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Sample records for calcium carbonate crystallization

  1. Alginate hydrogel-mediated crystallization of calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yufei; Feng, Qingling

    2011-05-15

    We documented a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system for the purpose of understanding the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of calcium carbonate. The alginate was involved in the nucleation and the growth process of CaCO{sub 3}. The crystal size, morphology and roughness of crystal surface were significantly influenced by the type of the alginate, which could be accounted for by the length of the G blocks in alginate. A combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed that there were the chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. This strategic approach revealed the biologically controlled CaCO{sub 3} mineralization within calcium alginate hydrogels via the selective nucleation and the confined crystallization of CaCO{sub 3}. The results presented here could contribute to the understanding of the mineralization process in hydrogel systems. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the growth of calcite aggregates with different morphologies obtained from (a) Low G alginate gels and (b) High G alginate gels. Display Omitted highlights: > We use a specific method for combining calcium ions and alginate molecules slowly and continuously in the mineralization system to understand the mediating function of alginate on the crystallization of CaCO{sub 3} crystals. > The crystal size, morphology and crystal surface roughness are influenced by the length of G blocks in alginate. There are chemical interactions between the alginate and the mineral phase. > We propose a potential mechanism of CaCO{sub 3} crystallization within High G and Low G calcium alginate hydrogel.

  2. The influence of xanthan on the crystallization of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodeng; Xu, Guiying

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) was crystallized in xanthan (XC) aqueous solutions. The CaCO 3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) methods. The concentrations of XC, Ca 2+ and CO 32- ions and the ratios [Ca 2+]/[CO 32-] and [Mg 2+]/[Ca 2+] show evident influence on the aggregation and growth of CaCO 3 particles. The presence of Mg 2+ ions influences not only the morphology, but also the polymorph of CaCO 3.

  3. Egg-white-mediated crystallization of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang; Hu, Yanli; Ma, Yongjun; Zhou, Yong; Nie, Fude; Liu, Xun; Pei, Chonghua

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, shape-controlled crystallization and self-assembly of CaCO3 hierarchical architectures has been successfully synthesized via the gas diffusion method in egg white solution. Stepwise growth and assembly of CaCO3 nanoparticles has been observed from transition of an amorphous CaCO3 to the crystallization and stabilization of platelet-like nanoparticles and eventually, the wool sphere-like CaCO3 hierarchical architectures assembling of nanoparticles. The proteins binding on nanoparticle surfaces proved to regulate the growth of nanoparticles and subsequent assembly into hierarchical superstructures via electrostatic and dipole interactions. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nano mechanical Tester. The measured average elastic modulus and the hardness of calcium carbonate hybrid materials were 5.32 GPa and 0.1886 GPa by the nano-indenter test, respectively.

  4. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  5. Influence of calcium carbonate and carbon nanotubes on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene at high supercooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawe, Jürgen E. K.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer fillers have been classified as active or inactive regarding their nucleation performance. Whereas an active filler significantly accelerates the crystallization process, an inactive filler has a significantly reduced influence on the crystallization kinetics. The majority of the studies of the filler influence on the crystallization process are performed at relatively low supercooling or at low cooling rates. In this paper, we use the Fast Scanning DSC to study the crystallization process of differently filled polypropylene (PP) in the temperature range between 120 °C and 0 °C. The inactive filler calcium carbonate reduces the crystallization rate of the α-phase at low supercooling (above 80 °C). Between 45 °C and 80 °C, calcium carbonate significantly accelerates the α-phase crystallization of PP. The mesophase crystallization is not affected by this filler. As an example of active filler, carbon nanotubes are used. Even with small filler content the α-phase crystallization of PP is significantly accelerated. Also in this case the mesophase crystallization is not significantly affected.

  6. Crystal growth of calcium carbonate in silk fibroin/sodium alginate hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Jinfa; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-01-01

    As known, silk fibroin-like protein plays a pivotal role during the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals in the nacre sheets. Here, we have prepared silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels to serve as templates for calcium carbonate mineralization. In this experiment, we report an interesting finding of calcium carbonate crystal growth in the silk fibroin/sodium alginate nanofiber hydrogels by the vapor diffusion method. The experimental results indicate calcium carbonate crystals obtained from nanofiber hydrogels with different proportions of silk fibroin/sodium alginate are mixture of calcite and vaterite with unusual morphologies. Time-dependent growth study was carried out to investigate the crystallization process. It is believed that nanofiber hydrogels play an important role in the process of crystallization. This study would help in understanding the function of organic polymers in natural mineralization, and provide a novel pathway in the design and synthesis of new materials related unique morphology and structure.

  7. The effect of pigeon yolk sac fluid on the growth behavior of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Song, Juan; Cheng, Haixia; Shen, Xinyu; Tong, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Previous experiments have proved that thermodynamically unstable calcium carbonate vaterite can exist for long periods in the yolk sac of a pigeon embryo. The aim of this article was to demonstrate the effect of in vitro mineralization of yolk sac fluid on calcium carbonate by direct precipitation. Experiments were conducted using pigeon yolk sac fluid and using lecithin extracted from pigeon yolk sac fluid as a control to investigate the regulating effects of the organic components in the embryo on the formation of the calcium carbonate precipitate. Multiple characterization methods were employed to study the various morphological patterns, sizes, crystal growth, and crystal phase transformations of the calcium carbonate precipitates as regulated by the yolk sac fluid extracted at different stages of incubation. The experimental results demonstrate that as the incubation proceeds towards the later stages, the composition and environmental features of the yolk sac fluid become more favorable for the formation of relatively unstable calcium carbonate phases with high energies of the vaterite state. The experiments conducted with extracted lecithin as the template for crystal growth yielded similar results. A large amount of organic molecules with polar functional groups carried by the yolk sac fluid have strong effects and can both initially induce the crystallization and regulate the aggregation of calcium carbonate. Furthermore, this regulation process is found to be closely related to the lecithin contained in yolk sac fluid. These observations confirm the changes in yolk sac fluid composition during incubation have significant effects on the production of vaterite, which implicates the calcium transport during embryo growth. PMID:25681477

  8. Effect of silk sericin on morphology and structure of calcium carbonate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui-Bo; Han, Hua-Feng; Ding, Shao; Li, Ze-Hao; Kong, Xiang-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, silk sericin was employed to regulate the mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). CaCO3 composite particles were prepared by the precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with calcium chloride solution in the presence of silk sericin. The as-prepared samples were collected at different reaction time to study the crystallization process of CaCO3 by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that silk sericin significantly affected the morphology and crystallographic polymorph of CaCO3. With increasing the reaction time, the crystal phase of CaCO3 transferred from calcite dominated to vaterite dominated mixtures, while the morphology of CaCO3 changed from disk-like calcite crystal to spherical vaterite crystal. These studies showed the potential of silk sericin used as a template molecule to control the growth of inorganic crystal.

  9. Calcium carbonate crystal growth beneath Langmuir monolayers of acidic β-hairpin peptides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haofei; Yang, Yi; Pluntke, Manuela; Marti, Othmar; Majer, Zsuzsa; Sewald, Norbert; Volkmer, Dirk

    2014-11-28

    Four amphiphilic peptides with designed hairpin structure were synthesized and their monolayers were employed as model systems to study biologically inspired calcium carbonate crystallization. Langmuir monolayers of hairpin peptides were investigated by surface pressure area isotherms, surface potential isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A β-hairpin conformation was found for all peptides at the air-water interface although their packing arrangements seem to be different. Crystallization of calcium carbonate under these peptide monolayers was investigated at different surface pressures and growth times both by in situ optical microscopy, BAM and ex situ investigations such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An amorphous calcium carbonate precursor was found at the initial crystallization stage. The crystallization process occurred in three stages. It starts from the nucleation of amorphous particles being a kinetically controlled process. Crystal nuclei subsequently aggregate to large particles and vaterite crystals start to form inside the amorphous layer, with the monolayer fluidity exerting an important role. The third process includes the re-crystallization of vaterite to calcite, which is thermodynamically controlled by monolayer structural factors including the monolayer flexibility and packing arrangement of the polar headgroups. Thus, the kinetic factors, monolayer fluidity and flexibility as well as structure factors govern the crystal morphology and polymorph distribution simultaneously and synergistically. PMID:25292256

  10. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  11. Dehydration and crystallization of amorphous calcium carbonate in solution and in air

    PubMed Central

    Ihli, Johannes; Wong, Wai Ching; Noel, Elizabeth H.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alexander N.; Christenson, Hugo K.; Duer, Melinda J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are poorly understood. Currently, attracting enormous interest is the crystallization of amorphous calcium carbonate, a key intermediary in synthetic, biological and environmental systems. Here we attempt to unify many contrasting and apparently contradictory studies by investigating this process in detail. We show that amorphous calcium carbonate can dehydrate before crystallizing, both in solution and in air, while thermal analyses and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements reveal that its water is present in distinct environments. Loss of the final water fraction—comprising less than 15% of the total—then triggers crystallization. The high activation energy of this step suggests that it occurs by partial dissolution/recrystallization, mediated by surface water, and the majority of the particle then crystallizes by a solid-state transformation. Such mechanisms are likely to be widespread in solid-state reactions and their characterization will facilitate greater control over these processes. PMID:24469266

  12. Results of the TTF-TCNQ and the calcium carbonate crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1992-01-01

    Experiment A0139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and TTF-TCNQ. Although temperature data was lost, the experimental program had been working since the valves in all containers had been opened. All four experiments produced crystals of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals will be presented. Comparisons will be made with our previous space solution growth experiments. The TTF-TCNQ crystals are no longer of the highest interest, so this activity has been terminated in favor of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate crystallizations.

  13. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. PMID:26117783

  14. Calcium Carbonate Storage in Amorphous Form and Its Template-Induced Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, T Y; Aizenberg, J

    2007-08-31

    Calcium carbonate crystallization in organisms often occurs through the transformation from the amorphous precursor. It is believed that the amorphous phase could be temporarily stabilized and stored, until its templated transition to the crystalline form is induced. Here we develop a bio-inspired crystallization strategy that is based on the above mechanism. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) spherulitic particles are formed and stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hydroxy-terminated alkanethiols on Au surface. The ACC is stored as a reservoir for ions and is induced to crystallize on command by introducing a secondary surface that is functionalized with carboxylic acid-terminated SAM. This secondary surface acts as a template for oriented and patterned nucleation. Various oriented crystalline arrays and micropatterned films are formed. We also show that the ACC phase can be doped with foreign ions (e.g. Mg) and organic molecules (e.g. dyes) and that these dopants later function as growth modifiers of calcite crystals and become incorporated into the crystals during the transformation process of ACC to calcite. We believe that our strategy opens the way of using a stabilized amorphous phase as a versatile reservoir system that can be converted in a highly controlled fashion to a crystalline form upon contacting the nucleating template.

  15. Enzyme-accelerated and structure-guided crystallization of calcium carbonate: role of the carbonic anhydrase in the homologous system.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schlossmacher, Ute; Schröder, Heinz C; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Glasser, Gunnar; Korzhev, Michael; Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    The calcareous spicules from sponges, e.g. from Sycon raphanus, are composed of almost pure calcium carbonate. In order to elucidate the formation of those structural skeletal elements, the function of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), isolated from this species, during the in vitro calcium carbonate-based spicule formation, was investigated. It is shown that the recombinant sponge CA substantially accelerates calcium carbonate formation in the in vitro diffusion assay. A stoichiometric calculation revealed that the turnover rate of the sponge CA during the calcification process amounts to 25 CO2s(-1) × molecule CA(-1). During this enzymatically driven process, initially pat-like particles are formed that are subsequently transformed to rhomboid/rhombohedroid crystals with a dimension of ~50 μm. The CA-catalyzed particles are smaller than those which are formed in the absence of the enzyme. The Martens hardness of the particles formed is ~4 GPa, a value which had been determined for other biogenic calcites. This conclusion is corroborated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which revealed that the particles synthesized are composed predominantly of the elements calcium, oxygen and carbon. Surprising was the finding, obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, that the newly formed calcitic crystals associate with the calcareous spicules from S. raphanus in a highly ordered manner; the calcitic crystals almost perfectly arrange in an array orientation along the two opposing planes of the spicules, leaving the other two plane arrays uncovered. It is concluded that the CA is a key enzyme controlling the calcium carbonate biomineralization process, which directs the newly formed particles to existing calcareous spicular structures. It is expected that with the given tools new bioinspired materials can be fabricated. PMID:23978410

  16. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  17. Effect of Hydraulic Activity on Crystallization of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) for Eco-Friendly Paper

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Han, Gi-Chun; Lim, Mihee; You, Kwang-Suk; Ryu, Miyoung; Ahn, Ji-Whan; Fujita, Toyohisa; Kim, Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Wt% of aragonite, a CaCO3 polymorph, increased with higher hydraulic activity (°C) of limestone in precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) from the lime-soda process (Ca(OH)2-NaOH-Na2CO3). Only calcite, the most stable polymorph, was crystallized at hydraulic activity under 10 °C, whereas aragonite also started to crystallize over 10 °C. The crystallization of PCC is more dependent on the hydraulic activity of limestone than CaO content, a factor commonly used to classify limestone ores according to quality. The results could be effectively applied to the determination of polymorphs in synthetic PCC for eco-friendly paper manufacture. PMID:20087470

  18. Transformation and Crystallization Energetics of Synthetic and Biogenic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P.U.P.A; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC→anhydrous ACC ~ biogenic anhydrous ACC→vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO₂ sequestration.

  19. Crystallization and assembling behavior of calcium carbonate controlled by Ca-organic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anliang; Ma, Peiyan; Fu, Zhengyi; Wu, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals with different phases were obtained on the basis of one-dimensional Ca-deoxycholate fibers (Ca-DC fibers) under ambient conditions. Ca-DC fibers were prepared by the combination of Ca2+ ions and sodium deoxycholate (SDC) before the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Vaterite dominated mixtures could be easily obtained in the presence of Ca-DC fibers in the aqueous system at 10 °C. As the temperature was increased to 30 and 120 °C, pure vaterite and aragonite with novel morphologies were obtained, respectively. The framework formed by one-dimensional Ca-DC fibers was demonstrated to be the key role in mediating the crystallization and assembling behaviors of calcium carbonate. In this study, Ca-DC fibers, prepared as a novel insoluble organic polymorph controller, could even play an important role in the industrial production of CaCO3 with different polymorphs in future and other similar Ca-organic fibers are believed to have same functions as well.

  20. The influence of polyaspartate additive on the growth and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Laurie Anne

    The addition of low levels of polyaspartate to a supersaturated calcium carbonate (CaCOsb3) solution leads to unusual morphologies in the inorganic phase. Spherulitic vaterite aggregates with helical protrusions, and distorted calcite crystals that contain spiral pits, have been produced. The helical particles are coated with an inorganic membrane that appears to be responsible for the helical twist. The polymer also causes deposition of thin CaCOsb3 tablets and films on the glass substrate. Two distinct types of films are deposited; the first is a mosaic of calcite crystals, and the second is spherulitic vaterite. In situ observations of the crystallization reaction have determined that the thin-film morphology is a result of the phase separation of a hydrated CaCOsb3/polymer liquid-precursor, whereby accumulation of isotropic droplets creates a coating on the substrate, and subsequent dehydration and crystallization yields birefringent CaCOsb3 films. During the amorphous to crystalline transition, incremental growth steps lead to "transition bars" and sectored calcite tablets. This in vitro system was originally modeled after certain aspects of CaCOsb3 biomineralization, in which the soluble proteins extracted from biominerals tend to have high levels of aspartic acid residues. Based on the similarities between features exhibited by the products of this system and those in biominerals, an argument has been presented to suggest that this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process is involved in the morphogenesis of CaCOsb3 biominerals. These features include the following: thin CaCOsb3 tablets that grow laterally; tablets that express unstable crystallographic faces; non-faceted single crystals with curved surfaces; spatially-delineated single crystals; sectored calcite tablets; hollow-shell spheres; calcium carbonate cements; and magnesium-bearing calcites. This work has demonstrated that a means of morphological control can be accomplished through non

  1. Characterization of calcium carbonate/chitosan composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, K.E.; Zhang, S.

    1995-12-31

    The crystal growth of calcium carbonate on a chitosan substrate was achieved using a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, by using various additives, polyacrylic acid (PAA). Polyacrylic acid modified the chitosan-film surface and promoted the nucleation of calcium carbonate crystals.

  2. Influence of acid-soluble proteins from bivalve Siliqua radiata ligaments on calcium carbonate crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zeng-Qiong; Zhang, Gang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    In vitro biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of shell proteins is a heavily researched topic in biomineralization. However, little is known regarding the function of bivalve ligament proteins in the growth of CaCO3 crystals. In this study, using fibrous protein K58 from Siliqua radiata ligaments or coverslips as substrates, we report the results of our study of CaCO3 precipitation in the presence or absence of acid-soluble proteins (ASP) from inner ligament layers. ASP can disturb the controlling function of K58 or a coverslip on the crystalline phase, resulting in the formation of aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In addition, we identified the following four primary components from ASP by mass spectroscopy: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ABC transporter, keratin type II cytoskeletal 1 (KRT 1), and phosphate ABC transporter, phosphate-binding protein (PstS). Further analysis revealed that the first three proteins and especially ALP, which is important in bone mineralisation, could affect the polymorphism and morphology of CaCO3 crystals by trapping calcium ions in their domains. Our results indicate that ALP may play an important role in the formation of aragonite in S. radiata ligaments. This paper may facilitate our understanding of the biomineralization process.

  3. Peptide induced crystallization of calcium carbonate on wrinkle patterned substrate: implications for chitin formation in molluscs.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Anindita Sengupta; Koch, Marcus; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2013-01-01

    We here present the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate under the influence of synthetic peptides on topographically patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates, which have a controlled density of defects between the wrinkles. Experiments with two lysine-rich peptides derived from the extracellular conserved domain E22 of the mollusc chitin synthase Ar-CS1, AKKKKKAS (AS8) and EEKKKKKES (ES9) on these substrates showed their influence on the calcium carbonate morphology. A transition from polycrystalline composites to single crystalline phases was achieved with the peptide AS8 by changing the pH of the buffer solution. We analyzed three different pH values as previous experiments showed that E22 interacts with aragonite biominerals more strongly at pH 7.75 than at pH 9.0. At any given pH, crystals appeared in characteristic morphologies only on wrinkled substrates, and did not occur on the flat, wrinkle-free PDMS substrate. These results suggest that these wrinkled substrates could be useful for controlling the morphologies of other mineral/peptide and mineral/protein composites. In nature, these templates are formed enzymatically by glycosyltransferases containing pH-sensitive epitopes, similar to the peptides investigated here. Our in vitro test systems may be useful to gain understanding of the formation of distinct 3D morphologies in mollusc shells in response to local pH shifts during the mineralization of organic templates. PMID:23736692

  4. Transformation and crystallization energetics of synthetic and biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Radha, A. V.; Forbes, Tori Z.; Killian, Christopher E.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a metastable phase often observed during low temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. ACC transforms with aging or heating into a less hydrated form, and with time crystallizes to calcite or aragonite. The energetics of transformation and crystallization of synthetic and biogenic (extracted from California purple sea urchin larval spicules, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) ACC were studied using isothermal acid solution calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Transformation and crystallization of ACC can follow an energetically downhill sequence: more metastable hydrated ACC → less metastable hydrated ACC⇒anhydrous ACC ∼ biogenic anhydrous ACC⇒vaterite → aragonite → calcite. In a given reaction sequence, not all these phases need to occur. The transformations involve a series of ordering, dehydration, and crystallization processes, each lowering the enthalpy (and free energy) of the system, with crystallization of the dehydrated amorphous material lowering the enthalpy the most. ACC is much more metastable with respect to calcite than the crystalline polymorphs vaterite or aragonite. The anhydrous ACC is less metastable than the hydrated, implying that the structural reorganization during dehydration is exothermic and irreversible. Dehydrated synthetic and anhydrous biogenic ACC are similar in enthalpy. The transformation sequence observed in biomineralization could be mainly energetically driven; the first phase deposited is hydrated ACC, which then converts to anhydrous ACC, and finally crystallizes to calcite. The initial formation of ACC may be a first step in the precipitation of calcite under a wide variety of conditions, including geological CO2 sequestration. PMID:20810918

  5. Results of the TTF-TCNQ- and the calcium carbonate-crystallization on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Kjeld Flemming; Lind, M. David

    1991-01-01

    Experiment AO139A on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried four large containers into orbit for five years with crystal growth solutions for lead sulfide, calcium carbonate, and tetra thiafulvalene- tetra cyanoquino methane (TTF-TCNQ). The LDEF was in excellent condition after the long orbital stay, and although the temperature data was lost, the experiment program had been working since the valves in all containers were opened. All four experiments produced crystals; however, they were of varying quality. The calcium carbonate crystals had the best appearance. The TTF-TCNQ crystals were packed together near the valve openings of the container. When taken apart, the single crystals showed some unusual morphological properties. X-ray investigations as well as conductivity measurements on the long duration space grown TTF-TCNQ crystals are presented, and pictures of the calcium carbonate are shown. Comparisons are made with previous space solution growth experiments on the European Spacelab Mission and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

  6. Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate from a homogeneous precursor solution in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was demonstrated by the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions (pH 10). In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol %) was used as the precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. Thermogravimetric analysis of the obtained xerogels showed that increasing the UV irradiation time increased the amount of CaCO3 formed and the complete conversion of calcium ions to calcite was achieved after 50 min of UV irradiation. Furthermore, solid phase analyses suggested that nanometer-to-micron-sized calcite crystals were formed and dispersed in the obtained PVAPS matrix.

  7. Divisive effect of alcohol-water mixed solvents on growth morphology of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yue, Lin-Hai; Wang, Fei; Wang, Qi

    2008-08-28

    Controlling the process of crystal growth is of importance to the biomineralization and materials science. In this work, some novel morphology of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was precipitated in an ethanol-water binary solvent (EWBS) with a CaCl2/Na2CO3 reaction system. For the solutions of CaCl2/Na2CO3 in EWBS, the alcoholization and hydration of Ca2+ and CO3(2-) were discussed from the radial distribution functions by molecular dynamics simulations, and the number density profiles of water molecules around and approximately 15 A away from CO3(2-) were employed to reveal the distribution of water molecules. It is found that EWBS has a divisive effect on Ca2+ and CO3(2-), and the local inhomogeneity of EWBS would be enhanced by adding some Na2CO3 into it. This inhomogeneity results in an aqueous two-phase system as x E goes up to 0.7. In addition, the novel morphology of CaCO3 under different molar ratios of Ca2+/CO3(2-) and in different mixed solvents were confirmed by XRD and SEM, and the relationships between the morphology of CaCO 3 and the structural properties of mixed solvents were further explored. PMID:18681476

  8. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Xue-Lin

    2013-07-01

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  9. Influence of Sticky Rice and Anionic Polyacrylamide on the Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate in Chinese Organic Sanhetu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Peng, Changsheng; Dai, Min; Gu, Qingbao; Song, Shaoxian

    2015-09-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in soil controlled by natural organic material was considered a very important reason to enhance the property of ancient Chinese organic Sanhetu (COS), but how the organic material affected the crystallization of CaCO3 in COS is still unclear. In this paper, a natural organic material (sticky rice, SR) and a synthetic organic material (anionic polyacrylamide, APAM) were selected as additives to investigate their effect on the crystallization of CaCO3. The experimental results showed that the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of additives and reaction time, while only the size of CaCO3 crystals could be affected by the concentration of reactant. Although the morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals varied greatly with the variation of additive concentration, reactant concentration and reaction time, the polymorph of CaCO3 crystals were always calcite, according to SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR analyses. This study may help us to better understand the mechanism of the influence of organic materials on CaCO3 crystallization and properties of COS.

  10. Vapor diffusion method: Dependence of polymorphs and morphologies of calcium carbonate crystals on the depth of an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Hai-Shui; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    The polymorph control of calcium carbonate by the vapor diffusion method is still a challenging issue because the resultant crystal polymorphs and morphologies highly depend on the experimental setup. In this communication, we demonstrated that the concentration gradients accompanied by the vapor diffusion method (ammonia concentration, pH and the ratio of CO32- to Ca2+ are changed with the solution depth and with time) are probably the main reasons to significantly affect the formation of crystal polymorphs. Raman, SEM and XRD data showed that calcite and vaterite crystals were preferred to nucleate and grow in the upper or the lower areas of aqueous solution respectively. The above results can be explained by the gradient effect.

  11. Perlwapin, an abalone nacre protein with three four-disulfide core (whey acidic protein) domains, inhibits the growth of calcium carbonate crystals.

    PubMed

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-10-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of approximately 40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  12. Perlwapin, an Abalone Nacre Protein with Three Four-Disulfide Core (Whey Acidic Protein) Domains, Inhibits the Growth of Calcium Carbonate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Treccani, Laura; Mann, Karlheinz; Heinemann, Fabian; Fritz, Monika

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a new protein from the nacreous layer of the shell of the sea snail Haliotis laevigata (abalone). Amino acid sequence analysis showed the protein to consist of 134 amino acids and to contain three sequence repeats of ∼40 amino acids which were very similar to the well-known whey acidic protein domains of other proteins. The new protein was therefore named perlwapin. In addition to the major sequence, we identified several minor variants. Atomic force microscopy was used to explore the interaction of perlwapin with calcite crystals. Monomolecular layers of calcite crystals dissolve very slowly in deionized water and recrystallize in supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. When perlwapin was dissolved in the supersaturated calcium carbonate solution, growth of the crystal was inhibited immediately. Perlwapin molecules bound tightly to distinct step edges, preventing the crystal layers from growing. Using lower concentrations of perlwapin in a saturated calcium carbonate solution, we could distinguish native, active perlwapin molecules from denaturated ones. These observations showed that perlwapin can act as a growth inhibitor for calcium carbonate crystals in saturated calcium carbonate solution. The function of perlwapin in nacre growth may be to inhibit the growth of certain crystallographic planes in the mineral phase of the polymer/mineral composite nacre. PMID:16861275

  13. Calcium Carbonate Crystal Growth in Porous Media, in the presence of Water Miscible and Non-Miscible Organic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaho, Sofia; Sygouni, Varvara; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of sparingly soluble salts (scaling) within porous media is a major problem encountered in many industrial and environmental applications. In the oil industry scaling causes severe operational malfunctions and, therefore, increasing the total operating and maintenance cost [1]. The most common types of sparingly soluble salts located in oil fields include carbonate and sulfate salts of calcium, strondium and barium[1,2]. Multiple phase flow and tubing surface properties are some of the factors affecting scale formation [3]. The main purpose of the present work was the investigation of the precipitation mechanisms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) through in situ mixing of two soluble salt solutions in a flow granular medium, in the presence of water miscible organic fluid (ethylene glycol) or non-miscible organic fluid (n-dodecane). All series of experiments were carried out in a two dimensional porous medium made of Plexiglas. For all solutions used in the experiments, the contact angles with the surface of the porous medium and the interfacial tensions were measured. During the experiments, the calcium carbonate crystal growth was continuously monitored and recorded through an optical microscope equipped with a digital programmed video camera. The snap-shots were taken within specific time intervals and their detailed procession gave information concerning the crystal growth rate and kinetics. The pH of the effluent was measured and fluids samples were collected for calcium analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). In all experiments effluent calcium concentration decreased as a function of time, suggesting that CaCO3 precipitation took place inside the porous medium. Crystals of the precipitated salt were identified using Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and the morphology of the crystals was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The induction time for precipitation of CaCO3 crystals in the presence of n-dodecane was significantly

  14. Hemocytes participate in calcium carbonate crystal formation, transportation and shell regeneration in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Yangjia; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-04-01

    In this study, light microscope, scanning and transmission electron microscope, hematoxylin-eosin and fluorescent staining, and mass spectrometry methods were employed to observe the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystal formation, hemocyte release and transportation, and hemocyte distribution at the shell regeneration area and to analyse the proteome of hemocytes in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The results indicated that intracellular CaCO3 crystals were observed in circulating hemocytes in P. fucata, implying that there was a suitable microenvironment for crystal formation in the hemocytes. This conclusion was further supported by the proteome analysis, in which various biomineralization-related proteins were detected. The crystal-bearing hemocytes, mainly granulocytes, may be released to extrapallial fluid (EPF) by the secretory cavities distributed on the outer surface of the mantle centre. These granulocytes in the EPF and between the regenerated shells were abundant and free. In the regenerated prismatic layer, the granulocytes were fused into each column and fragmented with the duration of shell maturation, suggesting the direct involvement of hemocytes in shell regeneration. Overall, this study provided evidence that hemocytes participated in CaCO3 crystal formation, transportation and shell regeneration in the pearl oyster. These results are helpful to further understand the exact mechanism of hemocyte-mediated biomineralization in shelled molluscs. PMID:26923245

  15. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Rivadeneyra, A; Gonzalez-Lopez, J; Rivadeneyra, M A

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  16. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Castro, G. A.; Uad, I.; Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rivadeneyra, A.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Rivadeneyra, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments. PMID:26273646

  17. High pressure Raman and single crystal X-ray diffraction of the alkali/calcium carbonate, shortite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Q. C.; Vennari, C.; O'Bannon, E. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Raman and synchrotron-based single crystal x-ray diffraction data have been collected on shortite (Na2Ca2(CO3)3) up to 10 GPa at 300 K. Shortite is of geological importance due to its presence in the ground-mass of kimberlites, and the alkaline-/carbon-rich character of kimberlitic eruptions. This investigation focuses on shortite's high pressure behavior and is relevant to the behavior of alkali-carbonate systems within Earth's upper mantle. X-ray data demonstrate that shortite's symmetry remains stable at high pressures—retaining orthorhombic C crystal system (Amm2) up to 10 GPa; diffraction data show a 12% volume decrease from room pressure, and a bulk modulus of 71.0(3) GPa. These also demonstrate that the c-axis is twice as compressible as the a- and b-axes. This anisotropic compression is likely due to the orientation of the relatively stiff carbonate groups, a third of which are oriented close to the plane of the a- and b-axes, c axis compression primarily involves the compaction of the 9-fold coordinate sodium and calcium polyhedral. The two distinct carbonate sites within the unit cell give rise to two Raman symmetric stretching modes of the symmetric stretch; the carbonate group stretching vibration which is close to in plane with the a- and b-axes shifts at 3.75 cm-1/GPa as opposed to the carbonate groups which is closer to in plane with the b- and c-axes which shift at 4.25 cm-1/GPa. This furthers evidence for anisotropic compression observed using x-ray diffraction--as the carbonate in plane with the a- and b-axes is compressed, the strength of oxygen bonds along the c-axis with the cations increases, thus decreasing the pressure shift of the mode. The out of plane bending vibration shifts at -0.48 cm-1/GPa, indicating an enhanced interaction of the oxygens with the cations. The multiple in plane bending modes all shift positively, as do at the low frequency lattice modes, indicating that major changes in bonding do not occur up to 10 GPa. The data

  18. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  19. Crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a flowing system: Influence of Cu2+ additives on induction time and crystalline phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmany, Y.; Putranto, W. A.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muryanto, S.

    2016-04-01

    Scaling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is commonly found in piping systems in oil, gas, desalination and other chemical processes. The scale may create technical problems, leading to the reduction of heat transfer, increase of energy consumption and unscheduled equipment shutdown. This paper presents crystallization scaling experiments and evaluation of the effect of Cu2+ additives on the induction time and calcium carbonate transformation. The crystals precursors were prepared using equimolar of CaCl2 and Na2CO3 resulted in concentrations of 3000 ppm Ca2+ in the solution. The Cu2+ in amounts of 0, 1 and 10 ppm was separately added in the solution. The flow rates (20, 35, and 60 mL/min) and elevated temperatures (27, 35 and 45°C) were selected in the study. The induction time for crystallization of CaCO3 was observed by measuring the solution conductivity over time, while the phase transformation of calcium carbonate was examined by XRD method and SEM/EDX. It was found that the conductivity remained steady for a certain period reflecting to the induction time of crystal formation, and then decreased sharply afterwards,. The induction time was increased from 34 and 48 minutes in the presence of Cu additives (1 and 10 ppm), depending on the flow rates and temperature observed. In all the experiments, the Cu2+ addition leads to the reduction of mass of crystals. Apparently, the presence of Cu2+ could inhibit the CaCO3 crystallization. In the absence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals obtained were a mixture of vaterite and calcite. In the presence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals formed were aragonite and calcite. Here, the presence of Cu2+ additives might have controlled the crystal transformation of CaCO3.

  20. SM50 repeat-polypeptides self-assemble into discrete matrix subunits and promote appositional calcium carbonate crystal growth during sea urchin tooth biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yelin; Satchell, Paul G; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    The two major proteins involved in vertebrate enamel formation and echinoderm sea urchin tooth biomineralization, amelogenin and SM50, are both characterized by elongated polyproline repeat domains in the center of the macromolecule. To determine the role of polyproline repeat polypeptides in basal deuterostome biomineralization, we have mapped the localization of SM50 as it relates to crystal growth, conducted self-assembly studies of SM50 repeat polypeptides, and examined their effect on calcium carbonate and apatite crystal growth. Electron micrographs of the growth zone of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin teeth documented a series of successive events from intravesicular mineral nucleation to mineral deposition at the interface between tooth surface and odontoblast syncytium. Using immunohistochemistry, SM50 was detected within the cytoplasm of cells associated with the developing tooth mineral, at the mineral secreting front, and adjacent to initial mineral deposits, but not in muscles and ligaments. Polypeptides derived from the SM50 polyproline alternating hexa- and hepta-peptide repeat region (SM50P6P7) formed highly discrete, donut-shaped self-assembly patterns. In calcium carbonate crystal growth studies, SM50P6P7 repeat peptides triggered the growth of expansive networks of fused calcium carbonate crystals while in apatite growth studies, SM50P6P7 peptides facilitated the growth of needle-shaped and parallel arranged crystals resembling those found in developing vertebrate enamel. In comparison, SM50P6P7 surpassed the PXX24 polypeptide repeat region derived from the vertebrate enamel protein amelogenin in its ability to promote crystal nucleation and appositional crystal growth. Together, these studies establish the SM50P6P7 polyproline repeat region as a potent regulator in the protein-guided appositional crystal growth that occurs during continuous tooth mineralization and eruption. In addition, our studies highlight the role of species

  1. Calcium carbonate crystallizations on hypogean mural paintings: a pilot study of monitoring and diagnostics in Roman catacombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapete, D.; Fratini, F.; Mazzei, B.; Camaiti, M.; Cantisani, E.; Riminesi, C.; Manganelli Del Fà, R.; Cuzman, O.; Tiano, P.

    2012-04-01

    One of the deterioration processes affecting mural paintings and rock surfaces within manmade hypogea consists in the formation of calcium carbonate crystallizations, which can create thick coverage and incrustations, even in some cases speleothems. These chemical reactions necessarily require the availability of calcium sources, which can be also of anthropogenic origin (e.g., lime-based mortars). Microclimate parameters also represent environmental forcing factors, on which the morphology and the degree of crystallinity of the precipitated carbonates depend. Understanding past/recent dynamics of carbonate precipitation implies a deep knowledge of the relationships between the exposed surfaces and the microclimate conditions, the impacts of external factors (e.g., groundwater infiltration and percolation from the overlying soil) and how they change over time. This is particularly fundamental for the preservation of hypogean sites which have not comparison with other typologies of environment due to their uniqueness, such as the ancient catacombs carved underneath the suburbs of Rome (Italy), since the 2nd century AD. In this paper we present the multidisciplinary methodological approach designed for the instrumental monitoring of the microphysical environment of the Catacombs of Saints Mark, Marcellian and Damasus, in the framework of the co-operation between the Institute for the Conservation and Valorization of Cultural Heritage and Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archaeology, Vatican, on the project HYPOGEA. Temperature inside the catacomb and on the surfaces, air relative humidity and CO2 concentration are the main of the parameters continuously measured by means of data loggers installed within the cubicles. Contemporarily, standardized methods of photographic documentation and digital micro-photogrammetry are used for change detection analysis of the painted surfaces and ancient plasters, as well as of the test areas purposely realized by applying fresh

  2. Crystallization behavior and kinetics of calcium carbonate in highly alkaline and supersaturated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ganyu; Li, Huiquan; Li, Shaopeng; Hou, Xinjuan; Xu, Dehua; Lin, Rongyi; Tang, Qing

    2015-10-01

    In causticization process of Na2CO3-Ca(OH)2, which is a liquid-solid system with high alkalinity and supersaturation, agglomeration and morphology instability of CaCO3 crystal have greatly limited its application. To deeply investigate the internal relations between crystallization process and condition control in this system, crystallization kinetics was conducted in a continuously operated crystallizer. The kinetic equations of growth rate, nucleation rate and agglomeration kernel were correlated in terms of power law kinetic expressions based on the agglomeration population balance equation. Magma density and mean residence time exert a considerable effect on crystal growth, nucleation, and agglomeration. Crystal growth and nucleation are surface-integration-limited and size-limited, respectively. Agglomeration increases with increasing mean residence time, but the increase in magma density break down the agglomerates by frequent and energetic collisions. Through the study, crystallization behavior of CaCO3 in causticization system was revealed, and the particle size and morphology were efficiently predicted and controlled. These results can provide a basis for understanding the design of the reactor.

  3. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  4. Role of CaCO3° Neutral Pair in Calcium Carbonate Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structure of the units that get incorporated into the nuclei of the crystalline phase and sustain their growth is a fundamental issue in the pathway from a supersaturated solution to the formation of crystals. Using a fluorescent dye we have recorded the variation of the pH value in time along a gel where CaCl2 and NaHCO3 counter-diffuse to crystallize CaCO3. The same pH–space–time distribution maps were also computationally obtained using a chemical speciation code (phreeqc). Using data arising from this model we investigated the space-time evolution of the activity of the single species (ions and ion pairs) involved in the crystallization process. Our combined results suggest that, whatever the pathway from solution to crystals, the neutral pair CaCO3° is a key species in the CaCO3 precipitation system. PMID:27512345

  5. Control of calcium carbonate crystallization by using anionic polymethylsiloxanes as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira-Carrillo, Andrónico; Vásquez-Quitral, Patricio; Paz Díaz, María; Soledad Fernández, María; Luis Arias, José; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad

    2012-10-01

    Sulfonated (SO3H-PMS) and carboxylated (CO2H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes were synthesized and their effects as anionic template modifier on the CaCO3 crystal morphologies were evaluated. In vitro crystallization assays of CaCO3 were performed at room temperature by using gas diffusion method at different concentration, pH and time. SEM images of CaCO3 showed well-defined short calcite piles (ca. 5 μm) and elongated calcite (ca. 20 μm) when SO3H-PMS was used. When CO2H-PMS was used, the morphology of CaCO3 crystals was single-truncated at pH 7-9 and aggregated-modified calcite at pH 10-11. However, at pH 12 the least stable donut-shaped vaterite crystals were formed. EDS and XRD confirmed the presence of Si from anionic PMS templates on the CaCO3 surfaces and its polymorphism, respectively. Results showed that the selective morphologies of CaCO3 reflect the electrostatic interaction of anionic groups of functionalized PMS with Ca2+ adsorbed on CaCO3 crystals. Rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO3 was also produced by the inclusion of functionalized PMS into the lattice of CaCO3 matrix. We demonstrated that the anionic PMS offer a good modifier for polymer-controlled crystallization and a convenient approach for understanding the biomineralization field.

  6. DISSOLUTION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFITE PLATELETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO2 abs...

  7. Control of calcium carbonate crystallization by using anionic polymethylsiloxanes as templates

    SciTech Connect

    Neira-Carrillo, Andronico; Vasquez-Quitral, Patricio; Paz Diaz, Maria; Soledad Fernandez, Maria; Luis Arias, Jose; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad

    2012-10-15

    Sulfonated (SO{sub 3}H-PMS) and carboxylated (CO{sub 2}H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes were synthesized and their effects as anionic template modifier on the CaCO{sub 3} crystal morphologies were evaluated. In vitro crystallization assays of CaCO{sub 3} were performed at room temperature by using gas diffusion method at different concentration, pH and time. SEM images of CaCO{sub 3} showed well-defined short calcite piles (ca. 5 {mu}m) and elongated calcite (ca. 20 {mu}m) when SO{sub 3}H-PMS was used. When CO{sub 2}H-PMS was used, the morphology of CaCO{sub 3} crystals was single-truncated at pH 7-9 and aggregated-modified calcite at pH 10-11. However, at pH 12 the least stable donut-shaped vaterite crystals were formed. EDS and XRD confirmed the presence of Si from anionic PMS templates on the CaCO{sub 3} surfaces and its polymorphism, respectively. Results showed that the selective morphologies of CaCO{sub 3} reflect the electrostatic interaction of anionic groups of functionalized PMS with Ca{sup 2+} adsorbed on CaCO{sub 3} crystals. Rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} was also produced by the inclusion of functionalized PMS into the lattice of CaCO{sub 3} matrix. We demonstrated that the anionic PMS offer a good modifier for polymer-controlled crystallization and a convenient approach for understanding the biomineralization field. - Graphical abstract: Optical photographs of rounded and truncated-modified fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} produced by the inclusion of sulfonated (SO{sub 3}H-PMS) polymethylsiloxanes into the lattice of CaCO{sub 3} matrix. Insert represents the simulation of modified and fluorescent CaCO{sub 3} crystals using Software JCrystal, (2008). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared two anionic polymethylsiloxanes (PMS) as templates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their modifier capacity on the CaCO{sub 3} crystal morphologies was demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 12, the least stable donut-shaped vaterite

  8. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  9. Identification of calcium oxalate crystals using alizarin red S stain.

    PubMed

    Proia, A D; Brinn, N T

    1985-02-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals stain with alizarin red S at a pH of 7.0 but not at a pH of 4.2. In contrast, calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate stain at a pH of both 7.0 and 4.2. This difference allows presumptive identification of calcium oxalate deposits. The identity of calcium oxalate can then be confirmed by its insolubility in 2M acetic acid, since both calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate are soluble. We have applied this procedure for several years and have found it to be a rapid, reliable, and technically simple procedure for distinguishing calcium oxalate from other calcium deposits. PMID:2579619

  10. The molecular characteristics of a human pancreatic acidic phosphoprotein that inhibits calcium carbonate crystal growth.

    PubMed Central

    De Caro, A; Multigner, L; Lafont, H; Lombardo, D; Sarles, H

    1984-01-01

    A CaCO3-crystal-growth inhibitor was isolated from human pancreatic stones by using EDTA demineralization, followed by DEAE-Trisacryl chromatography. The isolated inhibitor was found to be a phosphoglycoprotein with Mr 14017 and having an unusual chemical composition. It is characterized by a high (42%) acidic amino acid content, but lacks methionine and gamma-carboxyglutamic acid. The protein contains 2.65 mol of P/mol of protein, as phosphoserine (2 mol) and phosphothreonine (0.5 mol). Isoelectric focusing of the protein yields one major band corresponding to an isoelectric point of 4.2. Immunochemical quantification of the crystal-growth inhibitor in pure pancreatic juice reveals that it constitutes 14% of the normal exocrine secretion. Our findings demonstrate that this is a novel secretory protein, which has no enzymic activity and which maintains pancreatic juice in a supersaturated state with respect to CaCO3. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6487269

  11. Calcium carbonate polyamorphism and its role in biomineralization: how many amorphous calcium carbonates are there?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Checa, Antonio G; Gale, Julian D; Gebauer, Denis; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio

    2012-11-26

    Although the polymorphism of calcium carbonate is well known, and its polymorphs--calcite, aragonite, and vaterite--have been highly studied in the context of biomineralization, polyamorphism is a much more recently discovered phenomenon, and the existence of more than one amorphous phase of calcium carbonate in biominerals has only very recently been understood. Here we summarize what is known about polyamorphism in calcium carbonate as well as what is understood about the role of amorphous calcium carbonate in biominerals. We show that consideration of the amorphous forms of calcium carbonate within the physical notion of polyamorphism leads to new insights when it comes to the mechanisms by which polymorphic structures can evolve in the first place. This not only has implications for our understanding of biomineralization, but also of the means by which crystallization may be controlled in medical, pharmaceutical, and industrial contexts. PMID:23124964

  12. Calcium carbonate microparticle growth controlled by a conjugate drug-copolymer and crystallization time.

    PubMed

    Doroftei, Florica; Damaceanu, Mariana Dana; Simionescu, Bogdan C; Mihai, Marcela

    2014-04-01

    The influence of crystallization reaction time on CaCO3 microparticle growth from supersaturate aqueous solutions, in the presence of a conjugate drug-copolymer, has been investigated. The polymer conjugate, P(NVP-MA-Ox), is based on poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-co-maleic anhydride) as the support and 2-amino-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole as the drug. The microparticles are characterized by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, flow particle image analysis and particle charge density. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed that calcite polymorph content increased with an increase in crystallization time, even if the electrostatic interactions between Ca(2+) and polyanionic sites of P(NVP-MA-Ox) structure conduct to an increased vaterite phase stability. The strong particle size increase after 6 h of ageing can be ascribed to partially vaterite recrystallization and adsorption of nano-scaled calcite crystallite nuclei at microparticles surfaces. The pH stability of the particles was shown by zeta potential changes and their adsorption capacity as a function of their composition, and characteristics were tested using methylene blue. The sorption capacity of composite materials was strongly influenced by the ratio between polymorphs in the composites, and increased with the increase of calcite content and ageing time. PMID:24675592

  13. Phase transitions in biogenic amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yutao

    Geological calcium carbonate exists in both crystalline phases and amorphous phases. Compared with crystalline calcium carbonate, such as calcite, aragonite and vaterite, the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is unstable. Unlike geological calcium carbonate crystals, crystalline sea urchin spicules (99.9 wt % calcium carbonate and 0.1 wt % proteins) do not present facets. To explain this property, crystal formation via amorphous precursors was proposed in theory. And previous research reported experimental evidence of ACC on the surface of forming sea urchin spicules. By using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), we studied cross-sections of fresh sea urchin spicules at different stages (36h, 48h and 72h after fertilization) and observed the transition sequence of three mineral phases: hydrated ACC → dehydrated ACC → biogenic calcite. In addition, we unexpectedly found hydrated ACC nanoparticles that are surrounded by biogenic calcite. This observation indicates the dehydration from hydrated ACC to dehydrated ACC is inhibited, resulting in stabilization of hydrated ACC nanoparticles. We thought that the dehydration was inhibited by protein matrix components occluded within the biomineral, and we designed an in vitro assay to test the hypothesis. By utilizing XANES-PEEM, we found that SM50, the most abundant occluded matrix protein in sea urchin spicules, has the function to stabilize hydrated ACC in vitro.

  14. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. PMID:27460160

  15. Calcium Oxalate Crystals in Eucalypt Ectomycorrhizae: Morphochemical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pylro, Victor Satler; de Freitas, André Luiz Moreira; Otoni, Wagner Campos; da Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Borges, Arnaldo Chaer; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems, benefitting plants principally by increasing the uptake of water and nutrients such as calcium from the soil. Previous work has demonstrated accumulation of crystallites in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas, but detailed morphological and chemical characterization of these crystals has not been performed. In this work, cross sections of acetic acid-treated and cleared ectomycorrhizal fragments were visualized by polarized light microscopy to evaluate the location of crystals within cortical root cells. Ectomycorrhizal sections were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) microprobe analysis. The predominant forms of crystals were crystal sand (granules) and concretions. Calcium, carbon and oxygen were detected by EDS as constituent elements and similar elemental profiles were observed between both crystal morphologies. All analyzed crystalline structures were characterized as calcium oxalate crystals. This is the first report of the stoichiometry and morphology of crystals occurring in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas in tropical soils. The data corroborates the role of ectomycorrhizae in the uptake and accumulation of calcium in the form of calcium oxalate crystals in hybrid eucalypt plants. PMID:23844062

  16. Calcium oxalate crystals in eucalypt ectomycorrhizae: morphochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Pylro, Victor Satler; de Freitas, André Luiz Moreira; Otoni, Wagner Campos; da Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Borges, Arnaldo Chaer; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems, benefitting plants principally by increasing the uptake of water and nutrients such as calcium from the soil. Previous work has demonstrated accumulation of crystallites in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas, but detailed morphological and chemical characterization of these crystals has not been performed. In this work, cross sections of acetic acid-treated and cleared ectomycorrhizal fragments were visualized by polarized light microscopy to evaluate the location of crystals within cortical root cells. Ectomycorrhizal sections were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) microprobe analysis. The predominant forms of crystals were crystal sand (granules) and concretions. Calcium, carbon and oxygen were detected by EDS as constituent elements and similar elemental profiles were observed between both crystal morphologies. All analyzed crystalline structures were characterized as calcium oxalate crystals. This is the first report of the stoichiometry and morphology of crystals occurring in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas in tropical soils. The data corroborates the role of ectomycorrhizae in the uptake and accumulation of calcium in the form of calcium oxalate crystals in hybrid eucalypt plants. PMID:23844062

  17. Polymorphs calcium carbonate on temperature reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Kai-Yin; Chia, Chin-Hua; Zakaria, Sarani

    2014-09-03

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) has three different crystal polymorphs, which are calcite, aragonite and vaterite. In this study, effect of reaction temperature on polymorphs and crystallite structure of CaCO{sub 3} was investigated. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) were used to characterize the obtained CaCO{sub 3} particles. The obtained results showed that CaCO{sub 3} with different crystal and particle structures can be formed by controlling the temperature during the synthesis process.

