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Sample records for calcium chloride cacl2

  1. Examples Class 2 Calcium Chloride

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Examples Class 2 Calcium Chloride The orthorhombic unit cell of CaCl2 has a = 0.624 nm, b = 0 of this structure on (001). Figure 1: The structure projection for cal- cium chloride 1. What is the Bravais lattice

  2. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  3. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright, M. I.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  4. Consumer Acceptability of Cucumber Pickles Produced by Fermentation in Calcium Chloride Brine for Reduced Environmental Impact.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Emily M; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Osborne, Jason A

    2015-06-01

    Fermentation of cucumbers in calcium chloride (CaCl2 ) brine has been proposed as an alternative process to reduce the environmental impact of traditional, high salt fermentations. The objective of this research was to determine whether consumer acceptability of pickle products would be impacted by fermentation and storage of cucumbers in CaCl2 brine. Cucumbers were fermented and stored with 0.1M CaCl2 or 1M sodium chloride (NaCl) in open-air, 3000 gal tanks at a commercial facility and processed into hamburger dill chips containing 0.38M NaCl. Cucumbers fermented in CaCl2 required additional desalting to reduce CaCl2 concentrations to that of current products. Consumers (n = 101) showed no significant preference for pickles from different fermentation treatments, whether stored for 2 mo (P = 0.75) or 8 mo (P = 0.68) prior to processing. In contrast, NaCl fermented pickles were preferred over CaCl2 fermented pickles stored for 10 mo and desalted only once (P < 0.01). A series of preference tests indicated that the taste of CaCl2 was not the factor affecting consumer preference, and the 50% detection threshold of CaCl2 in dill pickle chips was found to be 61.8 ± 7.6 mM, indicating that processors could potentially use CaCl2 fermentations with a single desalting step. Consumer liking of flavor (n = 73) was not influenced by fermentation in CaCl2 or by 23 or 35 mM CaCl2 in finished products (P > 0.05), but variability in texture decreased consumer liking (P < 0.05). Although promising, individual fermentation variability and texture quality of CaCl2 fermented products should be further evaluated prior to broad implementation of this process. PMID:25981784

  5. SANITARY DIPS WITH CALCIUM PROPIONATE, CALCIUM CHLORIDE, OR A CALCIUM AMINO ACID CHELATE MAINTAIN QUALITY AND SHELF STABILITY OF HONEYDEW CHUNKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freshly cut honeydew chunks were dipped for 30 seconds in a solution containing 100 uL/L sodium hypochlorite (ClO) without and with a 40 mM concentration of calcium (Ca) propionate, a Ca amino acid chelate formulation (Ca chelate), calcium chloride (CaCl2) or not treated. Respiration and ethylene p...

  6. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  7. Effect of calcium chloride on physical properties of calcium-enriched mixture cement.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Sedigh Shams, Mahdi; Jamshidi, Yasin; Parashos, Peter; Bagheri, Rafat

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding 10% calcium chloride (CaCl2 ) on the setting time, solubility and the pH of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Setting time was assessed in accordance with American Dental Association specification N°57. Solubility was measured at 24 and 72?h, 7 and 14 days in hydrated and dehydrated conditions by calculating weight change. The pH of MiliQ water in which the CEM cement samples were immersed was measured immediately after each time interval with and without the addition of CaCl2 . The data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Student's t-test. The initial setting time was significantly decreased after the addition of 10% CaCl2 . The pH of water increased immediately when in contact with the cements in both groups. The weight loss of hydrated and dehydrated specimens was more than 3% and was significantly reduced by the addition of 10% CaCl2 . PMID:25656236

  8. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system. The Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. Omore »K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration. « less

  9. Raman spectroscopic studies of chemical speciation in calcium chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, Charles F.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2005-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy was applied to CaCl2 melts at 900 degrees C under both non-electrolyzed and electrolyzed conditions. The later used titania cathodes supplied by TIMET, Inc. and graphite anodes. Use of pulse-gating to collect the Raman spectra successfully eliminated any interference from black-body radiation and other stray light. The spectrum of molten CaCl2 exhibited no distinct, resolvable bands that could be correlated with a calcium chloride complex similar to MgCl42- in MgCl2 melts. Rather, the low frequency region of the spectrum was dominated by a broad “tail” arising from collective oscillations of both charge and mass in the molten salt “network.” Additions of both CaO and Ca at concentrations of a percent or two resulted in no new features in the spectra. Addition of CO2, both chemically and via electrolysis at concentrations dictated by stability and solubility at 900 degrees C and 1 bar pressure, also produced no new bands that could be correlated with either dissolved CO2 or the carbonate ion. These results indicated that Raman spectroscopy, at least under the conditions evaluated in the research, was not well suited for following the reactions and coordination chemistry of calcium ions, nor species such as dissolved metallic Ca and CO2 that are suspected to impact current efficiency in titanium electrolysis cells using molten CaCl2. Raman spectra of TIMET titania electrodes were successfully obtained as a function of temperature up to 900 degrees C, both in air and in-situ in CaCl2 melts. However, spectra of these electrodes could only be obtained when the material was in the unreduced state. When reduced, either with hydrogen or within an electrolysis cell, the resulting electrodes exhibited no measurable Raman bands under the conditions used in this work.

  10. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture...Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of...

  11. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture...Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of...

  12. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture...Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of...

  13. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture...Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the...

  14. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture...Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the...

  15. Desorption of CO2 from low concentration monoethanolamine solutions using calcium chloride and ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Okawa, Hirokazu; Fujiwara, Tatsuo; Kato, Takahiro; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We developed an effective method for desorbing CO2 from low-concentration (0.2 mol/l) monoethanolamine (MEA) solutions using calcium chloride (CaCl2) and ultrasound irradiation at 25 °C. The proportion of CO2 desorbed from the MEA solution was calculated from the amount of CaCO3 generated and the amount of CO2 emitted. The proportion of CO2 desorbed from the MEA solution was much higher when CaCl2 was added than when CaCl2 was not added. We also characterized the CaCO3 that was generated when the solution was treated with ultrasound irradiation and when the solution was stirred. The CaCO3 particles produced were more homogeneous and smaller when ultrasound irradiation was applied than when the solution was stirred.

  16. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  18. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  19. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  20. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  1. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  4. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  6. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172.330 Food and...Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely...

  12. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172.330 Food and...Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely...

  13. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172.330 Food and...Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely...

  14. Enhanced inactivation of avian influenza virus at -20°C by disinfectants supplemented with calcium chloride or other antifreeze agents.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jiewen; Chan, Maria; Brooks, Brian W; Rohonczy, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Avian influenza outbreaks have occurred during winter months, and effective disinfection of poultry premises at freezing temperatures is needed. The commercial disinfectants Virkon and Accel, supplemented with an antifreeze agent [propylene glycol (PG), methanol (MeOH), or calcium chloride (CaCl2)], were evaluated for their effectiveness in killing avian influenza virus (AIV) at -20°C or 21°C. An AIV suspension was applied to stainless steel disks, air-dried, and covered with a disinfectant or antifreeze agent for 5 to 30 min. Virkon (2%) and Accel (6.25%) with 30% PG, 20% MeOH, or 20% CaCl2 inactivated 6 log10 AIV within 5 min at -20°C and 21°C. At these temperatures PG and MeOH alone did not kill AIV, but the 20% CaCl2 solution alone inactivated 5 log10 AIV within 10 min. The results suggested that CaCl2 is potentially useful to enhance the effectiveness of disinfection of poultry facilities after outbreaks of AIV infection in warm and cold seasons. PMID:26424918

  15. Interactive role of nitric oxide and calcium chloride in enhancing tolerance to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nasir; Siddiqui, Manzer H; Mohammad, Firoz; Naeem, M

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a small diffusible, ubiquitous bioactive molecule, acts as prooxidant as well as antioxidant, and also regulates remarkable spectrum of plant cellular mechanisms. The present work was undertaken to investigate the role of nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and/or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) in the tolerance of excised mustard leaves to salt stress. After 24h, salt stressed leaves treated with SNP and/or CaCl(2), showed an improvement in the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and nitrate reductase (NR), and leaf chlorophyll (Chl) content, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and leaf ion concentration as compared with the leaves treated with NaCl only. Salinity stress caused a significant increase in H(2)O(2) content and membrane damage which is witnessed by enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage. By contrast, such increases were blocked by the application of 0.2mM SNP and 10mM CaCl(2) to salt stressed leaves. Application of SNP and/or CaCl(2) alleviated NaCl stress by enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and by enhancing proline (Pro) and glycinebetaine (GB) accumulation with a concomitant decrease in H(2)O(2) content, TBARS and electrolyte leakage, which is manifested in the tolerance of plants to salinity stress. Moreover, application of SNP with CaCl(2) was more effective to reduce the detrimental effects of NaCl stress on excised mustard leaves. In addition to this, ameliorating effect of SNP was not effective in presence of NO scavenger cPTIO [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide]. To put all these in a nut shell, the results advocate that SNP in association with CaCl(2) plays a role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to salt stress by improving antioxidative defence system, osmolyte accumulation and ionic homeostasis. PMID:22884961

  16. Predicting Phase Diagram of the CaCl2-H2O Binary System from the BET Adsorption Isotherm

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza

    2008-01-01

    A recent publication in Fluid Phase Equilibria by Zeng (Zeng, Zhou et al. 2007) claimed remarkable accuracy in predicting the solubility of CaCl2-H2O solutions with the Brunaruer-Emett-Teller (BET) model parameters. Their approach necessarily requires prior knowledge of equilibrium water vapor pressures above saturated solutions as a function of temperature for the hydrates of CaCl2 that exist under those conditions. However, the intrinsic BET model does not require prior knowledge of such solubility data that the approach of (Zeng, Zhou et al. 2007) is dependent upon. This paper highlights the differences between the two approaches and covers a much wider range of compositions and temperatures than is done by (Zeng, Zhou et al. 2007). The statistical mechanical description of multilayer adsorption culminating in the BET adsorption isotherm for aqueous electrolytes as developed by Ally and Braunstein (Ally and Braunstein 1993) is used to predict the liquidus behavior of CaCl2-H2O across the entire composition range (from the melting point of pure water to the melting point of anhydrous calcium chloride), including possible metastable crystalline phases. The method requires as input the two BET parameters r, the statistically averaged number of adsorption sites and ?, the energy of adsorption of water in excess of the energy of condensation of pure water. Usually it suffices to keep r and ? constant, typically evaluated at 298.15 K, but in the case of CaCl2-H2O, it is found that both r and ? must be considered temperature dependent in order to predict the liquidus curve, eutectic and peritectic points with reasonable accuracy over the large temperature and compositional range for this binary system.

