce a fuel which will burn in compliance with the recently passed Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA`s). To harden the pellets, the reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, referred to as carbonation, is being studied. Carbonation forms a bonding matrix of calcium carbonate. This is a two-year research program. This report covers the second quarter of the second year. Research is indicating that 5 to 10 wt% calcium hydroxide pellets can be produced via a roller-and-die pellet mill and air cured to achieve sufficient quality for handling and transportation. This quarter, 1/2 inch-diameter pellets containing 10% calcium hydroxide were demonstrated to gradually react with atmospheric carbon dioxide (3 days) while air drying to achieve compressive strengths equivalent to those attained for fully dried pellets which had been carbonated for one-hour with 100% commercial grade carbon dioxide. It was also demonstrated that an organic, adhesive binder, corn starch, can be very effective at producing strong pellets but drying is required before appreciable pellet strength is attained. For pellets containing 2 wt% corn starch, it was determined that less than 50% of the ultimate strength was achieved as the pellets were dried from 20 wt% to 5 wt% moisture. Strength improved considerably as the pellet moisture content was reduced below 5 wt%.

  1. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapenis, Andrei Gennady; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Heim, Alexander; Zheng, Chengyang; Shortle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  2. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenis, Andrei; Lawrence, Gregory; Buyantuev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  3. Constraining the cause of the end-Guadalupian extinction with coupled records of carbon and calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Adam B.; Mundil, Roland; He, Bin; Brown, Shaun T.; Altiner, Demir; Sun, Yadong; DePaolo, Donald J.; Payne, Jonathan L.

    2014-06-01

    A negative ?C13 excursion in carbonate sediments near the Guadalupian/Lopingian (Middle/Late Permian) boundary has been interpreted to have resulted from a large carbon cycle disturbance during the end-Guadalupian extinction event (ca. 260 Ma). However, the carbon isotope data alone are insufficient to uniquely determine the type and magnitude of perturbation to the global carbon cycle. Calcium isotopes can be used to further constrain the cause of a carbon isotope excursion because the carbon and calcium cycles are coupled via CaCO3 burial. In this study, we present coupled carbon and calcium isotope records from three Guadalupian-Lopingian (G/L) sections in China (Penglaitan and Chaotian) and Turkey (Köserelik Tepe). The ?C13 and ?Ca44/40 records differ among our studied sections and do not co-vary in the same manner. No section shows ?C13 and ?Ca44/40 changes consistent with massive, rapid volcanic CO2 emissions or methane clathrate destabilization. Additionally, many sections with large (>3‰) changes in ?C13 exhibit ?O18 evidence for diagenetic alteration. Only one section exhibits a large excursion in the ?Ca44/40 of limestone but the absence of a similar excursion in the ?Ca44/40 of conodont apatite suggests that the limestone excursion reflects a mineralogical control rather than a perturbation to the global calcium cycle. Hence, we interpret the large isotopic changes observed in some sections to have resulted from local burial conditions or diagenetic effects, rather than from a large carbon and calcium cycle disturbance. Perturbations to the global carbon and calcium cycles across the G/L transition were much less intense than the disturbances that occurred across the subsequent Permian-Triassic boundary. This finding is consistent with the much smaller magnitude of the end-Guadalupian extinction relative to the end-Permian.

  4. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Hackley, K.; Dagamac, M.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1993-12-31

    This research was an investigation of calcium hydroxide, a sulfur-capturing sorbent, as a binder for coal fines. The reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, referred to as carbonation, was studied as a method for improving pellet quality. Carbonation forms a cementitious matrix of calcium carbonate. Research has demonstrated that calcium hydroxide is a viable binder for coal fines and that a roller-and-die pellet mill is an effective method of pellet formation. From a minus 28 mesh preparation plant fine coal sample, a roller-and-die pellet mill produced strong pellets when 5 and 10% calcium hydroxide was used as a binder. The pellets containing 10% calcium hydroxide strengthened considerably when air cured. This increase in strength was attributed to carbonation via atmospheric carbon dioxide. Pellets containing 10 wt% calcium hydroxide were produced using an extruder but pellets formed in this manner were much weaker than pellets produced with the roller-and-die mill. In tests performed using a laboratory hydraulic press, the effect of particle size and compaction pressure on pellet strength was studied. Particle distributions with mean sizes of 200, 90 and 40 microns were tested. The results indicate that pellet strength increased with decreasing particle size and increasing compaction pressure when calcium hydroxide was used as a binder. Pellets containing 10 wt% calcium hydroxide increased in strength by approximately 40% when air dried for one day. As above, this increase in strength was attributed to carbonation of the calcium hydroxide via atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  5. Surface Modification and Planar Defects of Calcium Carbonates by Magnetic Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Powdery calcium carbonates, predominantly calcite and aragonite, with planar defects and cation–anion mixed surfaces as deposited on low-carbon steel by magnetic water treatment (MWT) were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and vibration spectroscopy. Calcite were found to form faceted nanoparticles having 3x () commensurate superstructure and with well-developed {} and {} surfaces to exhibit preferred orientations. Aragonite occurred as laths having 3x () commensurate superstructure and with well-developed () surface extending along [100] direction up to micrometers in length. The (hkil)-specific coalescence of calcite and rapid lath growth of aragonite under the combined effects of Lorentz force and a precondensation event account for a beneficial larger particulate/colony size for the removal of the carbonate scale from the steel substrate. The coexisting magnetite particles have well-developed {011} surfaces regardless of MWT. PMID:21170405

  6. Crystal Structures of the GCaMP Calcium Sensor Reveal the Mechanism of Fluorescence Signal Change and Aid Rational Design

    SciTech Connect

    Akerboom, Jasper; Velez Rivera, Jonathan D.; Rodriguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Tian, Lin; Hires, S. Andrew; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2009-03-16

    The genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP2 shows promise for neural network activity imaging, but is currently limited by low signal-to-noise ratio. We describe x-ray crystal structures as well as solution biophysical and spectroscopic characterization of GCaMP2 in the calcium-free dark state, and in two calcium-bound bright states: a monomeric form that dominates at intracellular concentrations observed during imaging experiments and an unexpected domain-swapped dimer with decreased fluorescence. This series of structures provides insight into the mechanism of Ca{sup 2+}-induced fluorescence change. Upon calcium binding, the calmodulin (CaM) domain wraps around the M13 peptide, creating a new domain interface between CaM and the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein domain. Residues from CaM alter the chemical environment of the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein chromophore and, together with flexible inter-domain linkers, block solvent access to the chromophore. Guided by the crystal structures, we engineered a series of GCaMP2 point mutants to probe the mechanism of GCaMP2 function and characterized one mutant with significantly improved signal-to-noise. The mutation is located at a domain interface and its effect on sensor function could not have been predicted in the absence of structural data.

  7. Coordination of biologically important alpha-amino acids to calcium(II) at high pH: insights from crystal structures of calcium alpha-aminocarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stefan; Büsching, Insa; Barklage, Walter; Strasdeit, Henry

    2007-02-01

    A series of calcium alpha-aminocarboxylates was prepared by refluxing aqueous solutions/suspensions of calcium hydroxide and the respective alpha-amino acid. The colorless, crystalline hydrates Ca(gly)2.H2O (1), Ca(ala)2.3H2O (2), Ca(val)2.H2O (3), Ca(leu)2.3H2O (4), Ca(met)2.nH2O (5, n approximately 2), and Ca(pro)2.H2O (6) have been isolated in yields between 29 and 67% (gly- = glycinate, ala- = rac-alaninate, val- = rac-valinate, leu- = rac-leucinate, met- = rac-methioninate, pro- = rac-prolinate). The compounds 1-6 are readily soluble in water. The 0.10 M solutions have ca. pH 10-11 which is consistent with a noticeable degree of dissociation. The 13C NMR spectra of 1-6 in D2O were measured, and their comparison with those of the corresponding tetramethylammonium alpha-aminocarboxylates point to carboxylate coordination in solution, but no indication of nitrogen coordination was found. Infrared spectra of 1-6 gave similar results for the solid state. Complete single-crystal X-ray structure analyses of 1-4 and preliminary ones of 5 and 6, however, revealed that all aminocarboxylate ligands are N,O-chelating. Crystals of 2 consist of mononuclear complexes, while the other five compounds form three different types of one-dimensional coordination polymers. Structural diversity is also observed with the binding modes of the aminocarboxylate ligands and the calcium environment. Besides terminal aminocarboxylate coordination, there are three different types of aminocarboxylate bridges. The calcium ions are seven- or eight-coordinate in N2O5 and N2O6 coordination environments, respectively; one or three water molecules are part of the first ligand sphere of each metal ion. The crystal structures support conjectures about the existence of the yet undetected solution species [Cax(aa)2x(H2O)n] (aa- = alpha-aminocarboxylate). For example, x = 1 is realized in crystalline [Ca(ala)2(H2O)3] (2), and in 4 [Ca2(leu)4(H2O)4] complexes (x = 2) are linked to infinite chains by bridging aqua ligands. PMID:17257025

  8. Ion microprobe measurement of strontium isotopes in calcium carbonate with application to salmon otoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, P.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Ingram, B.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The ion microprobe has the capability to generate high resolution, high precision isotopic measurements, but analysis of the isotopic composition of strontium, as measured by the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, has been hindered by isobaric interferences. Here we report the first high precision measurements of 87Sr/ 86Sr by ion microprobe in calcium carbonate samples with moderate Sr concentrations. We use the high mass resolving power (7000 to 9000 M.R.P.) of the SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe in combination with its high transmission to reduce the number of interfering species while maintaining sufficiently high count rates for precise isotopic measurements. The isobaric interferences are characterized by peak modeling and repeated analyses of standards. We demonstrate that by sample-standard bracketing, 87Sr/86Sr ratios can be measured in inorganic and biogenic carbonates with Sr concentrations between 400 and 1500 ppm with ???2??? external precision (2??) for a single analysis, and subpermil external precision with repeated analyses. Explicit correction for isobaric interferences (peak-stripping) is found to be less accurate and precise than sample-standard bracketing. Spatial resolution is ???25 ??m laterally and 2 ??m deep for a single analysis, consuming on the order of 2 ng of material. The method is tested on otoliths from salmon to demonstrate its accuracy and utility. In these growth-banded aragonitic structures, one-week temporal resolution can be achieved. The analytical method should be applicable to other calcium carbonate samples with similar Sr concentrations. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Crystallized nano-sized alpha-tricalcium phosphate from amorphous calcium phosphate: microstructure, cementation and cell response.

    PubMed

    Vecbiskena, Linda; Gross, Karlis Agris; Riekstina, Una; Yang, Thomas Chung-Kuang

    2015-04-01

    New insight on the conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to nano-sized alpha tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) provides a faster pathway to calcium phosphate bone cements. In this work, synthesized ACP powders were treated with either water or ethanol, dried, crystallized between 700 and 800?°C, and then cooled at different cooling rates. Particle size was measured in a scanning electron microscope, but crystallite size calculated by Rietveld analysis. Phase composition and bonding in the crystallized powder was assessed by x-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that 50?nm sized ?-TCP formed after crystallization of lyophilized powders. Water treated ACP retained an unstable state that may allow ordering to nanoapatite, and further transition to ?-TCP after crystallization and subsequent decomposition. Powders treated with ethanol, favoured the formation of pure ?-TCP. Faster cooling limited the growth of ?-TCP. Both the initial contact with water and the cooling rate after crystallization dictated ?-TCP formation. Nano-sized ?-TCP reacted faster with water to an apatite bone cement than conventionally prepared ?-TCP. Water treated and freeze-dried powders showed faster apatite cement formation compared to ethanol treated powders. Good biocompatibility was found in pure ?-TCP nanoparticles made from ethanol treatment and with a larger crystallite size. This is the first report of pure ?-TCP nanoparticles with a reactivity that has not required additional milling to cause cementation. PMID:25886478

  10. Influence of zinc on the calcium carbonate biomineralization of Halomonas halophila

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The salt tolerance of halophilic bacteria make them promising candidates for technical applications, like isolation of salt tolerant enzymes or remediation of contaminated saline soils and waters. Furthermore, some halophilic bacteria synthesize inorganic solids resulting in organic–inorganic hybrids. This process is known as biomineralization, which is induced and/or controlled by the organism. The adaption of the soft and eco-friendly reaction conditions of this formation process to technical syntheses of inorganic nano materials is desirable. In addition, environmental contaminations can be entrapped in biomineralization products which facilitate the subsequent removal from waste waters. The moderately halophilic bacteria Halomonas halophila mineralize calcium carbonate in the calcite polymorph. The biomineralization process was investigated in the presence of zinc ions as a toxic model contaminant. In particular, the time course of the mineralization process and the influence of zinc on the mineralized inorganic materials have been focused in this study. Results H. halophila can adapt to zinc contaminated medium, maintaining the ability for biomineralization of calcium carbonate. Adapted cultures show only a low influence of zinc on the growth rate. In the time course of cultivation, zinc ions accumulated on the bacterial surface while the medium depleted in the zinc contamination. Intracellular zinc concentrations were below the detection limit, suggesting that zinc was mainly bound extracellular. Zinc ions influence the biomineralization process. In the presence of zinc, the polymorphs monohydrocalcite and vaterite were mineralized, instead of calcite which is synthesized in zinc-free medium. Conclusions We have demonstrated that the bacterial mineralization process can be influenced by zinc ions resulting in the modification of the synthesized calcium carbonate polymorph. In addition, the shape of the mineralized inorganic material is chancing through the presence of zinc ions. Furthermore, the moderately halophilic bacterium H. halophila can be applied for the decontamination of zinc from aqueous solutions. PMID:23198844

  11. Adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on silica and calcium carbonate sand.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonjee C; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Nap, Rikkert J; Whitaker, Ragnhild D; Mathiyazhagan, Vidhya; Song, Yi-Qiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Szleifer, Igal; Wong, Joyce Y

    2014-01-28

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have the potential to be used in the characterization of porous rock formations in oil fields as a contrast agent for NMR logging because they are small enough to traverse through nanopores and enhance contrast by shortening NMR T2 relaxation time. However, successful development and application require detailed knowledge of particle stability and mobility in reservoir rocks. Because nanoparticle adsorption to sand (SiO2) and rock (often CaCO3) affects their mobility, we investigated the thermodynamic equilibrium adsorption behavior of citric acid-coated SPIO nanoparticles (CA SPIO NPs) and poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted SPIO nanoparticles (PEG SPIO NPs) on SiO2 (silica) and CaCO3 (calcium carbonate). Adsorption behavior was determined at various pH and salt conditions via chemical analysis and NMR, and the results were compared with molecular theory predictions. Most of the NPs were recovered from silica, whereas far fewer NPs were recovered from calcium carbonate because of differences in the mineral surface properties. NP adsorption increased with increasing salt concentration: this trend was qualitatively explained by molecular theory, as was the role of the PEG grafting in preventing NPs adsorption. Quantitative disagreement between the theoretical predictions and the data was due to NP aggregation, especially at high salt concentration and in the presence of calcium carbonate. Upon aggregation, NP concentrations as determined by NMR T2 were initially overestimated and subsequently corrected using the relaxation rate 1/T2, which is a function of aggregate size and fractal dimension of the aggregate. Our experimental validation of the theoretical predictions of NP adsorption to minerals in the absence of aggregation at various pH and salt conditions demonstrates that molecular theory can be used to determine interactions between NPs and relevant reservoir surfaces. Importantly, this integrated experimental and theoretical approach can be used to gain insight into NP mobility in the reservoir. PMID:24393031

  12. Formation of calcium carbonate films on chitosan substrates in the presence of polyacrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    He, Linghao; Xue, Rui; Song, Rui

    2009-05-15

    In this investigation, chitosan membranes with different surface average degrees of deacetylation (DA) are prepared and then are employed as the support matrix to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In the presence of high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained on the surface of all chitosan films mainly consisted of vaterite, which suggests the presence of bulk PAA plays an overwhelming part in stabilizing the vaterite. As a comparison, the influences of active groups indicate that only in case of low concentration PAA the thin CaCO{sub 3} films grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite owing to the strong nucleation ability of -NH{sub 2} group, whereas, for those grown on chitosan with 80% DA the CaCO{sub 3} films mainly consisted of aragonite. A more complex scenario revealed that in the case of intermediate concentration of PAA the formed polymorphs behave as mixtures of vaterite and aragonite. - Graphical abstract: Chitosan membranes with different degrees of deacetylation (DA) are employed as support to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained consisted of vaterite. However, the CaCO{sub 3} film grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite as opposed to aragonite for chitosan with 8% DA. The schematic presentation of the formation of calcium carbonate on chitosan films with different degrees of acetylation in the presence of PAA with low-, mid- and high concentrations.