  18. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  19. Phosphate-water interplay tunes amorphous calcium carbonate metastability: spontaneous phase separation and crystallization vs stabilization viewed by solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Kababya, Shifi; Gal, Assaf; Kahil, Keren; Weiner, Steve; Addadi, Lia; Schmidt, Asher

    2015-01-21

    Organisms tune the metastability of amorphous calcium carbonates (ACC), often by incorporation of additives such as phosphate ions and water molecules, to serve diverse functions, such as modulating the availability of calcium reserves or constructing complex skeletal scaffolds. Although the effect of additive distribution on ACC was noted for several biogenic and synthetic systems, the molecular mechanisms by which additives govern ACC stability are not well understood. By precipitating ACC in the presence of different PO4(3-) concentrations and regulating the initial water content, we identify conditions yielding either kinetically locked or spontaneously transforming coprecipitates. Solid state NMR, supported by FTIR, XRD, and electron microscopy, define the interactions of phosphate and water within the initial amorphous matrix, showing that initially the coprecipitates are homogeneous molecular dispersions of structural water and phosphate in ACC, and a small fraction of P-rich phases. Monitoring the transformations of the homogeneous phase shows that PO4(3-) and waters are extracted first, and they phase separate, leading to solid-solid transformation of ACC to calcite; small part of ACC forms vaterite that subsequently converts to calcite. The simultaneous water-PO4(3-) extraction is the key for the subsequent water-mediated accumulation and crystallization of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and carbonated hydroxyapatite. The thermodynamic driving force for the transformations is calcite crystallization, yet it is gated by specific combinations of water-phosphate levels in the initial amorphous coprecipitates. The molecular details of the spontaneously transforming ACC and of the stabilized ACC modulated by phosphate and water at ambient conditions, provide insight into biogenic and biomimetic pathways. PMID:25523637

  20. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... three common methods of manufacture: (1) As a byproduct in the “Lime soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation process”; or (3) By precipitation...

  1. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  2. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine, white, synthetically prepared powder consisting essentially...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed. PMID:26700479

  8. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Aminul; Teo, Siow Hwa; Rahman, M. Aminur; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33–41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed. PMID:26700479

  9. Crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Gaur, S. S.; Sheehan, M. E.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1988-02-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate has been investigated up to very large extents of growth over a range of supersaturations maintained using the Constant Composition technique. It is suggested that the initial rapid growth of aged seed crystals resulting in marked lattice perfection, reduces the density of growth sites on the crystal surfaces. A method for the preparation of perfected crystallites of calcium oxalate monohydrate through pregrowth of aged crystals has been developed. At large extents of growth with respect to initial seed crystals ( > 200% for aged crystals and 30-60% for pregrown crystals), the rates of crystallization at constant supersaturation undergo marked increases accompanying the formulation of secondary nuclei. These nucleation thresholds depend both upon supersaturation and upon the initial specific surface area of the crystallites and may be important factors in the formation of calcium oxalate stones in vivo. Experiments in whole urine suggest that the kinetics of growth, secondary nucleation, aggregation and cementation of particles may be important factors in kidney stone formation.

  10. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  11. Gypsum crystals formed on decomposing calcium citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söhnel, O.; Křivánková, I.; Krčmář, S.; Jurčová, M.

    1991-06-01

    Particle size and the specific surface area of gypsum crystals formed on decomposing an aqueous suspension of solid calcium citrate tetrahydrate by diluted 50% sulphuric acid at 25, 40, 60, 80 and 100°C was studied. The size of the gypsum crystals increases with increasing temperature of decomposition. At a constant temperature within the range of 25 to 100°C the median of gypsum crystal size distribution (PSD) increases for approximately 4 h after commencing decomposition and then reaches a virtually constant value. The specific surface area of gypsum crystals decreases after commencement of the reaction for approximately 6 h before reaching a constant value. Gypsum crystal growth by solute deposition from the liquid is responsible for PSD changes for approximately one hour at the commencement of reaction. Then the growth of larger crystals at the expense of smaller crystals, i.e. ripening, is apparently responsible for further changes in the PSD.

  12. Spinning up the polymorphs of calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Ramiz A.; Zhang, Fei; Tjandra, Edwin S.; Martin, Adam D.; Spagnoli, Dino; Raston, Colin L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the growth of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate is important in understanding the changing environmental conditions in the oceans. Aragonite is the main polymorph in the inner shells of marine organisms, and can be readily converted to calcite, which is the most stable polymorph of calcium carbonate. Both of these polymorphs are significantly more stable than vaterite, which is the other naturally occurring polymorph of calcium carbonate, and this is reflected in its limited distribution in nature. We have investigated the effect of high shear forces on the phase behaviour of calcium carbonate using a vortex fluidic device (VFD), with experimental parameters varied to explore calcium carbonate mineralisation. Variation of tilt angle, rotation speed and temperature allow for control over the size, shape and phase of the resulting calcium carbonate. PMID:24448077

  13. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  14. Structural Characteristics of Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, F. Marc; MacDonald, Jason; Feng, Jian; Phillips, Brian L.; Ehm, Lars; Tarabrella, Cathy; Parise, John B.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2008-08-06

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an important phase involved in calcification by a wide variety of invertebrate organisms and is of technological interest in the development of functional materials. Despite widespread scientific interest in this phase a full characterization of structure is lacking. This is mainly due to its metastability and difficulties in evaluating structure using conventional structure determination methods. Here we present new findings from the application of two techniques, pair distribution function analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provide new insight to structural aspects of synthetic ACC. Several important results have emerged from this study of ACC formed in vitro using two common preparation methods: (1) ACC exhibits no structural coherence over distances > 15 {angstrom} and is truly amorphous; (2) most of the hydrogen in ACC is present as structural H{sub 2}O, about half of which undergoes restricted motion on the millisecond time scale near room temperature; (3) the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC shows no distinct match to any known structure in the calcium carbonate system; and (4) most of the carbonate in ACC is monodentate making it distinctly different from monohydrocalcite. Although the structure of synthetic ACC is still not fully understood, the results presented provide an important baseline for future experiments evaluating biogenic ACC and samples containing certain additives that may play a role in stabilization of ACC, crystallization kinetics, and final polymorph selection.

  15. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  16. CALCIUM SULFITE CRYSTAL SIZING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a reliable experimental method that can be used routinely to determine the crystal size distribution function, a measure that is required for a mathematical representation of the nucleation and growth processes involved in the settling, dewatering, and dispos...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. Calcium carbonate shall meet the specifications...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications. Calcium carbonate shall meet the specifications...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate....

  20. Calcium carbonate polymorph control using droplet-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yashina, Alexandra; Meldrum, Fiona; Demello, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) is one of the most abundant minerals and of high importance in many areas of science including global CO(2) exchange, industrial water treatment energy storage, and the formation of shells and skeletons. Industrially, calcium carbonate is also used in the production of cement, glasses, paints, plastics, rubbers, ceramics, and steel, as well as being a key material in oil refining and iron ore purification. CaCO(3) displays a complex polymorphic behaviour which, despite numerous experiments, remains poorly characterised. In this paper, we report the use of a segmented-flow microfluidic reactor for the controlled precipitation of calcium carbonate and compare the resulting crystal properties with those obtained using both continuous flow microfluidic reactors and conventional bulk methods. Through combination of equal volumes of equimolar aqueous solutions of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate on the picoliter scale, it was possible to achieve excellent definition of both crystal size and size distribution. Furthermore, highly reproducible control over crystal polymorph could be realised, such that pure calcite, pure vaterite, or a mixture of calcite and vaterite could be precipitated depending on the reaction conditions and droplet-volumes employed. In contrast, the crystals precipitated in the continuous flow and bulk systems comprised of a mixture of calcite and vaterite and exhibited a broad distribution of sizes for all reaction conditions investigated. PMID:22655005

  1. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    PubMed Central

    Giocondi, Jennifer L.; El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Nancollas, George H.; Orme, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite’s excellent biocompatibility, can be used to great benefit in making resorbable biomedical cements. To optimize cements, additives are commonly used to control crystallization kinetics and phase transformation. This paper describes the use of in situ scanning probe microscopy to investigate the role of several solution parameters and additives in brushite atomic step motion. Surprisingly, this work demonstrates that the activation barrier for phosphate (rather than calcium) incorporation limits growth kinetics and that additives such as magnesium, citrate and bisphosphonates each influence step motion in distinctly different ways. Our findings provide details of how, and where, molecules inhibit or accelerate kinetics. These insights have the potential to aid in designing molecules to target specific steps and to guide synergistic combinations of additives. PMID:20308110

  2. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this pote...

  3. Calcium and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Calcium Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayr, Andrea; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Kisakürek, Basak; Balzer, Isabelle; Immenhauser, Adrian; Jürgen Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Different isotopic systems are influenced in multiple ways corresponding to the crystal structure, dehydration, deprotonation, adsorption, desorption, isotope exchange and diffusion processes. In this study we investigated the structural and kinetic effects on fractionation of stable Ca- and O-isotopes during CaCO3 precipitation. Calcite, aragonite and vaterite were precipitated using the CO2 diffusion technique[1]at a constant pH of 8.3, but various temperatures (6, 10, 25 and 40° C) and precipitation rates R (101.5 to 105 μmol h‑1 m‑2). The calcium isotopic fractionation between solution and vaterite is lower (Δ44/40Ca= -0.10 to -0.55 ‰) compared to calcite (-0.69 to -2.04 ‰) and aragonite (-0.91 to -1.55 ‰). In contrast the fractionation of oxygen isotopes is highest for vaterite (32.1 ‰), followed by aragonite (29.2 ‰) and calcite (27.6 ‰) at 25° C and equilibrium. The enrichment of 18O vs. 16O in all polymorphs decreases with increasing precipitation rate by around -0.7 ‰ per log(R). The calcium isotopic fractionation between calcite/ vaterite and aqueous Ca2+ increases with increasing precipitation rate by ˜0.45 ‰ per log(R) and ˜0.1 ‰ per log(R) at 25° C and 40° C, respectively. In contrast the fractionation of Ca-isotopes between aragonite and aqueous Ca2+ decreases with increasing precipitation rates. The large enrichment of 18O vs. 16O isotopes in carbonates is related to the strong bond of oxygen to the small and highly charged C4+-ion. In contrast equilibrium isotopic fractionation between solution and calcite or vaterite is nearly zero as the Ca-O bond length is similar for calcite, vaterite and the hydrated Ca. Aragonite incorporates preferentially the lighter 40Ca isotope as it has very large Ca-O bonds in comparison to the hydrated Ca. At the crystal surface the lighter 40Ca isotopes are preferentially incorporated as dehydration and diffusion of lighter isotopes are faster. Consequently, the surface becomes enriched in

  4. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  5. Incorporation of Chromate into Calcium Carbonate Structure during Coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin; Thornton, Edward C.; Yang, J.; Amonette, James E.

    2006-09-08

    To assess treatment technologies and establish regulatory framework for chromate-contaminated site remediation, it is imperative to know the exact chromium speciation in soil matrices. In an earlier study, Thornton and Amonette (1999) reported that some chromate in the bulk particles was not accessible to gaseous reductants or solution-phase extractants, based on XANES studies. We hypothesized that part of this non-extractable chromate may reside in the structure of minerals such as calcium carbonate. To test this hypothesis, a number of calcium carbonate precipitates were prepared in the presence of various concentrations of chromate during the precipitation, which could coprecipitate chromate, or by adding chromate after the precipitation was completed. Hydrochloric acid was used to dissolve calcium carbonate and therefore extract the coprecipitated and surface attached chromate. The results showed that the coprecipitated chromate was non-extractable by hot alkaline solution or phosphate buffer, but could be solubilized by HCl in proportional to the amount of calcium carbonate dissolved. The X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that the coprecipitation of chromate with calcium carbonate had an influence on its crystal structure: the higher the chromate concentration, the greater the ratio of vaterite to calcite.

  6. Ab Initio Studies of Calcium Carbonate Hydration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Berganza, Josue A; Diao, Yijue; Pamidighantam, Sudhakar; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2015-11-25

    Ab initio simulations of large hydrated calcium carbonate clusters are challenging due to the existence of multiple local energy minima. Extensive conformational searches around hydrated calcium carbonate clusters (CaCO3·nH2O for n = 1-18) were performed to find low-energy hydration structures using an efficient combination of Monte Carlo searches, density-functional tight binding (DFTB+) method, and density-functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level, or Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2 level. This multilevel optimization yields several low-energy structures for hydrated calcium carbonate. Structural and energetics analysis of the hydration of these clusters revealed a first hydration shell composed of 12 water molecules. Bond-length and charge densities were also determined for different cluster sizes. The solvation of calcium carbonate in bulk water was investigated by placing the explicitly solvated CaCO3·nH2O clusters in a polarizable continuum model (PCM). The findings of this study provide new insights into the energetics and structure of hydrated calcium carbonate and contribute to the understanding of mechanisms where calcium carbonate formation or dissolution is of relevance. PMID:26505205

  7. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  8. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  9. Nacre-like calcium carbonate controlled by ionic liquid/graphene oxide composite template.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chengli; Xie, Anjian; Shen, Yuhua; Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Hongying

    2015-06-01

    Nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures have been mediated by an ionic liquid (IL)-graphene oxide (GO) composite template. The resultant crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). The results showed that either 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4) or graphene oxide can act as a soft template for calcium carbonate formation with unusual morphologies. Based on the time-dependent morphology changes of calcium carbonate particles, it is concluded that nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures can be formed gradually utilizing [BMIM]BF4/GO composite template. During the process of calcium carbonate formation, [BMIM]BF4 acted not only as solvents but also as morphology templates for the fabrication of calcium carbonate materials with nacre-like morphology. Based on the observations, the possible mechanisms were also discussed. PMID:25842135

  10. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from a calcium acetate and ammonium carbamate batch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prah, J.; Maček, J.; Dražič, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for preparing precipitated calcium carbonate using solutions of ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate as the sources of calcium and carbon dioxide, respectively. Two different concentrations of the starting solutions at three different temperatures (15, 25 and 50 °C) were used for the reaction. The influence of temperature and concentration on the polymorphism and the resulting morphology of calcium carbonate are discussed. The most important parameter for controlling a particular crystal structure and precipitate morphology were the concentrations of the initial solutions. When initial solutions with lower concentrations were used, the crystal form of the precipitate changed with time. Regardless the different polymorphism at different temperatures, after one day only the calcite form was detected in all samples, regardless of at which temperature the samples were prepared. At higher concentrations, pure vaterite or a mixture of vaterite and calcite were present at the beginning of the experiment. After one day, pure vaterite was found in the samples that were prepared at 15 and 25 °C. If calcium carbonate precipitated at 50 °C, the XRD results showed a mixture of calcite and vaterite regardless of the time at which the sample was taken. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles prepared at various conditions changed from calcite cubes to spherical particles of vaterite and aragonite needles. When a low starting concentration was used, the morphology at the initial stage was strongly affected by the temperature at which the experiments were conducted. However, after one day only, cubes were present in all cases at low initial concentrations. In contrast, at high concentrations spherical particles precipitated at all three temperatures at the beginning of the reaction. Spherical particles were made up from smaller particles. Over time, the size of the particles was diminishing due to their disintegration into

  11. Effects of DPPC/Cholesterol liposomes on the properties of freshly precipitated calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Szcześ, A

    2013-01-01

    DPPC/Cholesterol liposomes of average diameter below 100nm were used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation. Adsorption of calcium ions on the vesicles was determined via zeta potential measurement. It was found that with increasing calcium ions concentration the electrokinetic potential of the vesicles varied toward more positive values. The changes became smaller with the cholesterol content increase. Accumulation of calcium ions close to the vesicles membranes lead to attraction of CO(3)(2-) ions and enhances nucleation and growth of small calcium carbonate crystals that aggregates within lipid vesicles forming porous balls aggregates. However, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) does not change the CaCO(3) crystal forms and calcite is the only form obtained during precipitation. Moreover, the influence of the phospholipid on the calcium carbonate precipitation is enhanced by the induction of cholesterol to the lipid membranes. PMID:22796770

  12. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A.; Dziuk, J.J. Jr.

    1989-05-09

    This patent describes a method for the accelerated calcination of a calcium carbonate material. It comprises: heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a fused salt catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. CaCO{sub 3}-CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}, wherein M is an alkali metal selected from sodium or potassium and x is 0 to 1 and the salt is formed by fusing M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is sodium and about 1:1 to 2:1 when the alkali metal is potassium. This patent also describes a blend adapted to be heated to form CaO. It comprises: a calcium carbonate material and a catalyst consisting of particles having a size above or below that of the calcium carbonate material; the catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula M{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-CaCO{sub 3}CaO-H{sub 2}O{sub {ital x}}.

  13. Diagnosis and clinical manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate and basic calcium phosphate crystal deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Lioté, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Basic calcium phosphate and pyrophosphate calcium crystals are the 2 main calcium-containing crystals that can deposit in all skeletal tissues. These calcium crystals give rise to numerous manifestations, including acute inflammatory attacks that can mimic alarming and threatening differential diagnoses, osteoarthritis-like lesions, destructive arthropathies, and calcific tendinitis. Awareness of uncommon localizations and manifestations such as intraspinal deposition (eg, crowned dens syndrome, tendinitis of longus colli muscle, massive cervical myelopathy compression) prevents inappropriate procedures and cares. Coupling plain radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and synovial fluid analysis allow accurate diagnosis by directly or indirectly identifying the GRAAL of microcrystal-related symptoms. PMID:24703344

  14. Calcination of calcium carbonate and blend therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, William A.; Dziuk, Jr., Jerome J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for calcination of a calcium carbonate material comprising heating the calcium carbonate material to a temperature and for a time sufficient to calcine the material to the degree desired while in the presence of a catalyst; said catalyst comprising at least one fused salt having the formula MCO.sub.3.CaCO.sub.3.CaO.H.sub.2 O.sub.x, wherein M is an alkali metal and x is 0 to 1 and formed by fusing MCO.sub.3 and CaCO.sub.3 in a molar ratio of about 1:2 to 2:1, and a blend adapted to be heated to CaO comprising a calcium carbonate material and at least one such fused salt.

  15. Strain-Specific Ureolytic Microbial Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Frederik; Boon, Nico; de Villiers, Johan; Verstraete, Willy; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2003-01-01

    During a study of ureolytic microbial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation by bacterial isolates collected from different environmental samples, morphological differences were observed in the large CaCO3 crystal aggregates precipitated within bacterial colonies grown on agar. Based on these differences, 12 isolates were selected for further study. We hypothesized that the striking differences in crystal morphology were the result of different microbial species or, alternatively, differences in the functional attributes of the isolates selected. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that all of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to the Bacillus sphaericus group. Urease gene diversity among the isolates was examined by using a novel application of PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). This approach revealed significant differences between the isolates. Moreover, for several isolates, multiple bands appeared on the DGGE gels, suggesting the apparent presence of different urease genes in these isolates. The substrate affinities (Km) and maximum hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of crude enzyme extracts differed considerably for the different strains. For certain isolates, the urease activity increased up to 10-fold in the presence of 30 mM calcium, and apparently this contributed to the characteristic crystal formation by these isolates. We show that strain-specific calcification occurred during ureolytic microbial carbonate precipitation. The specificity was mainly due to differences in urease expression and the response to calcium. PMID:12902285

  16. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  1. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongni; Li, Zhuo; Gao, Yonghua; Feng, Qingling

    2010-10-01

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH2 and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH2 and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different. PMID:20844320

  2. Influence of the surfactant nature on the calcium carbonate synthesis in water-in-oil emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2009-02-01

    Calcium carbonate has been precipitated from water-in-oil emulsions consisting of n-hexane/nonionic surfactant (Brij 30) and its mixture with cationic (DTAB) or anionic surfactant (SDS) to which calcium chloride and sodium carbonate were added. It was found that the surfactant kind and its amount can regulate the size, form and morphology of the precipitated particles. In case of nonionic surfactant the water/surfactant ratio is the most important parameter that allows to obtain small and regular calcium carbonate crystals. Addition of the DTAB results in different morphology of particles having the same crystal form, whereas addition of SDS changes the kind of emulsion from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. Moreover, light transmittance and backscattering light measurements have been used as a method to study the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in emulsion systems.

  3. The expanded amelogenin polyproline region preferentially binds to apatite versus carbonate and promotes apatite crystal elongation

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Gokul; Jin, Tianquan; Liu, Min; Li, Steve; Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Galang, Maria-Therese; Allen, Michael; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.

    2014-01-01

    The transition from invertebrate calcium carbonate-based calcite and aragonite exo- and endoskeletons to the calcium phosphate-based vertebrate backbones and jaws composed of microscopic hydroxyapatite crystals is one of the great revolutions in the evolution of terrestrial organisms. To identify potential factors that might have played a role in such a transition, three key domains of the vertebrate tooth enamel protein amelogenin were probed for calcium mineral/protein interactions and their ability to promote calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate crystal growth. Under calcium phosphate crystal growth conditions, only the carboxy-terminus augmented polyproline repeat peptide, but not the N-terminal peptide nor the polyproline repeat peptide alone, promoted the formation of thin and parallel crystallites resembling those of bone and initial enamel. In contrast, under calcium carbonate crystal growth conditions, all three amelogenin-derived polypeptides caused calcium carbonate to form fused crystalline conglomerates. When examined for long-term crystal growth, polyproline repeat peptides of increasing length promoted the growth of shorter calcium carbonate crystals with broader basis, contrary to the positive correlation between polyproline repeat element length and apatite mineralization published earlier. To determine whether the positive correlation between polyproline repeat element length and apatite crystal growth versus the inverse correlation between polyproline repeat length and calcium carbonate crystal growth were related to the binding affinity of the polyproline domain to either apatite or carbonate, a parallel series of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate/apatite protein binding studies was conducted. These studies demonstrated a remarkable binding affinity between the augmented amelogenin polyproline repeat region and calcium phosphates, and almost no binding to calcium carbonates. In contrast, the amelogenin N-terminus bound to both carbonate

  4. Calcium oxalate crystal growth in human urinary stones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.M.; Johnson, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Calcium oxalate stones are very common and increasing. Crystal growth is no less important than the crystal nucleation in the pathogenesis of stone formation. The crystal growth was studied in human calcium oxalate stones by a combined electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The main mode of weddellite growth was interpenetration twinning of tetrahedral bipyramids. Bipyramids may form as initial crystal seeds, develop from anhedral crystals (crystals which lack flat symmetric faces) of spherular or mulberry shape, develop on the surface of preformed bipyramids by spiral dislocation mechanisms, or develop on whewellite crystal by heterogeneous nucleation and epitaxy. Heterogeneous nucleations of whewellite on weddellite, and calcium apatite on whewellite were also observed. Whewellite grew mainly by parallel twinning. Interpenetration twinning was exceptional. Transformation of anhedral to euhedral (completely bounded by flat faces that are set ar fixed angles to one another) whewellite occurred by parallel fissurations followed by brick wall like stacking of the crystals, while euhedral transformation of weddellite occurred by protrusion of bipyramids frm anhedral crystal surface. Occasionally, an evidence of crystal dissolution was noted. Although an aggregation of crystals is believed to play a pivotal role in stone nidus formation, growth in size of the formed crystals, and twinning and epitactic crystal intergrowth apparently play a significant role in the obstructive urinary stone formation.

  5. Lysozyme mediated calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Hailing; Xia, Yongqing; Chen, Cuixia; Xu, Hai; Shan, Honghong; Lu, Jian R

    2009-04-01

    Lysozyme, a major component of egg white proteins, has been speculated to participate in the calcification of avian eggshells. However, its detailed role during the eggshell formation is not well understood. In this work, the influence of lysozyme on the precipitation of CaCO(3) has been investigated using a combined study of FTIR, XRD, and SEM. The precipitation was produced from (NH(4))(2)CO(3) vapor diffusion into CaCl(2) aqueous solution using a specially built chamber. In the absence of lysozyme, hexagonal platelets of vaterite and their spherical aggregates dominated the precipitates during the first 3-12 h crystallization period studied, with the (001) crystal face well expressed in the hexagonal direction. In contrast, calcite was favored to precipitate in the presence of lysozyme during the same period and the effect was found to be proportional to lysozyme concentration. Furthermore, the (110) face of calcite was expressed in addition to the common (104) face, and the morphological modification was also lysozyme concentration dependent. We attributed these phenomena to the selective adsorption of ammonium ions and lysozyme onto different crystal faces. Our findings have clearly revealed the concentration and face dependent role of lysozyme in CaCO(3) precipitation. This, together with the abundance of lysozyme in the uterine fluid, implies its direct contribution to the hierarchical structures of calcite during the initial stage of eggshell formation. PMID:19167007

  6. Alarm Photosynthesis: Calcium Oxalate Crystals as an Internal CO2 Source in Plants.

    PubMed

    Tooulakou, Georgia; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Orkoula, Malvina G; Kontoyannis, Christos G; Fasseas, Costas; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Klapa, Maria I; Karabourniotis, George

    2016-08-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals are widespread among animals and plants. In land plants, crystals often reach high amounts, up to 80% of dry biomass. They are formed within specific cells, and their accumulation constitutes a normal activity rather than a pathological symptom, as occurs in animals. Despite their ubiquity, our knowledge on the formation and the possible role(s) of these crystals remains limited. We show that the mesophyll crystals of pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus) exhibit diurnal volume changes with a gradual decrease during daytime and a total recovery during the night. Moreover, stable carbon isotope composition indicated that crystals are of nonatmospheric origin. Stomatal closure (under drought conditions or exogenous application of abscisic acid) was accompanied by crystal decomposition and by increased activity of oxalate oxidase that converts oxalate into CO2 Similar results were also observed under drought stress in Dianthus chinensis, Pelargonium peltatum, and Portulacaria afra Moreover, in A. hybridus, despite closed stomata, the leaf metabolic profiles combined with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated active photosynthetic metabolism. In combination, calcium oxalate crystals in leaves can act as a biochemical reservoir that collects nonatmospheric carbon, mainly during the night. During the day, crystal degradation provides subsidiary carbon for photosynthetic assimilation, especially under drought conditions. This new photosynthetic path, with the suggested name "alarm photosynthesis," seems to provide a number of adaptive advantages, such as water economy, limitation of carbon losses to the atmosphere, and a lower risk of photoinhibition, roles that justify its vast presence in plants. PMID:27261065

  7. Two competitive nucleation mechanisms of calcium carbonate biomineralization in response to surface functionality in low calcium ion concentration solution

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hua; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Xiumei; Du, Chang; Shen, Xingcan; Wang, Yingjun; Cui, Fuzhai

    2015-01-01

    Four self-assembled monolayer surfaces terminated with –COOH, –OH, –NH2 and –CH3 functional groups are used to direct the biomineralization processes of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in low Ca2+ concentration, and the mechanism of nucleation and initial crystallization within 12 h was further explored. On −COOH surface, nucleation occurs mainly via ion aggregation mechanism while prenucleation ions clusters may be also involved. On −OH and −NH2 surfaces, however, nucleation forms via calcium carbonate clusters, which aggregate in solution and then are adsorbed onto surfaces following with nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Furthermore, strongly negative-charged −COOH surface facilitates the direct formation of calcites, and the −OH and −NH2 surfaces determine the formation of vaterites with preferred crystalline orientations. Neither ACC nor crystalline CaCO3 is observed on −CH3 surface. Our findings present a valuable model to understand the CaCO3 biomineralization pathway in natural system where functional groups composition plays a determining role during calcium carbonate crystallization. PMID:26814639

  8. Two competitive nucleation mechanisms of calcium carbonate biomineralization in response to surface functionality in low calcium ion concentration solution.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Xiumei; Du, Chang; Shen, Xingcan; Wang, Yingjun; Cui, Fuzhai

    2015-09-01

    Four self-assembled monolayer surfaces terminated with -COOH, -OH, -NH2 and -CH3 functional groups are used to direct the biomineralization processes of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in low Ca(2+) concentration, and the mechanism of nucleation and initial crystallization within 12 h was further explored. On -COOH surface, nucleation occurs mainly via ion aggregation mechanism while prenucleation ions clusters may be also involved. On -OH and -NH2 surfaces, however, nucleation forms via calcium carbonate clusters, which aggregate in solution and then are adsorbed onto surfaces following with nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Furthermore, strongly negative-charged -COOH surface facilitates the direct formation of calcites, and the -OH and -NH2 surfaces determine the formation of vaterites with preferred crystalline orientations. Neither ACC nor crystalline CaCO3 is observed on -CH3 surface. Our findings present a valuable model to understand the CaCO3 biomineralization pathway in natural system where functional groups composition plays a determining role during calcium carbonate crystallization. PMID:26814639

  9. Aluminum citrate prevents renal injury from calcium oxalate crystal deposition.

    PubMed

    Besenhofer, Lauren M; Cain, Marie C; Dunning, Cody; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2012-12-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol-treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate's interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  10. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  11. Calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by in vitro cultured mantle cells from Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei; Li, Shiguo; Xiang, Liang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-08-01

    Formation of the molluscan shell is believed to be an extracellular event mediated by matrix proteins. We report calcium carbonate mineralization mediated by Pinctada fucata mantle cells. Crystals only appeared when mantle cells were present in the crystallization solution. These crystals were piled up in highly ordered units and showed the typical characteristics of biomineralization products. A thin organic framework was observed after dissolving the crystals in EDTA. Some crystals had etched surfaces with a much smoother appearance than other parts. Mantle cells were observed to be attached to some of these smooth surfaces. These results suggest that mantle cells may be directly involved in the nucleation and remodeling process of calcium carbonate mineralization. Our result demonstrate the practicability of studying the mantle cell mechanism of biomineralization and contribute to the overall understanding of the shell formation process. PMID:26079887

  12. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies, and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6°C.

  13. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  14. Bivalves build their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Soldati, A. L.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most common shell structures in the bivalve class is the prism and nacre structure. It is widely distributed amongst both freshwater and marine species and gives cultured pearls their sought-after lustre. In freshwater bivalves, both shell structures (prism and nacre) consist of aragonite. Formation of the shell form an amorphous precursor phase is a wide-spread strategy in biomineralization and presents a number of advantages for the organisms in the handling of the CaCO3 material. While there is already evidence that larval shells of some mollusk species use amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) as a transient precursor phase for aragonite, the use of this strategy by adult animals was only speculated upon. We present results from in-situ geochemistry, Raman spectroscopy and focused-ion beam assisted TEM on three species from two different bivalve families that show that remnants of ACC can be found in shells from adult species. We show that the amorphous phase is not randomly distributed, but is systematically found in a narrow zone at the interface between periostracum and prism layer. This zone is the area where spherulitic CaCO3- structures protrude from the inner periostracum to form the initial prisms. These observations are in accordance with our earlier results on equivalent structures in freshwater cultured pearls (Jacob et al., 2008) and show that the original building material for the prisms is amorphous calcium carbonate, secreted in vesicles at the inner periostracum layer. Quantitative temperature calibrations for paleoclimate applications using bivalve shells are based on the Mg-Ca exchange between inorganic aragonite (or calcite) and water. These calibrations, thus, do not take into account the biomineral crystallization path via an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor and are therefore likely to introduce a bias (a so-called vital effect) which currently is not accounted for. Jacob et al. (2008) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 5401-5415

  15. In vitro synthesis and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles within liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Chantel C.; Brock, Ryan E.; Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Krejci, Minna R.; Weigand, Steven; Joester, Derk

    2012-02-07

    We show that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) can be synthesized in phospholipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes). Liposome-encapsulated ACC nanoparticles are stable against aggregation, do not crystallize for at least 20 h, and are ideally suited to investigate the influence of lipid chemistry, particle size, and soluble additives on ACC in situ.

  16. Effects of human urine on aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Springmann, K E; Drach, G W; Gottung, B; Randolph, A D

    1986-01-01

    The importance of aggregation in calcium oxalate urolithiasis, although not fully understood, has long been postulated. Previous investigators of calcium oxalate crystal aggregation have applied static crystallization rather than continuous flow techniques to their studies. We describe the use of a Couette agglomerator in series with our previously reported continuous flow mixed suspension-mixed product removal crystallization system. We compared synthetic urine controls with 5 per cent volume-in-volume human urine additions from normal persons or patients with calcium oxalate stones. There was no significant difference in nucleation, linear crystal growth rate or total crystal mass between normal persons and those with stones. Control nucleation rate was significantly higher than in either human urine addition group. Comparison of aggregator particle size distributions revealed significant differences in aggregation among the control, normal and stone groups. We concluded that urine inhibitors to aggregation are somewhat deficient in patients with stones, resulting in the generation of larger particle masses or eventually stones. PMID:3941471

  17. Purifications of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, AMoRE

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HyangKyu

    2015-08-17

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) collaboration is going to use calcium molybdate crystals to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo isotope. In order to make the crystal, we use calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders as raw materials. Therefore it is highly necessary to reduce potential sources for radioactive backgrounds such as U and Th in the powders. In this talk, we will present our studies for purification of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders.

  18. Ubiquitylation Functions in the Calcium Carbonate Biomineralization in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes. PMID:22558208

  19. Crucibleless crystal growth and Radioluminescence study of calcium tungstate single crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. S.; Jesus, L. M.; Barbosa, L. B.; Ardila, D. R.; Andreeta, J. P.; Silva, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    In this article, single phase and high optical quality scheelite calcium tungstate single crystal fibers were grown by using the crucibleless laser heated pedestal growth technique. The as-synthesized calcium tungstate powders used for shaping seed and feed rods were investigated by X-ray diffraction technique. As-grown crystals were studied by Raman spectroscopy and Radioluminescence measurements. The results indicate that in both two cases, calcined powder and single crystal fiber, only the expected scheelite CaWO4 phase was observed. It was verified large homogeneity in the crystal composition, without the presence of secondary phases. The Radioluminescence spectra of the as-grown single crystal fibers are in agreement with that present in Literature for bulk single crystals, presented a single emission band centered at 420 nm when irradiated with β-rays.

  20. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  1. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    PubMed Central

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  2. Fortification of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate is acceptable.

    PubMed

    Romanchik-Cerpovicz, Joelle E; McKemie, Rebecca J

    2007-03-01

    Fortification helps provide adequate nutrients for individuals not meeting daily needs. Foods may be fortified with calcium to assist individuals with lactose intolerance and others preferring not to consume traditional forms of dairy. This study examined the quality of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas fortified with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate. These tortillas were compared to similarly prepared nonfortified flour tortillas (control) and commercial nonfortified flour tortillas. Calcium-fortified tortillas contained 114 mg elemental calcium per standard serving (48 g tortilla), an 8.6-fold increase compared to nonfortified tortillas. Moisture contents and rollabilities of all tortillas were similar. Consumers (N=87) evaluated each tortilla in duplicate using a hedonic scale and reported liking the appearance, texture, flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability of all tortillas. However, the appearance of control tortillas was preferred over commercial tortillas (P<0.01), whereas the aftertaste of commercial tortillas or those fortified with calcium carbonate was preferred over the control (P<0.05). Despite these differences, consumers were equally willing to purchase both fortified and nonfortified tortillas, suggesting that appearance and aftertaste may not influence willingness to purchase. Overall, this study shows that fortification of flour tortillas with various forms of calcium is a feasible alternative calcium source. PMID:17324671

  3. Morphologies and elemental compositions of calcium crystals in phyllodes and branchlets of Acacia robeorum (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Formation of calcium oxalate crystals is common in the plant kingdom, but biogenic formation of calcium sulfate crystals in plants is rare. We investigated the morphologies and elemental compositions of crystals found in phyllodes and branchlets of Acacia robeorum, a desert shrub of north-western Australia. Methods Morphologies of crystals in phyllodes and branchlets of A. robeorum were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and elemental compositions of the crystals were identified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Distributional patterns of the crystals were studied using optical microscopy together with SEM. Key Results According to the elemental compositions, the crystals were classified into three groups: (1) calcium oxalate; (2) calcium sulfate, which is a possible mixture of calcium sulfate and calcium oxalate with calcium sulfate being the major component; and (3) calcium sulfate · magnesium oxalate, presumably mixtures of calcium sulfate, calcium oxalate, magnesium oxalate and silica. The crystals were of various morphologies, including prisms, raphides, styloids, druses, crystal sand, spheres and clusters. Both calcium oxalate and calcium sulfate crystals were observed in almost all tissues, including mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex; calcium sulfate · magnesium oxalate crystals were only found in mesophyll and parenchyma cells in phyllodes. Conclusions The formation of most crystals was biologically induced, as confirmed by studying the crystals formed in the phyllodes from seedlings grown in a glasshouse. The crystals may have functions in removing excess calcium, magnesium and sulfur, protecting the plants against herbivory, and detoxifying aluminium and heavy metals. PMID:22294477

  4. Calcium carbonate does not affect imatinib pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Tawbi, Hussein; Christner, Susan M.; Lin, Yan; Johnson, Matthew; Mowrey, Emily T.; Cherrin, Craig; Chu, Edward; Lee, James J.; Puhalla, Shannon; Stoller, Ronald; Appleman, Leonard R.; Miller, Brian M.; Beumer, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec®/Glivec®), has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), and there is evidence for an exposure response relationship. Calcium carbonate is increasingly used as a calcium supplement and in the setting of gastric upset associated with imatinib therapy. Calcium carbonate could conceivably elevate gastric pH and complex imatinib, thereby influencing imatinib absorption and exposure. We aimed to evaluate whether use of calcium carbonate has a significant effect on imatinib pharmacokinetics. Methods Eleven healthy subjects were enrolled in a 2-period, open-label, single-institution, randomized cross-over, fixed-schedule study. In one period, each subject received 400 mg of imatinib p.o.. In the other period, 4000 mg calcium carbonate (Tums Ultra®) was administered p.o. 15 min before 400 mg of imatinib. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its active N-desmethyl metabolite CGP74588 were assayed by LC-MS; data were analyzed non-compartmentally, and compared after log transformation. Results Calcium carbonate administration did not significantly affect the imatinib area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) (41.2 μg/mL•h alone versus 40.8 μg/mL•h with calcium carbonate, P=0.99), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) (2.35 μg/mL alone versus 2.39 μg/mL with calcium carbonate, P=0.89). Conclusions Our results indicate that the use of calcium carbonate does not significantly affect imatinib pharmacokinetics. PMID:24170263

  5. Behaviour of calcium carbonate in sea water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloud, P.E., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    Anomalies in the behaviour of calcium carbonate in natural solutions diminish when considered in context. Best values found by traditional oceanographie methods for the apparent solubility product constant K'CaCO3 in sea water at atmospheric pressure are consistent mineralogically-at 36 parts per thousand salinity and T-25??C, K'aragonlte is estimated as 1.12 ?? 10-6 and K'calcite as 0.61 ?? 10-6. At 30??C the corresponding values are 0.98 ?? 10-6 for aragonite and 0.53 ?? 10-6 for calcite. Because the K' computations do not compensate for ionic activity, however, they cannot give thermodynamically satisfactory results. It is of interest, therefore, that approximate methods and information now available permit the estimation from the same basic data of an activity product constant KCaCO3 close to that found in solutions to which Debye-Hu??ckel theory applies. Such methods indicate approximate Karagonite 7.8 ?? 10-9 for surface sea water at 29??C; Kcalcite would be proportionately lower. Field data and experimental results indicate that the mineralogy of precipitated CaCO3 depends primarily on degree of supersaturation, thus also on kinetic or biologic factors that facilitate or inhibit a high degree of supersaturation. The shallow, generally hypersaline bank waters west of Andros Island yield aragonitic sediments with O18 O16 ratios that imply precipitation mainly during the warmer months, when the combination of a high rate of evaporation, increasing salinity (and ionic strength), maximal temperatures and photosynthetic removal of CO2 result in high apparent supersaturation. The usual precipitate from solutions of low ionic strength is calcite, except where the aragonite level of supersaturation is reached as a result of diffusion phenomena (e.g. dripstones), gradual and marked evaporation, or biologic intervention. Published data also suggest the possibility of distinct chemical milieus for crystallographic variations in skeletal calcium carbonate. It appears

  6. RECOVERY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE AND SULFUR FROM FGD SCRUBBER WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of key process steps in the proprietary Kel-S process for recovering calcium carbonate and sulfur from lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste. The steps are: reduction of the waste to calcium sulfide (using coal as...

  7. Plant calcium oxalate crystal formation, function, and its impact on human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate have been observed among members from most taxonomic groups of photosynthetic organisms ranging from the smallest algae to the largest trees. The biological roles for calcium oxalate crystal formation in plant growth and development include high capacity calcium regulatio...

  8. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value inmore » iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.« less

  9. Disordered amorphous calcium carbonate from direct precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Farhadi Khouzani, Masoud; Chevrier, Daniel M.; Güttlein, Patricia; Hauser, Karin; Zhang, Peng; Hedin, Niklas; Gebauer, Denis

    2015-06-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to play a prominent role in biomineralization. Different studies on the structure of biogenic ACCs have illustrated that they can have distinct short-range orders. However, the origin of so-called proto-structures in synthetic and additive-free ACCs is not well understood. In the current work, ACC has been synthesised in iso-propanolic media by direct precipitation from ionic precursors, and analysed utilising a range of different techniques. The data suggest that this additive-free type of ACC does not resemble clear proto-structural motifs relating to any crystalline polymorph. This can be explained by the undefined pH value in iso-propanolic media, and the virtually instantaneous precipitation. Altogether, this work suggests that aqueous systems and pathways involving pre-nucleation clusters are required for the generation of clear proto-structural features in ACC. Experiments on the ACC-to-crystalline transformation in solution with and without ethanol highlight that polymorph selection is under kinetic control, while the presence of ethanol can control dissolution re-crystallisation pathways.

  10. Synthesis of calcium antimonate nano-crystals by the 18th dynasty Egyptian glassmakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlil, S.; Biron, I.; Cotte, M.; Susini, J.; Menguy, N.

    2010-01-01

    During the 18th Egyptian dynasty (1570-1292 B.C.), opaque white, blue and turquoise glasses were opacified by calcium antimonate crystals dispersed in a vitreous matrix. The technological processes as well as the antimony sources used to manufacture these crystals remain unknown. Our results shed a new light on glassmaking history: contrary to what was thought, we demonstrate that Egyptian glassmakers did not use in situ crystallization but first synthesized calcium antimonate opacifiers, which do not exist in nature, and then added them to a glass. Furthermore, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the first time in the study of Egyptian opaque glasses, we show that these opacifiers were nano-crystals. Prior to this research, such a process for glassmaking has not been suggested for any kind of ancient opaque glass production. Studying various preparation methods for calcium antimonate, we propose that Egyptian craftsmen could have produced Ca2Sb2O7 by using mixtures of Sb2O3 or Sb2O5 with calcium carbonates (atomic ratio Sb/Ca=1) heat treated between 1000 and 1100°C. We developed an original strategy focused on the investigation of the crystals and the vitreous matrices using an appropriate suite of high-sensitivity and high-resolution micro- and nano-analytical techniques (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), TEM). Synchrotron-based micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μ-XANES) proved to be very well suited to the selective measure of the antimony oxidation state in the vitreous matrix. This work is the starting point for a complete reassessment not only of ancient Egyptian glass studies but more generally of high-temperature technologies used throughout antiquity.

  11. Mesoscale crystallization of calcium phosphate nanostructures in protein (casein) micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thachepan, Surachai; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    Aqueous micelles of the multi-protein calcium phosphate complex, casein, were treated at 60 °C and pH 7 over several months. Although partial dissociation of the micelles into 12 nm sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/protein nanoparticles occurred within a period of 14 days, crystallization of the ACP nanoclusters into bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofilaments was not observed until after 12 weeks. The HAP nanofilaments were formed specifically within the partially disrupted protein micelles suggesting a micelle-mediated pathway of mesoscale crystallization. Similar experiments using ACP-containing synthetic micelles prepared from β-casein protein alone indicated that co-aligned bundles of HAP nanofilaments were produced within the protein micelle interior after 24 hours at temperatures as low as 35 °C. The presence of Mg2+ ions in the casein micelles, as well as a possible synergistic effect associated with the multi-protein nature of the native aggregates, could account for the marked inhibition in mesoscale crystallization observed in the casein micelles compared with the single-component β-casein constructs.Aqueous micelles of the multi-protein calcium phosphate complex, casein, were treated at 60 °C and pH 7 over several months. Although partial dissociation of the micelles into 12 nm sized amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/protein nanoparticles occurred within a period of 14 days, crystallization of the ACP nanoclusters into bundles of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofilaments was not observed until after 12 weeks. The HAP nanofilaments were formed specifically within the partially disrupted protein micelles suggesting a micelle-mediated pathway of mesoscale crystallization. Similar experiments using ACP-containing synthetic micelles prepared from β-casein protein alone indicated that co-aligned bundles of HAP nanofilaments were produced within the protein micelle interior after 24 hours at temperatures as low as 35 °C. The presence of Mg2+ ions in

  12. Thermal breakdown of calcium carbonate and constraints on its use as a biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen P.; Parker, Julia E.; Tang, Chiu C.

    2014-02-01

    Observed differences in the thermal behaviour of calcium carbonates of biogenic and abiogenic origin (phase transformation and breakdown temperatures) are widely cited as potential biomarkers for whether life once existed on Mars. Although seemingly compelling, there has been no systematic investigation into the physical mechanism behind these apparent differences and therefore no direct proof that they are uniquely diagnostic of a biogenic versus abiogenic formation. In this paper we present a laboratory investigation into the thermal behaviour of two high purity calcium carbonates, one of which was produced in the presence of an amino acid as a biomimetic carbonate. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements show the aragonite-to-calcite phase transition and calcite-to-oxide breakdown temperatures are significantly lower in the biomimetic carbonate. The observed thermal differences closely match reported differences between biogenic and geological abiogenic carbonates. The biomimetic carbonate exhibits a modified crystal morphology, with a highly strained internal crystal lattice, similar to biogenic carbonate structures. Since biogenic carbonates are formed in the presence of organic macromolecules such as amino acids, the induced microstrain appears to be the defining common factor as it adds an additional energy term to the carbonate lattice energy, which lowers the activation energy required for structural transformation or decomposition. Although produced via biomimetic means, the carbonate investigated here is nevertheless abiogenic in origin and we propose that given suitable localised conditions such as pooled water and a supply of organic molecules, naturally occurring biomimetic carbonates could have similarly formed on the martian surface and could therefore exhibit the same thermal characteristics as biogenic carbonate. Thus as a limiting case - without other supporting observations - the thermal behaviour of martian calcium carbonate

  13. Carbon-enriched calcium carbide and its potential use

    SciTech Connect

    Ivakhnyuk, G.K.; Samonin, V.V.; Fedorov, N.F.; Vladimirov, V.A.; Stepanova, L.V.; Kas'yanova, O.M.

