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Sample records for calcium channels

  1. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  2. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  3. Calcium channel blockers and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Eckert, A

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative dementia is mainly caused by Alzheimer's disease and/or cerebrovascular abnormalities. Disturbance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis is central to the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, enhanced calcium load may be brought about by extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β. Recent studies suggest that soluble forms facilitate influx through calcium-conducting ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Calcium channel blockade attenuates amyloid-β-induced neuronal decline in vitro and is neuroprotective in animal models. Vascular dementia, on the other hand, is caused by cerebral hypoperfusion and may benefit from calcium channel blockade due to relaxation of the cerebral vasculature. Several calcium channel blockers have been tested in clinical trials of dementia and the outcome is heterogeneous. Nimodipine as well as nilvadipine prevent cognitive decline in some trials, whereas other calcium channel blockers failed. In trials with a positive outcome, BP reduction did not seem to play a role in preventing dementia, indicating a direct protecting effect on neurons. An optimization of calcium channel blockers for the treatment of dementia may involve an increase of selectivity for presynaptic calcium channels and an improvement of the affinity to the inactivated state. Novel low molecular weight compounds suitable for proof-of-concept studies are now available. PMID:23638877

  4. Calcium channels in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Schein, S J

    1977-01-01

    Reversal of swimming direction in paramecium is dependent on the calcium influx through the excitable-membrane calcium channels. Several mutants of Paramecium aurelia have been selected on the basis of their resistance to the paralyzing effect of barium. The mutants have reduced reversal behavior and are in the same three pawn genes as discovered by Kung (16, 17). Also, in barium solutions, the pawns live longer than the wild-type; however, pwB mutants are more resistant to barium toxicity than pwA mutants. These results suggest that the selection picked up mutants in the calcium channel. Electrophysiological studies demonstrate this point directly, showing defective calcium activation in all pawns, but also defective anomalous rectification in pwB mutants. A model is presented which accounts for the differences between pwA and pwB mutants. It ascribes the depolarization-sensitive "gate" function to the pwA gene product and the "pore" function to the pwB gene product. Additionally, the stability of the channel structure is demonstrated, channel half-life being from five to eight days. PMID:928443

  5. The Role of Calcium Channels in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    A central theme in the quest to unravel the genetic basis of epilepsy has been the effort to elucidate the roles played by inherited defects in ion channels. The ubiquitous expression of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) throughout the central nervous system (CNS), along with their involvement in fundamental processes, such as neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission, has made them attractive candidates. Recent insights provided by the identification of mutations in the P/Q-type calcium channel in humans and rodents with epilepsy and the finding of thalamic T-type calcium channel dysfunction in the absence of seizures have raised expectations of a causal role of calcium channels in the polygenic inheritance of idiopathic epilepsy. In this review, we consider how genetic variation in neuronal VGCCs may influence the development of epilepsy. PMID:26729757

  6. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  7. Management of calcium channel antagonist overdose.

    PubMed

    Salhanick, Steven D; Shannon, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are used primarily for the treatment of hypertension and tachyarrhythmias. Overdose of calcium channel antagonists can be lethal. Calcium channel antagonists act at the L-type calcium channels primarily in cardiac and vascular smooth muscle preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decreases in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy and chronotropy. The L-type calcium channel is a complex structure and is thus affected by a large number of structurally diverse antagonists. In the setting of overdose, patients may experience vasodilatation and bradycardia leading to a shock state. Patients may also be hyperglycaemic and acidotic due to the blockade of L-type calcium channels in the pancreatic islet cells that affect insulin secretion. Aggressive therapy is warranted in the setting of toxicity. Gut decontamination with charcoal, or whole bowel irrigation or multiple-dose charcoal in the setting of extended-release products is indicated. Specific antidotes include calcium salts, glucagon and insulin. Calcium salts may be given in bolus doses or may be employed as a continuous infusion. Care should be exercised to avoid the administration of calcium in the setting of concomitant digoxin toxicity. Insulin administration has been used effectively to increase cardiac inotropy and survival. The likely mechanism involves a shift to carbohydrate metabolism in the setting of decreased availability of carbohydrates due to decreased insulin secretion secondary to blockade of calcium channels in pancreatic islet cells. Glucose should be administered as well to maintain euglycaemia. Supportive care including the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, adrenergic agents, cardiac pacing, balloon pump or extracorporeal bypass is frequently indicated if antidotal therapy is not effective. Careful evaluation of asymptomatic patients, including and electrocardiogram and a period of observation, is indicated. Patients ingesting a nonsustained

  8. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms. PMID:24291103

  9. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  10. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  11. P/Q-type calcium channel modulators

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Gross, G

    2012-01-01

    P/Q-type calcium channels are high-voltage-gated calcium channels contributing to vesicle release at synaptic terminals. A number of neurological diseases have been attributed to malfunctioning of P/Q channels, including ataxia, migraine and Alzheimer's disease. To date, only two specific P/Q-type blockers are known: both are peptides deriving from the spider venom of Agelenopsis aperta, ω-agatoxins. Other peptidic calcium channel blockers with activity at P/Q channels are available, albeit with less selectivity. A number of low molecular weight compounds modulate P/Q-type currents with different characteristics, and some exhibit a peculiar bidirectional pattern of modulation. Interestingly, there are a number of therapeutics in clinical use, which also show P/Q channel activity. Because selectivity as well as the exact mode of action is different between all P/Q-type channel modulators, the interpretation of clinical and experimental data is complicated and needs a comprehensive understanding of their target profile. The situation is further complicated by the fact that information on potency varies vastly in the literature, which may be the result of different experimental systems, conditions or the splice variants of the P/Q channel. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of the compounds available that affect the P/Q-type channel and should help with the interpretation of results of in vitro experiments and animal models. It also aims to explain some clinical observations by implementing current knowledge about P/Q channel modulation of therapeutically used non-selective drugs. Chances and challenges of the development of P/Q channel-selective molecules are discussed. PMID:22670568

  12. Calcium, channels, intracellular signaling and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Jorge-Hernán; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca²⁺) is an important cation able to function as a second messenger in different cells of the immune system, particularly in B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and mastocytes, among others. Recent discoveries related to the entry of Ca²⁺ through the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) has opened a new investigation area about the cell destiny regulated by Ca²⁺ especially in B and T lymphocytes. SOCE acts through calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The function of CRAC depends of two recently discovered regulators: the Ca²⁺ sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum or stromal interaction molecule (STIM-1) and one subunit of CRAC channels called Orai1. This review focuses on the role of Ca²⁺ signals in B and T lymphocytes functions, the signalling pathways leading to Ca²⁺ influx, and the relationship between Ca²⁺ signals and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24001934

  13. Structural aspects of calcium-release activated calcium channel function

    PubMed Central

    Stathopulos, Peter B; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium (Ca2+) entry is the process by which molecules located on the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) respond to decreased luminal Ca2+ levels by signaling Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC) channels to open on the plasma membrane (PM). This activation of PM CRAC channels provides a sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevation associated with myriad physiological processes. The identities of the molecules which mediate SOCE include stromal interaction molecules (STIMs), functioning as the ER/SR luminal Ca2+ sensors, and Orai proteins, forming the PM CRAC channels. This review examines the current available high-resolution structural information on these CRAC molecular components with particular focus on the solution structures of the luminal STIM Ca2+ sensing domains, the crystal structures of cytosolic STIM fragments, a closed Orai hexameric crystal structure and a structure of an Orai1 N-terminal fragment in complex with calmodulin. The accessible structural data are discussed in terms of potential mechanisms of action and cohesiveness with functional observations. PMID:24213636

  14. Location Matters: Synaptotagmin Helps Place Vesicles Near Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Benjamin D.; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Positioning releasable vesicles near voltage-gated calcium channels may ensure transmitter release upon calcium influx. Disruption of vesicle positioning may underlie short-term synaptic depression. However, how this positioning is achieved is unclear. In this issue of Neuron, Young and Neher find that synaptotagmin 2 helps to align readily releasable vesicles near calcium channels at nerve terminals. PMID:19709623

  15. Calcium homeostasis modulator (CALHM) ion channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongming; Tanis, Jessica E; Taruno, Akiyuki; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), formerly known as FAM26C, was recently identified as a physiologically important plasma membrane ion channel. CALHM1 and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, CLHM-1, are regulated by membrane voltage and extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o). In the presence of physiological [Ca(2+)]o (∼1.5 mM), CALHM1 and CLHM-1 are closed at resting membrane potentials but can be opened by strong depolarizations. Reducing [Ca(2+)]o increases channel open probability, enabling channel activation at negative membrane potentials. Together, voltage and Ca(2+) o allosterically regulate CALHM channel gating. Through convergent evolution, CALHM has structural features that are reminiscent of connexins and pannexins/innexins/LRRC8 (volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC)) gene families, including four transmembrane helices with cytoplasmic amino and carboxyl termini. A CALHM1 channel is a hexamer of CALHM1 monomers with a functional pore diameter of ∼14 Å. CALHM channels discriminate poorly among cations and anions, with signaling molecules including Ca(2+) and ATP able to permeate through its pore. CALHM1 is expressed in the brain where it plays an important role in cortical neuron excitability induced by low [Ca(2+)]o and in type II taste bud cells in the tongue that sense sweet, bitter, and umami tastes where it functions as an essential ATP release channel to mediate nonsynaptic neurotransmitter release. CLHM-1 is expressed in C. elegans sensory neurons and body wall muscles, and its genetic deletion causes locomotion defects. Thus, CALHM is a voltage- and Ca(2+) o-gated ion channel, permeable to large cations and anions, that plays important roles in physiology. PMID:26603282

  16. Photoalteration of calcium channel blockade in the cardiac Purkinje fiber.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, M C; Kass, R S

    1984-05-01

    Organic compounds that block calcium channel current (calcium antagonists) are important tools for the characterization of this channel. However, the practically irreversible nature of this block restricts the usefulness of this group of drugs. In this paper, we investigate the influence of light on calcium channel blockade by several organic compounds. Our results show that inhibition of calcium channel current by two dihydropyridine derivatives that contain an o-nitro moiety (nisoldipine and nifedipine) can be rapidly reversed by illumination. The energy range important to this reaction is for light wavelengths between 320 and 450 nm. Calcium channel inhibition by two other dihydropyridine derivatives (nicardipine and nitrendipine) as well as by D600, is not modulated by illumination. These results indicate that the photosensitivity of certain dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers make these compounds useful as reversible blockers of this channel. PMID:6329345

  17. T-type Calcium Channel Blockers as Neuroprotective Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Benjamin J.; Liang, Ruqiang; Bao, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    T-type calcium channels are expressed in many diverse tissues, including neuronal, cardiovascular, and endocrine. T-type calcium channels are known to play roles in the development, maintenance, and repair of these tissues but have also been implicated in disease when not properly regulated. Calcium channel blockers have been developed to treat various diseases and their use clinically is widespread due to both their efficacy as well as their safety. Aside from their established clinical applications, recent studies have suggested neuroprotective effects of T-type calcium channels blockers. Many of the current T-type calcium channel blockers could act on other molecular targets besides T-type calcium channels making it uncertain whether their neuroprotective effects are solely due to blocking of T-type calcium channels. In this review, we discuss these drugs as well as newly developed chemical compounds that are designed to be more selective for T-type calcium channels. We review in vitro and in vivo evidence of neuroprotective effects by these T-type calcium channel blockers. We conclude by discussing possible molecular mechanisms underlying neuroprotective effects by T-type calcium channel blockers. PMID:24563219

  18. Calcium entry through nicotinic receptor channels and calcium channels in cultured rat superior cervical ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Trouslard, J; Marsh, S J; Brown, D A

    1993-01-01

    1. Patch-clamp techniques in conjunction with indo-1 fluorescent measurements were used to measure increases in intracellular free calcium concentration and membrane conductance induced by the activation of nicotinic and calcium channels in cultured rat sympathetic neurons. 2. Under voltage-clamp conditions, pressure application of the nicotinic agonist DMPP (1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide, 100 microM, 100 ms) increased [Ca2+]i by 193 +/- 26 nM at a clamp potential of -60 mV. This was accompanied by an inward current of -4.53 +/- 0.89 nA, giving a mean ratio of the delta (Ca2+]i to the total inward charge transfer of 42.7 nmoles per litre of free calcium per nanocoulomb of charge (M/q ratio). 3. The DMPP-induced current and associated delta [Ca2+]i were reduced by mecamylamine (100 nM-10 microM) but were unaffected by alpha-bungarotoxin (100 nM) or cadmium (100 microM). 4. The M/q ratio was not affected by the holding potential (from -80 to -40 mV) but was a function of the external calcium concentration. 5. The M/q ratio was reduced by increasing the intracellular calcium buffering capacity and increased by heparin but not affected by ryanodine or by depletion of the caffeine-sensitive calcium store. 6. Under the same recording conditions, we quantified the increase in [Ca2+]i associated with activation of the voltage-dependent calcium current. On average at -60 mV, the M/q ratio of this highly calcium-selective permeability was 1961 mM nC-1, which is 46 times that obtained for the nicotinic channel. 7. Assuming constant-field theory, ion-substitution experiments suggest that in 2.5 mM external calcium, the permeability sequence for the nicotinic conductance was Cs+ < Li+ < Na+ < K+ < Ca2+. 8. We conclude that the nicotinic channels in rat sympathetic neurones are significantly permeant to Ca2+ and that the influx of Ca2+ through these channels is the principal cause of the rise in [Ca2+]i seen under voltage clamp. PMID:8254522

  19. Cadmium and calcium uptake in the mollusc donax rugosus and effect of a calcium channel blocker

    SciTech Connect

    Sidoumou, Z.; Gnassia-Barelli, M.; Romeo, M.

    1997-02-01

    Donax rugosus, a common bivalve mollusc in the coastal waters of Mauritania, has been studied for trace metal concentrations as a function of sampling site (from South of Mauritania to the North of this country) and of season. In this paper, the uptake of cadmium was experimentally studied in the different organs of D. rugosus. Since metals such as cadmium, copper and mercury may alter calcium homeostasis, calcium uptake was also studied in the animals treated with cadmium. Since calcium is taken up through specific channels, it appears that metals inhibit Ca uptake by interacting with these channels in the plasma membrane. Cadmium and calcium have very similar atomic radii, thus cadmium may be taken up through the calcium channels, particularly through voltage-dependent channels. The uptake of cadmium and calcium by D. Rugosus was therefore also studied in the presence of the calcium channel blocker verapamil. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Management of calcium channel blocker overdoses.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Sundeep; Lankala, Shilpa; Adigopula, Sasikanth

    2014-10-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are some of the most commonly used medications in clinical practice to treat hypertension, angina, cardiac arrhythmias, and some cases of heart failure. Recent data show that CCBs are the most common of the cardiovascular medications noted in intentional or unintentional overdoses.(1) Novel treatment approaches in the form of glucagon, high-dose insulin therapy, and intravenous lipid emulsion therapies have been tried and have been successful. However, the evidence for these are limited to case reports and case series. We take this opportunity to review the various treatment options in the management of CCB overdoses with a special focus on high-dose insulin therapy as the emerging choice for initial therapy in severe overdoses. PMID:25066023

  1. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2014-08-01

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na+ and Ca2+ for [CaCl2] ranging from 10-8 to 10-2 M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  2. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2014-08-21

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} for [CaCl{sub 2}] ranging from 10{sup −8} to 10{sup −2} M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  3. STIM and calcium channel complexes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Isaac; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    The ion Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger that mediates a variety of cellular functions. Dysfunction of the mechanisms involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis underlies a number of pathological processes, including cancer. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a major mechanism for Ca(2+) entry modulated by the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The Ca(2+)-selective store-operated current (ICRAC) is mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and the store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channel Orai1, while other non-selective cation currents (ISOC) involves the participation of members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel family, including TRPC1. Distinct isoforms of the key components of SOCE have been described in mammalian cells, STIM1 and 2, Orai1-3 and TRPC1-7. In cancer cells, SOCE has been reported to play an important role in cell cycle progression and proliferation, migration, metastasis and evasion of apoptosis. Changes in the expression of the key elements of SOCE and Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling have been account to play important roles in the phenotypic changes observed in transformed cells. Despite there are differences in the expression level of the molecular components of SOCE, as well as in the relevance of the STIM, Orai and TRPC isoforms in SOCE and tumorigenesis among cancer cell types, there is a body of evidence supporting an important role for SOCE underlying the phenotypic modifications of cancer cells that propose STIM and the SOC channels as suitable candidate targets for future prognostic or therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26455959

  4. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part I).

    PubMed

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-11-01

    Calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs widely used in combination with other therapeutic agents. The potential exists for many clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions between these and other concurrently administered drugs. The mechanisms of calcium channel antagonist-induced changes in drug metabolism include altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme metabolising activity. Increases in serum concentrations and/or reductions in clearance have been reported for several drugs used with a number of calcium channel antagonists. A number of reports and studies of calcium channel antagonist interactions have yielded contradictory results and the clinical significance of pharmacokinetic changes seen with these agents is ill-defined. The first part of this article deals with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. PMID:1773549

  5. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  6. [Model of the selective calcium channel of characean algae].

    PubMed

    Lunevskiĭ, V Z; Zherelova, O M; Aleksandrov, A A; Vinokurov, M G; Berestovskiĭ, G N

    1980-01-01

    The present work was intended to further investigate the selective filter of calcium channel on both a cell membrane and reconstructed channels. For the studies on cell membranes, an inhibitor of chloride channels was chosen (ethacrynic acid) to pass currents only through the calcium channels. On both the cells and reconstructed channels, permeability of ions of different crystal radii and valencies was investigated. The obtained results suggest that the channel represents a wide water pore with a diameter larger than 8 A into which ions go together with the nearest water shell. The values of the maximal currents are given by electrostatic interaction of the ions with the anion center of the channel. A phenomenological two-barrier model of the channel is given which describes the movement of all the ions studied. PMID:6251921

  7. Simulation strategies for calcium microdomains and calcium-regulated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    von Wegner, Frederic; Wieder, Nicolas; Fink, Rainer H A

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an overview of simulation strategies in the context of subcellular domains where calcium-dependent signaling plays an important role. The presentation follows the spatial and temporal scales involved and represented by each algorithm. As an exemplary cell type, we will mainly cite work done on striated muscle cells, i.e. skeletal and cardiac muscle. For these cells, a wealth of ultrastructural, biophysical and electrophysiological data is at hand. Moreover, these cells also express ubiquitous signaling pathways as they are found in many other cell types and thus, the generalization of the methods and results presented here is straightforward.The models considered comprise the basic calcium signaling machinery as found in most excitable cell types including Ca(2+) ions, diffusible and stationary buffer systems, and calcium regulated calcium release channels. Simulation strategies can be differentiated in stochastic and deterministic algorithms. Historically, deterministic approaches based on the macroscopic reaction rate equations were the first models considered. As experimental methods elucidated highly localized Ca(2+) signaling events occurring in femtoliter volumes, stochastic methods were increasingly considered. However, detailed simulations of single molecule trajectories are rarely performed as the computational cost implied is too large. On the mesoscopic level, Gillespie's algorithm is extensively used in the systems biology community and with increasing frequency also in models of microdomain calcium signaling. To increase computational speed, fast approximations were derived from Gillespie's exact algorithm, most notably the chemical Langevin equation and the τ-leap algorithm. Finally, in order to integrate deterministic and stochastic effects in multiscale simulations, hybrid algorithms are increasingly used. These include stochastic models of ion channels combined with deterministic descriptions of the calcium buffering

  8. Drugs acting on calcium channels: potential treatment for ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Alps, B J

    1992-01-01

    Calcium subserves a ubiquitous role in the organisation of cell function. Ca2+ channels which control influx may be modified in disease states. Animal models of cerebral ischaemia do present some problems when investigating potential therapies involving Ca2+ channels. However, it is important not to be too rigid in searching for models which exactly mimic the human disease state, when even the best experimental approaches fall short of such an ideal. There are differences between different classes of calcium entry blocking drugs with regard to their activity on Ca2+ channels and transmembrane Ca2+ movement. Some calcium antagonists may also affect ion channels other than Ca2+, and this potential is exemplified by the novel ion channel modulator RS-87476, which affords experimental neurocytoprotection. Limitation of intracellular Na+ influx during ischaemia-induced depolarization may be useful. PMID:1327050

  9. T-Type Calcium Channel: A Privileged Gate for Calcium Entry and Control of Adrenal Steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Michel F

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in modulating a variety of functions such as muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, or cell growth. Calcium signaling has been however shown to be more complex than initially thought. Indeed, it is confined within cell microdomains, and different calcium channels are associated with different functions, as shown by various channelopathies. Sporadic mutations on voltage-operated L-type calcium channels in adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown recently to be the second most prevalent genetic abnormalities present in human aldosterone-producing adenoma. The observed modification of the threshold of activation of the mutated channels not only provides an explanation for this gain of function but also reminds us on the importance of maintaining adequate electrophysiological characteristics to make channels able to exert specific cellular functions. Indeed, the contribution to steroid production of the various calcium channels expressed in adrenocortical cells is not equal, and the reason has been investigated for a long time. Given the very negative resting potential of these cells, and the small membrane depolarization induced by their physiological agonists, low threshold T-type calcium channels are particularly well suited for responding under these conditions and conveying calcium into the cell, at the right place for controlling steroidogenesis. In contrast, high threshold L-type channels are normally activated by much stronger cell depolarizations. The fact that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, specific for L-type channels, are poorly efficient for reducing aldosterone secretion either in vivo or in vitro, strongly supports the view that these two types of channels differently affect steroid biosynthesis. Whether a similar analysis is transposable to fasciculata cells and cortisol secretion is one of the questions addressed in the present review. No similar mutations on L-type or T-type channels

  10. Molecular Determinants of Cav1.2 Calcium Channel Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to transient increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration that initiates a number of essential cellular functions including cardiac and vascular muscle contraction, gene expression, neuronal plasticity, and exocytosis. Inactivation or spontaneous termination of the calcium current through Cav1.2 is a critical step in regulation of these processes. The pathophysiological significance of this process is manifested in hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmia, and a number of other diseases where acceleration of the calcium current decay should present a benefit function. The central issue of this paper is the inactivation of the Cav1.2 calcium channel mediated by multiple determinants.

  11. Calcium Channels and Associated Receptors in Malignant Brain Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Fernanda B; Gehring, Marina P; Nicoletti, Natália F

    2016-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are highly lethal and aggressive. Despite recent advances in the current therapies, which include the combination of surgery and radio/chemotherapy, the average survival rate remains poor. Altered regulation of ion channels is part of the neoplastic transformation, which suggests that ion channels are involved in cancer. Distinct classes of calcium-permeable channels are abnormally expressed in cancer and are likely involved in the alterations underlying malignant growth. Specifically, cytosolic Ca(2+) activity plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, and Ca(2+) signaling is altered in proliferating tumor cells. A series of previous studies emphasized the importance of the T-type low-voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in different cancer types, including gliomas, and remarkably, pharmacologic inhibition of T-type VGCC caused antiproliferative effects and triggered apoptosis of human glioma cells. Other calcium permeable channels, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, contribute to changes in Ca(2+) by modulating the driving force for Ca(2+) entry, and some TRP channels are required for proliferation and migration in gliomas. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. Likewise, the purinergic P2X7 receptor acts as a direct conduit for Ca(2+)-influx and an indirect activator of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channel. Evidence also shows that P2X7 receptor activation is linked to elevated expression of inflammation promoting factors, tumor cell migration, an increase in intracellular mobilization of Ca(2+), and membrane depolarization in gliomas. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent findings on calcium channels and associated receptors as potential targets to treat malignant gliomas. PMID:27418672

  12. T-Type Calcium Channel: A Privileged Gate for Calcium Entry and Control of Adrenal Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, Michel F.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium plays a crucial role in modulating a variety of functions such as muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, or cell growth. Calcium signaling has been however shown to be more complex than initially thought. Indeed, it is confined within cell microdomains, and different calcium channels are associated with different functions, as shown by various channelopathies. Sporadic mutations on voltage-operated L-type calcium channels in adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown recently to be the second most prevalent genetic abnormalities present in human aldosterone-producing adenoma. The observed modification of the threshold of activation of the mutated channels not only provides an explanation for this gain of function but also reminds us on the importance of maintaining adequate electrophysiological characteristics to make channels able to exert specific cellular functions. Indeed, the contribution to steroid production of the various calcium channels expressed in adrenocortical cells is not equal, and the reason has been investigated for a long time. Given the very negative resting potential of these cells, and the small membrane depolarization induced by their physiological agonists, low threshold T-type calcium channels are particularly well suited for responding under these conditions and conveying calcium into the cell, at the right place for controlling steroidogenesis. In contrast, high threshold L-type channels are normally activated by much stronger cell depolarizations. The fact that dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, specific for L-type channels, are poorly efficient for reducing aldosterone secretion either in vivo or in vitro, strongly supports the view that these two types of channels differently affect steroid biosynthesis. Whether a similar analysis is transposable to fasciculata cells and cortisol secretion is one of the questions addressed in the present review. No similar mutations on L-type or T-type channels

  13. Neuronal modulation of calcium channel activity in cultured rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvalan, V.; Cole, R.; De Vellis, J.; Hagiwara, Susumu )

    1990-06-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to study whether cocultivation of neurons and astrocytes modulates the expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain astrocytes cocultured with rat embryonic neurons revealed two types of voltage-dependent inward currents carried by Ca{sup 2+} and blocked by either Cd{sup 2+} or Co{sup 2+} that otherwise were not detected in purified astrocytes. This expression of calcium channel activity in astrocytes was neuron dependent and was not observed when astrocytes were cocultured with purified oligodendrocytes.