  13. Characterisation of Calcium Phosphate Crystals on Calcified Human Aortic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Potential Role of Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Louvet, Loïc; Bazin, Dominique; Büchel, Janine; Steppan, Sonja; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Massy, Ziad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease including vascular calcification (VC) remains the leading cause of death in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). The process of VC seems likely to be a tightly regulated process where vascular smooth muscle cells are playing a key role rather than just a mere passive precipitation of calcium phosphate. Characterisation of the chemical and crystalline structure of VC was mainly led in patients or animal models with CKD. Likewise, Mg2+ was found to be protective in living cells although a potential role for Mg2+ could not be excluded on crystal formation and precipitation. In this study, the crystal formation and the role of Mg2+ were investigated in an in vitro model of primary human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HAVSMC) with physical techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings In HAVSMC incubated with increased Ca x Pi medium, only calcium phosphate apatite crystals (CPA) were detected by Micro-Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (µFTIR) and Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscope (FE — SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) at the cell layer level. Supplementation with Mg2+ did not alter the crystal composition or structure. The crystal deposition was preferentially positioned near or directly on cells as pictured by FE — SEM observations and EDX measurements. Large µFTIR maps revealed spots of CPA crystals that were associated to the cellular layout. This qualitative analysis suggests a potential beneficial effect of Mg2+ at 5 mM in noticeably reducing the number and intensities of CPA µFTIR spots. Conclusions/Significance For the first time in a model of HAVSMC, induced calcification led to the formation of the sole CPA crystals. Our data seems to exclude a physicochemical role of Mg2+ in altering the CPA crystal growth, composition or structure. Furthermore, Mg2+ beneficial role in attenuating VC should be linked to an active cellular role. PMID:25607936

  14. Peptoid nanosheets as soluble, two-dimensional templates for calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joo Myung V; Altoe, M Virginia P; Aloni, Shaul; Zuckermann, Ronald N

    2015-06-25

    Nacre-mimetic materials are of great interest, but difficult to synthesize, because they require the ordering of organic and inorganic materials on several length scales. Here we introduce peptoid nanosheets as a versatile two-dimensional platform to develop nacre mimetic materials. Free-floating zwitterionic nanosheets were mineralized with thin films of amorphous calcium carbonate (of 2-20 nm thickness) on their surface to produce planar nacre synthons. These can serve as tunable building blocks to produce layered brick and mortar nanoarchitectures. PMID:26021742

  15. Generation and conversion of electronic defects in calcium carbonates by UV/Vis light

    PubMed

    Bartoll; Stosser; Nofz

    2000-05-01

    Radical species like CO2-, CO3-, SO2-, and SO3- can be created by exposing natural and synthetic calcium carbonates to sunlight or to the light of a Hg(Xe) lamp. This poses as a risk for ESR dating of these materials, because the radicals formed by light exposure cannot be distinguished from those generated by radioactivity. Furthermore, paramagnetic centers like SO2- electrons trapped near Zn2+ or Cd2+ ions, surface defects, and radicals with g' = 2.0040, can be bleached in gamma-irradiated samples by light and show conversion effects. PMID:10836412

  16. Peptide interactions with steel surfaces: Inhibition of corrosion and calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, E.; Sikes, C.S. . Mineralization Center); Little, B.J. . Naval Research Lab.)

    1993-10-01

    Polyaspartate, a polyanionic peptide analog of an oyster-shell protein fraction, inhibited corrosion of AISI 1018 mild steel (UNS G10180) in seawater in a dose-dependent manner. A maximal inhibition of [approximately] 60% was obtained at a concentration of 100[mu]g mL[sup [minus]1]. Related peptides containing hydrophobic and/or phosphorylated amino acids had corrosion inhibition activities similar to or lower than polyaspartate in fresh and brackish waters. Binding studies demonstrated polyaspartate bound to mild steel in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Evidence for stainless steel (SS) binding was based on inhibition of calcium carbonate precipitation of the SS surface.

  17. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hackley, K.C.; Strickland, R.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1992-12-31

    In this project, the ISGS is investigating the pelletization of fine coal with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur-capturing sorbent. The objective is to produce a readily-transportable fuel which will burn in compliance with the recently passed Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA). To improve the economics of pelletizing, carbonation, or, the reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, which produces a binding matrix of calcium carbonate, is being investigated as a method of hardening pelletized coal fines. This year, pellets were produced from 28 {times} 0 coal fines collected from an Illinois preparation plant using a laboratory version of a California Pellet Mill (CPM), a commercially available pellet machine. The CPM effectively pelletized coal fines at the moisture content they were dewatered to at the plant. Carbonation nearly doubled the strength of pellets containing 10 wt % calcium hydroxide. Other results from this year`s work indicate that inclusion of calcium hydroxide into pellets resulted in chlorine capture of approximately 20 wt % for combustion tests conducted at both 850 and 1100{degrees}C. Arsenic emissions were reduced from near 38 wt% at 850 C to essentially nil with inclusion of 10 wt % calcium hydroxide into the pellets. At 110{degrees}C, arsenic emissions were reduced from about 90 wt % to about 15 wt %. Sodium emissions, however, increased with the addition of calcium hydroxide. At 850{degrees}C, sodium capture dropped from about 98 wt % to 73 wt % for pellets containing 10 wt % calcium hydroxide; at 1100{degrees}C, capture dropped from about 92 wt % to about 20 wt %.

  18. The crystallization of tough thermoplastic resins in the presence of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theil, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of the thermoplastic resins poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and poly(aryl-ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) in the presence and in the abscence of carbon fibers was studied. How carbon fiber surfaces in composites affect the crystallization of tough thermoplastic polymers that may serve as matrix resins were determined. The crystallization kinetics of such substances can provide useful information about the crystallization mechanisms and, thus, indicate if the presence of carbon fibers cause any changes in such mechanisms.

  19. Crystal structures of carbonates up to Mbar pressures determined by single crystal synchrotron radiation diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlini, M.

    2013-12-01

    The recent improvements at synchrotron beamlines, currently allow single crystal diffraction experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures [1,2] on very small single crystal domains. We successfully applied such technique to determine the crystal structure adopted by carbonates at mantle pressures. The knowledge of carbon-bearing phases is in fact fundamental for any quantitative modelling of global carbon cycle. The major technical difficulty arises after first order transitions or decomposition reactions, since original crystal (apx. 10x10x5 ?m3) is transformed in much smaller crystalline domains often with random orientation. The use of 3D reciprocal space visualization software and the improved resolution of new generation flat panel detectors, however, allow both identification and integration of each single crystal domain, with suitable accuracy for ab-initio structure solution, performed with direct and charge-flipping methods and successive structure refinements. The results obtained on carbonates, indicate two major crystal-chemistry trends established at high pressures. The CO32- units, planar and parallel in ambient pressure calcite and dolomite structures, becomes non parallel in calcite- and dolomite-II and III phases, allowing more flexibility in the structures with possibility to accommodate strain arising from different cation sizes (Ca and Mg in particular). Dolomite-III is therefore also observed to be thermodynamically stable at lower mantle pressures and temperatures, differently from dolomite, which undergoes decomposition into pure end-members in upper mantle. At higher pressure, towards Mbar (lowermost mantle and D'' region) in agreement with theoretical calculations [3,4] and other experimental results [5], carbon coordination transform into 4-fold CO4 units, with different polymerisation in the structure depending on carbonate composition. The second important crystal chemistry feature detected is related to Fe2+ in Fe-bearing magnesite, which spontaneously oxidises at HP/HT, forming Fe3+ carbonates, Fe3+ oxides and reduced carbon (diamonds). Single crystal diffraction approach allowed full structure determination of these phases, yielding to the discovery of few unpredicted structures, such as Mg2Fe2C4O13 and Fe13O19, which can be well reproduced in different experiments. Mg2Fe2C4O13 carbonate present truncated chain C4O13 groups, and Fe13O19 oxide, whose stoichiometry is intermediate between magnetite and hematite, is a one-layer structure, with features encountered in superconducting materials. The results fully support the ideas of unexpected complexities in the mineralogy of the lowermost mantle, and single crystal technique, once properly optimized in ad-hoc synchrotron beamlines, is fundamental for extracting accurate structural information, otherwise rarely accessible with other experimental techniques. References: [1] Merlini M., Hanfland M. (2013). Single crystal diffraction at Mbar conditions by synchrotron radiation. High Pressure Research, in press. [2] Dubrovinsky et al., (2010). High Pressure Research, 30, 620-633. [3] Arapan et al. (1997). Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 268501. [4] Oganov et al. (2008) EPSL, 273, 38-47. [5] Boulard et al. (2011) PNAS, 108, 5184-5187.

  20. Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation and strontium coprecipitation in a porous media flow system.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Schultz, Logan N; Bugni, Steven; Mitchell, Andrew C; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-02-01

    Strontium-90 is a principal radionuclide contaminant in the subsurface at several Department of Energy sites in the Western U.S., causing a threat to groundwater quality in areas such as Hanford, WA. In this work, we used laboratory-scale porous media flow cells to examine a potential remediation strategy employing coprecipitation of strontium in carbonate minerals. CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation were induced via ureolysis by Sporosarcina pasteurii in two-dimensional porous media reactors. An injection strategy using pulsed injection of calcium mineralization medium was tested against a continuous injection strategy. The pulsed injection strategy involved periods of lowered calcite saturation index combined with short high fluid velocity flow periods of calcium mineralization medium followed by stagnation (no-flow) periods to promote homogeneous CaCO(3) precipitation. By alternating the addition of mineralization and growth media the pulsed strategy promoted CaCO(3) precipitation while sustaining the ureolytic culture over time. Both injection strategies achieved ureolysis with subsequent CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation. The pulsed injection strategy precipitated 71-85% of calcium and 59% of strontium, while the continuous injection was less efficient and precipitated 61% of calcium and 56% of strontium. Over the 60 day operation of the pulsed reactors, ureolysis was continually observed, suggesting that the balance between growth and precipitation phases allowed for continued cell viability. Our results support the pulsed injection strategy as a viable option for ureolysis-induced strontium coprecipitation because it may reduce the likelihood of injection well accumulation caused by localized mineral plugging while Sr coprecipitation efficiency is maintained in field-scale applications. PMID:23282003

  1. Polymorph selection and nanocrystallite rearrangement of calcium carbonate in carboxymethyl chitosan aqueous solution: Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Donghui; Key Lab of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi, Changning, Shanghai 200050 ; Zhu, Yingchun; Li, Fang; Ruan, Qichao; Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Fangfang

    2010-01-15

    In this article, the polymorph selection of calcium carbonate has been successfully achieved in water-soluble carboxymethyl chitosan aqueous solution at different temperatures (25-95 {sup o}C). Vaterite is formed in carboxymethyl chitosan solution 25 {sup o}C accompanied with trace of calcite, whereas pure aragonite is obtained at 95 {sup o}C. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses show that the products are formed from the recrystallization of nanometer crystallites. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses reveal that the polymorph of calcium carbonate is controlled and selected by kinetics in various temperatures. As a heterogeneous nucleator and stabilizing agent, carboxymethyl chitosan changes the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate from thermodynamic into kinetic control. Under kinetic limitation, the reaction rate of aragonite increases along with the elevating of temperature and surpasses the rate of vaterite above 327 K.

  2. Corrosion resistance of inconel 690 to sodium carbonate, calcium carbonate, and sodium meta silicate at 900 and 1100{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1997-01-29

    Corrosive attack of Inconel 690 coupons was not observed following 3 day exposure tests to calcium carbonate, sodium carbonate, and sodium meta silicate at 900 {degrees}C. However, melt line attack was evident on coupons exposed to sodium meta silicate and sodium carbonate tested for 3 days at 1100 {degrees}C. In addition, intergranular attack (IGA), approximately 0.67 mils/day, was observed on the Inconel 690 coupon exposed to calcium carbonate at 1100 {degrees}C. Calcium carbonate did not completely remove the glass coating at 950 {degrees}C. In fact, it was comparable to the results obtained by exposing a glass coated coupon at 950 {degrees}C in air. Therefore, calcium carbonate is not recommended for cleaning the DWPF melter pour spout. Both sodium carbonate and sodium meta silicate appear to remove most of the glass. However, these cleaning agents will remain on the metal surface following exposure at 950 {degrees}C resulting in very rough surface and a potential for corrosive attack when heated to 1100 {degrees}C.

  3. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-?m-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270?nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500?nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600?nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies. PMID:26568414

  4. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-?m-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100–270?nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500?nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600?nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies. PMID:26568414

  5. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-?m-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100–270?nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500?nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600?nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  6. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.M. Ehrlinger, H.P.; Hackley, K.C.; Lytle, J.M.; Moran, D.L.; Berger, R.L.; Schanche, G.; Chow, Poo; Strickland, R.

    1992-09-01

    In this project supported by the CRSC, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), ISGS is investigating the pelletization of fine coal with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur capturing sorbent. The objective is to produce a readily-transportable fuel which will burn in compliance with the recently passed Clean Air Act Amendments. To improve the economics of pelletization, carbonation, or, the reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide to produce a binding matrix of calcium carbonate, is being investigated as a method of hardening pelletized coal fines. Previous results indicate that carbonation significantly improves pellet quality including serving to weatherproof the pellets. During this quarter, work was conducted on several topics. Calcium oxide was investigated as a potentially lower cost binder than calcium hydroxide and was determined to be of comparable effectiveness on a molar basis indicating some potential for an overall cost savings. The effect of pellet size on pellet quality was also investigated. Results indicate that 1/4 and 1/2-inch diameter pellets have similar compressive strengths when compared on the basis of pounds per square inch crushing pressure. Also a low cost starch was tested as an alternative binder. Although cheaper per pound than a starch binder previously tested, it was not less expensive when evaluated on the basis of pellet quality attained.

  7. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  8. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Yael; Natale, Frank; Sherrell, Robert M.; LaVigne, Michèle; Starovoytov, Valentin; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity in animals required the production of extracellular matrices that serve to spatially organize cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i) an organic ECM, which facilitates cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion; (ii) a skeletal organic matrix (SOM), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate skeleton itself, which provides the structural support for the 3D organization of coral colonies. In this report, we examine the production of these three matrices by using an in vitro culturing system for coral cells. In this system, which significantly facilitates studies of coral cell physiology, we demonstrate in vitro excretion of ECM by primary (nondividing) tissue cultures of both soft (Xenia elongata) and hard (Montipora digitata) corals. There are structural differences between the ECM produced by X. elongata cell cultures and that of M. digitata, and ascorbic acid, a critical cofactor for proline hydroxylation, significantly increased the production of collagen in the ECM of the latter species. We further demonstrate in vitro production of SOM and extracellular mineralized particles in cell cultures of M. digitata. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of Sr/Ca ratios revealed the particles to be aragonite. De novo calcification was confirmed by following the incorporation of 45Ca into acid labile macromolecules. Our results demonstrate the ability of isolated, differentiated coral cells to undergo fundamental processes required for multicellular organization. PMID:18162537

  9. Adsorption studies of cadmium ions on alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Amin, Athar; Zafar, Uzma; Raza, Muhammad Amir; Hafeez, Irfan; Akram, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite material was prepared in the form of beads and characterized using Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions was studied through batch experiments. The adsorption parameters such as contact time (120 min), adsorbent dose (1.5 g), initial metal ion concentration(10 mg/L), pH (6) and agitation speed (150 rpm) were optimized at room temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the data and it was noted that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions is better explained by Freundlich model. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters like ?G 0, ?H 0 and ?S 0 were calculated and on the basis of these values it was established that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. It was concluded from the study that the composite material of alginate and calcium carbonate can effectively be used to recover Cd2+ ions from wastewater.

  10. Flocculation of starch-coated solidified emulsion droplets and calcium carbonate particles.

    PubMed

    Poraj-Kozminski, Agatha; Hill, Reghan J; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2007-05-01

    In papermaking, many colloidal particles are added to a pulp fiber suspension to improve paper properties. Given the right conditions, these different colloids can interact and flocculate. Examples of papermaking colloids are fillers and internal sizing agents, which improve opacity and hydrophobicity of paper, respectively. Internal sizing agents (added at the wet end of a paper machine) are commonly solidified emulsion droplets, stabilized by cationic starch and other stabilizers. We studied the interaction of a common internal sizing agent, alkyl ketene dimer (AKD), with calcium carbonate fillers. AKD is a liquid above 50-65 degrees C (depending on alkyl chain length), which can be emulsified above its melting point in the presence of a stabilizer, resulting, after cooling, in solid colloidal particles close to 1 microm in size. We investigated the interaction of AKD particles, stabilized by cationic starch, with precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) particles. Pure PCC particles are positively charged, but they become negative in process waters. Flocculation experiments with positively charged AKD and negatively charged PCC were performed using a photometric dispersion analyzer. Instead of the expected heteroflocculation between AKD and PCC, we observed PCC homoflocculation and AKD homoflocculation, results confirmed by SEM. The results are explained by the transfer of starch from AKD to PCC, resulting in PCC flocculation by starch and AKD destabilization due to depletion of the stabilizer. PMID:17292908

  11. Synthesis of three-dimensional calcium carbonate nanofibrous structure from eggshell using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural biomaterials from bone-like minerals derived from avian eggshells have been considered as promising bone substitutes owing to their biodegradability, abundance, and lower price in comparison with synthetic biomaterials. However, cell adhesion to bulk biomaterials is poor and surface modifications are required to improve biomaterial-cell interaction. Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are preferred to act as growth support platforms for bone and stem cells. Although there have been several studies on generating nanoparticles from eggshells, no research has been reported on synthesizing 3D nanofibrous structures. Results In this study, we propose a novel technique to synthesize 3D calcium carbonate interwoven nanofibrous platforms from eggshells using high repetition femtosecond laser irradiation. The eggshell waste is value engineered to calcium carbonate nanofibrous layer in a single step under ambient conditions. Our striking results demonstrate that by controlling the laser pulse repetition, nanostructures with different nanofiber density can be achieved. This approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3D interwoven nanofibrous platforms from natural biomaterials. Conclusion The synthesized 3D nanofibrous structures can promote biomaterial interfacial properties to improve cell-platform surface interaction and develop new functional biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:21251288