  17. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt....

  18. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172...Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt....

  19. Effect of calcium chloride addition on ice cream structure and quality.

    PubMed

    Costa, F F; Resende, J V; Abreu, L R; Goff, H D

    2008-06-01

    The influence of calcium fortification by the addition of calcium chloride on quality parameters of ice cream based on physical properties was investigated, as was the effect of kappa-carrageenan at modifying the effects of this calcium fortification. Four ice cream mixes of conventional composition, with added kappa-carrageenan (0 or 0.025%) and added calcium chloride (0 or 4.4 g L(-1) = 40 mM of added Ca(2+)), were prepared. Modulated temperature-differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of calcium chloride on the nucleation temperature, enthalpy of melting, and freezing point depression. The protein composition of 15.4% (wt/wt) reconstituted skim milk powder solutions with or without 4.4 g L(-1) added CaCl(2) and in the supernatant after ultracentrifugation was determined. Fat particle size distributions in ice cream were characterized by light scattering. Ice crystal sizes before and after temperature cycling were determined by cold-stage light microscopy. The results demonstrated that the addition of calcium chloride led to a substantial increase in ice crystal sizes and in fat partial coalescence, which were exacerbated by the addition of kappa-carrageenan. These results can be explained by the interaction between Ca(2+) ions and casein micelles, rather than any effects on freezing point depression. The calcium ions led to a more compact micelle, less serum beta-casein, and high fat destabilization, all of which would be expected to reduce macromolecular structure and volume occupancy in the unfrozen phase, which led to increased rates of ice recrystallization. PMID:18487638

  20. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  1. Calcium Chloride in Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition Solutions with and without Added Cysteine: Compatibility Studies Using Laser and Micro-Flow Imaging Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Robert K.; Christensen, J. Mark; Alshahrani, Sultan M.; Mohamed, Sumeia M.; Clark, Sara M.; Nason, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Ying Xing

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies of compatibility of calcium chloride (CaCl2) and phosphates have not included particle counts in the range specified by the United States Pharmacopeia. Micro-flow imaging techniques have been shown to be comparable to light obscuration when determining particle count and size in pharmaceutical solutions. Objective The purpose of this study was to do compatibility testing for parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions containing CaCl2 using dynamic light scattering and micro-flow imaging techniques. Methods Solutions containing TrophAmine (Braun Medical Inc, Irvine, CA), CaCl2, and sodium phosphate (NaPhos) were compounded with and without cysteine. All solutions contained standard additives to neonatal PN solutions including dextrose, trace metals, and electrolytes. Control solutions contained no calcium or phosphate. Solutions were analyzed for particle size and particle count. Means of Z-average particle size and particle counts of controls were determined. Study solutions were compared to controls and United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Chapter 788 guidelines. The maximum amount of Phos that was compatible in solutions that contained at least 10 mmol/L of Ca in 2.5% amino acids (AA) was determined. Compatibility of these solutions was verified by performing analyses of 5 repeats of these solutions. Microscopic analyses of the repeats were also performed. Results Amounts of CaCl2 and NaPhos that were compatible in solutions containing 1.5%, 2%, 2.5%, and 3% AA were determined. The maximum amount of NaPhos that could be added to TrophAmine solutions of > = 2.5% AA containing at least 10 mmol/L of CaCl2 was 7.5 mmol/L. Adding 50 mg/dL of cysteine increased the amount of NaPhos that could be added to solutions containing 10 mmol/L of CaCl2 to 10 mmol/L. Conclusion Calcium chloride can be added to neonatal PN solutions containing NaPhos in concentrations that can potentially provide an intravenous intake of adequate amounts of calcium and phosphorus. PMID:26317344

  2. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  7. Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22 in Calcium Chloride and in Calcium Chloride Plus Calcium Nitrate Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K J; Day, S D; Ilevbare, G O; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-05-13

    Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is a nickel-based alloy, which is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) brines and to evaluate the inhibitive effect of nitrate, especially to localized corrosion. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion potential of Alloy 22 was approximately -360 mV in the silver-silver chloride (SSC) scale and independent of the tested temperature. Cyclic polarization tests showed that Alloy 22 was mainly susceptible to localized attack in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} at 75 C and higher temperatures. The addition of nitrate in a molar ratio of chloride to nitrate equal to 10 increased the onset of localized corrosion to approximately 105 C. The addition of nitrate to the solution also decreased the uniform corrosion rate and the passive current of the alloy.

  8. Single-Crystal Calcium Hexaboride Nanowires: Synthesis and

    E-print Network

    and by reaction of calcium chloride (CaCl2) with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at 500 °C in an autoclave for 8 h.23Single-Crystal Calcium Hexaboride Nanowires: Synthesis and Characterization Terry T. Xu, Jian, Illinois 60612 Received August 17, 2004 ABSTRACT Catalyst-assisted growth of single-crystal calcium

  9. Dynamics of calcium regulation of chloride currents in Xenopus oocytes

    E-print Network

    Dynamics of calcium regulation of chloride currents in Xenopus oocytes AKINORI KURUMA AND H. CRISS-3030 Kuruma, Akinori, and H. Criss Hartzell. Dynamics of calcium regulation of chloride currents in Xenopus-23187; store-operated calcium entry INCREASES IN CYTOSOLIC Ca can occur by Ca influx from

  10. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40 Section 415.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  11. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40 Section 415.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  12. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40 Section 415.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  13. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40 Section 415.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  14. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40 Section 415.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  15. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The...

  16. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The...

  17. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. 415.40...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. The...

  18. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory....

  19. 40 CFR 415.40 - Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...true Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory. 415...CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.40 Applicability; description of the calcium chloride production subcategory....

  20. POSTHARVEST CALCIUM CHLORIDE DIPS OF WHOLE TOMATO FRUIT REDUCE POSTHARVEST DECAY UNDER COMMERCIAL CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research showed that mature green tomato fruit dipped 1 to 4 minutes in a 1% CaCl2 solutions before storage had significantly increased peel calcium content and reduced postharvest decay. The present experiments, conducted over 3-day periods (reps), evaluate treatment effectiveness under c...

  1. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for special dietary uses in accordance with good manufacturing practice and under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is of the d (dextrorotatory) or the...

  2. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for special dietary uses in accordance with good manufacturing practice and under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is of the d (dextrorotatory) or the...

  3. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for special dietary uses in accordance with good manufacturing practice and under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is of the d (dextrorotatory) or the...

  4. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for special dietary uses in accordance with good manufacturing practice and under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is of the d (dextrorotatory) or the...

  5. Optical absorption and heating rate dependent glass transition in vanadyl doped calcium oxy-chloride borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, M. S.; Khasa, S.; Agarwal, A.

    2015-04-01

    Some important results pertaining to optical and thermal properties of vanadyl doped oxy-halide glasses in the chemical composition CaCl2-CaO-B2O3 are discussed. These glasses have been prepared by conventional melt quench technique. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles the amorphous nature of the doped glasses has been confirmed. The electronic polarizability is calculated and found to increase with increase in chloride content. The optical absorption spectra have been recorded in the frequency range of 200-3200 nm. Recorded spectra are analyzed to evaluate cut-off wavelength (?cut-off), optical band gap (Eg), band tailing (B), Urbach energy (?E) and refractive index (n). Thermal analysis has been carried out for the prepared glasses at three different heating rates viz. 5, 10 and 20 °C/min. The glass transition temperature (Tg) along with thermal activation energy (Ea) corresponding to each heating rate are evaluated from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermographs. It is found that Ea decrease and Tg increase with increase in heating rate. The variation in Tg is also observed with the substitution of calcium chloride in place of calcium oxide. The increasing and higher values of Ea suggest that prepared glasses have good thermal stability. Variation in Tg and Eg suggests that Cl- anions enter into the voids of borate network at low concentrations (<5.0%) and contribute to the network formation at high concentration (>5.0%).

  6. Effect of pre-harvest calcium chloride applications on fruit calcium level and post-harvest anthracnose disease of papaya

    E-print Network

    Biggs, Alan R.

    Effect of pre-harvest calcium chloride applications on fruit calcium level and post. Calcium chloride at 1%, 1.5% and 2.0% concentrations significantly decreased spore germination. Calcium October 2013 Keywords: Papaya Anthracnose Calcium Disease incidence Disease severity a b s t r a c

  7. Commercial scale cucumber fermentations brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate low salt, calcium chloride fermentation to commercial scale production. A...

  8. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generation of waste water containing sodium chloride from cucumber fermentation tank yards could be eliminated if cucumbers were fermented in brines that did not contain this salt. To determine if this is feasible, cucumbers were fermented in brines that contained only calcium chloride to maintain f...