  14. Cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20years, a new field of research, called channelopathies, investigating diseases caused by ion channel dysfunction has emerged. Cardiac ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the cardiac action potential. Investigators have largely determined the physiological roles of different cardiac ion channels, but little is known about the molecular determinants of their regulation. The voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.2 shapes the plateau phase of the cardiac action potential and allows the influx of calcium leading to cardiomyocyte contraction. Studies suggest that the regulation of Cav1.2 channels is not uniform in working cardiomyocytes. The notion of micro-domains containing Cav1.2 channels and different calcium channel interacting proteins, called macro-molecular complex, has been proposed to explain these observations. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently known information on the Cav1.2 macromolecular complexes in the cardiac cell and discuss their implication in cardiac function and disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26707467

  15. Two-pore channels: Regulation by NAADP and customized roles in triggering calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Marchant, Jonathan S; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2010-06-01

    NAADP is a potent regulator of cytosolic calcium levels. Much evidence suggests that NAADP activates a novel channel located on an acidic (lysosomal-like) calcium store, the mobilisation of which results in further calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the recent identification of a family of poorly characterized ion channels (the two-pore channels) as endo-lysosomal NAADP receptors. The generation of calcium signals by these channels is likened to those evoked by depolarisation during excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. We discuss the idea that two-pore channels can mediate a trigger release of calcium which is then amplified by calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This is similar to the activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and subsequent mobilisation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in cardiac tissue. We suggest that two-pore channels may physically interact with ryanodine receptors to account for more direct release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in analogy with the conformational coupling of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors in skeletal muscle. Interaction of two-pore channels with other calcium release channels likely occurs between stores "trans-chatter" and possibly within the same store "cis-chatter". We also speculate that trafficking of two-pore channels through the endo-lysosomal system facilitates interactions with calcium entry channels. Strategic placing of two-pore channels thus provides a versatile means of generating spatiotemporally complex cellular calcium signals. PMID:20621760

  16. Inhibition of N-type calcium channels by fluorophenoxyanilide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Ellen C; Graham, Janease E; Spiller, Sandro; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J; Duggan, Peter J; Tuck, Kellie L

    2015-04-01

    A set of fluorophenoxyanilides, designed to be simplified analogues of previously reported ω-conotoxin GVIA mimetics, were prepared and tested for N-type calcium channel inhibition in a SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma FLIPR assay. N-type or Cav2.2 channel is a validated target for the treatment of refractory chronic pain. Despite being significantly less complex than the originally designed mimetics, up to a seven-fold improvement in activity was observed. PMID:25871286

  17. Inhibition of N-Type Calcium Channels by Fluorophenoxyanilide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Ellen C.; Graham, Janease E.; Spiller, Sandro; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J.; Duggan, Peter J.; Tuck, Kellie L.

    2015-01-01

    A set of fluorophenoxyanilides, designed to be simplified analogues of previously reported ω-conotoxin GVIA mimetics, were prepared and tested for N-type calcium channel inhibition in a SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma FLIPR assay. N-type or Cav2.2 channel is a validated target for the treatment of refractory chronic pain. Despite being significantly less complex than the originally designed mimetics, up to a seven-fold improvement in activity was observed. PMID:25871286

  18. Calcium channel antagonists decrease the ethanol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Little, H J; Dolin, S J; Halsey, M J

    1986-12-01

    Withdrawal from chronic ethanol intake results in a syndrome of tremor and hyperexcitability, which can progress to seizures and death. Drugs used therapeutically to alleviate the syndrome have sedative actions and dependence liability of their own. The basis of the syndrome is unclear, although ethanol affects many neuronal functions, including membrane calcium conductance. Calcium channel blocking drugs have been used in cardiovascular disorders; they bind to high affinity sites in the brain but have few overt actions on the central nervous system. We have tested the effects of four calcium channel antagonists on the ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats. Nitrendipine and nimodipine abolished all spontaneous seizures and prevented or reduced seizures following an audiogenic stimulus, and mortality. Verapamil significantly decreased seizure incidence and both it and flunarizine lowered mortality. The dihydropyridines were considerably more effective than diazepam in the withdrawal syndrome but had little effect on pentylenetetrazol seizures, against which diazepam gave good protection. The calcium channel inhibitors showed no sedative activity in normal animals. The results provide evidence that alterations in calcium conductance may be involved in the ethanol withdrawal syndrome and offer possibilities for the development of non-sedative therapeutic treatment of this syndrome. PMID:3784769

  19. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  20. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  1. Treatment for calcium channel blocker poisoning: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, P.-A.; Gosselin, S.; Guimont, C.; Godwin, J.; Archambault, P. M.; Chauny, J.-M.; Frenette, A. J.; Darveau, M.; Le sage, N.; Poitras, J.; Provencher, J.; Juurlink, D. N.; Blais, R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Calcium channel blocker poisoning is a common and sometimes life-threatening ingestion. Objective To evaluate the reported effects of treatments for calcium channel blocker poisoning. The primary outcomes of interest were mortality and hemodynamic parameters. The secondary outcomes included length of stay in hospital, length of stay in intensive care unit, duration of vasopressor use, functional outcomes, and serum calcium channel blocker concentrations. Methods Medline/Ovid, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, TOXLINE, International pharmaceutical abstracts, Google Scholar, and the gray literature up to December 31, 2013 were searched without time restriction to identify all types of studies that examined effects of various treatments for calcium channel blocker poisoning for the outcomes of interest. The search strategy included the following Keywords: [calcium channel blockers OR calcium channel antagonist OR calcium channel blocking agent OR (amlodipine or bencyclane or bepridil or cinnarizine or felodipine or fendiline or flunarizine or gallopamil or isradipine or lidoflazine or mibefradil or nicardipine or nifedipine or nimodipine or nisoldipine or nitrendipine or prenylamine or verapamil or diltiazem)] AND [overdose OR medication errors OR poisoning OR intoxication OR toxicity OR adverse effect]. Two reviewers independently selected studies and a group of reviewers abstracted all relevant data using a pilot-tested form. A second group analyzed the risk of bias and overall quality using the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology) checklist and the Thomas tool for observational studies, the Institute of Health Economics tool for Quality of Case Series, the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines, and the modified NRCNA (National Research Council for the National Academies) list for animal studies. Qualitative synthesis was used to summarize the evidence. Of 15,577 citations identified in

  2. Mobility of calcium channels in the presynaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Romy; Hosy, Eric; Kohl, Johannes; Klueva, Julia; Choquet, Daniel; Thomas, Ulrich; Voigt, Andreas; Heine, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Unravelling principles underlying neurotransmitter release are key to understand neural signaling. Here, we describe how surface mobility of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) modulates release probabilities (P(r)) of synaptic vesicles (SVs). Coupling distances of <10 to >100 nm have been reported for SVs and VDCCs in different synapses. Tracking individual VDCCs revealed that within hippocampal synapses, ∼60% of VDCCs are mobile while confined to presynaptic membrane compartments. Intracellular Ca(2+) chelation decreased VDCC mobility. Increasing VDCC surface populations by co-expression of the α2δ1 subunit did not alter channel mobility but led to enlarged active zones (AZs) rather than higher channel densities. VDCCs thus scale presynaptic scaffolds to maintain local mobility. We propose that dynamic coupling based on mobile VDCCs supports calcium domain cooperativity and tunes neurotransmitter release by equalizing Pr for docked SVs within AZs. PMID:25892305

  3. Transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) reduces calcium permeability in heteromeric channel complexes.

    PubMed

    Storch, Ursula; Forst, Anna-Lena; Philipp, Maximilian; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael

    2012-01-27

    Specific biological roles of the classical transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) are still largely elusive. To investigate the function of TRPC1 proteins in cell physiology, we studied heterologously expressed TRPC1 channels and found that recombinant TRPC1 subunits do not form functional homomeric channels. Instead, by electrophysiological analysis TRPC1 was shown to form functional heteromeric, receptor-operated channel complexes with TRPC3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 indicating that TRPC1 proteins can co-assemble with all members of the TRPC subfamily. In all TRPC1-containing heteromers, TRPC1 subunits significantly decreased calcium permeation. The exchange of select amino acids in the putative pore-forming region of TRPC1 further reduced calcium permeability, suggesting that TRPC1 subunits contribute to the channel pore. In immortalized immature gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons endogenously expressing TRPC1, -2, -5, and -6, down-regulation of TRPC1 resulted in increased calcium permeability and elevated basal cytosolic calcium concentrations. We did not observe any involvement of TRPC1 in store-operated cation influx. Notably, TRPC1 suppressed the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons without affecting cell proliferation. Conversely, in TRPC1 knockdown neurons, specific migratory properties like distance covered, locomotion speed, and directionality were increased. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism relying on the expression of TRPC1 and the subsequent formation of heteromeric TRPC channel complexes with reduced calcium permeability, thereby fine-tuning neuronal migration. PMID:22157757

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 (TRPC1) Reduces Calcium Permeability in Heteromeric Channel Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Ursula; Forst, Anna-Lena; Philipp, Maximilian; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Specific biological roles of the classical transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) are still largely elusive. To investigate the function of TRPC1 proteins in cell physiology, we studied heterologously expressed TRPC1 channels and found that recombinant TRPC1 subunits do not form functional homomeric channels. Instead, by electrophysiological analysis TRPC1 was shown to form functional heteromeric, receptor-operated channel complexes with TRPC3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 indicating that TRPC1 proteins can co-assemble with all members of the TRPC subfamily. In all TRPC1-containing heteromers, TRPC1 subunits significantly decreased calcium permeation. The exchange of select amino acids in the putative pore-forming region of TRPC1 further reduced calcium permeability, suggesting that TRPC1 subunits contribute to the channel pore. In immortalized immature gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons endogenously expressing TRPC1, -2, -5, and -6, down-regulation of TRPC1 resulted in increased calcium permeability and elevated basal cytosolic calcium concentrations. We did not observe any involvement of TRPC1 in store-operated cation influx. Notably, TRPC1 suppressed the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons without affecting cell proliferation. Conversely, in TRPC1 knockdown neurons, specific migratory properties like distance covered, locomotion speed, and directionality were increased. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism relying on the expression of TRPC1 and the subsequent formation of heteromeric TRPC channel complexes with reduced calcium permeability, thereby fine-tuning neuronal migration. PMID:22157757

  5. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848

  6. Calcium-channel blockers in the treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Gelmers, H J

    1985-01-25

    According to classic theory, a migraine attack is initiated by cerebrovascular spasm followed by extracranial vasodilatation. Results of recent studies support this theory and suggest that cerebral blood flow during the initial phase of migraine symptoms is, in fact, decreased and this decrease probably leads to ischemia and hypoxia. Cellular hypoxia, in turn, can cause an increase in the flow of calcium from the extracellular fluid to the intracellular space, resulting in calcium overload and cellular dysfunction. Because calcium-channel blockers selectively inhibit the intracellular influx of calcium ions, investigators have begun evaluating the efficacy of these agents for migraine prophylaxis. Nimodipine, a calcium-channel blocker that exhibits selective effects on cerebral vessels, seems to offer protection against the cerebral ischemia and hypoxia presumed to be operative during migraine attacks. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, nimodipine decreased the frequency and duration of migraine attacks by at least half in 69% of patients treated with this agent. Comparable reductions in migraine frequency and duration were attained in 58, 51, 41 and 52% of patients treated with methysergide maleate, pizotifen, clonidine hydrochloride and propranolol, respectively. The piperazine derivative flunarizine also has calcium-channel blocking properties. This agent prevents vasospasm in cerebral arteries and protects against cerebral hypoxia. Results of double-blind studies of migraine prophylaxis with flunarizine demonstrate the beneficial effects of this agent, particularly in younger patients. Flunarizine proved to be superior to pizotifen in decreasing the severity of migraine attacks and comparable to pizotifen in decreasing their frequency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3881906

  7. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part II).

    PubMed

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-12-01

    Since calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs frequently administered in combination with other agents, the potential for clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions exists. These interactions occur most frequently via altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme activity. Part I of the article, which appeared in the previous issue of the Journal, dealt with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. Part II examines interactions with cyclosporin, anaesthetics, carbamazepine and cardiovascular agents. PMID:1782739

  8. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  9. L-type Calcium Channel Auto-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Jonathan; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Crump, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (LTCC) impact the function of nearly all excitable cells. The classical LTCC function is to mediate trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ flux. This review focuses on the contribution of a mobile segment of the LTCC that regulates ion channel function, and also serves as a regulator of transcription in the nucleus. Specifically we highlight recent work demonstrating an auto-feedback regulatory pathway whereby the LTCC transcription factor regulates the LTCC. Also discussed is acute and long-term regulation of function by the LTCC-transcription regulator. PMID:21295347

  10. Calcium-permeable ion channels in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiming; Greka, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) are crucial for a variety of cellular functions. The extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are thus tightly regulated to maintain Ca(2+) homeostasis. The kidney, one of the major organs of the excretory system, regulates Ca(2+) homeostasis by filtration and reabsorption. Approximately 60% of the Ca(2+) in plasma is filtered, and 99% of that is reabsorbed by the kidney tubules. Ca(2+) is also a critical signaling molecule in kidney development, in all kidney cellular functions, and in the emergence of kidney diseases. Recently, studies using genetic and molecular biological approaches have identified several Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel families as important regulators of Ca(2+) homeostasis in kidney. These ion channel families include transient receptor potential channels (TRP), voltage-gated calcium channels, and others. In this review, we provide a brief and systematic summary of the expression, function, and pathological contribution for each of these Ca(2+)-permeable ion channels. Moreover, we discuss their potential as future therapeutic targets. PMID:27029425

  11. Mechanisms of caffeine activation of single calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Sitsapesan, R; Williams, A J

    1990-01-01

    1. Calcium-release channels of sheep cardiac junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum were incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers. Single-channel current fluctuations were recorded under voltage clamp conditions. 2. Channels incorporate into the bilayer with a fixed orientation and channel open probability is regulated by the calcium concentration at the cytosolic face of the membrane. 3. Addition of caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) to the cytosolic side of the membrane increased the open probability of the calcium-activated calcium-release channel by increasing the frequency of opening without significant alteration to the durations of open events. This effect was observed at both 0.1 and 10 microM-activating cytosolic calcium. 4. Caffeine (0.5-2.0 mM) did not activate the channel at a subactivating cytosolic calcium concentration (80 pM). 5. At subactivating calcium concentrations, channels could be activated by higher concentrations of caffeine (greater than 5.0 mM) revealing a second, calcium-independent, mechanism for channel activation. Channel openings induced by these high concentrations of caffeine at subactivating calcium concentrations displayed different kinetics from those observed with calcium as the sole activating ligand or with combinations of calcium and low concentrations of caffeine. 6. Activation of channel opening by caffeine in the presence of calcium did not affect single-channel conductance. Channel openings produced by caffeine at subactivating cytosolic calcium concentrations had identical conductance and relative permeability to those seen on calcium activation. 7. Channels activated by caffeine at both activating and subactivating calcium concentrations were characteristically modified by ryanodine, Ruthenium Red, ATP and magnesium, implying that the same channel is involved under both conditions. PMID:2167363

  12. Calcium channel antibodies in patients with absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tektürk, Pınar; Baykan, Betül; Ekizoğlu, Esme; Ulusoy, Canan; Aydin-Özemir, Zeynep; Içöz, Sema; Kınay, Demet; Tüzün, Erdem

    2014-07-01

    Autoimmunity has aroused interest in the last years as a contributory mechanism of epilepsy, especially in epilepsies with unknown cause or therapy resistance. Since the relationship of absence epilepsy (AE) with calcium channels is well established, we aimed to investigate related antibodies in patients diagnosed with AE. Consecutive patients with typical absence seizures having either childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) or juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) with generalized spike and wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) were included after their consent. The patients were diagnosed according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2010 criteria. Antibodies against P-Q type voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC) and T-type VGCC subunit Cav3.2 (encoded by the CACNA1H gene) were investigated by RIA and ELISA, respectively. We searched for these antibodies in 32 patients with AE and 53 patients with focal epilepsy of unknown cause (FEOUC) as the disease control group; furthermore, 30 healthy persons served as the healthy controls. Eleven patients (34.3%) with AE had CAE and the remaining patients had JAE. Only a 47-year-old female FEOUC patient, who also had systemic lupus erythematosus with normal MRI scans showed antibodies against P-Q type VGCC, whereas no antibody positivity could be found in other FEOUC and AE patients and healthy controls. Our results might suggest that calcium channel antibodies do not play an important role in the pathophysiology of AE. Further studies with larger groups of other epileptic syndromes are needed to confirm our results. PMID:24147594

  13. Mechanosensitivity of N-type calcium channel currents.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Barbara; Tabarean, Iustin V; Juranka, Peter; Morris, Catherine E

    2002-11-01

    Mechanosensitivity in voltage-gated calcium channels could be an asset to calcium signaling in healthy cells or a liability during trauma. Recombinant N-type channels expressed in HEK cells revealed a spectrum of mechano-responses. When hydrostatic pressure inflated cells under whole-cell clamp, capacitance was unchanged, but peak current reversibly increased ~1.5-fold, correlating with inflation, not applied pressure. Additionally, stretch transiently increased the open-state inactivation rate, irreversibly increased the closed-state inactivation rate, and left-shifted inactivation without affecting the activation curve or rate. Irreversible mechano-responses proved to be mechanically accelerated components of run-down; they were not evident in cell-attached recordings where, however, reversible stretch-induced increases in peak current persisted. T-type channels (alpha(1I) subunit only) were mechano-insensitive when expressed alone or when coexpressed with N-type channels (alpha(1B) and two auxiliary subunits) and costimulated with stretch that augmented N-type current. Along with the cell-attached results, this differential effect indicates that N-type mechanosensitivity did not depend on the recording situation. The insensitivity of T-type currents to stretch suggested that N-type mechano-responses might arise from primary/auxiliary subunit interactions. However, in single-channel recordings, N-type currents exhibited reversible stretch-induced increases in NP(o) whether the alpha(1B) subunit was expressed alone or with auxiliary subunits. These findings set the stage for the molecular dissection of calcium current mechanosensitivity. PMID:12414690

  14. Mechanosensitivity of N-type calcium channel currents.

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Barbara; Tabarean, Iustin V; Juranka, Peter; Morris, Catherine E

    2002-01-01

    Mechanosensitivity in voltage-gated calcium channels could be an asset to calcium signaling in healthy cells or a liability during trauma. Recombinant N-type channels expressed in HEK cells revealed a spectrum of mechano-responses. When hydrostatic pressure inflated cells under whole-cell clamp, capacitance was unchanged, but peak current reversibly increased ~1.5-fold, correlating with inflation, not applied pressure. Additionally, stretch transiently increased the open-state inactivation rate, irreversibly increased the closed-state inactivation rate, and left-shifted inactivation without affecting the activation curve or rate. Irreversible mechano-responses proved to be mechanically accelerated components of run-down; they were not evident in cell-attached recordings where, however, reversible stretch-induced increases in peak current persisted. T-type channels (alpha(1I) subunit only) were mechano-insensitive when expressed alone or when coexpressed with N-type channels (alpha(1B) and two auxiliary subunits) and costimulated with stretch that augmented N-type current. Along with the cell-attached results, this differential effect indicates that N-type mechanosensitivity did not depend on the recording situation. The insensitivity of T-type currents to stretch suggested that N-type mechano-responses might arise from primary/auxiliary subunit interactions. However, in single-channel recordings, N-type currents exhibited reversible stretch-induced increases in NP(o) whether the alpha(1B) subunit was expressed alone or with auxiliary subunits. These findings set the stage for the molecular dissection of calcium current mechanosensitivity. PMID:12414690

  15. Role of TRPC Channels in Store-Operated Calcium Entry.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hwei Ling; de Souza, Lorena Brito; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-01-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is a ubiquitous Ca(2+) entry pathway that is activated in response to depletion of Ca(2+) stores within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and contributes to the control of various physiological functions in a wide variety of cell types. The transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (TRPCs 1-7), that are activated by stimuli leading to PIP2 hydrolysis, were first identified as molecular components of SOCE channels. TRPC channels show a miscellany of tissue expression, physiological functions and channel properties. However, none of the TRPC members display currents that resemble I CRAC. Intensive search for the CRAC channel component led to identification of Orai1 and STIM1, now established as being the primary constituents of the CRAC channel. There is now considerable evidence that STIM1 activates both Orai1 and TRPC1 via distinct domains in its C-terminus. Intriguingly, TRPC1 function is not only dependent on STIM1 but also requires Orai1. The critical functional interaction between TRPC1 and Orai1, which determines the activation of TRPC1, has also been identified. In this review, we will discuss current concepts regarding the role of TRPC channels in SOCE, the physiological functions regulated by TRPC-mediated SOCE, and the complex mechanisms underlying the regulation of TRPCs, including the functional interactions with Orai1 and STIM1. PMID:27161226

  16. Crystal structure of the epithelial calcium channel TRPV6.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Kei; Singh, Appu K; Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2016-06-23

    Precise regulation of calcium homeostasis is essential for many physiological functions. The Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV5 and TRPV6 play vital roles in calcium homeostasis as Ca(2+) uptake channels in epithelial tissues. Detailed structural bases for their assembly and Ca(2+) permeation remain obscure. Here we report the crystal structure of rat TRPV6 at 3.25 Å resolution. The overall architecture of TRPV6 reveals shared and unique features compared with other TRP channels. Intracellular domains engage in extensive interactions to form an intracellular 'skirt' involved in allosteric modulation. In the K(+) channel-like transmembrane domain, Ca(2+) selectivity is determined by direct coordination of Ca(2+) by a ring of aspartate side chains in the selectivity filter. On the basis of crystallographically identified cation-binding sites at the pore axis and extracellular vestibule, we propose a Ca(2+) permeation mechanism. Our results provide a structural foundation for understanding the regulation of epithelial Ca(2+) uptake and its role in pathophysiology. PMID:27296226

  17. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  18. RS 30026: a potent and effective calcium channel agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Patmore, L.; Duncan, G. P.; Clarke, B.; Anderson, A. J.; Greenhouse, R.; Pfister, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    1. A series of dihydropyridine derivatives has been evaluated for calcium channel agonist activity using reversal of nisoldipine-induced inhibition of beating of aggregates of embryonic chick myocytes. This test appears to be specific for calcium channel agonists since isoprenaline and cardiac glycosides are inactive. 2. RS 30026 was the most potent of the series, was significantly more potent than CGP 28392 and of similar potency to Bay K 8644 (pEC50 = 7.45, 6.16 and 7.20, respectively). RS 30026 increased edge movement of individual aggregates, in the absence of nisoldipine, by 50% at 2 nM. 3. Compounds were also evaluated for their effects on guinea-pig papillary muscle and porcine coronary artery rings. RS 30026 displayed positive inotropism at concentrations between 10(-9) and 10(-6) M (pEC200 = 8.21), but was a much more powerful inotrope than Bay K 8644, increasing contractility to 1300% of control at 10(-6) M (compared to 350% of control for Bay K 8644). RS 30026 caused vasoconstriction at concentrations between 10(-10) and 10(-7) M. 4. Calcium channel currents in single embryonic chick myocytes were recorded by whole-cell voltage clamp techniques. RS 30026 (100 nM-500 nM) produced large increases in peak current amplitude and shifted the voltage for threshold and maximal currents to more negative values. RS 30026 (500 nM) also produced large increases in the inward tail currents evoked upon repolarization. The effects of Bay K 8644 (50 and 500 nM) were much less marked.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1694461

  19. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weihua; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC), T-type calcium channels (TTCC), sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX), transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26078804

  20. Calcium channel blockers intake and psoriasis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A D; Kagen, M; Friger, M; Halevy, S

    2001-01-01

    In vitro evidence suggests that intracellular calcium metabolism influences keratinocyte differentiation. However, only a few reports have described exacerbation of psoriasis or psoriasiform eruptions due to intake of calcium channel blockers. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the association between exposure to calcium channel blockers and psoriasis. Data were obtained through a retrospective assessment of the files of 150 patients hospitalized for psoriasis or psoriasiform eruptions and 150 matched control patients. Exposure to calcium channel blockers was recorded in case and control patients. It was found that 13/150 patients hospitalized for psoriasis consumed calcium channel blockers. Calcium channel blockers were associated with precipitation of new-onset psoriasis (n = 2), as well as with the exacerbation of psoriasis (n = 11). The calcium channel blockers were as follows: nifedipine (n = 10), felodipine (n = 2) and amlodipine (n = 1). The median latent period between the beginning of intake of calcium channel blockers and precipitation or exacerbation of psoriasis was 28 months (range 4-143 months). A stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that intake of calcium channel blockers was significantly associated with psoriasis, as compared to the control group (p = 0.018). Our study implies a possible role of calcium channel blockers as precipitating or exacerbating factors in patients with psoriasis. PMID:11800142

  1. Role of calcium channels in cellular antituberculosis effects: Potential of voltage-gated calcium-channel blockers in tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Cui, Ruina; Yang, Yourong; Wu, Xueqiong

    2015-10-01

    The immunity of human immune cells and their ability to inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are key factors in the anti-MTB effect. However, MTB modulates the levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers, such as calcium, to evade protective immune responses. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting L-type calcium channel in immune cells using either antibodies or small interfering RNA increases calcium influx, upregulates the expression of proinflammation genes, and reduces MTB burden. First, we will review the key factors in calcium-signaling pathway that may affect the immunity of immune cells to MTB infection. Second, we will focus on the role of calcium channels in regulating cellular immunity to MTB. Finally, we will discuss the possibility of using calcium-channel blockers as anti-MTB chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapy effects, shorten treatment period, and overcome drug resistance. PMID:25442874

  2. Trypsin-Sensitive, Rapid Inactivation of a Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Christopher R.; Lingle, Christopher J.

    1992-09-01

    Most calcium-activated potassium channels couple changes in intracellular calcium to membrane excitability by conducting a current with a probability that depends directly on submembrane calcium concentration. In rat adrenal chromaffin cells, however, a large conductance, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) undergoes rapid inactivation, suggesting that this channel has a physiological role different than that of other BK channels. The inactivation of the BK channel, like that of the voltage-gated Shaker B potassium channel, is removed by trypsin digestion and channels are blocked by the Shaker B amino-terminal inactivating domain. Thus, this BK channel shares functional and possibly structural homologies with other inactivating voltage-gated potassium channels.

  3. TRPM2: a multifunctional ion channel for calcium signalling

    PubMed Central

    Sumoza-Toledo, Adriana; Penner, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    The transient potential receptor melastatin-2 (TRPM2) channel has emerged as an important Ca2+ signalling mechanism in a variety of cells, contributing to cellular functions that include cytokine production, insulin release, cell motility and cell death. Its ability to respond to reactive oxygen species has made TRPM2 a potential therapeutic target for chronic inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and oxidative stress-related pathologies. TRPM2 is a non-selective, calcium (Ca2+)-permeable cation channel of the melastatin-related transient receptor potential (TRPM) ion channel subfamily. It is activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) through a diphosphoribose hydrolase domain in its C-terminus and regulated through a variety of factors, including synergistic facilitation by [Ca2+]i, cyclic ADPR, H2O2, NAADP, and negative feedback regulation by AMP and permeating protons (pH). In addition to its role mediating Ca2+ influx into the cells, TRPM2 can also function as a lysosomal Ca2+ release channel, contributing to cell death. The physiological and pathophysiological context of ROS-mediated events makes TRPM2 a promising target for the development of therapeutic tools of inflammatory and degenerative diseases. PMID:21135052

  4. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels by RGK Proteins.