    1987-10-10

    The authors comparatively assess the feasibility of a variety of carbonaceous materials--lean coal, specialty coke, coal coke, semicoke, and coke residue from shale production--as raw materials for the production and carburization of calcium carbide and subsequently assess the value of the calcium carbide produced as a raw material in the production of graphite. They determine that calcium carbide enriched by their process is characterized by a high carbon content having the graphite structure and that the use of carburized calcium carbide allows for a significant increase in the output of graphite during low-temperature reaction of the carbide with magnesium chloride.

  14. Crystallization Kinetics of Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of a calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass with composition relevant for aerospace applications, like air-breathing engines, were evaluated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) in powder and bulk forms. Activation energy and frequency factor values for crystallization of the glass were evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the onset of crystallization and the phases that developed after heat treating bulk glass at temperatures ranging from 690 to 960 deg for various times. Samples annealed at temperatures below 900 deg remained amorphous, while specimens heat treated at and above 900 deg exhibited crystallinity originating at the surface. The crystalline phases were identified as wollastonite (CaSiO3) and aluminum diopside (Ca(Mg,Al) (Si,Al)2O6). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to examine the microstructure and chemical compositions of crystalline phases formed after heat treatment.

  15. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  16. Calcium carbonate scaling kinetics determined from radiotracer experiments with calcium-47

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.W.; Smith, D.W.

    1998-02-01

    The deposition of calcium carbonate is one of the principal modes of fouling of the heat-transfer surface of a fresh-water-cooled heat exchanger. The deposition rate of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface has been measured using a calcium-47 radiotracer and compared to the measured rate of thermal fouling. The crystalline phase of calcium carbonate that precipitates depends on the degree of supersaturation at the heat-transfer surface, with aragonite precipitating at higher supersaturations and calcite precipitating at lower supersaturations. Whereas the mass deposition rates were constant with time, the thermal fouling rates decreased throughout the course of each experiment as a result of densification of the deposit. It is proposed that the densification was driven by the temperature gradient across the deposit together with the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate. The temperature dependence of the deposition rate yielded an activation energy of 79 {+-} 4 kJ/mol for the precipitation of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface.

  17. Amorphous calcium carbonate controls avian eggshell mineralization: A new paradigm for understanding rapid eggshell calcification.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Marie, Pauline; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T; Gautron, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Avian eggshell mineralization is the fastest biogenic calcification process known in nature. How this is achieved while producing a highly crystalline material composed of large calcite columnar single crystals remains largely unknown. Here we report that eggshell mineral originates from the accumulation of flat disk-shaped amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles on specific organic sites on the eggshell membrane, which are rich in proteins and sulfated proteoglycans. These structures known as mammillary cores promote the nucleation and stabilization of a amorphous calcium carbonate with calcitic short range order which predetermine the calcite composition of the mature eggshell. The amorphous nature of the precursor phase was confirmed by the diffuse scattering of X-rays and electrons. The nascent calcitic short-range order of this transient mineral phase was revealed by infrared spectroscopy and HRTEM. The ACC mineral deposited around the mammillary core sites progressively transforms directly into calcite crystals without the occurrence of any intermediate phase. Ionic speciation data suggest that the uterine fluid is equilibrated with amorphous calcium carbonate, throughout the duration of eggshell mineralization process, supporting that this mineral phase is constantly forming at the shell mineralization front. On the other hand, the transient amorphous calcium carbonate mineral deposits, as well as the calcite crystals into which they are converted, form by the ordered aggregation of nanoparticles that support the rapid mineralization of the eggshell. The results of this study alter our current understanding of avian eggshell calcification and provide new insights into the genesis and formation of calcium carbonate biominerals in vertebrates. PMID:25934395

  18. Vertical Bridgman growth of calcium lithium niobium gallium garnet crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuewu; Chong, Tow-Chong; Zhang, Guangyu; Li, Minghua; Soo, Lay Hiok; Xu, Wei; Freeman, Bill

    2003-03-01

    The growth of calcium lithium niobium gallium garnet (CLNGG) crystal has been carried out using platinum crucibles in a vertical Bridgman (VB) furnace with three resistance-heating zones. Transparent CLNGG crystals grown from the congruent melts with and without weight loss compensation are different in color and are 25 mm in diameter and about 70 mm in length. The phase identification of the sintered raw materials, grown crystals and white compound formed on the side surface of the grown crystal has been done using the powder X-ray diffraction method. The formation of the white compound is related to the {1 0 0} facet growth near the side surface. The naturally selected growth direction of the CLNGG crystal grown without a seed is near <1 1 1> , which is in good agreement with the morphological importance analysis according to the BFDH law. The VB-grown CLNGG also shows a cleavable feature parallel to {1 1 0} face and no absorption peaks in the wavelength range of 1100-1600 nm. The linear thermal-expansion coefficient of the CLNGG crystal along <1 1 1> direction is also reported and compared with that of CNGG, GGG and platinum crucible.

  19. Influence of maleic acid copolymers on calcium orthophosphates crystallization at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelin, Irina M.; Popescu, Irina; Suflet, Dana M.; Aflori, Magdalena; Bulacovschi, Victor

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the maleic acid copolymers role on calcium orthophosphates crystallization at low temperature. In this respect, two maleic acid copolymers with different structures [poly(sodium maleate-co-vinyl acetate) and poly(sodium maleate-co-methyl methacrylate)] were used. The syntheses of the calcium orthophosphates in the absence and in the presence of the copolymers were performed through the wet chemical method using calcium nitrate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and ammonium hydroxide as reactants. The syntheses were monitored in situ by potentiometric and conductometric measurements. To ensure the transformation of less thermodynamically stable calcium orthophosphates into more stable forms, the samples were aged 30 days in mother solutions, at room temperature. The presence of the copolymers in the final products was evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and laser light scattering measurements gave information about the composites morphology and the size of the formed structures. X-ray diffraction evidenced that, as a function of comonomer structure and of copolymer concentration, the products could contain hydroxyapatite with low crystallinity, calcium-deficient or carbonated hydroxyapatite. At high concentration of poly(sodium maleate-co-methyl methacrylate) the transformation of brushite into apatitic structures was inhibited.

  20. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Cellular Biomineralization in Mantle Cell Cultures of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liang; Kong, Wei; Su, Jingtan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    The growth of molluscan shell crystals is generally thought to be initiated from the extrapallial fluid by matrix proteins, however, the cellular mechanisms of shell formation pathway remain unknown. Here, we first report amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precipitation by cellular biomineralization in primary mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata. Through real-time PCR and western blot analyses, we demonstrate that mantle cells retain the ability to synthesize and secrete ACCBP, Pif80 and nacrein in vitro. In addition, the cells also maintained high levels of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase activity, enzymes responsible for shell formation. On the basis of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed intracellular crystals production by mantle cells in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystals to be ACC, and de novo biomineralization was confirmed by following the incorporation of Sr into calcium carbonate. Our results demonstrate the ability of mantle cells to perform fundamental biomineralization processes via amorphous calcium carbonate, and these cells may be directly involved in pearl oyster shell formation. PMID:25405357

  1. Pathogenic Role of Basic Calcium Phosphate Crystals in Destructive Arthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Chobaz, Véronique; Nguyen, Christelle; Nasi, Sonia; van Lent, Peter; Daudon, Michel; Dessombz, Arnaud; Bazin, Dominique; McCarthy, Geraldine; Jolles-Haeberli, Brigitte; Ives, Annette; Van Linthoudt, Daniel; So, Alexander; Lioté, Frédéric; Busso, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Background basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are commonly found in osteoarthritis (OA) and are associated with cartilage destruction. BCP crystals induce in vitro catabolic responses with the production of metalloproteases and inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). In vivo, IL-1 production induced by BCP crystals is both dependant and independent of NLRP3 inflammasome. We aimed to clarify 1/ the role of BCP crystals in cartilage destruction and 2/ the role of IL-1 and NLRP3 inflammasome in cartilage degradation related to BCP crystals. Methodology/ Principal Findings synovial membranes isolated from OA knees were analysed by alizarin Red and FTIR. Pyrogen free BCP crystals were injected into right knees of WT, NLRP3 -/-, ASC -/-, IL-1α -/- and IL-1β-/- mice and PBS was injected into left knees. To assess the role of IL-1, WT mice were treated by intra-peritoneal injections of anakinra, the IL-1Ra recombinant protein, or PBS. Articular destruction was studied at d4, d17 and d30 assessing synovial inflammation, proteoglycan loss and chondrocyte apoptosis. BCP crystals were frequently found in OA synovial membranes including low grade OA. BCP crystals injected into murine knee joints provoked synovial inflammation characterized by synovial macrophage infiltration that persisted at day 30, cartilage degradation as evidenced by loss of proteoglycan staining by Safranin-O and concomitant expression of VDIPEN epitopes, and increased chondrocyte apoptosis. BCP crystal-induced synovitis was totally independent of IL-1α and IL-1β signalling and no alterations of inflammation were observed in mice deficient for components of the NLRP3-inflammasome, IL-1α or IL-1β. Similarly, treatment with anakinra did not prevent BCP crystal effects. In vitro, BCP crystals elicited enhanced transcription of matrix degrading and pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. Conclusions/ Significance intra-articular BCP crystals can elicit synovial inflammation and cartilage

  2. Nanoporous Structure and Medium-Range Order in Synthetic Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Michel, F. Marc; Phillips, Brian L.; Keen, David A.; Dove, Martin T.; Reeder, Richard J.

    2010-12-03

    We adopt a reverse Monte Carlo refinement approach, using experimental X-ray total scattering data, to develop a structure model for synthetic, hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). The ACC is revealed to consist of a porous calcium-rich framework that supports interconnected channels containing water and carbonate molecules. The existence of a previously unrecognized nanometer-scale channel network suggests mechanisms of how additives can be accommodated within the structure and provide temporary stabilization, as well as influence the crystallization process. Moreover, while lacking long-range order, the calcium-rich framework in the ACC contains similar Ca packing density to that present in calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, yielding clues of how the amorphous material converts into the different crystalline forms. Our results provide a new starting point for advancing our understanding of biomineralization as well as the development of biomimetic approaches to next-generation materials synthesis.

  3. Crystal structure of calcium dodecin (Rv0379), from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a unique calcium-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Arockiasamy, Arulandu; Aggarwal, Anup; Savva, Christos G.; Holzenburg, Andreas; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-28

    In eukaryotes, calcium-binding proteins play a pivotal role in diverse cellular processes, and recent findings suggest similar roles for bacterial proteins at different stages in their life cycle. Here, we report the crystal structure of calcium dodecin, Rv0379, from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with a dodecameric oligomeric assembly and a unique calcium-binding motif. Structure and sequence analysis were used to identify orthologs of Rv0379 with different ligand-binding specificity

  4. PHz current switching in calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ojoon; Kim, D.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that a current can be induced and switched in a sub-femtosecond time-scale in an insulating calcium fluoride single crystal by an intense optical field. This measurement indicates that a sizable current can be generated and also controlled by an optical field in a dielectric medium, implying the capability of rapid current switching at a rate of optical frequency, PHz (1015 Hz), which is a couple of orders of magnitude higher than that of contemporary electronic signal processing. This demonstration may serve to facilitate the development of ultrafast devices in PHz frequency.

  5. Precipitation of calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions in presence of ethylene glycol and dodecane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsi, Panagiota D.; Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros G.

    2015-04-01

    The formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in aqueous supersaturated solutions has been intensively studied over the past decades, because of its significance for a number of processes of industrial and environmental interest. In the oil and gas production industry the deposition of calcium carbonate affects adversely the productivity of the wells. Calcium carbonate scale deposits formation causes serious problems in water desalination, CO2 sequestration in subsoil wells, in geothermal systems and in heat exchangers because of the low thermal coefficient of the salt. Amelioration of the operational conditions is possible only when the mechanisms underlying nucleation and crystal growth of calcium carbonate in the aqueous fluids is clarified. Given the fact that in oil production processes water miscible and immiscible hydrocarbons are present the changes of the dielectric constant of the fluid phase has serious impact in the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation, which remains largely unknown. The problem becomes even more complicated if polymorphism exhibited by calcium carbonate is also taken into consideration. In the present work, the stability of aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to all calcium carbonate polymorphs and the subsequent kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation were measured. The measurements included aqueous solutions and solutions in the presence of water miscible (ethylene glycol, MEG) and water immiscible organics (n-dodecane). All measurements were done at conditions of sustained supersaturation using the glass/ Ag/AgCl combination electrode as a probe of the precipitation and pH as the master variable for the addition of titrant solutions with appropriate concentration needed to maintenance the solution supersaturation. Initially, the metastable zone width was determined from measurements of the effect of the solution supersaturation on the induction time preceding the onset of precipitation at free-drift conditions. The

  6. Dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate in equatorial Pacific sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Berelson, W.M.; Hammond, D.E.; McManus, J.; Kilgore, T.E. )

    1994-06-01

    Calcium carbonate dissolution exerts a major influence on the carbonate chemistry of seawater and is an important factor in regulating atmospheric CO2 concentration. The authors use a numerical model, based on an estimate of k determined from benthic chamber flux measurements, the distribution of CO3 2-in the water column and percent of CaCO3 in the sediments, to derive the total alkalinity flux from Pacific Ocean sediments. The significance of this budget is discussed as are the following questions: what is the rate of calcium carbonate dissolution on the deep sea floor what controls carbonate dissolution, organic carbon rain rates, or bottom water carbonate ion concentration what is the equations that relates carbonate dissolution to degree of undersaturation and what is the associate rate constant 43 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Biomineralization of calcium carbonates and their engineered applications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dhami, Navdeep K.; Reddy, M. Sudhakara; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2013-01-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process in which microbes produce inorganic materials as part of their basic metabolic activities. This technology has been widely explored and promising with potential in various technical applications. In the present review, the detailed mechanism of production of calcium carbonate biominerals by ureolytic bacteria has been discussed along with role of bacteria and the sectors where these biominerals are being used. The applications of bacterially produced carbonate biominerals for improving the durability of buildings, remediation of environment (water and soil), sequestration of atmospheric CO2 filler material in rubbers and plastics etc. are discussed. The study also sheds light on benefits of bacterial biominerals over traditional agents and also the issues that lie in the path of successful commercialization of the technology of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from lab to field scale. PMID:24194735

  8. Drug loading into porous calcium carbonate microparticles by solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Preisig, Daniel; Haid, David; Varum, Felipe J O; Bravo, Roberto; Alles, Rainer; Huwyler, Jörg; Puchkov, Maxim

    2014-08-01

    Drug loading into porous carriers may improve drug release of poorly water-soluble drugs. However, the widely used impregnation method based on adsorption lacks reproducibility and efficiency for certain compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate a drug-loading method based on solvent evaporation and crystallization, and to investigate the underlying drug-loading mechanisms. Functionalized calcium carbonate (FCC) microparticles and four drugs with different solubility and permeability properties were selected as model substances to investigate drug loading. Ibuprofen, nifedipine, losartan potassium, and metronidazole benzoate were dissolved in acetone or methanol. After dispersion of FCC, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure. For each model drug, a series of drug loads were produced ranging from 25% to 50% (w/w) in steps of 5% (w/w). Loading efficiency was qualitatively analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the presence of agglomerates and drug crystals as indicators of poor loading efficiency. The particles were further characterized by mercury porosimetry, specific surface area measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, and USP2 dissolution. Drug concentration was determined by HPLC. FCC-drug mixtures containing equivalent drug fractions but without specific loading strategy served as reference samples. SEM analysis revealed high efficiency of pore filling up to a drug load of 40% (w/w). Above this, agglomerates and separate crystals were significantly increased, indicating that the maximum capacity of drug loading was reached. Intraparticle porosity and specific surface area were decreased after drug loading because of pore filling and crystallization on the pore surface. HPLC quantification of drugs taken up by FCC showed only minor drug loss. Dissolution rate of FCC loaded with metronidazole benzoate and nifedipine was faster than the corresponding FCC-drug mixtures, mainly due to surface enlargement, because only small

  9. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  10. Ion chromatography detection of fluoride in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Jamie E; Ivey, Michelle M

    2011-09-01

    Fluoride in aquatic systems is increasing due to anthropogenic pollution, but little is known about how this fluoride affects organisms that live in and around aquatic habitats. Fluoride can bioaccumulate in structures comprised of calcium carbonate, such as shells and skeletons of both freshwater and saltwater species as diverse as snails, corals, and coccolithophorid algae. In this article, ion chromatography (IC) techniques are developed to detect and quantify fluoride in a matrix of calcium carbonate. Solid samples are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, pretreated to remove the majority of the chloride ions, and then analyzed using IC. With these methods, the 3σ limit of detection is 0.2 mg of fluoride/kg of calcium carbonate. PMID:21859530

  11. Influence of Substrate Mineralogy on Bacterial Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate: Implications for Stone Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed. PMID:22447589

  12. Influence of substrate mineralogy on bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate: implications for stone conservation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-06-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed. PMID:22447589

  13. Biomineralization of calcium phosphate crystals on chitin nanofiber hydrogel for bone regeneration material.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Mari; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2016-01-20

    We previously reported a chitin nanofiber hydrogel from squid pen β-chitin by a simple NaOH treatment. In the present study, a calcium phosphate/chitin nanofiber hydrogel was prepared for bone tissue engineering. Calcium phosphate was mineralized on the hydrogel by incubation in a solution of diammonium hydrogen phosphate solution followed by calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the formation of calcium phosphate crystals. The morphology of the calcium phosphate crystals changed depending on the calcification time. After mineralization, the mechanical properties of the hydrogel improved due to the reinforcement effect of calcium phosphate crystal. In an animal experiment, calcium phosphate/chitin nanofiber hydrogel accelerated mineralization in subcutaneous tissues. Morphological osteoblasts were observed. PMID:26572435

  14. The influence of aliphatic amines, diamines, and amino acids on the polymorph of calcium carbonate precipitated by the introduction of carbon dioxide gas into calcium hydroxide aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuajiw, Wittaya; Takatori, Kazumasa; Igarashi, Teruki; Hara, Hiroki; Fukushima, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The influence of aliphatic organic additives including amines, diamines and amino acids, on the polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitated from a calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) suspensions and carbon dioxide gas (CO2) was studied by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amorphous calcium carbonate, vaterite, aragonite and calcite were observed for the precipitated samples with organic additives. While the precipitation without organic additive, only the stable phase; calcite was obtained. The observed crystal phases were related with the alkyl chain length in the aliphatic part of additives. These results suggested that hydrophobic interactions due to the van der Waals force between organic additives and surface of inorganic precipitates could not be ignored. We concluded that covering or adsorbing of these organic additives on the precipitates surfaces retarded the successive dissolution/recrystallisation process in the aqueous systems. The results revealed that not only the polar interaction from the hydrophilic functional groups, as the former reports proposed, but also the van der Waals interactions from the hydrophobic alkyl groups played the important role in the phase transformation of CaCO3.

  15. In vitro effect of wheat bran (Triticum aestivum) extract on calcium oxalate urolithiasis crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sekkoum, Khaled; Cheriti, Abdelkrim; Taleb, Safia

    2011-10-01

    Urolithiasis can lead to the loss of renal function in some cases. In this study, we tested the inhibiting effect of wheat bran (Triticum aestivum L) extract on calcium oxalate crystallization in a turbidimetric model, by FTIR spectroscopy, and polarized microscopy. The results show that this plant extract has a major inhibitory effect on calcium oxalate crystallization. PMID:22164778

  16. CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION IS NOT ESSENTIAL FOR GROWTH OF MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. A number of roles for crystal formation in plant growth and development have been assigned based on the prevalence of crystals, their spatial distribution, and the variety of crystal shapes. ...

  17. Effect of dietary calcium and magnesium on experimental renal tubular deposition of calcium oxalate crystal induced by ethylene glycol administration and its prevention with phytin and citrate.

    PubMed

    Ebisuno, S; Morimoto, S; Yoshida, T; Fukatani, T; Yasukawa, S; Ohkawa, T

    1987-01-01

    Oral administration of ethylene glycol to rats, and the resultant intratubular depositions of microcrystals of calcium oxalate were studied investigating the influences of dietary calcium or magnesium and assessing the protective efficacies against the crystallizations by treatment with phytin and sodium citrate. With increase of calcium intake and consequent increase of urinary calcium excretion there was a marked increase in the amount of tubular deposit of calcium oxalate crystal and in the calcium content of renal tissue. Although magnesium deficiency accelerated renal tubular calcium oxalate deposition, the protection against the crystal formation was not observed with excessive dietary magnesium. When rats were fed a high-calcium diet supplemented with phytin, a significant inhibition of the intratubular crystallization was observed. It appeared obvious that a hypocalciuric action of phytin was attributed to the effect of the prevention. There was vigorous protection of crystal formation by treatment with sodium citrate, which correlated with the level of citrate concentration in the drinking water. PMID:3433579

  18. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  19. Distribution of calcium carbonate in desert soils: A model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.; McFadden, L.D.; Harden, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    A model that describes the distribution of calcium carbonate in desert soils as a function of dust flux, time, climate, and other soil-forming factors shows which factors most strongly influence the accumulation of carbonate and can be used to evaluate carbonate-based soil age estimates or paleoclimatic reconstructions. Models for late Holocene soils have produced carbonate distributions that are very similar to those of well-dated soils in New Mexico and southern California. These results suggest that (1) present climate is a fair representation of late Holocene climate, (2) carbonate dust flux can be approximated by its Holocene rate, and (3) changes in climate and/or dust flux at the end of the Pleistocene effected profound and complex changes in soil carbonate distributions. Both higher carbonate dust flux and greater effective precipitation are required during the latest Pleistocene-early Holocene to explain carbonate distributions in latest Pleistocene soils. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Crystal structure of the epithelial calcium channel TRPV6.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Kei; Singh, Appu K; Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2016-06-23

    Precise regulation of calcium homeostasis is essential for many physiological functions. The Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 play vital roles in calcium homeostasis as Ca(2+) uptake channels in epithelial tissues. Detailed structural bases for their assembly and Ca(2+) permeation remain obscure. Here we report the crystal structure of rat TRPV6 at 3.25 Å resolution. The overall architecture of TRPV6 reveals shared and unique features compared with other TRP channels. Intracellular domains engage in extensive interactions to form an intracellular 'skirt' involved in allosteric modulation. In the K(+) channel-like transmembrane domain, Ca(2+) selectivity is determined by direct coordination of Ca(2+) by a ring of aspartate side chains in the selectivity filter. On the basis of crystallographically identified cation-binding sites at the pore axis and extracellular vestibule, we propose a Ca(2+) permeation mechanism. Our results provide a structural foundation for understanding the regulation of epithelial Ca(2+) uptake and its role in pathophysiology. PMID:27296226

  1. Structural changes in a protein fragment from abalone shell during the precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Adamiano, Alessio; Bonacchi, Sara; Calonghi, Natalia; Fabbri, Daniele; Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Genovese, Damiano; Kralj, Damir; Montalti, Marco; Njegić Džakula, Branka; Prodi, Luca; Sartor, Giorgio

    2012-11-01

    Mineralized tissues grow through biologically controlled processes in which specific macromolecules are involved. Some of these molecules, which are present in very low concentrations and are difficult to localize and characterize, become entrapped inside the mineralized tissue. Herein, a protein fragment, GP, which was obtained by the alkaline digestion of the green sheet of the abalone shell, is used as a probe to study the changes in molecular structure that occur during the precipitation of calcium carbonate. This important goal was achieved by exploiting a fluorescent tag in GP. The experimental results that were obtained by using spectroscopic-, chromatographic-, and microscopic techniques indicate that GP controls the precipitation kinetics and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals, and that it only undergoes structural reorganization when entrapped inside calcium carbonate crystals. To the best of our knowledge, this report represents one of the first studies on the conformational changes of a protein fragment that is involved in biomineralization processes on moving from the solution phase into the mineral phase. PMID:22996327

  2. Influence of some polysaccharides on the production of calcium carbonate filler particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontrec, Jasminka; Kralj, Damir; Brečević, Ljerka; Falini, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    The influence of different water-soluble polysaccharides, dextrans (cationic, anionic and non-ionic) and soluble starch, on the precipitation of calcium carbonate, has been investigated in the model system in which calcium hydroxide and carbonic acid were reactants. In the absence of additives, the formation of metastable phases, vaterite and amorphous calcium carbonate is observed at the early stage of the process, and as a consequence of the solution-mediated transformation process calcite appears in the system as the only solid phase in equilibrium. In the presence of starch, vaterite is found in the final precipitate, with the content increasing with the increase of starch concentration, probably as a consequence of calcite nucleation and crystal growth inhibition. Non-ionic dextran causes the inhibition of vaterite nucleation, which results in the formation of calcite as a predominant solid phase throughout the precipitation process. The crystal size of the so-formed calcite reduces by increasing the relative molecular mass ( Mr) of neutral dextran. The presence of charged dextrans, either cationic or anionic, causes inhibition of the overall precipitation process: in the case of anionic dextran the inhibition seems to be the consequence of its reaction with Ca 2+ ions (supersaturation decrease), while cationic dextran most probably adsorbs electrostatically onto the negatively charged surfaces of calcite and vaterite.

  3. Deposition of calcium carbonate films by a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Laurie B.; Odom, Damian J.

    2000-03-01

    A polypeptide additive has been used to transform the solution crystallization of calcium carbonate to a solidification process of a liquid-phase mineral precursor. In situ observations reveal that polyaspartate induces liquid-liquid phase separation of droplets of a mineral precursor. The droplets deposit on the substrate and coalesce to form a coating, which then solidifies into calcitic tablets and films. Transition bars form during the amorphous to crystalline transition, leading to sectorization of calcite tablets, and the defect textures and crystal morphologies are atypical of solution grown crystals. The formation of nonequilibrium crystal morphologies using an acidic polypeptide may have implications in the field of biomineralization, and the environmentally friendly aspects of this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process may offer new techniques for aqueous-based processing of ceramic films, coatings, and particulates.

  4. Were kinetics of Archean calcium carbonate precipitation related to oxygen concentration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, D. Y.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Archean carbonates commonly contain decimetre- to metre-thick beds consisting entirely of fibrous calcite and neomorphosed fibrous aragonite that precipitated in situ on the sea floor. The fact that such thick accumulations of precipitated carbonate are rare in younger marine carbonates suggests an important change in the modes of calcium carbonate precipitation through time. Kinetics of carbonate precipitation depend on the concentration of inhibitors to precipitation that reduce crystallization rates and crystal nuclei formation, leading to kinetic maintenance of supersaturated solutions. Inhibitors also affect carbonate textures by limiting micrite precipitation and promoting growth of older carbonate crystals on the sea floor. Fe2+, a strong calcite-precipitation inhibitor, is thought to have been present at relatively high concentrations in Archean seawater because oxygen concentrations were low. The rise in oxygen concentration at 2.2-1.9 Ga led to the removal of Fe2+ from seawater and resulted in a shift from Archean facies, which commonly include precipitated beds, to Proterozoic facies, which contain more micritic sediment and only rare precipitated beds.

  5. Does aridity influence the morphology, distribution and accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals in Acacia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)?

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon L; Warwick, Nigel W M; Prychid, Christina J

    2013-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals are a common natural feature of many plant families, including the Leguminosae. The functional role of crystals and the mechanisms that underlie their deposition remain largely unresolved. In several species, the seasonal deposition of crystals has been observed. To gain insight into the effects of rainfall on crystal formation, the morphology, distribution and accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals in phyllodes of the leguminous Acacia sect. Juliflorae (Benth.) C. Moore & Betche from four climate zones along an aridity gradient, was investigated. The shapes of crystals, which include rare Rosanoffian morphologies, were constant between species from different climate zones, implying that morphology was not affected by rainfall. The distribution and accumulation of CaOx crystals, however, did appear to be climate-related. Distribution was primarily governed by vein density, an architectural trait which has evolved in higher plants in response to increasing aridity. Furthermore, crystals were more abundant in acacias from low rainfall areas, and in phyllodes containing high concentrations of calcium, suggesting that both aridity and soil calcium levels play important roles in the precipitation of CaOx. As crystal formation appears to be calcium-induced, we propose that CaOx crystals in Acacia most likely function in bulk calcium regulation. PMID:24157700

  6. Effect of indigenous plant extracts on calcium oxalate crystallization having a role in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Fauzia; Waqar, Muhammad A

    2011-10-01

    Crystallization process has a major role in urolithiasis. In the present study, effect of two indigenous plants extracts namely Boerhavia diffusa and Bryophyllum pinnatum extract was determined on the crystallization of calcium oxalate crystals. Effect on the number, size and type of calcium oxalate crystals was observed. Results showed significant activity of both extracts against calcium oxalate crystallization at different concentrations (P < 0.05). Size of the crystals gradually reduced with the increasing concentration of both extracts. The number of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals which are injurious to epithelial cells gradually reduced and at the highest concentration of extracts (100 mg/ml) completely disappeared (P < 0.05). These results confirm that B. diffusa and B. pinnatum extracts have antiurolithic activity and have the ability to reduce crystal size as well as to promote the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals rather than monohydrate (COM) crystals. Control of crystal size and formation of COD rather than COM crystals, in combination with the diuretic action of extracts is an important way to control urolithiasis. PMID:21643743

  7. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  8. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  9. ATP-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate nanospheres and their application in protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Feng; Wu, Jin

    2014-05-28

    Calcium carbonate is a common substance found in rocks worldwide, and is the main biomineral formed in shells of marine organisms and snails, pearls and eggshells. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is the least stable polymorph of calcium carbonate, which is so unstable under normal conditions that it is difficult to be prepared in vitro because it rapidly crystallizes to form one of the more stable polymorphs in aqueous solution. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of highly stable ACC nanospheres in vitro using adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt (ATP) as a stabilizer. The effect of ATP on the stability of ACC nanospheres is investigated. Our experiments show that ATP plays an unique role in the stabilization of ACC nanospheres in aqueous solution. Moreover, the as-prepared ACC nanospheres are highly stable in phosphate buffered saline for a relatively long period of time (12 days) even under relatively high concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions. The cytotoxicity tests show that the as-prepared highly stable ACC nanospheres have excellent biocompatibility. The highly stable ACC nanospheres have high protein adsorption capacity, implying that they are promising for applications in biomedical fields such as drug delivery and protein adsorption. PMID:24578276

  10. A critical analysis of calcium carbonate mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S; Ihli, Johannes; Kulak, Alex N; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Tang, Chiu C; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Griesshaber, Erika; Hyett, Geoffrey; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-01-01

    The term mesocrystal has been widely used to describe crystals that form by oriented assembly, and that exhibit nanoparticle substructures. Using calcite crystals co-precipitated with polymers as a suitable test case, this article looks critically at the concept of mesocrystals. Here we demonstrate that the data commonly used to assign mesocrystal structure may be frequently misinterpreted, and that these calcite/polymer crystals do not have nanoparticle substructures. Although morphologies suggest the presence of nanoparticles, these are only present on the crystal surface. High surface areas are only recorded for crystals freshly removed from solution and are again attributed to a thin shell of nanoparticles on a solid calcite core. Line broadening in powder X-ray diffraction spectra is due to lattice strain only, precluding the existence of a nanoparticle sub-structure. Finally, study of the formation mechanism provides no evidence for crystalline precursor particles. A re-evaluation of existing literature on some mesocrystals may therefore be required. PMID:25014563

  11. A critical analysis of calcium carbonate mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Ihli, Johannes; Kulak, Alex N.; Hetherington, Nicola B. J.; Tang, Chiu C.; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.; Griesshaber, Erika; Hyett, Geoffrey; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2014-01-01

    The term mesocrystal has been widely used to describe crystals that form by oriented assembly, and that exhibit nanoparticle substructures. Using calcite crystals co-precipitated with polymers as a suitable test case, this article looks critically at the concept of mesocrystals. Here we demonstrate that the data commonly used to assign mesocrystal structure may be frequently misinterpreted, and that these calcite/polymer crystals do not have nanoparticle substructures. Although morphologies suggest the presence of nanoparticles, these are only present on the crystal surface. High surface areas are only recorded for crystals freshly removed from solution and are again attributed to a thin shell of nanoparticles on a solid calcite core. Line broadening in powder X-ray diffraction spectra is due to lattice strain only, precluding the existence of a nanoparticle sub-structure. Finally, study of the formation mechanism provides no evidence for crystalline precursor particles. A re-evaluation of existing literature on some mesocrystals may therefore be required. PMID:25014563

  12. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution. PMID:26692360

  13. Preparation of pure calcium carbonate by mineral carbonation using industrial byproduct FGD gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K.; Kim, W.; Bang, J. H.; Park, S.; Jeon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is one of the geological approaches for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 gas. Its concept is based on the natural weathering processes in which silicate minerals containing divalent cations such as Ca or Mg are carbonated to CaCO3 or MgCO3 in the reaction with CO2gas. Raw materials for the mineral carbonation have been extended to various industrial solid wastes such as steel slag, ashes, or FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum which are rich in divalent cations. These materials have economic advantages when they are produced in CO2 emission sites. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is such a byproduct obtained in at coal-fired power plants. Recently, we carried out a research on the direct mineral carbonation of FGD gypsum for CO2sequestration. It showed high carbonation reactivity under ambient conditions and the process can be described as follows: CaSO4·2H2O + CO2(g) + 2NH4OH(aq) → CaCO3(s) + (NH4)2SO4(aq) (1) At the early stage of the process, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) exists as a dissolved ion pair during the induction period. High-purity CaCO3 could be precipitated from dissolved calcium carbonate solution extracted during the induction period. The effect of experimental parameters on pure CaCO3 was evaluated: CO2 flow rate (1-3 L/min), ammonia content (4-12%), and solid-to-liquid (S/L) ratio (5-300 g/L). FE-SEM (field-emission scanning electron microscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) study revealed that the precipitated CaCO3 was round-shaped vaterite crystals. The induction time was inversely proportional to the CO2 flow rate and the yield for pure CaCO3 increased with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure CaCO3 decreased with S/L (solid/liquid) ratio. It was 90% (mol/mol) when the S/L ratio was 5 g/L. However, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of dissolved CaCO3.

  14. A rare case of Mirizzi syndrome due to pure calcium carbonate stones (Limy Bile).

    PubMed

    Gilani, Nooman; Hanif, Muhammad Farooq; Karasek, Veronika

    2016-06-01

    We report the first case of Mirizzi syndrome in a patient who presented with biliary obstruction caused by pure calcium carbonate stones. A 61 years old male with history of portal vein thrombosis presented with rash, nausea and jaundice. An ultrasound of biliary tree showed gallstones with dilatation of hepatic duct and intrahepatic biliary tree. There was suspicion of a stone in proximal CBD. CT scan showed an opaque gallbladder with dense radio-opaque material in its lumen. An ERCP was then performed revealing external common hepatic duct obstruction at the neck of the gallbladder. A plastic biliary stent was placed across the obstruction, followed by a cholecystectomy. Resected gallbladder specimen revealed thick whitish paste like material, and formed stones filling the gallbladder lumen. Laboratory testing showed this material to be composed of 100% calcium carbonate crystals. PMID:27339582

  15. Birefringence simulation of annealed ingot of calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, H.; Miyazaki, N.; Mabuchi, T.; Nawata, T.

    2008-01-01

    We developed a method for simulating birefringence of an annealed ingot of calcium fluoride single crystal caused by the residual stress after annealing process. The method comprises the heat conduction analysis that provides the temperature distribution during the ingot annealing, the elastic thermal stress analysis using the assumption of the stress-free temperature that provides the residual stress after annealing, and the birefringence analysis of an annealed ingot induced by the residual stress. The finite element method was applied to the heat conduction analysis and the elastic thermal stress analysis. In these analyses, the temperature dependence of material properties and the crystal anisotropy were taken into account. In the birefringence analysis, the photoelastic effect gives the change of refractive indices, from which the optical path difference in the annealed ingot is calculated by the Jones calculus. The relation between the Jones calculus and the approximate method using the stress components averaged along the optical path is discussed theoretically. It is found that the result of the approximate method agrees very well with that of the Jones calculus in birefringence analysis. The distribution pattern of the optical path difference in the annealed ingot obtained from the present birefringence calculation methods agrees reasonably well with that of the experiment. The calculated values also agree reasonably well with those of the experiment, when a stress-free temperature is adequately selected.

  16. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate Production Subcategory § 415.300 Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  17. [In vitro effect of Hordeum vulgare on the crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite)].

    PubMed

    Djaroud, Samira; Harrache, Djamila; Amar, Amina

    2012-01-01

    The recommended conservative treatment of hyperoxaluria is mainly based on hyperhydration and ingestion of inhibitors of crystallization. In accordance with this context, the aim of this study was to determine the in vitro effect of Hordeum vulgare on calcium oxalate crystallization oxalo-dependent. The crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate in supersaturated aqueous solution at 37 °C, was followed in a model turbidimetric continuous in a closed system. The proposed model is very good reproducibility (CV < 10%), crystallization was monitored continuously in the presence of Hordeum vulgare at different concentrations (0.0625 to 1 g/L). The comparison of turbidimetric parameters, that characterize the growth stage of monohydrated oxalate calcium crystals and observation of the crystals obtained at the end of crystallization into scanning electron microscopy, have been able to demonstrate the inducing effect of Hordeum vulgare to 0.0625 g/L and a slight inhibitory effect at the others concentrations. PMID:23207820

  18. Bilateral Olecranon Bursitis – A Rare Clinical presentation of Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystal Deposition Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jignesh; Girishkumar; Mruthyunjaya; Rupakumar, C. S

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPPD) is the most common form of crystal arthropathy second only to gout. Common clinical presentation is an acute monoarticular arthritis commonly occurring in knee joints. We presented a case of bilateral olecranon bursitis in a calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease. Case Report: A 42-year-old female patient is presented with golf ball sized painless swellings in the posterior aspect of her elbows. Elbow joints were clinically normal except for restriction of terminal flexion. X-ray showed mild erosion at the tip of olecranon. Excision biopsy of the swelling showed positive birefringent calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals on the inner wall of the specimen on polarized light microscopy. Conclusion: Bilateral olecranon bursitis may be part of the extraarticular manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease with good prognosis following in toto bursa excision. PMID:27298934

  19. Structural study and crystal chemistry of the first stage calcium graphite intercalation compound

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Nicolas; Herold, Claire . E-mail: Claire.Herold@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr; Lagrange, Philippe

    2005-09-15

    A novel and efficient synthesis method concerning the preparation of the first stage calcium graphite intercalation compound is provided. It makes use of a reaction between liquid metallic alloy and pyrolytic graphite. From now on it is especially easy to obtain bulk CaC{sub 6} samples. Thanks to such samples, it was possible to study in detail the crystal structure of this binary intercalation compound. It has been entirely specified, so that we know that CaC{sub 6} crystal is rhombohedral and belongs to the R3-bar m space group with the following parameters: a=517pm and {alpha}=49.55 deg. The elemental unit cell contains one calcium atom and six carbon atoms. In this paper, we show also how the various MC{sub 6} structures evolve according to the size of the intercalated element and to the bond nature that appears in the final compound. CaC{sub 6} is unique, since all the other MC{sub 6} compounds exhibit a hexagonal symmetry.

  20. CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

  1. The nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals at protein and phosphatidylserine liposome surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nancollas, G H; Tsortos, A; Zieba, A

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of calcium phosphate crystal growth at the surfaces of proteins and phospholipids has been investigated using free drift and constant composition methods in supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions (relative supersaturations: with respect to hydroxyapatite, HAP, sigma HAP = 15.0, and with respect to octacalcium phosphate, OCP, sigma OCP = 1.9). Fibrinogen and collagen molecules adsorbed at hydrophobic surfaces as well as uncross-linked collagen fibrils induce ion binding and subsequent nucleation of calcium phosphate. The formation of OCP on phosphatidylserine vesicles introduced to highly supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions probably involves the interaction of the calcium ions with the ionized carboxylic groups of the phospholipid. PMID:9813627

  2. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c–axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and “low k di-electric” systems. PMID:27145699

  3. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c-axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and "low k di-electric" systems. PMID:27145699

  4. A Chemical Template for Synthesis of Molecular Sheets of Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianasari, Ina; Benyettou, Farah; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar; Blanton, Thomas; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Jagannathan, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by the discovery of graphene and its unique properties, we focused our research to develop a scheme to create nacre like lamellar structures of molecular sheets of CaCO3 interleaved with an organic material, namely carbon. We developed a facile, chemical template technique, using a formulation of poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) and calcium acetate to create lamellar stacks of single crystal sheets of CaCO3, with a nominal thickness of 17 Å, the same as a unit-cell dimension for calcite (c–axis = 17.062 Å), interleaved with amorphous carbon with a nominal thickness of 8 Å. The strong binding affinity between carboxylate anions and calcium cations in the formulation was used as a molecular template to guide CaCO3 crystallization. Computational modeling of the FTIR spectra showed good agreement with experimental data and confirmed that calcium ions are bridged between polymer chains, resulting in a net-like polymer structure. The process readily lends itself to explore the feasibility of creating molecular sheets of other important inorganic materials and potentially find applications in many fields such as super capacitors and “low k di-electric” systems.

  5. Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate on Multifunctional Peptide Assembly Acting as Mineral Source Supplier and Template.

    PubMed

    Murai, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Takatoshi; Nagata, Kenji; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2016-09-13

    Crystal phase and morphology of biominerals may be precisely regulated by controlled nucleation and selective crystal growth through biomineralization on organic templates such as a protein. We herein propose new control factors of selective crystal growth by the biomineralization process. In this study, a designed β-sheet Ac-VHVEVS-CONH2 peptide was used as a multifunctional template that acted as mineral source supplier and having crystal phase control ability of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) during a self-supplied mineralization. The peptides formed three-dimensional nanofiber networks composed of assembled bilayer β-sheets. The assembly hydrolyzed urea molecules to one carbonate anion and two ammonium cations owing to a charge relay effect between His and Ser residues under mild conditions. CaCO3 was selectively mineralized on the peptide assembly using the generated carbonate anions on the template. Morphology of the obtained CaCO3 was fiber-like structure, similar to that of the peptide template. The mineralized CaCO3 on the peptide template had aragonite phase. This implies that CaCO3 nuclei, generated using the carbonate anions produced by the hydrolysis of urea on the surface of the peptide assembly, preferentially grew into aragonite phase, the growth axis of which aligned parallel to the direction of the β-sheet fiber axis. PMID:27552287

  6. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the

  7. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, atmore » least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.« less

  8. Transformation mechanism of amorphous calcium carbonate into calcite in the sea urchin larval spicule

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Yael; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Abrecht, Mike; Gilbert, Benjamin; Wilt, Fred H.; Sagi, Irit; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sea urchin larval spicules transform amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite single crystals. The mechanism of transformation is enigmatic: the transforming spicule displays both amorphous and crystalline properties, with no defined crystallization front. Here, we use X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy with probing size of 40–200 nm. We resolve 3 distinct mineral phases: An initial short-lived, presumably hydrated ACC phase, followed by an intermediate transient form of ACC, and finally the biogenic crystalline calcite phase. The amorphous and crystalline phases are juxtaposed, often appearing in adjacent sites at a scale of tens of nanometers. We propose that the amorphous-crystal transformation propagates in a tortuous path through preexisting 40- to 100-nm amorphous units, via a secondary nucleation mechanism. PMID:18987314

  9. Zinc recovery from spent ZnO catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hua-Ching; Lin, Chun-I.; Chen, Hsi-Kuei

    2004-02-01

    Zinc recovery from the spent zinc oxide catalyst by carbon in the presence of calcium carbonate was studied using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS), and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spent zinc oxide catalyst was determined to be composed of 87.5 wt pct zinc oxide and 3.1 wt pct zinc sulfide. The results of X-ray diffractometry revealed that calcium carbonate decomposed to calcium oxide and carbon dioxide; zinc oxide and zinc sulfide were reduced to zinc vapor and carbon monoxide evolving from solid sample; and sulfur content was scavenged as calcium sulfide remained in the solid. Steps involved in this reaction system were summarized to explain the overall reaction. The experimental results of atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery can be increased by increasing either the sample height, the reaction temperature or the initial bulk density. Furthermore, they were found to increase with decrease in either the argon flow rate, the molar ratio of Zntotal/C, the molar ratio of Zntotal/CaCO3, the grain size of the spent catalyst, the agglomerate size of carbon, or the agglomerate size of calcium carbonate. Empirical expressions of the initial rate of zinc recovery and final zinc recovery have been determined.

  10. Textural properties of synthetic nano-calcite produced by hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Hernandez, G.; Fernández-Martínez, A.; Charlet, L.; Tisserand, D.; Renard, F.

    2008-05-01

    The hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH) 2) at high pressure of CO 2 (initial P=55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 °C) was used to synthesize fine particles of calcite. This method allows a high carbonation efficiency (about 95% of Ca(OH) 2-CaCO 3 conversion), a significant production rate (48 kg/m 3 h) and high purity of product (about 96%). However, the various initial physicochemical conditions have a strong influence on the crystal size and surface area of the synthesized calcite crystals. The present study is focused on the estimation of the textural properties of synthesized calcite (morphology, specific surface area, average particle size, particle size distribution and particle size evolution with reaction time), using Rietveld refinements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. This study demonstrate that the pressure, the temperature and the dissolved quantity of CO 2 have a significant effect on the average particle size, specific surface area, initial rate of precipitation, and on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals. In contrast, these PT x conditions used herein have an insignificant effect on the carbonation efficiency of Ca(OH) 2. Finally, the results presented here demonstrate that nano-calcite crystals with high specific surface area ( SBET=6-10 m 2/g) can be produced, with a high potential for industrial applications such as adsorbents and/or filler in papermaking industry.

  11. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  12. Compaction of functionalized calcium carbonate, a porous and crystalline microparticulate material with a lamellar surface.

    PubMed

    Stirnimann, Tanja; Atria, Susanna; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C; Alles, Rainer; Huwyler, Jörg; Puchkov, Maxim

    2014-05-15

    In the present study, we aimed to characterize the compressibility and compactibility of the novel pharmaceutical excipient, functionalized calcium carbonate (FCC). We studied three FCC modifications and compared the values for compressibility and compactibility with mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and ground calcium carbonate (CC 330) as well as mixtures of paracetamol and MCC or FCC at drug loads of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% (w/w). We used Heckel analysis, modified Heckel analysis, and Leuenberger analysis to characterize the compaction and compression behavior of the mixtures. Compaction analysis of FCC showed this material to markedly differ from ground calcium carbonate, exhibiting properties, i.e. plastic deformability, similar to those of MCC. This effect was attributed to the highly lamellar structure of FCC particles whose thickness is of the order of a single crystal unit cell. According to Leuenberger parameters, we concluded that FCC-based tablet formulations had mechanical properties equal or superior to those formulated with MCC. FCC tablets with high tensile strength were obtained already at low compressive pressures. Owing to these favorable properties (i.e. marked tensile strength and porosity), FCC promises to be suitable for the preparation of solid dosage forms. PMID:24631309

  13. ISOLATED MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS WITH INCREASED CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL ACCUMULATION HAVE DECREASED ASCORBIC ACID LEVELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms controlling oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation in plants remains largely unknown. As an initial step toward gaining insight into these regulatory mechanisms we initiated a mutant screen to identify plants that over-accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Four new mut...

  14. ADVANCES IN OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND FUNCTION IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation in plants appears to play a central role in a variety of important functions, including tissue calcium regulation, protection from herbivory, and metal detoxification. Evidence is mounting to support ascorbic acid as the primary precursor to oxalate biosynthesis. ...

  15. Plants defective in calcium oxalate crystal formation have more bioavailable calcium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 Medicago mutant was identified which contains wild-type amounts o...