  12. The fate of calcium carbonate nanoparticles administered by oral route: absorption and their interaction with biological matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hyoung-Mi; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Orally administered particles rapidly interact with biological fluids containing proteins, enzymes, electrolytes, and other biomolecules to eventually form particles covered by a corona, and this corona potentially affects particle uptake, fate, absorption, distribution, and elimination in vivo. This study explored relationships between the biological interactions of calcium carbonate particles and their biokinetics. Methods We examined the effects of food grade calcium carbonates of different particle size (nano [N-Cal] and bulk [B-Cal]: specific surface areas of 15.8 and 0.83 m2/g, respectively) on biological interactions in in vitro simulated physiological fluids, ex vivo biofluids, and in vivo in gastrointestinal fluid. Moreover, absorption and tissue distribution of calcium carbonates were evaluated following a single dose oral administration to rats. Results N-Cal interacted more with biomatrices than bulk materials in vitro and ex vivo, as evidenced by high fluorescence quenching ratios, but it did not interact more actively with biomatrices in vivo. Analysis of coronas revealed that immunoglobulin, apolipoprotein, thrombin, and fibrinogen, were the major corona proteins, regardless of particle size. A biokinetic study revealed that orally delivered N-Cal was more rapidly absorbed into the blood stream than B-Cal, but no significant differences were observed between the two in terms of absorption efficiencies or tissue distributions. Both calcium carbonates were primarily present as particulate forms in gastrointestinal fluids but enter the circulatory system in dissolved Ca2+, although both types showed partial phase transformation to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate. Relatively low dissolution (about 4%), no remarkable protein–particle interaction, and the major particulate fate of calcium carbonate in vivo gastrointestinal fluids can explain its low oral absorption (about 4%) regardless of particle size. Conclusion We conclude that calcium carbonate nanoparticles can act more actively with biological matrices in vitro and ex vivo, but that in vivo, their biological interactions and biokinetics are not affected by particle size. PMID:25848250

  13. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of accelerated carbonation of a synthetic calcium-?silicate?-hydrate gel

    SciTech Connect

    Morandeau, Antoine E.; White, Claire E.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium–silicate–hydrate (C–S–H) gel is the main binder component in hydrated ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste, and is known to play a crucial role in the carbonation of cementitious materials, especially for more sustainable alternatives containing supplementary cementitious materials. However, the exact atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of C–S–H gel remain unknown. Here, we investigate the local atomic structural changes that occur during carbonation of a synthetic calcium–silicate–hydrate gel exposed to pure CO? vapour, using in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and subsequent pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. By analysing both the reciprocal and real-space scattering data as the C–S–H carbonation reaction progresses, all phases present during the reaction (crystalline and non-crystalline) have been identified and quantified, with the results revealing the emergence of several polymorphs of crystalline calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite) in addition to the decalcified C–S–H gel. Furthermore, the results point toward residual calcium being present in the amorphous decalcified gel, potentially in the form of an amorphous calcium carbonate phase. As a result of the quantification process, the reaction kinetics for the evolution of the individual phases have been obtained, revealing new information on the rate of growth/dissolution for each phase associated with C–S–H gel carbonation. Moreover, the investigation reveals that the use of real space diffraction data in the form of PDFs enables more accurate determination of the phases that develop during complex reaction processes such as C–S–H gel carbonation in comparison to the conventional reciprocal space Rietveld analysis approach.

  14. Calcium carbonate sedimentation on northwestern Gulf of Mexico margin: a new tool for chemical stratigraphy and depositional modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.; Trainor, D.M.; Guilderson, T.; Gamble, R.; Corbin, J.

    1988-09-01

    The percentage of calcium carbonate in 80 box core tops from the Louisiana shelf and slope reveals that sedimentation of CaCO/sub 3/ is occurring with characteristic patterns on the margin. The Holocene patterns are directly related to proximity of the Mississippi delta system as it affects the relationship between detrital carbonate input, in-situ production of biogenic carbonate, and dilution by detrital siliciclastic components. The calcium carbonate records in exploration wells and offshore bore holes exhibit large and small-scale changes in the relationship between these components during the Pliocene-Pleistocene. Some of these changes in carbonate content are site specific and other changes record significant lateral (east-west) shifts in major siliciclastic depocenters along the developing margin during the Pliocene-Pleistocene.

  15. Increase in the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations by switching from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Toru; Kawakami, Junko; Mikami, Noriko; Wakai, Haruki; Ishii, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hida, Miho; Kurata, Yasuhisa

    2014-06-01

    It is widely known that dialysis patients who are administered vitamin D preparations have a better prognosis than patients who are not. In this study, of 22 patients on maintenance dialysis who had been administered calcium (Ca) carbonate in our hospital, we investigated the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations after the phosphorus (P) binder was switched from Ca carbonate to the newly developed lanthanum carbonate (LC). After completely switching to LC, the dosage amount of oral vitamin D3 preparation (alfacalcidol equivalent) was significantly increased from 0.094 ?g/day to 0.375 ?g/day (P = 0.0090). No significant changes were observed in the values of serum corrected Ca, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone and P after switching. The administration of LC enabled complete cessation of the administration of Ca carbonate preparations, and increased the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations. Therefore, LC may be a useful P binder to improve patient prognosis. PMID:24953761

  16. Micro-remnants of carbon- and calcium-bearing impact breccias of buried crater broken at Takamatsu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction: Impact evidences are discussed by 30 extraterrestrial-rich elements and shocked minerals in microscopic sizes. Micro-remnants during impact reactions can be obtained by impact breccias. Impact evidences at buried and broken impact crater structure in Takamatsu, Shikoku, Japan have been reported mainly by gravity anomaly and shocked-related materials on the Cretaceous Ryoke granite [1-10]. Anomalous materials with carbon-bearing materials and impact-related materials which are not usually included in the Japanese granitic rocks are found at the drilled materials. Main purposes of the paper are to elucidate carbon- and calcium-bearing micro-particles at the drilled samples of Takamatsu, Shikoku, Japan [9-10]. Anomalous carbon and calcium-bearing micro-grains: The Ryoke granitic rock at Takamatsu, Japan has few carbon and calcium contents in bulk XRF analyses from surface to 1,500m in depth. However, drilled sample at 950 m in depth contains nano-grains with high carbon and CaSiCO3 (in 100nm size) in composition. Carbon-rich grains in Takamatsu show very weak nano-diamond-like peak in the Raman spectra which are formed at impact reaction on carbon-rich target rock. Formation of remained carbon-bearing grains: Main sources of carbon and calcium which cannot be found in the granitic rock are sedimentary rocks as follows: 1) Carbon sources mainly found near at crater bottom (ca. 950m in depth) are considered to be impact target rocks of sedimentary limestone (from sea-sediments) with carbon dioxides gas during impact reaction on sea-water impact. 2) Calcium sources to form nano-grains of CaSiCO3 in composition are also considered to be sedimentary limestone and silicate-bearing rocks stored in the shallow sea-bottom. Summary: The present study is summarized as follows: a) Carbon-rich frilled sample of 950m in depth at buried crater in Takamatsu, Japan are indicates the main sources from shallow sea-limestone during impact reaction on shallow sea-impact. b) Calcium-rich sources to form micro-grains of CaSiCO3 in composition are considered to be shallow sea- limestone during sea-impact reaction.

  17. Advances in synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals with controlled size and shape.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaili; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2014-10-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) materials have a wide range of applications, including biomaterials, adsorbents, chemical engineering materials, catalysts and catalyst supports and mechanical reinforcements. The size and shape of CaP crystals and aggregates play critical roles in their applications. The main inorganic building blocks of human bones and teeth are nanocrystalline CaPs; recently, much progress has been made in the application of CaP nanocrystals and their composites for clinical repair of damaged bone and tooth. For example, CaPs with special micro- and nanostructures can better imitate the biomimetic features of human bone and tooth, and this offers significantly enhanced biological performances. Therefore, the design of CaP nano-/microcrystals, and the shape and hierarchical structures of CaPs, have great potential to revolutionize the field of hard tissue engineering, starting from bone/tooth repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery devices. Previously, a number of reviews have reported the synthesis and properties of CaP materials, especially for hydroxyapatite (HAp). However, most of them mainly focused on the characterizations and physicochemical and biological properties of HAp particles. There are few reviews about the control of particle size and size distribution of CaPs, and in particular the control of nano-/microstructures on bulk CaP ceramic surfaces, which is a big challenge technically and may have great potential in tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes the current state of the art for the synthesis of CaP crystals with controlled sizes from the nano- to the macroscale, and the diverse shapes including the zero-dimensional shapes of particles and spheres, the one-dimensional shapes of rods, fibers, wires and whiskers, the two-dimensional shapes of sheets, disks, plates, belts, ribbons and flakes and the three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of porous, hollow, and biomimetic structures similar to biological bone and tooth. In addition, this review will also summarize studies on the controlled formation of nano-/microstructures on the surface of bulk ceramics, and the preparation of macroscopical bone grafts with 3-D architecture nano-/microstructured surfaces. Moreover, the possible directions of future research and development in this field, such as the detailed mechanisms behind the size and shape control in various strategies, the importance of theoretical simulation, self-assembly, biomineralization and sacrificial precursor strategies in the fabrication of biomimetic bone-like and enamel-like CaP materials are proposed. PMID:24954909

  18. Isotactic polypropylene carbon nanotube composites -- crystallization and ordering behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Judith, Robert; Gombos, Erin; McIntyre, Michael; Schoen, Scott; Cebe, Peggy; Mattera, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The field of Polymer Nanocomposites (PNCs) is growing steadily in recent years. We use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to affect the crystallization behavior of the polymers. Isotactic Polypropylene (iPP) is very widely used and is a good model system to understand the physics of other similar polymers. iPP/CNT PNCs form ?, ?, and ? crystallographic phases under a variety of crystallization conditions: non-isothermal and isothermal melt crystallization, shear, stress, fiber extrusion, etc. The crystal growth is altered from spherulitic to ?-fibrillar upon the nucleation effect of CNTs. We are studying the effect of different temperature treatment schemes and different isothermal crystallization conditions. We found also that the smectic ordering in iPP is improved by the introduction of CNTs. We use Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Wide Angle X-ray scattering, Microscopic Transmission Ellipsometry and Avrami analysis. Research supported by: Assumption College Faculty Development Grant, funding for students' stipends, instrumentation and supplies, the NSF Polymers Program of the DMR, grant (DMR-0602473) and NASA grant (NAG8-1167).

  19. Evidence for the involvement of carbonic anhydrase and urease in calcium carbonate formation in the gravity-sensing organ of Aplysia californica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Harrison, J. L.; Campbell, J. W.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms that could modulate the formation of otoconia, calcium carbonate granules in the inner ear of vertebrate species, we examined statoconia formation in the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of the gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica using an in vitro organ culture model. We determined the type of calcium carbonate present in the statoconia and investigated the role of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and urease in regulating statocyst pH as well as the role of protein synthesis and urease in statoconia production and homeostasis in vitro. The type of mineral present in statoconia was found to be aragonitic calcium carbonate. When the CA inhibitor, acetazolamide (AZ), was added to cultures of statocysts, the pH initially (30 min) increased and then decreased. The urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), decreased statocyst pH. Simultaneous addition of AZ and AHA caused a decrease in pH. Inhibition of urease activity also reduced total statoconia number, but had no effect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of protein synthesis reduced statoconia production and increased statoconia volume. In a previous study, inhibition of CA was shown to decrease statoconia production. Taken together, these data show that urease and CA play a role in regulating statocyst pH and the formation and maintenance of statoconia. CA produces carbonate ion for calcium carbonate formation and urease neutralizes the acid formed due to CA action, by production of ammonia.

  20. Preparation and structure of carbonated calcium hydroxyapatite substituted with heavy rare earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yasukawa, Akemi; Kandori, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Gotoh, Keiko

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LnCaHap solid solution particles were prepared using five types of heavy rare earth ions by a precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The length and the crystallinity of the LnCaHap particles first increased and then decreased with increasing Ln{sup 3+} contents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A series of YCaHap solid solution particles formed with Y/(Y + Ca) = 0-0.10 were investigated using various methods in detail. -- Abstract: Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) particles substituted five types of heavy rare earth ions (Ln: Y{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}) were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using various means. These Ln ions strongly affected the crystal phases and the structures of the products. With increasing Ln/(Ln + Ca) in the starting solution ([X{sub Ln}]), the length and the crystallinity of the particles first increased and then decreased. The rare earth metal-calcium hydroxyapatite (LnCaHap) solid solution particles were obtained at [X{sub Y}] {<=} 0.10 for substituting Y system and at [X{sub Ln}] {<=} 0.01-0.03 for substituting the other Ln systems. LnPO{sub 4} was mixed with LnCaHap at higher [X{sub Ln}] for all Ln systems. A series of yttrium-calcium hydroxyapatite (YCaHap) solid solutions with [X{sub Y}] = 0-0.10 were investigated using XRD, TEM, ICP-AES, IR and TG-DTA in detail.

  1. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone constituents are described. In addition, tables of gel-grown organic and inorganic crystals are provided.

  2. Chapter 9 Crystal Structure Although the symmetry and beauty of crystals have always excited curiosity and wonder, the

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ho Sung

    1-1 Chapter 9 Crystal Structure Although the symmetry and beauty of crystals have always excited by the fact that when he accidently dropped a crystal of calcite (a form of calcium carbonate), it fractured into smaller crystals that had the same interfacial angles between their plane surface as did the original

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure refinement, and nonlinear-optical properties of CaB3O5(OH): Comparative crystal chemistry of calcium triborates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamnova, N. A.; Aksenov, S. M.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Volkov, A. S.; Dimitrova, O. V.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium triborate CaB3O5(OH) obtained by hydrothermal synthesis in the Ca(OH)2-H3BO3-Na2CO3-KCl system is studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell are as follows: a = 13.490(1), b = 6.9576(3), and c = 4.3930(2) Å; V = 412.32(3) Å3 and space group Pna21. The structure is refined in the anisotropic approximation of the atomic displacement parameters to R = 4.28% using 972 | F| > 4?( F). It is confirmed that the crystal structure of Ca triborate CaB3O5(OH) is identical to that described earlier. The hydrogen atom is localized. An SHG signal stronger than that of the quartz standard is registered. The phase transition of calcium triborate into calciborite is found on heating. The comparative crystal-chemical analysis of a series of borates with the general chemical formula 2Ca? · 3?2?3 · nH2? ( n = 0-13) with the constant Ca?: ?2?3= 2: 3 ratio and variable content of water is performed.

  4. Self-diffusion parameters in carbon-subgroup crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2010-03-15

    Self-diffusion parameters have been calculated for crystals of the carbon subgroup C (diamond), Si, Ge, {alpha}-Sn, Pb. It is shown that consideration of quantum effects in the delocalization of atoms leads to the following effect: at low temperatures (below the Debye temperature), the self-diffusion parameters depend strongly on temperature and the self-diffusion entropy is negative: s{sub d} < 0. With an increase in temperature, the function s{sub d} takes positive values. All thermodynamic parameters of self-diffusion in semiconductor crystals of carbon subgroup were calculated without any fitting parameters. The temperature dependences of self-diffusion parameters were studied for IVa-subgroup crystals upon isobaric heating from T = 0 K to the melting point. A good agreement with both experimental data and theoretical estimates obtained by other researchers is obtained. The correlation between the entropy and enthalpy of self-diffusion, as well as the correlation between the volume and entropy of self-diffusion for the entire temperature range under consideration, are discussed.

  5. Effect of calcium carbonate on low carbon steel corrosion behavior in saline CO2 high pressure environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, Lisiane Morfeo; Costa, Eleani Maria da; Andrade, Jairo José de Oliveira; Hubler, Roberto; Huet, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    The CaCO3 influence on the corrosion properties of low carbon steel in aqueous solutions saturated with CO2 and NaCl at 80 °C and 15 MPa was investigated over time with respect to morphology, thickness, structure, chemical composition and corrosion rate. The corrosion product formed in CaCO3-based solution was a calcium-enriched siderite and the scales were thinner and more porous than the ones formed in solutions without CaCO3. The CaCO3 reduced the corrosion rate, but the scales produced in the presence of this compound presented depassivation followed by formation of pits during electrochemical measurements effectuated on corroded samples.

  6. A flow-system comparison of the reactivities of calcium superoxide and potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    A single pass flow system was used to test the reactivity of calcium superoxide with respiratory gases and the performance was compared to that of potassium superoxide. The KO2 system is used by coal miners as a self-contained unit in rescue operations. Particular attention was given to the reactivity with carbon dioxide and water vapor at different temperatures and partial pressures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The calcium superoxide beds were found to absorb CO2 and H2O vapor, releasing O2. The KO2 bed, however, released O2 at twice the rate of CO2 absorption at 37 C. It is concluded that the calcium superoxide material is not a suitable replacement for the KO2 bed, although Ca(O2)2 may be added to the KO2 bed to enhance the CO2 absorption.

  7. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will also affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. These new federal drinking water regulations may require public water suppliers to adjust treatment practices or incorporate additional treatment operations into their existing treatment trains. Many options have been identified, including membrane processes, granular activated carbon, powered activated carbon (PAC), enhanced coagulation and/or softening, and alternative disinfectants (e.g., chlorine dioxide, ozone, and chloramines). Of the processes being considered, PAC appears to offer an attractive benefit-to-cost advantage for many water treatment plants, particularly small systems (those serving fewer than 10,000 customers). PAC has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. Activated carbons can be produced from a variety of raw materials, including wood, peat, coconut husks, and numerous types of coal. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During that study, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. We hypothesize that the sodium and calcium content of the coal plays a significant role in the development of pore structures and pore-size distribution, ultimately producing activated carbon products that have greater sorption capacity for specific contaminants, depending on molecular size.

  8. Analysis of carbon functional groups in mobile humic acid and recalcitrant calcium humate extracted from eight US soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to study the structure of soil humic fractions; however, knowledge regarding carbon structural relationships in humic fractions is limited. In this study, mobile humic acid (MHA) and recalcitrant calcium humate (CaHA) fr...