    PubMed

    Buraei, Zafir; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Due to their essential biological roles, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are regulated by a myriad of molecules and mechanisms. Fifteen years ago, RGK proteins were discovered to bind the VGCC β subunit (Cavβ) and potently inhibit high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels. RGKs (Rad, Rem, Rem2 and Gem/Kir) are a family of monomeric small GTPases belonging to the superfamily of Ras GTPases. They exert dual inhibitory effects on VGCCs, decreasing surface expression and suppressing surface channels through immobilization of the voltage sensor or reduction of channel open probability. While Cavβ is required for all forms of RGK inhibition, not all inhibition is mediated by the RGK-Cavβ interaction. Some RGK proteins also interact directly with the pore-forming α1 subunit of some types of VGCCs (Cavα1). Importantly, RGK proteins tonically inhibit VGCCs in native cells, regulating cardiac and neural functions. This minireview summarizes the mechanisms, molecular determinants, and physiological impact of RGK inhibition of VGCCs. PMID:25966691

  5. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel α1-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Nicole; Buryi, Vitali; Feron, Olivier; Gomez, Jean-Pierre; Christen, Marie-Odile; Godfraind, Théophile

    1998-01-01

    CHO cells expressing the α1C-a subunit (cardiac isoform) and the α1C-b subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for α1C isoforms.Inward current evoked by the transfected α1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration.Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of α1C-b-subunit than of α1C-a-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of −100 mV than at −50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms.Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on α1C-a than on α1C-b subunit at Vh of −100 mV and −50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages.[3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the α1C-b than for the α1C-a subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the α1C-a subunit than for the α1C-b subunit.These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the α1C-a and α1C-b subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  6. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel alpha1-subunits.

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Buryi, V; Feron, O; Gomez, J P; Christen, M O; Godfraind, T

    1998-11-01

    1. CHO cells expressing the alpha(1C-a) subunit (cardiac isoform) and the alpha(1C-b) subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for alpha1C isoforms. 2. Inward current evoked by the transfected alpha1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 3. Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of alpha(1C-)b-subunit than of alpha(1C-a)-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of -100 mV than at -50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms. 4. Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on alpha(1C-a) than on alpha(1C-b) subunit at Vh of -100 mV and -50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages. 5. [3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-b) than for the alpha(1C-a) subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-a) subunit than for the alpha(1C-b) subunit. 6. These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the alpha(1C-a) and alpha(1C-b) subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  7. Calcium-activated potassium channels and endothelial dysfunction: therapeutic options?

    PubMed Central

    Félétou, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The three subtypes of calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) of large, intermediate and small conductance (BKCa, IKCa and SKCa) are present in the vascular wall. In healthy arteries, BKCa channels are preferentially expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, while IKCa and SKCa are preferentially located in endothelial cells. The activation of endothelial IKCa and SKCa contributes to nitric oxide (NO) generation and is required to elicit endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations. In the latter responses, the hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells is evoked either via electrical coupling through myo-endothelial gap junctions or by potassium ions, which by accumulating in the intercellular space activate the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 and/or the Na+/K+-ATPase. Additionally, endothelium-derived factors such as cytochrome P450-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and under some circumstances NO, prostacyclin, lipoxygenase products and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) hyperpolarize and relax the underlying smooth muscle cells by activating BKCa. In contrast, cytochrome P450-derived 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and various endothelium-derived contracting factors inhibit BKCa. Aging and cardiovascular diseases are associated with endothelial dysfunctions that can involve a decrease in NO bioavailability, alterations of EDHF-mediated responses and/or enhanced production of endothelium-derived contracting factors. Because potassium channels are involved in these endothelium-dependent responses, activation of endothelial and/or smooth muscle KCa could prevent the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, direct activators of these potassium channels or compounds that regulate their activity or their expression may be of some therapeutic interest. Conversely, blockers of IKCa may prevent restenosis and that of BKCa channels sepsis-dependent hypotension. PMID:19187341

  8. Design of a functional calcium channel protein: inferences about an ion channel-forming motif derived from the primary structure of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A.; Tomich, J. M.; Iwamoto, T.; Montal, M.

    1993-01-01

    To identify sequence-specific motifs associated with the formation of an ionic pore, we systematically evaluated the channel-forming activity of synthetic peptides with sequence of predicted transmembrane segments of the voltage-gated calcium channel. The amino acid sequence of voltage-gated, dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive calcium channels suggests the presence in each of four homologous repeats (I-IV) of six segments (S1-S6) predicted to form membrane-spanning, alpha-helical structures. Only peptides representing amphipathic segments S2 or S3 form channels in lipid bilayers. To generate a functional calcium channel based on a four-helix bundle motif, four-helix bundle proteins representing IVS2 (T4CaIVS2) or IVS3 (T4CaIVS3) were synthesized. Both proteins form cation-selective channels, but with distinct characteristics: the single-channel conductance in 50 mM BaCl2 is 3 pS and 10 pS. For T4CaIVS3, the conductance saturates with increasing concentration of divalent cation. The dissociation constants for Ba2+, Ca2+, and Sr2+ are 13.6 mM, 17.7 mM, and 15.0 mM, respectively. The conductance of T4CaIVS2 does not saturate up to 150 mM salt. Whereas T4CaIVS3 is blocked by microM Ca2+ and Cd2+, T4CaIVS2 is not blocked by divalent cations. Only T4CaIVS3 is modulated by enantiomers of the DHP derivative BayK 8644, demonstrating sequence requirement for specific drug action. Thus, only T4CaIVS3 exhibits pore properties characteristic also of authentic calcium channels. The designed functional calcium channel may provide insights into fundamental mechanisms of ionic permeation and drug action, information that may in turn further our understanding of molecular determinants underlying authentic pore structures. PMID:7505682

  9. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J

    2016-03-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  10. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  11. Calcium channels in PDGF-stimulated A172 cells open after intracellular calcium release and are not voltage-dependent.

    PubMed

    Szöllösi, J; Feuerstein, B G; Vereb, G; Pershadsingh, H A; Marton, L J

    1991-07-01

    Using laser image cytometry and Indo-1 fluorescence, we investigated the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of confluent A172 human glioblastoma cells stimulated by the BB homodimer of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). The shape of the calcium transients and the delay time between stimulation and the beginning of the transient varied considerably. The percentage of responsive cells, the peak [Ca2+]i and the duration of the response were directly related to PDGF-BB dose, while the delay time was inversely related; the maximal response occurred at a PDGF-BB concentration of 20 ng/ml. Studies with EGTA and inorganic calcium-channel blockers (Ni2+, La3+) showed that the increase of [Ca2+]i resulted from initial release of intracellular stores and subsequent calcium influx across the plasma membrane. Opening of calcium channels in the plasma membrane, monitored directly by studying Mn2+ quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence, was stimulated by PDGF-BB and blocked by La3+; the opening occurred 55 +/- 10 s after the initial increase in [Ca2+]i. Therefore, in these tumor cells, intracellular release always occurs before channel opening in the plasma membrane. Depolarization of cells with high extracellular [K+] did not generally induce calcium transients but did decrease calcium influx. L-type calcium-channel blockers (verapamil, nifedipine, and diltiazem) had little or no effect on the calcium influx induced by PDGF-BB. These results indicate that PDGF-BB induces calcium influx by a mechanism independent of voltage-sensitive calcium channels in A172 human glioblastoma cells. PMID:1657394

  12. Lipopolysaccharides upregulate calcium concentration in mouse uterine smooth muscle cells through the T-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Jingyi; Zheng, Dongming; Liu, Sishi; Liu, Caixia

    2015-03-01

    Infection is a significant cause of preterm birth. Abnormal changes in intracellular calcium signals are the ultimate triggers of early uterine contractions that result in preterm birth. T‑type calcium channels play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer, as well as endocrine and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are limited studies on their role in uterine contractions and parturition. In the present study, mouse uterine smooth muscle cells were isolated and treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to mimic the microenvironment of uterine infection in vitro to investigate the role of T‑type calcium channels in the process of infection‑induced preterm birth. The results from quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis showed that LPS significantly induced the expression of the Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 subtypes of T‑type calcium channels. Measurements of intracellular calcium concentration showed a significant increase in response to LPS. However, these effects can be reversed by T‑type calcium channel blockers. Western blot analysis further indicated that LPS induced the activation of the nuclear factor (NF)‑κB signaling pathway, and endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) was significantly upregulated, whereas NF‑κB inhibitors significantly inhibited the LPS‑induced upregulation of Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and ET‑1 expression. In addition, ET‑1 directly induced Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 expression, whereas ET‑1 antagonists inhibited the LPS‑induced upregulation of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that infection triggers the upregulation of T‑type calcium channels and promotes calcium influx. This process relies on the activation of the NF‑κB/ET‑1 signaling pathway. The T‑type calcium channel is expected to become an effective target for the prevention of infection‑induced preterm birth. PMID:25573237

  13. Structural Basis for Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle, and other electrically excitable cells. Voltage-gated calcium channels are activated by depolarization during action potentials, and calcium influx through them is the key second messenger of electrical signaling, initiating secretion, contraction, neurotransmission, gene transcription, and many other intracellular processes. Drugs that block sodium channels are used in local anesthesia and the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and cardiac arrhythmia. Drugs that block calcium channels are used in the treatment of epilepsy, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, angina pectoris, and cardiac arrhythmia. The principal pore-forming subunits of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are structurally related and likely to have evolved from ancestral voltage-gated sodium channels that are widely expressed in prokaryotes. Determination of the structure of a bacterial ancestor of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels at high resolution now provides a three-dimensional view of the binding sites for drugs acting on sodium and calcium channels. In this minireview, we outline the different classes of sodium and calcium channel drugs, review studies that have identified amino acid residues that are required for their binding and therapeutic actions, and illustrate how the analogs of those key amino acid residues may form drug-binding sites in three-dimensional models derived from bacterial channels. PMID:25848093

  14. Inhibition of Peripheral Nerve Scarring by Calcium Antagonists, Also Known as Calcium Channel Blockers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jin-Wei; Jiao, Jian-Bao; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Yuan-Tao; Yang, Guang; Li, Chun-Yu; Yin, Wei-Tian; Ling, Li

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of calcium channel blockers (verapamil) on the formation of scars in the sciatic nerve anastomosis after peripheral nerve injury. One hundred twenty healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats were selected and prepared with right sciatic nerve injury for this study. Samples were selected at the fourth and 12th weeks, respectively, after treatment and observations were made on the nerve anastomosis healing and diameter. Image analysis and statistical processing were carried out relating to the results of the study. The diameter of the anastomosis of the treatment group at weeks 4 and 12 was noticeably smaller than the control group (P < 0.05). In the treatment group at week 4, there were many vesicles observed in the fibroblasts' cytosol and in the control group, the fibroblasts exhibited high number of rough endoplasmic reticulum. The collagen content of the nerve scarring at week 12 in the treatment group was apparently less than the control group (P < 0.01). The calcium channel blocker (verapamil) reduced the axon resistance through the anastomosis during nerve regeneration. It can effectively inhibit the formation of scarring from nerve injury. It also provided an excellent microenvironment for the regeneration of nerve fibers. PMID:26488333

  15. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  16. Plasma membrane calcium channels in cancer: Alterations and consequences for cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The study of calcium channels in molecular mechanisms of cancer transformation is still a novel area of research. Several studies, mostly conducted on cancer cell lines, however support the idea that a diversity of plasma membrane channels participates in the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis, which regulates various cancer hallmarks such as uncontrolled multiplication and increase in migration and invasion abilities. However few is still understood concerning the intracellular signaling cascades mobilized by calcium influx participating to cancer cell behavior. This review intends to gather some of these pathways dependent on plasma membrane calcium channels and described in prostate, breast and lung cancer cell lines. In these cancer cell types, the calcium channels involved in calcium signaling pathways promoting cancer behaviors are mostly non-voltage activated calcium channels and belong to the TRP superfamily (TRPC, TPRPV and TRPM families) and the Orai family. TRP and Orai channels are part of many signaling cascades involving the activation of transmembrane receptors by extracellular ligand from the tumor environment. TRPV can sense changes in the physical and chemical environment of cancer cells and TRPM7 are stretch activated and sensitive to cholesterol. Changes in activation and or expression of plasma-membrane calcium channels affect calcium-dependent signaling processes relevant to tumorigenesis. The studies cited in this review suggest that an increase in plasma membrane calcium channel expression and/or activity sustain an elevated calcium entry (constitutive or under the control of extracellular signals) promoting higher cell proliferation and migration in most cases. A variety of non-voltage-operated calcium channels display change expression and/or activity in a same cancer type and cooperate to the same process relevant to cancer cell behavior, or can be involved in a different sequence of events during the tumorigenesis. This article is part of a

  17. Bell-shaped calcium-response curves of lns(l,4,5)P3- and calcium-gated channels from endoplasmic reticulum of cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezprozvanny, Llya; Watras, James; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    1991-06-01

    RELEASE of calcium from intracellular stores occurs by two pathways, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-gated channel1-3 and a calcium-gated channel (ryanodine receptor)4-6. Using specific antibodies, both receptors were found in Purkinje cells of cerebellum7,8. We have now compared the functional properties of the channels corresponding to the two receptors by incorporating endoplasmic reticulum vesicles from canine cerebellum into planar bilayers. InsP3-gated channels were observed most frequently. Another channel type was activated by adenine nucleotides or caffeine, inhibited by ruthenium red, and modified by ryanodine, characteristics of the ryanodine receptor/channel6. The open probability of both channel types displayed a bell-shaped curve for dependence on calcium. For the InsP3-gated channel, the maximum probability of opening occurred at 0.2 µM free calcium, with sharp decreases on either side of the maximum. Maximum activity for the ryanodine receptor/channel was maintained between 1 and 100 µM calcium. Thus, within the physiological range of cytoplasmic calcium, the InsP3-gated channel itself allows positive feed-back and then negative feedback for calcium release, whereas the ryanodine receptor/channel behaves solely as a calcium-activated channel. The existence in the same cell of two channels with different responses to calcium and different ligand sensitivities provides a basis for complex patterns of intracellular calcium regulation.

  18. Permeation through the calcium release channel of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    Current voltage (I-V) relations were measured from the calcium release channel (CRC) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiac muscle in 12 KCl solutions, symmetrical and asymmetrical, from 25 mM to 2 M. I-V curves are nearly linear, in the voltage range +/- 150 mV approximately 12kT/e, even in asymmetrical solutions, e.g., 2 M // 100 mM. It is awkward to describe straight lines as sums of exponentials in a wide range of solutions and potentials, and so traditional barrier models have difficulty fitting this data. Diffusion theories with constant fields predict curvilinear I-V relations, and so they are also unsatisfactory. The Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) form a diffusion theory with variable fields. They fit the data by using adjustable parameters for the diffusion constant of each ion and for the effective density of fixed (i.e., permanent) charge P(x) along the channel's "filter" (7-A diameter, 10 A long). If P(x) is described by just one parameter, independent of x (i.e., P(x) = P0 = -4.2 M), the fits are satisfactory (RMS error/RMS current = 6.4/67), and the estimates of diffusion coefficients are reasonable D(K) = 1.3 x 10(-6) cm2/s, D(Cl) = 3.9 x 10(-6) cm2/s. The CRC seems to have a small selectivity filter with a very high density of permanent charge. This may be a design principle of channels specialized for large flux. The Appendix derives barrier models, and their prefactor, from diffusion theories (with variable fields) and argues that barrier models are poor descriptions of CRCs in particular and open channels in general. PMID:9284302

  19. Store-operated channels regulate intracellular calcium in mammalian rods.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Tünde; Barabas, Peter; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Punzo, Claudio; Kefalov, Vladimir; Križaj, David

    2012-08-01

    Exposure to daylight closes cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) and voltage-operated Ca(2+) -permeable channels in mammalian rods. The consequent lowering of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), if protracted, can contribute to light-induced damage and apoptosis in these cells. We here report that mouse rods are protected against prolonged lowering of [Ca(2+)](i) by store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Ca(2+) stores were depleted in Ca(2+)-free saline supplemented with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) sequestration blocker cyclopiazonic acid. Store depletion elicited [Ca(2+)](i) signals that exceeded baseline [Ca(2+)](i) by 5.9 ± 0.7-fold and were antagonized by an inhibitory cocktail containing 2-APB, SKF 96365 and Gd(3+). Cation influx through SOCE channels was sufficient to elicit a secondary activation of L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ entry. We also found that TRPC1, the type 1 canonical mammalian homologue of the Drosophila photoreceptor TRP channel, is predominantly expressed within the outer nuclear layer of the retina. Rod loss in Pde6b(rdl) (rd1), Chx10/Kip1(-/-rdl) and Elovl4(TG2) dystrophic models was associated with ∼70% reduction in Trpc1 mRNA content whereas Trpc1 mRNA levels in rodless cone-full Nrl(-/-) retinas were decreased by ∼50%. Genetic ablation of TRPC1 channels, however, had no effect on SOCE, the sensitivity of the rod phototransduction cascade or synaptic transmission at rod and cone synapses. Thus, we localized two new mechanisms, SOCE and TRPC1, to mammalian rods and characterized the contribution of SOCE to Ca(2+) homeostasis. By preventing the cytosolic [Ca(2+)](i) from dropping too low under sustained saturating light conditions, these signalling pathways may protect Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms within the ER and the cytosol without affecting normal rod function. PMID:22674725

  20. Management of a mixed overdose of calcium channel blockers, β-blockers and statins

    PubMed Central

    Thakrar, Reena; Shulman, Rob; Bellingan, Geoff; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of extreme mixed overdose of calcium channel blockers, β-blockers and statins. The patient was successfully treated with aggressive resuscitation including cardiac pacing and multiorgan support, glucagon and high-dose insulin for toxicity related to calcium channel blockade and β-blockade, and ubiquinone for treating severe presumed statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and muscle weakness. PMID:24907219

  1. The influence of environmental calcium concentrations on calcium flux, compensatory drinking and epithelial calcium channel expression in a freshwater cartilaginous fish.

    PubMed

    Allen, Peter J; Weihrauch, Dirk; Grandmaison, Vanessa; Dasiewicz, Patricia; Peake, Stephan J; Anderson, W Gary

    2011-03-15

    Calcium metabolism and mRNA levels of the epithelial calcium channel (ECaC) were examined in a freshwater cartilaginous fish, the lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens. Lake sturgeon were acclimated for ≥2 weeks to 0.1 (low), 0.4 (normal) or 3.3 (high) mmol l(-1) environmental calcium. Whole-body calcium flux was examined using (45)Ca as a radioactive marker. Net calcium flux was inward in all treatment groups; however, calcium influx was greatest in the low calcium environment and lowest in the high calcium environment, whereas efflux had the opposite relationship. A significant difference in the concentration of (45)Ca in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of fish in the low calcium environment led to the examination of drinking rate and calcium flux across the anterior-middle (mid) intestine. Drinking rate was not different between treatments; however, calcium influx across the mid-intestine in the low calcium treatment was significantly greater than that in both the normal and high calcium treatments. The lake sturgeon ECaC was 2831 bp in length, with a predicted protein sequence of 683 amino acids that shared a 66% identity with the closest sequenced ECaCs from the vertebrate phyla. ECaC mRNA levels were examined in the gills, kidney, pyloric caeca, mid-intestine and spiral intestine. Expression levels were highest in the gills, then the kidneys, and were orders of magnitude lower in the GIT. Contrary to existing models for calcium uptake in the teleost gill, ECaC expression was greatest in high calcium conditions and kidney ECaC expression was lowest in low calcium conditions, suggesting that cellular transport mechanisms for calcium may be distinctly different in these freshwater cartilaginous fishes. PMID:21346128

  2. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  3. Augmented behavioral response and enhanced synaptosomal calcium transport induced by repeated cocaine administration are decreased by calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K.; Ansah, T.A.; Ali, S.F.; Mukherjee, S.; Shockley, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that calcium influx via L-type calcium channels is necessary for psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. In addition, chronic amphetamine upregulates subtype Cav1.2-containing L-type calcium channels. In the present studies, we assessed the effect of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) on cocaine-induced behavioral sentitization and determined whether the functional activity of L-type calcium channels is altered after repeated cocaine administration. Rats were administered daily intraperitoneal injections of either flunarizine (40 mg/kg), diltiazem (40 mg/kg) or cocaine (20 mg/kg) and the combination of the CCB’s and cocaine for 30 days. Motor activities were monitored on Day 1, and every 6th day during the 30-day treatment period. Daily cocaine administration produced increased locomotor activity. Maximal augmentation of behavioral response to repeated cocaine administration was observed on Day 18. Flunarizine pretreatment abolished the augmented behavioral response to repeated cocaine administration while diltiazem was less effective. Measurement of tissue monoamine levels on Day 18 revealed cocaine-induced increases in DA and 5-HT in the nucleus accumbens. By contrast to behavioral response, diltiazem was more effective in attenuating increases in monoamine levels than flunarizine. Cocaine administration for 18 days produced increases in calcium-uptake in synaptosomes prepared from the nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex. Increases in calcium-uptake were abolished by flunarizine- and diltiazem-pretreatment. Taken together, the augmented cocaine-induced behavioral response on Day 18 may be due to increased calcium uptake in the nucleus accumbens leading to increased dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) release. Flunarizine and diltiazem attenuated the behavioral response by decreasing calcium uptake and decreasing neurochemical release. PMID:17689567

  4. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  5. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  6. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  7. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity.

    PubMed

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-01-01

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility. PMID:24980701

  8. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  9. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  10. External cadmium and internal calcium block of single calcium channels in smooth muscle cells from rabbit mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Quayle, J M; Worley, J F; Standen, N B; Nelson, M T

    1989-11-01

    The patch clamp technique was used to record unitary currents through single calcium channels from smooth muscle cells of rabbit mesenteric arteries. The effects of external cadmium and cobalt and internal calcium, barium, cadmium, and magnesium on single channel currents were investigated with 80 mM barium as the charge carrier and Bay K 8644 to prolong openings. External cadmium shortened the mean open time of single Ca channels. Cadmium blocking and unblocking rate constants of 16.5 mM-1 ms-1 and 0.6 ms-1, respectively, were determined, corresponding to dissociation constant Kd of 36 microM at -20 mV. These results are very similar to those reported for cardiac muscle Ca channels (Lansman, J. B., P. Hess, and R. W. Tsien. 1986. J. Gen. Physiol. 88:321-347). In contrast, Cd2+ (01-10 mM), when applied to the internal surface of Ca channels in inside-out patches, did not affect the mean open time, mean unitary current, or the variance of the open channel current. Internal calcium induced a flickery block, with a Kd of 5.8 mM. Mean blocking and unblocking rate constants for calcium of 0.56 mM-1 ms-1 and 3.22 ms-1, respectively, were determined. Internal barium (8 mM) reduced the mean unitary current by 36%. We conclude that under our experimental conditions, the Ca channel is not symmetrical with respect to inorganic ion block and that intracellular calcium can modulate Ca channel currents via a low-affinity binding site. PMID:2481511

  11. Mn ions pass through calcium channels. A possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The divalent transition-metal cations Fe, Co, and Ni were used to test the hypothesis that Mn ions pass through calcium channels because Mn ions have a relatively low energy of hydration. The test ions were applied to the bath and comparisons were made of their effects on Ca or Mn spikes elicited from myoepithelial cells of the proventriculus of the polychaete worm Syllis spongiphila. Control experiments showed that (a) results obtained using deoxygenated solutions (required to stabilize Fe2+ ions) could be compared with those using solutions containing oxygen, and (b) the test cations did not measurably affect the electrical coupling between cells. Ca spikes were reversibly abolished by the test cations in the order of effectiveness: Fe (16.1 mM +/- 1.0, SE; n = 15) = Co (14.6 mM +/- 0.8; n = 27) less than Ni (8.3 mM +/- 0.7; n = 16). The test cations diminished Mn spikes by decreasing maximum rates of rise (Fe = Co less than Ni) and overshoot amplitudes (Fe less than Co less than Ni). The test cations also increased the current intensity required for Ca (Fe = Co less than Ni) or Mn spike initiation (Fe less than Co less than Ni). Since the energies of hydration of Fe, Co, and Ni increase stepwise from that of Mn, and the effectiveness of these ions in diminishing Ca and Mn spikes increased in the order Fe less than or equal to Co less than Ni, these data support the hypothesis that Mn ions pass through Ca channels because they shed waters of hydration relatively easily. An additional observation was that, at below-blocking concentrations, the test cations caused decreased duration of Mn spikes and increased duration of Ca spikes. PMID:6308126

  12. Presynaptic Calcium Channel Localization and Calcium Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Regulated by the Fuseless Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. Ashleigh; Kim, Eunju; Leung, Hung-Tat; Woodruff, Elvin; An, Lingling; Doerge, R. W.; Pak, William L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Summary A systematic forward genetic Drosophila screen for electroretinogram mutants lacking synaptic transients identified the fuseless (fusl) gene, which encodes a predicted 8-pass transmembrane protein in the presynaptic membrane. Null fusl mutants display >75% reduction in evoked synaptic transmission but, conversely, a ~3-fold increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events. These neurotransmission defects are rescued by a wildtype fusl transgene targeted only to the presynaptic cell, demonstrating a strictly presynaptic requirement for Fusl function. Defects in FM dye turnover at the synapse show a severely impaired exo-endo synaptic vesicle cycling pool. Consistently, ultrastructural analyses reveal accumulated vesicles arrested in clustered and docked pools at presynaptic active zones. In the absence of Fusl, calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release is dramatically compromised and there is little enhancement of synaptic efficacy with elevated external Ca2+ concentrations. These defects are causally linked with severe loss of the Cacophony voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which fail to localize normally at presynaptic active zone domains in the absence of Fusl. These data indicate that Fusl regulates assembly of the presynaptic active zone Ca2+ channel domains required for efficient coupling of the Ca2+ influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:18385325

  13. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels for neuropathic pain management

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Luo, Z. David

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) play obligatory roles in diverse physiological functions. Pathological conditions leading to changes in their biophysical properties and expression levels may cause malfunctions of VGCC mediated activities, resulting in disease states. It is believed that changes in VGCC properties under pain-inducing conditions may play a causal role in the development of chronic pain, including nerve injury-induced pain, or neuropathic pain. Over the past decades, preclinical and clinical research in developing VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain management has been fruitful, leading to some US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs currently available for chronic pain management. However, their efficacy in pain relief is limited in some patients and their long-term use is limited by their side effect profiles. Certainly, there is room for improvement in developing more subtype specific VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain conditions. In this review, we summarized the most recent preclinical and clinical studies related to chronic pain medications acting on the VGCC. We also included clinical trials aiming to expand the application of approved VGCC drugs to different pain states derived from various pathological conditions, as well as drug combination therapies trying to improve the efficacies and side effect profiles of current pain medications. PMID:19789072

  14. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  15. Signal processing by T-type calcium channel interactions in the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Engbers, Jordan D. T.; Anderson, Dustin; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Turner, Ray W.