  16. Calcium carbonate scale control, effect of material and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Macadam, J; Parsons, S A

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing a reproducible method for reducing calcium carbonate scale formation on heated surfaces where scaling can cause serious problems. It is known that calcium carbonate precipitation is sensitive to impurity ions, such as iron and zinc, even at trace concentration levels. In this paper two sets of experiments are reported. The first experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of zinc, copper and iron dosing on CaCO3 nucleation and precipitation. Results from the experiments showed that the most effective inhibitor of CaCO3 precipitation was zinc and the effect was linked to dose levels and temperature. Copper and iron had little effect on precipitation in the dose range investigated. The second trial was undertaken to translate the precipitation data to scale formation. These tests were undertaken at 70 degrees C. 5 mg x L(-1) zinc dose reduced the scale formation by 35%. The effect of iron on calcium carbonate scaling rate was not significant. The physical nature of the material on which the scale is formed also influences the scaling. The scaling experiment was also used to investigate the effect of different surface material (stainless steel, copper and aluminium) on CaCO3 scale formation. Copper surface scaled the most. PMID:14982176

  17. Synthesis of nano precipitated calcium carbonate by using a carbonation process through a closed loop reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thriveni, Thenepalli; Ahn, Ji Whan; Ramakrishna, Chilakala; Ahn, Young Jun; Han, Choon

    2016-01-01

    Nano calcium carbonate particles have a wide range of industrial applications due to their beneficial properties such as high porosity and high surface area to volume ratio and due to their strengthening the mechanical properties of plastics and paper. Consequently, significant research has been done to deliver a new approach for the synthesis of precipitated nano calcium carbonate by using a carbonation process through a closed loop reactor. Both the experimental and the instrumental parameters, i.e. the CO2 flow rate, the concentration of the starting materials (Ca(OH)2 and CaO), the pH, the orifice diameter, etc., were investigated. The carbonation efficiency was increased due to the diffusion process involved in the loop reactor. The particle size was affected by the CO2 flow rate, reaction time, and orifice diameter. Finally, precipitated nano calcite calcium carbonate (50 to 100 nm) was synthesized by optimizing all the experimental and the instrumental parameters. The synthesized precipitated nano calcium carbonate was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. This study has proved that the carbonation efficiency can be enhanced for a short time by using a loop reactor and that the carbonation process was more energy efficient and cost effective than other conventional methods.

  18. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium

  19. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  20. Cogrinding significance for calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement. II. Effect on cement properties.

    PubMed

    Tadier, Solène; Bolay, Nadine Le; Fullana, Sophie Girod; Cazalbou, Sophie; Charvillat, Cédric; Labarrère, Michel; Boitel, Daniel; Rey, Christian; Combes, Christèle

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we aim to evaluate the contribution of the cogrinding process in controlling calcium carbonate-dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement properties. We set a method designed to evaluate phase separation, usually occurring during paste extrusion, which is quantitative, reliable, and discriminating and points out the determining role of cogrinding to limit filter-pressing. We show that solid-phase cogrinding leads to synergistic positive effects on cement injectability, mechanical properties, and radio-opacity. It allows maintaining a low (<0.4 kg) and constant load during the extrusion of paste, and the paste's composition remains constant and close to that of the initial paste. Analogous behavior was observed when adding a third component into the solid phase, especially SrCO(3) as a contrasting agent. Moreover, the cement's mechanical properties can be enhanced by lowering the L/S ratio because of the lower plastic limit. Finally, unloaded or Sr-loaded cements show uniform and increased optical density because of the enhanced homogeneity of dry component distribution. Interestingly, this study reveals that cogrinding improves and controls essential cement properties and involves processing parameters that could be easily scaled up. This constitutes a decisive advantage for the development of calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cements and, more generally, of injectable multicomponent bone cements that meet a surgeon's requirements. PMID:21953727

  1. Synthesis of calcium carbonate using extract components of croaker gill as morphology and polymorph adjust control agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Qing, Chengsong; Zheng, Jiaoling; Liu, Yuxi; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate with various polymorphs, sizes and morphologies by using organic substrates has become an interesting topic for the last years. Calcium carbonate has been synthesized by the reaction of Na2CO3 and CaCl2 in the presence of extract components of croaker gill. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum, and particle morphologies were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that at lower concentration yellow croaker gill extract has no effect on calcium carbonate crystal polymorph. Calcite was obtained only. But the morphologies of calcite particle change with the increase of the concentration. The corners of the particle change from angular to curved. However, with the further increase of the concentration of yellow croaker gill extract, the calcium carbonate obtained is a mixture of calcite and vaterite. The vaterite component in the mixture rises with increasing concentration of extract solution, indicating that the proteins from the yellow croaker gill during growth play a crucial role in stabilizing and directing the crystal growth. PMID:27040242

  2. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Bacillus and Sporosarcina Strains Isolated from Concrete and Analysis of the Bacterial Community of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Chulwoo; Jung, Jaejoon; Shin, Bora; Kim, Wook; Chung, Namhyun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP) is a long-standing but re-emerging environmental engineering process for production of self-healing concrete, bioremediation, and long-term storage of CO2. CCP-capable bacteria, two Bacillus strains (JH3 and JH7) and one Sporosarcina strain (HYO08), were isolated from two samples of concrete and characterized phylogenetically. Calcium carbonate crystals precipitated by the three strains were morphologically distinct according to field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping confirmed biomineralization via extracellular calcium carbonate production. The three strains differed in their physiological characteristics: growth at alkali pH and high NaCl concentrations, and urease activity. Sporosarcina sp. HYO08 and Bacillus sp. JH7 were more alkali- and halotolerant, respectively. Analysis of the community from the same concrete samples using barcoded pyrosequencing revealed that the relative abundance of Bacillus and Sporosarcina species was low, which indicated low culturability of other dominant bacteria. This study suggests that calcium carbonate crystals with different properties can be produced by various CCP-capable strains, and other novel isolates await discovery. PMID:26699752

  3. Synthesis of some calcium phosphate crystals using the useful biomass for immobilization of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohiruimaki, T.

    2011-10-01

    Three sources of biomass generated by primary industry were used as the raw material for the synthesis of calcium phosphate crystals. Phosphoric acid was extracted from burned rice chaff using a 30% nitric acid solution, while scallop shells and gypsum of plasterboard were used as calcium sources. The calcium phosphate crystals were synthesized by a method involving homogeneous precipitation, and the relationship between the composition and shape of the crystals and the pH at the time of the precipitation was investigated. Monetite crystals in a petal form with a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 2 μm were precipitated at pH 2.0, while granular apatite crystals with a mean diameter of 1 μm were precipitated at pH 6.0. We also investigated the ability of the synthesized calcium phosphate crystals to immobilize lactic acid bacteria for practical use in industrial bioreactor. It was determined that monetite crystals with a diameter of 2 μm had the highest ability to fix lactic acid bacteria. The population of lactic acid bacteria was estimated to exceed 1,300 bacteria per crystal surface of 50 μm2 suggesting that these crystals may be of practical use in industrial fermenters.

  4. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  5. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. Methods African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin–eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Results The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Conclusion Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone

  6. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyuan; Bua, Peter; Capodice, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg calcium) versus a single serving of calcium carbonate powder (one packet of powder=1,000 mg calcium) was performed in healthy women aged between 25 and 45. All subjects were on a calcium-restricted diet 7 days prior to testing and fasted for 12 h before being evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after oral administration of the test agents. Blood measurements for total and ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone were performed and adverse events were monitored. Results Twenty-three women were evaluable with a mean age of 33.2±8.71. Results showed that administration of a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder resulted in greater absorption in total and ionized calcium versus a single serving of calcium citrate tablets at 4 h (4.25±0.21 vs. 4.16±0.16, p=0.001). There were minimal side effects and no reported serious adverse events. Conclusions This study shows that a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder is more bioavailable than a single serving of calcium citrate tablets. This may be beneficial for long-term compliance. PMID:24772062

  7. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate under diffusion controlled mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet; James R. Henriksen; Luanjing Guo; Don T. Fox; Hai Huang; Lee Tu; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith; George Redden

    2014-07-01

    Multi-component mineral precipitation in porous, subsurface environments is challenging to simulate or engineer when in situ reactant mixing is controlled by diffusion. In contrast to well-mixed systems, the conditions that favor mineral precipitation in porous media are distributed along chemical gradients, which evolve spatially due to concurrent mineral precipitation and modification of solute transport in the media. The resulting physical and chemical characteristics of a mixing/precipitation zone are a consequence of coupling between transport and chemical processes, and the distinctive properties of individual chemical systems. We examined the spatial distribution of precipitates formed in “double diffusion” columns for two chemical systems, calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. Polyacrylamide hydrogel was used as a low permeability, high porosity medium to maximize diffusive mixing and minimize pressure- and density-driven flow between reactant solutions. In the calcium phosphate system, multiple, visually dense and narrow bands of precipitates were observed that were reminiscent of previously reported Liesegang patterns. In the calcium carbonate system, wider precipitation zones characterized by more sparse distributions of precipitates and a more open channel structure were observed. In both cases, formation of precipitates inhibited, but did not necessarily eliminate, continued transport and mixing of the reactants. A reactive transport model with fully implicit coupling between diffusion, chemical speciation and precipitation kinetics, but where explicit details of nucleation processes were neglected, was able to qualitatively simulate properties of the precipitation zones. The results help to illustrate how changes in the physical properties of a precipitation zone depend on coupling between diffusion-controlled reactant mixing and chemistry-specific details of precipitation kinetics.

  8. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of membrane vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saeed R.; Whalen, Patrick O.; Glenton, Patricia A.

    1993-12-01

    Membrane-assisted crystallization of calcium oxalate was studied in vitro, using constant composition methodology. Rat renal tubular brush border membrane vesicles were incubated in supersaturated solution of calcium oxalate. Calcium and oxalate depletion started much earlier in the presence of the vesicles than in their absence; within 8, 32, or 258 min of the incubation of vesicles in calcium oxalate solutions of relative supersaturation of 12, 10 or 6 respectively. Thin plate-like crystals with jagged edges formed in association with the membrane vesicles. Since crystal nucleation in the presence of membrane vesicles started within 8 min at a relative supersaturation as low as 12, it will start significantly earlier in the urine of stone formers which is known to have higher relative supersaturation with respect to calcium oxalate. These results demonstrate that cellular membranes can efficiently induce nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals from a metastable solution in an vitro system. Similar membrane induced heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate in vivo within the renal tubules is a distinct possibility.

  9. Application of pulsed spark discharge for calcium carbonate precipitation in hard water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Kim, Hyoungsup; Starikovskiy, Andrey; Fridman, Alexander; Cho, Young I

    2010-06-01

    The effect of underwater pulsed spark discharge on the precipitation of dissolved calcium ions was investigated in the present study. Water samples with different calcium hardness were prepared by continuous evaporation of tap water using a laboratory cooling tower. It was shown that the concentration of calcium ions dropped by 20-26% after 10-min plasma treatment, comparing with no drop for untreated cases. A laser particle counting method demonstrated that the total number of solid particles suspended in water increased by over 100% after the plasma treatment. The morphology and the crystal form of the particles were identified by both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Calcite with rhombohedron morphology was observed for plasma treated cases, comparing with the round structure observed for no-treatment cases. It was hypothesized that the main mechanisms for the plasma-assisted calcium carbonate precipitation might include electrolysis, local heating in the vicinity of plasma channel and a high electric field at the tip of plasma streamers, inducing structural changes in the electric double layer of hydrated ions. PMID:20494397

  10. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  11. Calcium carbonate mineralization: X-ray microdiffraction probing of the interface of an evaporating drop on a superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Angelo; Burghammer, Manfred; Di Cola, Emanuela; Reynolds, Michael; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian

    2011-07-01

    The liquid/air interface of calcium bicarbonate solution drops was probed by synchrotron radiation microbeam scattering. The drops were deposited on a nanopatterned superhydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) surface and raster-scanned during evaporation by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The appearance of about 200-nm-size calcite crystallites at the interface could be spatially resolved at the onset of crystallization. Diffuse scattering from the interface is attributed to a dense nanoscale amorphous calcium carbonate phase. Calcite was found to be the major phase in the solid residue with vaterite as minor phase. PMID:21663321

  12. Leaf calcium oxalate crystal structure and its role in defense against a chewing insect in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate are common in plants and widely distributed among many plant families. These hard and largely insoluble crystals take on many shapes and sizes depending on the tissue and species. In Medicago truncatula, calcium oxalate crystals are abundant in leaves and accumulate in sh...

  13. Multi-Functions of Carbonated Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite (CDHA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huan

    Natural bone is a complex composite mainly constituted of inorganic minerals and organic collagen molecules. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based materials have been proposed as the predominant bone substitute for bone tissue engineering applications due to their chemical similarity to bone mineral. Amorphous carbonated calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) is an important compound among CaP materials because of the amorphous crystallite structure. The presence of extra ions in its lattice structure not only influences cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts, but also helps in bone metabolism. Biomimetic coating approach is the most widely used approach to produce CDHA coatings to implant. It is a process using simulated body fluid (SBF) to deposit bone-like CDHA coating to various material surfaces. The CDHA formation mechanism, SBF compositions and reacting conditions of biomimetic coating have already been sufficiently studied and compared in the past 20 years. It is an attempt in this thesis to explore new applications of SBF in biomedical research, focusing on different biomaterial applications: 1) based on the low temperature reaction condition of SBF, bisphosphonate incorporated CDHA coatings were deposited onto Ti6Al4V surface for the treatment of osteoporosis; 2) amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres with extra elements in the lattice structure were prepared by a novel microwave assisted approach, providing a new potential of CaP materials production; 3) CDHA particles formed in SBF can be used as great fillers with biopolymers for preparing biocomposites for biomedical applications; 4) based on the high activity of CDHA amorphous structure and the stabilization ability of ethanol, yttrium and europium doped calcium phosphates were prepared using CDHA as a sacrificing template. In the end, future work based on these observations in the thesis is addressed, including areas of drug delivery, biocomposite fabrication and preparation of functionalized

  14. Transglutaminase-induced crosslinking of gelatin-calcium carbonate composite films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuemeng; Liu, Anjun; Ye, Ran; Wang, Wenhang; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The effects of transglutaminase (TGase) on the rheological profiles and interactions of gelatin-calcium carbonate solutions were studied. In addition, mechanical properties, water vapour permeability and microstructures of gelatin-calcium carbonate films were also investigated and compared. Fluorescence data suggested that the interaction of TGase and gelation-calcium carbonate belonged to a static quenching mechanism, and merely one binding site between TGase and gelatin-calcium carbonate was identified. Moreover, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the mechanical properties and the water vapour permeability studies revealed that TGase favoured the strong intramolecular polymerisation of the peptides in gelatin. The microstructures of the surfaces and cross sections in gelatin-calcium carbonate films were shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. The results of the fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that TGase caused conformational changes in the proteins films. Therefore, TGase successfully facilitated the formation of gelatin-calcium carbonate composite films. PMID:25053075

  15. From "loose" to "dense" crystalline phases of calcium carbonate through "repulsive" interactions: an experimental charge-density study.

    PubMed

    Nelyubina, Yulia V; Lyssenko, Konstantin A

    2012-10-01

    Anion-anion interactions in an eggshell: experimental electron density analysis for two polymorphs of calcium carbonate revealed why the less stable form, aragonite, has higher density than the most stable form, calcite. Although believed to be exclusively repulsive, the interactions between anions cause them to bind more tightly in a crystal and thus make the aragonite phase denser than its calcite counterpart. PMID:22915456

  16. Co-crystallization of cholesterol and calcium phosphate as related to atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Danielle; Azoury, Reuven; Sarig, Sara

    1990-09-01

    Calcification of atherosclerotic plaques occurs very frequently and aggravates the disease. In biological systems, epitaxial relationships between crystal structures may be important in nucleating the deposit of a solid phase. The biologically preferred calcium phosphate species, apatite, and cholesterol crystal have structurally compatible crystallographic faces which allow epitaxial growth of one crystal upon another. The present study describes a new approach to explore, in vitro, the crystallization processes of calcium phosphate (CaP) with cholesterol (CS) and cholestanol (CN) which are related to atherosclerosis. Aqueous solutions containing calcium and phosphate ions or CaP crystals as hydroxyapatite were added into saturated ethanolic solutions of CS or CS and 10% CN. After precipitation, crystals were collected and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infra-red (IR), X-ray, scanning electron microscope (SEM-LINK), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and atomic absorption. The principal result is the well-formed crystals precipitation when an aqueous solution and CaP seed crystals were added to saturated solutions of CS and 10% CN. Cholesterol-cholestanol dihydrate (CC2W) crystals precipitated in the presence of CaP seeds were compared to the CC2W crystals obtained without the mineral compound. The results of this comparison indicate a special link between crystals of CaP and CC2W, and support the epitaxial relationship between the two kinds of crystals. The potential of CC2W crystals to be precipitated by CaP seed crystals prove likewise the possible significant role of the cholestanol metabolite in the process of cholesterol crystallization and calcification in the arteries.

  17. Effects of temperature during the irradiation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia; Camargo-Raya, Claudia; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Uribe, Roberto M; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Calcium carbonate received gamma irradiation at different doses (0-309kGy) and temperature regimes (77-298K) to study the effects of irradiation temperature. The changes were followed by EPR spectroscopy. We observed the formation of a composite EPR spectrum, even at low radiation doses and temperature. There was a strong effect on the evaluation of the radicals formed as a function of irradiation temperature, probably due to the diffusion in the frozen powder and the recombination of some radicals at room temperature. PMID:26901240

  18. Calcium carbonate production, coral reef growth, and sea level change.

    PubMed

    Smith, S V; Kinsey, D W

    1976-11-26

    Shallow, seaward portions of modern coral reefs produce about 4 kilograms of calcium carbonate per square meter per year, and protected areas produce about 0.8 kilogram per square meter per year. The difference is probably largely a function of water motion. The more rapid rate, equivalent to a maximum vertical accretion of 3 to 5 millimeters per year, places an upper limit on the potential of modern coral reef communities to create a significant vertical structure on a rising sea. PMID:17748553

  19. Calcium isotope evidence for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate-bearing organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, Alexandra V.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-11-01

    Pore fluid calcium isotope, calcium concentration and strontium concentration data are used to measure the rates of diagenetic dissolution and precipitation of calcite in deep-sea sediments containing abundant clay and organic material. This type of study of deep-sea sediment diagenesis provides unique information about the ultra-slow chemical reactions that occur in natural marine sediments that affect global geochemical cycles and the preservation of paleo-environmental information in carbonate fossils. For this study, calcium isotope ratios (δ 44/40Ca) of pore fluid calcium from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 984 (North Atlantic) and 1082 (off the coast of West Africa) were measured to augment available pore fluid measurements of calcium and strontium concentration. Both study sites have high sedimentation rates and support quantitative sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation. The pattern of change of δ 44/40Ca of pore fluid calcium versus depth at Sites 984 and 1082 differs markedly from that of previously studied deep-sea Sites like 590B and 807, which are composed of nearly pure carbonate sediment. In the 984 and 1082 pore fluids, δ 44/40Ca remains elevated near seawater values deep in the sediments, rather than shifting rapidly toward the δ 44/40Ca of carbonate solids. This observation indicates that the rate of calcite dissolution is far lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites. The data are fit using a numerical model, as well as more approximate analytical models, to estimate the rates of carbonate dissolution and precipitation and the relationship of these rates to the abundance of clay and organic material. Our models give mutually consistent results and indicate that calcite dissolution rates at Sites 984 and 1082 are roughly two orders of magnitude lower than at previously studied carbonate-rich sites, and the rate correlates with the abundance of clay. Our calculated rates are conservative for these

  20. Spectral features of biogenic calcium carbonates and implications for astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, B. L.; Ronholm, J.; Applin, D. M.; Mann, P.; Izawa, M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Whyte, L. G.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to discriminate biogenic from abiogenic calcium carbonate (CaCO3) would be useful in the search for extant or extinct life, since CaCO3 can be produced by both biotic and abiotic processes on Earth. Bioprecipitated CaCO3 material was produced during the growth of heterotrophic microbial isolates on medium enriched with calcium acetate or calcium citrate. These biologically produced CaCO3, along with natural and synthetic non-biologically produced CaCO3 samples, were analysed by reflectance spectroscopy (0.35-2.5 μm), Raman spectroscopy (532 and 785 nm), and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (365 and 405 nm excitation). Optimal instruments for the discrimination of biogenic from abiogenic CaCO3 were determined to be reflectance spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Multiple absorption features in the visible light region occurred in reflectance spectra for most biogenic CaCO3 samples, which are likely due to organic pigments. Multiple fluorescence peaks occurred in emission spectra (405 nm excitation) of biogenic CaCO3 samples, which also are best attributed to the presence of organic compounds; however, further analyses must be performed in order to better determine the cause of these features to establish criteria for confirming the origin of a given CaCO3 sample. Raman spectroscopy was not useful for discrimination since any potential Raman peaks in spectra of biogenic carbonates collected by both the 532 and 785 nm lasers were overwhelmed by fluorescence. However, this also suggests that biogenic carbonates may be identified by the presence of this organic-associated fluorescence. No reliable spectroscopic differences in terms of parameters such as positions or widths of carbonate-associated absorption bands were found between the biogenic and abiogenic carbonate samples. These results indicate that the presence or absence of organic matter intimately associated with carbonate minerals is the only potentially useful

  1. Molecular mechanism of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    SciTech Connect

    Giocondi, J L; El-Dasher, B S; Nancollas, G H; Orme, C A

    2009-05-31

    In summary, SPM data has shown that (1) Mg inhibits growth on all steps but relatively high Mg/Ca ratios are needed. Extracting the mechanism of interaction requires more modeling of the kinetic data, but step morphology is consistent with incorporation. (2) Citrate has several effects depending on the citrate/Ca ratio. At the lowest concentrations, citrate increases the step free energy without altering the step kinetics; at higher concentrations, the polar step is slowed. (3) Oxalate also slows the polar step but additionally stabilizes a new facet, with a [100]{sub Cc} step. (4) Etidronate has the greatest kinetic impact of the molecules studied. At 7{micro}M concentrations, the polar step slows by 60% and a new polar step appears. However, at the same time the [10-1]{sub Cc} increases by 67%. It should be noted that all of these molecules complex calcium and can effect kinetics by altering the solution supersaturation or the Ca to HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. For the SPM data shown, this effect was corrected for to distinguish the effect of the molecule at the crystal surface from the effect of the molecule on the solution speciation. The goal of this paper is to draw connections between fundamental studies of atomic step motion and potential strategies for materials processing. It is not our intent to promote the utility of SPM for investigating processes in cement dynamics. The conditions are spectacularly different in many ways. The data shown in this paper are fairly close to equilibrium (S=1.6) whereas the nucleation of cements is initiated at supersaturation ratios in the thousands to millions. Of course, after the initial nucleation phase, the growth will occur at more modest supersaturations and as the cement evolves towards equilibrium certainly some of the growth will occur in regimes such as shown here. In addition to the difference in supersaturation, cements tend to have lower additive to calcium ratios. As an example, the additive to Ca ratio is

  2. The influence of kinetics on the oxygen isotope composition of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James M.; Nielsen, Laura C.; Ryerson, Frederick J.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2013-08-01

    Paleotemperature reconstructions rely on knowledge of the equilibrium separation of oxygen isotopes between aqueous solution and calcium carbonate. Although oxygen isotope separation is expected on theoretical grounds, the temperature-dependence remains uncertain because other factors, such as slow exchange of isotopes between dissolved CO2-species and water, can obscure the temperature signal. This is problematic for crystal growth experiments on laboratory timescales and for interpreting the oxygen isotope composition of crystals formed in natural settings. We present results from experiments in which inorganic calcite is precipitated in the presence of 0.25 μM dissolved bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA). The presence of dissolved CA accelerates oxygen isotope equilibration between the dissolved carbon species CO2, H2CO3, HCO3-, CO32- and water, thereby eliminating this source of isotopic disequilibrium during calcite growth. The experimental results allow us to isolate, for the first time, kinetic oxygen isotope effects occurring at the calcite-water interface. We present a framework of ion-by-ion growth of calcite that reconciles our new measurements with measurements of natural cave calcites that are the best candidate for having precipitated under near-equilibrium conditions. Our findings suggest that isotopic equilibrium between calcite and water is unlikely to have been established in laboratory experiments or in many natural settings. The use of CA in carbonate precipitation experiments offers new opportunities to refine oxygen isotope-based geothermometers and to interrogate environmental variables other than temperature that influence calcite growth rates.

  3. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  4. A mineralogical characterization of biogenic calcium carbonates precipitated by heterotrophic bacteria isolated from cryophilic polar regions.

    PubMed

    Ronholm, J; Schumann, D; Sapers, H M; Izawa, M; Applin, D; Berg, B; Mann, P; Vali, H; Flemming, R L; Cloutis, E A; Whyte, L G

    2014-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3(s) ) can be driven by microbial activity. Here, a systematic approach is used to identify the morphological and mineralogical characteristics of CaCO3(s) precipitated during the heterotrophic growth of micro-organisms isolated from polar environments. Focus was placed on establishing mineralogical features that are common in bioliths formed during heterotrophic activity, while in parallel identifying features that are specific to bioliths precipitated by certain microbial phylotypes. Twenty microbial isolates that precipitated macroscopic CaCO3(s) when grown on B4 media supplemented with calcium acetate or calcium citrate were identified. A multimethod approach, including scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD), was used to characterize CaCO3(s) precipitates. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that complete CaCO3(s) crystal encrustation of Arthrobacter sp. cells was common, while encrustation of Rhodococcus sp. cells did not occur. Several euhedral and anhedral mineral formations including disphenoid-like epitaxial plates, rhomboid-like aggregates with epitaxial rhombs, and spherulite aggregates were observed. While phylotype could not be linked to specific mineral formations, isolates tended to precipitate either euhedral or anhedral minerals, but not both. Three anhydrous CaCO3(s) polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite) were identified by μ-XRD, and calcite and aragonite were also identified based on TEM lattice-fringe d value measurements. The presence of certain polymorphs was not indicative of biogenic origin, although several mineralogical features such as crystal-encrusted bacterial cells, or casts of bacterial cells embedded in mesocrystals are an indication of biogenic origin. In addition, some features such as the formation of vaterite and bacterial entombment appear to be linked to certain phylotypes. Identifying

  5. Calcium distribution in globoid crystals of cucurbita cotyledon protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Lott, J N; Spitzer, E; Vollmer, C M

    1979-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis was used to investigate the location of globoid crystals with relatively high Ca levels within cotyledons of Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita mixta, and Cucurbita andreana. The small globoid crystals in both upper and lower epidermal cells commonly contained Ca. Ca was present in globoid crystals of all provascular regions with the exception of the very small provascular regions of C. maxima. In C. maxima and C. mixta cotyledons, some cases were observed where Ca was found in the globoid crystals of the first layer of mesophyll cells surrounding the provascular region, but in general Ca was absent from globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. In C. andreana, globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells commonly contained at least some Ca. Cell position and cell type are factors affecting the Ca content of globoid crystals in protein bodies. PMID:16660825

  6. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2003-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  7. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2001-12-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  8. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2001-07-01

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  9. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-12-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  10. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-07-09

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  11. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHAPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J.Fabry

    2004-01-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  12. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2001-09-10

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  13. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2003-04-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  14. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2003-07-15

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  15. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry, Ph.D.

    2002-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  16. Calcium Carbonate Produced by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2007-06-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO2 through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids - single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate - to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  17. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2005-01-24

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids ? single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate ? to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  18. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2005-04-29

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  19. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-04-26

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  20. CALCIUM CARBONATE PRODUCTION BY COCCOLITHOPHORID ALGAE IN LONG TERM, CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    V.J. Fabry

    2004-10-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds or bioreactors to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  1. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Alge in Long Term Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-09-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  2. Calcium Carbonate Production by Coccolithophorid Algae in Long Term, Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    V. J. Fabry

    2006-06-30

    Predictions of increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the specter of global warming have intensified research efforts to identify ways to sequester carbon. A number of novel avenues of research are being considered, including bioprocessing methods to promote and accelerate biosequestration of CO{sub 2} from the environment through the growth of organisms such as coccolithophorids, which are capable of sequestering CO{sub 2} relatively permanently. Calcium and magnesium carbonates are currently the only proven, long-term storage reservoirs for carbon. Whereas organic carbon is readily oxidized and releases CO{sub 2} through microbial decomposition on land and in the sea, carbonates can sequester carbon over geologic time scales. This proposal investigates the use of coccolithophorids--single-celled, marine algae that are the major global producers of calcium carbonate--to sequester CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants. Cultivation of coccolithophorids for calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) precipitation is environmentally benign and results in a stable product with potential commercial value. Because this method of carbon sequestration does not impact natural ecosystem dynamics, it avoids controversial issues of public acceptability and legality associated with other options such as direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the sea and ocean fertilization. Consequently, cultivation of coccolithophorids could be carried out immediately and the amount of carbon sequestered as CaCO{sub 3} could be readily quantified. The significant advantages of this approach warrant its serious investigation. The major goals of the proposed research are to identify the growth conditions that will result in the maximum amount of CO{sub 2} sequestration through coccolithophorid calcite production and to evaluate the costs/benefits of using coccolithophorid cultivation ponds to abate CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants.

  3. Growth and characterization of a novel nonlinear optical borate crystal - Yttrium calcium borate (YCB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Kumar, R.; Arivanandhan, M.; Dhanasekaran, R.; Hayakawa, Y.

    2013-06-01

    A new nonlinear optical single crystal yttrium calcium borate Y2CaB10O19 (YCB) was grown for the first time from its melt. The starting materials were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. The melting point of the synthesized material was identified to be 967 °C. YCB crystal exhibits monoclinic crystal structure with the space group C2. The crystalline perfection of the grown YCB crystal was found to be good. From the UV-VIS-NIR studies, the lower cutoff wavelength of the crystal occurs below 200 nm. The functional groups of the grown crystal were assigned using the FTIR data. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of the YCB crystal was observed using a Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The laser damage threshold value of the YCB crystal was found to be very high - 10.5 GW/cm2.

  4. Growth and characterization of a novel nonlinear optical borate crystal--yttrium calcium borate (YCB).

    PubMed

    Arun Kumar, R; Arivanandhan, M; Dhanasekaran, R; Hayakawa, Y

    2013-06-01

    A new nonlinear optical single crystal yttrium calcium borate Y2CaB10O19 (YCB) was grown for the first time from its melt. The starting materials were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. The melting point of the synthesized material was identified to be 967 °C. YCB crystal exhibits monoclinic crystal structure with the space group C2. The crystalline perfection of the grown YCB crystal was found to be good. From the UV-VIS-NIR studies, the lower cutoff wavelength of the crystal occurs below 200 nm. The functional groups of the grown crystal were assigned using the FTIR data. The second harmonic generation (SHG) of the YCB crystal was observed using a Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. The laser damage threshold value of the YCB crystal was found to be very high - 10.5 GW/cm(2). PMID:23583874

  5. Dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. Report for Sep 84-Aug 86

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, C.L.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the dissolution and crystallization of calcium sulfite platelets. The rates of calcium sulfite dissolution and crystallization are important in slurry scrubbing processes for flue-gas desulfurization. The rates affect the scrubber solution composition, SO{sub 2} absorption, sulfite oxidation, and limestone utilization. The dissolution and crystallization rates of platelet shaped calcium sulfite crystals were measured in the pH stat apparatus. The solution pH was varied from 3.0 to 6.0. The effects of sulfate content in the solids and solution were also investigated. The measured rates for the platelets were compared to the rates previously determined for agglomerates. It was determined that there are subtle differences between platelet and agglomerated calcium sulfite. The platelet sample with low solid sulfate content dissolved and crystallized slower than the sample with a high solid sulfate content and the agglomerated samples. The inhibiting effect of dissolved sulfate was also greater for the low solid sulfate sample. The sample with a high solid sulfate content dissolved and crystallized at approximately the same rate as the agglomerates.

  6. Uptake of chloride and carbonate ions by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2012-08-15

    Decommissioning of old nuclear reactors may produce waste streams containing chlorides and carbonates, including radioactive {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Their insolubilization by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate was investigated. Carbonates were readily depleted from the solution, giving at thermodynamic equilibrium monocarboaluminate, monocarboaluminate + calcite, or calcite only, depending on the initial ratio between the anion and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate. Chloride ions reacted more slowly and were precipitated as Kuzel's salt, Kuzel's and Friedel's salts, or Friedel's salt only. Rietveld refinement of X-Ray powder diffraction patterns was successfully used to quantify the phase distributions, which were compared to thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, analysing the lattice parameters of Kuzel's salt as a function of its chloride content showed the occurrence of a restricted solid solution towards the sulfate side with general formula 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}xCaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}(1 - x)CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}(12 - 2x){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (0.36 {<=} x {<=} 0.50).

  7. Constitutive modeling of calcium carbonate supersaturated seawater mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Martina; Sousa, Maria De Fátima; Bertran, Celso; Bassi, Adalberto

    2014-11-01

    Calcium carbonate supersaturated seawater mixtures have attracted attention of many researchers since the deposition of CaCO3(s) from such solutions can lead to scaling problems in oil fields. However, despite their evident practical importance in petroleum engineering, the hydro and thermodynamic behaviors of these mixtures have not been well-understood yet. In this work, a constitutive model based on the foundations of the constitutive theory of continuum mechanics, and the Müller-Liu entropy principle is proposed. The calcium carbonate supersaturated seawater mixture is regarded as a reactive viscous fluid with heat and electrical conductions. The obtained results indicate that the thermodynamic behavior of CaCO3 supersaturated seawater mixtures is closely related to the individual dynamics of each constituent of the mixture, particularly to the linear momentum, and mass exchanges. Furthermore, the results show that, unlike classical continuum mixtures, the extra entropy flux is not null, and higher-order gradients of deformation contribute to the residual entropy production of the class of mixtures under study. The results of this work may be relevant for the prevention of the mineral scale formation in oil fields. The first author acknowledges the São Paulo Research Foundation (Grant 2013/ 20872-2) for its funding.

  8. Effect of calcium carbonate saturation of seawater on coral calcification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gattuso, J.-P.; Frankignoulle, M.; Bourge, I.; Romaine, S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    The carbonate chemistry of seawater is usually not considered to be an important factor influencing calcium-carbonate-precipitation by corals because surface seawater is supersaturated with respect to aragonite. Recent reports, however, suggest that it could play a major role in the evolution and biogeography of recent corals. We investigated the calcification rates of five colonies of the zooxanthellate coral Stylophora pistillata in synthetic seawater using the alkalinity anomaly technique. Changes in aragonite saturation from 98% to 585% were obtained by manipulating the calcium concentration. The results show a nonlinear increase in calcification rate as a function of aragonite saturation level. Calcification increases nearly 3-fold when aragonite saturation increases from 98% to 390%, i.e., close to the typical present saturation state of tropical seawater. There is no further increase of calcification at saturation values above this threshold. Preliminary data suggest that another coral species, Acropora sp., displays a similar behaviour. These experimental results suggest: (l) that the rate of calcification does not change significantly within the range of saturation levels corresponding to the last glacial-interglacial cycle, and (2) that it may decrease significantly in the future as a result of the decrease in the saturation level due to anthropogenic release of CO2 into the atmosphere. Experimental studies that control environmental conditions and seawater composition provide unique opportunities to unravel the response of corals to global environmental changes.

  9. Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals internalized into renal tubular cells are degraded and dissolved by endolysosomes.

    PubMed

    Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-02-25

    Interaction between calcium oxalate crystals and renal tubular cells has been recognized as one of the key mechanisms for kidney stone formation. While crystal adhesion and internalization have been extensively investigated, subsequent phenomena (i.e. crystal degradation and dissolution) remained poorly understood. To explore these mechanisms, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals (1000 μg/ml of crystals/culture medium) to confirm crystal internalization into MDCK (Type II) renal tubular cells after exposure to the crystals for 1 h and to trace the internalized crystals. Crystal size, intracellular and extracellular fluorescence levels were measured using a spectrofluorometer for up to 48 h after crystal internalization. Moreover, markers for early endosome (Rab5), late endosome (Rab7) and lysosome (LAMP-2) were examined by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry confirmed that FITC-labelled COM crystals were internalized into MDCK cells (14.83 ± 0.85%). The data also revealed a reduction of crystal size in a time-dependent manner. In concordance, intracellular and extracellular fluorescence levels were decreased and increased, respectively, indicating crystal degradation/dissolution inside the cells and the degraded products were eliminated extracellularly. Moreover, Rab5 and Rab7 were both up-regulated and were also associated with the up-regulated LAMP-2 to form large endolysosomes in the COM-treated cells at 16-h after crystal internalization. We demonstrate herein, for the first time, that COM crystals could be degraded/dissolved by endolysosomes inside renal tubular cells. These findings will be helpful to better understand the crystal fate and protective mechanism against kidney stone formation. PMID:26748311

  10. Crystal growth of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solutions at constant PCO2 and 25°C: a test of a calcite dissolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Plummer, L. Neil; Busenberg, E.

    1981-01-01

    A highly reproducible seeded growth technique was used to study calcite crystallization from calcium bicarbonate solutions at 25°C and fixed carbon dioxide partial pressures between 0.03 and 0.3 atm. The results are not consistent with empirical crystallization models that have successfully described calcite growth at low PCO2 (< 10−3 atm). Good agreement was found between observed crystallization rates and those calculated from the calcite dissolution rate law and mechanism proposed by Plummer et al. (1978).

  11. Mitogenic effects of hydroxyapatite and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals on cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cheung, H S; Story, M T; McCarty, D J

    1984-06-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in 1% serum stimulated 3H thymidine uptake into quiescent canine synovial fibroblasts and human foreskin fibroblast cultures, as did 10% serum. The onset of stimulation and peak uptake of thymidine after crystal addition were delayed by 2-3 hours as compared with the effects produced by 10% serum. Stimulation of 3H thymidine uptake was proportional to the serum concentration used. HA crystals (50 micrograms/ml) stimulated nuclide uptake at each serum concentration used. 3H thymidine uptake was also proportional to the dose of HA or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals, although larger doses of the latter crystal were required to produce equivalent effects. Not all particulates were effective mitogenic agents. Latex beads and diamond crystals had no effect. Monosodium urate crystals modestly stimulated and calcium urate crystals markedly stimulated nuclide uptake. The more complex crystals found in a naturally occurring condition (calcinosis) were as mitogenic as the pure synthetic HA. The synovial cell hyperplasia sometimes associated with crystals might be explained in part by their mitogenic activity. PMID:6329235

  12. In situ calcium carbonate dissolution in the Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Feely, R. A.; Sabine, Chris; Lee, K.; Millero, F. J.; Lamb, M. F.; Greeley, D.; Bullister, J.L.; Key, Robert; Peng, T.-H.; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno

    2002-01-01

    Over the past several years researchers have been working to synthesize the WOCE/ JGOFS global CO2 survey data to better understand carbon cycling processes in the oceans. The Pacific Ocean data set has over 35,000 sample locations with at least two carbon parameters, oxygen, nutrients, CFC tracers, and hydrographic parameters. In this paper we estimate the in situ CaCO3 dissolution rates in the Pacific Ocean water column. Calcium carbonate dissolution rates ranging from 0.01 1.1 mmol kg1 yr1 are observed in intermediate and deepwater beginning near the aragonite saturation horizon. In the North Pacific Intermediate Water between 400 and 800 m, CaCO3 dissolution rates are more than 7 times faster than observed in middle and deep water depths (average = 0.051 mmol kg1 yr1). The total amount of CaCO3 that is dissolved within the Pacific is determined by integrating excess alkalinity throughout the water column. The total inventory of CaCO3 added by particle dissolution in the Pacific Ocean, north of 40S, is 157 Pg C. This amounts to an average dissolution rate of approximately 0.31 Pg C yr1. This estimate is approximately 74% of the export production of CaCO3 estimated for the Pacific Ocean. These estimates should be considered to be upper limits for in situ carbonate dissolution in the Pacific Ocean, since a portion of the alkalinity increase results from inputs from sediments.

  13. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent

  14. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Zhaofeng; Huang Jianhua

    2007-02-15

    The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.

  15. FKBP-12 exhibits an inhibitory activity on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, In Sook; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Park, Jong Wook; Suh, Min Ho; Suh, Sung Il; Shin, Song Woo; Ahn, Su Yul; Choe, Byung Kil

    2002-02-01

    Urolithiasis and calcium oxalate crystal deposition diseases are still significant medical problems. In the course of nephrocalcin cDNA cloning, we have identified FKBP-12 as an inhibitory molecule of calcium oxalate crystal growth. lambdagt 11 cDNA libraries were constructed from renal carcinoma tissues and screened for nephrocalcin cDNA clones using anti-nephrocalcin antibody as a probe. Clones expressing recombinant proteins, which appeared to be antigenically cross-reactive to nephrocalcin, were isolated and their DNA sequences and inhibitory activities on the calcium oxalate crystal growth were determined. One of the clone lambda gt 11 #31-1 had a partial fragment (80 bp) of FKBP-12 cDNA as an insert. Therefore, a full-length FKBP-12 cDNA was PCR-cloned from the lambda gt 11 renal carcinoma cDNA library and was subcloned into an expression vector. The resultant recombinant FKBP-12 exhibited an inhibitory activity on the calcium oxalate crystal growth (Kd=10(-7) M). Physiological effect of the extracellular FKBP-12 was investigated in terms of macrophage activation and proinflammatory cytokine gene induction. Extracellular FKBP-12 failed to activate macrophages even at high concentrations. FKBP-12 seems an anti-stone molecule for the oxalate crystal deposition disease and recurrent stone diseases. PMID:11850587

  16. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbonate...

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fundamental research is proposed to investigate the role of calcium carbonate grain coatings on the vadose zone chemical reactivity of key Hanford contaminants (i.e., 60Co2+, 90Sr2+, CrO42-, and 99TcO4-). Calcium carbonate is widely distributed through the Hanford vadose zone as...

  18. Calcium absorbability from milk products, an imitation milk, and calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, R.R.; Bammi, A.; Barger-Lux, M.J.; Heaney, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Whole milk, chocolate milk, yogurt, imitation milk (prepared from dairy and nondairy products), cheese, and calcium carbonate were labeled with /sup 45/Ca and administered as a series of test meals to 10 healthy postmenopausal women. Carrier Ca content of the test meals was held constant at 250 mg and subjects fasted before each meal. The absorbability of Ca from the six sources was compared by measuring fractional absorption by the double isotope method. The mean absorption values for all six sources were tightly clustered between 21 and 26% and none was significantly different from the others using one-way analysis of variance. We conclude that none of the sources was significantly superior or inferior to the others.

  19. Ureaplasma urealyticum-induced crystallization of magnesium ammonium phosphate and calcium phosphates in synthetic urine.

    PubMed

    Grenabo, L; Brorson, J E; Hedelin, H; Pettersson, S

    1984-10-01

    Crystallization of struvite and calcium phosphates was studied in vitro as encrustations on glass rods immersed in synthetic urine, to evaluate the crystallization capacity of Ureaplasma urealyticum and compare it with that of known urease and non-urease-producing bacteria. Inoculation of the synthetic urine with Ureaplasma urealyticum resulted in alkalinization of the synthetic urine and crystallization of struvite and brushite. Inoculation with Proteus mirabilis caused a faster and more pronounced alkalinization as well as crystallization of struvite and apatite. The alkalinization and crystallization caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum and Proteus mirabilis was completely prevented by acetohydroxamic acid, a potent urease inhibitor, linking the crystallization to the urease activity of the microorganisms. When the synthetic urine was inoculated with urease-negative Escherichia coli no alkalinization and no crystallization were seen. PMID:6381769

  20. Calcium oxalate toxicity in renal epithelial cells: the mediation of crystal size on cell death mode

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X-Y; Gan, Q-Z; Ouyang, J-M

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in renal epithelial cells has been studied extensively, but the cell death mode induced by CaOx with different physical properties, such as crystal size and crystal phase, has not been studied in detail. In this study, we comparatively investigated the differences of cell death mode induced by nano-sized (50 nm) and micron-sized (10 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) to explore the cell death mechanism. The effect of the exposure of nano-/micron-sized COM and COD crystals toward the African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were investigated by detecting cell cytoskeleton changes, lysosomal integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), apoptosis and/or necrosis, osteopontin (OPN) expression, and malondialdehyde (MDA) release. Nano-/micron-sized COM and COD crystals could cause apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Nano-sized crystals primarily caused apoptotic cell death, leading to cell shrinkage, phosphatidylserine ectropion, and nuclear shrinkage, whereas micron-sized crystals primarily caused necrotic cell death, leading to cell swelling and cell membrane and lysosome rupture. Nano-sized COM and COD crystals induced much greater cell death (sum of apoptosis and necrosis) than micron-sized crystals, and COM crystals showed higher cytotoxicity than the same-sized COD crystals. Both apoptosis and necrosis could lead to mitochondria depolarization and elevate the expression of OPN and the generation of lipid peroxidation product MDA. The amount of expressed OPN and generated MDA was positively related to cell injury degree. The physicochemical properties of crystals could affect the cell death mode. The results of this study may provide a basis for future studies on cell death mechanisms. PMID:27551481

  1. Tuning calcium carbonate growth through physical confinement and templating with amyloid-like polypeptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaco, Martin Francis

    The creation of useful composite materials requires precise control of the interface between the components in order to tune the overall shape and material properties. Despite the current research into nanotechnology, our ability to create materials with nanoscale precision is nascent. However, nature has a paradigm for the creation of finely structured composites under mild conditions called biomineralization. Through control of protein template assembly, solution conditions, and physical confinement, organisms are able to create useful optical and structural materials, such as bones, teeth, and mollusk shells. The objective of this thesis is to elucidate the importance of these various controls in synthetic systems to further our ability to create nanostructured materials. We begin by examining the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilanes on silica oxides. The formation of functionalized surfaces can help control the mineralization of amorphous or crystalline calcium carbonate. Long-chained organosilanes organize on surfaces to form dense, solid-like films, with the terminal groups determining the hydrophobicity and stereochemistry of the film. Our work has shown that uniform hydrophobic and hydrophilic films can be formed by using cleaned silica over glass or mica and through a vapor phase reaction over a liquid one. Additionally, we showed that mixed SAMs with phase-separated domains could be created through the selection of organosilanes and reaction conditions. We have built on these functionalized surfaces through the use of microfabrication and a gas permeable polymer to create three-dimensionally confined microcrystallizers. Other researchers have shown that one-dimensional confinement with a multi-functional surface (patterned with a small nucleating ordered region in a disordered SAM) can stabilize the creation of an amorphous calcium carbonate film before a single, large, micropatterned crystal is grown. Our work has determined

  2. Peptides of Matrix Gla Protein Inhibit Nucleation and Growth of Hydroxyapatite and Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S.; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A.; de Bruyn, John R.; Hunter, Graeme K.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney. PMID:24265810

  3. Calcium Oxalate Crystals: An Integral Component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Uloth, Margaret B.; Clode, Peta L.; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (< 0.5 μm) to large (up to 40 μm) highly organized arrangements. Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals. PMID:25816022

  4. Calcium oxalate crystals: an integral component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Uloth, Margaret B; Clode, Peta L; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (< 0.5 μm) to large (up to 40 μm) highly organized arrangements. Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals. PMID:25816022

  5. Effects of Monocarboxylic Acid Addition on Crystallization of Calcium Phosphate in a Hydrogel Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, T.; Kawashita, M.; Ohtsuki, C.

    2011-10-01

    In biomineralization, it is thought that water-soluble organic substances control crystal growth of minerals in hard tissues. The roles of organic substances are not well understood, because the biomineralization process is established by complicated parameters. Crystal growth in hydrogel matrixes can be regarded as simplified model system of biomineralization. In the present study, we investigated the effects of propionic acid (Pro) on crystalline phases and crystal morphologies of calcium phosphate formed in polymeric hydrogel matrixes as the model system of biomineralization. Crystalline phase of the precipitates was octacalcium phosphate (OCP) with spherical shape regardless of Pro concentrations. The fibrous crystals formed under the condition without addition of Pro. The crystal morphologies composing spherical crystals were changed from fibrous to plate-like shape with increasing Pro concentrations. Generally, OCP crystal has plate-like shape exposing (100) face, which calcium ions exist on. Therefore, crystal growth rate of [100] direction of OCP was decreased by Pro adsorbed on (100) face. As a result, crystal morphology composing spherulite became plate-like shape with increasing Pro concentrations.