  9. Incorporation of strontium in earthworm-secreted calcium carbonate granules produced in strontium-amended and strontium-bearing soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinza, Loredana; Quinn, Paul D.; Schofield, Paul F.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.; Hodson, Mark E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the incorporation of Sr into biomineralized calcium carbonate granules secreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. Experiments were conducted using an agricultural soil amended with Sr(NO3)2 to give concentrations in the range 50-500 mg kg-1 Sr and a naturally Sr-rich, Celestine-bearing soil containing up to 11 000 mg kg-1 Sr. Granule production rates were in the range 0.26-2.3 mgCaCO3 earthworm-1 day-1; they showed no relationship with soil or soil solution Sr concentration but decreased with decreasing pH. Strong relationships exist (r2 ? 0.8, p ? 0.01) between the Sr concentrations and Sr/Ca ratios of the granules and those of the soil, soil solution and earthworms. The highest bulk Sr concentration we recorded in the calcium carbonate granules was 5.1 wt.% Sr whilst electron microprobe analysis recorded spot concentrations of up to 4.3 wt.% Sr. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicate that the majority of the calcium carbonate is present as Sr-bearing calcite with trace amounts of Sr-bearing vaterite also being present. The granules produced in the Sr-amended soils concentrated Sr relative to Ca from the bulk soil and the earthworms. This suggests that earthworm secreted calcium carbonate may be significant in the cycling of 90Sr released into soils via nuclear accidents or leakage from nuclear waste storage facilities.

  10. Calcium carbonate dissolution in deep sea sediments: reconciling microelectrode, pore water and benthic flux chamber results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Richard A.; Jahnke, Deborah B.

    2004-01-01

    We report the benthic fluxes of O 2, titration alkalinity (TA), Ca 2+, NO 3-, PO 43-, and Si(OH) 4 from in situ benthic flux chamber incubations on the Ceara Rise and Cape Verde Plateau and compare them to previously published results. We find within analytical uncertainty that the TA flux is twice the calcium flux, suggesting that dissolution/precipitation of CaCO 3 is the principal mechanism controlling benthic TA and Ca 2+ fluxes. At sites where the sediments contain significant (>35%) CaCO 3 and the overlying waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO 3, the ratios of the total dissolution rate to the remineralization rate are significantly less than at all other study sites. We propose that these observations can be explained by precipitation of fresh CaCO 3 at the supersaturated sediment surface followed by redissolution deeper in the sediments because of metabolically-produced CO 2. A numerical simulation is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this explanation. In addition, surface exchange reactions in high-CaCO 3 sediments coupled with high rates of particle mixing may also impact rates of metabolic dissolution and depress chamber-derived estimates of carbonate alkalinity and calcium benthic fluxes. These results suggest that at supersaturated, high CaCO 3 locations, previous models of sediment diagenesis may have overestimated the impact of metabolic dissolution on the preservation of CaCO 3 deposited on the sea floor.

  11. Apo And Calcium-Bound Crystal Structures of Alpha-11 Giardin, An Unusual Annexin From 'Giardia Lamblia'

    SciTech Connect

    Pathuri, P.; Nguyen, E.T.; Svard, S.G.; Luecke, H.; /UC, Irvine /Uppsala U. /Karolinska Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Alpha-11 giardin is a member of the multi-gene alpha-giardin family in the intestinal protozoan, Giardia lamblia. This gene family shares an ancestry with the annexin super family, whose common characteristic is calcium-dependent binding to membranes that contain acidic phospholipids. Several alpha giardins are highly expressed during parasite-induced diarrhea in humans. Despite being a member of a large family of proteins, little is known about the function and cellular localization of alpha-11 giardin, although giardins are often associated with the cytoskeleton. It has been shown that Giardia exhibits high levels of alpha-11 giardin mRNA transcript throughout its life cycle; however, constitutive over-expression of this protein is lethal to the parasite. Determining the three-dimensional structure of an alpha-giardin is essential to identifying functional domains shared in the alpha-giardin family. Here we report the crystal structures of the apo and Ca{sup 2+}-bound forms of alpha-11 giardin, the first alpha giardin to be characterized structurally. Crystals of apo and Ca{sup 2+}-bound alpha-11 giardin diffracted to 1.1 angstroms and 2.93 angstroms, respectively. The crystal structure of selenium-substituted apo alpha-11 giardin reveals a planar array of four tandem repeats of predominantly {alpha}-helical domains, reminiscent of previously determined annexin structures, making this the highest-resolution structure of an annexin to date. The apo alpha-11 giardin structure also reveals a hydrophobic core formed between repeats I/IV and II/III, a region typically hydrophilic in other annexins. Surprisingly, the Ca{sup 2+}-bound structure contains only a single calcium ion, located in the DE loop of repeat I and coordinated differently from the two types of calcium sites observed in previous annexin structures. The apo and Ca{sup 2+}-bound alpha-11 giardin structures assume overall similar conformations; however, Ca2+-bound alpha-11 giardin crystallized in a lower-symmetry space group with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. Vesicle-binding studies suggest that alpha-11 giardin, unlike most other annexins, does not bind to vesicles composed of acidic phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner.

  12. Optical Properties of Small Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Geier, M.; Arienti, M.

    2013-12-01

    The optical properties of ice crystals play a fundamental role in modeling atmospheric radiation and hydrological cycle, which are critical in monitoring climate change. While Black Carbon (BC) is recognized as the dominant absorber with positive radiative forcing (warming) (Ramanathan & Carmichael, 2008), in-situ observations (Cappa, et al, 2012) indicate that the characterization of the mixing state of BC with ice crystals and other non-BC particles in global climate models (Ghan & Schwartz, 2007) needs further investigation. The limitation in the available mixing models is due to the drastically different absorbing properties of BC compared to other aerosols. We explore the scattering properties of ice crystals (in shapes commonly found in cirrus clouds and contrails - Yang, et al. 2012) with the inclusion of BC particles. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) (Yurkin & Hoekstra, 2011) is utilized to directly calculate the optical properties of the crystals with multiple BC inclusions, modeled as a distribution of spheres. The results are then compared with the most popular models of internal and external mixing (Liou, et al. 2011). The DDA calculations are carried out over a broad range of BC particle sizes and volume fractions within the crystal at the 532 nm wavelength and for ice crystals smaller than 50 ?m. The computationally intensive database generated in this study is critical for understanding the effect of different types of BC inclusions on the atmosphere radiative forcing. Examples will be discussed to illustrate the modification of BC optical properties by encapsulation in ice crystals and how the parameterization of the BC mixing state in global climate models can be improved. Acknowledgements Support by Sandia National Laboratories' LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Cappa, C.D., Onasch, T.B., Massoli, et al. (2012). Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon. Science, 337(6098), 1078-1081. Ghan, S.J., & Schwartz, S.E. (2007). Aerosol properties and processes: A path from field and laboratory measurements to global climate models. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 88(7), 1059-1083. Liou, K.N., Takano, Y., & Yang, P. (2011). Light absorption and scattering by aggregates: Application to black carbon and snow grains. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, 112(10), 1581-1594. Ramanathan, V., & Carmichael, G. (2008). Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon. Nature Geoscience, 1(4), 221-227. Yang, P., Bi, L., Baum, B.A., et al. (2013). Spectrally Consistent Scattering, Absorption, and Polarization Properties of Atmospheric Ice Crystals at Wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 ? m. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(1), 330-347. Yurkin, M.A., & Hoekstra, A.G. (2011). The discrete-dipole-approximation code ADDA: capabilities and known limitations. Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, 112(13), 2234-2247.

  13. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate-Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    PubMed

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper. PMID:26572417

  14. Layered growth of crayfish gastrolith: about the stability of amorphous calcium carbonate and role of additives.

    PubMed

    Habraken, Wouter J E M; Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Al-Sawalmih, Ali; Glazer, Lilah; Bentov, Shmuel; Fratzl, Peter; Sagi, Amir; Aichmayer, Barbara; Berman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on pre-molt gastroliths have shown a typical onion-like morphology of layers of amorphous mineral (mostly calcium carbonate) and chitin, resulting from the continuous deposition and densification of amorphous mineral spheres on a chitin-matrix during time. To investigate the consequences of this layered growth on the local structure and composition of the gastrolith, we performed spatially-resolved Raman, X-ray and SEM-EDS analysis on complete pre-molt gastrolith cross-sections. Results show that especially the abundance of inorganic phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)/citrate and proteins is not uniform throughout the organ but changes from layer to layer. Based on these results we can conclude that ACC stabilization in the gastrolith takes place by more than one compound and not by only one of these additives. PMID:25433275

  15. Influence of active sites organisation on calcium carbonate formation at model biomolecular interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacke, S.; Möbius, D.; Lieu, V.-T.

    2005-06-01

    In an approach to understand the influence of structural parameters of interfaces on calcification in biomineralisation, the distribution and conformation of head groups as active sites in an inert matrix were varied using two-component phospholipid model monolayers. Dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholin (DPPC), respectively, were the active components, and methyl octadecanoate (MOD) was used as inactive matrix. Surface pressure-area isotherms provide evidence for a different distribution of the active components in the matrix. Formation of solid calcium carbonate with two-component monolayers on subphases containing aqueous CaCO 3 was observed in situ by Brewster angle microscopy, where CaCO 3 domains appear bright. Striking differences in kinetics and extent of CaCO 3 formation are observed between monolayers containing dimyristoylphosphatidic acid and those containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholin. The presence of ?-carrageenan in the subphase as a further active component resulted in partial inhibition of CaCO 3 formation.

  16. Crystallization of carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A S; Berry, D K

    2010-06-11

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the 12C(?,?)16O reaction to S(300)?170??keV?b. PMID:20867223

  17. Crystallization of Carbon Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    E-print Network

    C. J. Horowitz; A. S. Schneider; D. K. Berry

    2010-05-14

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon/ oxygen mixtures in White Dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the $^{12}$C($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction to S_{300} <= 170 keV barns.

  18. Crystallization of Carbon Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    E-print Network

    Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2010-01-01

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon/ oxygen mixtures in White Dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the $^{12}$C($\\alpha,\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction to S_{300} <= 170 keV barns.

  19. Calcite growth rates as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio, saturation index and strontium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N; Grantham, Ms. Meg; Stack, Andrew G

    2012-01-01

    Using in situ atomic force microscopy, the growth rates of the obtuse and acute step orientations on the calcite surface were measured at two saturation indices as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and aqueous strontium concentration. The amount of strontium required to inhibit growth was found to correlate with the aqueous calcium concentration, but did not correlate with carbonate. This suggests that strontium inhibits attachment of calcium ions to the reactive sites on the calcite surface. Strontium/calcium cation exchange selectivity coefficients for those sites, Kex, of 1.09 0.09 and 1.44 0.19 are estimated for the obtuse and acute step orientations, respectively. The implication of this finding is that to avoid poisoning calcite growth, the concentration of calcium should be higher than the quotient of the strontium concentration and Kex, regardless of saturation state. Additionally, analytical models of nucleation and propagation of steps are expanded from previous work to capture growth rates of these steps at multiple saturation indices and the effect of strontium. This work will have broader implications for naturally occurring or engineered calcite growth, such as to sequester subsurface strontium contamination.

  20. The formation of web-like connection among electrospun chitosan/PVA fiber network by the reinforcement of ellipsoidal calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sambudi, Nonni Soraya; Kim, Minjeong G; Park, Seung Bin

    2016-03-01

    The electrospun fibers consist of backbone fibers and nano-branch network are synthesized by loading of ellipsoidal calcium carbonate in the mixture of chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) followed by electrospinning. The synthesized ellipsoidal calcium carbonate is in submicron size (730.7±152.4nm for long axis and 212.6±51.3nm for short axis). The electrospun backbone fibers experience an increasing in diameter by loading of calcium carbonate from 71.5±23.4nm to 281.9±51.2nm. The diameters of branch fibers in the web-network range from 15nm to 65nm with most distributions of fibers are in 30-35nm. Calcium carbonate acts as reinforcing agent to improve the mechanical properties of fibers. The optimum value of Young's modulus is found at the incorporation of 3wt.% of calcium carbonate in chitosan/PVA fibers, which is enhanced from 15.7±3MPa to 432.4±94.3MPa. On the other hand, the ultimate stress of fibers experiences a decrease. This result shows that the fiber network undergoes changes from flexible to more stiff by the inclusion of calcium carbonate. The thermal analysis results show that the crystallinity of polymer is changed by the existence of calcium carbonate in the fiber network. The immersion of fibers in simulated body fluid (SBF) results in the formation of apatite on the surface of fibers. PMID:26706559

  1. The effect of antiscalant addition on calcium carbonate precipitation for a simplified synthetic brackish water reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Testa, Fabrice; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Moulin, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The primary limitations to inland brackish water reverse osmosis (RO) desalination are the cost and technical feasibility of concentrate disposal. To decrease concentrate volume, a side-stream process can be used to precipitate problematic scaling salts and remove the precipitate with a solid/liquid separation step. The treated concentrate can then be purified through a secondary reverse osmosis stage to increase overall recovery and decrease the volume of waste requiring disposal. Antiscalants are used in an RO system to prevent salt precipitation but might affect side-stream concentrate treatment. Precipitation experiments were performed on a synthetic RO concentrate with and without antiscalant; of particular interest was the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Particle size distributions, calcium precipitation, microfiltration flux, and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the effects of antiscalant type, antiscalant concentration, and precipitation pH on calcium carbonate precipitation and filtration. Results show that antiscalants can decrease precipitate particle size and change the shape of the particles; smaller particles can cause an increase in microfiltration flux decline during the solid/liquid separation step. The presence of antiscalant during precipitation can also decrease the mass of precipitated calcium carbonate. PMID:20350741

  2. Study on structural, morphological, optical and thermal properties of guanidine carbonate doped nickel sulfate hexahydrate crystal.

    PubMed

    Silambarasan, A; Rajesh, P; Ramasamy, P

    2015-01-01

    The single crystal of guanidine carbonate doped nickel sulfate hexahydrate was grown from solution for ultraviolet filters. The single crystal XRD confirms that the grown single crystal belongs to the tetragonal system with the space group of P4?2?2. The crystallinity of the grown crystal was estimated by powder X-ray diffraction studies. The optical transmission and thermal stability of as-grown guanidine carbonate doped nickel sulfate single crystals have been studied. The optical transmission spectrum demonstrates the characteristics of ultraviolet filters. The TG/DTA studies confirm the thermal properties of grown crystals. Thermo-gravimetric analysis showed that the dehydration temperature of the guanidine carbonate doped nickel sulfate crystal is about 100 °C, which is much higher than that of pure nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NSH) crystals which is 72 °C. The growth behaviors and dislocation density were detected under the high resolution XRD and etching studies respectively. PMID:25022507

  3. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide. Annual report, September 1989--August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1990-09-01

    This research effort is designed to investigate the technical feasibility of a high-temperature, high-pressure process for the bulk separation of CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gases. The two-year contract was awarded in September 1989. This report describes the research effort and results obtained during the first year of the effort. The overall project consists of 6 tasks, four of which were active during year 01. Tasks 1 and 2 were completed during the year while activity in Tasks 3 and 6 will carry over into year 02. Tasks 4 and 5 will be initiated during year 02. Three primary objectives were met in Task 1. A literature search on the calcination-carbonation reactions of CO{sub 2} with calcium-based sorbents was completed. A high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) electrobalance reactor suitable for studying the calcination and carbonation reactions was constructed. This reactor system is now fully operable and we are routinely collecting kinetics data at temperatures in the range of 550-900{degree}C and pressures of 1 to 15 atm. Samples of nine candidate calcium-based sorbents were acquired and tested. These samples were subjected to reaction screening tests as part of Task 2. As a result of these screening tests, chemically pure calcium carbonate, chemically pure calcium acetate, and the commercial dolomite were selected for more detailed kinetic testing. In Task 3, the HTHP electrobalance reactor is being used to study the calcination-carbonation behavior of the three base sorbents as a function of calcination temperature, carbonation temperature, carbonation pressure, and CO{sub 2} concentration.