    2013-01-01

    T-type calcium channels of the Cav3 family are unique among voltage-gated calcium channels due to their low activation voltage, rapid inactivation, and small single channel conductance. These special properties allow Cav3 calcium channels to regulate neuronal processing in the subthreshold voltage range. Here, we review two different subthreshold ion channel interactions involving Cav3 channels and explore the ability of these interactions to expand the functional roles of Cav3 channels. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Cav3 and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium (IKCa) channels form a novel complex which creates a low voltage-activated, transient outward current capable of suppressing temporal summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In large diameter neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei, Cav3-mediated calcium current (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH) are activated during trains of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. These currents have distinct, and yet synergistic, roles in the subthreshold domain with IT generating a rebound burst and IH controlling first spike latency and rebound spike precision. However, by shortening the membrane time constant the membrane returns towards resting value at a faster rate, allowing IH to increase the efficacy of IT and increase the range of burst frequencies that can be generated. The net effect of Cav3 channels thus depends on the channels with which they are paired. When expressed in a complex with a KCa channel, Cav3 channels reduce excitability when processing excitatory inputs. If functionally coupled with an HCN channel, the depolarizing effect of Cav3 channels is accentuated, allowing for efficient inversion of inhibitory inputs to generate a rebound burst output. Therefore, signal processing relies not only on the activity of individual subtypes of channels but also on complex interactions between ion channels whether based on a physical complex or by indirect

  16. Calcium-permeable ion channels in control of autophagy and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kondratskyi, Artem; Yassine, Maya; Kondratska, Kateryna; Skryma, Roman; Slomianny, Christian; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, or cellular self-eating, is a tightly regulated cellular pathway the main purpose of which is lysosomal degradation and subsequent recycling of cytoplasmic material to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Defects in autophagy are linked to a variety of pathological states, including cancer. Cancer is the disease associated with abnormal tissue growth following an alteration in such fundamental cellular processes as apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, migration and autophagy. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex, as it can promote both tumor prevention and survival/treatment resistance. It's now clear that modulation of autophagy has a great potential in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings identified intracellular calcium as an important regulator of both basal and induced autophagy. Calcium is a ubiquitous secondary messenger which regulates plethora of physiological and pathological processes such as aging, neurodegeneration and cancer. The role of calcium and calcium-permeable channels in cancer is well-established, whereas the information about molecular nature of channels regulating autophagy and the mechanisms of this regulation is still limited. Here we review existing mechanisms of autophagy regulation by calcium and calcium-permeable ion channels. Furthermore, we will also discuss some calcium-permeable channels as the potential new candidates for autophagy regulation. Finally we will propose the possible link between calcium permeable channels, autophagy and cancer progression and therapeutic response. PMID:24106480

  17. Emerging Roles of L-Type Voltage-Gated and Other Calcium Channels in T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Badou, Abdallah; Jha, Mithilesh K.; Matza, Didi; Flavell, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    In T lymphocytes, calcium ion controls a variety of biological processes including development, survival, proliferation, and effector functions. These distinct and specific roles are regulated by different calcium signals, which are generated by various plasma membrane calcium channels. The repertoire of calcium-conducting proteins in T lymphocytes includes store-operated CRAC channels, transient receptor potential channels, P2X channels, and L-type voltage-gated calcium (Cav1) channels. In this paper, we will focus mainly on the role of the Cav1 channels found expressed by T lymphocytes, where these channels appear to operate in a T cell receptor stimulation-dependent and voltage sensor independent manner. We will review their expression profile at various differentiation stages of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Then, we will present crucial genetic evidence in favor of a role of these Cav1 channels and related regulatory proteins in both CD4 and CD8 T cell functions such as proliferation, survival, cytokine production, and cytolysis. Finally, we will provide evidence and speculate on how these voltage-gated channels might function in the T lymphocyte, a non-excitable cell. PMID:24009608

  18. Odor stimuli trigger influx of calcium into olfactory neurons of the channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, D; Miyamoto, T; Bryant, B P; Teeter, J H

    1990-09-01

    Olfactory transduction is thought to be mediated by a G protein-coupled increase in intracellular adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) that triggers the opening of cAMP-gated cation channels and results in depolarization of the plasma membrane of olfactory neurons. In olfactory neurons isolated from the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, stimulation with olfactory stimuli (amino acids) elicits an influx of calcium that leads to a rapid increase in intracellular calcium. In addition, in a reconstitution assay a plasma membrane calcium channel has been identified that is gated by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), which could mediate this calcium influx. Together with previous studies indicating that stimulation with olfactory stimuli leads to stimulation of phosphoinositide turnover in olfactory cilia, these data suggest that an influx of calcium triggered by odor stimulation of phosphoinositide turnover may be an alternate or additional mechanism of olfactory transduction. PMID:2168580

  19. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  20. Calcium channel stability measured by gradual loss of excitability in pawn mutants of Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Schein, S J

    1976-12-01

    Mutants of Paramecium aurelia that are unable to reverse swimming direction are called pawns. They lack the inward ionic (calcium) current required for the upstroke of the electrically excitable membrane response. By following the progressive loss of reversal response and excitability in cells that are suddenly changed from a heterozygous (wild-type) state to a homozygous mutant state, an estimate of the stability and mean lifetime of the calcium channel has been obtained. During rapid growth, channel dilution due to division occurred, but no channel decay was observed. Under conditions of slow growth, decay could also be observed; channel lifetime was found to be from 5 to 8 days. PMID:1035256

  1. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (CaV3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective CaV1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep, and

  2. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra; Dolphin, Annette C

    2015-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type Ca(V)1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (Ca(V)3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (Ca(V)2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., Ca(V)1.2 and Ca(V)1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective Ca(V)1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep

  3. High expression of calcium channel subtypes in uterine fibroid of patients

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiaoping; Cheng, Zhongping; Qu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Wenchao; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of calcium channel protein in uterine fibroids, and to explore the relationship between calcium signaling pathway and the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids. Methods: Uterine fibroid tissues (UFC) and adjacent healthy uterine smooth muscle tissues (SMC) were collected from 30 cases of uterine fibroids. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot were used to detect cell membrane calcium channel protein subtypes: TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC6, TRPM6 and TRPM7. The effects of genes exhibiting most-notable differences on cell proliferation were examined using gene interference techniques. Results: We found that calcium channel protein subtypes expressed differently in fibroids and the surrounding smooth muscles. The mRNA and protein expressions of TRPC1 and TRPM7 were higher in uterine fibroid tissues than in smooth muscle (P < 0.05), while no obvious difference was found in terms of other subtypes (TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC6 and TRPM6). In cultured uterine leiomyoma cells, modifying the expressions of TRPC1 and TRPM7 significantly affected the proliferation rate of uterine fibroids. Conclusion: Calcium channel subtypes TRPC1 and TRPM7 exhibit different expression patterns in uterine fibroids and surrounding smooth muscles, suggesting that calcium signaling pathway regulated by these calcium channel proteins may be associated with the incidence of uterine fibroids. PMID:24995090

  4. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  5. Calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels mediate the β(2)-adrenergic regulation of Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Keller, Michael J; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Budinger, G R Scott; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2014-12-20

    β2-Adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  6. Calcium Release-Activated Calcium (CRAC) Channels Mediate the β2-Adrenergic Regulation of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael J.; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Scott Budinger, G.R.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2014-01-01

    β2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  7. Calcium-channel number critically influences synaptic strength and plasticity at the active zone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiansong; He, Liming; Zheng, Hongwei; Xue, Lei; Luo, Fujun; Shin, Wonchul; Sun, Tao; Kuner, Thomas; Yue, David T; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-01-01

    How synaptic-vesicle release is controlled at the basic release structure, the active zone, is poorly understood. By performing cell-attached current and capacitance recordings predominantly at single active zones in rat calyces, we found that single active zones contained 5-218 (mean, 42) calcium channels and 1–10 (mean, 5) readily releasable vesicles (RRVs) and released 0–5 vesicles during a 2-ms depolarization. Large variation in the number of calcium channels caused wide variation in release strength (measured during a 2-ms depolarization) by regulating the RRV release probability (PRRV) and the RRV number. Consequently, an action potential opened ~1–35 (mean, ~7) channels, resulting in different release probabilities at different active zones. As the number of calcium-channels determined PRRV, it critically influenced whether subsequent release would be facilitated or depressed. Regulating calcium channel density at active zones may thus be a major mechanism to yield synapses with different release properties and plasticity. These findings may explain large differences reported at synapses regarding release strength (release of 0, 1 or multiple vesicles), PRRV, short-term plasticity, calcium transients and the requisite calcium-channel number for triggering release. PMID:22683682

  8. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2012-07-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of -261 pA was measured at -50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction. PMID:22732308

  9. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27038376

  10. Characterization of novel cannabinoid based T-type calcium channel blockers with analgesic effects.

    PubMed

    Bladen, Chris; McDaniel, Steven W; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Petrov, Ravil R; Berger, N Daniel; Diaz, Philippe; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-02-18

    Low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are important regulators of the transmission of nociceptive information in the primary afferent pathway and finding ligands that modulate these channels is a key focus of the drug discovery field. Recently, we characterized a set of novel compounds with mixed cannabinoid receptor/T-type channel blocking activity and examined their analgesic effects in animal models of pain. Here, we have built on these previous findings and synthesized a new series of small organic compounds. We then screened them using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques to identify the most potent T-type calcium channel inhibitors. The two most potent blockers (compounds 9 and 10) were then characterized using radioligand binding assays to determine their affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies have led to the discovery of a new T-type calcium channel blocker, compound 9. Compound 9 was efficacious in mediating analgesia in mouse models of acute inflammatory pain and in reducing tactile allodynia in the partial nerve ligation model. This compound was shown to be ineffective in Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel null mice at therapeutically relevant concentrations, and it caused no significant motor deficits in open field tests. Taken together, our data reveal a novel class of compounds whose physiological and therapeutic actions are mediated through block of Cav3.2 calcium channels. PMID:25314588

  11. Characterization of Novel Cannabinoid Based T-Type Calcium Channel Blockers with Analgesic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are important regulators of the transmission of nociceptive information in the primary afferent pathway and finding ligands that modulate these channels is a key focus of the drug discovery field. Recently, we characterized a set of novel compounds with mixed cannabinoid receptor/T-type channel blocking activity and examined their analgesic effects in animal models of pain. Here, we have built on these previous findings and synthesized a new series of small organic compounds. We then screened them using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques to identify the most potent T-type calcium channel inhibitors. The two most potent blockers (compounds 9 and 10) were then characterized using radioligand binding assays to determine their affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors. The structure–activity relationship and optimization studies have led to the discovery of a new T-type calcium channel blocker, compound 9. Compound 9 was efficacious in mediating analgesia in mouse models of acute inflammatory pain and in reducing tactile allodynia in the partial nerve ligation model. This compound was shown to be ineffective in Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel null mice at therapeutically relevant concentrations, and it caused no significant motor deficits in open field tests. Taken together, our data reveal a novel class of compounds whose physiological and therapeutic actions are mediated through block of Cav3.2 calcium channels. PMID:25314588

  12. Spironolactone inhibition of contraction and calcium channels in rat portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Dacquet, C.; Loirand, G.; Mironneau, C.; Mironneau, J.; Pacaud, P.

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of spironolactone have been studied on the mechanical activity of rat portal vein strips and the calcium channel currents of isolated cells using the patch clamp technique (whole-cell configuration). 2. Spironolactone (50 nM to 0.1 mM) depressed both K+-induced and twitch contractions within 5-6 min. This inhibitory effect was overcome by elevating the calcium concentration in the perfusing solution. 3. Spironolactone (60 microM) depressed the transient contractions induced in a Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing solution by either acetylcholine (0.1 mM) or noradrenaline (10 microM). The effect of spironolactone was dependent on a reduction in the filling of the internal calcium store. 4. Rapidly inactivating calcium channel current was maintained in the presence of spironolactone (60 microM), while slowly inactivating calcium channel current was blocked in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-inhibition of slow calcium channel current was obtained at concentrations between 5-7 microM. 5. Administration of spironolactone (10 microM) at rest reduced calcium channel current by about 70% (tonic inhibition). Repetitive depolarizations (300 ms long pulses to zero mV, applied between 0.05 and 0.5 Hz) had no further inhibitory effect on the inward current (absence of use-dependence). 6. When cells were held at depolarized membrane potentials at which slow calcium current was inactivated by about 80%, the inhibitory effect of spironolactone (10 microM) was similar to that obtained with cells normally polarized. Spironolactone (10 microM) had no effect on the voltage-dependence of inactivation of the calcium channel current. 7. Our results suggest that spironolactone acts primarily on the plasma membrane by depressing inward current through slow calcium channels. This effect may be explained by a preferential binding of the drug to the resting state of the slow calcium channel. In addition, spironolactone may depress contractions dependent on the release of calcium

  13. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus.

  14. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  15. Binding of ( sup 125 I)iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.I.; Fitzpatrick, L.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with (125I) iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for (125I) iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited (125I) iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes.

  16. Differential Effects of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Blockers on Calcium Channel Alpha-2-Delta-1 Subunit Protein Mediated Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E.; Chen, X.; Kim, M.; Gong, N.; Bhatia, S.; Luo, Z.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) alpha-2-delta1 subunit protein (Cavα2δ1) has been shown to cause pain states. However, whether VGCC are involved in pain states driven by abnormal Cavα2δ1 expression is not known. Methods Intrathecal injection of N-, P/Q-, and L-type VGCC blockers were tested in two models: a transgenic neuronal Cavα2δ1 overexpression (TG) model with behavioral hypersensitivity and a spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model with Cavα2δ1 overexpression in sensory pathways and neuropathy pain states. Results The nociceptive response to mechanical stimuli was significantly attenuated in both models with ω-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VGCC blocker) and nifedipine (a L-type VGCC blocker), in which ω-conotoxin GVIA appeared more potent than nifedipine. Treatments with ω-agatoxin IVA (P-VGCC blocker), but not ω-conotoxin MVIIC (Q-VGCC blocker) had similar potency in the TG model as the N-type VGCC blocker, while both ω-agatoxin IVA and ω-conotoxin MVIIC had minimal effects in the SNL model compared to controls. Conclusion These findings suggest that, at the spinal level, N- and L-type VGCC are likely involved in behavioral hypersensitivity states driven by Cavα2δ1 overexpression. Q-type VGCC have minimal effects in both models. The anti-nociceptive effects of P-type VGCC blocker in the Cavα2δ1 TG mice, but minimally at the SNL model with presynaptic Cavα2δ1 upregulation, suggest that its potential action site(s) is at the post-synaptic and/or supraspinal level. These findings support that N-, L- and P/Q-type VGCC have differential contributions to behavioral hypersensitivity modulated by Cavα2δ1 dysregulation at the spinal cord level. PMID:25158907

  17. Phylogeny Unites Animal Sodium Leak Channels with Fungal Calcium Channels in an Ancient, Voltage-Insensitive Clade

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; Hillis, David M.; Zakon, Harold H.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins in the superfamily of voltage-gated ion channels mediate behavior across the tree of life. These proteins regulate the movement of ions across cell membranes by opening and closing a central pore that controls ion flow. The best-known members of this superfamily are the voltage-gated potassium, calcium (Cav), and sodium (Nav) channels, which underlie impulse conduction in nerve and muscle. Not all members of this family are opened by changes in voltage, however. NALCN (NA+ leak channel nonselective) channels, which encode a voltage-insensitive “sodium leak” channel, have garnered a growing interest. This study examines the phylogenetic relationship among Nav/Cav voltage-gated and voltage-insensitive channels in the eukaryotic group Opisthokonta, which includes animals, fungi, and their unicellular relatives. We show that NALCN channels diverged from voltage-gated channels before the divergence of fungi and animals and that the closest relatives of NALCN channels are fungal calcium channels, which they functionally resemble. PMID:22821012

  18. Indoleamines and calcium channels influence morphogenesis in in vitro cultures of Mimosa pudica L.

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Akula; Giridhar, Parvatam

    2009-01-01

    The present article reports the interplay of indoleamine neurohormones viz. serotonin, melatonin and calcium channels on shoot organogenesis in Mimosa pudica L. In vitro grown nodal segments were cultured on MS medium with B5 vitamins containing Serotonin (SER) and Melatonin (MEL) at 100 µM and indoleamine inhibitors viz. serotonin to melatonin conversion inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA) at 40 µM, serotonin reuptake inhibitor (Prozac) 20 µM. In another set of experiment, calcium at 5 mM, calcium ionophore (A23187) 100 µM, and calcium channel blocker varapamil hydrochloride (1 mM) a calcium chelator EGTA (100 µM) were administered to the culture medium. The percentage of shoot multiplication, endogenous MEL and SER were monitored during shoot organogenesis. At 100 µM SER and MEL treatment 60% and 70% explants responded for shoot multiplication respectively. Medium supplemented with either SER or MEL along with calcium (5 mM) 75%–80% explants responded for organogenesis. SER or MEL along with calcium ionophore (A23187) at 100 µM 70% explants responded for shoot multiplication. p-CPA, prozac, verapamil and EGTA, shoot multiplication was reduced and endogenous pools of SER, MEL decreased by 40–70%. The results clearly demonstrated that indoleamines and calcium channels positively influenced shoot organogenesis in M. pudica L. PMID:20514228

  19. Ineffectiveness of organic calcium channel blockers in antagonizing long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Taube, J S; Schwartzkroin, P A

    1986-08-01

    Evidence has accumulated suggesting that the presence of calcium is critical for development of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, there is a paucity of information about whether calcium's role in LTP is pre- or postsynaptic. In the present study, we examined the effectiveness of nitrendipine, verapamil, flunarizine and the benzodiazepine diazepam in: blocking voltage-dependent calcium channels; blocking synaptic transmission; and preventing development of LTP. Using the in vitro slice preparation, we obtained intracellular and extracellular recordings from guinea pig hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. At the cellular level, all 4 drugs were ineffective in blocking voltage-dependent calcium spikes (TTX resistant) and the calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarization. Verapamil and diazepam appeared to antagonize synaptic transmission, as reflected in smaller population spike amplitudes. Development of long-term potentiation was not affected by the presence of verapamil, flunarizine and diazepam. Nitrendipine appeared to reduce the percentage of slices exhibiting LTP; however, ethanol, the vehicle used to dissolve nitrendipine, was shown in separate experiments to reduce the percentage of slices exhibiting LTP. These results suggest that neither the organic calcium channel blockers--nitrendipine, verapamil, and flunarizine--nor micromolar concentrations of diazepam are potent blockers of extrasynaptic voltage-sensitive calcium channels in hippocampus. They thus cannot be used to demonstrate a specific pre- or postsynaptic calcium role in LTP. PMID:3017511

  20. Fluorescence combined with excised patch: measuring calcium currents in plant cation channels.

    PubMed

    Gradogna, Antonella; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Gutla, Paul Vijay Kanth; Carpaneto, Armando

    2009-04-01

    Combined application of the patch-clamp technique and fura-2 fluorescence detection enables the study of study calcium fluxes or related increases in cytosolic calcium concentration. Here we used the excised patch configuration, focusing the photomultiplier on the tip of the recording pipette where the fluorescent dye was present (FLEP, fluorescence combined with excised patch). This configuration has several advantages, i.e. a lack of delay in loading the fluorophore, of interference by internal calcium buffers and of photobleaching, due to the quasi-infinite dye reservoir inside the pipette. Upon voltage stimulation of tonoplast patches, sustained and robust fluorescence signals indicated permeation of calcium through the slow vacuolar (SV) channel. Both SV currents and fluorescence signal changes were absent in the presence of SV channel inhibitors and in vacuoles from Arabidopsis tpc1 knockout plants that lack SV channel activity. The fractional calcium currents of this non-selective cation channel were voltage-dependent, and were approximately 10% of the total SV currents at elevated positive potentials. Interestingly, calcium permeation could be recorded as the same time as oppositely directed potassium fluxes. These events would have been impossible to detect using patch-clamp measurements alone. Thus, we propose use of the FLEP technique for the study of divalent ion-selective channels or transporters that may be difficult to access using conventional electrophysiological approaches. PMID:19067975

  1. Demonstration of Binding of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 to the Cav2.1 P/Q-Type Calcium Channel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In neurons, entry of extracellular calcium (Ca2+) into synaptic terminals through Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels is the driving force for exocytosis of neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles. This class of Ca2+ channel is, therefore, pivotal during normal neurotransmission in higher organisms. In response to channel opening and Ca2+ influx, specific Ca2+-binding proteins associate with cytoplasmic regulatory domains of the P/Q channel to modulate subsequent channel opening. Channel modulation in this way influences synaptic plasticity with consequences for higher-level processes such as learning and memory acquisition. The ubiquitous Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of all types of mammalian voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, including the P/Q class, by direct binding to specific regulatory motifs. More recently, experimental evidence has highlighted a role for additional Ca2+-binding proteins, particularly of the CaBP and NCS families in the regulation of P/Q channels. NCS-1 is a protein found from yeast to humans and that regulates a diverse number of cellular functions. Physiological and genetic evidence indicates that NCS-1 regulates P/Q channel activity, including calcium-dependent facilitation, although a direct physical association between the proteins has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to determine if there is a direct interaction between NCS-1 and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the Cav2.1 α-subunit. Using distinct but complementary approaches, including in vitro binding of bacterially expressed recombinant proteins, fluorescence spectrophotometry, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and expression of fluorescently tagged proteins in mammalian cells, we show direct binding and demonstrate that CaM can compete for it. We speculate about how NCS-1/Cav2.1 association might add to the complexity of calcium channel regulation mediated by other known calcium-sensing proteins and how

  2. Discovery of novel tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives as orally active N-type calcium channel blockers with high selectivity for hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Ogiyama, Takashi; Inoue, Makoto; Honda, Shugo; Yamada, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Gotoh, Takayasu; Kiso, Tetsuo; Koakutsu, Akiko; Kakimoto, Shuichiro; Shishikura, Jun-ichi

    2014-12-15

    N-type calcium channels represent a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The selective N-type calcium channel blocker ziconotide ameliorates severe chronic pain but has a narrow therapeutic window and requires intrathecal administration. We identified tetrahydroisoquinoline derivative 1a as a novel potent N-type calcium channel blocker. However, this compound also exhibited potent inhibitory activity against hERG channels. Structural optimizations led to identification of (1S)-(1-cyclohexyl-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)-2-{[(1-hydroxycyclohexyl)methyl]amino}ethanone ((S)-1h), which exhibited high selectivity for hERG channels while retaining potency for N-type calcium channel inhibition. (S)-1h went on to demonstrate in vivo efficacy as an orally available N-type calcium channel blocker in a rat spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain. PMID:25456079

  3. Control of neuronal voltage-gated calcium ion channels from RNA to protein.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Allen, Summer E; Toro, Cecilia P

    2013-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium ion (CaV) channels convert neuronal activity into rapid intracellular calcium signals to trigger a myriad of cellular responses. Their involvement in major neurological and psychiatric diseases, and importance as therapeutic targets, has propelled interest in subcellular-specific mechanisms that align CaV channel activity to specific tasks. Here, we highlight recent studies that delineate mechanisms controlling the expression of CaV channels at the level of RNA and protein. We discuss the roles of RNA editing and alternative pre-mRNA splicing in generating CaV channel isoforms with activities specific to the demands of individual cells; the roles of ubiquitination and accessory proteins in regulating CaV channel expression; and the specific binding partners that contribute to both pre- and postsynaptic CaV channel function. PMID:23907011

  4. Control of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Ion Channels From RNA to Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lipscombe, Diane; Allen, Summer E; Toro, Cecilia P.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (CaV) ion channels convert neuronal activity into rapid intracellular calcium signals to trigger a myriad of cellular responses. Their involvement in major neurological and psychiatric diseases, and importance as therapeutic targets, has propelled interest in subcellular-specific mechanisms that align CaV channel activity to specific tasks. Here we highlight recent studies that delineate mechanisms controlling the expression of CaV channels at the level of RNA and protein. We discuss the roles of RNA editing and alternative pre-mRNA splicing in generating CaV channel isoforms with activities specific to the demands of individual cells; the roles of ubiquitination and accessory proteins in regulating CaV channel expression; and the specific binding partners which contribute to both pre- and post- synaptic CaV channel function. PMID:23907011

  5. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca2+ response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca2+]i response, whereas the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca2+]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca2+ channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  6. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca(2+) response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca(2+)]i response, whereas the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca(2+) channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  7. Members of the thrombospondin gene family bind stromal interaction molecule 1 and regulate calcium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Nadler, Monica; Okuhara, Dayne; Thompson, Jill; Shuttleworth, Trevor; Lawler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cellular phenotype through interactions with a myriad of other proteins and proteoglycans. We have identified a novel interaction of the members of the TSP gene family with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). This association is robust since it is preserved in Triton X-100, can be detected with multiple anti-TSP-1 and anti-STIM1 antibodies, and is detected in a wide range of cell types. We have also found that STIM1 co-immunoprecipitates with TSP-4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and that a recombinant version of the N-terminal domain of STIM1 binds to the signature domain of TSP-1 and COMP. The association of the TSPs with STIM1 is observed in both the presence and absence of calcium indicating that the calcium-dependent conformation of the signature domain of TSPs is not required for binding. Thus, this interaction could occur in the ER under conditions of normal or low calcium concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of COMP in HEK 293 cells decreases STIM1-mediated calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel currents and increases arachidonic acid calcium (ARC) channel currents. These data indicate that the TSPs regulate STIM1 function and participate in the reciprocal regulation of two channels that mediate calcium entry into the cell. PMID:24845346

  8. Calcium-dependent anion channel in the water mold, Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J H; Van Brunt, J; Harold, F M

    1986-01-01

    Injection of depolarizing current into vegetative cells of the water mold Blastocladiella emersonii elicits a regenerative response that has the electrical characteristics of an action potential. Once they have been taken past a threshold of about -40 mV, cells abruptly depolarize to +20 mV or above; after an interval ranging from several hundred milliseconds to a few seconds, the cells spontaneously return to their resting potential near -100 mV. When the action potential was analyzed with voltage-clamp recording, it proved to be biphasic. The initial phase reflects an influx of calcium ions through voltage-sensitive channels that also carry Sr2+ ions. The delayed, and more extended, phase of inward current results from the efflux of chloride and other anions. The anion channels are broadly selective, passing chloride, nitrate, phosphate, acetate, succinate and even PIPES. The anion channels open in response to the entry of calcium ions, but do not recognize Sr2+. Calcium channels, anion channels and calcium-specific receptors that link the two channels appear to form an ensemble whose physiological function is not known. Action potentials rarely occur spontaneously but can be elicited by osmotic downshock, suggesting that the ion channels may be involved in the regulation of turgor. PMID:2420994