  9. Preparation and Characterization of a Calcium Phosphate Ceramic for the Immobilization of Chloride-containing Intermediate Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Brian; Donald, Ian W.; Scheele, Randall D.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2003-12-01

    Attention has recently been given to the immobilization of special categories of radioactive wastes, some of which contain high concentrations of actinide chlorides. Although vitrification in phosphate glass has been proposed, this was rejected because of the high losses of chloride. On the basis of non-radioactive and, more recently, radioactive studies, we have shown that calcium phosphate is an effective host for immobilizing the chloride constituents [1]. In this instance, the chlorine is retained as chloride, rather than evolved as a chlorine-bearing gas. The immobilized product is in the form of a free-flowing, non-hygroscopic powder, in which the chlorides are chemically combined within the mineral phases chlorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3Cl] and spodiosite [Ca2(PO4)Cl]. Data from studies on non-radioactive simulated waste consisting of a mixture of CaCl2 and SmCl3, and radioactive simulated waste composed of CaCl2 with PuCl3 or PuCl3 and AmCl3, are presented and compared. The XRD data confirm the presence of chlorapatite and spodiosite in the non-radioactive and radioactive materials. The durability of all specimens was measured with a modified MCC-1 test. Releases of Cl after 28 days were 1.6 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive specimens and 7 x 10-3 g m-2 for the Pu-bearing specimens. Releases of Ca after 28 days were 0.3 x 10-3 and 2.0 x 10-3 g m-2 for the non-radioactive composition and the Pu composition, respectively, whilst release of Pu from the radioactive specimens was lower for the mixed Pu/Am specimen at 1.2 x 10-5g m-2. The release of Am from the mixed Pu/Am composition was exceptionally low at 2.4 x 10-7 g m-2. Overall, the release rate data suggest that the ceramics dissolve congruently, followed by precipitation of Sm, Pu and Am as less soluble phases, possibly oxides or phosphates. The differences in behaviour noted between non-radioactive and radioactive specimens are interpreted in terms of the crystal chemistry of the individual systems.

  10. Skin injuries afflicting three oil workers following contact with calcium bromide and/or calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Saeed, W R; Distante, S; Holmes, J D; Kolhe, P S

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bromide brine is a highly concentrated aqueous solution of calcium bromide and calcium chloride. It is used extensively in the oil industry. This solution and its components are recognized as causes of skin injury and information is available from the manufacturers on their safe use and handling. Two patients who were injured following unprotected skin exposure to this solution and one patient who was injured following exposure to calcium chloride powder are reported. All sustained skin injuries characterised by an absence of pain and a delayed clinical appearance of the full extent of the injury. Furthermore healing was complicated by graft loss or was slow. Although organic bromine compounds are recognized as a cause of skin injuries, no previous reports of such injuries to humans secondary to calcium chloride or bromide exposure were found in the medical literature. Our experience with these patients is described. PMID:9568340

  11. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for special dietary uses in accordance with good manufacturing practice and under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive is of the d (dextrorotatory) or the dl (racemic) form. (b) To assure safe...

  12. The calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 1 contributes to the regulation of renal function

    E-print Network

    Witzgall, Ralph - Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät III

    The calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 1 contributes to the regulation of renal function¨tsklinikum Mu¨nster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus, Mu¨nster, Germany The role of calcium-activated chloride channels identified calcium-activated chloride channels, Anoctamin 1 (Ano1, TMEM16A) in human and mouse proximal

  13. Author's personal copy Submicron spheres of amorphous calcium phosphate forming in a stirred

    E-print Network

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    , Catalog No: C79), magnesium chloride hexahydrate (N99.5%, MgCl2·6- H2O, Fisher, No: AC19753), potassium.1. Materials and solution preparation Calcium chloride dihydrate (N99.5%, CaCl2·2H2O, Fisher Scientific chloride (N99.5%, KCl, Sigma, No: P3911), sodium hydrogen carbonate (N99.9%, NaHCO3, Merck, No: 106329

  14. Uptake of chloride and carbonate ions by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2012-08-15

    Decommissioning of old nuclear reactors may produce waste streams containing chlorides and carbonates, including radioactive {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Their insolubilization by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate was investigated. Carbonates were readily depleted from the solution, giving at thermodynamic equilibrium monocarboaluminate, monocarboaluminate + calcite, or calcite only, depending on the initial ratio between the anion and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate. Chloride ions reacted more slowly and were precipitated as Kuzel's salt, Kuzel's and Friedel's salts, or Friedel's salt only. Rietveld refinement of X-Ray powder diffraction patterns was successfully used to quantify the phase distributions, which were compared to thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, analysing the lattice parameters of Kuzel's salt as a function of its chloride content showed the occurrence of a restricted solid solution towards the sulfate side with general formula 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}xCaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}(1 - x)CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}(12 - 2x){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (0.36 {<=} x {<=} 0.50).

  15. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    McFeeters, Roger F; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys

    2010-04-01

    Waste water containing high levels of NaCl from cucumber fermentation tank yards is a continuing problem for the pickled vegetable industry. A major reduction in waste salt could be achieved if NaCl were eliminated from the cucumber fermentation process. The objectives of this project were to ferment cucumbers in brine containing CaCl(2) as the only salt, to determine the course of fermentation metabolism in the absence of NaCl, and to compare firmness retention of cucumbers fermented in CaCl(2) brine during subsequent storage compared to cucumbers fermented in brines containing both NaCl and CaCl(2) at concentrations typically used in commercial fermentations. The major metabolite changes during fermentation without NaCl were conversion of sugars in the fresh cucumbers primarily to lactic acid which caused pH to decrease to less than 3.5. This is the same pattern that occurs when cucumbers are fermented with NaCl as the major brining salt. Lactic acid concentration and pH were stable during storage and there was no detectable production of propionic acid or butyric acid that would indicate growth of spoilage bacteria. Firmness retention in cucumbers fermented with 100 to 300 mM CaCl(2) during storage at a high temperature (45 degrees C) was not significantly different from that obtained in fermented cucumbers with 1.03 M NaCl and 40 mM CaCl(2). In closed jars, cucumber fermentations with and without NaCl in the fermentation brine were similar both in the chemical changes caused by the fermentative microorganisms and in the retention of firmness in the fermented cucumbers. PMID:20492282

  16. Histological effects of calcium chloride in stored apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature apples, Malus domestica Borkh., cv. 'Golden Delicious' were immersed for 2 min in 0, 0.14, 0.27, or 0.41 mol L-1 (0, 2%, 4%, or 6%, respectively) aqueous solutions (w/v) of CaCl2 at 0 or 68.95 Kpa, and stored at 0°C. Histological samples of peel/cortex were taken at harvest and at four month...

  17. The CaCl2 transition in Stishovite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. E.

    2001-12-01

    Rutile-structured SiO2, or stishovite, has been the subject of intense theoretical study for the development and testing of theoretical methods.1 The pressure induced phase transition of stishovite to the CaCl2 structure is one of the few cases of phase transitions predicted from first-principles electronic structure theory before being proven experimentally. Such tests are important, because one does not know to what level to trust theoretical predictions unless there are test predictions that are fulfilled. There were some indications of a phase transition from earlier ionic model calculations,3 but confidence in the predicted pressure was low because the model was not sufficiently accurate for the equation of state. Then, Linearized Augmented Plane Wave (LAPW) calculations, which make no assumptions abouyt ionicity, were performed for SiO2, and clearly showed an elastic instability at about 45 GPa.2 Non-hydrostatic experiments showed evidence for a transition, but at about 100 GPa.4 Raman experiments showed softening of the B1g Raman mode frequency, which, if extrapolated, would vanish at about 100 GPa.5 Theory predicted an transition, where the elastic anomaly c11-c12=0, at which point the Raman mode would begin to increase in frequency. A hydrostatic single crystal Raman experiment was done to higher pressures, and the transition was found at about 45-50 GPa, and the Raman spectra were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.5 Single crystal hydrostatic x-ray studies have verified the transition, and showed that the transition is weakly first-order, with some hysteresis.7 Progress in theoretical studies of stishovite and the transition will be reviewed. 1 Cohen, R. E. In: Silica: Physical Behavior, Geochemistry, and Materials Applications. P. Heaney, C. T. Prewitt and G. V. Gibbs. Washington, D.C., Mineralogical Society of America. 29: 369-402, 1994. 2 Cohen, R. E., In: High Pressure Research in Mineral Physics: Application to Earth and Planetary Science. M. H. Manghnani and Y. Syono. Washington, D.C., AGU: 425-432, 1992. 3 Cohen, R. E. Geophys. Res. Lett. 14: 37-40, 1987. 4 Tsuchida, Y. and T. Yagi, Nature 340: 217-220, 1989. 5 Hemley, R. J., In: High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics. M. H. Manghnani and Y. Syono. Tokyo, Terra Scientific: 347-359, 1987. 6 Kingma, K. J., R. E. Cohen, R. J. Hemley and H. K. Mao, Nature 374: 243-245, 1995. 7 Hemley, R. J., J. Shu, M. A. Carpenter, J. Hu, H. K. Mao and K. J. Kingma, Solid State Comm. 114: 527-532, 2000.

  18. Repassivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Sodium and Calcium Chloride Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Ilevbare, G O; Carranza, R M

    2007-08-11

    A comprehensive matrix of 60 tests was designed to explore the effect of calcium chloride vs. sodium chloride and the ratio R of nitrate concentration over chloride concentration on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22. Tests were conducted using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique at 75 C and at 90 C. Results show that at a ratio R of 0.18 and higher nitrate was able to inhibit the crevice corrosion in Alloy 22 induced by chloride. Current results fail to show in a consistent way a different effect on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22 for calcium chloride solutions than for sodium chloride solutions.