  4. Diff Quik staining method for detection and identification of monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluids

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, E; Manganelli, S; Catenaccio, M; De Stefano, R; Frati, E; Cucini, S; Marcolongo, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate whether the Diff Quik (DQ) staining method might prove useful in identifying monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals on permanent mounted stained slides.?METHODS—27 synovial fluid (SF) samples obtained from the knees of 21 patients with acute CPPD disease and 6 with acute gout were studied. Wet analysis for crystal detection and identification was performed within one hour of joint aspiration. In addition, 16 inflammatory synovial effusions obtained from patients with knee arthritis induced by non-crystalline inflammatory diseases were studied. For each SF, a DQ stained slide was analysed by two of the authors trained in SF analysis. The observers were blinded to the type of crystals present in the SF. Each slide was analysed by compensated polarised as well as transmitted light microscopy. An SF was considered positive if intracellular and/or extracellular crystals were clearly identified. In addition, the observer was asked to identify the type of the crystals using compensated polarised light microscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the DQ staining method were determined.?RESULTS—51 true positive and 28 true negative cases were correctly classified (39 CPPD samples, 12 MSU samples, 28 samples of crystal unrelated arthropathies). Overall, four false positive and three false negative cases were reported. In all the false positive cases, extracellular CPPD crystals were erroneously identified, whereas CPPD crystals present in the SF were not identified in the three false negative cases. All MSU specimens were correctly diagnosed. The overall specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy using DQ stained slides for crystal confirmation were respectively 87.5%, 94.4%, and 91.9%. The PPV was 92.7% and the NPV 90.3%. In particular, the specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for CPPD detection were 90.9%, 92.9%, and 91.9%, with a PPV of 90.7 and an NPV of 93.0%. All the MSU specimens were correctly identified, providing 100% sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV, and NPV.?CONCLUSIONS—Stained preparations of SF, including DQ stained smears, could provide a useful tool for delayed SF analysis suitable for quality controls, including cytological examination and crystals detection and identification.?? PMID:11171677

  5. Hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate microparticles as a potential carrier for enhancing oral delivery of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Wufu; Lin, Qisi; Han, Jin; Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that a novel hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate (HP-?-CD/CC) based amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can be used to increase the solubility and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Irbesartan (IRB) was selected as a model compound and loaded into the nanoporous HP-?-CD/CC matrix using an immersion method. The IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation was characterized by various analytical techniques, such as specific surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Analyses with PXRD and DSC confirmed that IRB was fully converted into the amorphous form in the nanopores of HP-?-CD/CC. From the solubility and dissolution tests, it was observed that the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were increased significantly compared with those of pure IRB and IRB-loaded mesoporous silica. Likewise, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited better absorption compared with that of the commercially available IRB capsules in beagle dogs. The mean peak plasma concentration (C max) and the area under the mean plasma concentration-time curve (AUC[0?48]) of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were 1.56- and 1.52-fold higher than that of the commercial product, respectively. Furthermore, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited excellent stability against re-crystallization. These results clearly demonstrate that HP-?-CD/CC based porous ASD is a promising formulation approach to improve the aqueous solubility and the in vivo absorption performance of a water-insoluble compound like IRB. PMID:25995635

  6. Hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate microparticles as a potential carrier for enhancing oral delivery of water-insoluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Zhu, Wufu; Lin, Qisi; Han, Jin; Jiang, Liqun; Zhang, Yanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate that a novel hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin functionalized calcium carbonate (HP-?-CD/CC) based amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) can be used to increase the solubility and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs. Irbesartan (IRB) was selected as a model compound and loaded into the nanoporous HP-?-CD/CC matrix using an immersion method. The IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation was characterized by various analytical techniques, such as specific surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Analyses with PXRD and DSC confirmed that IRB was fully converted into the amorphous form in the nanopores of HP-?-CD/CC. From the solubility and dissolution tests, it was observed that the aqueous solubility and dissolution rate of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were increased significantly compared with those of pure IRB and IRB-loaded mesoporous silica. Likewise, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited better absorption compared with that of the commercially available IRB capsules in beagle dogs. The mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the mean plasma concentration–time curve (AUC[0?48]) of IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC were 1.56- and 1.52-fold higher than that of the commercial product, respectively. Furthermore, the IRB-loaded HP-?-CD/CC formulation exhibited excellent stability against re-crystallization. These results clearly demonstrate that HP-?-CD/CC based porous ASD is a promising formulation approach to improve the aqueous solubility and the in vivo absorption performance of a water-insoluble compound like IRB. PMID:25995635

  7. Potential CO2 leakage reduction through biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Adrienne J; Lauchnor, Ellen; Eldring, Joachim Joe; Esposito, Richard; Mitchell, Andrew C; Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Alfred B; Spangler, Lee H

    2013-01-01

    Mitigation strategies for sealing high permeability regions in cap rocks, such as fractures or improperly abandoned wells, are important considerations in the long term security of geologically stored carbon dioxide (CO(2)). Sealing technologies using low-viscosity fluids are advantageous in this context since they potentially reduce the necessary injection pressures and increase the radius of influence around injection wells. Using aqueous solutions and suspensions that can effectively promote microbially induced mineral precipitation is one such technology. Here we describe a strategy to homogenously distribute biofilm-induced calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) precipitates in a 61 cm long sand-filled column and to seal a hydraulically fractured, 74 cm diameter Boyles Sandstone core. Sporosarcina pasteurii biofilms were established and an injection strategy developed to optimize CaCO(3) precipitation induced via microbial urea hydrolysis. Over the duration of the experiments, permeability decreased between 2 and 4 orders of magnitude in sand column and fractured core experiments, respectively. Additionally, after fracture sealing, the sandstone core withstood three times higher well bore pressure than during the initial fracturing event, which occurred prior to biofilm-induced CaCO(3) mineralization. These studies suggest biofilm-induced CaCO(3) precipitation technologies may potentially seal and strengthen fractures to mitigate CO(2) leakage potential. PMID:22913538

  8. The One-Dimensional Wigner Crystal in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vikram

    2008-03-01

    Electron-electron interactions strongly affect the behavior of low-dimensional systems. In one dimension (1D), arbitrarily weak interactions qualitatively alter the ground state producing a Luttinger liquid (LL) which has now been observed in a number of experimental systems. Interactions are even more important at low carrier density, and in the limit when the long-ranged Coulomb potential is the dominant energy scale, the electron liquid is expected to become a periodically ordered solid known as the Wigner crystal. In 1D, the Wigner crystal has been predicted to exhibit novel spin and magnetic properties not present in an ordinary LL. However, despite recent progress in coupled quantum wires, unambiguous experimental demonstration of this state has not been possible due to the role of disorder. We demonstrate using low-temperature single-electron transport spectroscopy that a hole gas in low-disorder carbon nanotubes with a band gap is a realization of the 1D Wigner crystal [1]. We observe for the first time three distinct regimes as a function of carrier density and axial magnetic field: (I) a completely spin and isospin polarized state, (II) an isospin polarized, spin antiferromagnetic state, and (III) an unpolarized state with a four-fold addition energy period. The transitions among these regimes can be quantitatively and intuitively explained using a Wigner crystal picture based on a gapped LL model [2] with the carriers represented by spatially localized solitons. Our observation provides a clean platform for testing theories of interacting electrons in 1D and also indicates the possibility of using this many-body state for solid-state quantum information processing. [1] V. V. Deshpande and M. Bockrath, arXiv:0710.0683v1 [cond-mat.str-el] [2] L. S. Levitov and A. M Tsvelik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 016401 (2003)

  9. Calcium tetraboride-does it exist? Synthesis and properties of a carbon-doped calcium tetraboride that is isotypic with the known rare earth tetraborides.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Ruth; Blaschkowski, Björn; Eichele, Klaus; Meyer, H-Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    Crystalline samples of carbon-doped CaB4 were synthesized by solid-state reactions in sealed niobium ampules from the elements Ca, B, and C. The structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (P4/mbm, Z = 4, a = 7.0989(7) A, c = 4.1353(5) A, R1 = 0.026, and wR2 = 0.058) revealing an atom arrangement containing a three-dimensional boron network built up from B6 octahedra and B2 dumbbells which is well-known from the structures of rare earth tetraborides. Crystals of CaB(4-x)Cx are black with a metallic luster and behave stable against mineral acids. Band structure calculations indicate that CaB4 is a stable semiconducting compound with a narrow band gap and that carbon should not necessarily be required for the stability of this compound. The presence of carbon in the crystalline samples of CaB(4-x)Cx was indicated by electron energy loss spectroscopy, but the carbon content in the samples was estimated to be less than 5% according to inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry measurements. The distribution of boron and carbon atoms in the structure was investigated by means of 11B and 13C solid-state magic angle spinning NMR. Measurements of the magnetic susceptibility indicate a temperature-independent paramagnetism down to 20 K. PMID:16562963

  10. Biocalcite, a multifunctional inorganic polymer: Building block for calcareous sponge spicules and bioseed for the synthesis of calcium phosphate-based bone

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-01-01

    Summary Calcium carbonate is the material that builds up the spicules of the calcareous sponges. Recent results revealed that the calcium carbonate/biocalcite-based spicular skeleton of these animals is formed through an enzymatic mechanism, such as the skeleton of the siliceous sponges, evolutionarily the oldest animals that consist of biosilica. The enzyme that mediates the calcium carbonate deposition has been identified as a carbonic anhydrase (CA) and has been cloned from the calcareous sponge species Sycon raphanus. Calcium carbonate deposits are also found in vertebrate bones besides the main constituent, calcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (HA). Evidence has been presented that during the initial phase of HA synthesis poorly crystalline carbonated apatite is deposited. Recent data summarized here indicate that during early bone formation calcium carbonate deposits enzymatically formed by CA, act as potential bioseeds for the precipitation of calcium phosphate mineral onto bone-forming osteoblasts. Two different calcium carbonate phases have been found during CA-driven enzymatic calcium carbonate deposition in in vitro assays: calcite crystals and round-shaped vaterite deposits. The CA provides a new target of potential anabolic agents for treatment of bone diseases; a first CA activator stimulating the CA-driven calcium carbonate deposition has been identified. In addition, the CA-driven calcium carbonate crystal formation can be frozen at the vaterite state in the presence of silintaphin-2, an aspartic acid/glutamic acid-rich sponge-specific protein. The discovery that calcium carbonate crystals act as bioseeds in human bone formation may allow the development of novel biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Na-alginate hydrogels, enriched with biosilica, have recently been demonstrated as a suitable matrix to embed bone forming cells for rapid prototyping bioprinting/3D cell printing applications. PMID:24991497

  11. Constraining the cause of the end-Guadalupian extinction with coupled records of carbon and calcium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, A. B.; Mundil, R.; He, B.; Brown, S. T.; Altiner, D.; Sun, Y.; DePaolo, D. J.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    A negative ?13C excursion in carbonate sediments from Guadalupian (Middle Permian) and Lopingian (Late Permian) stratigraphic sections has been interpreted to result from a large carbon cycle disturbance during end-Guadalupian extinction event (ca. 260 Ma). However, the carbon isotope data alone are insufficient to uniquely determine the type and magnitude of perturbations to the global carbon cycle. The carbon and calcium cycles are coupled via CaCO3 burial, so changes in calcium isotopes can be used to constrain the cause of a carbon isotope excursion. In this study, we present coupled carbon and calcium isotope records from three Guadalupian-Lopingian (G/L) sections in China and Turkey. Isotope records among our studied sections are inconsistent in both their ?13C and ?44/40Ca records. Similar inconsistencies in ?13C among sections occur across previously published datasets. Sections with large (>3‰) changes in ?13C either show evidence for diagenetic alteration or do not show ?13C and ?44/40Ca changes consistent with severe volcanic degassing from Emeishan or methane clathrate destabilization. We conclude that the large isotopic changes are more likely the result of local burial conditions or diagenetic effects, rather than a large carbon cycle disturbance. Perturbations to the global carbon and calcium cycles appear to have been much smaller across the G/L transition than across the subsequent Permian-Triassic boundary. This finding is consistent with recent paleobiological data showing that the end-Guadalupian extinction was much less severe than previously believed, and was indistinguishable in magnitude from background intervals. However, selective extinction of marine animals with passive respiratory physiology indicates that the G/L extinction cannot simply be due to background extinction or sampling failure, and that it was triggered by some environmental event. Therefore, any environmental event must have been small enough to not generate large changes in ?13C and ?44/40Ca. A small acidification or warming event is therefore plausible, but difficult to confirm. Loss of marine habitat by way of sea-level change also remains a possible extinction trigger.

  12. Calcium phosphate crystal distribution in the superficial zone of human femoral head articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Scotchford, C A; Greenwald, S; Ali, S Y

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of cuboid crystals in articular cartilage was examined by image analysis of electron micrographs. The specimens were considered to be functionally normal articular cartilage from femoral heads resected either because of femoral neck fracture or tumour in the distal femur. The study was restricted to the superficial region between 0 and 50 microns depth. Crystals were present in all specimens regardless of the age of the patient. The crystal profile area density was significantly greater in superior region samples than inferior region samples and this difference was less in older specimens. A band of microcrystals 10-20 microns below the articular surface was observed in superior samples. A significant correlation between mean individual crystal profile area and age was observed. It is noted that crystals are present in regions of cartilage subject to high mechanical stress. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1295867

  13. Biocompatibility of Ricinus communis polymer with addition of calcium carbonate compared to titanium. Experimental study in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Graça, Yorgos Luiz Santos De Salles; Opolski, Ana Cristina; Barboza, Barbara Evelin Gonçalves; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski; Mazzaro, Caroline Cantalejo; Klostermann, Flávia Caroline; Sucharski, Enéas Eduardo; Kubrusly, Luiz Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present investigation was to determine whether the difference in inflammatory tissue reaction between the Riccinus communis (castor) polymer with calcium carbonate and the titanium implant is statistically significant. Methods Thirty-two Cavia porcellus were allocated into four groups of eight animals each. We implanted the two types of materials in the retroperitoneal space of all the animals. They were euthanized at 7, 20, 30 and 40 days after surgery, and an histological study of the samples was conducted. Results All implants showed characteristics of chronic inflammation regardless of the material and timepoint of evaluation. There was no statistically significant difference between Pm+CaCO3 and Ti with regard to the presence of granulation tissue, tissue congestion, histiocytes, lymphocytes, neutrophils, giant cells, and fibrosis (P> 0.05). Conclusion The castor oil polymer plus calcium carbonate implant was not statistically different from the titanium implant regarding inflammatory tissue reaction. PMID:25140479

  14. Competitive crystallization of a propylene/ethylene random copolymer filled with a ?-nucleating agent and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Conventional and ultrafast DSC study.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G; Papageorgiou, George Z; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Bikiaris, Dimitrios; Schick, Christoph; Chrissafis, Konstantinos

    2013-11-27

    A propylene/ethylene polymeric matrix was reinforced by the simultaneous addition of a ?-nucleating agent (calcium pimelate) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in various concentrations. The present manuscript explores the competitive crystallization tendency that is caused by the presence of the two fillers. On the one hand, calcium pimelate forces the material to crystallize predominantly in the ?-crystalline form, while, on the other, the strong ?-nucleating ability of MWCNTs compels the material to develop higher ?-crystalline content. An in-depth study has been performed on the nanocomposite samples by means of conventional, temperature-modulated, and differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC) under various dynamic and isothermal conditions. The results showed that ?-crystals are predominant at low MWCNT content (<2.5 wt %), while, at high MWCNT content, the material crystallizes mainly in the ?-form. The recrystallization phenomenon during melting was confirmed with step-scan DSC, and the use of very high cooling rates by UFDSC made it possible to achieve and study the nucleation of the samples. The presence of MWCNTs enabled the nanocomposites to crystallize faster under both isothermal and dynamic conditions. The activation energy of the samples was also calculated according to Friedman's theory. PMID:24224932

  15. An assessment of engineered calcium oxalate crystal formation on plant growth and development as a step toward evaluating its use to enhance plant defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill ...

  16. Crystallization of germanium-carbon alloys -- Structure and electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    John, T.M.; Blaesing, J.; Veit, P.; Druesedau, T.

    1997-07-01

    Amorphous Ge{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x} alloys were deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering from a germanium target in methane-argon atmosphere. Structural investigations were performed by means of wide and small angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectometry and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The electronic transport properties were characterized using Hall-measurements and temperature depended conductivity. The results of X-ray techniques together with the electron microscopy clearly prove the existence of a segregation of the electronic conductivity in the as-prepared films follows the Mott' T{sup {minus}1/4} law, indicating transport by a hopping process. After annealing at 870 K, samples with x {le} 0.4 show crystallization of the Ge-clusters with a crystallite size being a function of x. After Ge-crystallization, the conductivity increases by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Above room temperature, electronic transport is determined by a thermally activated process. For lower temperatures, the {sigma}(T) curves show a behavior which is determined by the crystallite size and the free carrier concentration, both depending on the carbon content.