  9. Synthetic Aβ oligomers (Aβ(1-42) globulomer) modulate presynaptic calcium currents: prevention of Aβ-induced synaptic deficits by calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Hermann, David; Mezler, Mario; Müller, Michaela K; Wicke, Karsten; Gross, Gerhard; Draguhn, Andreas; Bruehl, Claus; Nimmrich, Volker

    2013-02-28

    Alzheimer's disease is accompanied by increased brain levels of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers. It has been suggested that oligomers directly impair synaptic function, thereby causing cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease patients. Recently, it has been shown that synthetic Aβ oligomers directly modulate P/Q-type calcium channels, possibly leading to excitotoxic cascades and subsequent synaptic decline. Using whole-cell recordings we studied the modulation of recombinant presynaptic calcium channels in HEK293 cells after application of a stable Aβ oligomer preparation (Aβ1-42 globulomer). Aβ globulomer shifted the half-activation voltage of P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels to more hyperpolarized values (by 11.5 and 7.5 mV). Application of non-aggregated Aβ peptides had no effect. We then analyzed the potential of calcium channel blockers to prevent Aβ globulomer-induced synaptic decline in hippocampal slice cultures. Specific block of P/Q-type or N-type calcium channels with peptide toxins completely reversed Aβ globulomer-induced deficits in glutamatergic neurotransmission. Two state-dependent low molecular weight P/Q-type and N-type calcium channel blockers also protected neurons from Aβ-induced alterations. On the contrary, inhibition of L-type calcium channels failed to reverse the deficit. Our data show that Aβ globulomer directly modulates recombinant P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels in HEK293 cells. Block of presynaptic calcium channels with both state-dependent and state-independent modulators can reverse Aβ-induced functional deficits in synaptic transmission. These findings indicate that presynaptic calcium channel blockers may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23376566

  10. Effect of dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) on L-type calcium channel current and its pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Ying; Cai, Zheng-Xu; Li, Ping; Cai, Chun-Yu; Qu, Cheng-Long; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2010-09-24

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), a newly-described natriuretic peptide, relaxes gastrointestinal smooth muscle. L-type calcium channel currents play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contraction. The effect of DNP on L-type calcium channel currents in gastrointestinal tract is still unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of DNP on barium current (I(Ba)) through the L-type calcium channel in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs and cGMP-pathway mechanism. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record L-type calcium channel currents. The content of cGMP in guinea pig gastric antral smooth muscle and perfusion solution was measured using radioimmunoassay. DNP markedly enhanced cGMP levels in gastric antral smooth muscle tissue and in perfusion medium. DNP concentration-dependently inhibited I(Ba) in freshly isolated guinea pig gastric antral circular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of guinea pigs. DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was partially blocked by LY83583, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. KT5823, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor, almost completely blocked DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba). However, DNP-induced inhibition of I(Ba) was potentiated by zaprinast, an inhibitor of cGMP-sensitive phosphodiesterase. Taken together, DNP inhibits L-type calcium channel currents via pGC-cGMP-PKG-dependent signal pathway in gastric antral myocytes of guinea pigs. PMID:20594955

  11. Cold Transiently Activates Calcium-Permeable Channels in Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carpaneto, Armando; Ivashikina, Natalya; Levchenko, Victor; Krol, Elzbieta; Jeworutzki, Elena; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hedrich, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Living organisms are capable of discriminating thermal stimuli from noxious cold to noxious heat. For more than 30 years, it has been known that plant cells respond to cold with a large and transient depolarization. Recently, using transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the calcium-sensitive protein aequorin, an increase in cytosolic calcium following cold treatment was observed. Applying the patch-clamp technique to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, we could identify a transient plasma membrane conductance induced by rapid cooling. This cold-induced transient conductance was characterized as an outward rectifying 33 pS nonselective cation channel. The permeability ratio between calcium and cesium was 0.7, pointing to a permeation pore >3.34 Å (ø of cesium). Our experiments thus provide direct evidence for the predicted but not yet measured cold-activated calcium-permeable channel in plants. PMID:17114272

  12. Antischizophrenic drugs of the diphenylbutylpiperidine type act as calcium channel antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, R J; Murphy, K M; Reynolds, I J; Snyder, S H

    1983-01-01

    Antischizophrenic neuroleptic drugs of the diphenylbutylpiperidine class, which includes pimozide, fluspirilene, penfluridol, and clopimozide, inhibit [3H]nitrendipine binding with IC50 values of 13-30 nM. This inhibition involves receptors for the verapamil/prenylamine class of calcium channel antagonists. These diphenylbutylpiperidines also inhibit potassium-induced calcium-dependent contractions of rat vas deferens at concentrations of 40-350 nM. Other phenothiazine and butyrophenone neuroleptics lack such potent calcium-antagonist actions. Diphenylbutylpiperidines also differ from other neuroleptics in their ability to relieve negative symptoms of schizophrenia, such as emotional withdrawal, as well as the positive symptoms which respond to all neuroleptics. We suggest that these unique antischizophrenic actions are related to a blockade by diphenylbutylpiperidines of voltage-operated calcium channels. PMID:6136040

  13. Pharmacological correction of obesity-induced autophagy arrest using calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hwan-Woo; Park, Haeli; Semple, Ian A.; Jang, Insook; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Cazares, Victor A.; Stuenkel, Edward L.; Kim, Jung-Jae; Kim, Jeong Sig; Lee, Jun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy deregulation during obesity contributes to the pathogenesis of diverse metabolic disorders. However, without understanding the molecular mechanism of obesity interference in autophagy, development of therapeutic strategies for correcting such defects in obese individuals is challenging. Here we show that chronic increase of cytosolic calcium concentration in hepatocytes upon obesity and lipotoxicity attenuates autophagic flux by preventing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. As a pharmacological approach to restore cytosolic calcium homeostasis in vivo, we administered the clinically approved calcium channel blocker verapamil to obese mice. Such treatment successfully increases autophagosome-lysosome fusion in liver, preventing accumulation of protein inclusions and lipid droplets and suppressing inflammation and insulin resistance. As calcium channel blockers have been safely used in clinics for the treatment of hypertension for more than thirty years, our results suggest they may be a safe therapeutic option for restoring autophagic flux and treating metabolic pathologies in obese patients. PMID:25189398

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives with calcium channel blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Bladen, Chris; Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Şimşek, Rahime; Şafak, Cihat; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2014-07-01

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) are an important class of L-type calcium channel blockers that are used to treat conditions such as hypertension and angina. Their primary target in the cardiovascular system is the Cav1.2 L-type calcium channel isoform, however, a number of DHPs also block low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels. Here, we describe the synthesis of a series of novel DHP derivatives that have a condensed 1,4-DHP ring system (hexahydroquinoline) and report on their abilities to block both L- and T-type calcium channels. Within this series of compounds, modification of a key ester moiety not only regulates the blocking affinity for both L- and T-type channels, but also allows for the development of DHPs with 30-fold selectivity for T-type channels over the L-type. Our data suggest that a condensed dihydropyridine-based scaffold may serve as a pharmacophore for a new class of T-type selective inhibitors. PMID:24149495

  15. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  16. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G.; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J.; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  17. The mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channel: key component of a plasmalemmal control centre?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.; Ding, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanosensory calcium-selective ion channels probably serve to detect not only mechanical stress but also electrical, thermal, and diverse chemical stimuli. Because all stimuli result in a common output, most notably a shift in second messenger calcium concentration, the channels are presumed to serve as signal integrators. Further, insofar as second messenger calcium in turn gives rise to mechanical, electrical, and diverse chemical changes, the channels are postulated to initiate regulatory feedbacks. It is proposed that the channels and the feedback loops play a wide range of roles in regulating normal plant function, as well as in mediating disturbance of normal function by environmental stressors and various pathogens. In developing evidence for the physiological performance of the channel, a model for a cluster of regulatory plasmalemmal proteins and cytoskeletal elements grouped around a set of wall-to-membrane and transmembrane linkers has proved useful. An illustration of how the model might operate is presented. It is founded on the demonstration that several xenobiotics interfere both with normal channel behaviour and with gravitropic reception. Accordingly, the first part of the illustration deals with how the channels and the control system within which they putatively operate might initiate gravitropism. Assuming that gravitropism is an asymmetric expression of growth, the activities of the channels and the plasmalemmal control system are extrapolated to account for regulation of both rate and allometry of cell expansion. Finally, it is discussed how light, hormones, redox agents and herbicides could in principle affect growth via the putative plasmalemmal control cluster or centre.

  18. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response—homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors. There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies—such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other disorders. PMID

  19. Detection of calcium activity in human monocytes by the fura-2 fluorescence method: in vitro differentiation sensitizes cells to dihydropyridine calcium channel modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Cabello, Olga A.; Shan, Qin; Tittel, Frank K.; Henry, Philip D.

    1994-07-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel blockers have been shown to suppress atherogenesis in various species and controlled angiographic trials suggest that these drugs may retard the progression of occlusive coronary disease in humans. Because mononuclear leukocytes play a key role in the formation of early and advanced atheromatous lesions, we determined effects of DHP calcium channel modulators on calcium uptake by cells of the monocytic lineage. Human peripheral blood monocytes were evaluated before and after undergoing in vitro differentiation induced by two days of culture with fetal calf serum and FMLP. Changes in intracellular calcium activity were estimated with fura-2, a fluorescent calcium indicator. Freshly isolated (unactivated) monocytes were insensitive to DHP drugs both in the presence and absence of high potassium membrane depolarization. In contrast, nisoldipine, a DHP calcium channel blocker, and BAY K 8644, a DHP calcium channel activator, decreased and increased calcium uptake by KC1-depolarized differentiated monocytes. Results suggest that differentiation of monocytes to macrophages may involve a change in the expression and/or regulation of DHP- sensitive calcium channels.

  20. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  1. Coupled gating between cardiac calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors).

    PubMed

    Marx, S O; Gaburjakova, J; Gaburjakova, M; Henrikson, C; Ondrias, K; Marks, A R

    2001-06-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle requires the activation of Ca(2+)-release channels/type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s) by Ca(2+) influx. RyR2s are arranged on the sarcoplasmic reticular membrane in closely packed arrays such that their large cytoplasmic domains contact one another. We now show that multiple RyR2s can be isolated under conditions such that they remain physically coupled to one another. When these coupled channels are examined in planar lipid bilayers, multiple channels exhibit simultaneous gating, termed "coupled gating." Removal of the regulatory subunit, the FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6), functionally but not physically uncouples multiple RyR2 channels. Coupled gating between RyR2 channels may be an important regulatory mechanism in excitation-contraction coupling as well as in other signaling pathways involving intracellular Ca(2+) release. PMID:11397781

  2. Selecting Ions by Size in a Calcium Channel: The Ryanodine Receptor Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Dirk; Xu, Le; Meissner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Many calcium channels can distinguish between ions of the same charge but different size. For example, when cations are in direct competition with each other, the ryanodine receptor (RyR) calcium channel preferentially conducts smaller cations such as Li+ and Na+ over larger ones such as K+ and Cs+. Here, we analyze the physical basis for this preference using a previously established model of RyR permeation and selectivity. Like other calcium channels, RyR has four aspartate residues in its GGGIGDE selectivity filter. These aspartates have their terminal carboxyl group in the pore lumen, which take up much of the available space for permeating ions. We find that small ions are preferred by RyR because they can fit into this crowded environment more easily. PMID:25418295

  3. Interactions of cryptosin with mammalian cardiac dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.R.; Banning, J.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Cryptosin, a new cardenolide, was found to be a potent inhibitor of cardiac Na{sup +} and K{sup +} dependent Adenosinetri-phosphatase. In experiments with dog heart ex vivo, development of inotropic and toxic effect correlated with changes in the cardiac dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels as measured by the binding of {sup 3}(H)PN 200-110. A significant change in the PN 200-110 binding was observed when guinea pig and dog heart sarcolemmal membranes were pre-incubated with cryptosin in vitro. Binding analysis of {sup 3}(H)PN 200-110 (Isradipine), a 1,4-dihydropyridine analog with very specific calcium channel binding properties, in both in vitro and ex vivo studies were consistent and indicated a non-specific type of interaction of cryptosin with mammalian cardiac 1,4-dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels.

  4. Genetic disruption of voltage-gated calcium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Samuel; Pratt, Wendy S.; Rees, Elliott; Dahimene, Shehrazade; Ferron, Laurent; Owen, Michael J.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises genetic studies in which calcium channel genes have been connected to the spectrum of neuropsychiatric syndromes, from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders and intellectual impairment. Among many other genes, striking numbers of the calcium channel gene superfamily have been implicated in the aetiology of these diseases by various DNA analysis techniques. We will discuss how these relate to the known monogenic disorders associated with point mutations in calcium channels. We will then examine the functional evidence for a causative link between these mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms and the disease processes. A major challenge for the future will be to translate the expanding psychiatric genetic findings into altered physiological function, involvement in the wider pathology of the diseases, and what potential that provides for personalised and stratified treatment options for patients. PMID:26386135

  5. Augmentation by calcium channel antagonists of general anaesthetic potency in mice.

    PubMed

    Dolin, S J; Little, H J

    1986-08-01

    The effects of three kinds of calcium channel antagonists on the anaesthetic potencies of ethanol, pentobarbitone and argon were examined in mice. Ethanol and pentobarbitone anaesthetic potencies in mice were significantly increased by verapamil 10 mg kg-1, flunarizine 40 mg kg-1 and nitrendipine 100 mg kg-1. Argon anaesthetic potency was significantly increased by nitrendipine 50 mg kg-1 and 100 mg kg-1 in a dose-related fashion. Even at very high doses the calcium channel antagonists did not produce anaesthesia by themselves. At the doses used the calcium channel antagonists did not affect the blood concentrations of ethanol, 2 h, or pentobarbitone, 15 min, after anaesthetic administration. PMID:2943355

  6. A novel series of pyrazolylpiperidine N-type calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Subasinghe, Nalin L; Wall, Mark J; Winters, Michael P; Qin, Ning; Lubin, Mary Lou; Finley, Michael F A; Brandt, Michael R; Neeper, Michael P; Schneider, Craig R; Colburn, Raymond W; Flores, Christopher M; Sui, Zhihua

    2012-06-15

    Selective blockers of the N-type calcium channel have proven to be effective in animal models of chronic pain. However, even though intrathecally delivered synthetic ω-conotoxin MVIIA from Conus magnus (ziconotide [Prialt®]) has been approved for the treatment of chronic pain in humans, its mode of delivery and narrow therapeutic window have limited its usefulness. Therefore, the identification of orally active, small-molecule N-type calcium channel blockers would represent a significant advancement in the treatment of chronic pain. A novel series of pyrazole-based N-type calcium channel blockers was identified by structural modification of a high-throughput screening hit and further optimized to improve potency and metabolic stability. In vivo efficacy in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain was demonstrated by a representative compound from this series. PMID:22608964

  7. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  8. Noradrenaline upregulates T-type calcium channels in rat pinealocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Our basic hypothesis is that mammalian pinealocytes have cycling electrical excitability and Ca2+ signalling that may contribute to the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin secretion. This study asked whether the functional expression of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaV channels) in rat pinealocytes is changed by culturing them in noradrenaline (NA) as a surrogate for the night signal. Channel activity was assayed as ionic currents under patch clamp and as optical signals from a Ca2+-sensitive dye. Channel mRNAs were assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured without NA, pinealocytes showed only non-inactivating L-type dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca2+ current. After 24 h in NA, additional low-voltage activated transient Ca2+ current developed whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a T-type CaV3.1 channel. This change was initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A as revealed by pharmacological experiments. mRNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels became significantly elevated, but mRNA for another T-type channel and for the major L-type channel did not change. After only 8 h of NA treatment, the CaV3.1 mRNA was already elevated, but the transient Ca2+ current was not. Even a 16 h wait without NA following the 8 h NA treatment induced little additional transient current. However, these cells were somehow primed to make transient current as a second NA exposure for only 60 min sufficed to induce large T-type currents. The NA-induced T-type channel mediated an increased Ca2+ entry during short depolarizations and supported modest transient electrical responses to depolarizing stimuli. Such experiments reveal the potential for circadian regulation of excitability. PMID:25504572

  9. Calcium channel antagonists and the treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, D A

    1986-01-01

    Despite ongoing dispute over the pathophysiologic basis of migraine, the vasospastic theory of pathogenesis has brought to the forefront a promising class of new antimigraine agents, the Ca2+ channel antagonists. Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, integral membrane proteins that permit extracellular Ca2+ to enter cells down their electrical and concentration gradients, have a universal role in stimulus-response coupling in excitable cells. Thus, they participate in translating electrical excitation into secretory and contractile events. Ca2+ channel antagonists, a structurally diverse group of organic compounds, inhibit ion flux through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by binding to specific, channel-associated drug receptor sites and thereby reduce the frequency of channel opening in response to membrane depolarization. Ca2+ channels in cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and neurons all exhibit high affinity for Ca2+ channel antagonists, although neurons also contain a population of drug-resistant channels. Extensive clinical experience in the use of Ca2+ channel antagonists has accumulated from their application to nonneurologic, especially cardiovascular, disorders. Three such drugs, nifedipine, verapamil, and diltiazem, are currently available in the United States, although none are specifically approved for use in migraine. Other agents, such as nimodipine, are likely to be released in the near future. A large number of clinical studies have now addressed the efficacy of Ca2+ channel antagonists in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. Dihydropyridines (nifedipine and nimodipine), phenylalkylamines (verapamil), diphenylalkylamines (flunarizine), and benzothiazepines (diltiazem) have all been examined, and a beneficial effect has been noted in each case. The limited directly comparative data currently available and the difficulties involved in comparing the results of different studies do not presently support claims of superiority for any single agent. This is an

  10. Paramecium calmodulin mutants defective in ion channel regulation can bind calcium and undergo calcium-induced conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Jaren, O R; Harmon, S; Chen, A F; Shea, M A

    2000-06-13

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic protein that binds calcium ions cooperatively at four EF-hand binding sites to regulate signal transduction pathways. Interactions between the apo domains of vertebrate CaM reduce the calcium affinities of sites I and II below their intrinsic values, allowing sequential opening of the two hydrophobic clefts in CaM. Viable domain-specific mutants of Parameciumcalmodulin (PCaM) differentially affect ion channels and provide a unique opportunity to dissect the roles of the two highly homologous half-molecule domains. Calcium binding induced an increase in the level of ordered secondary structure and a decrease in Stokes radius in these mutants; such changes were identical in direction to those of wild type CaM, but the magnitude depended on the mutation. Calcium titrations monitored by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of Y138 in site IV showed that the affinities of sites III and IV of wild type PCaM were (i) higher than those of the same sites in rat CaM, (ii) equivalent to those of the same sites in PCaM mutants altered between sites I and II, and (iii) higher than those of PCaM mutants modified in sites III and IV. Thus, calcium saturation drove all mutants to undergo conformational switching in the same direction but not to the same extent as wild type PCaM. The disruption of the allosteric mechanism that is manifest as faulty channel regulation may be explained by altered properties of switching among the 14 possible partially saturated species of PCaM rather than by an inability to adopt two end-state conformations or target interactions similar to those of the wild type protein. PMID:10841769

  11. Antibody-mediated targeting of the Orai1 calcium channel inhibits T cell function.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer H; Hussell, Scott; Søndergaard, Henrik; Roepstorff, Kirstine; Bui, John-Vu; Deer, Jen Running; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhan-Guo; Lamberth, Kasper; Kvist, Peter Helding; Padkjær, Søren; Haase, Claus; Zahn, Stefan; Odegard, Valerie H

    2013-01-01

    Despite the attractiveness of ion channels as therapeutic targets, there are no examples of monoclonal antibodies directed against ion channels in clinical development. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ion channels could offer a directed, specific therapeutic approach. To investigate the potential of inhibiting ion channel function with an antibody, we focused on Orai1, the pore subunit of the calcium channel responsible for store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in T cells. Effector T cells are key drivers of autoimmune disease pathogenesis and calcium signaling is essential for T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. We show here the generation of a specific anti-human Orai1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an extracellular loop of the plasma membrane-spanning protein. The anti-Orai1 mAb binds native Orai1 on lymphocytes and leads to cellular internalization of the channel. As a result, T cell proliferation, and cytokine production is inhibited in vitro. In vivo, anti-Orai1 mAb is efficacious in a human T cell-mediated graft-versus host disease (GvHD) mouse model. This study demonstrates the feasibility of antibody-mediated inhibition of Orai1 function and, more broadly, reveals the possibility of targeting ion channels with biologics for the treatment of autoimmunity and other diseases. PMID:24376610

  12. Modulation of mechanosensitive calcium-selective cation channels by temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    Gating of associations of mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-selective cation co-channels in the plasmalemma of onion epidermis has a strong and unusual temperature dependence. Tension-dependent activity rises steeply as temperature is lowered from 25 degrees C to about 6 degrees C, but drops to a low level at about 5 degrees C. Under the conditions tested (with Mg2+ and K+ at the cytosolic face of outside-out membrane patches), promotion results both from more bursting at all observed linkage levels and from longer duration of bursts of co-channels linked as quadruplets and quintuplets. Co-channel conductance decreases linearly, but only modestly, with declining temperature. It is proposed that these and related mechanosensitive channels may participate in a variety of responses to temperature, including thermonasty, thermotropism, hydrotropism, and both cold damage and cold acclimation.

  13. Calcium channels of schistosomes: unresolved questions and unexpected answers

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Recatalà, Vicenta; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of schistosomiasis, a highly prevalent, neglected tropical disease that causes significant morbidity in hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The current treatment of choice against schistosomiasis is praziquantel (PZQ), which is known to affect Ca2+ homeostasis in schistosomes, but which has an undefined molecular target and mode of action. PZQ is the only available antischistosomal drug in most parts of the world, making reports of PZQ resistance particularly troubling. Voltage-gated Ca2+ (Cav) channels have been proposed as possible targets for PZQ, and, given their central role in the neuromuscular system, may also serve as targets for new anthelmintic therapeutics. Indeed, ion channels constitute the majority of targets for current anthelmintics. Cav channel subunits from schistosomes and other platyhelminths have several unique properties that make them attractive as potential drug targets, and that could also provide insights into structure-function relationships in, and evolution of, Cav channels. PMID:22347719

  14. Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Vaz Martins, Teresa; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Findlay, Kim; Soumpourou, Eleni; Thouin, Julien; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Sanders, Dale; Morris, Richard J; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2016-05-27

    Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions. PMID:27230377

  15. LRRK2 Regulates Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Cade; Sears, Catherine; Perez-Carrion, Maria; Piccoli, Giovanni; Condliffe, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type (wt) LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how mutations in LRRK2

  16. Sodium and calcium channels in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, E M; Marty, A; Neher, E

    1982-10-01

    1. Inward currents in chromaffin cells were studied with the patch-clamp technique (Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth, 1981). The intracellular solution contained 120 mM-Cs(+) and 20 mM-tetraethylammonium (TEA(+)). Na(+) currents were studied after blockade of Ca(2+) channels with 1 mM-Co(2+) applied externally. Ca(2+) currents were recorded after eliminating Na(+) currents with tetrodotoxin (TTX). The current recordings were obtained in cell-attached, outside-out and whole-cell recording configurations (Hamill et al. 1981).2. Single channel measurements gave an elementary current amplitude of 1 pA at -10 mV for Na(+) channels. This amplitude increased with hyperpolarization between -10 and -40 mV, but did not vary significantly between -40 and -70 mV.3. The mean Na(+) channel open time was 1 ms at -30 mV. This open time decreased both with depolarization and hyperpolarization. Its value was close to the time constant of inactivation, tau(h), above -20 mV.4. Ensemble fluctuation analysis of Na(+) currents gave results consistent with those of single channel measurements. Noise power spectra obtained between -35 mV and 0 mV could be fitted with a single Lorentzian. A range of Na(+) channel densities of 1.5-10 channels per mum(2) was calculated.5. Cell-attached single Ca(2+) channel recordings were obtained in isotonic BaCl(2) solution. The single channel amplitude was 0.9 pA at -5 mV, and it became smaller for positive potential values.6. At -5 mV, single Ba(2+) currents appeared as bursts of 1.9 ms mean duration containing on the average 0.6 short gaps. The burst duration was larger at positive potentials.7. Ensemble fluctuation analysis of Ca(2+) channels was performed on whole-cell recordings in external solutions containing isotonic BaCl(2) or external Ca(2+) (Ca(o)) concentrations of 1 and 5 mM. The unit amplitude calculated in the former case was similar to that obtained in single channel measurements.8. Noise power spectra of Ca(2+) or Ba(2+) currents

  17. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  18. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, KCa3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca2+) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells. PMID:26344775

  19. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels at Nodes of Ranvier Secure Axonal Spike Propagation.

    PubMed

    Gründemann, Jan; Clark, Beverley A

    2015-09-22

    Functional connectivity between brain regions relies on long-range signaling by myelinated axons. This is secured by saltatory action potential propagation that depends fundamentally on sodium channel availability at nodes of Ranvier. Although various potassium channel types have been anatomically localized to myelinated axons in the brain, direct evidence for their functional recruitment in maintaining node excitability is scarce. Cerebellar Purkinje cells provide continuous input to their targets in the cerebellar nuclei, reliably transmitting axonal spikes over a wide range of rates, requiring a constantly available pool of nodal sodium channels. We show that the recruitment of calcium-activated potassium channels (IK, K(Ca)3.1) by local, activity-dependent calcium (Ca(2+)) influx at nodes of Ranvier via a T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) current provides a powerful mechanism that likely opposes depolarizing block at the nodes and is thus pivotal to securing continuous axonal spike propagation in spontaneously firing Purkinje cells. PMID:26344775

  20. Calcium Channels and Short-term Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, William A.; Leal, Karina; Nanou, Evanthia

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in presynaptic nerve terminals initiate neurotransmitter release in response to depolarization by action potentials from the nerve axon. The strength of synaptic transmission is dependent on the third to fourth power of Ca2+ entry, placing the Ca2+ channels in a unique position for regulation of synaptic strength. Short-term synaptic plasticity regulates the strength of neurotransmission through facilitation and depression on the millisecond time scale and plays a key role in encoding information in the nervous system. CaV2.1 channels are the major source of Ca2+ entry for neurotransmission in the central nervous system. They are tightly regulated by Ca2+, calmodulin, and related Ca2+ sensor proteins, which cause facilitation and inactivation of channel activity. Emerging evidence reviewed here points to this mode of regulation of CaV2.1 channels as a major contributor to short-term synaptic plasticity of neurotransmission and its diversity among synapses. PMID:23400776

  1. Identifying Calcium Channels and Porters in Plant Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, Heven

    1998-04-01

    The overall objectives of the proposal submitted in 6/90 was to understand how Ca was transported across plant membranes, and how these transport pathways were regulated. Ca participates in many cellular processes, including the transduction of hormonal and environmental signals, secretion, and protein folding. These processes depend on the coordination of passive Ca fluxes via channels and active Ca pumps; however these transport pathways are poorly understood in plants. We had, therefore, proposed to identify and characterize Ca transport proteins, such as the inositol-1 ,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca channels and Ca pumps. We have had difficulties characterizing and cloning the IP3-sensitive Ca channel, but have made considerable progress on the biochemical characterization, and partial purification of a 120 kD Ca-pumping ATPase. We have begun to determine the structure of Ca pumps by molecular cloning and have already obtained a partial cDNA with features characteristic of Ca pumps.