  19. Liquid Calcium Chloride Solar Storage: Concept and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Quinnell, J. A.; Davidson, J. H.; Burch, J.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous calcium chloride has a number of potential advantages as a compact and long-term solar storage medium compared to sensibly heated water. The combination of sensible and chemical binding energy of the liquid desiccant provides higher energy densities and lower thermal losses, as well as a temperature lift during discharge via an absorption heat pump. Calcium chloride is an excellent choice among desiccant materials because it is relatively inexpensive, non-toxic, and environmentally safe. This paper provides an overview of its application for solar storage and presents a novel concept for storing the liquid desiccant in a single storage vessel. The storage system uses an internal heat exchanger to add and discharge thermal energy and to help manage the mass, momentum, and energy transfer in the tank. The feasibility of the proposed concept is demonstrated via a computational fluid dynamic study of heat and mass transfer in the system over a range of Rayleigh, Lewis, Prandtl, and buoyancy ratio numbers expected in practice.

  20. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Mixed with Normal Saline, Calcium Chloride or KY Jelly as Apical Plug in Simulated Open Apices: An In vitro Microleakage Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Akhavan, Hengameh; Ghasemi, Sara; Khodaei, Fatemeh; Tour Savadkouhi, Sohrab; Dianat, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) mixed with normal saline has short working time, delayed setting time, and poor consistency when used as an apical plug. A preliminary study suggested that substituting normal saline with KY Jelly or 5% calcium chloride (CaCl2) as a vehicle expedites the setting time of MTA. The present in vitro study compared the microleakage of ProRoot MTA mixed with normal saline (MS) to that of ProRoot MTA mixed with KY Jelly and/or 5% CaCl2 in simulated canals with open apices. Materials and methods: Thirty six single-rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned and shaped with ProTaper rotary system to make 36 standardized artificially created open apices. Teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=10) and two control groups (n=3). In group 1, MTA was mixed with normal saline (MS) and placed into the canals to form 4 to 5 mm apical plugs. In group 2, MTA was mixed with 5% CaCl2 (MC) and in group 3, MTA was mixed with KY Jelly (MK). The other two groups served as positive and negative controls. The remaining canal spaces in the experimental groups were backfilled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without sealer. Dye penetration and clearing was used to evaluate the sealing ability of each group. The samples were then examined under stereomicroscope to measure the microleakage of different MTA mixtures in mm. Data were statistically analyzed using One-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for determination of normal distribution and then by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests to detect any significance. Results: Positive and negative controls responded as expected. The MS group showed the least mean dye penetration value. There was a significant difference between MS with other groups (P<0.05) but no difference was found between MC and MK groups. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, we can conclude that among these three vehicles, normal saline mixed with ProRoot MTA has the least amount of microleakage in canals with open apices. PMID:24396375

  1. Antimicrobial Effect of Calcium Chloride Alone and Combined with Lactic Acid Injected into Chicken Breast Meat

    PubMed Central

    Alahakoon, Amali U.; Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Chicken breast meat was injected with calcium chloride alone and in combination with lactic acid (0.01% and 0.002%, respectively). The inhibitory effects of the treatments on microbial growth were determined in the injected chicken breast meat stored at 4°C under aerobic packaging condition for 0, 3, and 7 d. Calcium chloride combined with 0.002% and 0.01% lactic acid reduced microbial counts by 0.14 and 1.08 Log CFU/g, respectively, however, calcium chloride alone was unable to inhibit microbial growth. Calcium chloride combined with 0.01% lactic acid was the most effective antimicrobial treatment and resulted in the highest initial redness value. Calcium chloride alone and combined with lactic acid suppressed changes in pH and the Hunter color values during storage. However, injection of calcium chloride and lactic acid had adverse effects on lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics. The higher TBARS values were observed in samples treated with calcium chloride and lactic acid when compared to control over the storage period. Addition of calcium chloride and lactic acid resulted in lower sensory scores for parameters tested, except odor and color, compared to control samples. Therefore, the formulation should be improved in order to overcome such defects prior to industrial application.

  2. AMMONIUM CHLORIDE DECALCIFICATION, AS MODIFIED BY CALCIUM INTAKE: THE RELATION BETWEEN GENERALIZED OSTEOPOROSIS AND OSTITIS FIBROSA

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Henry L.; Bodansky, Aaron; Chandler, Joseph P.

    1932-01-01

    1. In all age groups the effects of ammonium chloride administration were found to be strikingly dependent upon the calcium intake. 2. Dogs receiving an adequate calcium diet and ammonium chloride showed less decalcification than those receiving a low calcium diet with or without ammonium chloride. 3. In the younger groups the added effect of ammonium chloride to calcium-low diet brought out more striking changes than a low calcium diet alone. 4. When the decalcification was less severe—in the oldest dogs on the low calcium diet with or without ammonium chloride, and in the younger dogs on an adequate calcium intake with ammonium chloride —generalized thinning of the bones without marrow fibrosis resulted (osteoporosis). 5. When the decalcification was rapid and severe—in the youngest dogs on low calcium diet, particularly with ammonium chloride— generalized decalcification and secondary marrow fibrosis resulted (ostitis fibrosa). 6. Generalized ostitis fibrosa is a rather inclusive term and may be applied to the histologic picture which results when clinical or experimental decalcification is rapid, and therefore leads to extensive marrow fibrosis. 7. The special underlying causes of the decalcification may incidentally contribute features to modify the generalized osteoporosis or ostitis fibrosa as in rickets and in von Recklinghausen's disease. PMID:19870105

  3. Structures and spectroscopic characterization of calcium chloride-nicotinamide, -isonicotinamide, -picolinamide and praseodymium bromide-nicotinamide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Junhui; Jiang, Ye; Li, Weihong; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Zhang, Gaohui; Bu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2015-02-01

    The coordination structures formed by calcium complexes with nicotinamide (na), isonicotinamide (ina) and picolinamide (pa) and praseodymium bromide-na are reported. The structures of CaCl2·(C6H6N2O)2·2H2O (Ca-na), CaCl2·(C6H6N2O)2·4H2O (Ca-ina), CaCl2·(C6H6N2O)2·5H2O (Ca-pa) and PrBr3·(C6H6N2O)2·6H2O (PrBr-na) in the solid state have been characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectroscopies. Carbonyl oxygen of nicotinamide is coordinated to Ca2+, but it is O-monodentate (carbonyl oxygen) and N,O-bidentate ligand (pyridyl nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen) for Pr3+ to form a chain structure in PrBr-na. For isonicotinamide, only carbonyl oxygen atom is coordinated to Ca2+. Pyridyl nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of picolinamide are coordinated to Ca2+ to form a five-membered ring structure. The crystal structure and spectroscopic results indicate the differences of the coordination of Ca and Pr ions, the changes of hydrogen bonds and conformation of the ligands induced by complexation. Unlike transition metal ions, Sr2+ or lanthanide ions, Ca2+ is inclined to coordinate to carbonyl oxygen atoms of the ligands.

  4. Structures and spectroscopic characterization of calcium chloride-nicotinamide, -isonicotinamide, -picolinamide and praseodymium bromide-nicotinamide complexes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junhui; Jiang, Ye; Li, Weihong; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Zhang, Gaohui; Bu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2015-02-25

    The coordination structures formed by calcium complexes with nicotinamide (na), isonicotinamide (ina) and picolinamide (pa) and praseodymium bromide-na are reported. The structures of CaCl2·(C6H6N2O)2·2H2O (Ca-na), CaCl2·(C6H6N2O)2·4H2O (Ca-ina), CaCl2·(C6H6N2O)2·5H2O (Ca-pa) and PrBr3·(C6H6N2O)2·6H2O (PrBr-na) in the solid state have been characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction, FTIR, FIR, THz and Raman spectroscopies. Carbonyl oxygen of nicotinamide is coordinated to Ca(2+), but it is O-monodentate (carbonyl oxygen) and N,O-bidentate ligand (pyridyl nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen) for Pr(3+) to form a chain structure in PrBr-na. For isonicotinamide, only carbonyl oxygen atom is coordinated to Ca(2+). Pyridyl nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of picolinamide are coordinated to Ca(2+) to form a five-membered ring structure. The crystal structure and spectroscopic results indicate the differences of the coordination of Ca and Pr ions, the changes of hydrogen bonds and conformation of the ligands induced by complexation. Unlike transition metal ions, Sr(2+) or lanthanide ions, Ca(2+) is inclined to coordinate to carbonyl oxygen atoms of the ligands. PMID:25280333

  5. Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash 

    E-print Network

    Choi, Hyung Jun

    2006-10-30

    On-going research at Texas A&M University indicated that soil stabilization using calcium chloride filter cake along with Class F fly ash generates high strength. Previous studies were conducted with samples containing ...