  6. Biomimetic growth of calcium oxalate crystals: synchrotron X-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2010-03-01

    Oriented crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) form one of the major constituents of kidney stones in humans, and these crystals are also found in many plants. It is widely accepted that an organic matrix of lipids and proteins is involved in the crystallization of COM, though their role is not well-understood [1]. Langmuir monolayers of lipids on supersaturated aqueous solutions can be used to mimic the lipid-crystal interface during mineralization. We have studied nucleation and growth of COM crystals under heneicosanoic acid monolayers at the air-water interface. We used synchrotron x-rays in the grazing incidence geometry to determine the structure of the organic monolayer and the orientation of COM crystals in-situ during crystallization. We see that the (-101) faces of COM crystals are parallel to the organic matrix. There is a commensurate relationship between the heneicosanoic acid monolayer and the (-101) crystal face that may be responsible from the oriented growth. Evolution of the monolayer structure with time will be described. [1]S. R. Khan, Calcium Oxalate in Biological Systems, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995

  7. Identification and characterisation of a calcium carbonate-binding protein, blue mussel shell protein (BMSP), from the nacreous layer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Iwashima, Ai; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2011-11-01

    The nacreous layer of molluscan shells consists of a highly organised, layered structure comprising calcium carbonate aragonite crystals, each surrounded by an organic matrix. In the Japanese pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, the Pif protein from the nacreous layer functions in aragonite binding, and plays a key role in nacre formation. Here, we investigated whether the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis also has a protein with similar functions in the nacreous layer. By using a calcium carbonate-binding assay, we identified the novel protein blue mussel shell protein (BMSP) 100 that can bind calcium carbonate crystals of both aragonite and calcite. When the entire sequence of a cDNA encoding BMSP 100 was determined, it was found that BMSP is a preproprotein consisting of a signal peptide and two proteins, BMSP 120 and BMSP 100. BMSP 120 contains four von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domains and one chitin-binding domain, thus suggesting that it has a role in maintaining structure within the matrix. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that BMSP 100 is present throughout the nacreous layer with dense localisation in the myostracum. Posttranslational modification analysis indicated that BMSP 100 is phosphorylated and glycosylated. These results suggest that there is a common molecular mechanism between P. fucata and M. galloprovincialis that underlies the nacreous layer formation. PMID:21932217

  8. An Unusual Association: Iliopsoas Bursitis Related to Calcium Pyrophosphate Crystal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Di Carlo, Marco; Draghessi, Antonella; Carotti, Marina; Salaffi, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with osteoarthritis and chondrocalcinosis came to our observation developing a swelling in the groin region after a recent left colectomy for adenocarcinoma. The imaging techniques revealed the presence of an iliopsoas bursitis in connection with the hip. The synovial fluid analysis detected the presence of calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals and allowed the final and unusual diagnosis of iliopsoas bursitis related to acute CPP crystal hip arthritis. PMID:26550514

  9. Characterization of the terbium-doped calcium fluoride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheleznov, Dmitry S.; Starobor, Aleksey V.; Palashov, Oleg V.

    2015-08-01

    Optical, thermo-optical and magneto-optical characteristics of the terbium-doped (10 at.%) calcium fluoride sample were investigated. It was made the analysis, confirmed the possibility of development of a Faraday isolator and a cryogenic Faraday isolator based on the studied medium, which will provide more than 30 dB isolation ratio of laser radiation in the "eye-safe" wavelength range (1530-1620 nm) at the 5 and 20 kW power, respectively.

  10. Rheological properties of polyolefin composites highly filled with calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Jakubowska, Paulina; Sterzynski, Tomasz

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological properties of highly filled polyolefin composites (HFPCs) have been investigated. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3), with stearic acid modified surface, was used as filler. Ternary compounds have been obtained by the inclusion of a CaCO3/polypropylene master batch into the high density polyethylene matrix. The highly filled polyolefin composites with CaCO3 content in the range between 40 and 64 wt% have been prepared in the molten state using a single-screw extruder, the temperature of the extrusion die was set at 230°C. The melt rheological properties of the HFPCs have been extensively investigated both in oscillatory and steady shear flow.

  11. Artificial dental root made of natural calcium carbonate (Bioracine).

    PubMed

    Camprasse, S; Camprasse, G; Pouzol, M; Lopez, E

    1990-01-01

    'Bioracine' is an artificial dental root made of natural calcium carbonate (Pinctade maxima mother of pearl). This non-biodegradable material is very close to bone tissue in its physicochemical composition and presents remarkable hardness, resistance and elasticity. Bioracine is a buried dental implant with a special screw thread, presenting a large surface which shows pores of 2-3 mum. A histological study of the interface between the implant and human maxillary bone demonstrated an extraordinary cellular union between these two tissues. Furthermore, bioracine presents two new technical innovations: a periprosthetic epithelial attachment of connective tissue with an active shock absorbing system. Bioracine is an exceptional dental root substitute that matches the biological properties of natural bone. PMID:10147506

  12. Calcium carbonate obstructive urolithiasis in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Dana M; Gamble, Kathryn C; Corner, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    A 6-yr-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented for a history of inappetance, abnormal behavior, and unconfirmed elimination for 6 hr prior to presentation. Based on abdominal ultrasound, abdominocentesis, and cystocentesis, a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract obstruction with uroabdomen and hydronephrosis was reached. Abdominal radiographs did not assist in reaching an antemortem diagnosis. Postmortem examination confirmed a urinary bladder rupture secondary to urethral obstruction by a single urethrolith. Bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter were identified and determined to be a result of bilateral ureteroliths. Urolith analysis revealed a composition of 100% calcium carbonate. A dietary analysis was performed, implicating an increased Ca:P ratio from a food preparation miscommunication as a contributing factor. Appropriate husbandry changes were made, and mob surveillance procedures were performed, which resolved the urolithiasis risk for the remaining five animals. PMID:23505728

  13. Inhibition of crystallization of calcium oxalate by the extraction of Tamarix gallica L.

    PubMed

    Bensatal, Ahmed; Ouahrani, M R

    2008-12-01

    The main objective is to study the inhibitor effect of acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L on the crystallization of calcium oxalate. The extract of Tamarix gallica L is very rich by acid compounds that are used as an inhibitor of nephrolithiasis (calcium oxalate). Our study of the calcium oxalate crystallization is based on the model of turbidimetry by means of a spectrophotometer. The calcium oxalate formation is induced by the addition of oxalate solutions of sodium and of calcium chloride. The addition of inhibitor with various concentrations enabled us to give information on the percentage of inhibition. The comparison between the turbidimetric slopes with and without inhibitor gives the effectiveness of inhibitor for the acid fraction. By comparing the photographs of with and without inhibitor, we concluded that the extract of Tamarix gallica L acts at the stage of growth. The acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L gives an activity remarkable in the formation of urinary lithiasis (calcium oxalate); this effectiveness is due to the presence of functions of acid. PMID:19002446

  14. Formate oxidation-driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Arvaniti, Eleni Charalampous; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Ramos, Jose Angel; Rahier, Hubert; Boon, Nico

    2014-08-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such asammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented here to overcome these disadvantages. To induce calcium carbonate precipitation, M. parvus was incubated at different calcium formate concentrations and starting culture densities. Up to 91.4% ± 1.6% of the initial calcium was precipitated in the methane-amended cultures compared to 35.1% ± 11.9% when methane was not added. Because the bacteria could only utilize methane for growth, higher culture densities and subsequently calcium removals were exhibited in the cultures when methane was added. A higher calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when higher culture densities were used but not necessarily when more calcium formate was added. This was mainly due to salt inhibition of the bacterial activity at a high calcium formate concentration. A maximum 0.67 ± 0.03 g of CaCO3 g of Ca(CHOOH)2(-1) calcium carbonate precipitate yield was obtained when a culture of 10(9) cells ml(-1) and 5 g of calcium formate liter(-)1 were used. Compared to the current strategy employing biogenic urea degradation as the basis for MICP, our approach presents significant improvements in the environmental sustainability of the application in the construction industry. PMID:24837386

  15. The "crowned dens" revisited: imaging findings in calcium crystal deposition diseases around the odontoid.

    PubMed

    Viana, Sergio L; Fernandes, João L; De Araújo Coimbra, Pablo P; De Mendonça, José L F; Freitas, Flávia M O; De Carvalho Barbosa Viana, Maria A

    2010-10-01

    The so-called "crowned dens" is a peculiar manifestation of calcium crystal deposition diseases, either caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate or caused by calcium hydroxiapatite crystals, characterized by the presence of calcific deposits around the odontoid, often showing a crown-like configuration on imaging. It has protean clinical and radiological pictures, and care should be taken to avoid misinterpretation and diagnostic errors. Although asymptomatic in many patients, this entity may present as a predominantly algic or febrile condition, and in some cases, signs of compression of the spinal cord may be the major complaint. The detection of calcifications in the periodontoid tissues is the key to the diagnosis, erosive osseous changes, and variably calcified soft-tissue masses being occasionally associated. Computed tomography is the most important imaging study to be performed in this setting. PMID:19344369

  16. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  17. Physical characteristics of Medicago truncatula calcium oxalate crystals determine their effectiveness in insect defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structural traits can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feeding. They ar...

  18. Liquid crystal-carbon nanotubes mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa-Nita, V.; Kralj, S.

    2010-01-01

    The self-organizing properties of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) can be used to align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in them. In the previous paper [P. van der Schoot, V. Popa-Nita, and S. Kralj, J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 4512 (2008)], we have considered the weak anchoring limit of the nematic LC molecules at the nanotube's surface, where the CNT alignment is caused by the anisotropic interfacial tension of the nanotubes in the nematic host fluid. In this paper, we present the theoretical results obtained for strong enough anchoring at the CNT-LC interface for which the nematic ordering around nanotube is apparently distorted. Consequently, relatively strong long-range and anisotropic interactions can emerge within the system. In order to get insight into the impact of LC ordering on the alignment of nanotubes we treat the two mixture components on the same footing and combine Landau-de Gennes free energy for the thermotropic ordering of the liquid crystal and Doi free energy for lyotropic nematic ordering of carbon nanotubes caused by their mutually excluded volume. The phase ordering of the binary mixture is analyzed as a function of the volume fraction of the carbon nanotubes, the strength of coupling, and the temperature. We find that the degree of ordering of the nanorods can be tuned by raising or lowering the temperature or by increasing or decreasing their concentration.

  19. New and unusual forms of calcium oxalate raphide crystals in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Raman, Vijayasankar; Horner, Harry T; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-11-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals in higher plants occur in five major forms namely raphides, styloids, prisms, druses and crystal sand. The form, shape and occurrence of calcium oxalate crystals in plants are species- and tissue-specific, hence the presence or absence of a particular type of crystal can be used as a taxonomic character. So far, four different types of needle-like raphide crystals have been reported in plants. The present work describes two new and unusual forms of raphide crystals from the tubers of Dioscorea polystachya--six-sided needles with pointed ends (Type V) and four-sided needles with beveled ends (Type VI). Both of these new types of needles are distinct from the other four types by each having a surrounding membrane that envelopes a bundle of 10-20 closely packed thin crystalline sheets. The previously known four types of needles have solid or homogenous crystalline material, surrounded by a membrane or lamellate sheath called a crystal chamber. Only the Type VI crystals have beveled ends and the needles of the other five types have pointed ends. PMID:25139563

  20. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  1. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial

  2. Morphology and polymorphic phase changes of calcium carbonate micro/nanocrystals using fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad

    2011-05-01

    This study reveals the morphology and polymorphic phase changes of calcium carbonate crystals into a mixture of calcite and aragonite micro/nanocrystals of interesting morphology at room temperature by a simple reaction with fruit extracts of Tamarindus indica and Emblica officinalis respectively by mixing CaCO3 solutions with their corresponding extracts. The control experiments were carried out to establish the plausible role of tartaric acid from Tamarindus indica and ascorbic acid from Emblica officinalis in this regard. The quantitative determination of CaCO3 phases was done based on the use of intensities obtained from corresponding XRD spectrum. The molar % of aragonite was found to be more in case of TA and AA rather than TI and EO respectively, however the calcite was observed to be the predominant phase in all four reactions. Interestingly, the TI changes the rhombohedral morphology of calcite to elongated rods, whereas EO induces a great polymorphic phase change. PMID:21780397

  3. Design of a continuous process setup for precipitated calcium carbonate production from steel converter slag.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Hannu-Petteri; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2014-03-01

    A mineral carbonation process "slag2PCC" for carbon capture, utilization, and storage is discussed. Ca is extracted from steel slag by an ammonium salt solvent and carbonated with gaseous CO2 after the separation of the residual slag. The solvent is reused after regeneration. The effects of slag properties such as the content of free lime, fractions of Ca, Si, Fe, and V, particle size, and slag storage on the Ca extraction efficiency are studied. Small particles with a high free-lime content and minor fractions of Si and V are the most suitable. To limit the amount of impurities in the process, the slag-to-liquid ratio should remain below a certain value, which depends on the slag composition. Also, the design of a continuous test setup (total volume ∼75 L) is described, which enables quick process variations needed to adapt the system to the varying slag quality. Different precipitated calcium carbonate crystals (calcite and vaterite) are generated in different parts of the setup. PMID:24578147

  4. Controlled synthesis of crystalline calcium carbonate aggregates with unusual morphologies involving the phase transformation from amorphous calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Hua; Yu Jiaguo Zhao Xiufeng

    2009-04-02

    Peanut-shaped CaCO{sub 3} aggregates, featured of two dandelion-like heads built up from rod-like subunits, have been synthesized via a facile precipitation reaction between Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCl{sub 2} at ambient temperature in the presence of magnesium ions and ethanol solvent. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that a high magnesium concentration and ethanol solvent are necessary for the formation of the unusual peanut-like aggregates. In addition, a multistep phase transformation process from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) to a mixture of ACC and calcite and ultimately to calcite and aragonite was observed in the formation process of the unusual structures. A possible mechanism for the formation of the unusual peanut-shape aggregates has been proposed and discussed.

  5. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  6. Solubility, inhibition of crystallization and microscopic analysis of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of fractions from Humulus lupulus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckowiak, Anna; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Skibiński, PrzemysŁaw; GaweŁ, WiesŁaw; Zaczyńska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-11-01

    Procedures for obtaining noncytotoxic and nonmutagenic extracts from Humulus lupulus L. of high potency for inhibition and dissolving of model (calcium oxalate crystals) and real kidney stones, obtained from patients after surgery, are presented. Multistep extraction procedures were performed in order to obtain the preparations with the highest calcium complexing properties. The composition of obtained active fractions was analyzed by GC/MS and NMR methods. The influence of preparations on inhibition of formation and dissolution of model and real kidney stones were evaluated based on conductrometric titration, flame photometry and microscopic analysis. The "fraction soluble in methanol" obtained from water-alkaline extracts contains sugar alcohols and organic acids, and is effective in dissolving the kidney stones. The "fraction insoluble in methanol" contains only sugar derivatives and it changes the morphology of the crystals, making them "jelly-like". Both fractions are potentially effective in kidney stone therapy.

  7. Extraction of radiostrontium coprecipitated with calcium carbonate in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    The fraction of soil ZSr coprecipitated with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was determined by extraction into 0.1M hydrochloric acid (HCl)-0.5M potassium chloride (KCl) after an initial extraction with either 1M ammonium acetate (NH4OAc) or 1M KCl to remove soluble salts and exchangeable cations. This procedure was tested on soil samples supplemented with 85 g CaCO3/kg containing coprecipitated YVSr. A significant amount of both YVSr and Ca remained undissolved in this extractant but were subsequently removed by extraction with 8M HNO3. The extraction procedure was also applied to a group of 16 ZSr-contaminated soil and stream bed sediment samples. The amount of Cs + Mg extracted by 0.1M HCl-0.5M KCl, following KCl extraction, was well correlated with but slightly lower than the amounts expected for a complete dissolution of the CaCO3. Pre-extraction with NH4OAc, rather than KCl, dissolved significantly more CaCO3, resulting in a lower estimate of the soil CaCO3. Several soil samples, taken from a radioactive waste burial trench that had received sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) treatment injections, revealed that up to 98% of the total ZSr was observed in a CaCO3 phase. Untreated soils typically exhibited 80 to 95% of their ZSr in a cation exchangeable form, i.e., extractable by either NH4OAc or KCl.

  8. Stabilization and transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate: structural and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Millicent Promise

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a common transient precursor in the formation of more stable crystalline calcium carbonate minerals, most notably calcite, vaterite, and aragonite. Formation of ACC from calcium carbonate rich aqueous solution rather than direct crystallization of crystalline polymorphs by organisms provides several advantages: control of morphology, grain size, orientation, hardness, and other bulk properties as well as reduction of energy costs during growth cycles. Despite decades of study, stabilization and transformation mechanisms of synthetic and biogenic ACC remain unclear. In particular, the roles of H2O and inorganic phosphate in ACC structure and transformation, and the variables affecting transformation kinetics and polymorph selection are understudied. In this research, we addressed structure and kinetic behavior of ACC through four complementary investigations: two studies focus on synthetic ACC stabilization and two focus on synthetic and biogenic ACC transformation behavior in solution at ambient temperatures. We explored ACC stabilization via compositional and thermal analyses, X-ray scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transformation experiments used a novel method of in situ structural analysis that provided quantitative kinetic and structural data and allowed us to visualize the ACC transformation pathway. Results revealed the complexity of H2O structure in ACC samples synthesized from three methods, indicating that the distinct hydrous populations produced define ACC behavior. Transformation kinetics and polymorph selection were strongly affected by the hydration state and type of synthetic ACC reacted. In situ transformation experiments also showed differences in kinetic behavior due to reaction medium. The structural role of hydrous components was again evident in in situ transformation experiments for ACC from a biogenic lobster gastrolith (LG) reacted with water. LG

  9. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  10. Co-effects of amines molecules and chitosan films on in vitro calcium carbonate mineralization.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jifei; Kennedy, John F; Nie, Jun; Ma, Guiping

    2015-11-20

    Amines monomers, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), N,N-dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMEDA) and N-methiyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were used to induce the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystals on chitosan films, by using (NH4)2CO3 diffusion method at ambient temperature. The obtained CaCO3 particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The influence of reaction variables, such as the additive concentration and their types were also investigated on the products. The morphologies of CaCO3 crystals, inter-grown in cube-shape, were controlled by DMAEMA and DMEA. It was observed that the morphologies of CaCO3 changed from the cube grown arms to massive calcite with a hole on the face by increasing the concentrations of DMEDA and MDEA. While the precipitation grew on chitosan film without any organic additive, only single cube-shaped crystals were obtained. By these results the possible mechanisms can be proposed that electronic movement of the groups on the monomer effected ions configuration and molecules absorbed on the exposed surface, resulted the change of the surface energy, which caused the change in the morphology of CaCO3. PMID:26344256

  11. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi, Mohammad Daoud; Zhao, Wei; Tan, Wen Feng

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and Ca{sup 2+} solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2} cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO{sub 4}{sup 3} inhibited the activity of CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} during bound with Ca{sup 2+}. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ca{sup 2+} distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} shows that the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the vibrations of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in HAp. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO

  12. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  13. Effects of Mg/Ca ratio and temperature on the mineralogy of calcium carbonate precipitates and their paleooceanographic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoi, M.Y.; Belli, S.

    1996-10-01

    Because of the importance of the global carbon cycle throughout the life of the Earth, scientists have tried to use components of it to find out past conditions of the Earth`s atmosphere, oceans, and climate. However, lack of knowledge about past conditions makes it difficult to paint a complete picture of the chemistry of ancient oceans and atmospheres. One approach is to use the mineralogy of ancient sedimentary carbonates to examine the problem from the standpoint that certain conditions dictate the formation of particular crystal structures. Thus, we need to more completely understand the conditions which influence the precipitation of carbonate minerals. We examine the effects of both seawater Mg/Ca ratio and temperature on the mineralogy of calcium carbonate precipitated from seawater. This will refine our knowledge of paleo-ocean chemistry.

  14. Powder XRD and dielectric studies of gel grown calcium pyrophosphate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Bharat; Parikh, Ketan; Joshi, Mihir

    2013-06-01

    Formation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals in soft tissues such as cartilage, meniscus and synovial tissue leads to CPPD deposition diseases. The appearance of these crystals in the synovial fluid can give rise to an acute arthritic attack with pain and inflammation of the joints, a condition called pseudo-gout. The growth of CPP crystals has been carried out, in the present study, using the single diffusion gel growth technique, which can broadly mimic in vitro the condition in soft tissues. The crystals were characterized by different techniques. The FTIR study revealed the presence of various functional groups. Powder XRD study was also carried out to verify the crystal structure. The dielectric study was carried out at room temperature by applying field of different frequency from 500 Hz to 1 MHz. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and a.c. resistivity decreased as frequency increased, whereas the a.c. conductivity increased as frequency increased.

  15. Calcium carbonate corrosivity in an Alaskan inland sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W.; Mathis, J. T.; Cross, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean acidification is the hydrogen ion increase caused by the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2, and is a focal point in marine biogeochemistry, in part, because this chemical reaction reduces calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation states (Ω) to levels that are corrosive (i.e. Ω ≤ 1) to shell-forming marine organisms. However, other processes can drive CaCO3 corrosivity; specifically, the addition of tidewater glacier melt. To highlight this process, we present carbonate system data collected in May (spring) and September (autumn) starting 2009 through 2012 from Prince William Sound (PWS), a semi-enclosed inland sea located on the south-central coast of Alaska that is ringed with fjords containing tidewater glaciers. Initial sampling in PWS covered limited stations in the western sound, and Ω levels corrosive to aragonite, a form of CaCO3, were observed in association with glacial melt during autumn. Beginning in September 2011, expanded sampling spanned the western and central sound, and included two fjords proximal to tidewater glaciers: Icy Bay and Columbia Bay. The observed conditions in these fjords affected CaCO3 corrosivity in the upper water column (< 50 m) in PWS in two ways: (1) as spring-time formation sites of mode water with near-corrosive Ω levels seen below the mixed layer depth across the sound, and (2) as point sources for surface plumes of glacial melt with corrosive Ω levels (Ω for aragonite and calcite down to 0.60 and 1.02, respectively) and carbon dioxide partial pressures (pCO2) well below atmospheric levels. The cumulative effect of glacial melt is likely responsible for the seasonal widespread reduction of Ω in PWS; however, glacial melt-driven CaCO3 corrosivity is poorly reflected by pCO2 or pHT, indicating that any one of those carbonate parameters alone would inadequately track corrosive conditions in PWS. The unique conditions of the carbonate system in the surface glacial melt plumes enhances atmospheric CO2 uptake, which, if

  16. Preparation, crystal growth and luminescence in calcium sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightwell, J. W.; Ray, B.; Buckley, C. N.

    1982-09-01

    The preparation of microcrystalline CaS of high purity, as determined from X-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, is reported. Systematic doping of CaS with between 2.0×10 -5 and 1.5×10 -3 mole parts of Mn has been carried out. Single crystal CaS, taking an octahedral habit with side dimensions up to 1 mm, has been prepared by chemical vapour transport using iodine at a concentration of 1 μg mm -3 for growth over a temperature differential 1200 to 800°C. A model supported by thermodynamic data is advanced for crystal growth of CaS with HI rather than I 2 being postulated as the principal transporting agent. Fluorescent emission spectra have indicated substantial emission in the blue-green for undoped single crystal CaS and for microcrystalline CaS with low Mn levels, whilst for 7.5×10 -4 and 1.5×10 -3 mole parts of Mn significant orange emission at 575 nm

  17. Effects of phosphate pollutants on the growth of the oyster Crassostrea virginica in the Pamlico River estuary and on calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro. Part 2. Extension. Period of project: September 1, 1984-February 28, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four phosphates at various concentrations were studied for effect on shell growth of the clam Rangia cuneata over 24 h and 36 h using /sup 45/Ca. Four phosphates, present in polluted waters, have been examined for their effects at various concentrations on crystallization rate of CaCO/sub 3/ in vitro. Growth of the clam in the Pamlico River, North Carolina, were followed during fall, winter, and spring along with records of phosphate, temperature, salinity, chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen of the native water. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Mechanochemical-hydrothermal synthesis of calcium phosphate powders with coupled magnesium and carbonate substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchanek, Wojciech L.; Byrappa, Kullaiah; Shuk, Pavel; Riman, Richard E.; Janas, Victor F.; TenHuisen, Kevor S.

    2004-03-01

    Magnesium- and carbonate-substituted calcium phosphate powders (Mg-, CO 3-CaP) with various crystallinity levels were prepared at room temperature via a heterogeneous reaction between MgCO 3/Ca(OH) 2 powders and an (NH 4) 2HPO 4 solution using the mechanochemical-hydrothermal route. X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis were performed. It was determined that the powders containing both Mg 2+ and CO 32- ions were incorporated uniformly into an amorphous calcium phosphate phase while in contrast, the as-prepared powder free of these dopants was crystalline phase-pure, stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the average particle size of the room temperature Mg-, CO 3-CaP powders was in the range of 482 nm-700 nm with a specific surface area between 53 and 91 m 2/g. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the Mg-, CO 3-CaP powders consisted of agglomerates of equiaxed, ≈20-35 nm crystals.

  19. SURVEY OF NUMBER AND ARRANGEMENT OF CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS IN LEAVES OF ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL SOYBEAN AND ALLIED TAXA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean is only one of many flowering plants that contain calcium oxalate crystals in its plant organs, especially in the leaves. Even though the functional significance of the crystals is still not understood, the sometimes massive amount, location and structure of crystals have been used in syste...

  20. DFT Calculations with van der Waals Interactions of Hydrated Calcium Carbonate Crystals CaCO3·(H2O, 6H2O): Structural, Electronic, Optical, and Vibrational Properties.

    PubMed

    Costa, Stefane N; Freire, Valder N; Caetano, Ewerton W S; Maia, Francisco F; Barboza, Carlos A; Fulco, Umberto L; Albuquerque, Eudenilson L

    2016-07-21

    The role of hydration on the structural, electronic, optical, and vibrational properties of monohydrated (CaCO3·H2O, hexagonal, P31, Z = 9) and hexahydrated (CaCO3·6H2O, monoclinic, C2/c, Z = 4) calcite crystals is assessed with the help of published experimental and theoretical data applying density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a dispersion correction scheme. We show that the presence of water increases the main band gap of monohydrocalcite by 0.4 eV relative to the anhydrous structure, although practically not changing the hexahydrocalcite band gap. The gap type, however, is modified from indirect to direct as one switches from the monohydrated to the hexahydrated crystal. A good agreement was obtained between the simulated vibrational infrared and Raman spectra and the experimental data, with an infrared signature of hexahydrocalcite relative to monohydrocalcite being observed at 837 cm(-1). Other important vibrational signatures of the lattice, water molecules, and CO3(2-) were identified as well. Analysis of the phonon dispersion curves shows that, as the hydration level of calcite increases, the longitudinal optical-transverse optical phonon splitting becomes smaller. The thermodynamics properties of hexahydrocalcite as a function of temperature resemble closely those of calcite, while monohydrocalcite exhibits a very distinct behavior. PMID:27409458

  1. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  2. Growth Rate of Calcite Steps as a Function of Aqueous Calcium-to-Carbonate Ratio: Independent Attachment and Detachment of Calcium and Carbonate Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G; Grantham, Ms. Meg

    2010-01-01

    Growth rates of monolayer-height steps on the {1014} calcite surface have been measured as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio. The maximum growth rates of the two common crystallographic orientations were found to deviate from the ideal stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, and dissolution features were observed under supersaturated solutions containing high calcium-to-carbonate ratios. To explain these phenomena, a theory is applied that treats the rates of attachment and detachment of aqueous calcium and carbonate ions separately. The resultant attachment rate constants are 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the water exchange rate of the constituent aqueous ions, suggesting that ligand-exchange processes may directly drive attachment. The broader implication is that the saturation state alone is not adequate to fully describe the rates of the multiple, independent reactions that occur on mineral surfaces under these conditions.

  3. Calcium carbonate corrosivity in an Alaskan inland sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W.; Mathis, J. T.; Cross, J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is the hydrogen ion increase caused by the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2, and is a focal point in marine biogeochemistry, in part, because this chemical reaction reduces calcium carbonate (CaCO3) saturation states (Ω) to levels that are corrosive (i.e., Ω ≤ 1) to shell-forming marine organisms. However, other processes can drive CaCO3 corrosivity; specifically, the addition of tidewater glacial melt. Carbonate system data collected in May and September from 2009 through 2012 in Prince William Sound (PWS), a semienclosed inland sea located on the south-central coast of Alaska and ringed with fjords containing tidewater glaciers, reveal the unique impact of glacial melt on CaCO3 corrosivity. Initial limited sampling was expanded in September 2011 to span large portions of the western and central sound, and included two fjords proximal to tidewater glaciers: Icy Bay and Columbia Bay. The observed conditions in these fjords affected CaCO3 corrosivity in the upper water column (< 50 m) in PWS in two ways: (1) as spring-time formation sites of mode water with near-corrosive Ω levels seen below the mixed layer over a portion of the sound, and (2) as point sources for surface plumes of glacial melt with corrosive Ω levels (Ω for aragonite and calcite down to 0.60 and 1.02, respectively) and carbon dioxide partial pressures (pCO2) well below atmospheric levels. CaCO3 corrosivity in glacial melt plumes is poorly reflected by pCO2 or pHT, indicating that either one of these carbonate parameters alone would fail to track Ω in PWS. The unique Ω and pCO2 conditions in the glacial melt plumes enhances atmospheric CO2 uptake, which, if not offset by mixing or primary productivity, would rapidly exacerbate CaCO3 corrosivity in a positive feedback. The cumulative effects of glacial melt and air-sea gas exchange are likely responsible for the seasonal reduction of Ω in PWS, making PWS highly sensitive to increasing atmospheric CO2 and amplified Ca

  4. Intracrystalline Proteins Promote Dissolution of Urinary Calcium Oxalate Crystals in Cultured Renal Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Phulwinder K.; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Fleming, David E.; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2007-04-01

    We have proposed that internalized calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals containing intracrystalline proteins would be vulnerable to intracellular dissolution. The aims of this study were (1) to measure non-uniform strain and crystallite size in CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystals containing increasing amounts of intracrystalline crystal matrix extract (CME) and (2) to compare the rates of crystal dissolution in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cells. CME was isolated by demineralization of COM crystals generated from human urine. Cold and 14C-oxalate-labelled COM crystals were precipitated from ultrafiltered urine containing CME at final concentrations of 0-5mg/L. Non-uniform strain and crystallite size were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with Rietveld whole-pattern peak fitting and profile analysis, and the protein content of the crystals was analyzed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting for prothrombin fragment 1. Radiolabeled crystals were added to MDCKII cells and dissolution was expressed as radioactive label released into the medium relative to that in the crystals at zero time. Non-uniform strain increased and crystallite size decreased proportionally with rising CME concentration, reaching saturation between approximately 1 and 5 mg/L, and demonstrating unequivocally the inclusion of increasing quantities of proteins in the crystals. This was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Crystal dissolution also followed saturation kinetics. These findings were confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), which showed that the degree of crystal degradation increased relative to CME concentration. We conclude that intracrystalline proteins enhance intracellular dissolution of CaOx crystals and thus may provide a natural defense against stone pathogenesis.

  5. Controlled degradation pattern of hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ning; Zhong, Qiwei; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) is widely used in clinic due to its good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity except for its slow degradation speed. In the present study, spherical calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) is fabricated in the presence of silk protein sericin, which is transmuted into HAP microsphere in phosphate solution with the assistance of microwave irradiation. The effect of reaction conditions on the conversion of CaCO3 is investigated including reaction time, chemical composition of phosphate solution, and microwave power to get a series of HAP/CaCO3 composites. The degradation property of the composites is evaluated in vitro. Results show the degradation speed of the composite with higher HAP content is slower. The degradation rate of the composite could be changed effectively by modulating the proportion of HAP and CaCO3 . This work provides a feasible method for the preparation of spherical HAP/CaCO3 composite with controllable degradability. The composite thus obtained may be an ideal material for bone tissue engineering application. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:518-524, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037606

  6. Synthesis of calcium carbonate nanocrystals and their potential application as vessels for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Viviana; Carata, Elisabetta; Panzarini, Elisa; Baldassare, Francesca; Dini, Luciana; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Pure and stable calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanocrystals were synthesized by spray drying method. We exploited the opportunity to use them as vessels for drug delivery studying the biocompatibility and the internalization in HeLa cells.

  7. [Either calcium carbonate or sevelamer decreases urinary oxalate excretion in chronic renal failure patients].

    PubMed

    Caravaca, F; Ruiz, A B; Escola, J M; Hernández Gallego, R; Cerezo, I; Fernández, N; Barroso, S; Martín, M V

    2007-01-01

    The rate of oxalate absorbed from intestine is highly influenced by calcium intake in healthy subjects. It is unknown whether commonly used phosphate binders modify intestinal absorption and renal excretion of oxalate in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study aims to determine if calcium carbonate or sevelamer influences on urinary oxalate excretion. Twenty patients with CKD (stage 4 and 5 pre-dialysis) were included. Two treatment (1500 mg of calcium carbonate or 2400 mg of sevelamer), two-period (21 days each), crossover study with balanced assignment of the order of administration, and two washout periods were the main characteristics of this study design. Laboratory analyses in each phase included: serum creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, bicarbonate, total cholesterol, and 24 h urinary excretion of oxalate, creatinine, and urea. Creatinine clearance, protein catabolic rate (PNNA), total urinary oxalate excretion, and urinary oxalate / creatinine ratio were determined. Seventeen patients completed both treatment sequences. Total urinary oxalate excretion and urinary oxalate / creatinine ratios decreased significantly with respect to washout periods either after sevelamer or calcium carbonate treatment. The decrease in urinary oxalate excretion was greater after calcium carbonate (41.2+/-17.4%) than after sevelamer treatment (30.4+/-23.8%). There were not significant changes in renal function or PNNA values throughout the study periods. In conclusion, either calcium carbonate or sevelamer significantly reduces urinary oxalate excretion in CKD patients. Further studies will be needed to ascertain whether the type of phosphate binder influences on the accumulation of oxalate in CKD patients. PMID:17944584

  8. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  9. A simple method for quantitating the propensity for calcium oxalate crystallization in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wabner, C. L.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the propensity for spontaneous crystallization of calcium oxalate in urine, the permissible increment in oxalate is calculated. The previous method required visual observation of crystallization with the addition of oxalate, this warranted the need for a large volume of urine and a sacrifice in accuracy in defining differences between small incremental changes of added oxalate. Therefore, this method has been miniaturized and spontaneous crystallization is detected from the depletion of radioactive oxalate. The new "micro" method demonstrated a marked decrease (p < 0.001) in the permissible increment in oxalate in urine of stone formers versus normal subjects. Moreover, crystallization inhibitors added to urine, in vitro (heparin or diphosphonate) or in vivo (potassium citrate administration), substantially increased the permissible increment in oxalate. Thus, the "micro" method has proven reliable and accurate in discriminating stone forming from control urine and in distinguishing changes of inhibitory activity.

  10. The role of prenucleation clusters in surface-induced calcium phosphate crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Archan; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Müller, Frank A.; Will, Julia; Frederik, Peter M.; de With, Gijsbertus; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Unravelling the processes of calcium phosphate formation is important in our understanding of both bone and tooth formation, and also of pathological mineralization, for example in cardiovascular disease. Serum is a metastable solution from which calcium phosphate precipitates in the presence of calcifiable templates such as collagen, elastin and cell debris. A pathological deficiency of inhibitors leads to the uncontrolled deposition of calcium phosphate. In bone and teeth the formation of apatite crystals is preceded by an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) precursor phase. ACP formation is thought to proceed through prenucleation clusters-stable clusters that are present in solution already before nucleation-as was recently demonstrated for CaCO3 (refs 15,16). However, the role of such nanometre-sized clusters as building blocks for ACP has been debated for many years. Here we demonstrate that the surface-induced formation of apatite from simulated body fluid starts with the aggregation of prenucleation clusters leading to the nucleation of ACP before the development of oriented apatite crystals.

  11. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  12. Pore fluid chemistry and spectral induced polarization signatures of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-12-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals are a key family of compounds that frequently precipitate during natural and engineered subsurface processes. They play important roles in elemental cycling within geosystems and can be utilized in the context of environmental remediation (such as metal sequestration through co-precipitation) and in geotechnical engineering (such as improving soil strength or decreasing rock permeability). Characterizing the spatial extent and temporal dynamics of carbonate mineral precipitation is critical for these studies. Our previous research has indicated the potential of geophysical methods, particularly spectral induced polarization (SIP) for tracking the onset and evolution of mineral precipitates, including calcite. Here, we experimentally document the significant role of pore fluid chemistry and surface charge structure on the SIP signature of calcium carbonates. Our column studies revealed that the SIP signature of calcium carbonate is dictated by surface charge structure that relies heavily on surface complexation properties, such as charge density and speciation. For calcium carbonate, the primary potential determining ions (PDIs) are calcium and carbonate ions and the SIP signatures of calcium carbonate are primarily controlled by the concentrations of these species. Our data show that calcium carbonates in thermodynamic equilibrium with pore fluid produce a negligible SIP response due to very small (if any) surface charges. In contrast, systems that are over saturated with respect to calcium carbonate (i.e., far from equilibrium) produce significant SIP responses, which is consistent with high surface charge densities shown by high zeta potential values in previous studies. Our studies reveal that a closed system that transitions from over-saturation to equilibrium conditions is accompanied by significant decrease of SIP signals (and vice-versa). The studies also show that the effect of pH on SIP signature of calcium carbonate is

  13. Calcium carbonate nucleation driven by ion binding in a biomimetic matrix revealed by in situ electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeets, Paul J. M.; Cho, Kang Rae; Kempen, Ralph G. E.; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; de Yoreo, James J.

    2015-04-01

    The characteristic shapes, structures and properties of biominerals arise from their interplay with a macromolecular matrix. The developing mineral interacts with acidic macromolecules, which are either dissolved in the crystallization medium or associated with insoluble matrix polymers, that affect growth habits and phase selection or completely inhibit precipitation in solution. Yet little is known about the role of matrix-immobilized acidic macromolecules in directing mineralization. Here, by using in situ liquid-phase electron microscopy to visualize the nucleation and growth of CaCO3 in a matrix of polystyrene sulphonate (PSS), we show that the binding of calcium ions to form Ca-PSS globules is a key step in the formation of metastable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), an important precursor phase in many biomineralization systems. Our findings demonstrate that ion binding can play a significant role in directing nucleation, independently of any control over the free-energy barrier to nucleation.

  14. Influence of eggshell matrix proteins on the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Hernández, A.; Vidal, M. L.; Gómez-Morales, J.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A. B.; Labas, V.; Gautron, J.; Nys, Y.; García Ruiz, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    To understand the role of eggshell organic matrix on the biomineralization process, we have tested the influence of different purified fractions of the eggshell organic matrix on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) precipitation. Purification was carried out after successive anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and gel filtration chromatography of two different prepurified eggshell extracts (A) and (B); the purified fractions (named g, h, n and r) and ( c', g', i', k') respectively were diluted to 50 μg/ml before being tested in vitro and analysed by the sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) procedure and mass spectrometry. The precipitation experiments were carried out by the method of vapour diffusion on crystallization mushrooms. Each purified fraction showed a different effect on CaCO 3 precipitation. Some of them exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on nucleation, thus suppressing the precipitation of CaCO 3 almost totally while the others did not produce any notable effect. However, all fractions favoured the precipitation of calcite over the other CaCO 3 polymorphs. Additionally, all fractions modified in a different manner the size and morphology of the precipitated calcite crystals.

  15. High Calcium (~80mol%) Late Stage Carbonate in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, K. J.; Holland, G.; Lyon, I. C.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Burgess, R.

    2006-03-01

    Brief petrological, chemical and textural description of previously undescribed high Ca late stage carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001. This carbonate surrounds Mg rich carbonates and rosette fragments.

  16. GFP Facilitates Native Purification of Recombinant Perlucin Derivatives and Delays the Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Eva; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2012-01-01

    Insolubility is one of the possible functions of proteins involved in biomineralization, which often limits their native purification. This becomes a major problem especially when recombinant expression systems are required to obtain larger amounts. For example, the mollusc shell provides a rich source of unconventional proteins, which can interfere in manifold ways with different mineral phases and interfaces. Therefore, the relevance of such proteins for biotechnological processes is still in its infancy. Here we report a simple and reproducible purification procedure for a GFP-tagged lectin involved in biomineralization, originally isolated from mother-of-pearl in abalone shells. An optimization of E. coli host cell culture conditions was the key to obtain reasonable yields and high degrees of purity by using simple one-step affinity chromatography. We identified a dual functional role for the GFP domain when it became part of a mineralizing system in vitro. First, the GFP domain improved the solubility of an otherwise insoluble protein, in this case recombinant perlucin derivatives. Second, GFP inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation in a concentration dependent manner. This was demonstrated here using a simple bulk assay over a time period of 400 seconds. At concentrations of 2 µg/ml and higher, the inhibitory effect was observed predominantly for HCO3− as the first ionic interaction partner, but not necessarily for Ca2+. The interference of GFP-tagged perlucin derivatives with the precipitation of calcium carbonate generated different types of GFP-fluorescent composite calcite crystals. GFP-tagging offers therefore a genetically tunable tool to gently modify mechanical and optical properties of synthetic biocomposite minerals. PMID:23056388

  17. GFP facilitates native purification of recombinant perlucin derivatives and delays the precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Weber, Eva; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2012-01-01

    Insolubility is one of the possible functions of proteins involved in biomineralization, which often limits their native purification. This becomes a major problem especially when recombinant expression systems are required to obtain larger amounts. For example, the mollusc shell provides a rich source of unconventional proteins, which can interfere in manifold ways with different mineral phases and interfaces. Therefore, the relevance of such proteins for biotechnological processes is still in its infancy. Here we report a simple and reproducible purification procedure for a GFP-tagged lectin involved in biomineralization, originally isolated from mother-of-pearl in abalone shells. An optimization of E. coli host cell culture conditions was the key to obtain reasonable yields and high degrees of purity by using simple one-step affinity chromatography. We identified a dual functional role for the GFP domain when it became part of a mineralizing system in vitro. First, the GFP domain improved the solubility of an otherwise insoluble protein, in this case recombinant perlucin derivatives. Second, GFP inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation in a concentration dependent manner. This was demonstrated here using a simple bulk assay over a time period of 400 seconds. At concentrations of 2 µg/ml and higher, the inhibitory effect was observed predominantly for HCO(3) (-) as the first ionic interaction partner, but not necessarily for Ca(2+). The interference of GFP-tagged perlucin derivatives with the precipitation of calcium carbonate generated different types of GFP-fluorescent composite calcite crystals. GFP-tagging offers therefore a genetically tunable tool to gently modify mechanical and optical properties of synthetic biocomposite minerals. PMID:23056388

  18. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  19. The effect of alginates, fucans and phenolic substances from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora in calcium carbonate mineralization in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, L. T.; Amado Filho, G. M.; Fernandez, M. S.; Arias, J. L.; Farina, M.

    2011-04-01

    The mineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) in the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora is a biologically induced process and is restricted to the cell wall surface. It has been suggested that the CaCO 3 crystallization that occurs over the thallus cell wall surface is induced by changes in the surface pH caused by a local efflux of OH -, Ca ++ and HCO3- ions. However, no studies on the roles of the P. gymnospora cell wall components in this mineralization process had been performed. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of a subset of P. gymnospora cell wall molecules on CaCO 3 crystallization in vitro. The molecules tested were the anionic polysaccharides alginates and fucans (with potential nucleation activity) and phenolic substances (secondary metabolites with amphipathic property). The crystallization assays were performed using polystyrene microbridges as the crystallization apparatus. Crystals formed in the microbridges were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the results confirmed that the phenolic substances have the specific capability of changing the morphology of calcite crystals grown in vitro by inducing an elongated morphology in the direction of the c-axis. This morphology is similar to that induced by molecules that attach to { h k 0}-crystal planes. It was also shown that the alginates and the fucans do not specifically modulate the morphology of the growing crystals. In fact, these crystals exhibited a rounded shape due to the slower growth rates of several new crystal planes that appeared in the place of the original corners and edges.

  20. Crystal structure of complex natural aluminum magnesium calcium iron oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2010-07-15

    The structure of a new natural oxide found near the Tashelga River (Eastern Siberia) was studied by X-ray diffraction. The pseudo-orthorhombic unit cell parameters are a = 5.6973(1) A, b = 17.1823(4) A, c = 23.5718(5) A, {beta} = 90{sup o}, sp. gr. Pc. The structure was refined to R = 0.0516 based on 4773 reflections with vertical bar F vertical bar > 7{sigma}(F) taking into account the twin plane perpendicular to the z axis (the twin components are 0.47 and 0.53). The crystal-chemical formula (Z = 4) is Ca{sub 2}Mg{sub 2}{sup IV}Fe{sub 2}{sup (2+)IV}[Al{sub 14}{sup VI}O{sub 31}(OH)][Al{sub 2}{sup IV}O][Al{sup IV}]AL{sup IV}(OH)], where the Roman numerals designate the coordination of the atoms. The structure of the mineral is based on wide ribbons of edge-sharing Al octahedra (an integral part of the spinel layer). The ribbons run along the shortest x axis and are inclined to the y and z axes. The adjacent ribbons are shifted with respect to each other along the y axis, resulting in the formation of step-like layers in which the two-ribbon thickness alternates with the three-ribbon thickness. Additional Al octahedra and Mg and Fe{sup 2+} tetrahedra are located between the ribbons. The layers are linked together to form a three-dimensional framework by Al tetrahedra, Ca polyhedra, and hydrogen bonds with the participation of OH groups.

  1. Revisiting spatial distribution and biochemical composition of calcium-containing crystals in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium-containing (CaC) crystals, including basic calcium phosphate (BCP) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP), are associated with destructive forms of osteoarthritis (OA). We assessed their distribution and biochemical and morphologic features in human knee OA cartilage. Methods We prospectively included 20 patients who underwent total knee replacement (TKR) for primary OA. CaC crystal characterization and identification involved Fourier-transform infra-red spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy of 8 to 10 cartilage zones of each knee, including medial and lateral femoral condyles and tibial plateaux and the intercondyle zone. Differential expression of genes involved in the mineralization process between cartilage with and without calcification was assessed in samples from 8 different patients by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry and histology studies were performed in 6 different patients. Results Mean (SEM) age and body mass index of patients at the time of TKR was 74.6 (1.7) years and 28.1 (1.6) kg/m², respectively. Preoperative X-rays showed joint calcifications (chondrocalcinosis) in 4 cases only. The medial femoro-tibial compartment was the most severely affected in all cases, and mean (SEM) Kellgren-Lawrence score was 3.8 (0.1). All 20 OA cartilages showed CaC crystals. The mineral content represented 7.7% (8.1%) of the cartilage weight. All patients showed BCP crystals, which were associated with CPP crystals for 8 joints. CaC crystals were present in all knee joint compartments and in a mean of 4.6 (1.7) of the 8 studied areas. Crystal content was similar between superficial and deep layers and between medial and femoral compartments. BCP samples showed spherical structures, typical of biological apatite, and CPP samples showed rod-shaped or cubic structures. The expression of several genes involved in mineralization, including human homolog of progressive ankylosis, plasma-cell-membrane glycoprotein 1 and tissue

  2. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  3. Sulfur Cycling Mediates Calcium Carbonate Geochemistry in Modern Marine Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, P. T.; Hoeft, S. E.; Bebout, B. M.; Reid, R. P.