  2. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  3. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. PMID:26162812

  4. David J. Triggle: Medicinal chemistry, to pharmacology, calcium channels, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J A

    2015-11-15

    David Triggle's scientific career began as a chemist, went through medicinal chemistry into pharmacology, and finally on to somewhat more philosophical interests in later years. It was a career marked by many contributions to all of those aspects of science. Chief amongst his many contributions, in addition to those in medicinal chemistry, was his work on the drugs known as calcium ion channel blockers or (calcium antagonists). In the calcium ion channel field he was a particularly instrumental figure in sorting out the mechanisms, actions and roles of the class of calcium channel blockers, known chemical and pharmacologically as the dihydropyridines (DHPs) in particular, as well as other calcium blockers of diverse structures. During the course of a long career, and extensive journeys into medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, he published voluminously in terms of papers, reviews, conference proceedings and books. Notably, many of his papers often had limited authorship where, as senior author it reflected his deep involvement in all aspects of the reported work. His work always helped clarify the field while his incisive reviews, together with his role in coordinating and running scientific meetings, were a great help in clarifying and organizing various fields of study. He has had a long and illustrious career, and is wellknown in the world of biomedical science; his contributions are appreciated, and well recognized everywhere. The following article attempts to chart a path through his work and contributions to medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, science, academia and students. PMID:26206197

  5. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  6. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  7. Alternative splicing: functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E

    2013-07-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal Ca(V) channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of Ca(V) channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of Ca(V) channel structures and functions. The precise composition of Ca(V) channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of Ca(V) splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of Ca(V) pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23022282

  8. Alternative splicing: Functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences☆

    PubMed Central

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal CaV channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of CaV channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of CaV channel structures and functions. The precise composition of CaV channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of CaV splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of CaV pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. PMID:23022282

  9. Tracking Quantum Dot–Tagged Calcium Channels at Vertebrate Photoreceptor Synapses: Retinal Slices and Dissociated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    At synapses in the central nervous system, precisely localized assemblies of presynaptic proteins, neurotransmitter-filled vesicles, and postsynaptic receptors are required to communicate messages between neurons. Our understanding of synaptic function has been significantly advanced using electrophysiological methods, but the dynamic spatial behavior and real-time organization of synapses remains poorly understood. In this unit, we describe a method for labeling individual presynaptic calcium channels with photo-stable quantum dots for single-particle tracking analysis. We have used this technique to examine the mobility of L-type calcium channels in the presynaptic membrane of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. These channels control release of glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles at the ribbon synapses in photoreceptor terminals. This technique offers the advantage of providing a real-time biophysical readout of ion channel mobility and can be manipulated by pharmacological or electrophysiological methods. For example, the combination of electrophysiological and single-particle tracking experiments has revealed that fusion of nearby vesicles influences calcium channel mobility and changes in channel mobility can influence release. These approaches can also be readily adapted to examine membrane proteins in other systems. PMID:23315944

  10. [Cognitive Function and Calcium. Cognitive improvement through T type calcium channel stimulation].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kohji

    2015-02-01

    Low-threshold Ca2+ spikes are mediated by T-type Ca2+ channels, which have fast inactivation and slow deactivation kinetics (transient) , and single channel conductance. The activation are triggered by -60 to -65 mV. T-type Ca2+ channels are predominantly expressed in the brain and heart pacemaker cells. Three subtypes of T-type Ca2+ channels Cav3.1 (α1G), Cav3.2 (α1H), Cav3.3 (α1I) encoding by CACNA1G, CACNA1H, CACNA1I genes have been cloned. Although high-threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ channels have auxiliary α2δ, β, γ subunits, T-type Ca2+ channels are composed only by α1 subunit. Although T-type Ca2+ channels are involved in the pace making in heart and a robust low-threshold Ca2+ spike in neurons, the physiological functions in the memory and synaptic plasticity remain unclear. In this paper, I would like to focus on the pathophysiological relevance of T-type Ca2+ channels in the brain functions including cognition. PMID:25634050

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  12. EXAMINATION OF THE ANTICONVULSANT PROPERTIES OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM CHANNEL INHIBITORS IN AMYGDALA KINDLED SEIZURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Representatives from three different classes of voltage-sensitive calcium (VSC) channel inhibitors were assessed for their protection against amygdala kindled seizures. dult male long Evans rats (n=12) were implanted with electrodes in the amygdala and were stimulated once daily ...

  13. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  14. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  15. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible. PMID:26983215

  16. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants having domain-specific effects on the regulation of ion channels.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Shea, Madeline A

    2006-12-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential, eukaryotic protein comprised of two highly homologous domains (N and C). CaM binds four calcium ions cooperatively, regulating a wide array of target proteins. A genetic screen of Paramecia by Kung [Kung, C. et al. (1992) Cell Calcium 13, 413-425] demonstrated that the domains of CaM have separable physiological roles: "under-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent sodium currents mapped to the N-domain, while "over-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent potassium currents localized to the C-domain of CaM. To determine whether and how these mutations affected intrinsic calcium-binding properties of CaM domains, phenylalanine fluorescence was used to monitor calcium binding to sites I and II (N-domain) and tyrosine fluorescence was used to monitor sites III and IV (C-domain). To explore interdomain interactions, binding properties of each full-length mutant were compared to those of its corresponding domain fragments. The calcium-binding properties of six under-reactive mutants (V35I/D50N, G40E, G40E/D50N, D50G, E54K, and G59S) and one over-reactive mutant (M145V) were indistinguishable from those of wild-type CaM, despite their deleterious physiological effects on ion-channel regulation. Four over-reactive mutants (D95G, S101F, E104K, and H135R) significantly decreased the calcium affinity of the C-domain. Of these, one (E104K) also increased the calcium affinity of the N-domain, demonstrating that the magnitude and direction of wild-type interdomain coupling had been perturbed. This suggests that, while some of these mutations alter calcium-binding directly, others probably alter CaM-channel association or calcium-triggered conformational change in the context of a ternary complex with the affected ion channel. PMID:17128970

  17. Long-term correlation in single calcium-activated potassium channel kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos de Oliveira, R. A.; Barbosa, C. T. F.; Consoni, L. H. A.; Rodrigues, A. R. A.; Varanda, W. A.; Nogueira, R. A.

    2006-05-01

    Ion channels are protein molecules found in biological membranes, which can assume distinct open and closed conformational states, a phenomenon called ion channel kinetics. The transitions from one state to another are dependent on the potential energy barrier that separates them and can be controlled by the electrical field, ions and/or drugs. Both Markovian and fractal models have been used for modeling the ion channel kinetics. Ion single channel records are characterized by successive openings and closings, which are correlated in time. Here the rescaled range analysis ( R/S Hurst analysis) is used to test for the occurrence of long-term correlation in the kinetics of a calcium-activated potassium channel of Leydig cells. A Hurst coefficient H=0.640±0.064 ( n=5) was found for the single calcium-activated potassium channel clamped at -80 mV and exposed to a free Ca 2+ concentration equal to 10 nM. This numerical value indicates the presence of long-term correlation (memory) in this kinetic process. However, when the R/ S analysis was applied to ion channel data simulated using Markovian and fractal models, it could not account for the long-term correlation previously found in the experimental data. In summary, in this work we show that: (i) opening and closing dwell times for the single calcium-activated potassium channel of Leydig cells present long-term correlation and (ii) Markovian and fractal models, which describe well the dwell time distributions, are not adequate to describe the memory found in the kinetics of this channel.

  18. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  19. Apamin-sensitive, small-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels mediate cholinergic inhibition of chick auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Yuhas, W A; Fuchs, P A

    1999-11-01

    Acetylcholine released from efferent neurons in the cochlea causes inhibition of mechanosensory hair cells due to the activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. Hair cells are known to have large-conductance, "BK"-type potassium channels associated with the afferent synapse, but these channels have different properties than those activated by acetylcholine. Whole-cell (tight-seal) and cell-attached patch-clamp recordings were made from short (outer) hair cells isolated from the chicken basilar papilla (cochlea equivalent). The peptides apamin and charybdotoxin were used to distinguish the calcium-activated potassium channels involved in the acetylcholine response from the BK-type channels associated with the afferent synapse. Differential toxin blockade of these potassium currents provides definitive evidence that ACh activates apamin-sensitive, "SK"-type potassium channels, but does not activate carybdotoxin-sensitive BK channels. This conclusion is supported by tentative identification of small-conductance, calcium-sensitive but voltage-insensitive potassium channels in cell-attached patches. The distinction between these channel types is important for understanding the segregation of opposing afferent and efferent synaptic activity in the hair cell, both of which depend on calcium influx. These different calcium-activated potassium channels serve as sensitive indicators for functionally significant calcium influx in the hair cell. PMID:10573868

  20. Atypical calcium regulation of the PKD2-L1 polycystin ion channel.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Liu, Xiaowen; Abiria, Sunday; Clapham, David E

    2016-01-01

    Native PKD2-L1 channel subunits are present in primary cilia and other restricted cellular spaces. Here we investigate the mechanism for the channel's unusual regulation by external calcium, and rationalize this behavior to its specialized function. We report that the human PKD2-L1 selectivity filter is partially selective to calcium ions (Ca(2+)) moving into the cell, but blocked by high internal Ca(2+)concentrations, a unique feature of this transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family member. Surprisingly, we find that the C-terminal EF-hands and coiled-coil domains do not contribute to PKD2-L1 Ca(2+)-induced potentiation and inactivation. We propose a model in which prolonged channel activity results in calcium accumulation, triggering outward-moving Ca(2+) ions to block PKD2-L1 in a high-affinity interaction with the innermost acidic residue (D523) of the selectivity filter and subsequent long-term channel inactivation. This response rectifies Ca(2+) flow, enabling Ca(2+) to enter but not leave small compartments such as the cilium. PMID:27348301

  1. Atypical calcium regulation of the PKD2-L1 polycystin ion channel

    PubMed Central

    DeCaen, Paul G; Liu, Xiaowen; Abiria, Sunday; Clapham, David E

    2016-01-01

    Native PKD2-L1 channel subunits are present in primary cilia and other restricted cellular spaces. Here we investigate the mechanism for the channel's unusual regulation by external calcium, and rationalize this behavior to its specialized function. We report that the human PKD2-L1 selectivity filter is partially selective to calcium ions (Ca2+) moving into the cell, but blocked by high internal Ca2+concentrations, a unique feature of this transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family member. Surprisingly, we find that the C-terminal EF-hands and coiled-coil domains do not contribute to PKD2-L1 Ca2+-induced potentiation and inactivation. We propose a model in which prolonged channel activity results in calcium accumulation, triggering outward-moving Ca2+ ions to block PKD2-L1 in a high-affinity interaction with the innermost acidic residue (D523) of the selectivity filter and subsequent long-term channel inactivation. This response rectifies Ca2+ flow, enabling Ca2+ to enter but not leave small compartments such as the cilium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13413.001 PMID:27348301

  2. The impact of splice isoforms on voltage-gated calcium channel α1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Semi-conserved exon boundaries in members of the CACNA1 gene family result in recurring pre-mRNA splicing patterns. The resulting variations in the encoded pore-forming subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel affect functionally significant regions, such as the vicinity of the voltage-sensing S4 segments or the intracellular loops that are important for protein interaction. In addition to generating functional diversity, RNA splicing regulates the quantitative expression of other splice isoforms of the same gene by producing transcripts with premature stop codons which encode two-domain or three-domain channels. An overview of some of the known splice isoforms of the α1 calcium channel subunits and their significance is given. PMID:14645450

  3. The impact of splice isoforms on voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2004-02-01

    Semi-conserved exon boundaries in members of the CACNA1 gene family result in recurring pre-mRNA splicing patterns. The resulting variations in the encoded pore-forming subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel affect functionally significant regions, such as the vicinity of the voltage-sensing S4 segments or the intracellular loops that are important for protein interaction. In addition to generating functional diversity, RNA splicing regulates the quantitative expression of other splice isoforms of the same gene by producing transcripts with premature stop codons which encode two-domain or three-domain channels. An overview of some of the known splice isoforms of the alpha(1) calcium channel subunits and their significance is given. PMID:14645450

  4. Expression of L-type calcium channels associated with postnatal development of skeletal muscle function in mouse.

    PubMed

    Mänttäri, S; Pyörnilä, A; Harjula, R; Järvilehto, M

    2001-01-01

    Several factors have an influence on the improvement of muscle activity and motor co-ordination of mammals during post-natal development. One of them is voltage sensitive L-type calcium channel function. In striated muscles of adult mammals these channels are located in T-tubule membranes thus linking the on-coming action potential to the molecular process of muscle contraction. The postnatal development of L-type calcium channels is therefore critical not only for contraction but also for all subsequent motor learning. We used high affinity enantiomer of dihydropyridine labelled with a fluorophore in order to show the relative amount of L-type calcium channels by histofluorescence in tissue. We found by qualitative microscopical analysis that the amount of L-type calcium channels increased during the postnatal development in the mouse skeletal muscle (m. rectus femoris and m. gastrocnemius). We also noted variation between different fibre types in the increase of the amount of L-type calcium channels, as judged by the intensity of histofluorescence. We showed by histochemical staining and statistical analysis that the high density of L-type calcium channels in adult muscles is correlated with fast oxidative glycolytic fibre type of striated muscles rather than slow oxidative or fast glycolytic fibres. Based on this finding we propose that the development of L-type calcium channels can be considered as one of the factors determining the different physiological properties of fibre types. PMID:11563550

  5. Reporting Sodium Channel Activity Using Calcium Flux: Pharmacological Promiscuity of Cardiac Nav1.5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Du, Fang; Xu, Kaiping

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are essential for membrane excitability and represent therapeutic targets for treating human diseases. Recent reports suggest that these channels, e.g., Nav1.3 and Nav1.5, are inhibited by multiple structurally distinctive small molecule drugs. These studies give reason to wonder whether these drugs collectively target a single site or multiple sites in manifesting such pharmacological promiscuity. We thus investigate the pharmacological profile of Nav1.5 through systemic analysis of its sensitivity to diverse compound collections. Here, we report a dual-color fluorescent method that exploits a customized Nav1.5 [calcium permeable Nav channel, subtype 5 (SoCal5)] with engineered-enhanced calcium permeability. SoCal5 retains wild-type (WT) Nav1.5 pharmacological profiles. WT SoCal5 and SoCal5 with the local anesthetics binding site mutated (F1760A) could be expressed in separate cells, each with a different-colored genetically encoded calcium sensor, which allows a simultaneous report of compound activity and site dependence. The pharmacological profile of SoCal5 reveals a hit rate (>50% inhibition) of around 13% at 10 μM, comparable to that of hERG. The channel activity is susceptible to blockage by known drugs and structurally diverse compounds. The broad inhibition profile is highly dependent on the F1760 residue in the inner cavity, which is a residue conserved among all nine subtypes of Nav channels. Both promiscuity and dependence on F1760 seen in Nav1.5 were replicated in Nav1.4. Our evidence of a broad inhibition profile of Nav channels suggests a need to consider off-target effects on Nav channels. The site-dependent promiscuity forms a foundation to better understand Nav channels and compound interactions. PMID:25422141

  6. Diffusion around a cardiac calcium channel and the role of surface bound calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Bers, D M; Peskoff, A

    1991-01-01

    The diffusion of Ca as it converges to the external mouth of a Ca channel is examined. Diffusional limitation on Ca ions entering Ca channels during current flow, cause local extracellular Ca depletions. Such extracellular Ca depletions have been reported in cardiac muscle. The cardiac sarcolemma has a large number of low-affinity Ca binding sites that can buffer these local Ca depletions. For a hemisphere of extracellular space (of radius less than 0.33 microns) centered on the external mouth of a Ca channel the amount of Ca bound at the membrane surface exceeds that which is free within the associated hemisphere. The ratio of bound Ca/free Ca increases as r decreases, such that the [Ca] nearest the Ca channel is the most strongly buffered by sarcolemmal bound Ca. It is demonstrated that Ca ions coming from these sarcolemmal Ca binding sites contribute quantitatively to the integrated Ca current. The electric field generated by the local depletion of Ca near the channel mouth has little impact on the extent of Ca depletion, but if an additional electric field exists at the mouth of the channel, Ca depletion can be significantly altered. Other low-affinity Ca binding sites in the interstitium may also contribute to the buffering of extracellular Ca. The complex geometry of the extracellular space in cardiac muscle (e.g., transverse tubules and restrictions of extracellular space between cells) increases both the predicted Ca depletions (in the absence of binding) and the bound/free ratio. Thus, the impact of this surface Ca binding is greatly increased. By considering arrays of Ca channels in transverse tubules or in parallel planes (e.g., membranes of neighboring cells), extracellular Ca depletions are predicted which agree with those measured experimentally. Membrane Ca binding may also be expected to buffer increases in [Ca] around the inner mouth of Ca channels. It is demonstrated that in the absence of other intracellular systems most of the Ca entering the

  7. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease: potential relevance in treatment strategies of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodison, William V; Frisardi, Vincenza; Kehoe, Patrick G

    2012-01-01

    Midlife hypertension is a risk factor for late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it is one of the components of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Observational studies and some cardiovascular disease-related clinical trials suggest that antihypertensive treatment reduced the incidence and progression of AD. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs), one of the more commonly used treatments for hypertension, target voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) which are found on neurons in the brain where calcium regulation is very important in both learning and memory. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, one of the main pathological hallmarks of AD, causes increases to intracellular calcium via VGCCs, which in turn leads to further increases in Aβ production. Memantine, a current treatment used in AD, exerts some of its beneficial effects by blocking calcium entry into neurons. We explore the possibility of whether CCBs acting in the brain may delay the onset and progression of AD and thus may inform treatment regimes in people with MetS. PMID:22377784

  8. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  9. Single-channel Analysis and Calcium Imaging in the Podocytes of the Freshly Isolated Glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Palygin, Oleg; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Podocytes (renal glomerular epithelial cells) are known to regulate glomerular permeability and maintain glomerular structure; a key role for these cells in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases has been established since podocyte injury leads to proteinuria and foot process effacement. It was previously reported that various endogenous agents may cause a dramatic overload in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in podocytes, presumably leading to albuminuria, and this likely occurs via calcium-conducting ion channels. Therefore, it appeared important to study calcium handling in the podocytes both under normal conditions and in various pathological states. However, available experimental approaches have remained somewhat limited to cultured and transfected cells. Although they represent a good basic model for such studies, they are essentially extracted from the native environment of the glomerulus. Here we describe the methodology of studying podocytes as a part of the freshly isolated whole glomerulus. This preparation retains the functional potential of the podocytes, which are still attached to the capillaries; therefore, podocytes remain in the environment that conserves the major parts of the glomeruli filtration apparatus. The present manuscript elaborates on two experimental approaches that allow 1) real-time detection of calcium concentration changes with the help of ratiometric confocal fluorescence microscopy, and 2) the recording of the single ion channels activity in the podocytes of the freshly isolated glomeruli. These methodologies utilize the advantages of the native environment of the glomerulus that enable researchers to resolve acute changes in the intracellular calcium handling in response to applications of various agents, measure basal concentration of calcium within the cells (for instance, to evaluate disease progression), and assess and manipulate calcium conductance at the level of single ion channels. PMID:26167808

  10. Single-channel Analysis and Calcium Imaging in the Podocytes of the Freshly Isolated Glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Palygin, Oleg; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Podocytes (renal glomerular epithelial cells) are known to regulate glomerular permeability and maintain glomerular structure; a key role for these cells in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases has been established since podocyte injury leads to proteinuria and foot process effacement. It was previously reported that various endogenous agents may cause a dramatic overload in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in podocytes, presumably leading to albuminuria, and this likely occurs via calcium-conducting ion channels. Therefore, it appeared important to study calcium handling in the podocytes both under normal conditions and in various pathological states. However, available experimental approaches have remained somewhat limited to cultured and transfected cells. Although they represent a good basic model for such studies, they are essentially extracted from the native environment of the glomerulus. Here we describe the methodology of studying podocytes as a part of the freshly isolated whole glomerulus. This preparation retains the functional potential of the podocytes, which are still attached to the capillaries; therefore, podocytes remain in the environment that conserves the major parts of the glomeruli filtration apparatus. The present manuscript elaborates on two experimental approaches that allow 1) real-time detection of calcium concentration changes with the help of ratiometric confocal fluorescence microscopy, and 2) the recording of the single ion channels activity in the podocytes of the freshly isolated glomeruli. These methodologies utilize the advantages of the native environment of the glomerulus that enable researchers to resolve acute changes in the intracellular calcium handling in response to applications of various agents, measure basal concentration of calcium within the cells (for instance, to evaluate disease progression), and assess and manipulate calcium conductance at the level of single ion channels. PMID:26167808

  11. Putative calcium-binding domains of the Caenorhabditis elegans BK channel are dispensable for intoxication and ethanol activation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S. J.; Scott, L. L.; Ordemann, G.; Philpo, A.; Cohn, J.; Pierce-Shimomura, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol modulates the highly conserved, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel, which contributes to alcohol-mediated behaviors in species from worms to humans. Previous studies have shown that the calcium-sensitive domains, RCK1 and the Ca2+ bowl, are required for ethanol activation of the mammalian BK channel in vitro. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, ethanol activates the BK channel in vivo, and deletion of the worm BK channel, SLO-1, confers strong resistance to intoxication. To determine if the conserved RCK1 and calcium bowl domains were also critical for intoxication and basal BK channel-dependent behaviors in C. elegans, we generated transgenic worms that express mutated SLO-1 channels predicted to have the RCK1, Ca2+ bowl or both domains rendered insensitive to calcium. As expected, mutating these domains inhibited basal function of SLO-1 in vivo as neck and body curvature of these mutants mimicked that of the BK null mutant. Unexpectedly, however, mutating these domains singly or together in SLO-1 had no effect on intoxication in C. elegans. Consistent with these behavioral results, we found that ethanol activated the SLO-1 channel in vitro with or without these domains. By contrast, in agreement with previous in vitro findings, C. elegans harboring a human BK channel with mutated calcium-sensing domains displayed resistance to intoxication. Thus, for the worm SLO-1 channel, the putative calcium-sensitive domains are critical for basal in vivo function but unnecessary for in vivo ethanol action. PMID:26113050

  12. Zebrafish CaV2.1 calcium channels are tailored for fast synchronous neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Wen, Hua; Brehm, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-dependent calcium channels are prevalent throughout the nervous system where they mediate synaptic transmission, but the basis for the selective presence at individual synapses still remains an open question. The CaV2.1 channels have been proposed to respond more effectively to brief action potentials (APs), an idea supported by computational modeling. However, the side-by-side comparison of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 kinetics in intact neurons failed to reveal differences. As an alternative means for direct functional comparison we expressed zebrafish CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 α-subunits, along with their accessory subunits, in HEK293 cells. HEK cells lack calcium currents, thereby circumventing the need for pharmacological inhibition of mixed calcium channel isoforms present in neurons. HEK cells also have a simplified morphology compared to neurons, which improves voltage control. Our measurements revealed faster kinetics and shallower voltage-dependence of activation and deactivation for CaV2.1. Additionally, recordings of calcium current in response to a command waveform based on the motorneuron AP show, directly, more effective activation of CaV2.1. Analysis of calcium currents associated with the AP waveform indicate an approximately fourfold greater open probability (PO) for CaV2.1. The efficient activation of CaV2.1 channels during APs may contribute to the highly reliable transmission at zebrafish neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25650925

  13. Zebrafish CaV2.1 Calcium Channels Are Tailored for Fast Synchronous Neuromuscular Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, David; Wen, Hua; Brehm, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-dependent calcium channels are prevalent throughout the nervous system where they mediate synaptic transmission, but the basis for the selective presence at individual synapses still remains an open question. The CaV2.1 channels have been proposed to respond more effectively to brief action potentials (APs), an idea supported by computational modeling. However, the side-by-side comparison of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 kinetics in intact neurons failed to reveal differences. As an alternative means for direct functional comparison we expressed zebrafish CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 α-subunits, along with their accessory subunits, in HEK293 cells. HEK cells lack calcium currents, thereby circumventing the need for pharmacological inhibition of mixed calcium channel isoforms present in neurons. HEK cells also have a simplified morphology compared to neurons, which improves voltage control. Our measurements revealed faster kinetics and shallower voltage-dependence of activation and deactivation for CaV2.1. Additionally, recordings of calcium current in response to a command waveform based on the motorneuron AP show, directly, more effective activation of CaV2.1. Analysis of calcium currents associated with the AP waveform indicate an approximately fourfold greater open probability (PO) for CaV2.1. The efficient activation of CaV2.1 channels during APs may contribute to the highly reliable transmission at zebrafish neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25650925

  14. Regulation of T-type calcium channel expression by sodium butyrate in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Erika M; Zamora, Francis J; Puplampu-Dove, Yvonne A; Kiessu, Ezechielle; Hearne, Jennifer L; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2015-02-15