  6. Alpha-adrenergic stimulation activates a calcium-sensitive chloride current in brown fat cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The first response of brown adipocytes to adrenergic stimulation is a rapid depolarizing conductance increase mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors. We used patch recording techniques on cultured brown fat cells from neonatal rats to characterize this conductance. Measurements in perforated patch clamped cells showed that fast depolarizing responses were frequent in cells maintained in culture for 1 d or less, but were seen less often in cells cultured for longer periods. Ion substitution showed that the depolarization was due to a selective increase in membrane chloride permeability. The reversal potential for the depolarizing current in perforated patch clamped cells indicated that intracellular chloride concentrations were significantly higher than expected if chloride were passively distributed. The chloride conductance could be activated by increases in intracellular calcium, either by exposing intact cells to the ionophore A23187 or by using pipette solutions with free calcium levels of 0.2-1.0 microM in whole- cell configuration. The chloride conductance did not increase monotonically with increases in intracellular calcium, and going whole cell with pipette-free calcium concentrations > or = 10 microM rapidly inactivated the current. The chloride currents ran down in whole-cell recordings using intracellular solutions of various compositions, and were absent in excised patches. These findings imply that cytoplasmic factors in addition to intracellular calcium are involved in regulation of the chloride conductance. The chloride currents could be blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid with IC50s of 3 and 7 microM, or by higher concentrations of SITS (IC50 = 170 microM), DIDS (IC50 = 50 microM), or 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (IC50 = 80 microM). The chloride conductance activated in whole cell by intracellular calcium had the permeability sequence PNOS > PI > PBr > PCl >> Paspartate, measured from either reversal potentials or conductances. Instantaneous current-voltage relations for the calcium-activated chloride currents were linear in symmetric chloride solutions. Much of the current was time and voltage independent and active at all membrane potentials between -100 and +100 mV, but an additional component of variable amplitude showed time-dependent activation with depolarization. Volume- sensitive chloride currents were also present in brown fat cells, but differed from the calcium-activated currents in that they responded to cell swelling, required intracellular ATP in whole-cell recordings, showed no sensitivity to intracellular or extracellular calcium levels, and were relatively resistant to block by niflumic and flufenamic acids. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8537817

  7. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride...

  8. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride...

  9. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride...

  10. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false If I am mining calcium chloride, may I... Lease Terms and Conditions § 3511.11 If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride...

  11. Coagulation of ?-conglycinin, glycinin and isoflavones induced by calcium chloride in soymilk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Yu, Chia-Jung; Li, Wen-Tai; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2015-08-01

    The coagulation of ?-conglycinin (7S), glycinin (11S) and isoflavones induced by calcium chloride was investigated. Approximately 92.6% of the soymilk proteins were coagulated into the soymilk pellet fraction (SPF) after the addition of 5?mM calcium chloride. SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis indicated that most of the 7S (?’, ? and ?), 11S acidic (A1a, A1b, A2, A3 and A4) and 11S basic (B1a) proteins in the SSF were coagulated into the SPF after treatment with 5 mM calcium chloride. Isoflavones, including daidzein and genistein, were also coagulated into the SPF after the addition of 5 mM calcium chloride. The amounts of daidzein and genistein in the SSF decreased to 39.4?±?1.6 and 11.8?±?7.0%, respectively. HPLC analysis suggested that daidzein and genistein were bound with 7S and 11S proteins and then were coprecipitated into the SPF by 5?mM calcium chloride.

  12. Coagulation of ?-conglycinin, glycinin and isoflavones induced by calcium chloride in soymilk

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Yu, Chia-Jung; Li, Wen-Tai; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation of ?-conglycinin (7S), glycinin (11S) and isoflavones induced by calcium chloride was investigated. Approximately 92.6% of the soymilk proteins were coagulated into the soymilk pellet fraction (SPF) after the addition of 5?mM calcium chloride. SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis indicated that most of the 7S (?’, ? and ?), 11S acidic (A1a, A1b, A2, A3 and A4) and 11S basic (B1a) proteins in the SSF were coagulated into the SPF after treatment with 5 mM calcium chloride. Isoflavones, including daidzein and genistein, were also coagulated into the SPF after the addition of 5 mM calcium chloride. The amounts of daidzein and genistein in the SSF decreased to 39.4?±?1.6 and 11.8?±?7.0%, respectively. HPLC analysis suggested that daidzein and genistein were bound with 7S and 11S proteins and then were coprecipitated into the SPF by 5?mM calcium chloride. PMID:26260443

  13. Tribological behaviors of graphite sliding against cemented carbide in CaCl2 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fei; Tian, Yu; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuming

    2015-12-01

    The tribological behaviors of graphite sliding against cemented carbide were investigated using a standard tribological tester Plint TE92 in a ring-on-ring contact configuration in both CaCl2 solution and deionized water. An interesting phenomenon occurred: as the CaCl2 solution concentration increased, the friction coefficient firstly decreased and was lower than that in the deionized water, and then gradually increased, exceeding the friction coefficient in the deionized water. The wear rate of the ,graphite also presented the same variation trend. According to the polarization curves of cemented carbide, contact angle measurements, Raman spectrum analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images analysis, the above friction and wear behaviors of graphite sliding against cemented carbide were attributed to the graphite surface wettability and the cemented carbide surface corrosion property.

  14. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  15. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene and calcium chloride treatments on quality maintenance of 'Lingwu Long' Jujube fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Ban, Zhaojun; Li, Xihong; Xue, Ting

    2014-04-01

    'Lingwu Long' jujube (Zizyphus jujuba cv. Mill) fruits were harvested at mature-green stages and then treated with 1.0 ?L L(-1) 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), 1.0% CaCl2 or their combination. All treatments were stored at room temperature (22?±?1 °C) and 80-90% relative humidity (RH) up for 15 days. Results indicated that 1.0 ?L L(-1) 1-MCP, 1.0% CaCl2 or their combination were effective in terms of senescence inhibition, and the storage life was extended by 6, 4 and 9 days, respectively. 1-MCP and CaCl2 treatment had a synergic effect on the inhibition of ethylene production and microbial population of 'Lingwu Long' jujube fruit. The combination of 1-MCP and CaCl2 significantly reduced polygalacturonase (PG) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activities. It also maintained higher concentrations of titratable acid and ascorbic acid. PMID:24741163

  16. Consumer acceptability of cucumber pickles produced by fermentation in calcium chloride brine for reduced environmental impact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation of cucumbers in calcium chloride brine has been proposed as an alternative process to reduce the environmental impact of traditional, high salt fermentations. The objective of this research was to determine whether consumer acceptability of pickle products would be impacted by fermentat...

  17. A Study of the Oral Toxicity of Calcium Chloride in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, L. G.; Pelletier, R. P.

    1966-01-01

    The effects of oral administration of calcium chloride solutions to dairy cows were studied. When a 0.3 per cent solution was given ad libitum, and as the sole source of water for a period of 75 days, we observed no significant changes in feed consumption, body weight or milk production. The average daily water intake was increased by approximately 20 per cent, and signs of slight gastro-intestinal irritation were seen. No major changes in blood hemoglobin levels, hematocrits, total and differential white cell counts or thrombocyte numbers could be attributed to the treatment. We observed no significant effect on the serum calcium, chloride, magnesium, potassium, or sodium content. The level of inorganic phosphate in the serum rose to higher, but still normal values. During the entire experiment the urine pH was abnormally acid for dairy cows. Electrocardiograms were taken after 45 days of calcium chloride administration, and they appeared normal. When 0.1 and 0.2 per cent solutions were given as the sole source of water for a period of 81 days, the cows remained in good condition, and we observed no changes in appetite, body weight or milk production. In general, dairy cows will refuse to drink calcium chloride solutions when the concentration exceeds 0.5 per cent, even when they have been deprived of water for 18-24 hours. On the other hand, since the administration of lower concentrations for periods of 75 and 81 days did not cause any clinical sign of disease, it seems that on farms where more than one source of water are usually available, poisoning of dairy cattle by calcium chloride in solution is quite unlikely. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:4223697

  18. Acoustic attenuation due to transformation twins in CaCl2: Analogue behaviour for stishovite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiying; Schranz, Wilfried; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-09-01

    CaCl2 undergoes a tetragonal (P42/mnm) to orthorhombic (Pnnm) transition as a function of temperature which is essentially the same as occurs in stishovite at high pressures. It can therefore be used as a convenient analogue material for experimental studies. In order to investigate variations in elastic properties associated with the transition and possible anelastic loss behaviour related to the mobility of ferroelastic twin walls in the orthorhombic phase, the transition in polycrystalline CaCl2 has been examined using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) at high frequencies (0.1-1.5 MHz) in the temperature interval 7-626 K, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) at low frequencies (0.1-50 Hz) in the temperature interval 378-771 K. RUS data show steep softening of the shear modulus as the transition temperature is approached from above and substantial acoustic dissipation in the stability field of the orthorhombic structure. DMA data show softening of the storage modulus, which continues through to a minimum ˜20 K below the transition point and is followed by stiffening with further lowering of temperature. There is no obvious acoustic dissipation associated with the transition, as measured by tan ?, however. The elastic softening and stiffening matches the pattern expected for a pseudoproper ferroelastic transition as predicted elsewhere. Acoustic loss behaviour at high frequencies fits with the pattern of behaviour expected for a twin wall loss mechanism but with relaxation times in the vicinity of ˜10-6 s. With such short relaxation times, the shear modulus of CaCl2 at frequencies corresponding to seismic frequencies would include relaxations of the twin walls and is therefore likely to be significantly lower than the intrinsic shear modulus. If these characteristics apply also to twin wall mobility in stishovite, the seismic signature of the orthorhombic phase should be an unusually soft shear modulus but with no increase in attenuation.