  17. Synthesis of high-purity precipitated calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste.

    PubMed

    de Beer, M; Doucet, F J; Maree, J P; Liebenberg, L

    2015-12-01

    We recently showed that the production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from gypsum waste by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS) followed by its direct aqueous carbonation yielded low-grade carbonate products (i.e. <90mass% as CaCO3). In this study, we used the insight gained from our previous work and developed an indirect aqueous CaS carbonation process for the production of high-grade CaCO3 (i.e. >99mass% as CaCO3) or precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). The process used an acid gas (H2S) to improve the aqueous dissolution of CaS, which is otherwise poorly soluble. The carbonate product was primarily calcite (99.5%) with traces of quartz (0.5%). Calcite was the only CaCO3 polymorph obtained; no vaterite or aragonite was detected. The product was made up of micron-size particles, which were further characterised by XRD, TGA, SEM, BET and true density. Results showed that about 0.37 ton of high-grade PCC can be produced from 1.0 ton of gypsum waste, and generates about 0.19 ton of residue, a reduction of 80% from original waste gypsum mass to mass of residue that needs to be discarded off. The use of gypsum waste as primary material in replacement of mined limestone for the production of PPC could alleviate waste disposal problems, along with converting significant volumes of waste materials into marketable commodities. PMID:26316100

  18. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Fanwen; Zhu, Jixiang; Tian, Xiumei; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, ?-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and ?-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with ?-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and ?-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and ?-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. PMID:25746269

  19. Phosphate binders and metabolic acidosis in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis—sevelamer hydrochloride, calcium carbonate, and bixalomer.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Toru; Tada, Hideo; Ono, Takashi; Fukumitsu, Toma

    2015-01-01

    The serum bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) levels are decreased in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients treated with sevelamer hydrochloride (SH). We assessed the effects of bixalomer on the chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients. We examined 12 of the 122 consecutive Japanese patients with end-stage renal disease on HD, who orally ingested a dose of SH (?2250?mg), and an arterial blood gas analysis and biochemical analysis were performed before HD. Patients whose serum HCO3(-) levels were under 18?mmol/L were changed from SH to the same dose of bixalomer. A total of 12 patients were treated with a large amount of SH. Metabolic acidosis (a serum HCO3(-) level under 18?mmol/L) was found in eight patients. These patients were also treated with or without small dose of calcium carbonate (1.2?±?1.1?g). The dose of SH was changed to that of bixalomer. After 1 month, the serum HCO3(-) levels increased from 16.3?±?1.4 to 19.6?±?1.7?mmol/L (P?calcium carbonate with SH. In the present study, the development of chronic metabolic acidosis was induced by HCl containing phosphate binders, such as SH, and partially ameliorated by calcium carbonate, then subsequently improved after changing the treatment to bixalomer. PMID:24980286

  20. Retention of silica nanoparticles on calcium carbonate sands immersed in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M

    2014-12-15

    Understanding nanoparticle-surface adhesion is necessary to develop inert tracers for subsurface applications. Here we show that nanoparticles with neutral surface charge may make the best subsurface tracers, and that it may be possible to used SiO2 nanoparticle retention to measure the fraction of solid surface that has positive charge. We show that silica nanoparticles dispersed in NaCl electrolyte solutions are increasingly retained in calcium carbonate (calcite) sand-packed columns as the solution ionic strength increases, but are not retained if they are injected in pure water or Na2SO4 electrolyte solutions. The particles retained in the NaCl experiments are released when the column is flushed with pure water or Na2SO4 solution. AFM measurements on calcite immersed in NaCl solutions show the initial repulsion of a silica colloidal probe as the surface is approached is reduced as the solution ionic strength increases, and that at high ionic strengths it disappears entirely and only attraction remains. These AFM measurements and their interpretation with Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory shows the calcite surface charge is always negative for Na2SO4 solutions, but changes from negative to positive in a patchy fashion as the ionic strength of the NaCl solution increases. Since mixed-charge (patchy) surfaces may be common in the subsurface, nanoparticles with near-zero charge may make the best tracers. PMID:25259754

  1. Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polycaprolactone/Chitosan Blend by Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Abdolmohammadi, Sanaz; Siyamak, Samira; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Rahman, Mohamad Zaki Ab; Azizi, Susan; Fatehi, Asma

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles on the mechanical and thermal properties and surface morphology of polycaprolactone (PCL)/chitosan nanocomposites. The nanocomposites of PCL/chitosan/CaCO3 were prepared using a melt blending technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicate the average size of nanoparticles to be approximately 62 nm. Tensile measurement results show an increase in the tensile modulus with CaCO3 nanoparticle loading. Tensile strength and elongation at break show gradual improvement with the addition of up to 1 wt% of nano-sized CaCO3. Decreasing performance of these properties is observed for loading of more than 1 wt% of nano-sized CaCO3. The thermal stability was best enhanced at 1 wt% of CaCO3 nanoparticle loading. The fractured surface morphology of the PCL/chitosan blend becomes more stretched and homogeneous in PCL/chitosan/CaCO3 nanocomposite. TEM micrograph displays good dispersion of CaCO3 at lower nanoparticle loading within the matrix. PMID:22605993

  2. A thermodynamic solution model for calcium carbonate: Towards an understanding of multi-equilibria precipitation pathways.

    PubMed

    Donnet, Marcel; Bowen, Paul; Lemaître, Jacques

    2009-12-15

    Thermodynamic solubility calculations are normally only related to thermodynamic equilibria in solution. In this paper, we extend the use of such solubility calculations to help elucidate possible precipitation reaction pathways during the entire reaction. We also estimate the interfacial energy of particles using only solubility data by a modification of Mersmann's approach. We have carried this out by considering precipitation reactions as a succession of small quasi-equilibrium states. Thus possible equilibrium precipitation pathways can be evaluated by calculating the evolution of surface charge, particle size and/or interfacial energy during the ongoing reaction. The approach includes the use of the Kelvin's law to express the influence of particle size on the solubility constant of precipitates, the use of Nernst's law to calculate surface potentials from solubility calculations and relate this to experimentally measured zeta potentials. Calcium carbonate precipitation and zeta potential measurements of well characterised high purity calcite have been used as a model system to validate the calculated values. The clarification of the change in zeta potential on titration illustrates the power of this approach as a tool for reaction pathway prediction and hence knowledge based tailoring of precipitation reactions. PMID:19815226

  3. Osteoblasts Growth Behaviour on Bio-Based Calcium Carbonate Aragonite Nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zuki Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocrystals derived from cockle shells emerge to present a good concert in bone tissue engineering because of their potential to mimic the composition, structure, and properties of native bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological response of CaCO3 nanocrystals on hFOB 1.19 and MC3T3 E-1 osteoblast cells in vitro. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed by MTT and BrdU assays, and LDH was measured to determine the effect of CaCO3 nanocrystals on cell membrane integrity. Cellular morphology was examined by SEM and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that CaCO3 nanocrystals had no toxic effects to some extent. Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and protein synthesis were enhanced by the nanocrystals when compared to the control. Cellular interactions were improved, as indicated by SEM and fluorescent microscopy. The production of VEGF and TGF-1 was also affected by the CaCO3 nanocrystals. Therefore, bio-based CaCO3 nanocrystals were shown to stimulate osteoblast differentiation and improve the osteointegration process. PMID:24734228

  4. Osteoblasts growth behaviour on bio-based calcium carbonate aragonite nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Shafiu Kamba, Abdullahi; Zakaria, Zuki Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocrystals derived from cockle shells emerge to present a good concert in bone tissue engineering because of their potential to mimic the composition, structure, and properties of native bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological response of CaCO3 nanocrystals on hFOB 1.19 and MC3T3 E-1 osteoblast cells in vitro. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed by MTT and BrdU assays, and LDH was measured to determine the effect of CaCO3 nanocrystals on cell membrane integrity. Cellular morphology was examined by SEM and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that CaCO3 nanocrystals had no toxic effects to some extent. Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and protein synthesis were enhanced by the nanocrystals when compared to the control. Cellular interactions were improved, as indicated by SEM and fluorescent microscopy. The production of VEGF and TGF-1 was also affected by the CaCO3 nanocrystals. Therefore, bio-based CaCO3 nanocrystals were shown to stimulate osteoblast differentiation and improve the osteointegration process. PMID:24734228

  5. Calcium Carbonate Mineralized Nanoparticles as an Intracellular Transporter of Cytochrome?c for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ahn Na; Min, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Hong Jae; Jegal, Jun Ho; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2015-11-01

    A new intracellular delivery system based on an apoptotic protein-loaded calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) mineralized nanoparticle (MNP) is described. Apoptosis-inducing cytochrome?c (Cyt?c) loaded CaCO3 MNPs (Cyt?c MNPs) were prepared by block copolymer mediated in situ CaCO3 mineralization in the presence of Cyt?c. The resulting Cyt?c MNPs had a vaterite polymorph of CaCO3 with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 360.5?nm and exhibited 60?% efficiency for Cyt?c loading. The Cyt?c MNPs were stable at physiological pH (pH?7.4) and effectively prohibited the release of Cyt?c, whereas, at intracellular endosomal pH (pH?5.0), Cyt?c release was facilitated. The MNPs enable the endosomal escape of Cyt?c for effective localization of Cyt?c in the cytosols of MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry showed that the Cyt?c MNPs effectively induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. These findings indicate that the CaCO3 MNPs can meet the prerequisites for delivery of cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins for cancer therapy. PMID:26235642

  6. Consolidation of archaeological gypsum plaster by bacterial biomineralization of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Garcia-Bueno, Ana; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Gypsum plasterworks and decorative surfaces are easily degraded, especially when exposed to humidity, and thus they require protection and/or consolidation. However, the conservation of historical gypsum-based structural and decorative materials by conventional organic and inorganic consolidants shows limited efficacy. Here, a new method based on the bioconsolidation capacity of carbonatogenic bacteria inhabiting the material was assayed on historical gypsum plasters and compared with conventional consolidation treatments (ethyl silicate; methylacrylate-ethylmethacrylate copolymer and polyvinyl butyral). Conventional products do not reach in-depth consolidation, typically forming a thin impervious surface layer which blocks pores. In contrast, the bacterial treatment produces vaterite (CaCO3) biocement, which does not block pores and produces a good level of consolidation, both at the surface and in-depth, as shown by drilling resistance measurement system analyses. Transmission electron microscopy analyses show that bacterial vaterite cement formed via oriented aggregation of CaCO3 nanoparticles (?20nm in size), resulting in mesocrystals which incorporate bacterial biopolymers. Such a biocomposite has superior mechanical properties, thus explaining the fact that drilling resistance of bioconsolidated gypsum plasters is within the range of inorganic calcite materials of equivalent porosity, despite the fact that the bacterial vaterite cement accounts for only a 0.02 solid volume fraction. Bacterial bioconsolidation is proposed for the effective consolidation of this type of material. The potential applications of bacterial calcium carbonate consolidation of gypsum biomaterials used as bone graft substitutes are discussed. PMID:24657676

  7. Pilot-scale demonstration of the OSCAR process for high-temperature multipollutant control of coal combustion flue gas, using carbonated fly ash and mesoporous calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, H.; Thomas, T.J.; Park, A.H.A.; Iyer, M.V.; Gupta, P.; Agnihotri, R.; Jadhav, R.A.; Walker, H.W.; Weavers, L.K.; Butalia, T.; Fan, L.S.

    2007-07-15

    A pilot-scale study of the Ohio State Carbonation Ash Reactivation (OSCAR) process was performed to demonstrate the reactivity of two novel calcium-based sorbents toward sulfur and trace heavy metal (arsenic, selenium, and mercury) capture in the furnace sorbent injection (FSI) mode on a 0.365 m{sup 3}/s slipstream of a bituminous coal-fired stoker boiler. The sorbents were synthesized by bubbling CO{sub 2} to precipitate calcium carbonate (a) from the unreacted calcium present in the lime spray dryer ash and (b) from calcium hydroxide slurry that contained a negatively charged dispersant. The heterogeneous reaction between these sorbents and SO{sub 2} gas occurred under entrained flow conditions by injecting fine sorbent powders into the flue gas slipstream. The reacted sorbents were captured either in a hot cyclone (about 650{sup o}C) or in the relatively cooler downstream baghouse (about 230{sup o}C). The baghouse samples indicated about 90% toward sulfation and captured arsenic, selenium and mercury to 800 ppmw, 175 ppmw and 3.6 ppmw, respectively.

  8. An inferred relationship between some uranium deposits and calcium carbonate cement in southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.

    1956-01-01

    Evidence resulting from geologic mapping in the southern Black Hills indicates that the areas marginal to some of the larger carbonate-cemented sandstones constitute favorable geochemical environments for the localization of uranium deposits. To determine whether these favorable environments are predictable a limited experimental core-drilling program was carried out. An extensive deposit was discovered in an area marginal to a sandstone well-cemented with calcium carbonate. The deposit has not yet been developed, but from the available data it appears that there is a significant quantity of mineralized rock present containing as much as 3.0 percent eU3O8.

  9. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Thin Films from Liquid Crystal Polyelectrolyte Inks.

    PubMed

    Tune, Daniel D; Blanch, Adam J; Shearer, Cameron J; Moore, Katherine E; Pfohl, Moritz; Shapter, Joseph G; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-11-25

    Single walled carbon nanotube thin films are fabricated by solution shearing from high concentration sodium nanotubide polyelectrolyte inks. The solutions are produced by simple stirring of the nanotubes with elemental sodium in dimethylacetamide, and the nanotubes are thus not subject to any sonication-induced damage. At such elevated concentrations (?4 mg mL(-1)), the solutions exist in the liquid crystal phase and during deposition this order is transferred to the films, which are well aligned in the direction of shear with a 2D nematic order parameter of ?0.7 determined by polarized absorption measurements. Compared to similarly formed films made from superacids, the polyelectrolyte films contain smaller bundles and a much narrower distribution of bundle diameters. After p-doping with an organic oxidizer, the films exhibit a very high DC electrical to optical conductivity ratio of ?DC/?OP ? 35, corresponding to a calculated DC conductivity of over 7000 S cm(-1). When very thin (T550 ? 96%), smooth (RMS roughness, Rq ? 2.2 nm), and highly aligned films made via this new route are used as the front electrodes of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells, the power conversion efficiency is almost an order of magnitude greater than that obtained when using the much rougher (Rq ? 20-30 nm) and less conductive (peak ?DC/?OP ? 2.5) films formed by common vacuum filtration of the same starting material, and having the same transmittance. PMID:26511159

  10. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF AN UNDESIRABLE CRYSTAL PRECIPITATE IN A DEVELOPMENTAL CARBON FUEL CELL

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF AN UNDESIRABLE CRYSTAL PRECIPITATE IN A DEVELOPMENTAL CARBON FUEL CELL Thesis Advisor Dr. Michael Jerry Antal Jr. #12;iv Abstract Carbon fuel cells have the potential of fossil fuels and reduce our carbon emissions. The goal of this project is to determine the chemical

  11. Acute and 3-month effects of microcrystalline hydroxyapatite, calcium citrate and calcium carbonate on serum calcium and markers of bone turnover: a randomised controlled trial in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Sarah M; Gamble, Greg D; Stewart, Angela; Horne, Lauren; House, Meaghan E; Aati, Opetaia; Mihov, Borislav; Horne, Anne M; Reid, Ian R

    2014-11-28

    Ca supplements are used for bone health; however, they have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk, which may relate to their acute effects on serum Ca concentrations. Microcrystalline hydroxyapatite (MCH) could affect serum Ca concentrations less than conventional Ca supplements, but its effects on bone turnover are unclear. In the present study, we compared the acute and 3-month effects of MCH with conventional Ca supplements on concentrations of serum Ca, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and bone turnover markers. We randomised 100 women (mean age 71 years) to 1 g/d of Ca as citrate or carbonate (citrate-carbonate), one of two MCH preparations, or a placebo. Blood was sampled for 8 h after the first dose, and after 3 months of daily supplementation. To determine whether the acute effects changed over time, eight participants assigned to the citrate dose repeated 8 h of blood sampling at 3 months. There were no differences between the citrate and carbonate groups, or between the two MCH groups, so their results were pooled. The citrate-carbonate dose increased ionised and total Ca concentrations for up to 8 h, and this was not diminished after 3 months. MCH increased ionised Ca concentrations less than the citrate-carbonate dose; however, it raised the concentrations of phosphate and the Ca-phosphate product. The citrate-carbonate and MCH doses produced comparable decreases in bone resorption (measured as serum C-telopeptide (CTX)) over 8 h and bone turnover (CTX and procollagen type-I N-terminal propeptide) at 3 months. These findings suggest that Ca preparations, in general, produce repeated sustained increases in serum Ca concentrations after ingestion of each dose and that Ca supplements with smaller effects on serum Ca concentrations may have equivalent efficacy in suppressing bone turnover. PMID:25274192

  12. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was likely less saline. The division of marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum is associated with periodic deposition and dissolution of CaCO3, the rhythms and intensity of which are dependent on concentrations of both OH(-) and Na(+). Thus, the role of present-day marine cyanobacteria in the global carbonate cycle might be reduced to aggregation and recrystallization of available CaCO3 particles in marine water rather than long-term precipitation and accumulation of CaCO3 deposits. For lower Na(+) concentrations, precipitation of carbonates by cyanobacteria would be even less significant. These results suggest that the lack of calcified cyanobacteria in stromatalite-bearing Precambrian sequences can be explained not only by high dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations but also by lower salinity, as well as possible lower pH compared to present-day oceans.

  13. Calcium Isotope Systematics of Diagenetically Altered Carbonates: Example from the Proterozoic Carbonates of Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, J.; Jacobsen, S.; Frauenstein, F.; Veizer, J.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed mass-dependent (?44/40Ca) and radiogenic (?Ca) calcium isotope variations of diagenetically altered carbonates collected from the Duitschland Formation (~2.45 Ga) of the Transvaal Supergroup in a vicinity of the younger Bushveld Igneous Complex (Frauenstein, 2005, PhD Thesis, Ruhr Univ. Bochum). Textural, trace element and isotope data measured on these samples provide convincing evidence for extensive post-depositional alteration and diagenetic resetting. Samples selected for the Ca isotope study have Mn/Sr ratios from 0.8 to 33, 87Sr/86Sr from 0.704 to 0.719 and their ?18O and ?18C scatter from -20 to -2.8‰ and from 9.7 to -1.1‰, respectively. The ?44/40Ca (NIST) of carbonates range from 0.3 to 1.3‰ and their ?Ca indicate no radiogenic 40Ca excesses larger than the analytical uncertainty of ~1.5 ?-unit, confirming that the ?44/40Ca variation is exclusively due to mass-dependent fractionation. There is a difference between ?44/40Ca of limestones and dolostones, the former range from ~0.3 to 1.2‰ and the latter cluster tightly around 1.1. Using Mn/Sr as an index for diagenetic alteration (Brand and Veizer, 1980, J. Sed. Petrol., 50, 1219-1236) the ?44/40Ca of limestones becomes progressively heavier with an increasing degree of alteration (?44/40Ca vs. Mn/Sr, r = .84, p < .01). The ?44/40Ca and Mn/Sr of dolostones plot in the area occupied by 'most altered' limestones, perhaps suggesting that these dolomites might be of diagenetic origin. The best preserved or 'least altered' limestone with the lowest Mn/Sr and ?44/40Ca show also the least radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7042 that is in a range of the accepted Sr isotope composition of coeval seawater (Shield and Veizer, 2002, Geochem., Geophys., Geosys., 3, 1-12). The slope of ?44/40Ca vs. Sr content in studies carbonates of about -0.00077 is very close to the slope documented for diagenetically altered skeletal carbonates (-0.00085; Steuber and Buhl, 2006, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 70, 5507-5521) or kinetic precipitates (-0.00094; Tang et al., 2008, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 72, 3733-3745), yet it is much steeper compared to that of well-preserved Phanerozoic brachiopods (-0.00028; Farkas et al., 2008 Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 71, 5117-5134). Thus, care should be exercised when interpreting ?44/40Ca data of ancient marine carbonates in terms of paleo-seawater composition and they should always be reported with supporting trace element data. Finally, we propose that in a suite of coeval marine limestones, samples with the lowest ?44/40Ca, Mn/Sr and 87Sr/86Sr should, in most cases, represent the least altered components.