    Several cellular mechanisms contribute to the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, including exposure to sodium butyrate (NaBu), a naturally occurring salt of the short chain fatty acid n-butyric acid. NaBu belongs to a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors with potential anticancer function. T-type calcium channel expression constitutes an important route for calcium influx in tumor cells that may trigger changes in cell proliferation and differentiation. In this work we investigated the role NaBu on the differentiation of lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) cells and its effect on T-type Ca(2+) channel expression. NaBu stimulates the morphological and molecular differentiation of LNCaP cells. Stimulation of LNCaP cells with NaBu evokes a significant increase in the expression of the Cav3.2 T-type channel subunits. Furthermore, the increased Cav3.2 expression promotes membrane insertion of T-type Ca(2+) channels capable of generating fast inactivating Ca(2+) currents, sensitive to 100μM Ni(2+) ions. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channel function reduces the outgrowth of neurite-like processes in LNCaP cells. NaBu-evoked expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels is also involved in the regulation of cell viability. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channels causes a significant reduction in the viability of LNCaP cells treated with 1mM NaBu, suggesting that Ca(2+) influx via T-type channels can promote cell proliferation. However, increased expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels enhanced the cytotoxic effect of thapsigargin and paclitaxel on cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate that NaBu stimulates T-type Ca(2+) channel expression, thereby regulating both the morphological differentiation and growth of prostate cancer cells. PMID:25557765

  15. Calcium channels in mouse hair cells: function, properties and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jutta; Michna, Marcus; Platzer, Josef; Striessnig, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Adult inner hair cells (IHCs) possess voltage-activated Ca2+ currents that couple receptor potentials to transmitter release at the afferent synapses. Before the onset of hearing both IHCs and outer hair cells (OHCs) exhibit Ca2+ currents. More than 90% of neonatal hair cell (HC) currents flow through alpha1D Ca2+ channel subunits because they are absent in both IHCs and OHCs from alpha1D-/- mice and residual currents are insensitive to L-type agonists. Since lack of the alpha1D-subunit leads to HC degeneration and profound deafness, class D L-type Ca2+ currents seem to be crucial for the development and functioning of the inner ear. Neonatal HC Ca2+ currents were studied using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. They showed rapid activation, rapid deactivation and very little inactivation. They started activating as negative as -65mV. In contrast to alpha1C-mediated (classical L-type) Ca2+ currents, they showed a rather low sensitivity to various L-type antagonists. 10 microM nifedipine e.g. blocked HC Ca2+ currents by about 40% whereas class C L-type Ca2+ currents are completely blocked by 100nM nifedipine. The L-type channel agonist Bay K 8644 increased the HC Ca2+ current by 100-200% and shifted the IV curve to more negative potentials which is similar to its effects in alpha1C-mediated Ca2+ currents. PMID:11885659

  16. Modulation and pharmacology of low voltage-activated ("T-Type") calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Anne Marie R

    2003-12-01

    Although T-type calcium channel currents were observed almost 30 years ago, the genes that encode the pore-forming subunits have only been recently reported. When expressed in heterologous systems, three distinct alpha1 subunits (alpha1G (Cav3.1), alpha1H (Car3.2), and alpha1I (Cav3.3)) conduct T-type currents with insert similar but not identical electrophysiological characteristics that. Alpha 1G, alpha 1H, and alpha 1I transcripts are found throughout neural and nonneural tissues, suggesting multiple types of T-type channels (also called low voltage-activated calcium channels (LVAs)) are coexpressed by many tissues. The study of endogenous LVAs has been hampered by a lack of highly selective antagonists that differentiate between LVA subtypes. Furthermore, many pharmacological agents attenuate currents conducted by LVA and high voltage-activated calcium channels (HVAs). At least 15 classes of pharmacological agents affect T-type currents, and the therapeutic use of many of these drugs has implicated LVAs in the etiology of a variety of diseases. Comparison of the responses of recombinant and native LVAs to pharmacological agents and endogenous modulatory molecules will lead to a better understanding of LVAs in normal and diseased cells. PMID:15000521

  17. Structure-related blockage of calcium channels by vasodilator alkamides in mice mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daniela C G; Pereira, Aline C; Gutierrez, Stanley J C; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lemos, Virgínia S; Côrtes, Steyner F

    2016-07-01

    The development of new calcium channel blockers is still relevant for the understanding of their physiological role and pharmacological and therapeutic purposes. For this task, natural products represent a relevant source of new drugs. The present work investigated the mechanism and the structural relationship of the vasodilator effect of riparins I, II and III in mouse small mesenteric artery. Riparins I, II and III induced an endothelium-independent and concentration-dependent vasodilator effect in mesenteric arteries. Riparins II and III were more potent than riparin I, suggesting a structural relationship of the effect of these drugs. All riparins inhibited the contractile effect of KCl, similarly to nifedipine. However, the inhibitory profile was different for the contractile responses to phenylephrine and caffeine, passing from similar to nifedipine with riparin I, for similar to SKF-96365 with riparin III. A comparable effect was observed for the increase in the intracellular calcium concentration induced by caffeine and phenylephrine. These results suggest that the higher hydroxylation provides the alkamides the ability to inhibit non-selective cation channels in addition to the inhibition of L-type calcium channels in mouse mesenteric arteries. These observations may give support to the development of new selective inhibitors of non-selective cation channels using alkamides as leading compounds. PMID:27173831

  18. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S.; Milescu, Lorin S.; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b–S4 “paddle motif,” which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3–S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning. PMID:27045173

  19. Molecular Interactions between Tarantula Toxins and Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Salari, Autoosa; Vega, Benjamin S; Milescu, Lorin S; Milescu, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Few gating-modifier toxins have been reported to target low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channels, and the structural basis of toxin sensitivity remains incompletely understood. Studies of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have identified the S3b-S4 "paddle motif," which moves at the protein-lipid interface to drive channel opening, as the target for these amphipathic neurotoxins. Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels contain four homologous voltage sensor domains, suggesting multiple toxin binding sites. We show here that the S3-S4 segments within Cav3.1 can be transplanted into Kv2.1 to examine their individual contributions to voltage sensing and pharmacology. With these results, we now have a more complete picture of the conserved nature of the paddle motif in all three major voltage-gated ion channel types (Kv, Nav, and Cav). When screened with tarantula toxins, the four paddle sequences display distinct toxin binding properties, demonstrating that gating-modifier toxins can bind to Cav channels in a domain specific fashion. Domain III was the most commonly and strongly targeted, and mutagenesis revealed an acidic residue that is important for toxin binding. We also measured the lipid partitioning strength of all toxins tested and observed a positive correlation with their inhibition of Cav3.1, suggesting a key role for membrane partitioning. PMID:27045173

  20. Isolated P/Q Calcium Channel Deletion in Layer VI Corticothalamic Neurons Generates Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, Valerie C.; Aiba, Isamu; Qian, Jing; Mark, Melanie D.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Generalized spike-wave seizures involving abnormal synchronization of cortical and underlying thalamic circuitry represent a major category of childhood epilepsy. Inborn errors of Cacna1a, the P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel α subunit gene, expressed throughout the brain destabilize corticothalamic rhythmicity and produce this phenotype. To determine the minimal cellular lesion required for this network disturbance, we used neurotensin receptor 1 (Ntsr1) cre-driver mice to ablate floxed Cacna1a in layer VI pyramidal neurons, which supply the sole descending cortical synaptic input to thalamocortical relay cells and reticular interneurons and activate intrathalamic circuits. Targeted Cacna1a ablation in layer VI cells resulted in mice that display a robust spontaneous spike-wave absence seizure phenotype accompanied by behavioral arrest and inhibited by ethosuximide. To verify the selectivity of the molecular lesion, we determined that P/Q subunit proteins were reduced in corticothalamic relay neuron terminal zones, and confirmed that P/Q-mediated glutamate release was reduced at these synapses. Spike-triggered exocytosis was preserved by N-type calcium channel rescue, demonstrating that evoked release at layer VI terminals relies on both P/Q and N-type channels. Whereas intrinsic excitability of the P/Q channel depleted layer VI neurons was unaltered, T-type calcium currents in the postsynaptic thalamic relay and reticular cells were dramatically elevated, favoring rebound bursting and seizure generation. We find that an early P/Q-type release defect, limited to synapses of a single cell-type within the thalamocortical circuit, is sufficient to remodel synchronized firing behavior and produce a stable generalized epilepsy phenotype. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study dissects a critical component of the corticothalamic circuit in spike-wave epilepsy and identifies the developmental importance of P/Q-type calcium channel-mediated presynaptic glutamate release

  1. Iron Overload and Apoptosis of HL-1 Cardiomyocytes: Effects of Calcium Channel Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-pian; Cabantchik, Z. Ioav; Chan, Shing; Chan, Godfrey Chi-fung; Cheung, Yiu-fai

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron overload cardiomyopathy that prevails in some forms of hemosiderosis is caused by excessive deposition of iron into the heart tissue and ensuing damage caused by a raise in labile cell iron. The underlying mechanisms of iron uptake into cardiomyocytes in iron overload condition are still under investigation. Both L-type calcium channels (LTCC) and T-type calcium channels (TTCC) have been proposed to be the main portals of non-transferrinic iron into heart cells, but controversies remain. Here, we investigated the roles of LTCC and TTCC as mediators of cardiac iron overload and cellular damage by using specific Calcium channel blockers as potential suppressors of labile Fe(II) and Fe(III) ingress in cultured cardiomyocytes and ensuing apoptosis. Methods Fe(II) and Fe(III) uptake was assessed by exposing HL-1 cardiomyocytes to iron sources and quantitative real-time fluorescence imaging of cytosolic labile iron with the fluorescent iron sensor calcein while iron-induced apoptosis was quantitatively measured by flow cytometry analysis with Annexin V. The role of calcium channels as routes of iron uptake was assessed by cell pretreatment with specific blockers of LTCC and TTCC. Results Iron entered HL-1 cardiomyocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced cardiac apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated caspase-3 dependent pathways. Blockade of LTCC but not of TTCC demonstrably inhibited the uptake of ferric but not of ferrous iron. However, neither channel blocker conferred cardiomyocytes with protection from iron-induced apoptosis. Conclusion Our study implicates LTCC as major mediators of Fe(III) uptake into cardiomyocytes exposed to ferric salts but not necessarily as contributors to ensuing apoptosis. Thus, to the extent that apoptosis can be considered a biological indicator of damage, the etiopathology of cardiosiderotic damage that accompanies some forms of hemosiderosis would seem to be unrelated to LTCC or TTCC, but rather to other

  2. Peptide Neurotoxins that Affect Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: A Close-Up on ω-Agatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pringos, Emilie; Vignes, Michel; Martinez, Jean; Rolland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins found in animal venoms have gained great interest in the field of neurotransmission. As they are high affinity ligands for calcium, potassium and sodium channels, they have become useful tools for studying channel structure and activity. Peptide neurotoxins represent the clinical potential of ion-channel modulators across several therapeutic fields, especially in developing new strategies for treatment of ion channel-related diseases. The aim of this review is to overview the latest updates in the domain of peptide neurotoxins that affect voltage-gated calcium channels, with a special focus on ω-agatoxins. PMID:22069688

  3. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I.; Luchinsky, D. G.; Tindjong, R.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Qf at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Qf=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Qf for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Qf leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Qf(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca2+/Na+ valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls.

  4. Energetics of discrete selectivity bands and mutation-induced transitions in the calcium-sodium ion channels family.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, I; Luchinsky, D G; Tindjong, R; McClintock, P V E; Eisenberg, R S

    2013-11-01

    We use Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations to study the ionic conduction and valence selectivity of a generic electrostatic model of a biological ion channel as functions of the fixed charge Q(f) at its selectivity filter. We are thus able to reconcile the discrete calcium conduction bands recently revealed in our BD simulations, M0 (Q(f)=1e), M1 (3e), M2 (5e), with a set of sodium conduction bands L0 (0.5e), L1 (1.5e), thereby obtaining a completed pattern of conduction and selectivity bands vs Q(f) for the sodium-calcium channels family. An increase of Q(f) leads to an increase of calcium selectivity: L0 (sodium-selective, nonblocking channel) → M0 (nonselective channel) → L1 (sodium-selective channel with divalent block) → M1 (calcium-selective channel exhibiting the anomalous mole fraction effect). We create a consistent identification scheme where the L0 band is putatively identified with the eukaryotic sodium channel The scheme created is able to account for the experimentally observed mutation-induced transformations between nonselective channels, sodium-selective channels, and calcium-selective channels, which we interpret as transitions between different rows of the identification table. By considering the potential energy changes during permeation, we show explicitly that the multi-ion conduction bands of calcium and sodium channels arise as the result of resonant barrierless conduction. The pattern of periodic conduction bands is explained on the basis of sequential neutralization taking account of self-energy, as Q(f)(z,i)=ze(1/2+i), where i is the order of the band and z is the valence of the ion. Our results confirm the crucial influence of electrostatic interactions on conduction and on the Ca(2+)/Na(+) valence selectivity of calcium and sodium ion channels. The model and results could be also applicable to biomimetic nanopores with charged walls. PMID:24329301

  5. Intracellular calcium channels: inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fedorenko, Olena A.; Popugaeva, Elena; Enomoto, Masahiro; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    The inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs) are the major intracellular Ca2+-release channels in cells. Activity of InsP3Rs is essential for elementary and global Ca2+ events in the cell. There are three InsP3Rs isoforms that are present in mammalian cells. In this review review we will focus primarily on InsP3R type 1. The InsP3R1 is a predominant isoform in neurons and it is most extensively studied isoform. Combination of biophysical and structural methods revealed key mechanisms of InsP3R function and modulation. Cell biological and biochemical studies lead to identification of a large number of InsP3R-binding proteins. InsP3Rs are involved in the regulation of numerous physiological processes, including learning and memory, proliferation, differentiation, development and cell death. Malfunction of InsP3R1 play a role in a number of neurodegenerative disorders and other disease states. InsP3Rs represent a potentially valuable drug target for treatment of these disorders and for modulating activity of neurons and other cells. Future studies will provide better understanding of physiological functions of InsP3Rs in health and disease. PMID:24300389

  6. Endothelin induces two types of contractions of rat uterus: phasic contractions by way of voltage-dependent calcium channels and developing contractions through a second type of calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, M.; Ito, T.; Hirose, S.; Takahashi, K.; Hagiwara, H.

    1989-02-28

    Effects of endothelin on nonvascular smooth muscle have been examined using rat uterine horns and two modes of endothelin action have been revealed. Endothelin (0.3 nM) caused rhythmic contractions of isolated uterus in the presence of extracellular calcium. The rhythmic contractions were completely inhibited by calcium channel antagonists. These characteristics of endothelin-induced contractions were very similar to those induced by oxytocin. Binding assays using /sup 125/I-endothelin showed that endothelin and the calcium channel blockers did not compete for the binding sites. However, endothelin was unique in that it caused, in addition to rhythmic contractions, a slowly developing monophasic contraction that was insensitive to calcium channel blockers. This developing contraction became dominant at higher concentrations of endothelin and was also calcium dependent.

  7. Selectivity of calcium channels in rat uterine smooth muscle: interactions between sodium, calcium and barium ions.

    PubMed

    Jmari, K; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1987-03-01

    1. Action potentials and membrane currents were recorded by means of a double sucrose-gap technique from Cs-loaded strips from pregnant rats superfused in Ca-free EGTA-containing solutions. 2. When external Ca was reduced below 1 microM in the presence of 1 mM-EGTA, step depolarizations from a holding potential close to the normal resting potential produced tetrodotoxin-resistant inward currents. These currents were suppressed after removal of external Na and blocked by a variety of Ca-channel blockers such as Mn, Co, Ni and nifedipine. 3. Inactivation of the inward Na current was studied using a double-pulse protocol. The degree of inactivation of the Na current was almost maximal for depolarizations of +50 mV. Application of stronger depolarizations did not significantly increase it and had no effect on recovery from inactivation. Similarly, increasing the duration of the conditioning pulse from 30 to 250 ms had no further effect on both amplitude and kinetics of the Na current. These results suggest that the Na current inactivation reflects a pure voltage-dependent mechanism. 4. The effects of external Ca were studied over a 10(9)-fold range in concentration. When external Ca was gradually increased from 1 nM to 1 microM, the inward Na current was reduced and finally abolished. As the external Ca was increased over 0.5 mM, inward current reappeared and increased as Ca became the charge carrier. 5. When Na was the charge carrier, external Ca was the most effective divalent cation in blocking the Ca channel with a half-blockage concentration of 0.1 microM. Addition of millimolar concentrations of Ca and Sr also reduced the Ba current while adding Ba to Ca-containing solution produced no increase in current. 6. Membrane currents in solutions containing both Ba and Ca ions were less than in solutions containing either Ca or Ba at the same concentration, suggesting that Ca channels are single-file multi-ion pores. 7. We conclude that the selectivity of uterine Ca

  8. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Deák, F; Lasztóczi, B; Pacher, P; Petheö, G L; Valéria Kecskeméti; Spät, A

    2000-04-01

    Fluoxetine, an antidepressant which is used world-wide, is a prominent member of the class of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors. Recently, inhibition of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels by fluoxetine has also been reported. We examined the effect of fluoxetine on voltage-gated calcium channels using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. In hippocampal pyramidal cells, fluoxetine inhibited the low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium current with an IC(50) of 6.8 microM. Fluoxetine decreased the high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium current with an IC(50) between 1 and 2 microM. Nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the HVA current by 24% and 43%, respectively. Fluoxetine (3 microM), applied in addition to nifedipine or omega-conotoxin, further reduced the current. When fluoxetine (3 microM) was applied first neither nifedipine nor omega-conotoxin attenuated the remaining component of the HVA current. This observation indicates that fluoxetine inhibits both L- and N-type currents. In addition, fluoxetine inhibited the HVA calcium current in carotid body type I chemoreceptor cells and pyramidal neurons prepared from prefrontal cortex. In hippocampal pyramidal cells high K(+)-induced seizure-like activity was inhibited by 1 microM fluoxetine; the mean burst duration was shortened by an average of 44%. These results provide evidence for inhibition of T-, N- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels by fluoxetine at therapeutically relevant concentrations. PMID:10727713

  9. Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Lv, Caixia; Stewart, William J; Akanyeti, Otar; Frederick, Courtney; Zhu, Jie; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Sheets, Lavinia; Liao, James C; Zenisek, David

    2016-06-21

    Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term "ghost ribbons." Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons. PMID:27292637

  10. Postcountershock myocardial damage after pretreatment with adrenergic and calcium channel antagonists in halothane-anesthetized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, D.M.; Metz, S.; Maze, M.

    1985-05-01

    Transthoracic electric countershock can cause necrotic myocardial lesions in humans as well as experimental animals. The authors investigated the effect on postcountershock myocardial damage of pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist; L-metoprolol, a beta-1 antagonist, and verapamil, a calcium channel-blocking agent. Twenty dogs were anesthetized with halothane and given two transthoracic countershocks of 295 delivered joules each after drug or vehicle treatment. Myocardial injury was quantitated 24 h following countershock by measuring the uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the myocardium. Elevated technetium-99m pyrophosphate uptake occurred in visible lesions in most dogs regardless of drug treatment. For each of four parameters of myocardial damage there was no statistically significant difference between control animals and those treated with prazosin, metoprolol, or verapamil. These data suggest that adrenergic or calcium channel-mediated mechanisms are not involved in the pathogenesis of postcountershock myocardial damage.

  11. Aluminium and hydrogen ions inhibit a mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    The tension-dependent activity of mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in excised plasmalemmal patches from onion bulb scale epidermis is modulated by pH in the physiologically meaningful range between 4.5 and 7.2. It is rapidly lowered by lowering pH and rapidly raised by raising pH. Channel activity is effectively inhibited by low levels of aluminium ions and activity can be partially restored by washing for a few minutes. We suggest that under normal conditions the sensitivity of the mechanosensory channels to pH of the wall free space plays important roles in regulation of plant activities such as growth. We further suggest that, when levels of acid and aluminium ions in the soil solution are high, they might inhibit similar sensory channels in cells of the root tip, thus contributing critically to the acid soil syndrome.

  12. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXV: Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Wong, Xiuming

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are widely expressed in various tissues and implicated in physiological processes such as sensory transduction, epithelial secretion, and smooth muscle contraction. Transmembrane proteins with unknown function 16 (TMEM16A) has recently been identified as a major component of CaCCs. Detailed molecular analysis of TMEM16A will be needed to understand its structure-function relationships. The role this channel plays in physiological systems remains to be established and is currently a subject of intense investigation. PMID:22090471

  13. Native store-operated calcium channels are functionally expressed in mouse spinal cord dorsal horn neurons and regulate resting calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jingsheng; Pan, Rong; Gao, Xinghua; Meucci, Olimpia; Hu, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are calcium-selective cation channels that mediate calcium entry in many different cell types. Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is involved in various cellular functions. Increasing evidence suggests that impairment of SOCE is responsible for numerous disorders. A previous study demonstrated that YM-58483, a potent SOC inhibitor, strongly attenuates chronic pain by systemic or intrathecal injection and completely blocks the second phase of formalin-induced spontaneous nocifensive behaviour, suggesting a potential role of SOCs in central sensitization. However, the expression of SOCs, their molecular identity and function in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that SOCs are expressed in dorsal horn neurons. Depletion of calcium stores from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) induced large sustained calcium entry, which was blocked by SOC inhibitors, but not by voltage-gated calcium channel blockers. Depletion of ER calcium stores activated inward calcium-selective currents, which was reduced by replacing Ca2+ with Ba2+ and reversed by SOC inhibitors. Using the small inhibitory RNA knockdown approach, we identified both STIM1 and STIM2 as important mediators of SOCE and SOC current, and Orai1 as a key component of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels in dorsal horn neurons. Knockdown of STIM1, STIM2 or Orai1 decreased resting Ca2+ levels. We also found that activation of neurokinin 1 receptors led to SOCE and activation of SOCs produced an excitatory action in dorsal horn neurons. Our findings reveal that a novel SOC signal is present in dorsal horn neurons and may play an important role in pain transmission. PMID:24860175

  14. Chaotic model and memory in single calcium-activated potassium channel kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandeira, Heliovânio T.; Barbosa, Catão T. F.; Campos De Oliveira, Regina A.; Aguiar, José F.; Nogueira, Romildo A.

    2008-09-01

    Ion channels are pores formed by proteins and responsible for carrying ion fluxes through cellular membranes. The ion channels can assume conformational states thereby controlling ion flow. Physically, the conformational transitions from one state to another are associated with energy barriers between them and are dependent on stimulus, such as, electrical field, ligands, second messengers, etc. Several models have been proposed to describe the kinetics of ion channels. The classical Markovian model assumes that a future transition is independent of the time that the ion channel stayed in a previous state. Others models as the fractal and the chaotic assume that the rate of transitions between the states depend on the time that the ionic channel stayed in a previous state. For the calcium activated potassium channels of Leydig cells the R/S Hurst analysis has indicated that the channels are long-term correlated with a Hurst coefficient H around 0.7, showing a persistent memory in this kinetic. Here, we applied the R /S analysis to the opening and closing dwell time series obtained from simulated data from a chaotic model proposed by L. Liebovitch and T. Tóth [J. Theor. Biol. 148, 243 (1991)] and we show that this chaotic model or any model that treats the set of channel openings and closings as independent events is inadequate to describe the long-term correlation (memory) already described for the experimental data.

  15. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  16. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N.; Clapham, David E.

    2013-12-01

    A primary cilium is a solitary, slender, non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, primary cilia also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signalling and hedgehog signalling pathways. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia use diverse ion channels. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells, but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC and PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane proteins (PKD1, PKD1L1 and PKD1L2) remarkable for a large extracellular amino terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site, and the 6-transmembrane channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2L1 and PKD2L2; TRPPs). Evidence indicates that the PKD1 proteins associate with the PKD2 proteins via coiled-coil domains. Here we use a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and use it to record directly from primary cilia, and demonstrate that PKD1L1 and PKD2L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with an accompanying manuscript, we show that the PKD1L1-PKD2L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established hedgehog pathways.