  19. The use of a setting accelerator and its effect on pH and calcium ion release of mineral trioxide aggregate and white Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Antunes Bortoluzzi, Eduardo; Juárez Broon, Norberto; Antonio Hungaro Duarte, Marco; de Oliveira Demarchi, Ana Claudia Cardoso; Monteiro Bramante, Clovis

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of adding 10% calcium chloride (CaCl2) indicated as setting accelerator on pH and release of calcium ions of commercially available materials: ProRoot MTA (tooth-colored formula), MTA Branco, and White Portland cement. The products were mixed for 30 seconds in previously established ratios. To estimate the values of pH and release of calcium ion, polyethylene tubes were filled with the materials and immersed in containers with 10 ml of deionized water. The analyses were performed baseline, 30 minutes, 60 minutes, and 24 hours after the mixing process. A pHmeter (MicroNal B 371, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil) and an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Model GBC 904; CG Corp, Melbourne, Australia) equipped with a hollow cathode lamp were used to determine the data. According to the Student's t-test, the comparison between the pure and the CaCl2-added products indicated that the presence of this substance increased immediately the pH, although the results were very similar when they were analyzed in the other intervals. In addition, products with CaCl2 released more calcium ions than pure materials in the 24-hour period (p<0.05). The results revealed that the addition of CaCl2 to MTA enhanced the physicochemical properties of this product. Thus, materials mixed with CaCl2 became easier to handle and needed lower amounts of water in the mixing process. PMID:17174682

  20. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-01-01

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02772.001 PMID:24980701

  1. Electrochemical Behavior of Titanium(II) Ion in a Purified Calcium Chloride Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Min Ho; Song, Jianxun; Zhu, Hongmin; Jiao, Shuqiang

    2015-02-01

    Cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and square wave voltammetry were used to investigate electrochemical behavior of Ti(II) ion in a purified CaCl2 melt at a temperature of 1173 K (900 °C). The result indicated that the cathodic reduction of Ti(II) ion in the melt was a one-step quasi-reversible process controlled by the diffusion. The diffusion coefficient was determined in a CaCl2-TiCl(0.5 mol/dm3) at 1173 K (900 °C). The work also demonstrated the feasibility of producing metallic titanium in the as-prepared CaCl2-TiCl2 melts through galvanostatic electrolysis.

  2. Dye adsorption by calcium chloride treated beech sawdust in batch and fixed-bed systems.

    PubMed

    Batzias, F A; Sidiras, D K

    2004-10-18

    Batch and column kinetics of methylene blue and red basic 22 adsorption on CaCl(2) treated beech sawdust was investigated, using untreated beech sawdust as control, in order to explore its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for wastewater dye removal. The adsorption capacity, estimated according to Freundlich's model, and the adsorption capacity coefficient values, determined using the Bohart and Adams' bed depth service model indicate that CaCl(2) treatment enhanced the adsorption properties of the original material. PMID:15511588

  3. The influence of magnesium chloride on blood and urine parameters in calcium oxalate stone patients.

    PubMed

    Brundig, P; Berg, W; Schneider, H J

    1981-01-01

    The influence of magnesium chloride on various blood and urine parameters in calcium oxalate stone patients is studied. High dose magnesium therapy was found to increase urinary magnesium concentrations, whereas the oxalic acid concentration is reduced. The experiments support the statements on the role of magnesium in endogenous oxalic acid depression and the inhibition of the intestinal resorption. For urolith prevention it will be necessary to apply high magnesium doses of easily absorbable and well-tolerated medicaments. PMID:7461010

  4. Critical behavior of thermal phase transitions of iota-carrageenan in CaCl 2 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbek, Haluk; Pekcan, Önder

    2006-07-01

    In situ photon transmission method was applied to study thermal phase transitions of ?-carrageenan in CaCl 2 solution. Coil-to-helix (c-h) and helix-to-dimer (h-d) transitions were detected upon cooling. An extra dimer-to-dimer (d-d) transition was observed as well during cooling at low-temperature region. Upon heating only dimer-to-helix (d-h) and helix-to-coil (h-c) transitions were detected. Photon transmission intensity, Itr was monitored against temperature to determine several phase transitions and transition temperatures. It was observed that the c-h transition in ?-carrageenan-CaCl 2 system performs a crossover between 3D percolation to classical theory. Upon heating, the specific heat exponent over the d-h transition was extracted from the transmitted intensity data and was found to be 0.045.

  5. Use of a D-optimal design with constrains to quantify the effects of the mixture of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chloride salts on the growth parameters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Chiesa, A; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2008-08-01

    The combined effect of NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), and MgCl(2) on the water activity (a (w)) and the growth parameters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied by means of a D-optimal mixture design with constrains (total salt concentrations < or = 9.0%, w/v). The a (w) was linearly related to the concentrations of the diverse salts; its decrease, by similar concentrations of salts, followed the order NaCl > CaCl(2) > KCl > MgCl(2), regardless of the reference concentrations used (total absence of salts or 5% NaCl). The equations that expressed the maximum specific growth (mu (max)), lag phase duration (lambda), and maximum population reached (N (max)) showed that the values of these parameters depended on linear effects and two-way interactions of the studied chloride salts. The mu (max) decreased as NaCl and CaCl(2) increased (regardless of the presence or not of previous NaCl); however, in the presence of a 5% NaCl, a further addition of KCl and MgCl(2) markedly increased mu (max). The lambda was mainly affected by MgCl(2) and the interactions NaCl x CaCl(2) and CaCl(2) x MgCl(2). The further addition of NaCl and CaCl(2) to a 5% NaCl medium increased the lag phase while KCl and MgCl(2) had negligible or slightly negative effect, respectively. N (max) was mainly affected by MgCl(2) and its interactions with NaCl, KCl, and CaCl(2); MgCl(2) stimulated N (max) in the presence of 5% NaCl while KCl, NaCl, and CaCl(2) had a progressive decreasing effect. These results can be of interest for the fermentation and preservation of vegetable products, and foods in general, in which this yeast could be present. PMID:18465155

  6. Influence of Calcium(II) and Chloride on the Oxidative Reactivity of a Manganese(II) Complex of a Cross-Bridged Cyclen Ligand

    E-print Network

    Hubin, Tim

    Influence of Calcium(II) and Chloride on the Oxidative Reactivity of a Manganese(II) Complex calcium(II) and chloride have been recognized to play significant roles in the catalytic cycle, even(IV) complexes with no chloride ligand present, adding Ca2+ positively shifted the redox potential of the Mn

  7. The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. . E-mail: joanne.hill@nirex.co.uk; Harris, A.W.; Manning, M.; Chambers, A.; Swanton, S.W.

    2006-07-01

    The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 deg. C compared to those prepared at 25 deg. C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium.

  8. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Investigation of Water in Supercritical CO2 and the Effect of CaCl2

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Joly, Alan G.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Dixon, David A.

    2013-01-25

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was applied to investigate the dissolution and chemical interaction of water dissolved into supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and the influence of CaCl2 in the co-existing aqueous phase at fo empe e : 40 50 75 nd 100 C at 90 atm. Consistent with the trend of the vapor pressure of water, the solubility of pure water in scCO2 inc e ed f om 40 ?C (0.32 mole%) o 100 ?C (1.61 mole%). The presence of CaCl2 negatively affects the solubility of water in scCO2: at a given temperature and pressure the solubility of water decreased as the concentration of CaCl2 in the aqueous phase increased, following the trend of the activity of water. A 40 ?C, the water concentration in scCO2 in contact with saturated CaCl2 aqueous solution was only 0.16 mole%, a drop of more than 50% as compared to pure water while that a 100 ?C was 1.12 mole%, a drop of over 30% as compared to pure water, under otherwise the same conditions. Analysis of the spectral profiles suggested that water dissolved into scCO2 exists in the monomeric form under the evaluated temperature and pressure conditions, for both neat water and CaCl2 solutions. However, its rotational degrees of freedom decrease at lower temperatures due to higher fluid densities, leading to formation of weak H2O:CO2 Lewis acid-base complexes. Similarly, the nearly invariant spectral profiles of dissolved water in the presence and absence of saturated CaCl2 under the same experimental conditions was taken as evidence that CaCl2 dissolution in scCO2 was limited as the dissolved Ca2+/CaCl2 would likely be highly hydrated and would alter the overall spectra of waters in the scCO2 phase.

  9. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride...MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING OF SOLID MINERALS OTHER THAN COAL AND OIL SHALE Lease...

  10. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride...MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING OF SOLID MINERALS OTHER THAN COAL AND OIL SHALE Lease...

  11. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride...MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING OF SOLID MINERALS OTHER THAN COAL AND OIL SHALE Lease...

  12. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride...MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LEASING OF SOLID MINERALS OTHER THAN COAL AND OIL SHALE Lease...

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXV: Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Wong, Xiuming

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are widely expressed in various tissues and implicated in physiological processes such as sensory transduction, epithelial secretion, and smooth muscle contraction. Transmembrane proteins with unknown function 16 (TMEM16A) has recently been identified as a major component of CaCCs. Detailed molecular analysis of TMEM16A will be needed to understand its structure-function relationships. The role this channel plays in physiological systems remains to be established and is currently a subject of intense investigation. PMID:22090471

  14. Crystalline transition and morphology variation of polyamide 6/CaCl2 composite during the decomplexation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoxuan; Zhang, Chengfeng; Proniewicz, Edyta; Proniewicz, Leonard M.; Kim, Younkyoo; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Yizhuang; Wu, Jinguang

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we developed a new method to prepare porous PA6 with different morphologic feature and crystalline forms via the decomplexation of PA6/CaCl2 composite. The structures and morphology of thus obtained materials were characterized by vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR and Raman) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) method. When amorphous PA6/CaCl2 composite films were treated in water at room temperature, PA6 re-arranges into ? form. However, decomplexation of the PA6/CaCl2 composite in boiling water produces PA6 in ? crystalline form. If the PA6/CaCl2 composite is soaked in methanol, part of PA6 is dissolved or swollen in methanol/metal salt solutions. As a result, a dissolve/precipitation process occurred during the decomplexation process, which led to the formation of PA6 in ? crystalline form. Further investigation demonstrates that the morphologies of the porous PA6 could be adjusted by using different solvents and/or different decomplexation conditions.