    2004-01-01

    Modem marine stromatolites forming in Highborne Cay, Exumas (Bahamas), contain microbial mats dominated by Schizothrix. Although saturating concentrations of Ca2+ and CO32- exist, microbes mediate CaCO3 precipitation. Cyanobacterial photosynthesis in these stromatolites aids calcium carbonate precipitation by removal of HS+ through CO2 use. Photorespiration and exopolymer production predominantly by oxygenic phototrophs fuel heterotrophic activity: aerobic respiration (approximately 60 umol/sq cm.h) and sulfate reduction (SR; 1.2 umol SO42-/sq cm.h) are the dominant C- consuming processes. Aerobic microbial respiration and the combination of SR and H2S oxidation both facilitate CaCO3 dissolution through H+ production. Aerobic respiration consumes much more C on an hourly basis, but duel fluctuating O2 and H2 depth profiles indicate that overall, SR consumes only slightly less (0.2-0.5) of the primary production. Moreover, due to low O2 concentrations when SR rates are peaking, reoxidation of the H2S formed is incomplete: both thiosulfate and polythionates are formed. The process of complete H2S oxidation yields H+. However, due to a low O2 concentration late in the day and relatively high O2 concentrations early in the following morning, a two-stage oxidation takes place: first, polythionates are formed from H2S, creating alkalinity which coincides with CaCO3 precipitation; secondly, oxidation of polythionates to sulfate yields acidity, resulting in dissolution, etc. Vertical profiles confirmed that the pH peaked late in the afternoon (greater than 8.8) and had the lowest values (less than 7.4) early in the morning. Thus, the effect of this S-cycling through alkalinity production, followed by acidification during H2S oxidation, results in a six times stronger fluctuation in acidity than photosynthesis plus aerobic respiration accomplish. This implies that anaerobic processes play a pivotal role in stromatolite formation.

  4. In vitro inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization and crystal adherence to renal tubular epithelial cells by Terminalia arjuna.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Tandon, S; Singla, S K; Tandon, C

    2016-04-01

    Urolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and remains a public health problem around the world. Of all types of renal stones, calcium oxalate (CaOx) is the most common composition formed in the urinary system of the patients with urolithiasis. The present study is aimed at evaluating the antiurolithiatic properties of the Tris-Cl extract (TE) of Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna). The antilithiatic activity of TE of T. arjuna was investigated on nucleation, aggregation, and growth of the CaOx crystals, as well as its protective potency was tested on oxalate-induced cell injury of NRK-52E renal epithelial cells. Also, in vitro antioxidant activity of TE T. arjuna bark was also determined. The TE of T. arjuna exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of nucleation and growth of CaOx crystals. Inhibition of aggregation of CaOx crystals remains constant. When NRK-52E cells were injured by exposure to oxalate for 48 h, the TE prevented the cells from injury and CaOx crystal adherence resulting in increased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The TE also scavenged the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals with an IC50 at 51.72 µg/mL. The results indicated that T. arjuna is a potential candidate for phytotherapy against urolithiasis as it attains the ability to inhibit CaOx crystallization and scavenge DPPH free radicals in vitro along with a cytoprotective role. PMID:26424092

  5. Effects of polymer concentration on the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals formed in polyacrylamide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Taishi; Kawashita, Masakazu; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2013-11-01

    Growing crystals in hydrogels is an attractive method to form inorganic solids with designed morphology under ambient conditions. Precipitation of the inorganic solids in a hydrogel matrix can be regarded as mimicking the process of biomineralization. In the construction of biominerals, an organic template composed of insoluble macromolecules is used to control the crystal growth of the inorganic compounds. The morphological control in biomineralization can be applied to artificial reaction systems. In this study, the morphology of calcium phosphate crystals formed in polymeric hydrogels of various polymer concentrations was investigated. Spherical octacalcium phosphate (OCP) precipitated in the polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels. Fibrous crystals gradually covered the surface of the spherical crystals as the polymer concentration of the gel increased. The morphology of the OCP crystals changed from sea urchin shapes to wool-ball shapes with increasing PAAm concentration. The morphological change is generated by the template effect of the polymer wall, which is made up of stacked PAAm sheets, surrounding the spherical OCP crystals.

  6. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate: Implications for their use as paleoclimatic proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodler, A.; Sánchez-Pastor, N.; Fernández-Díaz, L.; Frei, R.

    2015-09-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during the Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation of chromate into the calcite lattice to investigate isotopic changes facilitated by the coprecipitation process. Our experiments indicate enrichment in Cr concentration in the precipitates compared to the solutions, consistent with previous reports of Cr enrichment in chemical sediments compared to ambient seawater. The fractionation of Cr isotopes during calcium carbonate coprecipitation was assumed to be small, based on previously published data of modern seawater and modern non-skeletal marine carbonates. However, results from this study for rapidly precipitated calcium carbonate in the presence of chromate show a tendency for preferential incorporation of heavy Cr isotopes in the precipitates resulting in increasing relative isotope difference between precipitate and initial solution (Δ53Cr[p-is]) from +0.06‰ to +0.18‰, with increasing initial Cr concentration of the solution. Sample precipitation in the presence of chromate also showed the presence of vaterite. Calcium carbonate crystals were also precipitated in a double diffusion silica hydrogel over a longer period of time resulting in samples consisting of micrometric-millimetric calcite crystals, which were again significantly enriched in heavy Cr isotopes compared to the initial solutions. They average, irrespective of the initial Cr concentration, a relative isotope difference (Δ53Cr[p-is]) of +0.29 ± 0.08‰ (2σ), whereas

  7. Basic calcium phosphate crystal-induced Egr-1 expression stimulates mitogenesis in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiao R.; Sun Yubo; Wenger, Leonor; Cheung, Herman S. . E-mail: hcheung@med.miami.edu

    2005-05-13

    Previously, we have reported that basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals stimulate mitogenesis and synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases in cultured human foreskin and synovial fibroblasts. However, the detailed mechanisms involved are still unclear. In the present study, using RT-PCR and Egr-1 promoter analysis we showed that BCP crystals could stimulate early growth response gene Egr-1 transcription through a PKC{alpha}-dependent p44/p42 MAPK pathway. Using a retrovirus gene expression system (Clontech) to overexpress Egr-1 in human fibroblast BJ-1 cells resulted in promotion of mitogenesis measured either by MTT cell proliferation analysis or by direct cell counting. The results demonstrate that Egr-1 may play a key role in mediating BCP crystal-induced synovial fibroblast mitogenesis.

  8. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition. PMID:25411524

  9. Effects of calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite on zinc and iron retention in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson-Hughes, B.; Seligson, F.H.; Hughes, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    We measured the effect of calcium carbonate and hydroxyapatite on whole-body retention of zinc-65 in 11 and iron-59 in 13 healthy, postmenopausal women. In a single-blind, controlled, crossover study, each subject, on three occasions, ingested a standard test meal supplemented with iron-59 or zinc-65 and capsules containing placebo or 500 mg elemental calcium as calcium carbonate or hydroxyapatite. Whole-body countings were performed prior to, 30 min after, and 2 wk after each meal. Mean (SEM) zinc retention was 18.1 +/- 1.0% with placebo (control) and did not vary significantly with calcium carbonate (110.0 +/- 8.6% of control) or hydroxyapatite (106.0 +/- 7.9% of control). Iron retention, 6.3 +/- 2.0% with placebo, was significantly reduced with both calcium carbonate (43.3 +/- 8.8% of control, p = 0.002) and hydroxyapatite (45.9 +/- 10.0% of control, p = 0.003). Iron absorption may be significantly reduced when calcium supplements are taken with meals.

  10. Isolation and metagenomic characterization of bacteria associated with calcium carbonate and struvite precipitation in a pure moving bed biofilm reactor-membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A; Leyva-Díaz, J C; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A; Muñoz-Palazon, B; Rivadeneyra, A; Poyatos, J M; Rivadeneyra, M A; Martinez-Toledo, M V

    2015-01-01

    A bench-scale pure moving bed bioreactor-membrane bioreactor (MBBR-MBR) used for the treatment of urban wastewater was analyzed for the identification of bacterial strains with the potential capacity for calcium carbonate and struvite biomineral formation. Isolation of mineral-forming strains on calcium carbonate and struvite media revealed six major colonies with a carbonate or struvite precipitation capacity in the biofouling on the membrane surface and showed that heterotrophic bacteria with the ability to precipitate calcium carbonate and struvite constituted ~7.5% of the total platable bacteria. These belonged to the genera Lysinibacillus, Trichococcus, Comamomas and Bacillus. Pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial communities in the suspended cells and membrane biofouling showed a high degree of similarity in all the samples collected with respect to bacterial assemblage. The study of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified through pyrosequencing suggested that ~21% of the total bacterial community identified in the biofouling could potentially form calcium carbonate or struvite crystals in the pure MBBR-MBR system used for the treatment of urban wastewater. PMID:26000766

  11. Aqueous extract of Costus arabicus inhibits calcium oxalate crystal growth and adhesion to renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    de Cógáin, Mitra R; Linnes, Michael P; Lee, Hyo Jung; Krambeck, Amy E; de Mendonça Uchôa, Julio Cezar; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lieske, John C

    2015-04-01

    Costus arabicus L. (C. arabicus) is a plant used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat urolithiasis; however, its mechanism of action is unclear. The interaction between calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and the renal epithelium is important in calculogenesis, and compounds that modulate this process represent candidate therapeutic agents for stone prevention. Therefore, we assessed the inhibitory activity of C. arabicus on CaOx crystallization and the interaction of CaOx crystals with the renal epithelium. A seeded CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystallization system was used to study the effect of C. arabicus on crystal growth. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were used to study [(14)C] COM crystal adhesion in the presence and absence of an aqueous extract of C. arabicus. Cytotoxicity was assessed using a tetrazolium (MTS) cell proliferation assay. Aqueous extracts of C. arabicus decreased crystal growth in a concentration-dependent fashion. Precoating crystals with C. arabicus extract prevented their adhesion to MDCK cells, while pretreating cells did not show any effect. The extract was non-cytotoxic in concentrations of at least 1 mg/ml, which is likely above concentrations achievable in the urine following oral ingestion and excretion. No inhibitory activity was found in hexane, methyl chloride, n-butanol and ethyl acetate fractions of an ethanol extract of the herb. An aqueous extract of C. arabicus may disrupt calculogenesis by interacting with CaOx crystal surfaces. Activity was present in the aqueous extract; therefore, this agent may be bioavailable when administered orally. Fractionation results suggest that the active agent might be a polar polysaccharide. Further identification and characterization along these lines may be warranted. PMID:25652357

  12. MEDICAGO TRUNCATULA MUTANTS DEMONSTRATE THE ROLE OF PLANT CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS AS AN EFFECTIVE DEFENSE AGAINST CHEWING INSECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate is the most abundant insoluble mineral found in plants and its crystals have been reported in over 200 plant families. In the barrel medic, Medicago truncatula Gaertn., these crystals accumulate predominantly in a sheath surrounding secondary veins of leaves. Mutants of M. truncatul...

  13. pH control in biological systems using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; van Turnhout, A G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-05-01

    Due to its abundance, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has high potentials as a source of alkalinity for biotechnological applications. The application of CaCO3 in biological systems as neutralizing agent is, however, limited due to potential difficulties in controlling the pH. The objective of the present study was to determine the dominant processes that control the pH in an acid-forming microbial process in the presence of CaCO3. To achieve that, a mathematical model was made with a minimum set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions that was able to reproduce the experimental data of a batch fermentation experiment using finely powdered CaCO3. In the model, thermodynamic equilibrium was assumed for all speciation, complexation and precipitation reactions whereas, rate limited reactions were included for the biological fatty acid production, the mass transfer of CO2 from the liquid phase to the gas phase and the convective transport of CO2 out of the gas phase. The estimated pH-pattern strongly resembled the measured pH, suggesting that the chosen set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions were establishing the experimental pH. A detailed analysis of the reaction system with the aid of the model revealed that the pH establishment was most sensitive to four factors: the mass transfer rate of CO2 to the gas phase, the biological acid production rate, the partial pressure of CO2 and the Ca(+2) concentration in the solution. Individual influences of these factors on the pH were investigated by extrapolating the model to a continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) case. This case study indicates how the pH of a commonly used continuous biotechnological process could be manipulated and adjusted by altering these four factors. Achieving a better insight of the processes controlling the pH of a biological system using CaCO3 as its neutralizing agent can result in broader applications of CaCO3 in biotechnological industries. PMID:25425281

  14. Effect of acid rain on calcium carbonate saturation in the Albemarle sound of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, K.A.; Burgess, S.K.; Willey, J.D.; Kieber, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of acidic rainwater additions on calcium carbonate solubility and alkalinity in the poorly buffered, biologically active and commercially important waters of the Albemarle Sound, NC are reported. Samples collected monthly at four sites were analyzed for salinity, pK total alkalinity, and calcium concentrations. Five percent and 10% dilutions of sulfuric acid at pH 4, mimicking acid rain additions, were added and total alkalinity and calcium concentrations again determined. The addition of acid decreased the alkalinity in the Albemarle samples by as much as 15%, although the magnitude of the impact depended both on site and season. The effects of acid additions on dissolved calcium concentrations were more variable,. and also displayed a site and season dependency. Calcium concentrations, alkalinity, and pH values were also determined during controlled laboratory experiments, where 25 mg/L Callinectes sapidus shells were added to Albemarle Sound water. All three analytes increased significantly upon acid additions relative to controls.

  15. A facile magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterial as potential bone graft.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xiumei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-12-01

    The calcium carbonate is the main composition of coral which has been widely used as bone graft in clinic. Herein, we readily prepared novel magnesium-containing calcium carbonate biomaterials (MCCs) under the low-temperature conditions based on the dissolution-recrystallization reaction between unstable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and metastable vaterite-type calcium carbonate with water involved. The content of magnesium in MCCs was tailored by adjusting the proportion of ACC starting material that was prepared using magnesium as stabilizer. The phase composition of MCCs with various amounts of magnesium was composed of one, two or three kinds of calcium carbonates (calcite, aragonite, and/or magnesian calcite). The different MCCs differed in topography. The in vitro degradation of MCCs accelerated with increasing amount of introduced magnesium. The MCCs with a certain amount of magnesium not only acquired higher compressive strength, but also promoted in vitro cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the facile MCCs shed light on their potential as bone graft. PMID:26539810

  16. Recovery of calcium carbonate from steelmaking slag and utilization for acid mine drainage pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Mashego, M; Zvimba, J N

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of steelmaking slag (a waste product of the steelmaking process) to calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) was tested using hydrochloric acid, ammonium hydroxide and carbon dioxide via a pH-swing process. Batch reactors were used to assess the technical feasibility of calcium carbonate recovery and its use for pre-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines. The effects of key process parameters, such as the amount of acid (HCl/calcium molar ratio), the pH and the CO(2) flow rate were considered. It was observed that calcium extraction from steelmaking slag significantly increased with an increase in the amount of hydrochloric acid. The CO(2) flow rate also had a positive effect on the carbonation reaction rate but did not affect the morphology of the calcium carbonate produced for values less than 2 L/min. The CaCO(3) recovered from the bench scale batch reactor demonstrated effective neutralization ability during AMD pre-treatment compared with the commercial laboratory grade CaCO(3). PMID:22643421

  17. Structural and optical properties of calcium neodymium hexaaluminates single crystals, potential laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alablanche, S.; Kahn-Harari, A.; Thery, J.; Viana, B.; Vivien, D.; Dexpert-Ghys, J.; Faucher, M.

    1992-05-01

    The structural and optical properties of calcium-neodymium hexaaluminates crystals Ca 1- xNd xMg x Al 12- xO 19 (labeled Ca 1- xNd x) with a magnetoplumbite (MP) structure are investigated. The floating zone method is used to grow single crystals in the composition range 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.7, although for high calcium content, the melting of the compounds is no longer congruent. The X-ray structural determination, optical absorption at 4 K, and ESR investigation agree in the localization of Nd 3+ at the regular large cations site of the MP structure with axial ( D3 h) symmetry. A set of crystal field and free ion parameters which fits the absorption spectrum of Nd 3+ in this site is calculated. When x increases, Nd 3+ ions tend to occupy also a second site with lower symmetry. Moreover some anomalous behavior observed in the absorption and ESR spectra at high neodymium concentration may be related to Nd 3+-Nd 3+ ion pairing. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime measurements as a function of the x value are reported. There is evidence of strong cross-relaxation between neighboring neodymium ions for high x values. The results obtained for the Ca 1- xNd x compounds can be extended to other series in which Nd 3+ is replaced by another lanthanide ion. Preliminary investigations have been performed with Pr 3+ and are also reported.

  18. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE AND CALCIUM CARBONATE PARTICLE SIZE EFFECTS ON REACTIVITY WITH SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of measurements of the effect of in situ calcium-based sorbent particle size upon reactivity with 3000 ppm SO2 in an 1100 c drop-tube furnace, using on-line collection of the reacted sorbent with a particle cascade impactor. Significant agglomeration occ...

  19. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Han, C.

    1994-10-01

    In this experimental investigation, a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor containing a calcium-based sorbent is being used to study the feasibility of combining CO{sub 2} removal with the water gas shift reaction. The sorptive properties of the calcium oxide sorbent were studied as a function of carbonation temperature and pressure, synthesis gas composition, reactor space velocity, and sorbent composition and properties.

  20. Medicago truncatula Mutants Demonstrate the Role of Plant Calcium Oxalate Crystals as an Effective Defense against Chewing Insects1

    PubMed Central

    Korth, Kenneth L.; Doege, Sarah J.; Park, Sang-Hyuck; Goggin, Fiona L.; Wang, Qin; Gomez, S. Karen; Liu, Guangjie; Jia, Lingling; Nakata, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxalate is the most abundant insoluble mineral found in plants and its crystals have been reported in more than 200 plant families. In the barrel medic Medicago truncatula Gaertn., these crystals accumulate predominantly in a sheath surrounding secondary veins of leaves. Mutants of M. truncatula with decreased levels of calcium oxalate crystals were used to assess the defensive role of this mineral against insects. Caterpillar larvae of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua Hübner show a clear feeding preference for tissue from calcium oxalate-defective (cod) mutant lines cod5 and cod6 in choice test comparisons with wild-type M. truncatula. Compared to their performance on mutant lines, larvae feeding on wild-type plants with abundant calcium oxalate crystals suffer significantly reduced growth and increased mortality. Induction of wound-responsive genes appears to be normal in cod5 and cod6, indicating that these lines are not deficient in induced insect defenses. Electron micrographs of insect mouthparts indicate that the prismatic crystals in M. truncatula leaves act as physical abrasives during feeding. Food utilization measurements show that, after consumption, calcium oxalate also interferes with the conversion of plant material into insect biomass during digestion. In contrast to their detrimental effects on a chewing insect, calcium oxalate crystals do not negatively affect the performance of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris, a sap-feeding insect with piercing-sucking mouthparts. The results confirm a long-held hypothesis for the defensive function of these crystals and point to the potential value of genes controlling crystal formation and localization in crop plants. PMID:16514014

  1. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 8807

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady D.; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Microcosm experiments were performed in which Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and bicarbonate concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Disappearance of soluble calcium was used as an indicator of CaCO3 formation; results from metabolically active microcosms were compared to controls with no cells or no carbonate added. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment with approximately 18.6 mg of calcium in the solid phase. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of calcium was removed in the solid phase. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. Removal of inorganic carbon by fixation into biomass was insignificant compared to the mass of inorganic carbon removed by incorporation into the growing CaCO3 solid.

  2. Synthesis of novel amorphous calcium carbonate by sono atomization for reactive mixing.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kanai, Makoto; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki

    2012-03-01

    Droplets of several micrometers in size can be formed in aqueous solution by atomization under ultrasonic irradiation at 2 MHz. This phenomenon, known as atomization, is capable of forming fine droplets for use as a reaction field. This synthetic method is called SARM (sono atomization for reactive mixing). This paper reports on the synthesis of a novel amorphous calcium carbonate formed by SARM. The amorphous calcium carbonate, obtained at a solution concentration of 0.8 mol/dm(3), had a specific surface area of 65 m(2)/g and a composition of CaCO(3)•0.5H(2)O as determined using thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Because the ACC had a lower hydrate composition than conventional amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), the ACC synthesized in this paper was very stable at room temperature. PMID:21788149

  3. Immobilization of Pseudomonas sp. DG17 onto sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Qi; Hua, Fei; Zhao, Yi Cun; Li, Yi; Wang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas sp. DG17, capable of degrading crude oil, was immobilized in sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate for biodegradation of crude oil contaminated soil. In this work, proportion of independent variables, the laboratory immobilization parameters, the micromorphology and internal structure of the immobilized granule, as well as the crude oil biodegradation by sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate immobilized cells and sodium alginate–attapulgite immobilized cells were studied to build the optimal immobilization carrier and granule-forming method. The results showed that the optimal concentrations of sodium alginate–attapulgite–calcium carbonate and calcium chloride were 2.5%–3.5%, 0.5%–1%, 3%–7% and 2%–4%, respectively. Meanwhile, the optimal bath temperature, embedding cell amount, reaction time and multiplication time were 50–60 °C, 2%, 18 h and 48 h, respectively. Moreover, biodegradation was enhanced by immobilized cells with a total petroleum hydrocarbon removal ranging from 33.56% ± 3.84% to 56.82% ± 3.26% after 20 days. The SEM results indicated that adding calcium carbonate was helpful to form internal honeycomb-like pores in the immobilized granules. PMID:26019567

  4. The influence of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putro, Triswantoro; Endarko

    2016-04-01

    The influences of electron discharge and magnetic field on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation in water have been successfully investigated. The study used three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T whilst the electron discharge was generated from television flyback transformer type BW00607 and stainless steel SUS 304 as an electrode. The water sample with an initial condition of 230 mg/L placed in the reactor with flow rate 375 mL/minutes, result showed that the electron discharge can be reduced contain of calcium carbonate the water sample around 17.39% within 2 hours. Meanwhile for the same long period of treatment and flow rate, around 56.69% from initial condition of 520 mg/L of calcium carbonate in the water sample can be achieved by three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T. When the combination of three pairs of magnetic field 0.1 T and the electron discharge used for treatment, the result showed that the combination of electron discharge and magnetic field methods can be used to precipitate calcium carbonate in the water sample 300 mg/L around 76.66% for 2 hours of treatment. The study then investigated the influence of the polar position of the magnetic field on calcium carbonate precipitation. Two positions of magnetic field were tested namely the system with alternated polar magnetics and the system without inversion of the polar magnetics. The influence of the polar position showed that the percentage reduction in levels of calcium carbonate in the water sample (360 mg/L) is significant different. Result showed that the system without inversion of the polar magnetics is generally lower than the system with alternated polar magnetics, with reduction level at 30.55 and 57.69%, respectively.

  5. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  6. Adsorption of sodium polyacrylate in high solids loading calcium carbonate slurries.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joshua J; Sigmund, Wolfgang M

    2010-01-15

    The adsorption of sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) in slurries with up to 75 wt.% calcium carbonate was investigated with the use of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and adsorption of probe molecules. Analysis of the IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylate groups of NaPAA adsorbed onto ground calcium carbonate (GCC) in three different modes. These modes were shown to be dependent on the solids loading and age of the slurry. Further investigation lead to the determination of the chelating ability of NaPAA at high solids loading. PMID:19875128

  7. How does an amorphous surface influence molecular binding?--ovocleidin-17 and amorphous calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Colin L; Harding, John H; Quigley, David; Rodger, P Mark

    2015-07-14

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of dehydrated amorphous calcium carbonate interacting with the protein ovocleidin-17 are presented. These simulations demonstrate that the amorphisation of the calcium carbonate surface removes water structure from the surface. This reduction of structure allows the protein to bind with many residues, unlike on crystalline surfaces where binding is strongest when only a few residues are attached to the surface. Basic residues are observed to dominate the binding interactions. The implications for protein control over crystallisation are discussed. PMID:26009013

  8. Renal intratubular crystals and hyaluronan staining occur in stone formers with bypass surgery but not with idiopathic calcium oxalate stones.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Coe, Fredric L; Gillen, Daniel; Lingeman, James E; Bledsoe, Sharon; Worcester, Elaine M

    2008-03-01

    Whether idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers form inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) crystal deposits bears on pathogenetic mechanisms of stone formation. In prior work, using light and transmission electron microscopy, we have found no IMCD crystal deposits. Here, we searched serial sections of papillary biopsies from a prior study of 15 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, 4 intestinal bypass patients with CaOx stones, and 4 non-stone-forming subjects, and biopsies from an additional hitherto unreported 15 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers and 1 bypass patient using polarized light oil immersion optics, for deposits overlooked in our original study. We found no IMCD deposits in any of 1,500 serial sections from the 30 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, nor in 87 additional sections from a frozen idiopathic calcium oxalate stone former biopsy sample processed without exposure to aqueous solutions. Among 4 of the 5 bypass patients but in none of the 30 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers or 4 normal stone formers, we found tiny birefringent thin crystalline overlays on scattered IMCD cell membranes. We also found IMCD lumen deposits in two bypass patients that contained mixed birefringent and nonbirefringent crystals, presumably CaOx and apatite. In the bypass patients, we observed focal apical IMCD cell hyaluronan staining, which was absent in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. The absence of any IMCD deposits in 1,500 serial sections of biopsies from 30 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers allows us to place the upper limit on the probability of their occurrence at approximately 0.002 and place the lower limit of their size at the resolution of the optics (<0.2 mu). The tiny deposits in bypass patients may be the initial crystal lesion. PMID:18286613

  9. Nanoscale Confinement Controls the Crystallization of Calcium Phosphate: Relevance to Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cantaert, Bram; Beniash, Elia; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of biomineralization processes is that they take place within confined volumes, in which the local environment can have significant effects on mineral formation. Herein, we investigate the influence of confinement on the formation mechanism and structure of calcium phosphate (CaP). This is of particular relevance to the formation of dentine and bone, structures of which are based on highly mineralized collagen fibrils. CaP was precipitated within 25–300 nm diameter, cylindrical pores of track etched and anodised alumina membranes under physiological conditions, in which this system enables systematic study of the effects of the pore size in the absence of a structural match between the matrix and the growing crystals. Our results show that the main products were polycrystalline hydroxapatite (HAP) rods, together with some single crystal octacalcium phosphate (OCP) rods. Notably, we demonstrate that these were generated though an intermediate amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase, and that ACP is significantly stabilised in confinement. This effect may have significance to the mineralization of bone, which can occur through a transient ACP phase. We also show that orientation of the HAP comparable, or even superior to that seen in bone can be achieved through confinement effects alone. Although this simple experimental system cannot be considered, a direct mimic of the in vivo formation of ultrathin HAP platelets within collagen fibrils, our results show that the effects of physical confinement should not be neglected when considering the mechanisms of formation of structures, such as bones and teeth. PMID:24115275

  10. A Rare Case of Tumoral Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease of the Wrist Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Osamu; Kaji, Yoshio; Yamagami, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Kounosuke; Nishimura, Hideki; Fukuoka, Natsuko; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease (CPPDCD), also known as tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD), is a tumorlike lesion, and it should be distinguished from usual CPDD that causes severe joint inflammation and arthralgia. A case of tumoral CPPDCD of the wrist joint that required differentiation from synovial osteochondromatosis is described. Case Presentation. The patient was a 78-year-old woman with a 5-year history of nodular lesions at the right wrist that had gradually increased in size. An excisional biopsy and a histological examination of the excised nodular lesions by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were performed, demonstrating numerous polarizable, rhabdoid, and rectangular crystals, surrounded by fibroblasts, macrophages, and foreign body-type giant cells, consistent with tumoral CPPDCD. Conclusion. Tumoral CPPDCD, especially at the wrist joint, is rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 2 articles have been published. This case seems to need further follow-up for recurrence, because tumoral CPPDCD may recur after complete or incomplete surgical excision. PMID:26783477

  11. Thermal-Diffusivity Dependence on Temperature of Gadolinium Calcium Oxoborate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.; Łukasiewicz, T.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal diffusivities of pure and doped gadolinium calcium oxoborate (GdCOB) single crystals were measured as a function of the temperature along optical indicatrix axes X, Y, and Z. Three GdCOB samples were investigated, chemically pure single crystal, the one doped with 4 at% of Nd and the next one doped with 7 at% of Yb. Measurements were carried out for temperature range 40 °C to 300 °C. Determination of the thermal diffusivity based on an analysis of thermal wave propagation in the sample. For a detection of temperature disturbance propagating in the sample the mirage effect was used. Obtained results show that the thermal diffusivity decreases with the increase of sample temperature for all investigated crystals. The GdCOB single crystals reveal a strong anisotropy. The thermal diffusivity along Y direction has the highest value while values obtained in X and Z axes are much lower. Dopants cause decrease in the thermal diffusivity for all investigated directions.

  12. The Influence of Calcium Carbonate Grain Coatings on Contaminant Reactivity in Vadose Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Chambers, Scott; Brown Jr., Gordon E.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2001-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is widely distributed through the Hanford vadose zone as a minor phase. As a result of current and past geochemical processes, CaCO3 exists as grain coatings, intergrain fill, and distinct caliche layers in select locations. Calcium carbonate may also precipitate when high-level wastes react with naturally Ca- and Mg-saturated Hanford sediments. Calcium carbonate is a very reactive mineral phase. Sorption reactions on its surface may slow the migration of certain contaminants (Co, Sr), but its surface coatings on other mineral phases may diminish contaminant retardation (for example, Cr) by blocking surface reaction sites of the substrate. This project explores the behavior of calcium carbonate grain coatings, including how they form and dissolve, their reactivity toward key Hanford contaminants, their impact (as surface coatings) on the reactivity of other mineral substrates, and on their in-ground composition and minor element enrichment. The importance of CaCO3 as a contaminant sorbent will be defined in all of its different manifestations in Hanford sediments: dispersed minor lithic fragments, pedogenic carbonate coatings on gravel and stringers in silt, and nodules in clay and paleosols. Mass action models will be developed that allow understanding and prediction of the geochemical effects of CaCO3 on contaminant retardation in Hanford sediments.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein GCaMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Akerboom, Jasper; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-07-01

    The genetically encoded fluorescent calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. Fluorescent proteins and their engineered variants have played an important role in the study of biology. The genetically encoded calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 comprises a circularly permuted fluorescent protein coupled to the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and a calmodulin target peptide, M13, derived from the intracellular calmodulin target myosin light-chain kinase and has been used to image calcium transients in vivo. To aid rational efforts to engineer improved variants of GCaMP2, this protein was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.1, b = 47.1, c = 68.8 Å, β = 100.5° and one GCaMP2 molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure was phased by molecular replacement and refinement is currently under way.

  14. Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis: effect of renal crystal deposition on the cellular composition of the renal interstitium.

    PubMed

    de Water, R; Noordermeer, C; van der Kwast, T H; Nizze, H; Boevé, E R; Kok, D J; Schröder, F H

    1999-04-01

    Urinary calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and crystal agglomerates are normally harmlessly excreted, but in nephrolithiasis they are retained by tubular epithelial cells and shifted into the renal interstitium. This crystalline material induces an inflammatory response consisting of an increase in the number of interstitial cells and an expansion of the extracellular matrix. The newly arrived cells either derive from the blood or the connective tissue or they are formed by local proliferation. Identification of the cells that surround the interstitial crystals is a first step in investigating the question of whether the interstitial cells could remove the crystalline material. Therefore, we performed an immunohistochemical study on the kidneys of rats made hyperoxaluric by ethylene glycol (EG) and ammonium chloride (AC). Attention was paid to expression of the leukocyte common antigen (LCA), which identifies all types of leukocytes, the ED1 antigen, which is specific for monocytes and macrophages, and the major histocompatibility class II antigen (MHC II), which is present on dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and activated macrophages. The results obtained were compared with those seen in two human kidney specimens with acute and chronic oxalosis. In both rat and humans, macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are the major cells that encapsulate the interstitial crystals. This similarity in response underlines the relevance of the rat nephrolithiasis model. The rat experiments showed, furthermore, that the number of interstitial crystals and the amount of biochemically measured kidney-associated oxalate both decrease with time, if the nephrolithiatic agents EG and AC are omitted from the drinking water. Further studies must clarify whether macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are able to remove the interstitial crystals and how these cells are recruited at the inflammatory site. PMID:10196021

  15. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  16. Microwave hydrothermal transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate nanospheres and application in protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng

    2014-03-26

    Calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate are the main components of biominerals. Among all of the forms of biominerals, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) are the most important forms because they play a pivotal role in the process of biomineralization and are the precursors to the crystalline polymorphs. In this work, we first synthesized ACC in vitro using adenosine 5'-triphosphate disodium salt (ATP) as the stabilizer and investigated the transformation of the ACC under microwave hydrothermal conditions, and ACC/ACP composite nanospheres and carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanospheres were successfully prepared. In this novel strategy, ATP has two main functions: it serves as the stabilizer for ACC and the phosphorus source for ACP and CHA. Most importantly, the morphology and the size of the ACC precursor can be well-preserved after microwave heating, so it provides a new method for the preparation of calcium phosphate nanostructured materials using phosphorus-containing biomolecule-stabilized ACC as the precursor. Furthermore, the as-prepared ACC/ACP composite nanospheres have excellent biocompatibility and high protein adsorption capacity, indicating that they are promising for applications in biomedical fields such as drug delivery and protein adsorption. PMID:24568728

  17. CO.sub.2 Pretreatment prevents calcium carbonate formation

    DOEpatents

    Neavel, Richard C.; Brunson, Roy J.; Chaback, Joseph J.

    1980-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 14 to about 68 atmospheres and a carbon dioxide partial pressure within the range from about 14 to about 34 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 100.degree. to about 200.degree. C.

  18. Chemical analysis and molecular models for calcium-oxygen-carbon interactions in black carbon found in fertile Amazonian anthrosoils.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, Braulio S; Araujo, Joyce R; Silva, Alexander M; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Falcão, Newton P S; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Carbon particles containing mineral matter promote soil fertility, helping it to overcome the rather unfavorable climate conditions of the humid tropics. Intriguing examples are the Amazonian Dark Earths, anthropogenic soils also known as "Terra Preta de Índio'' (TPI), in which chemical recalcitrance and stable carbon with millenary mean residence times have been observed. Recently, the presence of calcium and oxygen within TPI-carbon nanoparticles at the nano- and mesoscale ranges has been demonstrated. In this work, we combine density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of TPI-carbons to elucidate the chemical arrangements of calcium-oxygen-carbon groups at the molecular level in TPI. The molecular models are based on graphene oxide nanostructures in which calcium cations are strongly adsorbed at the oxide sites. The application of material science techniques to the field of soil science facilitates a new level of understanding, providing insights into the structure and functionality of recalcitrant carbon in soil and its implications for food production and climate change. PMID:24892495

  19. Factors affecting ex-situ aqueous mineral carbonation using calcium and magnesium silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonation of magnesium- and calcium-silicate minerals to form their respective carbonates is one method to sequester carbon dioxide. Process development studies have identified reactor design as a key component affecting both the capital and operating costs of ex-situ mineral sequestration. Results from mineral carbonation studies conducted in a batch autoclave were utilized to design and construct a unique continuous pipe reactor with 100% recycle (flow-loop reactor). Results from the flow-loop reactor are consistent with batch autoclave tests, and are being used to derive engineering data necessary to design a bench-scale continuous pipeline reactor.

  20. Evidence for Calcium Carbonate at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Arvidson, R. E.; Hoffman, J.; Niles, P. B.; Smith, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Phoenix mission has recently finished its study of the north polar environment of Mars with the aim to help understand both the current climate and to put constraints on past climate. An important part of understanding the past climate is the study of secondary minerals, those formed by reaction with volatile compounds such as H2O and CO2. This work describes observations made by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Phoenix Lander related to carbonate minerals. Carbonates are generally considered to be products of aqueous processes. A wet and warmer climate during the early history of Mars coupled with a much denser CO2 atmosphere are ideal conditions for the aqueous alteration of basaltic materials and the subsequent formation of carbonates. Carbonates (Mg- and Ca-rich) are predicted to be thermodynamically stable minerals in the present martian environment, however, there have been only a few indications of carbonates on the surface by a host of orbiting and landed missions to Mars. Carbonates (Mg-rich) have been suggested to be a component (2-5 wt %) of the martian global dust based upon orbital thermal emission spectroscopy. The identifications, based on the presence of a 1480 cm-1 absorption feature, are consistent with Mgcarbonates. A similar feature is observed in brighter, undisturbed soils by Mini-TES on the Gusev plains. Recently, Mg-rich carbonates have been identified in the Nili Fossae region by the CRISM instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Carbonates have also been confirmed as aqueous alteration phases in martian meteorites so it is puzzling why there have not been more discoveries of carbonates by landers, rovers, and orbiters. Carbonates may hold important clues about the history of liquid water and aqueous processes on the surface of Mars.

  1. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING...

  2. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING...

  3. 40 CFR 415.300 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the calcium carbonate production subcategory. 415.300 Section 415.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING...

  4. PROGRESS REPORT. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project explores the behavior of calcium carbonate grain coatings, including how they form and dissolve, their reactivity toward key Hanford contaminants, their impact (as surface coatings) on the reactivity of other mineral substrates, and on their in-ground composition and...

  5. ANNUAL REPORT. THE INFLUENCE OF CALCIUM CARBONATE GRAIN COATINGS ON CONTAMINANT REACTIVITY IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project is to investigate the role of calcium carbonate grain coatings on adsorption and heterogeneous reduction reactions of key chemical and radioactive contaminants in sediments on the Hanford Site. Research will ascertain whether these coatings p...

  6. Coexistence of three calcium carbonate polymorphs in the shell of the Antarctic clam Laternula elliptica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrke, Gernot; Poigner, Harald; Wilhelms-Dick, Dorothee; Brey, Thomas; Abele, Doris

    2012-05-01

    We analyzed shell cuts of five individuals of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica from three locations along the Antarctic Peninsula by means of Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) as well as Electron Microprobe (EMP). The shell of L. elliptica has been previously described as being composed of aragonite exclusively. Now, CRM mapping reveals that three polymorphs of calcium carbonate - aragonite, calcite, and vaterite - are present in the chondrophore region of the examined individuals. Annual shell growth layers continue through aragonite and vaterite, suggesting simultaneous mineralization of both polymorphs. Spatially congruent EMP scans showed that the calcium carbonate polymorph affects the distribution of magnesium and strontium within the chondrophore. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of the coexistence of these three calcium carbonate polymorphs within the mineralized structures of a marine calcifying organism. Particularly the presence of vaterite is unexpected, but shows striking similarities to some fish otoliths. The strong effect of the calcium carbonate polymorph on trace element incorporation restrict the suitability of magnesium and strontium based proxies for the chondrophore area of L. elliptica.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION STATES OF WATER SYSTEMS (TECHNICAL NOTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emphasis is given to the fact that saturation indexes only indicate the tendency of a water to dissolve or precipitate calcium carbonate (CaCo3). The rate at which a given water attains equilibrium cannot be derived from the saturation index value.

  8. A solvothermal method for synthesizing monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengtong; Gebauer, Denis; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-05-19

    A solvothermal method was developed for synthesizing organic monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid as ligand, ethanol as solvent and NaHCO3 decomposition as CO2 source, which can be extended to synthesize other monolayer protected mineral clusters. PMID:27161807

  9. High Sodium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Poor Anticrystallization Defense Aggravate Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Rat Hyperoxaluric Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sodium excretion is associated with intrarenal oxidative stress. The present study evaluated whether oxidative stress caused by high sodium (HS) may be involved in calcium oxalate crystal formation. Male rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet. Normal-sodium and HS diets were achieved by providing drinking water containing 0.3% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet with 5% hydroxyl-L-proline (HP) for 7 and 42 days to induce hyperoxaluria and/or calcium oxalate deposition. Compared to normal sodium, HS slightly increased calcium excretion despite diuresis; however, the result did not reach statistical significance. HS did not affect the hyperoxaluria, hypocalciuria or supersaturation caused by HP; however, it increased calcium oxalate crystal deposition soon after 7 days of co-treatment. Massive calcium oxalate formation and calcium crystal excretion in HS+HP rats were seen after 42 days of treatment. HP-mediated hypocitraturia was further exacerbated by HS. Moreover, HS aggravated HP-induced renal injury and tubular damage via increased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Increased urinary malondialdehyde excretion, in situ superoxide production, NAD(P)H oxidase and xanthine oxidase expression and activity, and decreased antioxidant enzyme expression or activity in the HS+HP kidney indicated exaggerated oxidative stress. Interestingly, this redox imbalance was associated with reduced renal osteopontin and Tamm-Horsfall protein expression (via increased excretion) and sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC-1 upregulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a HS diet induces massive crystal formation in the hyperoxaluric kidney; this is not due to increased urinary calcium excretion but is related to oxidative injury and loss of anticrystallization defense. PMID:26241473

  10. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions. PMID:26843366

  11. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-02-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions.

  12. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Govada, Lata; Leese, Hannah S; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Kassen, Sean; Chain, Benny; Khurshid, Sahir; Menzel, Robert; Hu, Sheng; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chayen, Naomi E

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted materials, combined with a range of controls, were used in a large-scale assessment of the effectiveness for protein crystal nucleation of 20 different carbon nanomaterials on five proteins. This study has allowed a direct comparison of the key characteristics of carbon-based nucleants: appropriate surface chemistry, porosity and/or roughness are required. The most effective solid system tested in this study, carbon black nanoparticles functionalised with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of mean molecular weight 5000, provides a novel highly effective nucleant, that was able to induce crystal nucleation of four out of the five proteins tested at metastable conditions. PMID:26843366

  13. All three Ca[superscript 2+]-binding loops of photoproteins bind calcium ions: The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apo-aequorin and apo-obelin

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lu; Vysotski, Eugene S.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Lee, John; Rose, John; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2010-07-13

    The crystal structures of calcium-loaded apoaequorin and apo-obelin have been determined at resolutions 1.7 {angstrom} and 2.2 {angstrom}, respectively. A calcium ion is observed in each of the three EF-hand loops that have the canonical calcium-binding sequence, and each is coordinated in the characteristic pentagonal bipyramidal configuration. The calcium-loaded apo-proteins retain the same compact scaffold and overall fold as the unreacted photoproteins containing the bound substrate, 2-hydroperoxycoelenterazine, and also the same as the Ca{sup 2+}-discharged obelin bound with the product, coelenteramide. Nevertheless, there are easily discerned shifts in both helix and loop regions, and the shifts are not the same between the two proteins. It is suggested that these subtle shifts are the basis of the ability of these photoproteins to sense Ca{sup 2+} concentration transients and to produce their bioluminescence response on the millisecond timescale. A mechanism of intrastructural transmission of the calcium signal is proposed.

  14. Calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) analysis for the identification of decayed tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Huang, Linpei

    2014-01-01

    The history of tea is poorly known, mainly due to the questionable identification of decayed tea plants in archaeological samples. This paper attempts to test the utility of calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) for the identification of tea in archaeological samples. It provides the first survey of the macropatterns of calciphytoliths in several species of Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants. Crystals were extracted from 45 samples of tea, Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants, and detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. In tea plants, druse and trichome base are the most distinctive crystals. Druses have the smallest diameter (11.65 ± 3.64 μm), and trichome bases have four distinctive straight and regular cracks, similar to a regular extinction cross. The results provide morphological criteria for distinguishing tea from other plants, specifically the presence of identifiable druses together with calcified trichome bases. The implications are significant for understanding the history of tea and plant exploitation, especially for plants for which the preservation of macrofossils is poor. PMID:25342006

  15. Calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) analysis for the identification of decayed tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianping; Lu, Houyuan; Huang, Linpei

    2014-01-01

    The history of tea is poorly known, mainly due to the questionable identification of decayed tea plants in archaeological samples. This paper attempts to test the utility of calciphytoliths (calcium oxalate crystals) for the identification of tea in archaeological samples. It provides the first survey of the macropatterns of calciphytoliths in several species of Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants. Crystals were extracted from 45 samples of tea, Theaceae and common non-Theaceae plants, and detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. In tea plants, druse and trichome base are the most distinctive crystals. Druses have the smallest diameter (11.65 ± 3.64 μm), and trichome bases have four distinctive straight and regular cracks, similar to a regular extinction cross. The results provide morphological criteria for distinguishing tea from other plants, specifically the presence of identifiable druses together with calcified trichome bases. The implications are significant for understanding the history of tea and plant exploitation, especially for plants for which the preservation of macrofossils is poor. PMID:25342006

  16. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo Zhong, Chongli

    2014-05-28

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid−liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  17. Laser ablation MC-ICP-MS U/Pb geochronology of ocean basement calcium carbonate veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Parrish, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Given the vast areas of mid ocean ridge flanks, even small chemical changes dues to fluid-rock interaction on the flanks may significantly influence global geochemical cycles. A conductive heat flow anomaly associated with hydrothermal circulation in ocean crust exists until on average 65Ma, but it is not known whether the thermal signature is accompanied by continued fluid-rock chemical exchange. Constraining the duration of fluid-rock chemical exchange is critical for calculating robust chemical fluxes associated with ridge flank hydrothermal circulation. Calcium carbonate veins form during relatively late-stage hydrothermal alteration and can be used to estimate the duration of ridge flank hydrothermal circulation. LA-MC-ICP-MS U/Pb geochronology provides a novel and independent approach to date calcium carbonate veins, and is advantageous over using the seawater Sr isotope curve that is in part non-unique and requires assumptions about the contribution of MORB Sr from fluid-rock exchange. LA-MC-ICP-MS U/Pb analyses have been undertaken on a suite of calcium carbonate veins from a range of basement ages (1.6 - 170 Ma), spreading rates and sediment thickness. Preliminary results indicate that the temperature of formation of calcium carbonate veins place a strong control on achieving a successful U/Pb isochron. This is likely related to the temperature dependent geochemical evolution of basement fluids due to fluid-rock reaction, and the partitioning of U and Pb into calcite/aragonite. Successful U/Pb isochrons have been achieved for a range of crustal ages and spreading rates, and indicate that calcium carbonate precipitation occurs within 25Myrs of crustal formation. This is substantially shorter than 65Ma, the average extent of the conductive heat flow anomaly, and will allow for more robust estimates of the contribution of hydrothermal chemical fluxes to global geochemical cycles.

  18. Carbon dioxide transport in molten calcium carbonate occurs through an oxo-Grotthuss mechanism via a pyrocarbonate anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, Dario; Coudert, François-Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity, speciation and solvation structure of CO2 in carbonate melts are relevant for both the fate of carbon in deep geological formations and for its electroreduction to CO (to be used as fuel) when solvated in a molten carbonate electrolyte. In particular, the high solubility of CO2 in carbonate melts has been tentatively attributed to the formation of the pyrocarbonate anion, C2O52–. Here we study, by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, the behaviour of CO2 in molten calcium carbonate. We find that pyrocarbonate forms spontaneously and the identity of the CO2 molecule is quickly lost through O2– exchange. The transport of CO2 in this molten carbonate thus occurs in a fashion similar to the Grotthuss mechanism in water, and is three times faster than molecular diffusion. This shows that Grotthuss-like transport is more general than previously thought.

  19. Carbon dioxide transport in molten calcium carbonate occurs through an oxo-Grotthuss mechanism via a pyrocarbonate anion.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Dario; Coudert, François-Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity, speciation and solvation structure of CO2 in carbonate melts are relevant for both the fate of carbon in deep geological formations and for its electroreduction to CO (to be used as fuel) when solvated in a molten carbonate electrolyte. In particular, the high solubility of CO2 in carbonate melts has been tentatively attributed to the formation of the pyrocarbonate anion, C2O5(2-). Here we study, by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, the behaviour of CO2 in molten calcium carbonate. We find that pyrocarbonate forms spontaneously and the identity of the CO2 molecule is quickly lost through O(2-) exchange. The transport of CO2 in this molten carbonate thus occurs in a fashion similar to the Grotthuss mechanism in water, and is three times faster than molecular diffusion. This shows that Grotthuss-like transport is more general than previously thought. PMID:27102679

  20. Optical Study of Liquid Crystal Doped with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharde, Rita A.; Thakare, Sangeeta Y.