  14. Evaluation of ERTS data for certain oceanographic uses. [precipitation of calcium carbonate in Lake Michigan, Lake Erie, and Lake Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E. (principal investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. According to Lake Michigan records, the pH levels have been steadily increasing as the lake becomes more eutrophic. Numerous upwellings during the summer of 1973, beginning with the late July event, appear to be triggering a chemical precipitation of calcium carbonate. The upwelling provides abundant carbon dioxide into the surface water and results in massive blooms of phytoplankton. As the CO2 is utilized by these microscopic plants the pH is increased (acidity decreases) and CaCO3 no longer is able to remain in solution. The precipitation takes place where the phytoplankton are living, near depths of 10 meters. Therefore, the whiting observed by ERTS-1 is only seen in the green band, as red cannot penetrate but a few meters. With these whitings, secci disc readings lower in July from 10-15 meters to 3-5 meters and green, milky water is observed by research vessels. It appears that whitings have been becoming more frequent since the middle 60's but until ERTS-1 the extent had never been realized. Calcium levels are too low, presently, for a similar precipitate in Lakes Huron or Superior. However, whitings have been seen by ERTS-1 in Lakes Erie and Ontario where the calcium ion and pH levels are more like those found in Lake Michigan.

  15. Sustained release of small molecules from carbon nanotube-reinforced monetite calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Boren; Zhou, Huan; Leaman, Douglas W; Goel, Vijay K; Agarwal, Anand K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2014-10-01

    The interest in developing calcium phosphate cement (CPC) as a drug delivery system has risen because of its capability to achieve local and controlled treatment to the site of the bone disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the release pattern of drug-carrying carboxylic acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-reinforced monetite (DCPA, CaHPO4)-based CPC. Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al (MG132), a small peptide molecule inhibiting NF-?B-mediated osteoclastic resorption, was used as a model drug. MG132 was added into the cement during setting and released into the medium used to culture indicator cells. Significant cell death was observed in osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in the medium incubated with MG132-loaded CPC; however, with the presence of MWCNTs in the cement, the toxic effect was not detectable. NF-?B activation was quantified using a NF-?B promoter-driving luciferase reporter in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The medium collected after incubation with drug-incorporated CPC with or without MWCNT inhibited TNF?-induced NF-?B activation indicating that the effective amount of MG132 was released. CPC/drug complex showed a rapid release within 24h whereas incorporation of MWCNTs attenuated this burst release effect. In addition, suppression of TNF?-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cell culture also confirmed the sustained release of MWCNT/CPC/drug. Our data demonstrated the drug delivery capability of this cement composite, which can potentially be used to carry therapeutic molecules to improve bone regeneration in conjunction with its fracture stabilizing function. Furthermore, it suggested a novel approach to lessen the burst release effect of the CPC-based drug delivery system by incorporating functionalized MWCNTs. PMID:25175192

  16. Baseline Assessment of Net Calcium Carbonate Accretion Rates on U.S. Pacific Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Ángel, Bernardo; Richards, Cristi L.; Vroom, Peter S.; Price, Nichole N.; Schils, Tom; Young, Charles W.; Smith, Jennifer; Johnson, Maggie D.; Brainard, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive quantitative baseline assessment of in situ net calcium carbonate accretion rates (g CaCO3 cm-2 yr-1) of early successional recruitment communities on Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU) plates deployed on coral reefs at 78 discrete sites, across 11 islands in the central and south Pacific Oceans. Accretion rates varied substantially within and between islands, reef zones, levels of wave exposure, and island geomorphology. For forereef sites, mean accretion rates were the highest at Rose Atoll, Jarvis, and Swains Islands, and the lowest at Johnston Atoll and Tutuila. A comparison between reef zones showed higher accretion rates on forereefs compared to lagoon sites; mean accretion rates were also higher on windward than leeward sites but only for a subset of islands. High levels of spatial variability in net carbonate accretion rates reported herein draw attention to the heterogeneity of the community assemblages. Percent cover of key early successional taxa on CAU plates did not reflect that of the mature communities present on surrounding benthos, possibly due to the short deployment period (2 years) of the experimental units. Yet, net CaCO3 accretion rates were positively correlated with crustose coralline algae (CCA) percent cover on the surrounding benthos and on the CAU plates, which on average represented >70% of the accreted material. For foreeefs and lagoon sites combined CaCO3 accretion rates were statistically correlated with total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a; a GAM analysis indicated that SiOH and Halimeda were the best predictor variables of accretion rates on lagoon sites, and total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a for forereef sites, demonstrating the utility of CAUs as a tool to monitor changes in reef accretion rates as they relate to ocean acidification. This study underscores the pivotal role CCA play as a key benthic component and supporting actively calcifying reefs; high Mg-calcite exoskeletons makes CCA extremely susceptible changes in ocean water pH, emphasizing the far-reaching threat that ocean acidification poses to the ecological function and persistence of coral reefs worldwide. PMID:26641885

  17. Baseline Assessment of Net Calcium Carbonate Accretion Rates on U.S. Pacific Reefs.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ángel, Bernardo; Richards, Cristi L; Vroom, Peter S; Price, Nichole N; Schils, Tom; Young, Charles W; Smith, Jennifer; Johnson, Maggie D; Brainard, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive quantitative baseline assessment of in situ net calcium carbonate accretion rates (g CaCO3 cm-2 yr-1) of early successional recruitment communities on Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU) plates deployed on coral reefs at 78 discrete sites, across 11 islands in the central and south Pacific Oceans. Accretion rates varied substantially within and between islands, reef zones, levels of wave exposure, and island geomorphology. For forereef sites, mean accretion rates were the highest at Rose Atoll, Jarvis, and Swains Islands, and the lowest at Johnston Atoll and Tutuila. A comparison between reef zones showed higher accretion rates on forereefs compared to lagoon sites; mean accretion rates were also higher on windward than leeward sites but only for a subset of islands. High levels of spatial variability in net carbonate accretion rates reported herein draw attention to the heterogeneity of the community assemblages. Percent cover of key early successional taxa on CAU plates did not reflect that of the mature communities present on surrounding benthos, possibly due to the short deployment period (2 years) of the experimental units. Yet, net CaCO3 accretion rates were positively correlated with crustose coralline algae (CCA) percent cover on the surrounding benthos and on the CAU plates, which on average represented >70% of the accreted material. For foreeefs and lagoon sites combined CaCO3 accretion rates were statistically correlated with total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a; a GAM analysis indicated that SiOH and Halimeda were the best predictor variables of accretion rates on lagoon sites, and total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a for forereef sites, demonstrating the utility of CAUs as a tool to monitor changes in reef accretion rates as they relate to ocean acidification. This study underscores the pivotal role CCA play as a key benthic component and supporting actively calcifying reefs; high Mg-calcite exoskeletons makes CCA extremely susceptible changes in ocean water pH, emphasizing the far-reaching threat that ocean acidification poses to the ecological function and persistence of coral reefs worldwide. PMID:26641885

  18. Pentagonal monolayer crystals of carbon, boron nitride, and silver azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagmurcukardes, M.; Sahin, H.; Kang, J.; Torun, E.; Peeters, F. M.; Senger, R. T.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a theoretical investigation of structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of pentagonal monolayers of carbon (p-graphene), boron nitride (p-B2N4 and p-B4N2), and silver azide (p-AgN3) by performing state-of-the-art first principles calculations. Our total energy calculations suggest feasible formation of monolayer crystal structures composed entirely of pentagons. In addition, electronic band dispersion calculations indicate that while p-graphene and p-AgN3 are semiconductors with indirect bandgaps, p-BN structures display metallic behavior. We also investigate the mechanical properties (in-plane stiffness and the Poisson's ratio) of four different pentagonal structures under uniaxial strain. p-graphene is found to have the highest stiffness value and the corresponding Poisson's ratio is found to be negative. Similarly, p-B2N4 and p-B4N2 have negative Poisson's ratio values. On the other hand, the p-AgN3 has a large and positive Poisson's ratio. In dynamical stability tests based on calculated phonon spectra of these pentagonal monolayers, we find that only p-graphene and p-B2N4 are stable, but p-AgN3 and p-B4N2 are vulnerable against vibrational excitations.

  19. Parameters of vacancies' formation in the carbon-subgroup crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2008-10-15

    The parameters of formation of vacancies in crystals of elements of the carbon subgroup (C{sub diam}, Si, Ge, {alpha}-Sn, Pb) are calculated. The method used takes into account both quantum effects at low temperatures and delocalization of atoms at higher temperatures. It is shown that consideration of atom delocalization brings about an increase in the values of enthalpy and entropy and the volume of the vacancy formation. At low temperatures, the parameters of vacancy formation depend heavily on temperature, with the entropy of vacancy formation becoming negative. In the region of high temperatures, good agreement was obtained with both experimental data and theoretical estimates reported in other publications. The dependence of vacancy-related parameters on temperature in the course of isobaric heating of diamond in the range from 100 to 4500 K is studied. The limits of applicability of the Arrhenius equation with temperature-independent energy of activation process are discussed. It is shown that there is validity of the 'compensation rule' (correlation between the entropy and enthalpy of vacancy formation) and of the correlation between the volume and entropy of the vacancy formation within the entire studied temperature range.

  20. Collagen scaffolds reinforced with biomimetic composite nano-sized carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite crystals and shaped by rapid prototyping to contain internal microchannels.

    PubMed

    Sachlos, Eleftherios; Gotora, Duce; Czernuszka, Jan T

    2006-09-01

    The next generation of tissue engineering scaffolds will be made to accommodate blood vessels and nutrient channels to support cell survival deep in the interior of the scaffolds. To this end, we have developed a method that incorporates microchannels to permit the flow of nutrient-rich media through collagen-based scaffolds. The scaffold matrix comprises nano-sized carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals internally precipitated in collagen fibers. The scaffold therefore mimics many of the features found in bone. A biomimetic precipitation technique is used whereby a collagen membrane separates reservoirs of calcium and phosphate solutions. The collision of calcium and phosphate ions diffusing from opposite directions results in the precipitation of mineral within the collagen membrane. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed the dimension of the mineral crystals to be approximately 180 x 80 x 20 nm, indicating that the crystals reside in the intermicrofibril gaps. Electron diffraction indicated that the mineral was in the HA phase, and infrared spectroscopy confirmed type A carbonate substitution. The collagen-HA membrane is then used to make 3-dimensional (3D) scaffolds: the membrane is shredded and mixed in an aqueous-based collagen dispersion and processed using the critical point drying method. Adjusting the pH of the dispersion to 5.0 before mixing the composite component preserved the nano-sized carbonate-substituted HA crystals. Branching and interconnecting microchannels in the interior of the scaffolds are made with a sacrificial mold manufactured by using a 3D wax printer. The 3D wax printer has been modified to print the mold from biocompatible materials. Appropriately sized microchannels within collagen-HA scaffolds brings us closer to fulfilling the mass transport requirements for osteogenic cells living deep within the scaffold. PMID:16995781

  1. Crystal Structure of Recoverin with Calcium Ions Bound to Both Functional EF Hands.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramasamy P; Ranaghan, Matthew J; Ganjei, Allen Y; Oprian, Daniel D

    2015-12-15

    Recoverin (Rv), a small Ca(2+)-binding protein that inhibits rhodopsin kinase (RK), has four EF hands, two of which are functional (EF2 and EF3). Activation requires Ca(2+) in both EF hands, but crystal structures have never been observed with Ca(2+) ions in both sites; all previous structures have Ca(2+) bound to only EF3. We suspected that this was due to an intermolecular crystal contact between T80 and a surface glutamate (E153) that precluded coordination of a Ca(2+) ion in EF2. We constructed the E153A mutant, determined its X-ray crystal structure to 1.2 Å resolution, and showed that two Ca(2+) ions are bound, one in EF3 and one in EF2. Additionally, several other residues are shown to adopt conformations in the 2Ca(2+) structure not seen previously and not seen in a second structure of the E153A mutant containing Na(+) instead of Ca(2+) in the EF2 site. The side-chain rearrangements in these residues form a 28 Å allosteric cascade along the surface of the protein connecting the Ca(2+)-binding site of EF2 with the active-site pocket responsible for binding RK. PMID:26584024

  2. ABSORPTION OF CALCIUM FROM THE CARBONATED DAIRY SOFT DRINK IS GREATER THAN THAT FROM FAT-FREE MILK AND CALCIUM-FORTIFIED ORANGE JUICE IN WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the intestinal calcium absorption of a new product that combines calcium and other nutrients from milk and the consumer's desire for soft drinks. The overall objective was to compare calcium absorption of commercially available products, the dairy soft drink, fat-free milk, and ca...

  3. Calcium Carbonate Phosphate Binding Ion Exchange Filtration and Accelerated Denitrification Improve Public Health Standards and Combat Eutrophication in Aquatic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the greater Los Angeles area, California, cultural eutrophication has become a major problem. In this study, calcium carbonate was found to be an excellent phosphate binder, reducing up to 70% of the phosphates in a given sample of water, and it posed relatively negligent ecological repercussions. This study involved the testing of this principle in both the laboratory and the real ecosystem. A calcium carbonate lacing procedure was first carried out to determine its efficacy in Madrona Marsh. Through this, ammonia was found to interfere with the solubility of calcium carbonate and therefore to be a hindrance to the reduction of phosphate. Therefore, various approaches for reduction of ammonia were tested, including aeration, use of fiber growth media, and plants, mainly Caulerpa verticellata, chosen for it hardiness, primarily in an attempt to increase population of Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas. All were successful in moderately reducing ammonia levels. In addition, soil sampling, sediment analysis, microscopic plant analysis, microorganism and macroinvertebrate identification, and rate law formulations were conducted. The effect of phosphate and ammonia reduction on the populations of enterobacteria was also an important focus of this experiment. Varying concentrations of phosphate, ammonia, and calcium carbonate in conjunction with phosphate were tested in Madrona Marsh to determine their effects on the populations of enteropathogens on nonspecific blood agar, MacConkey agar, and Hektoen agar. Initial analyses suggest a strong correlation between phosphate concentrations and bacterial populations; a 66% decrease in phosphate resulted in a 35% reduction in bacterial populations and a 45% reduction in enteropathogenic populations. Likewise, a strong correlation was shown between calcium carbonate concentrations and bacterial reduction greater than that which can be attributed to the phosphate reduction alone. This was followed by the construction of various phosphate binding calcium carbonate filters, which used the ion exchange principle, including a spring loading filter, PVC pipe filter, and a galvanized filter. All were tested with the aid of Stoke's law formulation. The experiment was extremely successful in designing a working phosphate-binding and ammonia-reducing filter, and a large-scale agitator-clarifier filter system is currently being planned for construction in Madrona Marsh; this filter will reduce phosphate and ammonia levels substantially in the following years, bringing ecological, economical, and health-related improvements to the overall ecosystem and habitat. PMID:16381147

  4. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  5. Crystal field disorder effects in the optical spectra of Nd{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}-doped calcium lithium niobium gallium garnets laser crystals and ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lupei, V.; Lupei, A.; Gheorghe, C.; Gheorghe, L.; Achim, A.; Ikesue, A.

    2012-09-15

    The optical spectroscopic properties of RE{sup 3+} (Nd, 1 at. % or Yb, 1 to 10 at. %)-doped calcium-lithium-niobium-gallium garnet (CLNGG) single crystals and ceramics in the 10 K-300 K range are analyzed. In these compositionally disordered materials, RE{sup 3+} substitute Ca{sup 2+} in dodecahedral sites and the charge compensation is accomplished by adjusting the proportion of Li{sup +}, Nb{sup 5+}, and Ga{sup 3+} to the doping concentration. The crystals and ceramics show similar optical spectra, with broad and structured (especially at low temperatures) bands whose shape depends on temperature and doping concentration. At 10 K, the Nd{sup 3+4}I{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 4}F{sub 3/2,5/2} and Yb{sup 3+2}F{sub 7/2}{yields}{sup 2}F{sub 5/2} absorption bands, which show prospect for diode laser pumping, can be decomposed in several lines that can be attributed to centers with large differences in the crystal field. The positions of these components are the same, but the relative intensity depends on the doping concentration and two main centers dominate the spectra. Non-selective excitation evidences broad emission bands, of prospect for short-pulse laser emission, whereas the selective excitation reveals the particular emission spectra of the various centers. The modeling reveals that the nonequivalent centers correspond to RE{sup 3+} ions with different cationic combinations in the nearest octahedral and tetrahedral coordination spheres, and the most abundant two centers have 4Nb and, respectively, 3Nb1Li in the nearest octahedral sphere. At 300 K, the spectral resolution is lost. It is then inferred that the observed optical bands are envelopes of the spectra of various structural centers, whose resolution is determined by the relative contribution of the temperature-dependent homogeneous broadening and the effects of crystal field disordering (multicenter structure, inhomogeneous broadening). The relevance of spectroscopic properties for selection of pumping conditions and of laser design that would enable utilization of the broad optical bands for efficient laser emission and reduced heat generation is discussed.