  15. Crystalline transition and morphology variation of polyamide 6/CaCl2 composite during the decomplexation process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoxuan; Zhang, Chengfeng; Proniewicz, Edyta; Proniewicz, Leonard M; Kim, Younkyoo; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Ying; Xu, Yizhuang; Wu, Jinguang

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we developed a new method to prepare porous PA6 with different morphologic feature and crystalline forms via the decomplexation of PA6/CaCl2 composite. The structures and morphology of thus obtained materials were characterized by vibrational spectroscopy (FT-IR and Raman) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) method. When amorphous PA6/CaCl2 composite films were treated in water at room temperature, PA6 re-arranges into ? form. However, decomplexation of the PA6/CaCl2 composite in boiling water produces PA6 in ? crystalline form. If the PA6/CaCl2 composite is soaked in methanol, part of PA6 is dissolved or swollen in methanol/metal salt solutions. As a result, a dissolve/precipitation process occurred during the decomplexation process, which led to the formation of PA6 in ? crystalline form. Further investigation demonstrates that the morphologies of the porous PA6 could be adjusted by using different solvents and/or different decomplexation conditions. PMID:23892342

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Non-surgical Sterilization of Male Cats with Single Intra-testicular Injection of Calcium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Calcium chloride solution is an established injectable sterilant in dogs and other mammals. With cat populations a continuing problem, we sought to explore its first use in cats. Six cats per group were injected with 5%, 10% or 20% calcium chloride dihydrate in saline solution with lignocaine hydrochloride, a local anaesthetic. Results At the 60th day post-injection, cat testes were collected and showed complete testicular necrosis and replacement by fibrous tissue; very low sperm counts; and reduction of serum testosterone by at least 70% in 20% dose. Androgenic enzyme activities and their expressions were also reduced in all the treated groups along with intra-testicular testosterone concentration was also low. Increased testicular lipid peroxidation, with reduced antioxidants and mitochondrial membrane potential, were evident following calcium chloride treatments. However, there were no apparent changes in serum concentrations of cortisol, fasting blood sugar level, blood urea nitrogen, packed cell volume, or total serum protein following calcium chloride injection, suggesting that this method of sterilization is not associated with any general stress response. Conclusion Calcium chloride solution demonstrates potential for androgenesis-eliminating nonsurgical sterilization of male cats in addition to its proven efficacy in dogs and other mammals. PMID:21774835

  17. Origin of CaCl2 brines by basalt-seawater interaction: Insights provided by some simple mass balance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Lawrence A.

    1983-06-01

    Modern rift zone hydrothermal brines are typically CaCl2-bearing brines, an unusual chemical signature they share with certain oil field brines, fluid inclusions in ore minerals and a few uncommon saline lakes. Many origins have been suggested for such CaCl2 brines but in the Reykjanes, Iceland, geothermal system a strong empirical case can be made for a basalt-seawater interaction origin. To examine this mechanism of CaCl2 brine evolution some simple mass balance calculations were carried out. Average Reykjanes olivine tholeiite was “reacted” with average North Atlantic seawater to make an albite-chlorite-epidotesphene rock using Al2O3 as the conservative rock component and Cl as the conservative fluid component. The excess components released by the basalt to the fluid were “precipitated” at 275° C as quartz, calcite, anhydrite, magnetite and pyrite to complete the conversion to greenstone. The resulting fluid was a CaCl2 brine of seawater chlorinity with a composition remarkably similar to the actual Reykjanes brine at 1750 m depth. Thus, the calculations strongly support the idea that the Reykjanes CaCl2 brines result from “closed system” oceanic basalt-seawater interaction (albitization — chloritization mechanism) at greenschist facies temperatures. The calculation gives a seawater: basalt mass ratio of 3?1 to 4?1 (vol. ratio of 9?1 to 12?1), in keeping with experimental results, submarine vent data and with ocean crust cooling calculations. The brine becomes anoxic because there is insufficient dissolved or combined oxygen to balance all the Fe released from the basalt during alteration. Large excesses of Ca are released to the fluid and precipitate out in the form of anhydrite which essentially sweeps the brine free of sulfate leaving an elevated Ca concentration. The calculated rock-water interaction basically involves Na + Mg + SO4 ? Ca + K, simulating chemical differences observed between oceanic basalts and greenstones from many mid-ocean ridges.

  18. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake and implications for Mars

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, James L.; Head, James W.; Levy, Joseph S.; Marchant, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery on Mars of recurring slope lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral water in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Antarctica, and is adjacent to several steep-sloped water tracks, the closest analog for RSL. The source of DJP has been interpreted to be deep groundwater. We present time-lapse data and meteorological measurements that confirm deliquescence within the DJP watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines that control summertime water levels. Groundwater input was not observed. In addition to providing an analog for RSL formation, CaCl2 brines and chloride deposits in basins may provide clues to the origin of ancient chloride deposits on Mars dating from the transition period from “warm/wet” to “cold/dry” climates. PMID:23378901

  19. Protective effect of a calcium channel blocker "diltiazem" on aluminum chloride-induced dementia in mice.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anu; Neha; Sodhi, Rupinder K; Kaur, Amanpreet

    2015-11-01

    Many studies report that heavy metals such as aluminum are involved in amyloid beta aggregation and neurotoxicity. Further, high concentration of aluminum in the brain deregulates calcium signaling which contributes to synaptic dysfunction and halts neuronal communication which ultimately leads to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker clinically used in angina, is reported to decrease amyloid beta production by inhibiting calcium influx, decreasing inflammation and oxidative stress. However, the probable role of this drug in aluminum chloride (AlCl3)-induced experimental dementia is yet to be explored. Therefore, the present study is designed to investigate the effect of AlCl3-induced dementia in mice. Morris water maze test and elevated plus maze were utilized to evaluate learning and memory. Various biochemical estimations including brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), brain total protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) level, reduced glutathione (GSH) level, nitrate/nitrite, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. AlCl3 significantly impaired learning and memory and increased brain AChE, brain total protein, TBARS, and nitrate/nitrite and decreased brain GSH or SOD. On the other hand, treatment with diltiazem significantly reversed AlCl3-induced behavioral and biochemical deficits. The present study indicates the beneficial role of diltiazem in AlCl3-induced dementia. PMID:26142889

  20. Effect of aluminum chloride, -citrate, and -maltol on the calcium-mediated degradation of neurofilament proteins.

    PubMed

    Van Ginkel, M F; Heijink, E; Dekker, P B; Miralem, T; van der Voet, G B; de Wolff, F A

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) has been observed to cause neurofilament protein accumulation in both experimental animals and cultured cells. Impairment of axonal transport is thought to be a mechanism of toxicity. Inhibition of the degradation of neurofilament proteins, however, resulting in accumulation of these proteins may be an alternative mechanism for Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of calcium (Ca) on the proteolysis of the neurofilament triplet proteins by calcium-activated neutral proteases (CANP) was studied in the isolated sciatic nerve explants. The extent of the degradation was found to be dependent on the Ca concentration. The effect of Al chloride, -citrate and -maltol on the calcium-induced degradation was studied. No effect of any of the Al compounds was observed, suggesting that the metal may exert its neurotoxic effect via a mechanism other than impairment of neurofilament proteolysis. Maltol itself was found to enhance the effect of Ca on the degradation of neurofilament proteins, probably by facilitating the movement of Ca across the neuronal membrane. PMID:8361672

  1. The effects of CaCl2 and CaBr2 on the reproduction of Daphnia magna Straus.

    PubMed

    Mažuran, Neda; Hršak, Vladimir; Kova?evi?, Goran

    2015-06-01

    Concentrated CaCl2 and CaBr2 salt solutions of densities up to 2.3 kg L-1 are regularly used to control hydrostatic pressure in oil wells during special operations in the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil. Various concentrations of high density salts are frequently left in mud pits near the drilling site as waste, polluting fresh and ground waters by spillage and drainage. The toxic effects of these salts have already been observed. This study investigated the effects of CaCl2 and CaBr2 on water flea Daphnia magna Straus in a 21-day reproduction test. The three tested concentrations of CaCl2 (240, 481, and 1925 mg L-1) caused a significant dose-response decrease of reproduction (p<0.001). With CaBr2 (533 and 1066 mg L-1), only aborted eggs were produced, demonstrating the embryotoxicity of the substance. The results suggest that high concentrations of the tested chemicals are harmful to Daphnia's reproduction and could reduce its abundance. PMID:26110475

  2. Electrochemical deoxidation of ZrSiO4 in molten calcium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Jae; Noh, Jae-Soo; Kim, Ki-Young; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2014-12-01

    The electrochemical deoxidation of ZrSiO4 pellets in molten CaCl2 at 850°C in an argon atmosphere was studied. The sintered ZrSiO4 pellet was cathodically polarized against a graphite counter electrode under a constant applied potential. XRD and EDX analyses revealed that ZrSiO4 became ZrSi. Reduction from ZrSiO4 to ZrSi started at the location on the surface around the cathodic current-collector Mo wire and extended to the entire surface. As the electro-deoxidation reaction continued, the oxygen content in the product decreased.

  3. Calcium chloride electron injection/extraction layers in organic electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Bo E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn; Gao, Zhi; Yang, Hongsheng; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn

    2014-01-27

    Nontoxic calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) was introduced into organic electronic devices as cathode buffer layer (CBL). The turn-on voltage and maximum luminance of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with 1.5?nm CaCl{sub 2} was 3.5?V and 21 960?cd/m{sup 2}, respectively. OLED with 1.5?nm CaCl{sub 2} possessed comparable electroluminescent characteristics to that of the commonly used LiF. Moreover, the performance of the organic photovoltaic device with 0.5?nm CaCl{sub 2} was comparable to that of the control device with LiF. Therefore, CaCl{sub 2} has the potential to be used as the CBL for organic electronic devices.