  17. Functional segregation of voltage-activated calcium channels in motoneurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Garry; Lasser-Katz, Efrat; Simchovitz, Alon; Sharon, Ronit; Soreq, Hermona; Surmeier, D. James

    2015-01-01

    Calcium influx elevates mitochondrial oxidant stress (mOS) in dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons that are prone to Lewy body pathologies in presymptomatic Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In experimental PD models, treatment with isradipine, the dihydropyridine with the highest affinity to Cav1.3 channels, prevents subthreshold calcium influx via Cav1.3 channels into midbrain dopamine neurons and protects them from mOS. In DMV neurons, isradipine is also effective in reducing mOS despite overwhelming evidence that subthreshold calcium influx is negligible compared with spike-triggered influx. To solve this conundrum we combined slice electrophysiology, two-photon laser scanning microscopy, mRNA profiling, and computational modeling. We find that the unusually depolarized subthreshold voltage trajectory of DMV neurons is positioned between the relatively hyperpolarized activation curve of Cav1.3 channels and that of other high-voltage activated (HVA) calcium channels, thus creating a functional segregation between Cav1.3 and HVA calcium channels. The HVA channels flux the bulk of calcium during spikes but can only influence pacemaking through their coupling to calcium-activated potassium currents. In contrast, Cav1.3 currents, which we show to be more than an order-of-magnitude smaller than the HVA calcium currents, are able to introduce sufficient inward current to speed up firing. However, Kv4 channels that are constitutively open in the subthreshold range guarantee slow pacemaking, despite the depolarizing action of Cav1.3 and other pacemaking currents. We propose that the efficacy of isradipine in preventing mOS in DMV neurons arises from its mixed effect on Cav1.3 channels and on HVA Cav1.2 channels. PMID:26156385

  18. T-Type voltage-sensitive calcium channels mediate mechanically-induced intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes by regulating endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Genevieve N; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X Edward

    2016-07-01

    One of the earliest responses of bone cells to mechanical stimuli is a rise in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)), and osteocytes in particular exhibit robust oscillations in Ca(2+) when subjected to loading. Previous studies implicate roles for both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and T-Type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC) in these responses, but their interactions or relative contributions have not been studied. By observing Ca(2+) dynamics in the cytosol (Ca(2+)cyt) and the ER (Ca(2+)ER), the focus of this study was to explore the role of the ER and T-Type channels in Ca(2+) signaling in bone cells. We demonstrate that inhibition of T-Type VSCC in osteocytes significantly reduces the number of Ca(2+)cyt responses and affects Ca(2+)ER depletion dynamics. Simultaneous observation of Ca(2+) exchange among these spaces revealed high synchrony between rises in Ca(2+)cyt and depressions in Ca(2+)ER, and this synchrony was significantly reduced by challenging T-Type VSCC. We further confirmed that this effect was mediated directly through the ER and not through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathways. Taken together, our data suggests that T-Type VSCC facilitate the recovery of Ca(2+)ER in osteocytes to sustain mechanically-induced Ca(2+) oscillations, uncovering a new mechanism underlying the behavior of osteocytes as mechanosensors. PMID:27108342

  19. 3-Benzamides and 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl amines as calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bohee; Oh, Jung Ae; Lee, Jee Youn; Rhim, Hyewhon; Yune, Tae Young; Park Choo, Hea-Young

    2015-09-15

    T- and N-type calcium channels have known for relating to therapy of neuropathic pain which is chronic, debilitating pain state. Neuropathic pain is caused by damage of the somatosensory system. It may be associated with abnormal sensations and pain produced by normally non-painful stimuli (allodynia). Neuropathic pain is very difficult to treat, and only some 40-60% of patients achieve partial relief. For a neuropathic pain therapy, anticonvulsant like Lamotrigine, Carbamazepine and a topical anesthetic such as Lidocaine are used. We synthesized 15 novel amine derivatives and evaluated their activities against T-type and N-type calcium channels by whole-cell patch clamp recording on HEK293 cells. Among the tested compounds, compound 10 showed good inhibitory activity for both T-type and N-type calcium channels with the IC50 value of 1.9 μM and 4.3 μM, respectively. Compound 10 also showed good analgesic activity on rat spinal cord injury model. PMID:26296911

  20. Progesterone Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels is a Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism against Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, Jessie I; Kelley, Brooke G; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of progesterone following traumatic brain injury has recently entered phase III clinical trials as a means of neuroprotection. Although it has been hypothesized that progesterone protects against calcium overload following excitotoxic shock, the exact mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of progesterone have yet to be determined. We found that therapeutic concentrations of progesterone to be neuroprotective against depolarization-induced excitotoxicity in cultured striatal neurons. Through use of calcium imaging, electrophysiology and the measurement of changes in activity-dependent gene expression, progesterone was found to block calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels, leading to alterations in the signaling of the activity-dependent transcription factors NFAT and CREB. The effects of progesterone were highly specific to this steroid hormone, although they did not appear to be receptor mediated. In addition, progesterone did not inhibit AMPA or NMDA receptor signaling. This analysis regarding the effect of progesterone on calcium signaling provides both a putative mechanism by which progesterone acts as a neuroprotectant, as well as affords a greater appreciation for its potential far-reaching effects on cellular function. PMID:21371490

  1. FGF23 promotes renal calcium reabsorption through the TRPV5 channel

    PubMed Central

    Andrukhova, Olena; Smorodchenko, Alina; Egerbacher, Monika; Streicher, Carmen; Zeitz, Ute; Goetz, Regina; Shalhoub, Victoria; Mohammadi, Moosa; Pohl, Elena E; Lanske, Beate; Erben, Reinhold G

    2014-01-01

    αKlotho is thought to activate the epithelial calcium channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-5 (TRPV5) in distal renal tubules through its putative glucuronidase/sialidase activity, thereby preventing renal calcium loss. However, αKlotho also functions as the obligatory co-receptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), a bone-derived phosphaturic hormone. Here, we show that renal calcium reabsorption and renal membrane abundance of TRPV5 are reduced in Fgf23 knockout mice, similar to what is seen in αKlotho knockout mice. We further demonstrate that αKlotho neither co-localizes with TRPV5 nor is regulated by FGF23. Rather, apical membrane abundance of TRPV5 in renal distal tubules and thus renal calcium reabsorption are regulated by FGF23, which binds the FGF receptor-αKlotho complex and activates a signaling cascade involving ERK1/2, SGK1, and WNK4. Our data thereby identify FGF23, not αKlotho, as a calcium-conserving hormone in the kidney. PMID:24434184

  2. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  3. A critical GxxxA motif in the γ6 calcium channel subunit mediates its inhibitory effect on Cav3.1 calcium current

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zuojun; Witschas, Katja; Garcia, Thomas; Chen, Ren-Shiang; Hansen, Jared P; Sellers, Zachary M; Kuzmenkina, Elza; Herzig, Stefan; Best, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The eight members of the calcium channel γ subunit family are integral membrane proteins that regulate the expression and behaviour of voltage and ligand gated ion channels. While a subgroup consisting of γ2, γ3, γ4 and γ8 (the TARPs) modulate AMPA receptor localization and function, the γ1 and γ6 subunits conform to the original description of these proteins as regulators of voltage gated calcium channels. We have previously shown that the γ6 subunit is highly expressed in atrial myocytes and that it is capable of acting as a negative modulator of low voltage activated calcium current. In this study we extend our understanding of γ6 subunit modulation of low voltage activated calcium current. Using engineered chimeric constructs, we demonstrate that the first transmembrane domain (TM1) of γ6 is necessary for its inhibitory effect on Cav3.1 current. Mutational analysis is then used to identify a unique GxxxA motif within TM1 that is required for the function of the subunit strongly suggesting the involvement of helix–helix interactions in its effects. Results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirm a physical association of γ6 with the Cav3.1 channel in both HEK cells and atrial myocytes. Single channel analysis reveals that binding of γ6 reduces channel availability for activation. Taken together, the results of this study provide both a molecular and a mechanistic framework for understanding the unique ability of the γ6 calcium channel subunit to modulate low voltage activated (Cav3.1) calcium current density. PMID:18818244

  4. A calcium antagonist drug binding site in skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum: evidence for a calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, A S; Thayer, S A; Colker, J E; Beatty, D A

    1983-03-21

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (S.R.) of rabbit skeletal muscle has been found to contain a single, high affinity binding site for the Ca antagonist drug [3H]-nitrendipine. Two subfractions of the reticulum were studied, the heavy (HSR) and light (LSR) preparations, which exhibited similar nitrendipine equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of 1nM. Crude cardiac and brain membranes assayed under the same conditions exhibited KD values of 0.2-0.3nM. The concentration of binding sites per mg. protein (Bmax) in HSR was found to be very high, namely 6.7 picomoles/mg, some four times greater than that of LSR. [3H]-nitrendipine binding to HSR was reversible and inhibited by the Ca antagonists flunarizine and verapamil, and by the intracellular Ca release antagonist TMB-8 (8-diethylamino-octyl 3,4,5-trimethylbenzoate hydrochloride). However, unlabelled nitrendipine at 2 X 10(-5)M had no effect on contraction of isolated electrically stimulated rabbit lumbrical or rat diaphragm muscles, nor did it affect the neuromuscular junction as studied in rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. Also, little effect of 2 X 10(-5)M nitrendipine was seen on net 45Ca uptake by HSR. These results suggest that [3H]-nitrendipine binding to skeletal muscle S.R. resembles that of brain membranes, which also contain a high affinity binding site for [3H]-nitrendipine and which similarly are pharmacologically insensitive to this dihydropyridine type of Ca channel blocking agent. Since HSR is also enriched in calsequestrin and terminal cysternae from which Ca is released in vivo, it seems likely that the [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites in S.R. are associated with Ca channels in the S.R. PMID:6300579

  5. The effect of calcium hardness on hatching success of channel catfish x blue catfish hybrid catfish eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was designed to determine the optimal level of calcium hardness in hatching waters to incubate channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus ' x blue catfish I. furcatus ' hybrid catfish eggs. Hatching success of hybrid catfish eggs was higher (p<0.05) at 75 mg L-1 of calcium hardness (C...

  6. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  7. The calcium release-activated calcium channel Orai1 represents a crucial component in hypertrophic compensation and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Buckley, Cadie L; Alvarez, Ernest M; Schorlemmer, Anita; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    As exceptionally calcium selective store-operated channels, Orai channels play a prominent role in cellular calcium signaling. While most studied in the immune system, we are beginning to recognize that Orai1 provides unique calcium signaling pathways in numerous tissue contexts. To assess the involvement of Orai1 in cardiac hypertrophy we used transverse aortic constriction to model pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure in Orai1 deficient mice. We demonstrate that Orai1 deficient mice have significantly decreased survival in this pressure overload model. Transthoracic echocardiography reveals that Orai1 deficient mice develop rapid dilated cardiomyopathy, with greater loss of function, and histological and molecular data indicate that this pathology is associated with significant apoptosis, but not major differences in cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and some major hypertrophic makers. Orai1 represents a crucial calcium entry mechanism in the compensation of the heart to pressure overload over-load, and the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:24135962

  8. Forskolin Regulates L-Type Calcium Channel through Interaction between Actinin 4 and β3 Subunit in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Peng, Wen; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels that permit cellular calcium influx are essential in calcium-mediated modulation of cellular signaling. Although the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels is linked to many factors including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity and actin cytoskeleton, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying the regulation in osteoblasts. Our present study investigated the modulation of L-type calcium channel activities through the effects of forskolin on actin reorganization and on its functional interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4. The results showed that forskolin did not significantly affect the trafficking of pore forming α1c subunit and its interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4, whereas it significantly increased the expression of β3 subunit and its interaction with actinin 4 in osteoblast cells as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, and immunostaining. Further mapping showed that the ABD and EF domains of actinin 4 were interaction sites. This interaction is independent of PKA phosphorylation. Knockdown of actinin 4 significantly decreased the activities of L-type calcium channels. Our study revealed a new aspect of the mechanisms by which the forskolin activation of adenylyl cyclase - cAMP cascade regulates the L-type calcium channel in osteoblast cells, besides the PKA mediated phosphorylation of the channel subunits. These data provide insight into the important role of interconnection among adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, PKA, the actin cytoskeleton, and the channel proteins in the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cells. PMID:25902045

  9. Comparison of electrophysiological effects of calcium channel blockers on cardiac repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang-Ae; Hyun, Sung-Ae; Park, Sung-Gurl

    2016-01-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been widely used to treat of several cardiovascular diseases. An excessive shortening of action potential duration (APD) due to the reduction of Ca2+ channel current (ICa) might increase the risk of arrhythmia. In this study we investigated the electrophysiological effects of nicardipine (NIC), isradipine (ISR), and amlodipine (AML) on the cardiac APD in rabbit Purkinje fibers, voltage-gated K+ channel currents (IKr, IKs) and voltage-gated Na+ channel current (INa). The concentration-dependent inhibition of Ca2+ channel currents (ICa) was examined in rat cardiomyocytes; these CCBs have similar potency on ICa channel blocking with IC50 (the half-maximum inhibiting concentration) values of 0.142, 0.229, and 0.227 nM on NIC, ISR, and AML, respectively. However, ISR shortened both APD50 and APD90 already at 1 µM whereas NIC and AML shortened APD50 but not APD90 up to 30 µM. According to ion channel studies, NIC and AML concentration-dependently inhibited IKr and IKs while ISR had only partial inhibitory effects (<50% at 30 µM). Inhibition of INa was similarly observed in the three CCBs. Since the IKr and IKs mainly contribute to cardiac repolarization, their inhibition by NIC and AML could compensate for the AP shortening effects due to the block of ICa. PMID:26807031

  10. Sequential ionic and conformational signaling by calcium channels drives neuronal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Boxing; Tadross, Michael R; Tsien, Richard W

    2016-02-19

    Voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels (L-type calcium channel α1C subunits) are critical mediators of transcription-dependent neural plasticity. Whether these channels signal via the influx of calcium ion (Ca(2+)), voltage-dependent conformational change (VΔC), or a combination of the two has thus far been equivocal. We fused CaV1.2 to a ligand-gated Ca(2+)-permeable channel, enabling independent control of localized Ca(2+) and VΔC signals. This revealed an unexpected dual requirement: Ca(2+) must first mobilize actin-bound Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, freeing it for subsequent VΔC-mediated accumulation. Neither signal alone sufficed to activate transcription. Signal order was crucial: Efficiency peaked when Ca(2+) preceded VΔC by 10 to 20 seconds. CaV1.2 VΔC synergistically augmented signaling by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Furthermore, VΔC mistuning correlated with autistic symptoms in Timothy syndrome. Thus, nonionic VΔC signaling is vital to the function of CaV1.2 in synaptic and neuropsychiatric processes. PMID:26912895

  11. Effect of inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases on voltage-operated calcium channel currents in rabbit isolated ear artery cells

    PubMed Central

    Wijetunge, S; Lymn, J S; Hughes, A D

    1998-01-01

    The effect of increasing cellular tyrosine phosphorylation by inhibiting endogenous tyrosine phosphatases was examined on voltage-operated calcium channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells.In single ear artery smooth muscle cells of the rabbit, studied by the whole cell voltage clamp technique, intracellular application of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors, sodium orthovanadate (100 μM) and peroxyvanadate (100 μM orthovanadate+1 mM H2O2) increased voltage-operated calcium channel currents by 56% and 83%, respectively.Bath application of two other membrane permeant tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors, phenylarsine oxide (100 μM) and dephostatin (50 μM) also increased voltage-operated calcium channel currents by 48% and 52%, respectively.The selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-23 (100 μM) reduced calcium channel currents by 41%. Pre-incubation with tyrphostin-23 abolished the effects of peroxyvanadate, phenylarsine oxide and dephostatin on calcium channels.Western blot analysis of rabbit ear artery cell lysates showed increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several endogenous proteins following treatment with peroxyvanadate.These results indicate that a number of structurally dissimilar inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatases increase voltage-operated calcium channel currents in arterial smooth muscle cells presumably due to increased tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:9641547

  12. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  13. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  14. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A.; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2015-01-01

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  15. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P; Stornetta, Ruth L; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P; Zhu, J Julius

    2015-07-15

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  16. Use of a purified and functional recombinant calcium-channel beta4 subunit in surface-plasmon resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Geib, Sandrine; Sandoz, Guillaume; Mabrouk, Kamel; Matavel, Alessandra; Marchot, Pascale; Hoshi, Toshinori; Villaz, Michel; Ronjat, Michel; Miquelis, Raymond; Lévêque, Christian; de Waard, Michel

    2002-05-15

    Native high-voltage-gated calcium channels are multi-subunit complexes comprising a pore-forming subunit Ca(v) and at least two auxiliary subunits alpha(2)delta and beta. The beta subunit facilitates cell-surface expression of the channel and contributes significantly to its biophysical properties. In spite of its importance, detailed structural and functional studies are hampered by the limited availability of native beta subunit. Here, we report the purification of a recombinant calcium-channel beta(4) subunit from bacterial extracts by using a polyhistidine tag. The purified protein is fully functional since it binds on the alpha1 interaction domain, its main Ca(v)-binding site, and regulates the activity of P/Q calcium channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes in a similar way to the beta(4) subunit produced by cRNA injection. We took advantage of the functionality of the purified material to (i) develop an efficient surface-plasmon resonance assay of the interaction between two calcium channel subunits and (ii) measure, for the first time, the affinity of the recombinant His-beta(4) subunit for the full-length Ca(v)2.1 channel. The availability of this purified material and the development of a surface-plasmon resonance assay opens two immediate research perspectives: (i) drug screening programmes applied to the Ca(v)/beta interaction and (ii) crystallographic studies of the calcium-channel beta(4) subunit. PMID:11988102

  17. Calcium channel dynamics limit synaptic release in response to prosthetic stimulation with sinusoidal waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Jeng, Jed S.; Kelly, Shawn K.; Hartveit, Espen; Fried, Shelley I.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular electric stimulation with sinusoidal waveforms has been shown to allow preferential activation of individual types of retinal neurons by varying stimulus frequency. It is important to understand the mechanisms underlying this frequency dependence as a step towards improving methods of preferential activation. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, we implemented a morphologically realistic model of a retinal bipolar cell and measured the response to extracellular stimulation with sinusoidal waveforms. We compared the frequency response of a passive membrane model to the kinetics of voltage-gated calcium channels that mediate synaptic release. The passive electrical properties of the membrane exhibited lowpass filtering with a relatively high cutoff frequency (nominal value = 717 Hz). This cutoff frequency was dependent on intra-axonal resistance, with shorter and wider axons yielding higher cutoff frequencies. However, we found that the cutoff frequency of bipolar cell synaptic release was primarily limited by the relatively slow opening kinetics of Land T-type calcium channels. The cutoff frequency of calcium currents depended nonlinearly on stimulus amplitude, but remained lower than the cutoff frequency of the passive membrane model for a large range of membrane potential fluctuations. These results suggest that while it may be possible to modulate the membrane potential of bipolar cells over a wide range of stimulus frequencies, synaptic release will only be initiated at the lower end of this range. PMID:21628768

  18. Genetic Interactions Found Between Calcium Channel Genes Modulate Amyloid Load Measured by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD’s genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidigenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  19. Modulation of ischemic-induced damage to cerebral adenylate cyclase in gerbils by calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Christie-Pope, B C; Palmer, G C

    1986-12-01

    It has been previously established that prolonged bilateral carotid occlusion followed by recirculation produces damage to the synaptic enzyme adenylate cyclase in the frontal cortex of the gerbil. Since calcium entrance into the brain may account in part for the deleterious consequences of stroke, the present study examined whether pretreatment with calcium channel blockers would modify the effects of 60 min of bilateral ischemia plus 40 min of reflow on various parameters of cortical adenylate cyclase activation. In this context activation of cerebral homogenates by norepinephrine with or without 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate was preserved by pretreatment of ischemic gerbils with verapamil but worsened by flunarizine. In contrast, in particulate fractions (treated with EGTA to reduce metallic ion levels) the damage to the Mn2+-sensitive catalytic site of adenylate cyclase was prevented only by flunarizine. Pretreatment with the two calcium channel blockers resulted in an elevated basal activity of the enzyme, thereby reducing the response in the homogenate preparation to forskolin. Gerbils pretreated with verapamil tended to have an increased ability for survival resulting from the ischemic episode. Under in vitro conditions the enzyme preparations were not markedly influenced by either drug. PMID:3508245

  20. RIM Promotes Calcium Channel Accumulation at Active Zones of the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Ethan R.; Valakh, Vera; Wright, Christina M.; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Yong Q.; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synaptic communication requires the controlled release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic axon terminals. Release efficacy is regulated by the many proteins that comprise the presynaptic release apparatus, including Ca2+ channels and proteins that influence Ca2+ channel accumulation at release sites. Here we identify Drosophila RIM and demonstrate that it localizes to active zones at the larval neuromuscular junction. In Drosophila RIM mutants, there is a large decrease in evoked synaptic transmission, due to a significant reduction in both the clustering of Ca2+ channels and the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles at active zones. Hence, RIM plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating synaptic calcium channel localization and readily releasable pool size. Since RIM has traditionally been studied as an effector of Rab3 function, we investigate whether RIM is involved in the newly identified function of Rab3 in the distribution of presynaptic release machinery components across release sites. Bruchpilot (Brp), an essential component of the active zone cytomatrix T bar, is unaffected by RIM disruption, indicating that Brp localization and distribution across active zones does not require wild type RIM. In addition, larvae containing mutations in both RIM and rab3 have reduced Ca2+ channel levels and a Brp distribution that is very similar to that of the rab3 single mutant, indicating that RIM functions to regulate Ca2+ channel accumulation but is not a Rab3 effector for release machinery distribution across release sites. PMID:23175814

  1. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-induced calcium-channel gating in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferriere, F; Khan, N A; Meyniel, J P; Deschaux, P

    1997-01-01

    The present study was conducted on peripheral blood lympho-cytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to assess the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 'serotonin') in calcium signalling. 5-HT-induced increases in intracellular free calcium concentrations, [Ca2+]i, and its action was mediated by 5-HT receptor subtype 3 (5-HT3), but not by 5-HT receptor subtype 1A (5-HT1A) or subtype 2 (5-HT2) in these cells. In Ca2+-containing medium (1 mM CaCl2), 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT (5-HT3 receptor agonist) induced increases in [Ca2+]i, whereas in Ca2+-free medium (0 Ca2+, 1 mM EGTA), these two agents failed to evoke increases in [Ca2+]i in these cells, demonstrating that 5-HT mobilizes Ca2+ from the extracellular environment. Furthermore, 5-HT-induced increases in [Ca2+]i are not contributed to by the intracellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) pool, as thapsigargin, an agent that recruits Ca2+ from ER stores, had additive effects on 5-HT-induced [Ca2+]i responses in fish peripheral lymphocytes. 5-HT-induced increases in [Ca2+]i were mediated by 5-HT3 receptors via gating the calcium through L-type, but not N-type, calcium channels in trout lymphocytes. PMID:9173890

  3. Effects of calcium channel blockers on gastric emptying and acid secretion of the rat in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Brage, R.; Cortijo, J.; Esplugues, J.; Esplugues, J. V.; Martí-Bonmatí, E.; Rodriguez, C.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of three calcium channel blockers (verapamil, diltiazem and cinnarizine) on gastric emptying and secretion in the rat. Pretreatment with the calcium blockers delayed gastric emptying of phenol red in a dose-dependent manner. Verapamil was the most effective of the agents tested. Verapamil and diltiazem inhibited gastric acid secretion in the pylorus-ligated rat without affecting pepsin output. Cinnarizine was ineffective in this model. When the perfused lumen of the anaesthetized rat was used, verapamil was found to inhibit responses to carbachol or histamine more than those to pentagastrin. Further, we found a greater sensitivity to verapamil for basal compared with vagal-stimulated (2-deoxy-D-glucose) acid secretion. Neither diltiazem nor cinnarizine modified gastric acid secretion in this experimental model. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of extracellular calcium in gastric motility and secretion, and the existence of a regional and functional selectivity for calcium blockers is proposed. PMID:3814903

  4. STIM1 Protein Activates Store-Operated Calcium Channels in Cellular Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vigont, V. A.; Zimina, O. A.; Glushankova, L. N.; Kolobkova, J. A.; Ryazantseva, M. A.; Mozhayeva, G. N.; Kaznacheyeva, E. V.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that the expression of full-length mutated huntingtin in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) leads to an abnormal increase in calcium entry through store-operated channels. In this paper, the expression of the N-terminal fragment of mutated huntingtin (Htt138Q-1exon) is shown to be enough to provide an actual model for Huntington’s disease. We have shown that Htt138Q-1exon expression causes increased store-operated calcium entry, which is mediated by at least two types of channels in SK-N-SH cells with different reversal potentials. Calcium sensor, STIM1, is required for activation of store-operated calcium entry in these cells. The results provide grounds for considering the proteins responsible for the activation and maintenance of the store-operated calcium entry as promising targets for developing novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25558393

  5. Inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels in smooth muscle by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiao; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms responsible for the termination of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)), simultaneous measurements of whole cell currents and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were made in equine tracheal myocytes. In nondialyzed cells, or cells dialyzed with 1 mM ATP, ICl(Ca) decayed before the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas the calcium-activated potassium current decayed at the same rate as [Ca2+]i. Substitution of AMP-PNP or ADP for ATP markedly prolonged the decay of ICl(Ca), resulting in a rate of current decay similar to that of the fall in [Ca2+]i. In the presence of ATP, dialysis of the calmodulin antagonist W7, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN93, or a CaMKII-specific peptide inhibitor the rate of ICl(Ca) decay was slowed and matched the [Ca2+]i decline, whereas H7, a nonspecific kinase inhibitor with low affinity for CaMKII, was without effect. When a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was produced in ATP dialyzed cells, the current decayed completely, whereas in cells loaded with 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), KN93, or the CaMKII inhibitory peptide, ICl(Ca) did not decay. Slowly decaying currents were repeatedly evoked in ADP- or AMP-PNP-loaded cells, but dialysis of adenosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) or okadaic acid resulted in a smaller initial ICl(Ca), and little or no current (despite a normal [Ca2+]i transient) with a second stimulation. These data indicate that CaMKII phosphorylation results in the inactivation of calcium-activated chloride channels, and that transition from the inactivated state to the closed state requires protein dephosphorylation. PMID:9405714

  6. Homeostatic synaptic depression is achieved through a regulated decrease in presynaptic calcium channel abundance.

    PubMed

    Gaviño, Michael A; Ford, Kevin J; Archila, Santiago; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic signaling stabilizes synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) of Drosophila, mice, and human. It is believed that homeostatic signaling at the NMJ is bi-directional and considerable progress has been made identifying mechanisms underlying the homeostatic potentiation of neurotransmitter release. However, very little is understood mechanistically about the opposing process, homeostatic depression, and how bi-directional plasticity is achieved. Here, we show that homeostatic potentiation and depression can be simultaneously induced, demonstrating true bi-directional plasticity. Next, we show that mutations that block homeostatic potentiation do not alter homeostatic depression, demonstrating that these are genetically separable processes. Finally, we show that homeostatic depression is achieved by decreased presynaptic calcium channel abundance and calcium influx, changes that are independent of the presynaptic action potential waveform. Thus, we identify a novel mechanism of homeostatic synaptic plasticity and propose a model that can account for the observed bi-directional, homeostatic control of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. PMID:25884248

  7. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  8. Antioxidant effect of T-type calcium channel blockers in gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Bilici, Dilek; Banoğlu, Z Nur; Kiziltunç, Ahmet; Avci, Bahattin; Ciftçioğlu, Akif; Bilici, Sefa

    2002-04-01

    It is known that calcium ion has an important role in the cellular function. For this reason, calcium channel blockers may have a protective action against gastric injury which is induced by various stimuli. In this study, the influence of mibefradil on ethanol-induced gastric injury was investigated in rats. Mibefradil was given at a dose 50 mg/kg intraperitoneally 30 min before administration of 1 ml absolute ethanol given by gavage. We compared this effect of mibefradil with that of omeprazol. Ethanol-induced mucosal damage was evaluated using three different approaches: analysis of biochemical parameters and pathologic and macroscopic investigation. It was found that pretreatment with mibefradil significantly reduced ethanol-induced macroscopic, pathologic, and biochemical changes in the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, it is speculated that this findings may prove important in the development of new and improved therapies for the treatment and prevention of gastric ulcers in humans. PMID:11991620

  9. Identification and cellular localisation of voltage-operated calcium channels in immature rat testis.

    PubMed

    Fragale, A; Aguanno, S; Kemp, M; Reeves, M; Price, K; Beattie, R; Craig, P; Volsen, S; Sher, E; D'Agostino, A

    2000-04-25

    Sertoli cells regulate the spermatogenic process mainly through the secretion of a complex fluid into the lumen of the seminiferous tubules behind the blood-testis barrier, containing many of the essential proteins necessary for maintenance and maturation of male germ cells. Thus, the study of Sertoli cell secretory processes is strictly correlated with the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of spermatogenesis. In this work the authors have explored the voltage-sensitive calcium channel variety in the immature rat testis, their localisation and distribution within the seminiferous epithelium and peritubular and interstitial tissues as well as the possible role in the control of Sertoli cell secretion. The results reported in this paper, obtained by in situ hybridisation, immunohistology of rat testicular sections and Western blot analysis of Sertoli cell plasma membranes, show that mammalian Sertoli cells express mRNA encoding for several voltage-operated calcium channel subunits and express such proteins on their surface. Experiments performed on Sertoli cell monolayers cultured in the presence of specific toxins indicate that both N and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels are involved in the regulation of protein secretion. PMID:10854695

  10. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Evan W.; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca2+]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca2+]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca2+]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca2+]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca2+]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca2+ channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca2+]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222