  6. Calcium-magnesium carbonate solid solutions from Holocene conglomerate cements and travertines in the Coast Range of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, I.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1971-01-01

    Two calcium-magnesium carbonate solid solutions form Holocene travertines and conglomerate cements in fresh water stream channels of the Coast Range of California. Calcite does not yield the {015} diffraction maximum. The {006} diffraction maximum is lacking over most of the range of composition of calcite. Calcite has compositions from CaCO3 to Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3. Dolomite yields both the {006} and {015} diffraction maxima over its entire composition range, Ca0.6Mg0.4CO3 to Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3. The Ca-Mg carbonates form in isotopic equilibrium and thermodynamic disequilibrium from dispersion of Ca2+-rich water into CO32--rich water within the alluvium. The stable isotope data suggest that all the Mg-rich carbonates are primary precipitates and not a result of Mg-substitution in precursor CaCO3. There is a correlation between ??C13 and Mg content of the carbonates which predicts a 5%. fractionation of C13 between dolomite and calcite at sedimentary temperatures. C14 is incorporated in Ca-Mg carbonates forming from C13-poor meteoric waters and C13-rich waters from Cretaceous sediments. C14 ages of the Ca-Mg carbonates are apparent, and cannot be corrected to absolute values. Solution rates of calcite decrease with increasing MgCO3 content; dolomite dissolves slower than any calcite. ?? 1971.

  7. Investigation of early growth of calcium hydroxide crystals in cement solution by soft x-ray transmission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyunyan, V. S.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Monteiro, P. J. M.; Aivazyan, A. P.; Fischer, P.

    2009-02-02

    Research on cement hydration was performed at the full-field soft transmission X-ray microscope XM-1 located at beamline 6.1.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley CA which is operated by the Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. A series of works [1-3] has been conducted using this microscope for the in situ observation and qualitative analysis of through-solution hydration products and products of topochemical reactions, which form in cementitious aqueous solutions. This paper studies the precipitation of the calcium hydroxide (CH) crystals from the cement solution. The analysis of successive images of the hydration process provides critical quantitative information about the growth rate of calcium hydroxide (CH) crystals, the supersaturation ratio, and the kinetic and diffusion coefficients of the growth process. ASTM Type II portland cement and 6% C{sub 4}A{sub 3}{bar S} admixture were mixed in aqueous solution and saturated with respect to CH and gypsum. The C{sub 4}A{sub 3}{bar S} admixture was included in the experimental program because of the general research program on expansive cements, and adding C{sub 4}A{sub 3}{bar S} to portland cement is an efficient method of generating ettringite and significant early-age expansion. The solution/solid materials ratio was 10 cm{sup 3}/g, which is higher than the one existing in regular concrete and mortars; to compensate for this dilution, the solution was originally saturated with CH and gypsum. To allow sufficient transmission of the soft X-rays, a small droplet was taken from the supernatant solution and assembled in the sample holder, and then squeezed between two silicon nitride windows for the analysis. The X-ray optical setup of the microscope XM-1 is described elsewhere [2]. In this experiment, a wavelength of 2.4 nm (516.6 eV) was used. The radiation transmitting the sample was detected using an X-ray CCD camera, with a resolution of 35 nm provided by Fresnel zone plate X-ray optics and magnification factor of about 2000. The recorded images have a circular field of view of approximately 10 {micro}m in diameter. The illumination time per image was in the range of 1 to 14 seconds depending largely on the absorption of the sample. The experimental work was conducted at room temperature T = 298 K.

  8. Precipitation and dissolution of calcium carbonate: key processes bridging the bio- and geosciences (Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    In this Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky medal lecture, I will focus on the biogeochemical cycle of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) which is arguably one of the best example of a set processes that bridge the bio- and geosciences. The main reactions involved are calcification and dissolution that, respectively, manufacture and destroy calcium carbonate. Biology is intimately involved in these two processes which are key controls of the Earth's climate and leave remains that are of great use to human societies (as building materials) and geoscientists. I will illustrate the bridge between the bio- and geosciences by providing brief examples for each of the following four issues. (1) The marine cycle of CaCO3 and its relationship with climate. The release of CO2 by the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the uptake of CO2 by its dissolution are important controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate. The vertical distribution of ?, the ratio of CO2 released/used per CaCO3 precipitated/dissolved in the ocean will be shown to be consistent with the Högbom-Urey reactions. (2) The use of CaCO3 in paleooceanography. The remains of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons are wonderful archives of past environmental changes. Their isotopic composition and the concen-tration of trace elements are invaluable in the reconstruction of past climate. I will address the challenge of calibrating one of the proxies used to reconstruct past ocean pH. (3) The challenge of understanding calcification. Despite having been investigated for decades, many aspects of the physiological and molecular processes involved in calcification by marine organisms remain obscure. Recent breakthroughs, mostly on reef-building corals, will be briefly reviewed. (4) The response of calcification and dissolution to environmental change. The critical importance of CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution as climate controls makes it vital to understand their response to global environmental changes such as ocean warming and acidification. A few examples of knowns and unknowns will be presented.

  9. ''The Influence of Calcium Carbonate Grain Coatings on Contaminant Reactivity in Vadose Zone Sediments''

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-06-11

    Our component of this project focuses on the reaction of contaminant-containing fluids with carbonate mineral surfaces in order to better understand the dissolution-growth and related solid-solution processes that ultimately affect contaminant mobility in settings containing carbonates or carbonate grain coatings. Our collaborators (Stanford, PNNL) have focused on other aspects of carbonate and carbonate mineral surfaces as part of the overall project. Because some of the sediments through which contaminants leaking from the Hanford waste have carbonate grain coatings; better understanding the chemistry of carbonate-contaminant interaction constitutes fundamental chemistry needed in order to construct better models of contaminant transport through carbonate-containing sediments.

  10. Crystal Analysis of Multi Phase Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles Containing Different amount of Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozalian, Afsaneh; Behnamghader, Ali Asghar; Moshkforoush, Arash

    In this study, Mg doped hydroxyapatite [(Ca, Mg)10(PO4)6(OH)2] and ?-tricalcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized via sol gel method. Triethyl phosphite, calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and magnesium nitrate hexahydrate were used as P, Ca and Mg precursors. The ratio of (Ca+Mg)/P and the amount of magnesium (x) were kept constant at 1.67 and ranging x = 0 up to 3 in molecular formula of Ca10-xMgx (PO4)6(OH)2, respectively. Phase composition and chemical structure were performed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). Phase percentages, crystallite size, degree of crystallinity and lattice parameters were investigated. The presence of magnesium led to form the Mg doped tricalcium phosphate (?-TCMP) and Mg doped hydroxyapatite (Mg-HA). Based on the results of this study, lattice parameters, degree of crystallinity and crystallite size decreased with magnesium content. In addition, with increasing magnesium content, the amount of CaO phase decreased whereas the amount of MgO phase increased significantly. Obtained results can be used for new biomaterials design.

  11. Controls of Polysaccharide Chemistry on the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Heterogeneous Calcium Carbonate Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; Han, N.; Dove, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Polysaccharide fibrils control the orientation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) biominerals. Good examples are found in the multilayered extracellular mucilaginous sheath of green algae and cyanobacteria and in specialized vesicles inside coccolithophorids. More complex organisms such as arthropods and mollusks form biomineralized exoskeletons and shells that consist of insoluble polysaccharides and soluble acid-rich proteins. In these structures, CaCO3 mineral orientation occurs along fibers of the polysaccharide chitin. This raises the question of whether polysaccharide chemistry has specific roles in directing biomineralization. The last three decades of research show that acidic proteins influence CaCO3 polymorph selection, crystallographic orientation, and nucleation and growth rates but little is known about the function of polysaccharides. In fact, polysaccharides are long considered an inert component of organic frameworks. In this experimental investigation, we test the hypothesis that polysaccharides have chemistry-specific influences on calcification by measuring the kinetics of calcite nucleation onto three types of polysaccharide films under controlled solution compositions. Characterized polysaccharides of simple repeating monomer sequences were chosen as model compounds to represent the major carbohydrates seen in microbial and calcifying environments: 1) alginic acid with carboxyl groups, 2) hyaluronic acid with alternating carboxyl and acetylamine groups, and 3) chitosan with amine and acetylamine groups. Biosubstrates were prepared by electrodeposition of these compounds as thin gel-like films onto gold-coated silicon wafers. Using a flow-through cell, heterogeneous nucleation rates of calcite were measured for a suite of supersaturation conditions. These rate data were compared to similar measurements for carboxyl- and hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Calcite nucleation rates onto the three polysaccharides vary by a factor of 400x. Preliminary analyses of the data attribute these differences to changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic barriers to nucleation. These initial findings indicate that polysaccharide chemistry can have active roles in regulating the kinetics of calcite formation. It may be time to reconsider their presumed function as inert framework molecules for mineralized structures. Future work will investigate CaCO3 nucleation on substrates of polysaccharides with more complex functionalization and monomer sequences to decipher the origins of these effects in promoting or inhibiting mineralization.

  12. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  13. Near-infrared waveguide formation and RBS/channeling spectrometry analysis for damage in calcium barium niobate crystals via ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lian; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Gao, Wen-Lan; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Yu-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Tie-Jun; Song, Hong-Lian; Qiao, Mei; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2015-11-01

    We report on the fabrication of planar waveguide structures in calcium barium niobate crystals via C ion implantation at room temperature. The SRIM code was applied to calculate damage profiles of the C ions implanted into Ca0.32Ba0.68Nb2O6 crystals. The low-damage profiles in the near-surface of the implanted regions were verified by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry. The waveguide characteristics were investigated in the near-infrared bands. The propagation loss of the waveguide was estimated to be 0.88 dB/cm.

  14. Isolation of an acidic protein from cholesterol gallstones, which inhibits the precipitation of calcium carbonate in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, S; Sabsay, B; Veis, A; Ostrow, J D; Rege, R V; Dawes, L G

    1989-01-01

    In seeking to identify nucleating/antinucleating proteins involved in the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones, a major acidic protein was isolated from each of 13 samples of cholesterol gallstones. After the stones were extracted with methyl t-butyl ether to remove cholesterol, and methanol to remove bile salts and other lipids, they were demineralized with EDTA. The extracts were desalted with Sephadex-G25, and the proteins separated by PAGE. A protein was isolated, of molecular weight below 10 kD, which included firmly-bound diazo-positive yellow pigments and contained 24% acidic, but only 7% basic amino acid residues. The presence of N-acetyl glucosamine suggested that this was a glycoprotein. This protein at concentrations as low as 2 micrograms/ml, but neither human serum albumin nor its complex with bilirubin, inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation from a supersaturated solution in vitro. This protein could be precipitated from 0.15 M NaCl solution by the addition of 0.5 M calcium chloride. Considering that cholesterol gallstones contain calcium and pigment at their centers, and that small acidic proteins are important regulators in other biomineralization systems, this protein seems likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones. Images PMID:2592569

  15. Crystal structure of dimeric cardiac L-type calcium channel regulatory domains bridged by Ca[superscript 2+]·calmodulins

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, Jennifer L.; Baker, Mariah R.; Xiong, Liangwen; Loy, Ryan E.; Yang, Guojun; Dirksen, Robert T.; Hamilton, Susan L.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2009-11-10

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(V)) open in response to changes in membrane potential, but their activity is modulated by Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin (CaM). Structural studies of this family of channels have focused on CaM bound to the IQ motif; however, the minimal differences between structures cannot adequately describe CaM's role in the regulation of these channels. We report a unique crystal structure of a 77-residue fragment of the Ca(V)1.2 alpha(1) subunit carboxyl terminus, which includes a tandem of the pre-IQ and IQ domains, in complex with Ca(2+).CaM in 2 distinct binding modes. The structure of the Ca(V)1.2 fragment is an unusual dimer of 2 coiled-coiled pre-IQ regions bridged by 2 Ca(2+).CaMs interacting with the pre-IQ regions and a canonical Ca(V)1-IQ-Ca(2+).CaM complex. Native Ca(V)1.2 channels are shown to be a mixture of monomers/dimers and a point mutation in the pre-IQ region predicted to abolish the coiled-coil structure significantly reduces Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of heterologously expressed Ca(V)1.2 channels.

  16. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1993-07-01

    This research project is investigating the technical feasibility of a high-temperature, high pressure (HTHP) process for the bulk separation Of CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gas. Phase I research, in which an electrobalance reactor was used to establish the technical feasibility of the regenerable sorbent process, was completed in March 1992 and results have been fully described in earlier quarterly reports. In Phase 1, the calcination and carbonation characteristics of three calcium sorbents were studied as a function of calcination and carbonation temperature and pressure, mol fraction CO{sub 2} in the carbonation gas, and carbonation background gas composition. Desirable reaction conditions required for high reactivity and good sorbent durability were determined. Multicycle tests consisting of as many as ten complete calcination and carbonation cycles were completed. Indirect evidence which suggested that the water-gas shift reaction occurred simultaneously with CO{sub 2} removal was found. Occurrence of the simultaneous reactions created the possibility of a direct one-step process for the manufacture of hydrogen from coal-gas while at the same time separating a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2}The concentrated CO{sub 2} Stream could be quite significant if, in the future, environmental regulations restrict atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions.

  17. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  18. Poly(ethylene oxide) Crystallization in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Nanocomposites: Kinetics and Structural Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    T Chatterjee; A Lorenzo; R Krishnamoorti

    2011-12-31

    The overall isothermal crystallization behavior of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based nanocomposites is studied with a focus on growth kinetics and morphological evolution of PEO using differential scanning calorimetry and in-situ small angle x-ray scattering measurements respectively. The characteristic time for crystallization of PEO increases due to the presence of lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) stabilized carbon nanotubes. Further, analysis of crystallization data using the Lauritzen-Hoffman regime theory of crystal growth shows the PEO chains stiffen in presence of LDS with an increased energy barrier associated with the nucleation and crystal growth, and the nanotubes further act as a barrier to chain transport or enhance the efficacy of the LDS action. The energy penalty and diffusional barrier to chain transport in the nanocomposites disrupt the crystalline PEO helical conformation. This destabilization leads to preferential growth of local nuclei resulting in formation of thinner crystal lamellae and suggests that the crystallization kinetics is strongly affected by the nucleation and crystal growth events. This study is particularly interesting considering the suppression of the PEO crystallinity in presence of small fraction of Lithium ion based surfactant and carbon nanotubes.

  19. Tunable scattering from liquid crystal devices using carbon nanotubes network electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ammar A.; Dabera, G. Dinesha M. R.; Butt, Haider; Qasim, Malik M.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Silva, S. Ravi P.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystals are of technological interest as they allow for optical effects which can be electrically controlled. In this paper we present an electro-optical device consisting of nematic liquid crystals addressed by an electrode structure consisting of thin films of polymer wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes (nanohybrids). Thin films of nanohybrids display excellent optical transmission and electrical conduction properties. Due to the randomly organised nanohybrids these composite films produce interesting director profile arrangements within the liquid crystal layers. As a result, enhanced scattering of laser and white light was observed from these liquid crystal cells which bend themselves as electrically controllable optical diffusers and beam shapers.

  20. Tunable scattering from liquid crystal devices using carbon nanotubes network electrodes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ammar A; Dabera, G Dinesha M R; Butt, Haider; Qasim, Malik M; Amaratunga, Gehan A J; Silva, S Ravi P; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystals are of technological interest as they allow for optical effects which can be electrically controlled. In this paper we present an electro-optical device consisting of nematic liquid crystals addressed by an electrode structure consisting of thin films of polymer wrapped single walled carbon nanotubes (nanohybrids). Thin films of nanohybrids display excellent optical transmission and electrical conduction properties. Due to the randomly organised nanohybrids these composite films produce interesting director profile arrangements within the liquid crystal layers. As a result, enhanced scattering of laser and white light was observed from these liquid crystal cells which bend themselves as electrically controllable optical diffusers and beam shapers. PMID:25407043

  1. Mesoporous carbons with self-assembled surfaces of defined crystal orientation

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Kengqing; Truong, Trung C.; Hoffman, Wesley P.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    The design of carbon sorbents traditionally focuses on the control of pore structure and the number and type of surface functional groups. The present paper explores the potential of also controlling the carbon crystal structure, or graphene layer orientation, in the immediate vicinity of the internal surfaces. We hypothesize that this crystal structure influences the properties of the carbon surfaces and affects the number and type of active sites for functionalization. Here a series of mesoporous carbons are fabricated by capillary infiltration of mesophase pitch (naphthalene homopolymer) into a series of controlled pore glass templates of different characteristic pore size followed by carbonization and template etching. The liquid crystalline mesogens are known to adopt perpendicular alignment (anchoring) at liquid/silica interfaces, which after carbonization lead to a high concentration of graphene edge sites at the inner surfaces. These surfaces are shown to have elevated chemical reactivity, and the pore structures are shown to be consistent with predictions of a quantitative model based on the negative replica concept. Overall, the use of mesophase pitch for templated mesoporous carbons allows systematic and simultaneous control of both pore structure and interfacial crystal structure through the well-defined rules of liquid crystal surface anchoring. PMID:19190761

  2. Distribution and speciation of gold in biogenic and abiogenic calcium carbonates - Implications for the formation of gold anomalous calcrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, Frank; Etschmann, Barbara; Dart, Robert C.; Brewe, Dale L.; Vogt, Stefan; Schmidt Mumm, Andreas; Brugger, Joël

    2011-04-01

    Calcrete (pedogenic Ca carbonate) is an important sampling medium for geochemical gold (Au) exploration in semi-arid and arid regions of Australia, because it is widespread, easy to sample and calcium (Ca) shows a strong positive correlation with Au, but not with base metals, in calcrete overlying buried Au mineralization. In this study we show that the formation of Au-anomalous calcrete can be biomediated through the activity of resident microorganisms, and may not simply be the result of passive nucleation on inactive cells or evapotransporative processes. Calcified microfossils are highly abundant in calcrete from the Barns Au-prospect in South Australia. These microfossils are morphological analogues of calcified cells and biofilms formed in laboratory experiments conducted with active bacterial cultures enriched from Au-anomalous calcareous sand from the Barns prospect. Calcium carbonates precipitated by these cultures consisted mostly of calcite, which is the main carbonate mineral in calcrete. Synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (S-?XRF) mapping was used to assess the distribution of Au, Zn, Ca and other metals in Ca