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystalline materials have been useful for display devices i.e watches, calculators, automobile dashboards, televisions, multi media projectors etc. as well as in electro tunable lasers, optical fibers and lenses. Carbon nanotube is chosen as the main experimental factor in this study as it has been observed that Carbon Nano Tube influence the existing properties of liquid crystal host and with the doping of CNT can enhance1 the properties of LC. The combination of carbon nanotube (CNT) and liquid crystal (LC) materials show considerable interest in the scientific community due to unique physical properties of CNT in liquid crystal. Dispersion of CNTs in LCs can provide us a cheap, simple, versatile and effective means of controlling nanotube orientation on macroscopic scale with no restrictions on nanotube type. LCs have the long range orientational order rendering them to be anisotropic phases. If CNTs can be well dispersed in LC matrix, they will align with their long axes along the LC director to minimize distortions of the LC director field and the free energy. In this paper, we doped liquid crystal (Cholesteryl Nonanoate) by a small amount of multiwall carbon nanotube 0.05% and 0.1% wt. We found that by adding carbon nanotube to liquid crystals the melting point of the mixture is decreased but TNI is increased. It has been also observed that with incereas in concentration of carbon nanotube into liquid crystal shows conciderable effect on LC. The prepared samples were characterized using various techniques to study structural, thermal and optical properties i.e PMS, FPSS, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR measurements, and DTA.

  1. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  2. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  3. CLearance of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in vivo. II. Studies using triclinic crystals doubly labeled with 45Ca and 85Sr.

    PubMed

    McCarty, D J; Palmer, D W; James, C

    1979-10-01

    The clearance rate of isotopically labeled synthetic triclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals injection into rabbit joints was estimated by serial counting. Kinetic analysis using a four compartment model showed that half of the injected dose was cleared from 4 rabbit knee joints in 19.1 +/- 0.42 (SEM) days. Profound hypomagnesemia, produced in 2 rabbits with a low magnesium diet, did not affect the rate of crystal clearance detectably. Lavage of joints with solutions known to promote CPPD crystal solubility failed to remove detectable radioactivity. The previous finding of CPPD crystals in synovial phagocytes by electron microscopy, together with the finding of nuclide activity in the synovium and the failure to remove such activity by joint lavage, suggests that endocytosis by synovial cells is an important, effective mechanism controlling the synovial fluid concentration of crystals in patients with CPPD crystal deposition disease. PMID:226098

  4. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    SciTech Connect

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-09-21

    Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

  5. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility.

    PubMed

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D L; Coggan, Kimberly A; Sperlazza, Justin R; Heiniger, Ryan W; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2010-01-19

    Several bacterial pathogens require the "twitching" motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified beta-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner--by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility. PMID:20080557

  6. Isotopic tracer evidence for the amorphous calcium carbonate to calcite transformation by dissolution-reprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, Anthony J.; Gagnon, Alexander C.; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2015-09-01

    Observations that some biogenic and sedimentary calcites grow from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) raise the question of how this mineralization process influences composition. However, the detailed pathway and geochemical consequences of the ACC to calcite transformation are not well constrained. This experimental study investigated the formation of calcite from ACC by using magnesium and calcium stable isotope labeling to directly probe the transformation pathway and controls on composition. Four processes were considered: dissolution-reprecipitation, solid state transformation, and combinations of these end-members. To distinguish between these scenarios, ACC was synthesized from natural isotope abundance solutions and subsequently transferred to spiked solutions that were enriched in 43Ca and 25Mg for the transformation to calcite. Isotope measurements by NanoSIMS determined the 43Ca/40Ca, and 25Mg/24Mg ratios of the resulting calcite crystals. Analysis of the data shows the transformation is best explained by a dissolution-reprecipitation process. We find that when a small amount of ACC is transferred, the isotopic signals in the resulting calcite are largely replaced by the composition of the surrounding spiked solution. When larger amounts of ACC are transferred, calcite compositions reflect a mixture between the ACC and initial solution end-member. Comparisons of the measurements to the predictions of a simple mixing model indicate that calcite compositions (1) are sensitive to relative amounts of ACC and the surrounding solution reservoir and (2) are primarily governed by the conditions at the time of ACC transformation rather than the initial ACC formation. Shifts in calcite composition over the duration of the transformation period reflect the progressive evolution of the local solution conditions. This dependence indicates the extent to which there is water available would change the end point composition on the mixing line. While these findings have

  7. 35-GHz Measurements of Carbon Dioxide Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J.; Chang, A.; Hall, D.; Tait, A.; Klein, A.

    1998-01-01

    In order to maximize our knowledge of the martian polar caps, it is important to compare and contrast the behavior of both frozen H2O and CO2 in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Relatively little attention has been given, thus far, to observing the thermal microwave part of the spectrum. In this experiment, passive microwave radiation emanating from within a 33-cm snowpack was measured with a 35-GHz hand-held radiometer, and in addition to the natural snow measurements, the radiometer was used to measure the microwave emission and scattering from layers of manufactured CO2 (dry ice) crystals. A 1 square meter plate of aluminum sheet metal was positioned beneath the natural snow so that microwave emissions from the underlying soil layers would be minimized. 35 GHz measurements of this plate were made through the 33-cm snowpack. Layers of the snow were removed and measurements were repeated for the diminishing snowpack until the bare plate was in view. Then, 9 cm of CO2 crystals were deposited onto the sheet-metal plate, and as was the case for the natural snow, hand-held measurements were made each time the thickness of the deposit was altered. These CO2 crystals were -0.65 cm in diameter and were cylindrical. The temperature of the dry ice was -76 C, whereas the temperature at the top of the snowpack was -1.9 C (the air temperature was -3 C). Two additional 9-cm increments were placed on top of the existing CO2 crystals, resulting in a total thickness of 27 cm of dry ice. After this series of measurements was made, the CO2 crystals were then placed on top of the snowpack, and as before, measurements were made using the 35-GHz radiometer. As a final part of this experiment, soil particles were spread on top of the dry ice, and once again, microwave measurements were made with the 35-GHz radiometer.

  8. Posterior C1-C2 calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Isaac Bing-Yi; Arkun, Knarik; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease rarely occurs in the posterior aspect of the craniocervical junction (CCJ). To the best of our knowledge, there have been only 2 previously reported cases of patients with posterior CPPD lesions in this region that have led to cervical myelopathy. We report the case of a 70-year-old man presenting with neck pain and cervical myelopathy with multilevel stenosis from C1-C6. The stenosis was worst at C1-C2, secondary to compression by a CPPD lesion posterior to the spinal cord. The patient underwent a C2-C6 laminectomy and fusion with resection of the CPPD lesion. In this report, we discuss the patient and present a novel theory to explain the preponderance of CPPD lesions in the CCJ occurring anteriorly and not posteriorly to the spinal cord. PMID:26976840

  9. Climatically driven loss of calcium in steppe soil as a sink for atmospheric carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapenis, A.G.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Aparin, B.F.; Shiklomanov, A.I.; Speranskaya, N.A.; Torn, M.S.; Calef, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last several thousand years the semi-arid, cold climate of the Russian steppe formed highly fertile soils rich in organic carbon and calcium (classified as Chernozems in the Russian system). Analysis of archived soil samples collected in Kemannaya Steppe Preserve in 1920, 1947, 1970, and fresh samples collected in 1998 indicated that the native steppe Chernozems, however, lost 17-28 kg m-2 of calcium in the form of carbonates in 1970-1998. Here we demonstrate that the loss of calcium was caused by fundamental shift in the steppe hydrologic balance. Previously unleached soils where precipitation was less than potential evapotranspiration are now being leached due to increased precipitation and, possibly, due to decreased actual evapotranspiration. Because this region receives low levels of acidic deposition, the dissolution of carbonates involves the consumption of atmospheric CO2. Our estimates indicate that this climatically driven terrestrial sink of atmospheric CO2 is ???2.1-7.4 g C m-2 a-1. In addition to the net sink of atmospheric carbon, leaching of pedogenic carbonates significantly amplified seasonal amplitude of CO2 exchange between atmosphere and steppe soil. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkal, W.; Zaoui, A.

    2013-04-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m2) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m2, i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images.

  11. Nanoscale analysis of the morphology and surface stability of calcium carbonate polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Sekkal, W; Zaoui, A

    2013-01-01

    Under earth surface conditions, in ocean and natural water, calcium carbonate is ubiquitous, forming anhydrous and hydrous minerals. These hydrous phases are of considerable interest for their role as precursors to stable carbonate minerals. Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed here to perform a comprehensive and quantitative study of the structural and energetic stability of dry and hydrous surfaces of calcium carbonate polymorphs using two recently developed forcefields. Results show that the dry forms are prone to ductility; while hydrous phases are found to be brittle. The (001) surface of monohydrocalcite appears to be the most stable (0.99 J/m(2)) whereas for the ikaite phase, the (001) surface is the most stable. The corresponding value is 0.2 J/m(2), i.e. even lower than the surface energy of the Beautiful computed morphology pictures are obtained with Xiao's model and are very similar to the observed SEM images. PMID:23545842

  12. Calcium sulfate crystallization along citrus root channels in a Florida soil exhibiting acid sulfate properties

    SciTech Connect

    Syslo, S.K.; Myhre, D.L.; Harris, W.G.

    1988-02-01

    The authors observed euhedral crystals in Manatee soil in a citrus grove in St. Lucie County, Florida. The material was identified as gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/ /times/ 2H/sub 2/O) using x-ray diffraction and infrared spectra. Photomicrography and scanning electron microscopy revealed that gypsum accumulated both in old root channels and within citrus root tissue of the Btg horizon. The subsurface horizons had elevated sulfate levels, a low initial pH, a drop (0.5 unit) in pH upon air-drying. Electrical conductivity paralleled the concentration of water-soluble sulfate. High levels of calcium and sulfate occurred for horizons above the water table. This accumulation is attributed to groundwater bearing these ions and subsequently discharging them to the overlying soil. Dead citrus roots appear to act as wicks to aid water transfer from lower to higher horizons. The roots and their empty channels provide spaces in which the gypsum can precipitate if the concentrations of calcium and sulfate in the evaporating groundwater exceed the solubility product of gypsum.

  13. Complexation/encapsulation of green tea polyphenols in mixed calcium carbonate and phosphate micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Elabbadi, Amal; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P; Ouali, Lahoussine

    2011-01-01

    We used a double-jet mixer to encapsulate water-soluble polyphenols, green tea extract (GTE), with calcium-based inorganic materials. The device mixed calcium chloride solutions with a solution of carbonate and phosphate in the presence of a GTE solution, and formed micro-particles which capture the GTE molecules. The micro-particles were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the encapsulation yield and loading of the different GTE components. We established correlations between (1) the efficiency of the GTE encapsulation and the composition of the mixed anion solutions and (2) the protonation degree of the ions and the molar ratio of calcium cations and carbonate/phosphate anions. An optimal and reproducible GTE loading of about 40% with an encapsulation yield of 65% was observed for a carbonate/phosphate molar composition of 4 : 1. In addition, our experimental results showed that the process is selective and favours the encapsulation of gallated species which form stronger complexes with calcium cations. PMID:20945969

  14. Physical characteristics of calcium oxalate crystals as determinants in structural defense against chewing insects in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to the numerous chemical defenses that plants employ to fend off insect herbivores, simple structural components can also play important roles in effective protection. Our investigations have shown that plant crystals of calcium oxalate can function in insect defense. The isolation of ca...

  15. Medicago truncatula-derived calcium oxalate crystals have a negative impact on chewing insect performance via their physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant structural traits often act as defenses against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Fabaceae) leaves have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feedi...

  16. Synthesis of sodium caseinate-calcium carbonate microspheres and their mineralization to bone-like apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhewu; Liang, Guobin; Jin, Lin; Wang, Zhenling; Xing, Chao; Jiange, Qing; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-06-01

    Phosphoproteins can induce and stabilize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) vaterite, which has desirable features for high reactivity. The purpose of this study was to synthesize bioactive CaCO3 microspheres for bone regeneration. Sodium caseinate (NaCas)-containing CaCO3 microspheres, with the crystal phase of vaterite, were synthesized by fast precipitation in an aqueous solution of CaCl2, Na2CO3, and 2 mg/mL of NaCas. The uniform microspheres exhibited rougher surfaces and lower negative charges than CaCO3 particles without NaCas addition. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) of the microspheres showed characteristic peaks or bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) curves exhibited approximately 5% weight loss below 600 °C due to the decomposition of NaCas. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed lath-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) on the surface after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) revealed that the agglomerates were composed of Ca, C, O, P, Na, and Mg elements, and the Ca/P ratios ranged from 1.53 to 1.56. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibited peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite. The results of this study demonstrated that the addition of NaCas induced the formation of vaterite microspheres which possesses an enhanced apatite formation after soaking in SBF at 37 °C for 5 and 10 days. These NaCas-CaCO3 microspheres may be a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  17. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic.

    PubMed

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. PMID:27127035

  18. The Properties and Characteristics of Concretes Containing Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3) and Synthetic Lightweight Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Matthew J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of precipitated calcium carbonate as a means for enhancing the mechanical and environmental favorability of concretes containing synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLA), which are comprised of recycled mixed plastic and fly ash. Compressive strength tests show that 2% calcium carbonate additions are able to mitigate strength decreases induced by SLA as well as decrease concrete density when compared to NWA concretes. SLA concretes containing 5% calcium carbonate do not show the same trend. Instead, strength decreases and density increases are observed. Furthermore, increases in aluminum trisulphate (AFt) phase mineralization are observed through scanning electron microscopy. Results suggest that calcium carbonate additions increase early hydration and stabilize AFt minerals thaumasite and ettringite throughout hydration. It is proposed that increased AFt phase mineralization causes reductions in concrete density. However, a limit to this relationship was observed as additions of greater than 2% calcium carbonate exceed the potential for increased hydration, causing a threshold effect that resulted in calcium carbonate acting as filler, which increases density. Improved mechanical properties and the ability to stabilize waste plastics, fly ash, and CO2 emissions make the use of 2% calcium carbonate in conjunction with SLA a favorable alternative to ordinary concretes.

  19. A calcium oxide sorbent process for bulk separation of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1990-09-01

    This research effort is designed to investigate the technical feasibility of a high-temperature, high-pressure process for the bulk separation of CO{sub 2} from coal-derived gases. The two-year contract was awarded in September 1989. This report describes the research effort and results obtained during the first year of the effort. The overall project consists of 6 tasks, four of which were active during year 01. Tasks 1 and 2 were completed during the year while activity in Tasks 3 and 6 will carry over into year 02. Tasks 4 and 5 will be initiated during year 02. Three primary objectives were met in Task 1. A literature search on the calcination-carbonation reactions of CO{sub 2} with calcium-based sorbents was completed. A high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) electrobalance reactor suitable for studying the calcination and carbonation reactions was constructed. This reactor system is now fully operable and we are routinely collecting kinetics data at temperatures in the range of 550-900{degree}C and pressures of 1 to 15 atm. Samples of nine candidate calcium-based sorbents were acquired and tested. These samples were subjected to reaction screening tests as part of Task 2. As a result of these screening tests, chemically pure calcium carbonate, chemically pure calcium acetate, and the commercial dolomite were selected for more detailed kinetic testing. In Task 3, the HTHP electrobalance reactor is being used to study the calcination-carbonation behavior of the three base sorbents as a function of calcination temperature, carbonation temperature, carbonation pressure, and CO{sub 2} concentration.

  20. The mineral phase in the cuticles of two species of Crustacea consists of magnesium calcite, amorphous calcium carbonate, and amorphous calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alexander; Ziegler, Andreas; Epple, Matthias

    2005-05-21

    The cuticules (shells) of the woodlice Porcellio scaber and Armadillidium vulgare were analysed with respect to their content of inorganic material. It was found that the cuticles consist of crystalline magnesium calcite, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), besides small amounts of water and an organic matrix. It is concluded that the cuticle, which constitutes a mineralized protective organ, is chemically adapted to the biological requirements by this combination of different materials. PMID:15877152

  1. Investigating the Role of Carbonate Ion Concentration on the Magnesium Content of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, C.; Dove, P. M.; Han, N.

    2011-12-01

    The fields of biomineralization and carbonate geochemistry are undergoing a paradigm shift with the realization that the formation of calcite with diverse compositions and textures can be understood within the framework of multiple pathways to mineralization. Many organisms do not form their skeletons via the classical step-growth process, but instead mineralization occurs through a mesocrystal pathway that begins with the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), which subsequently transforms to calcite. Little is known about factors that regulate this type of calcification because the last 50 years of research have focused almost entirely on step-growth processes. In particular, new findings indicate that the chemical signatures and properties of calcites that form via an amorphous pathway are significantly different. Variable temperature has been shown to influence the amount of magnesium that is incorporated into ACC, but the effect of alkalinity has not been constrained. Here, a flow-through method was developed to produce ACC within a geochemically relevant pH range and with a constant supersaturation, and to determine the effect of carbonate ion concentration on magnesium uptake. The experimental approach uses a high precision syringe pump to prepare ACC under specified and constant chemical conditions. This study used two syringes that contained: 1) 100 ml of MgCl2?6H2O and CaCl2?2H2O such that the Mg/Ca ratio is fixed at 5:1 (modern seawater), and 2) 100 ml of 60mM - 400mM NaHCO3. The initial sodium bicarbonate solutions were buffered to a pH of 9.75 using NaOH, and upon mixing with the 5:1 Mg/Ca solution the resulting pH range was 9.2 - 9.7. All experiments were performed at temperatures between 21.5 and 23 degrees Celsius. Solution and solids were collected on 0.20 micron filter paper with a vacuum pump running continuously. Experiments were typically conducted for an hour and a half and all samples were rinsed with distilled deionized water before

  2. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies. PMID:22626627

  3. Microbially-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ser Ku; Roh, Yul

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biomineralization of carbonate minerals using microorganisms (Wu Do-1) enriched from rhodoliths. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that Wu Do-1 mainly contained Proteus mirabilis. The pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over the first 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, after which it increased to 7.8 over the remaining incubation period. XRD analysis showed that the precipitates were Mg-rich cal- cite (MgxCa(1-x)CO3), whereas no precipitates were formed without the addition of Wu Do-1 in D-1 medium. SEM-EDS analyses showed that the Mg-rich calcite had a rhombohedron shape and consisted of Ca, Si and Mg with an extracelluar polymeric substance (EPS). In addition, TEM-EDS analyses revealed they were hexagon in shape, 500-700 nm in size, and composed of Ca, Mg, C, and O. These results indicated that Wu Do-1 induced precipitation of Mg-rich calcite on the cell walls and EPS via the accumulation of Ca and/or Mg ions. Therefore, microbial precipitation of carbonate nanoparticles may play an important role in metal and carbon biogeochemistry, as well as in carbon sequestration in natural environments. PMID:27433711

  4. The preparation of calcium carbonate in an emulsified liquid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, R. J.; Hirai, T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for preparing 1 μm calcite rhombs in a double emulsion is described. This is the first report of the use of such a system for precipitation of a carbonate and may find application in a range of industrially important materials such as fillers and catalysts.

  5. Factors affecting crystallization, dispersion, and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate in various urinary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmas, Kimberly Gail

    The mechanisms for the formation of kidney stones are not well understood. One possible mechanism is the formation of aggregates in the nephron tubules of the kidneys. However, altering the urinary environment may be a method to help prevent the recurrence of the formation of kidney stones. The primary inorganic constituent found in kidney stones of North American patients is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). In this research, studies on the effect of mixing rate on COM precipitation showed that rapid mixing compared to slow mixing produced smaller particle sizes and a narrower particle size distribution due to the more uniform supersaturation level. The findings are consistent with the general contention that mixing directly influences nucleation rate while mixing rate has relatively little influence over rate of growth in precipitation processes. Screening and central composite experimental designs are used to determine the effect of various factors on the aggregation and dispersion characteristics of previously grown calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals in artificial urinary environments of controlled variables. The variables examined are pH, calcium, oxalate, pyrophosphate, citrate, and protein concentrations in ultrapure water and artificial urine. Optical density measurements, zeta potential analysis, particle size analyzer, optical microscopy, AFM force measurements, protein adsorption, and ions and small molecule adsorption have been used to assess the state of aggregation and dispersion of the COM crystals and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such a complex system. The data indicate that our model protein, mucin, acts as a dispersant. This is attributed to steric hindrance resulting from the adsorbed mucoprotein. Oxalate, however, promotes aggregation. Interesting interactions between protein and oxalate along with protein and citrate are observed. Such interactions (synergistic or antagonistic) are found to depend on the concentrations of

  6. A review: Different methods producing different particles size and distribution in synthesis of calcium carbonate nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulimai, N. H.; Rusop, M.; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.

    2016-07-01

    Carbonates exist as 73 percent of world crust carbon. Abundance and bioavailability of Calcium Carbonates offer reliable resources, costs saving and environmental friendly potentials in its applications. Studies proven nano-sized Calcium Cabonate (nCC) employs a more significant characteristics compared to larger sizes. Properties of nCC is affected by the dispersion of the particles in which agglomeration occurs. It is important to gain more understanding of the conditions contributing or stunting the agglomeration to gain more control of the particles morphology and dynamic. A few recent studies with different methods to prepare calcium carbonate nanoparticles were listed in Table 1 .Particle size and dispersity of calcium carbonate are affected by different conditions of its preparation. Other factors such as mechanical aggression, concentration of solution, temperature of precipitation, pH of reaction are all contributing factors towards particle sizes and distribution.

  7. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During previous studies, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. During this study, activated carbons were prepared from three coals representing high-sodium, low-sodium--low-calcium, and high-calcium compositions in two steps, an initial char formation followed by mild activation with steam to avoid excessive burnout. This set of carbons was characterized with respect to physical and chemical properties. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption isotherms gave relatively low surface areas (ranging from 245 to 370 m{sup 2}/g). The lowest-BET area was obtained for the high-sodium carbon, which can be attributed to enlargement of micropores as a result of sodium-catalyzed gasification reaction of the carbon structure. This hypothesis is consistent with the scanning electron microscopy microprobe analyses, which show that in both the coal and the activated carbon from this coal, the sodium is distributed over both the carbon structure and the mineral particles. Thus it is initially associated with carboxylate groups on the coal and then as sodium oxide or

  8. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxin; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Spycher, Nicolas; Hubbard, Susan S; Zhang, Guoxiang; Williams, Kenneth H; Taylor, Joanna; Fujita, Yoshiko; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  9. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup

  10. Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2011-09-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  11. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  12. A geospatial assessment of the relationship between reef flat community calcium carbonate production and wave energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamylton, S. M.; Pescud, A.; Leon, J. X.; Callaghan, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of benthic communities inhabiting coral reefs to produce calcium carbonate underpins the development of reef platforms and associated sedimentary landforms, as well as the fixation of inorganic carbon and buffering of diurnal pH fluctuations in ocean surface waters. Quantification of the relationship between reef flat community calcium carbonate production and wave energy provides an empirical basis for understanding and managing this functionally important process. This study employs geospatial techniques across the reef platform at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, to (1) map the distribution and estimate the total magnitude of reef community carbonate production and (2) empirically ascertain the influence of wave energy on community carbonate production. A World-View-2 satellite image and a field data set of 364 ground referencing points are employed, along with data on physical reef characteristics (e.g. bathymetry, rugosity) to map and validate the spatial distribution of the four major community carbonate producers (live coral, carbonate sand, green calcareous macroalgae and encrusting calcified algae) across the reef platform. Carbonate production is estimated for the complete reef platform from the composition of these community components. A synoptic model of wave energy is developed using the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) two-dimensional model for the entire reef platform. The relationship between locally derived measures of carbonate production and wave energy is evaluated at both the global scale and local scale along spatial gradients of wave energy traversing the reef platform. A wave energy threshold is identified, below which carbonate production levels appear to increase with wave energy and above which mechanical forcing reduces community production. This implies an optimal set of hydrodynamic conditions characterized by wave energy levels of approximately 300 J m-2, providing an empirical basis for management of potential changes

  13. Construction of two ureolytic model organisms for the study of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James; Kaufman, Megan; Rothman, Adam; Gupta, Rashmi; Redden, George; Schuster, Martin; Colwell, Frederick; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-09-01

    Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MJK1 and Escherichia coli MJK2, were constructed that both express green fluorescent protein (GFP) and carry out ureolysis. These two novel model organisms are useful for studying bacterial carbonate mineral precipitation processes and specifically ureolysis-driven microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP). The strains were constructed by adding plasmid-borne urease genes (ureABC, ureD and ureFG) to the strains P. aeruginosa AH298 and E. coli AF504gfp, both of which already carried unstable GFP derivatives. The ureolytic activities of the two new strains were compared to the common, non-GFP expressing, model organism Sporosarcina pasteurii in planktonic culture under standard laboratory growth conditions. It was found that the engineered strains exhibited a lower ureolysis rate per cell but were able to grow faster and to a higher population density under the conditions of this study. Both engineered strains were successfully grown as biofilms in capillary flow cell reactors and ureolysis-induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation was observed microscopically. The undisturbed spatiotemporal distribution of biomass and calcium carbonate minerals were successfully resolved in 3D using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Observations of this nature were not possible previously because no obligate urease producer that expresses GFP had been available. Future observations using these organisms will allow researchers to further improve engineered application of MICP as well as study natural mineralization processes in model systems. PMID:23835134

  14. Lumenal gating mechanism revealed in calcium pump crystal structures with phosphate analogues.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Chikashi; Nomura, Hiromi; Tsuda, Takeo

    2004-11-18

    P-type ion transporting ATPases are ATP-powered ion pumps that establish ion concentration gradients across biological membranes. Transfer of bound cations to the lumenal or extracellular side occurs while the ATPase is phosphorylated. Here we report at 2.3 A resolution the structure of the calcium-ATPase of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, a representative P-type ATPase that is crystallized in the absence of Ca2+ but in the presence of magnesium fluoride, a stable phosphate analogue. This and other crystal structures determined previously provide atomic models for all four principal states in the reaction cycle. These structures show that the three cytoplasmic domains rearrange to move six out of ten transmembrane helices, thereby changing the affinity of the Ca2+-binding sites and the gating of the ion pathway. Release of ADP triggers the opening of the lumenal gate and release of phosphate its closure, effected mainly through movement of the A-domain, the actuator of transmembrane gates. PMID:15448704

  15. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, J.; Hackley, K.; Dagamac, M.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1993-09-01

    This research is an investigation of calcium hydroxide, a sulfur-capturing sorbent, as a binder for coal fines. The reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, referred to as carbonation, is being studied as a method of improving pellet quality. Carbonation forms a cementitious matrix of calcium carbonate. The effect of particle size and compaction pressure on pellet strength was studied using a laboratory hydraulic press. Particle distributions with mean sizes of 200, 90 and 40 microns were tested. The results indicate that pellet strength increased with decreasing particle size and increasing compaction pressure when calcium hydroxide was used as a binder. Pellets containing 10 wt% calcium hydroxide increased in strength by approximately 40% when air dried for one day. This increase in strength is attributed to carbonation of the calcium hydroxide via atmospheric carbon dioxide. Corn starch, an adhesive binder, was tested at the finest particle size. Pellet strength did not increase as a function of increasing compaction pressure. At the finest particle size and highest compaction pressure (18,750 psi), dried pellets formed with 2 wt% corn starch were equivalent in strength to pellets containing 5 wt% calcium hydroxide.

  16. High-throughput platform for design and screening of peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Chung, Jihae; Chandra, Divya; Sosa, Ricardo D.; Karande, Pankaj; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Crystal growth modifiers present a versatile tool for controlling crystal shape and size. Our work described here focuses on the design and screening of short peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals using high-throughput approaches. We designed a small library of 13 peptides containing Ala and Asp amino acids arranged in varying sequences that mimic ubiquitous motifs in natural calcium-binding proteins. Peptides were screened using a quick assay to measure their efficacy for inhibiting COM crystallization. Our results show that subtle variations in the placement of Ala and Asp residues in the peptide sequence can have a profound effect on their inhibition potential. We were able to discover peptide sequences that inhibit COM crystallization more effectively than some of the well-known COM inhibitors, such as citrate. Our results also demonstrate that peptides can be engineered to bind to specific faces of COM crystals. Peptide sequences identified in this work are promising candidates for further development as therapies for biomineral-related diseases, such as kidney stone disease. Collectively, our work establishes new paradigms for the design, synthesis, and screening of peptides for controlling crystal habit with the potential to impact a variety of fields, including drug discovery, advanced materials, catalysis and separations.

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Shelly D; Kemner, Kenneth M; Brooks, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy identifies calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at environmental concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Brooks, S. C.; Biosciences Division; ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 {micro}M uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO{sub 2}-CO{sub 3} complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations.

  19. Crystal structure of metastasis-associated protein S100A4 in the active, calcium-bound form

    PubMed Central

    Pathuri, Puja; Vogeley, Lutz; Luecke, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Summary S100A4 (metastasin) is a member of the S100 family of calcium-binding proteins that is directly involved in tumorgenesis. Until recently, the only structural information available was the solution NMR structure of the inactive, calcium-free form of the protein. Here we report the crystal structure of human S100A4 in the active, calcium-bound state at 2.03 Å resolution that was solved by molecular replacement in the space group P65 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit from perfectly merohedrally twinned crystals. The Ca2+-bound S100A4 structure reveals a large conformational change in the three-dimensional structure of the dimeric S100A4 protein upon calcium binding. This calcium-dependent conformational change opens up a hydrophobic binding pocket that is capable of binding to target proteins such as annexin A2, the p53 tumor suppressor protein, and myosin IIA. The structure of the active form of S100A4 provides insight into its interactions with its binding partners and a better understanding on its role in metastasis. PMID:18783790

  20. Chemistry of calcium carbonate-rich shallow water sediments in the Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, J.W.; Zullig, J.J.; Bernstein, L.D.; Millero, F.J.; Milne, P.; Mucci, A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The geochemistry of calcium carbonate-rich sediments from a variety of environments throughout the Bahamas was investigated with particular emphasis on the factors that control the pore water chemistry. Most sediments are supersaturated with respect to aragonite, the most abundant carbonate component. Experimental studies indicate that the observed in situ calcium carbonate ion activity products can often be produced as reversible metastable equilibria between the sediments and seawater. This is interpreted as being the result of interactions between the solutions and the minor high Mg-calcite component present in these sediments. Although the overlying waters are more supersaturated than the pore waters, carbonate dissolution, not precipitation, dominates in these sediments as a result of organic matter oxidation and the resulting increase in P/sub CO/sub 2//. The carbonate sediments of the Bahamas are remarkable for their purity, with the exception of special environments such as mangrove swamps and tidal flats with algal mats. Organic matter and heavy metal content is extremely low. Only minor sulfate reduction is occurring in most sediments. Phosphate is undetectable in all pore waters, probably as a result of adsorption on carbonate mineral surfaces. Other dissolved pore water components such as ammonia and DOC are much lower than typically found in shallow water fine-grained terrigeneous sediments.

  1. Detection of calcium phosphate crystals in the joint fluid of patients with osteoarthritis – analytical approaches and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yavorskyy, Alexander; Hernandez-Santana, Aaron; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Clinically, osteoarthritis (OA) is characterised by joint pain, stiffness after immobility, limitation of movement and, in many cases, the presence of basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals in the joint fluid. The detection of BCP crystals in the synovial fluid of patients with OA is fraught with challenges due to the submicroscopic size of BCP, the complex nature of the matrix in which they are found and the fact that other crystals can co-exist with them in cases of mixed pathology. Routine analysis of joint crystals still relies almost exclusively on the use of optical microscopy, which has limited applicability for BCP crystal identification due to limited resolution and the inherent subjectivity of the technique. The purpose of this Critical Review is to present an overview of some of the main analytical tools employed in the detection of BCP to date and the potential of emerging technologies such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman microspectroscopy for this purpose. PMID:18299743

  2. Development of antimicrobial water filtration hybrid material from bio source calcium carbonate and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apalangya, Vitus; Rangari, Vijaya; Tiimob, Boniface; Jeelani, Shaik; Samuel, Temesgen

    2014-03-01

    Biobased calcium carbonate and silver hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized using a simple mechanochemical milling technique. The XRD spectrum showed that the hybrid materials is composed of crystalline calcite and silver nanoparticles. The TEM results indicated that the silver nanoparticles are discrete, uncapped and well stabilized in the surface of the eggshell derived calcium carbonate particles. The silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape and 5-20 nm in size. The SEM studies indicated that the eggshells are in micron size with the silver nanoparticle embedded in their surface. The hybrid eggshell/silver nanocomposite exhibited superior inhibition of E. coli growth using the Kirby-Bauer discs diffusion assay and comparing the zone of inhibition around the filter paper disc impregnated with the hybrid particles against pristine silver nanoparticles.

  3. A transparent hybrid of nanocrystalline cellulose and amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, Denis; Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Salajkova, Michaela; Sort, Jordi; Zhou, Qi; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German

    2011-09-01

    Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy.Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental procedures and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10681c

  4. Carbonation acceleration of calcium hydroxide nanoparticles: induced by yeast fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, Paula; Zornoza-Indart, Ainara

    2015-09-01

    Carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles and consolidation of limestone are accelerated by high humidity and a yeast fermentation system that supplies a saturated atmosphere on CO2, H2O vapor and ethanol during 28 days. Nanoparticles were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analyses with thermogravimetry. Spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and hydric and mechanical tests were also performed in stones specimens. Samples exposed to the yeast environment achieve 100 % relative CaCO3 yield, whereas at high humidity but without the yeast and under laboratory environment, relative yields of 95 % CaCO3 and 15 % CaCO3 are, respectively, reached, with white crusts and glazing left on the stone surfaces when the nanoparticles are applied at a concentration of 25 g/l. The largest increase in the drilling resistance and surface hardness values with slight increase in the capillarity absorption and desorption coefficients and with lesser stone color changes are produced at a concentration of 5 g/l, in the yeast system environment. This especially happens in stone specimens initially with bimodal pore size distributions, more amounts of pores with diameters between 0.1 and 1 µm, higher open porosity values and faster capillary coefficients. An inexpensive and reliable method based on water and yeast-sugar solution is presented to speed up carbonation of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles used as a consolidating product to improve the mechanical properties of decayed limestone from archaeological and architectural heritage.

  5. Imaging calcium carbonate distribution in human sweat pore in vivo using nonlinear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueqin; Gasecka, Alicja; Formanek, Florian; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Rigneault, Hervé

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear microscopies, including two-photon excited autofluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), were used to study individual human sweat pore morphology and topically applied antiperspirant salt penetration inside sweat pore, in vivo on human palms. Sweat pore inner morphology in vivo was imaged up to the depth of 100 μm by TPEF microscopy. The 3D penetration and distribution of "in situ calcium carbonate" (isCC), an antiperspirant salt model, was investigated using CARS microscopy.

  6. The Impact of Adsorbed Triethylene Glycol on Water Wettability of the {1014} Calcium Carbonate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Water flooding is increasingly being used as a method of enhanced oil recovery and frequently involves calcium carbonate reservoirs. Very often, thermodynamic conditions in the upper few hundred meters allow for hydrate formation. One possible method of preventing hydrates is to inject hydrate inhibitors such as triethylene glycol (TEG) into the reservoir. Thus, it is of importance to know how such glycols affect water wettability, which is an important factor defining the oil behavior in such reservoirs. Wettability of a surface is defined by the contact angle of a liquid drop on the surface. The stronger the liquid is attracted to the surface, the smaller the wetting angle becomes, implying an increased degree of wetting. Therefore, it is possible to gain qualitative knowledge of the change in wetting properties with respect to external influences by studying corresponding changes in free energy of adsorption of the liquid. In our work [1], we used molecular dynamics (MD) and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) to study how adsorbed TEG on the {1014} calcium carbonate surface affected adsorbed water. We used the changes in density profiles of water to estimate changes in adsorption free energy of water. The adaptive biasing force (ABF) method was applied to TEG to calculate the adsorption free energy of TEG on the calcium carbonate surface. We found that water wetting of the calcium carbonate surface decreased in the presence of adsorbed TEG. [1] - Olsen, R.; Leirvik, K.; Kvamme, B.; Kuznetsova, T. Adsorption Properties of Triethylene Glycol on a Hydrated {1014} Calcite Surface and Its Effect on Adsorbed Water, Langmuir 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02228

  7. Macromolecule loading into spherical, elliptical, star-like and cubic calcium carbonate carriers.

    PubMed

    Parakhonskiy, Bogdan V; Yashchenok, Alexey M; Donatan, Senem; Volodkin, Dmitry V; Tessarolo, Francesco; Antolini, Renzo; Möhwald, Helmuth; Skirtach, Andre G

    2014-09-15

    We fabricated calcium carbonate particles with spherical, elliptical, star-like and cubical morphologies by varying relative salt concentrations and adding ethylene glycol as a solvent to slow down the rate of particle formation. The loading capacity of particles of different isotropic (spherical and cubical) and anisotropic (elliptical and star-like) geometries is investigated, and the surface area of such carriers is analysed. Potential applications of such drug delivery carriers are highlighted. PMID:25044943

  8. Chemical immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd by phosphate materials and calcium carbonate in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoyong; Su, Xiaojuan; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Zhu, Yifei; Hu, Hongqing

    2016-08-01

    Soil contamination with toxic metals has increasingly become a global concern over the past few decades. Phosphate and carbonate compounds are good passivation materials for Pb immobilization, while the effect of phosphate and carbonate on the immobilization of multiple heavy metals (Pb, Cu, and Cd) in contaminated soils was seldom investigated. In this study, bone meal (BM), phosphate rock (PR), oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock (APR), super phosphate (SP), and calcium carbonate (CC) were added to the contaminated soils to evaluate the effect of phosphate materials and calcium carbonate on the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd. The results showed that the pH of the treated soils increased 1.3-2.7, except SP which decreased 0.5 at most. Compared to the control treatment, all phosphates and calcium carbonate added to the polluted soils increased the fraction of residual metals, and the application of APR, PR, BM, and CC significantly reduced exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction metals. PR and APR were the most effective for the immobilization of Pb, Cu, and Cd in the soils among these materials. Moreover, the concentrations of all metals in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate decreased with increasing amounts of amendments, and the concentrations of Pb in the TCLP leachate for soils treated with PR and APR were below the nonhazardous regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1) (US Environmental Protection Agency). Based on our results, phosphate rock and oxalic acid-activated phosphate rock are effective in the immobilization of multiple metals by reducing their mobility in the co-contaminated soils. PMID:27197655

  9. Rapid hydrothermal flow synthesis and characterisation of carbonate- and silicate-substituted calcium phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Jonathan C; Rehman, Ihtesham; Darr, Jawwad A

    2013-01-01

    A range of crystalline and nano-sized carbonate- and silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite has been successfully produced by using continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis technology. Ion-substituted calcium phosphates are better candidates for bone replacement applications (due to improved bioactivity) as compared to phase-pure hydroxyapatite. Urea was used as a carbonate source for synthesising phase pure carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO3-HA) with ≈5 wt% substituted carbonate content (sample 7.5CO3-HA) and it was found that a further increase in urea concentration in solution resulted in biphasic mixtures of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the particle size of hydroxyapatite decreased with increasing urea concentration. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy result revealed a calcium deficient apatite with Ca:P molar ratio of 1.45 (±0.04) in sample 7.5CO3-HA. For silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiO4-HA) silicon acetate was used as a silicate ion source. It was observed that a substitution threshold of ∼1.1 wt% exists for synthesis of SiO4-HA in the continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis system, which could be due to the decreasing yields with progressive increase in silicon acetate concentration. All the as-precipitated powders (without any additional heat treatments) were analysed using techniques including Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Differential scanning calorimetry, Thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:22983020

  10. Rapid hydrothermal flow synthesis and characterisation of carbonate- and silicate-substituted calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Aqif A; Knowles, Jonathan C; Rehman, Ihtesham; Darr, Jawwad A

    2013-09-01

    A range of crystalline and nano-sized carbonate- and silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite has been successfully produced by using continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis technology. Ion-substituted calcium phosphates are better candidates for bone replacement applications (due to improved bioactivity) as compared to phase-pure hydroxyapatite. Urea was used as a carbonate source for synthesising phase pure carbonated hydroxyapatite (CO₃-HA) with ≈5 wt% substituted carbonate content (sample 7.5CO₃-HA) and it was found that a further increase in urea concentration in solution resulted in biphasic mixtures of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed that the particle size of hydroxyapatite decreased with increasing urea concentration. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy result revealed a calcium deficient apatite with Ca:P molar ratio of 1.45 (±0.04) in sample 7.5CO₃-HA. For silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiO₄-HA) silicon acetate was used as a silicate ion source. It was observed that a substitution threshold of ∼1.1 wt% exists for synthesis of SiO₄-HA in the continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis system, which could be due to the decreasing yields with progressive increase in silicon acetate concentration. All the as-precipitated powders (without any additional heat treatments) were analysed using techniques including Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Differential scanning calorimetry, Thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:22983020

  11. Fracture Sealing with Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Adrienne J; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin; Hiebert, Randy; Hwang, Chiachi; Lomans, Bartholomeus P; Westrich, Joseph; Mantilla, Cesar; Kirksey, Jim; Esposito, Richard; Spangler, Lee

    2016-04-01

    A primary environmental risk from unconventional oil and gas development or carbon sequestration is subsurface fluid leakage in the near wellbore environment. A potential solution to remediate leakage pathways is to promote microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) to plug fractures and reduce permeability in porous materials. The advantage of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) over cement-based sealants is that the solutions used to promote MICP are aqueous. MICP solutions have low viscosities compared to cement, facilitating fluid transport into the formation. In this study, MICP was promoted in a fractured sandstone layer within the Fayette Sandstone Formation 340.8 m below ground surface using conventional oil field subsurface fluid delivery technologies (packer and bailer). After 24 urea/calcium solution and 6 microbial (Sporosarcina pasteurii) suspension injections, the injectivity was decreased (flow rate decreased from 1.9 to 0.47 L/min) and a reduction in the in-well pressure falloff (>30% before and 7% after treatment) was observed. In addition, during refracturing an increase in the fracture extension pressure was measured as compared to before MICP treatment. This study suggests MICP is a promising tool for sealing subsurface fractures in the near wellbore environment. PMID:26911511

  12. Tribological and Antioxidation Synergistic Effect Study of Sulfonate-Modified Nano Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Zhongyi, He; Liping, Xiong; Sheng, Han; Aixi, Chen; Jianwei, Qiu; Xisheng, Fu

    2013-01-01

    A middle base number sulphonate-modified nano calcium carbonate (SMC) with an average size of 35 nm was synthesized, and its tribological and antioxidation synergistic behaviors with ashless antioxidant N-phenyl-α-naphthylamine (T531) in hydrogenated oil (5Cst) were evaluated. The results demonstrate that adding this synethesized additive even at a low amount (<2.0 wt.%) can evidently improve its load-carrying capacity by 1.5 times and enhance its antiwear performance; in addition, the friction-reducing effect of additive in the high load was better than that in low load. The SMC have a good synergistic antioxidation effect with T531, which verifies the nano calcium carbonate compound was a kind of multifunctional and high-performance additive. The chemical composition of the rubbing surface which formed on the boundary film was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicating that the excellent antiwear and load-carrying performance could be attributed to the forming of boundary lubrication film which composed of calcium carbonate, oxides, ferrites, sulphide and FeSO4, and so on. Its ability to increase oxidation free energy of base oil is the main reason for increasing its antioxidant collaboration property with ashless antioxidant T531. PMID:23658705

  13. Structuralization of Ca(2+)-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks Prepared via Coordination Replication of Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Kenji; Hu, Ming; Furukawa, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as potential candidates to supplant existing adsorbent types in real-world applications has led to an explosive growth in the number of compounds available to researchers, as well as in the diversity of the metal salts and organic linkers from which they are derived. In this context, the use of carbonate-based precursors as metal sources is of interest due to their abundance in mineral deposits and their reaction chemistry with acids, resulting in just water and carbon dioxide as side products. Here, we have explored the use of calcium carbonate as a metal source and demonstrate its versatility as a precursor to several known frameworks, as well as a new flexible compound based on the 2,5-dihydroxybenzoquinone (H2dhbq) linker, Ca(dhbq)(H2O)2. Furthermore, inspired by the ubiquity and unique structures of biomineralized forms of calcium carbonate, we also present examples of the preparation of superstructures of Ca-based MOFs via the coordination replication technique. In all, the results confirm the suitability of carbonate-based metal sources for the preparation of MOFs and further expand upon the growing scope of coordination replication as a convenient strategy for the preparation of structuralized materials. PMID:27002690

  14. Unidirectional growth of non-linear optical triglycine calcium dibromide single crystal by a Sankaranaryanan-Ramasamy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Rao, G.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-04-01

    Single crystals oriented along prerequisite direction are very important in terms of reducing loss of material and cost during nonlinear optical device fabrication. A transparent uniaxial triglycine calcium dibromide single crystal having dimension of 10 mm diameter and 126 mm length was grown by a Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method with a growth rate of 2 mm per day. From the optical transmittance study it is observed that the crystal grown by the SR method has 10% higher transmittance compared to a conventional method grown crystals. High intense luminescence at 368 nm for the SR method grown crystal is observed from the photoluminescence study. The etch pit density of the conventional and SR method grown crystal is found as 4.5×103 cm-2 and 3.5×103 cm-2 respectively. The average laser damage threshold obtained on the conventional method grown crystal was 3.74 Gw/cm2 whereas a high damage threshold of 4.78 Gw/cm2 was obtained for the SR grown crystal. The crystal grown by the SR method shows high mechanical strength and good laser damage stability with low dislocation density which make it suitable for the SHG device fabrication.

  15. Effect of six kinds of scale inhibitors on calcium carbonate precipitation in high salinity wastewater at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaochen; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Ma, Defang; Rong, Hongyan; Zhao, Pin; Teng, Pengyou

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) scale on heat transfer surfaces is a serious and expensive problem widely occurring in numerous industrial processes. In this study, we compared the scale inhibition effect of six kinds of commercial scale inhibitors and screened out the best one (scale inhibitor SQ-1211) to investigate its scale inhibition performance in highly saline conditions at high temperature through static scale inhibition tests. The influences of scale inhibitor dosage, temperature, heating time and pH on the inhibition efficiency of the optimal scale inhibitor were investigated. The morphologies and crystal structures of the precipitates were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis. Results showed that the scale inhibition efficiency of the optimal scale inhibitor decreased with the increase of the reaction temperature. When the concentration of Ca2+ was 1600 mg/L, the scale inhibition rate could reach 90.7% at 80°C at pH8. The optimal scale inhibitor could effectively retard scaling at high temperature. In the presence of the optimal scale inhibitor, the main crystal structure of CaCO3 changed from calcite to aragonite. PMID:25766020

  16. Dissolved Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates Promote Arsenate Release From Ferrihydrite in Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, S. L.; Bostick, B. C.

    2007-12-01

    Field data from water systems around the world have shown that arsenic can reach toxic concentrations in dynamic groundwater systems. This is generally in contrast to analogous static systems at circumneutral pH, where arsenic is strongly retained by sorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Our research examines the effect of calcium and magnesium carbonates on As(V) mobility. In both dynamic flow and static experiments, arsenate was pre- sorbed to poorly crystalline iron hydroxides (1-10% sorption capacity), with varying aqueous compositions including calcium, magnesium, carbonate, sulfate, lactate, and other common groundwater species (pH 7.5-8). Thus we investigated how the dissolution of common carbonate minerals, specifically CaCO3 and MgCO3, affect arsenic behavior in the context of groundwater solutions. Under static (batch) conditions, no measurable arsenic (<10 μg/L) is released into solutions containing alkaline earth metals (AEMs) and carbonates. When elevated concentrations of AEMs and carbonate are introduced by dynamic flow, however, arsenic is mobilized at up to 500 μg/L, releasing significant proportions the total arsenic present. This is only the case when both of these species are present; with other common ion pairs, little to no arsenic is released. These results indicate that arsenate adsorption is kinetically controlled under flow conditions, resulting in very different mobility relative to otherwise equivalent static systems. Furthermore, the combination of alkaline earth metals and carbonates promotes As(V) mobility in column-based systems. We propose that these phenomena indicate a combination of physical and chemical effects by which diffusion limitation becomes dominant in limiting arsenic sorption in flow systems. Many carbonate-buffered aquifers, as well as those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, could be affected by these processes of AEM-carbonate-limited sorption and increased arsenic mobility.

  17. Biological Origin of Micro-laminated Calcium Carbonate Deposits on Antarctic Rock Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, M.; Stone, J. O.

    2001-12-01

    We have observed and sampled patchy encrustations of calcium carbonate on rock surfaces in East and West Antarctica. Individual disk-like deposits are up to 1 cm across and a few mm thick, but in places coalesce to form more extensive, colloform coatings. We have observed these deposits on substrates of granite, sandstone, and schist. Their distribution appears similar to that of Antarctic lichens and endolithic algae, extending up to ca. 1000m elevation, but has no consistent relationship to snow drifts, solar radiation, or prevailing winds. The morphology and position of the deposits are distinct from sub-glacial carbonate precipitates. In Marie Byrd Land, the encrustations occur on the surfaces exposed by deglaciation within the past 5000 yrs, and the sample from East Antarctica contains live C-14 (M. Mabin, pers. comm.), suggesting a possible biological origin Electron microprobe and SEM examination of cross-sectioned specimens reveals micron-scale layering of predominantly calcium carbonate, but with a number of bright laminae in SEM images, believed to be calcium fluoride. Sections closely resemble desert varnish in micro-morphology, though not in mineralogy. Isotopic analysis of an organic carbon extract (as opposed to C from the CaCO3 itself) gave a delta C-13 PDB value of -23.3 per mil, similar to values expected in carbon of biological origin. However, we have no proof yet that the carbon analyzed was produced by organisms within the encrustation, rather than being entrapped during an inorganic precipitation process. To investigate the possible biological origin of this material, we attempted to sequence the 16S segment of rRNA in the organic extract, but have not yet completed successful PCR replication. We are continuing attempts to isolate and analyze the pertinent genetic material. The micro-morphology, strongly negative delta C-13 and presence of live C-14 suggest a biological process for precipitation of these calcium carbonate deposits. We hope to

  18. Histopathological and ultrastructural studies of synovium in Milwaukee shoulder syndrome--a basic calcium phosphate crystal arthropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Halverson, P B; Garancis, J C; McCarty, D J

    1984-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic study of synovial specimens from four patients with the Milwaukee shoulder syndrome disclosed vascular congestion, villous and focal synovial lining cell hyperplasia, occasional giant cells, and fibrin deposition both within and on the surface of the synovium. Although these changes are non-specific, the finding of basic calcium phosphate crystal aggregates in all four cases and the near total absence of an inflammatory reaction are helpful in distinguishing this condition from other types of arthritis. The focal areas of synovial cell hyperplasia may relate to the powerful mitogenic effect of both synthetic and naturally occurring calcium-containing crystals in concentrations found in the synovial fluid of these patients. Images PMID:6497465

  19. Crystal Structures of the GCaMP Calcium Sensor Reveal the Mechanism of Fluorescence Signal Change and Aid Rational Design

    SciTech Connect

    Akerboom, Jasper; Velez Rivera, Jonathan D.; Rodriguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Tian, Lin; Hires, S. Andrew; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2009-03-16

    The genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP2 shows promise for neural network activity imaging, but is currently limited by low signal-to-noise ratio. We describe x-ray crystal structures as well as solution biophysical and spectroscopic characterization of GCaMP2 in the calcium-free dark state, and in two calcium-bound bright states: a monomeric form that dominates at intracellular concentrations observed during imaging experiments and an unexpected domain-swapped dimer with decreased fluorescence. This series of structures provides insight into the mechanism of Ca{sup 2+}-induced fluorescence change. Upon calcium binding, the calmodulin (CaM) domain wraps around the M13 peptide, creating a new domain interface between CaM and the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein domain. Residues from CaM alter the chemical environment of the circularly permuted enhanced green fluorescent protein chromophore and, together with flexible inter-domain linkers, block solvent access to the chromophore. Guided by the crystal structures, we engineered a series of GCaMP2 point mutants to probe the mechanism of GCaMP2 function and characterized one mutant with significantly improved signal-to-noise. The mutation is located at a domain interface and its effect on sensor function could not have been predicted in the absence of structural data.

  20. Incorporation of lead into calcium carbonate granules secreted by earthworms living in lead contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, A.; Lambkin, D. C.; Lee, M. R.; Schofield, P. F.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Hodson, M. E.

    2011-05-01

    The influence of soil organisms on metal mobility and bioavailability in soils is not currently fully understood. We conducted experiments to determine whether calcium carbonate granules secreted by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris could incorporate and immobilise lead in lead- and calcium-amended artificial soils. Soil lead concentrations were up to 2000 mg kg -1 and lead:calcium ratios by mass were 0.5-8. Average granule production rates of 0.39 ± 0.04 mg calcite earthworm -1 day -1 did not vary with soil lead concentration. The lead:calcium ratio in granules increased significantly with that of the soil ( r2 = 0.81, p = 0.015) with lead concentrations in granules reaching 1577 mg kg -1. X-ray diffraction detected calcite and aragonite in the granules with indications that lead was incorporated into the calcite at the surface of the granules. In addition to the presence of calcite and aragonite X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that lead was present in the granules mainly as complexes sorbed to the surface but with traces of lead-bearing calcite and cerussite. The impact that lead-incorporation into earthworm calcite granules has on lead mobility at lead-contaminated sites will depend on the fraction of total soil lead that would be otherwise mobile.

  1. Planar waveguides in neodymium-doped calcium niobium gallium garnet crystals produced by proton implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Xiao, Liu; Meng, Chen; Li-Li, Fu; Rui-Lin, Zheng; Hai-Tao, Guo; Zhi-Guang, Zhou; Wei-Nan, Li; She-Bao, Lin; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the fabrication and optical properties of a planar waveguide in a neodymium-doped calcium niobium gallium garnet (Nd:CNGG) crystal are reported. The waveguide is produced by proton (H+) implantation at 480 keV and a fluence of 1.0×1017 ions/cm2. The prism-coupling measurement is performed to obtain the dark mode of the waveguide at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The reflectivity calculation method (RCM) is used to reconstruct the refractive index profile. The finite-difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) is employed to calculate the guided mode profile of the waveguide. The stopping and range of ions in matter 2010 (SRIM 2010) code is used to simulate the damage profile induced by the ion implantation. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that the waveguide can confine the light propagation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11405041, 61405240, 61077070, 61177086, 51002181, and 61177084), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation for New Teachers of Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (NUPTSF) (Grant No. NY214159), and the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. ZSF0401).

  2. Synthesis of calcium oxalate crystals in culture medium irradiated with non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Octahedral particulates several tens of microns in size were synthesized in a culture medium irradiated through contact with a plume of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (NEAPP). The particulates were identified in the crystalline phase as calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). The original medium contained constituents such as NaCl, d-glucose, CaCl2, and NaHCO3 but not oxalate or oxalic acid. The oxalate was clearly synthesized and crystallized in the medium as thermodynamically unstable COD crystals after the NEAPP irradiation.

  3. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100–270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies. PMID:26568414

  4. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies. PMID:26568414

  5. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-01

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  6. Osteopontin knockdown in the kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to reduction in renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hidenori; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Nozawa, Masahiro; Umekawa, Tohru; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; De Velasco, Marco A; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Khan, Saeed R

    2014-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) expression is increased in kidneys of rats with ethylene glycol (EG) induced hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of OPN knockdown by in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA on deposition of CaOx crystals in the kidneys. Hyperoxaluria was induced in 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats by administering 1.5% EG in drinking water for 2 weeks. Four groups of six rats each were studied: Group A, untreated animals (tap water); Group B, administering 1.5% EG; Group C, 1.5% EG with in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA; Group D, 1.5% EG with in vivo transfection of negative control siRNA. OPN siRNA transfections were performed on day 1 and 8 by renal sub-capsular injection. Rats were killed at day 15 and kidneys were removed. Extent of crystal deposition was determined by measuring renal calcium concentrations and counting renal crystal deposits. OPN siRNA transfection resulted in significant reduction in expression of OPN mRNA as well as protein in group C compared to group B. Reduction in OPN expression was associated with significant decrease in crystal deposition in group C compared to group B. Specific suppression of OPN mRNA expression in kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to a decrease in OPN production and simultaneously inhibits renal crystal deposition. PMID:24619192

  7. Osteopontin knockdown in the kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to reduction in renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobutaka; Nozawa, Masahiro; Umekawa, Tohru; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; De Velasco, Marco A.; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Khan, Saeed R.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) expression is increased in kidneys of rats with ethylene glycol (EG) induced hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of OPN knockdown by in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA on deposition of CaOx crystals in the kidneys. Hyperoxaluria was induced in 6-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats by administering 1.5 % EG in drinking water for 2 weeks. Four groups of six rats each were studied: Group A, untreated animals (tap water); Group B, administering 1.5 % EG; Group C, 1.5 % EG with in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA; Group D, 1.5 % EG with in vivo transfection of negative control siRNA. OPN siRNA transfections were performed on day 1 and 8 by renal sub-capsular injection. Rats were killed at day 15 and kidneys were removed. Extent of crystal deposition was determined by measuring renal calcium concentrations and counting renal crystal deposits. OPN siRNA transfection resulted in significant reduction in expression of OPN mRNA as well as protein in group C compared to group B. Reduction in OPN expression was associated with significant decrease in crystal deposition in group C compared to group B. Specific suppression of OPN mRNA expression in kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to a decrease in OPN production and simultaneously inhibits renal crystal deposition. PMID:24619192

  8. A study on calcium oxalate crystals in Tinantia anomala (Commelinaceae) with special reference to ultrastructural changes during anther development.

    PubMed

    Gębura, Joanna; Winiarczyk, Krystyna

    2016-07-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals in higher plants occur in five forms: raphides, styloids, prisms, druses, and crystal sand. CaOx crystals are formed in almost all tissues in intravacuolar crystal chambers. However, the mechanism of crystallization and the role of CaOx crystals have not been clearly explained. The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence and location of CaOx crystals in organs of Tinantia anomala (Torr.) C.B. Clarke (Commelinaceae) with special attention to ultrastructural changes in the quantity of tapetal raphides during microsporogenesis. We observed various parts of the plant, that is, stems, leaves, sepals, petals, anthers, staminal trichomes and stigmatic papillae and identified CaOx crystals in all parts except staminal trichomes and stigmatic papillae in Tinantia anomala. Three morphological forms: styloids, raphides and prisms were found in different amounts in different parts of the plant. Furthermore, in this species, we identified tapetal raphides in anthers. The number of tapetal raphides changed during microsporogenesis. At the beginning of meiosis, the biosynthesis of raphides proceeded intensively in the provacuoles. These organelles were formed from the endoplasmic reticulum system. In the tetrad stage, we observed vacuoles with needle-shaped raphides (type I) always localised in the centre of the organelle. When the amoeboid tapetum was degenerating, vacuoles also began to fade. We observed a small number of raphides in the stage of mature pollen grains. PMID:26961770

  9. Tuning the dissolution kinetics of wollastonite via chelating agents for CO2 sequestration with integrated synthesis of precipitated calcium carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huangjing; Park, Youngjune; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2013-09-28

    Carbon mineralization has recently received much attention as one of the most promising options for CO2 sequestration. The engineered weathering of silicate minerals as a means of permanent carbon storage has unique advantages such as the abundance of naturally occurring calcium and magnesium-bearing minerals and the formation of environmentally-benign and geologically stable solids via a thermodynamically favored carbonation reaction. However, several challenges need to be overcome to successfully deploy carbon mineralization on a large scale. In particular, the acceleration of the rate-limiting mineral dissolution step along with process optimization is essential to ensure the economic feasibility of the proposed carbon storage technology. In this study, the effect of various types of chelating agents on the dissolution rate of calcium-bearing silicate mineral, wollastonite, was explored to accelerate its weathering rate. It was found that chelating agents such as acetic acid and gluconic acid significantly improved the dissolution kinetics of wollastonite even at a much diluted concentration of 0.006 M by complexing with calcium in the mineral matrix. Calcium extracted from wollastonite was then reacted with a carbonate solution to form precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), while tuning the particle size and the morphological structure of PCC to mimic commercially available PCC-based filler materials. PMID:23925694

  10. Characterisation of Calcium Phosphate Crystals on Calcified Human Aortic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Potential Role of Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Louvet, Loïc; Bazin, Dominique; Büchel, Janine; Steppan, Sonja; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Massy, Ziad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease including vascular calcification (VC) remains the leading cause of death in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). The process of VC seems likely to be a tightly regulated process where vascular smooth muscle cells are playing a key role rather than just a mere passive precipitation of calcium phosphate. Characterisation of the chemical and crystalline structure of VC was mainly led in patients or animal models with CKD. Likewise, Mg2+ was found to be protective in living cells although a potential role for Mg2+ could not be excluded on crystal formation and precipitation. In this study, the crystal formation and the role of Mg2+ were investigated in an in vitro model of primary human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HAVSMC) with physical techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings In HAVSMC incubated with increased Ca x Pi medium, only calcium phosphate apatite crystals (CPA) were detected by Micro-Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (µFTIR) and Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscope (FE — SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) at the cell layer level. Supplementation with Mg2+ did not alter the crystal composition or structure. The crystal deposition was preferentially positioned near or directly on cells as pictured by FE — SEM observations and EDX measurements. Large µFTIR maps revealed spots of CPA crystals that were associated to the cellular layout. This qualitative analysis suggests a potential beneficial effect of Mg2+ at 5 mM in noticeably reducing the number and intensities of CPA µFTIR spots. Conclusions/Significance For the first time in a model of HAVSMC, induced calcification led to the formation of the sole CPA crystals. Our data seems to exclude a physicochemical role of Mg2+ in altering the CPA crystal growth, composition or structure. Furthermore, Mg2+ beneficial role in attenuating VC should be linked to an active cellular role. PMID:25607936

  11. Effect of sodium polyacrylate molecular weight on the crystallogenesis of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jada, A.; Ait Akbour, R.; Jacquemet, C.; Suau, J. M.; Guerret, O.

    2007-08-01

    Aqueous solutions of sodium polyacrylates (NaPA) series having molecular weights ( Mw) ranging from 2540 to 9890 g mol -1 are used as precipitation media to control the size and shape of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) particles. The retarding effect of polyacrylates on CaCO 3 nucleation is evidenced by the increase of the induction time, τ, of the precipitated CaCO 3, from τ=55 s in the absence of additives, to τ values in the range 100-2500 s in the presence of NaPA samples. The data also show the coexistence of two polymorphs, calcite and vaterite, for CaCO 3 particles as prepared in the presence of NaPA samples. The vaterite fraction, fv, varies in all instances with the polymer concentration, Cpoly (g. L -1), and reaches its maximum value, fv,max at optimal ratio, R (mol. g -1), of Ca ion to polymer (NaPA), R=[Ca]/([NaPA]=Cpoly). No simple general trend is found to explain the influence of the molecular weight ( Mw) of NaPA on the induction time, τ, and on the vaterite fraction, fv, since these two parameters are found to vary with Cpoly and Mw. However, under certain experimental conditions, an optimum polymer molecular weight ( Mw=5530 g mol -1) of the NaPA series, gives the highest values of fv,max and τ. Such optimum indicates the influence of Mw of NaPA on CaCO 3 nucleation and growth, and it is related to the surface density and the rate of adsorption of the polymer onto the growing crystal. The CaCO 3 particle size is reduced from about 20 μm, as obtained in the control experiment, to sizes varying in the range 2-8 μm in the presence NaPA samples. Polymers having low Mw values ( Mw<5000 g mol -1) are found to be more efficient in reducing the CaCO 3 particle size.

  12. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenis, Andrei; Lawrence, Gregory; Buyantuev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  13. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapenis, Andrei Gennady; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Heim, Alexander; Zheng, Chengyang; Shortle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  14. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by phosphate rich organic matrix proteins and by single phosphoamino acids.

    PubMed

    Bentov, Shmuel; Weil, Simy; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a unique material produced naturally exclusively as a biomineral. It was demonstrated that proteins extracted from biogenic stable ACC induce and stabilize synthetic ACC in vitro. Polyphosphate molecules were similarly shown to induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in vitro. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that biogenic ACC induction and stabilization is mediated by the phosphorylated residues of phosphoproteins. We show that extracellular organic matrix extracted from gastroliths of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus induce stable ACC formation in vitro. The proteinaceous fraction of this organic matrix is highly phosphorylated and is incorporated into the ACC mineral phase during precipitation. We have identified the major phosphoproteins of the organic matrix and showed that they have high calcium binding capacity. Based on the above, in vitro precipitation experiments with single phosphoamino acids were performed, indicating that phosphoserine or phosphothreonine alone can induce the formation of highly stable ACC. The results indicate that phosphoproteins may play a major role in the control of ACC formation and stabilization and that their phosphoamino acid moieties are key components in this process. PMID:20416381

  15. Rapid, high-temperature, field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcium carbonate scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Asperger, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    A new test method is described that allows the rapid field testing of calcium carbonate scale inhibitors at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). The method evolved from use of a full-flow test loop on a well with a mass flow rate of about 1 x 10/sup 6/ lbm/hr (126 kg/s). It is a simple, effective way to evaluate the effectiveness of inhibitors under field conditions. Five commercial formulations were chosen for field evaluation on the basis of nonflowing, laboratory screening tests at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). Four of these formulations from different suppliers controlled calcium carbonate scale deposition as measured by the test method. Two of these could dislodge recently deposited scale that had not age-hardened. Performance-profile diagrams, which were measured for these four effective inhibitors, show the concentration interrelationship between brine calcium and inhibitor concentrations at which the formulations will and will not stop scale formation in the test apparatus. With these diagrams, one formulation was chosen for testing on the full-flow brine line. The composition was tested for 6 weeks and showed a dramatic decrease in the scaling occurring at the flow-control valve. This scaling was about to force a shutdown of a major, long-term flow test being done for reservoir economic evaluations. The inhibitor stopped the scaling, and the test was performed without interruption.

  16. Oligomeric proanthocyanidins protect against HK-2 cell injury induced by oxalate and calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Du, Peng; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Jia; Tang, Xingxing; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to test whether the antioxidants oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs) could provide protection against oxalate and calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals (COM) toxicity in HK-2 cells. Four groups were chosen for the study: negative control group, positive control group (COM + oxalate), OPCs group (OPCs + COM + oxalate), Vit E group (Vit E + COM + oxalate). HK-2 cells were exposed for 4, 8, 12 and 24 h. The activity of HK-2 cell was assessed by MTT. Cellular injury was assessed by activity of Na(+)/K(+) ATP enzyme. Peroxidation level was assessed by malondialdehyde (MDA) content in medium and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Morphological changes of HK-2 cell after exposed for 4 and 12 h in each group were observed under Transmission electron microscope (TEM). The effects of OPCs and VitE on oxalate- and COM-exposed cells were tested. After exposed to oxalate and COM crystals, activity of cells, Na(+)/K(+) ATP enzyme and SOD enzyme showed a significant reduction, and MDA content in medium was significantly increased. OPCs group: the addition of OPCs significantly increased activity of cell, SOD and Na(+)/K(+) ATP enzyme while MDA content was significantly decreased compared with the positive control group. VitE group: compared with the positive control group, activity of HK-2 cell, Na(+)/K(+) ATP enzyme was not significantly changed while SOD activity was restored, and MDA content was significantly decreased after the addition of Vit E. Morphological structure of HK-2 cell was extremely changed as observed under TEM after exposure to high level of COM crystals and oxalate. After the addition of OPCs or Vit E, amounts of cells with vacuoles formed in cytoplasms, karyotheca dissolved and nucleolus disappeared were less than in positive control group. The morphological structure changing in OPCs group was slighter than that in Vit E group. OPCs and vitamin E administration may prevent oxalate- and COM-mediated peroxidative

  17. The crystallization of tough thermoplastic resins in the presence of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theil, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of the thermoplastic resins poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and poly(aryl-ether-ether-ketone) (PEEK) in the presence and in the abscence of carbon fibers was studied. How carbon fiber surfaces in composites affect the crystallization of tough thermoplastic polymers that may serve as matrix resins were determined. The crystallization kinetics of such substances can provide useful information about the crystallization mechanisms and, thus, indicate if the presence of carbon fibers cause any changes in such mechanisms.

  18. Surface Modification and Planar Defects of Calcium Carbonates by Magnetic Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Powdery calcium carbonates, predominantly calcite and aragonite, with planar defects and cation–anion mixed surfaces as deposited on low-carbon steel by magnetic water treatment (MWT) were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and vibration spectroscopy. Calcite were found to form faceted nanoparticles having 3x () commensurate superstructure and with well-developed {} and {} surfaces to exhibit preferred orientations. Aragonite occurred as laths having 3x () commensurate superstructure and with well-developed () surface extending along [100] direction up to micrometers in length. The (hkil)-specific coalescence of calcite and rapid lath growth of aragonite under the combined effects of Lorentz force and a precondensation event account for a beneficial larger particulate/colony size for the removal of the carbonate scale from the steel substrate. The coexisting magnetite particles have well-developed {011} surfaces regardless of MWT. PMID:21170405

  19. Structural optimization of calcium carbonate cores as templates for protein encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Sudareva, Natalia; Popova, Helen; Saprykina, Natalia; Bronnikov, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    The calcium carbonate (CaCO3) cores being templates for model proteins encapsulation were obtained for developing oral drug delivery systems. The influence of the characteristics of the core formation (the time, the temperature, the stirring intensity, the ultrasound treatment and drying conditions) on the size and morphology of the carbonate cores was studied. The core size was shown to decrease with increasing the stirring time and stirring intensity. Statistical analysis of the scanning electron microscopy images of the carbonate cores allowed finding a correlation between their mean diameter and the parameters of the core formation. The regularities of proteins loading into porous CaCO3 cores were determined, and different loading methods were compared quantitatively. The co-precipitation method gives cores with the proteins load about five times as much as the adsorption method. The influence of protein properties and the ionic environment of protein molecules on the loading parameters were shown. PMID:24697174

  20. Kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in K-Na-Mg-Ca-Carbonate-Carbon melt-solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solopova, N. A.; Spivak, A. V.; Litvin, Yu. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Tsel'movich, V. A.; Nekrasov, A. N.

    2013-02-01

    The kinetic peculiarities of diamond crystallization in multicomponent K-Na-Mg-Ca-carbonate-carbon system have been studied in conditions of diamond stability at 1500-1800°C and 7.5-8.5 GPa. It has been established that the diamond phase nucleation density at a fixed temperature of 1600°C decreases from 1.3 × 105 nuclei/mm3 at 8.5 GPa to 3.7 × 103 nuclei/mm3 at 7.5 GPa. The fluorescence spectra of obtained diamond crystals contain peaks at 504 nm ( H3-defect), 575 nm (NV-center), and 638 nm (NV-defect), caused by the presence of nitrogen impurity. In the cathodoluminescence spectra, an A-band with the maximum at 470 nm is present. The obtained data make it possible to assign the synthesized diamonds in the carbonate-carbon system to the mixed Ia + Ib type.

  1. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Hackley, K.; Dagamac, M.; Berger, R.; Schanche, G.

    1993-12-31

    This research was an investigation of calcium hydroxide, a sulfur-capturing sorbent, as a binder for coal fines. The reaction of carbon dioxide with calcium hydroxide, referred to as carbonation, was studied as a method for improving pellet quality. Carbonation forms a cementitious matrix of calcium carbonate. Research has demonstrated that calcium hydroxide is a viable binder for coal fines and that a roller-and-die pellet mill is an effective method of pellet formation. From a minus 28 mesh preparation plant fine coal sample, a roller-and-die pellet mill produced strong pellets when 5 and 10% calcium hydroxide was used as a binder. The pellets containing 10% calcium hydroxide strengthened considerably when air cured. This increase in strength was attributed to carbonation via atmospheric carbon dioxide. Pellets containing 10 wt% calcium hydroxide were produced using an extruder but pellets formed in this manner were much weaker than pellets produced with the roller-and-die mill. In tests performed using a laboratory hydraulic press, the effect of particle size and compaction pressure on pellet strength was studied. Particle distributions with mean sizes of 200, 90 and 40 microns were tested. The results indicate that pellet strength increased with decreasing particle size and increasing compaction pressure when calcium hydroxide was used as a binder. Pellets containing 10 wt% calcium hydroxide increased in strength by approximately 40% when air dried for one day. As above, this increase in strength was attributed to carbonation of the calcium hydroxide via atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  2. Ion microprobe measurement of strontium isotopes in calcium carbonate with application to salmon otoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, P.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Ingram, B.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The ion microprobe has the capability to generate high resolution, high precision isotopic measurements, but analysis of the isotopic composition of strontium, as measured by the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, has been hindered by isobaric interferences. Here we report the first high precision measurements of 87Sr/ 86Sr by ion microprobe in calcium carbonate samples with moderate Sr concentrations. We use the high mass resolving power (7000 to 9000 M.R.P.) of the SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe in combination with its high transmission to reduce the number of interfering species while maintaining sufficiently high count rates for precise isotopic measurements. The isobaric interferences are characterized by peak modeling and repeated analyses of standards. We demonstrate that by sample-standard bracketing, 87Sr/86Sr ratios can be measured in inorganic and biogenic carbonates with Sr concentrations between 400 and 1500 ppm with ???2??? external precision (2??) for a single analysis, and subpermil external precision with repeated analyses. Explicit correction for isobaric interferences (peak-stripping) is found to be less accurate and precise than sample-standard bracketing. Spatial resolution is ???25 ??m laterally and 2 ??m deep for a single analysis, consuming on the order of 2 ng of material. The method is tested on otoliths from salmon to demonstrate its accuracy and utility. In these growth-banded aragonitic structures, one-week temporal resolution can be achieved. The analytical method should be applicable to other calcium carbonate samples with similar Sr concentrations. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Herbal preparations affect the kinetic factors of calcium oxalate crystallization in synthetic urine: implications for kidney stone therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Allen L; Webber, Dawn; Ramsout, Ronica; Gohel, Mayur Danny I

    2014-06-01

    Herbal remedies are increasingly being considered as suitable long-term treatments for renal dysfunction. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of some herbal extracts, all previously identified in published studies as influencing kidney stone formation, on the crystallization characteristics of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in synthetic urine (SU). Five herbal extracts were selected for the study: Folium pyrrosiae, Desmodium styracifolium, Phyllanthus niruri, Orthosiphon stamineus and Cystone(®). Concentrated stock solutions of each herbal extract were prepared and were tested at their recommended dosages in in vitro crystallization studies in SU. CaOx crystallization experiments were performed in which the metastable limit (MSL), average particle size, and nucleation and growth rates were determined. The CaOx MSL of SU was unaltered by the five herbal extracts. Three of the herbs (Desmodium styracifolium, Orthosiphon stamineus and Cystone(®)) significantly reduced the average particle size of precipitated crystals relative to undosed SU. All of the extracts increased the rate of nucleation and decreased the rate of growth significantly in SU. Cystone(®) showed the greatest effect on the measured risk factors. It is concluded that all of the herbs have the potential to serve as inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone formation and warrant investigation in clinical trials. PMID:24648109

  4. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  5. Influence of zinc on the calcium carbonate biomineralization of Halomonas halophila

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The salt tolerance of halophilic bacteria make them promising candidates for technical applications, like isolation of salt tolerant enzymes or remediation of contaminated saline soils and waters. Furthermore, some halophilic bacteria synthesize inorganic solids resulting in organic–inorganic hybrids. This process is known as biomineralization, which is induced and/or controlled by the organism. The adaption of the soft and eco-friendly reaction conditions of this formation process to technical syntheses of inorganic nano materials is desirable. In addition, environmental contaminations can be entrapped in biomineralization products which facilitate the subsequent removal from waste waters. The moderately halophilic bacteria Halomonas halophila mineralize calcium carbonate in the calcite polymorph. The biomineralization process was investigated in the presence of zinc ions as a toxic model contaminant. In particular, the time course of the mineralization process and the influence of zinc on the mineralized inorganic materials have been focused in this study. Results H. halophila can adapt to zinc contaminated medium, maintaining the ability for biomineralization of calcium carbonate. Adapted cultures show only a low influence of zinc on the growth rate. In the time course of cultivation, zinc ions accumulated on the bacterial surface while the medium depleted in the zinc contamination. Intracellular zinc concentrations were below the detection limit, suggesting that zinc was mainly bound extracellular. Zinc ions influence the biomineralization process. In the presence of zinc, the polymorphs monohydrocalcite and vaterite were mineralized, instead of calcite which is synthesized in zinc-free medium. Conclusions We have demonstrated that the bacterial mineralization process can be influenced by zinc ions resulting in the modification of the synthesized calcium carbonate polymorph. In addition, the shape of the mineralized inorganic material is chancing

  6. Adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on silica and calcium carbonate sand.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonjee C; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Nap, Rikkert J; Whitaker, Ragnhild D; Mathiyazhagan, Vidhya; Song, Yi-Qiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Szleifer, Igal; Wong, Joyce Y

    2014-01-28

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have the potential to be used in the characterization of porous rock formations in oil fields as a contrast agent for NMR logging because they are small enough to traverse through nanopores and enhance contrast by shortening NMR T2 relaxation time. However, successful development and application require detailed knowledge of particle stability and mobility in reservoir rocks. Because nanoparticle adsorption to sand (SiO2) and rock (often CaCO3) affects their mobility, we investigated the thermodynamic equilibrium adsorption behavior of citric acid-coated SPIO nanoparticles (CA SPIO NPs) and poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted SPIO nanoparticles (PEG SPIO NPs) on SiO2 (silica) and CaCO3 (calcium carbonate). Adsorption behavior was determined at various pH and salt conditions via chemical analysis and NMR, and the results were compared with molecular theory predictions. Most of the NPs were recovered from silica, whereas far fewer NPs were recovered from calcium carbonate because of differences in the mineral surface properties. NP adsorption increased with increasing salt concentration: this trend was qualitatively explained by molecular theory, as was the role of the PEG grafting in preventing NPs adsorption. Quantitative disagreement between the theoretical predictions and the data was due to NP aggregation, especially at high salt concentration and in the presence of calcium carbonate. Upon aggregation, NP concentrations as determined by NMR T2 were initially overestimated and subsequently corrected using the relaxation rate 1/T2, which is a function of aggregate size and fractal dimension of the aggregate. Our experimental validation of the theoretical predictions of NP adsorption to minerals in the absence of aggregation at various pH and salt conditions demonstrates that molecular theory can be used to determine interactions between NPs and relevant reservoir surfaces. Importantly, this integrated experimental and

  7. Formation of calcium carbonate films on chitosan substrates in the presence of polyacrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    He, Linghao; Xue, Rui; Song, Rui

    2009-05-15

    In this investigation, chitosan membranes with different surface average degrees of deacetylation (DA) are prepared and then are employed as the support matrix to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In the presence of high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained on the surface of all chitosan films mainly consisted of vaterite, which suggests the presence of bulk PAA plays an overwhelming part in stabilizing the vaterite. As a comparison, the influences of active groups indicate that only in case of low concentration PAA the thin CaCO{sub 3} films grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite owing to the strong nucleation ability of -NH{sub 2} group, whereas, for those grown on chitosan with 80% DA the CaCO{sub 3} films mainly consisted of aragonite. A more complex scenario revealed that in the case of intermediate concentration of PAA the formed polymorphs behave as mixtures of vaterite and aragonite. - Graphical abstract: Chitosan membranes with different degrees of deacetylation (DA) are employed as support to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained consisted of vaterite. However, the CaCO{sub 3} film grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite as opposed to aragonite for chitosan with 8% DA. The schematic presentation of the formation of calcium carbonate on chitosan films with different degrees of acetylation in the presence of PAA with low-, mid- and high concentrations.

  8. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor. When using this medicine as a dietary supplement, take it with food or following meals.Chewable tablets should be chewed thoroughly before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either ...

  9. Calcium oxalate crystals increased enolase-1 secretion from renal tubular cells that subsequently enhanced crystal and monocyte invasion through renal interstitium.

    PubMed

    Chiangjong, Wararat; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals cause kidney stone disease by still unclear mechanisms. The present study aimed to characterize changes in secretion of proteins from basolateral compartment of renal tubular epithelial cells after exposure to COM crystals and then correlated them with the stone pathogenesis. Polarized MDCK cells were cultivated in serum-free medium with or without 100 μg/ml COM crystals for 20 h. Secreted proteins collected from the lower chamber (basolateral compartment) were then resolved in 2-D gels and visualized by Deep Purple stain (n = 5 gels/group). Spot matching and intensity analysis revealed six protein spots with significantly altered levels in COM-treated samples. These proteins were then identified by tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS), including enolase-1, phosphoglycerate mutase-1, actinin, 14-3-3 protein epsilon, alpha-tubulin 2, and ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The increased enolase-1 level was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Functional analysis revealed that enolase-1 dramatically induced COM crystal invasion through ECM migrating chamber in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, enolase-1 bound onto U937 monocytic cell surface markedly enhanced cell migration through the ECM migrating chamber. In summary, our data indicated that the increased secretory enolase-1 induced by COM crystals played an important role in crystal invasion and inflammatory process in renal interstitium. PMID:27045290

  10. Calcium oxalate crystals increased enolase-1 secretion from renal tubular cells that subsequently enhanced crystal and monocyte invasion through renal interstitium

    PubMed Central

    Chiangjong, Wararat; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals cause kidney stone disease by still unclear mechanisms. The present study aimed to characterize changes in secretion of proteins from basolateral compartment of renal tubular epithelial cells after exposure to COM crystals and then correlated them with the stone pathogenesis. Polarized MDCK cells were cultivated in serum-free medium with or without 100 μg/ml COM crystals for 20 h. Secreted proteins collected from the lower chamber (basolateral compartment) were then resolved in 2-D gels and visualized by Deep Purple stain (n = 5 gels/group). Spot matching and intensity analysis revealed six protein spots with significantly altered levels in COM-treated samples. These proteins were then identified by tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS), including enolase-1, phosphoglycerate mutase-1, actinin, 14-3-3 protein epsilon, alpha-tubulin 2, and ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The increased enolase-1 level was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Functional analysis revealed that enolase-1 dramatically induced COM crystal invasion through ECM migrating chamber in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, enolase-1 bound onto U937 monocytic cell surface markedly enhanced cell migration through the ECM migrating chamber. In summary, our data indicated that the increased secretory enolase-1 induced by COM crystals played an important role in crystal invasion and inflammatory process in renal interstitium. PMID:27045290

  11. Recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum and utilization for remediation of acid mine drainage from coal mines.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Radebe, V

    2012-01-01

    The recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum (a waste product of the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process) was tested using sodium carbonate. Batch recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum slurries by reacting with sodium carbonate under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of CaCO(3) recovery and its use for pre-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines. The effect of key process parameters, such as the slurry concentration (%) and the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum were considered. It was observed that batch waste gypsum conversion significantly increased with decrease in the slurry concentration or increase in the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum. The CaCO(3) recovered from the bench-scale batch reactor demonstrated effective neutralization ability during AMD pre-treatment compared with commercial laboratory grade CaCO(3). PMID:22828309

  12. Optical Properties of Small Ice Crystals with Black Carbon Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Geier, M.; Arienti, M.

    2013-12-01

    The optical properties of ice crystals play a fundamental role in modeling atmospheric radiation and hydrological cycle, which are critical in monitoring climate change. While Black Carbon (BC) is recognized as the dominant absorber with positive radiative forcing (warming) (Ramanathan & Carmichael, 2008), in-situ observations (Cappa, et al, 2012) indicate that the characterization of the mixing state of BC with ice crystals and other non-BC particles in global climate models (Ghan & Schwartz, 2007) needs further investigation. The limitation in the available mixing models is due to the drastically different absorbing properties of BC compared to other aerosols. We explore the scattering properties of ice crystals (in shapes commonly found in cirrus clouds and contrails - Yang, et al. 2012) with the inclusion of BC particles. The Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) (Yurkin & Hoekstra, 2011) is utilized to directly calculate the optical properties of the crystals with multiple BC inclusions, modeled as a distribution of spheres. The results are then compared with the most popular models of internal and external mixing (Liou, et al. 2011). The DDA calculations are carried out over a broad range of BC particle sizes and volume fractions within the crystal at the 532 nm wavelength and for ice crystals smaller than 50 μm. The computationally intensive database generated in this study is critical for understanding the effect of different types of BC inclusions on the atmosphere radiative forcing. Examples will be discussed to illustrate the modification of BC optical properties by encapsulation in ice crystals and how the parameterization of the BC mixing state in global climate models can be improved. Acknowledgements Support by Sandia National Laboratories' LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure refinement, and nonlinear-optical properties of CaB3O5(OH): Comparative crystal chemistry of calcium triborates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamnova, N. A.; Aksenov, S. M.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Volkov, A. S.; Dimitrova, O. V.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium triborate CaB3O5(OH) obtained by hydrothermal synthesis in the Ca(OH)2-H3BO3-Na2CO3-KCl system is studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell are as follows: a = 13.490(1), b = 6.9576(3), and c = 4.3930(2) Å; V = 412.32(3) Å3 and space group Pna21. The structure is refined in the anisotropic approximation of the atomic displacement parameters to R = 4.28% using 972 | F| > 4σ( F). It is confirmed that the crystal structure of Ca triborate CaB3O5(OH) is identical to that described earlier. The hydrogen atom is localized. An SHG signal stronger than that of the quartz standard is registered. The phase transition of calcium triborate into calciborite is found on heating. The comparative crystal-chemical analysis of a series of borates with the general chemical formula 2CaО · 3В2О3 · nH2О ( n = 0-13) with the constant CaО: В2О3= 2: 3 ratio and variable content of water is performed.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure refinement, and nonlinear-optical properties of CaB{sub 3}O{sub 5}(OH): Comparative crystal chemistry of calcium triborates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamnova, N. A. Aksenov, S. M.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Volkov, A. S.; Dimitrova, O. V.

    2015-09-15

    Calcium triborate CaB{sub 3}O5(OH) obtained by hydrothermal synthesis in the Ca(OH){sub 2}–H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}–Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–KCl system is studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The parameters of the orthorhombic unit cell are as follows: a = 13.490(1), b = 6.9576(3), and c = 4.3930(2) Å; V = 412.32(3) Å{sup 3} and space group Pna2{sub 1}. The structure is refined in the anisotropic approximation of the atomic displacement parameters to R = 4.28% using 972 vertical bar F vertical bar > 4σ(F). It is confirmed that the crystal structure of Ca triborate CaB{sub 3}O{sub 5}(OH) is identical to that described earlier. The hydrogen atom is localized. An SHG signal stronger than that of the quartz standard is registered. The phase transition of calcium triborate into calciborite is found on heating. The comparative crystal-chemical analysis of a series of borates with the general chemical formula 2CaO · 3B{sub 2}O{sub 3} · nH{sub 2}O (n = 0–13) with the constant CaO: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}= 2: 3 ratio and variable content of water is performed.

  15. Transmission electron microscopic identification of silicon-containing particles in synovial fluid: potential confusion with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and apatite crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, T; Schumacher, H R; Lansaman, J; Rothfuss, S; Dryll, A

    1984-01-01

    Silicon-containing particles were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in thin sections of two synovial fluids, which also contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals, aspirated during acute attacks of pseudogout. Such particles, which are interpreted as probably being artefacts from glassware, were electron dense and similar in appearance to some CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystals. Images PMID:6476921

  16. Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation and strontium coprecipitation in a porous media flow system.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Schultz, Logan N; Bugni, Steven; Mitchell, Andrew C; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-02-01

    Strontium-90 is a principal radionuclide contaminant in the subsurface at several Department of Energy sites in the Western U.S., causing a threat to groundwater quality in areas such as Hanford, WA. In this work, we used laboratory-scale porous media flow cells to examine a potential remediation strategy employing coprecipitation of strontium in carbonate minerals. CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation were induced via ureolysis by Sporosarcina pasteurii in two-dimensional porous media reactors. An injection strategy using pulsed injection of calcium mineralization medium was tested against a continuous injection strategy. The pulsed injection strategy involved periods of lowered calcite saturation index combined with short high fluid velocity flow periods of calcium mineralization medium followed by stagnation (no-flow) periods to promote homogeneous CaCO(3) precipitation. By alternating the addition of mineralization and growth media the pulsed strategy promoted CaCO(3) precipitation while sustaining the ureolytic culture over time. Both injection strategies achieved ureolysis with subsequent CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation. The pulsed injection strategy precipitated 71-85% of calcium and 59% of strontium, while the continuous injection was less efficient and precipitated 61% of calcium and 56% of strontium. Over the 60 day operation of the pulsed reactors, ureolysis was continually observed, suggesting that the balance between growth and precipitation phases allowed for continued cell viability. Our results support the pulsed injection strategy as a viable option for ureolysis-induced strontium coprecipitation because it may reduce the likelihood of injection well accumulation caused by localized mineral plugging while Sr coprecipitation efficiency is maintained in field-scale applications. PMID:23282003

  17. Experimental modelling of Calcium carbonate precipitation in the presence of phototrophic anaerobic bacteria Rhodovulum sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundeleva, Irina; Shirokova, Liudmila; Benezeth, Pascale; Pokrovsky, Oleg; Kompantseva, Elena

    2010-05-01

    -potential of the cells. To characterise the link between the rate of bacterial growth (biomass production) and the rate of CaCO3 precipitation, batch kinetic experiments were performed. These experiments were carried out in closed (anaerobic) bottles with initial concentration of calcium from 1 to 20 mM and from 5 to 20 mM bicarbonate. The biomass of cells, pH, [Ca2+] and [Alk] were measured as a function of time. Blank experiments (without cell or autoclaved cells) were always carried out. We found that the optimal conditions for both CaCO3 precipitation and biomass increase for the culture Rhodovulum sp. A-20s, is calcium concentration of 3 mM, whatever the concentration of bicarbonate (5, 10, 15 mM). Note also that for calcium concentration higher than 3 mM, the biomass production decreases. In the case of strictly anaerobic Rhodovulum sp. S-1765 bacteria, the optimal conditions for calcium carbonate precipitation is observed for the bicarbonate concentration of 10 mM, whatever the calcium concentration (3, 5, 10 mM). Overall, the present study allows quantitative modeling of bacterially-induced CaCO3 precipitation. It helps to distinguish between the effect of cell surface functional groups, surface electrical charge, soluble organic matter and metabolic change of solution pH on the rate and nature of precipitating calcium carbonate solid phase.

  18. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  19. Crystallization of carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A S; Berry, D K

    2010-06-11

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction to S(300)≤170  keV b. PMID:20867223

  20. Crystallization of Carbon-Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.

    2010-06-11

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction to S{sub 300{<=}}170 keV b.

  1. Crystallization of Carbon-Oxygen Mixtures in White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.

    2010-06-01

    We determine the phase diagram for dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarf (WD) star interiors using molecular dynamics simulations involving liquid and solid phases. Our phase diagram agrees well with predictions from Ogata et al. and from Medin and Cumming and gives lower melting temperatures than Segretain et al. Observations of WD crystallization in the globular cluster NGC 6397 by Winget et al. suggest that the melting temperature of WD cores is close to that for pure carbon. If this is true, our phase diagram implies that the central oxygen abundance in these stars is less than about 60%. This constraint, along with assumptions about convection in stellar evolution models, limits the effective S factor for the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction to S300≤170keVb.

  2. Biomediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate in a Slightly Acidic Hot Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.

    2015-12-01

    A slightly acidic hot spring named "Female Tower" (T=73.5 °C, pH=6.64) is located in the Jifei Geothermal Field, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The precipitates in the hot spring are composed of large amounts of calcite, aragonite, and sulfur. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the microbial mats were formed of various coccoid, rod-shaped, and filamentous microbes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the intracellular sulfur granules were commonly associated with these microbes. A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the majority of the bacteria in the spring were sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the spring water, H2S concentration was up to 60 ppm, while SO42- concentration was only about 10 ppm. We speculated that H2S might be utilized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in this hot spring water, leading to the intracellular formation of sulfur granules. In the meantime, this reaction increased the pH in the micron-scale microdomains, which fostered the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the microbial mats. The results of this study indicated that the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria could play an important role in calcium carbonate precipitation in slightly acidic hot spring environments.

  3. Application of Box-Behnken design to prepare gentamicin-loaded calcium carbonate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad-Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this research was to prepare and optimize calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles as carriers for gentamicin sulfate. A chemical precipitation method was used to prepare the gentamicin sulfate-loaded CaCO3 nanoparticles. A 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken design was used for the optimization procedure, with the molar ratio of CaCl2: Na2CO3 (X1), the concentration of drug (X2), and the speed of homogenization (X3) as the independent variables. The particle size and entrapment efficiency were considered as response variables. Mathematical equations and response surface plots were used, along with the counter plots, to relate the dependent and independent variables. The results indicated that the speed of homogenization was the main variable contributing to particle size and entrapment efficiency. The combined effect of all three independent variables was also evaluated. Using the response optimization design, the optimized Xl-X3 levels were predicted. An optimized formulation was then prepared according to these levels, resulting in a particle size of 80.23 nm and an entrapment efficiency of 30.80%. It was concluded that the chemical precipitation technique, together with the Box-Behnken experimental design methodology, could be successfully used to optimize the formulation of drug-incorporated calcium carbonate nanoparticles. PMID:25950955

  4. Methotrexate intercalated calcium carbonate nanostructures: Synthesis, phase transformation and bioassay study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chao-Fan; Wang, Wei-Yuan; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shu-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-12-01

    The formation and stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is an active area of research owing to the presence of stable ACC in various biogenic minerals. In this paper, the synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) under the participation of methotrexate (MTX) via a facile gas diffusion route was reported. The results indicated that the addition of MTX can result in the phase transformation of CaCO3, and then two kinds of hybrids, i.e., MTX-vaterite and stable MTX-ACC came into being. Interestingly, the functional agent MTX served as both the target anticancer drug loaded and effective complexation agents to modify and control the morphology of final samples. The examination of MTX-ACC biodegradation process revealed that the collapse of MTX-ACC nanoparticles was due to the synergistic effect of drug release and the phase transformation. Finally, our study also proved that MTX-ACC exhibited the most excellent suppressing function on the viability of cancer cells, especially after long-time duration. PMID:27612750

  5. Synthesis of three-dimensional calcium carbonate nanofibrous structure from eggshell using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural biomaterials from bone-like minerals derived from avian eggshells have been considered as promising bone substitutes owing to their biodegradability, abundance, and lower price in comparison with synthetic biomaterials. However, cell adhesion to bulk biomaterials is poor and surface modifications are required to improve biomaterial-cell interaction. Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are preferred to act as growth support platforms for bone and stem cells. Although there have been several studies on generating nanoparticles from eggshells, no research has been reported on synthesizing 3D nanofibrous structures. Results In this study, we propose a novel technique to synthesize 3D calcium carbonate interwoven nanofibrous platforms from eggshells using high repetition femtosecond laser irradiation. The eggshell waste is value engineered to calcium carbonate nanofibrous layer in a single step under ambient conditions. Our striking results demonstrate that by controlling the laser pulse repetition, nanostructures with different nanofiber density can be achieved. This approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3D interwoven nanofibrous platforms from natural biomaterials. Conclusion The synthesized 3D nanofibrous structures can promote biomaterial interfacial properties to improve cell-platform surface interaction and develop new functional biomaterials for a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:21251288

  6. Tubular electrodeposition of chitosan-carbon nanotube implants enriched with calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Nawrotek, Katarzyna; Tylman, Michał; Rudnicka, Karolina; Gatkowska, Justyna; Balcerzak, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    A new approach for obtaining chitosan-carbon nanotube implants enriched with calcium ions in the form of tubular hydrogels is fostered. The intended application of the hydrogels is tissue engineering, especially peripheral nervous tissue regeneration. The fabrication method, based on an electrodeposition phenomenon, shows significant advantages over current solutions as implants can now be obtained rapidly at any required dimensions. Thus, it may open a new avenue to treat patients with peripheral nerve injuries. Either single walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes enhance the mechanical properties of the tubular hydrogels. The controlled presence of calcium ions, sourced from hydroxyapatite, is also expected to augment the regenerative response. Because in vitro cytotoxic assays on mouse cell lines (L929 fibroblasts and mHippoE-18 hippocampal cells) as well as pro-inflammatory tests on THP-1XBlue™ cells show that the manufactured implants are biocompatible, we next intend to evaluate their immune- and nervous-safety on an animal model. PMID:26913639

  7. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro.

    PubMed<