  4. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-print Network

    Marchant, David R.

    chloride deposits on Mars dating from the transition period from ``warm/wet'' to ``cold/dry'' climates. D and Jurassic-aged dolerite sills5 , to the west by a channel-incised and ice-cemented sediment lobe (also

  5. Effect of oral calcium and calcium + fluoride treatments on mouse bone properties during suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, S. J.; Luttges, M. W.; Allen, K. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The bone effects of oral dosages of calcium chloride with or without supplementary sodium fluoride were assessed in antiorthostatically suspended mice. Two calcium dosages were used to replace half (3.1 mM) or all(6.3 mM) of the dietary calcium lost due to reduced food intake by the suspended mice. Two groups of 6.3 mM CaCl2-treated mice were additionally treated with 0.25 or 2.5 mM NaF. The results indicate that supplementation of the mouse drinking water with calcium salts prevents bone changes induced by short-term suspension, while calcium salts in combination with fluoride are less effective as fluoride dosage increases. However, the calcium supplements change the relationship between the femur mechanical properties and the mineral composition of the bone. Because of this, it appears that oral calcium supplements are effective through a mechanism other than simple dietary supplementation and may indicate a dependence of bone consistency on systemic and local fluid conditions.

  6. Behavior of protein in the presence of calcium during heating of whey protein concentrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Riou, Emmanuelle; Havea, Palatasa; McCarthy, Owen; Watkinson, Philip; Singh, Harjinder

    2011-12-28

    The effect of added CaCl(2) on heat-induced changes in whey protein (WP) solutions prepared from whey protein isolate (WP1), acid whey protein concentrate (WP2), and cheese whey protein concentrate (WP3) was investigated. The loss of native-like, proteins, aggregation, and gel firmness of WP were maximum at certain levels of added CaCl(2). These levels were different for different WP products. The effect of added CaCl(2) on these changes appeared to be related to the initial calcium concentrations of these solutions. The higher the calcium content of the product, the less available sites for added CaCl(2) to bind. It was considered that addition of CaCl(2) changed the types of protein interactions that formed the protein aggregates during heating. Added calcium caused dramatic decreases in fracture stress of WP gels due to the formation of large protein aggregates. PMID:22066753

  7. Activation and Inhibition of TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca2+-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, and discovered that Mg2+ competes with Ca2+ in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore–as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions–appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  8. Long-Term Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in 5 M CaCl2 at 120?C

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J C; Hust, G A; Evans, K J; Stuart, M L; Rebak, R B

    2006-02-05

    In conditions where tight crevices exist in hot chloride containing solutions Alloy 22 may suffer crevice corrosion. The occurrence (or not) of crevice corrosion in a given environment (e.g. salt concentration and temperature), is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of creviced Alloy 22 specimens in 5 M calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) at 120 C. Tested specimens included non-creviced rods and multiple creviced assemblies (MCA) both non-welded (wrought) and welded. Results show that Alloy 22 suffers crevice corrosion under the open circuit conditions in the aerated hot CaCl{sub 2} brine. However, after more than a year immersion the propagation of crevice corrosion was not significant. The general corrosion rate decreased or remained unchanged as the immersion time increased. For rods and MCA specimens, the corrosion rate was lower than 100 nm/year after more than a year immersion time.

  9. Long-Term Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in 5M CaCl2 at 120 C

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Estill; G.A. Hust; K.J. Evans; M.L. Stuart; R.B. Rebak

    2006-05-08

    In conditions where tight crevices exist in hot chloride containing solutions Alloy 22 may suffer crevice corrosion. The occurrence (or not) of crevice corrosion in a given environment (e.g, salt concentration and temperature), is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of creviced Alloy 22 specimens in 5 M calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) at 120 C. Tested specimens included non-creviced rods and multiple creviced assemblies (MCA) both non-welded (wrought) and welded. Results show that Alloy 22 suffers crevice corrosion under the open circuit conditions in the aerated hot CaCl{sub 2} brine. However, after more than a year of immersion the propagation of crevice corrosion was not significant. The general corrosion rate decreased or remained unchanged as the immersion time increased. For rods and MCA specimens, the corrosion rate was lower than 100 nm/year after more than a year immersion time.

  10. Removal of uranium and gross radioactivity from coal bottom ash by CaCl2 roasting followed by HNO3 leaching.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xuefei; Qi, Guangxia; Sun, Yinglong; Xu, Hui; Wang, Yi

    2014-07-15

    A roast-leach method using CaCl2 and HNO3 to remove uranium and gross radioactivity in coal bottom ash was investigated. Heat treatment of the ash with 100% CaCl2 (900°C, 2h) significantly enhanced uranium leachability (>95%) compared with direct acid-leaching (22.6-25.5%). The removal efficiency of uranium and gross radioactivity increased steeply with increasing CaCl2 content, from 10% to 50%, and a HNO3 leaching time from 5 min to 1h, but remained nearly constant or decreased slightly with increasing CaCl2 dosage >50% or acid-leaching time >1h. The majority of the uranium (87.3%), gross ? (92.9%) and gross ? (84.9%) were removed under the optimized roast-leach conditions (50% CaCl2, 1M HNO3 leaching for 1h). The mineralogical characteristics of roasted clinker indicated that molten CaCl2 promoted the incorporation of Ca into silica and silicates and resulted in its progressive susceptibility to acid attack. Uranium and other radionuclides, most likely present in the form of silicates or in association with miscellaneous silicates in the highest density fraction (>2.5g mL(-1)), were probably leached out as the result of the acid decomposition of newly formed "gelatinizing silicates". PMID:24922094

  11. Monodisperse Calcium Carbonate Microtablets Forming at 701C in Prerefrigerated CaCl2GelatinUrea Solutions

    E-print Network

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    . Gelatin is known to be the denatured collagen. The thermal decomposition of dissolved urea was exploited, printing ink, cosmetics, tooth- paste, and food industries. CaCO3 has three anhydrous polymorphs: calcite

  12. Corrosion Effects of Calcium Chloride Injection for Mercury Control on the Pollution Control Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay Sethi; M.P. Sharma

    2009-02-28

    In response to the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) of 2005, Black Hills Power (BHP) initiated testing of a calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) injection method in their Wygen 1 (Gillette, WY) coal-fired power plant to help lower mercury emissions. In 2006, Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) was contracted to test their CaCl{sub 2} technology in-situ by adding a CaCl{sub 2} solution onto the raw, pre-pulverized coal during normal operation of Wygen 1. Follow-up tests were conducted by BHP in 2007. Data were collected from these two time periods and analyzed by a collaborative investigation team from Western Research Institute (WRI) and the University of Wyoming (UW) to see if there were any effects on the current air pollution control systems. During a CaCl{sub 2} injection period in 2007, corrosion was monitored in the flue and recycle ash system by placing corrosion coupons in strategic locations to test if corrosion was enhanced by the CaCl{sub 2} injection. While the CaCl{sub 2} produced a reduction in stack mercury levels, there was some evidence of beneficial impacts on the removal of SO{sub 2} from the flue gas during CaCl{sub 2} injection. Data on NOx remained inconclusive. It was also discovered that corrosion was enhanced significantly in the Spray Drier Absorber (SDA) vessel and corresponding outlet ductwork during CaCl{sub 2} injections. Further studies are being carried out in the field and lab to better understand the corrosive effects of CaCl{sub 2} to help formulate operation controls to manage the increased corrosion rates.

  13. TRPC1 regulates calcium-activated chloride channels in salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuyang; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Singh, Brij B

    2015-11-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) plays an important role in modulating epithelial secretion. It has been suggested that in salivary tissues, sustained fluid secretion is dependent on Ca(2+) influx that activates ion channels such as CaCC to initiate Cl(-) efflux. However direct evidence as well as the molecular identity of the Ca(2+) channel responsible for activating CaCC in salivary tissues is not yet identified. Here we provide evidence that in human salivary cells, an outward rectifying Cl(-) current was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)]i, which was inhibited by the addition of pharmacological agents niflumic acid (NFA), an antagonist of CaCC, or T16Ainh-A01, a specific TMEM16a inhibitor. Addition of thapsigargin (Tg), that induces store-depletion and activates TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+) entry, potentiated the Cl(-) current, which was inhibited by the addition of a non-specific TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 or removal of external Ca(2+). Stimulation with Tg also increased plasma membrane expression of TMEM16a protein, which was also dependent on Ca(2+) entry. Importantly, in salivary cells, TRPC1 silencing, but not that of TRPC3, inhibited CaCC especially upon store depletion. Moreover, primary acinar cells isolated from submandibular gland also showed outward rectifying Cl(-) currents upon increasing [Ca(2+)]i. These Cl(-) currents were again potentiated with the addition of Tg, but inhibited in the presence of T16Ainh-A01. Finally, acinar cells isolated from the submandibular glands of TRPC1 knockout mice showed significant inhibition of the outward Cl(-) currents without decreasing TMEM16a expression. Together the data suggests that Ca(2+) entry via the TRPC1 channels is essential for the activation of CaCC. PMID:25899321

  14. Possibility of inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel rescuing erectile failures in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lau, L-C; Adaikan, P G

    2014-01-01

    Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) blockers, niflumic acid (NFA) and anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A9C), have been shown as potential erectogenic agents in healthy corpus cavernosum (CC) tissues, the pharmacological characteristics of CaCC blockers in diabetic state are relatively unknown. This study compares the direct muscle relaxant property of NFA and A9C with their influence on contraction and nitrergic relaxation as elicited by electrical field stimulation in normal and 16-week-old diabetic rabbit CC (n=8). Mean blood glucose level in alloxan-treated rabbits was elevated threefold (21.9±0.5?mmol ?l(-1) vs 7.1±0.2?mmol?l(-1) in untreated rabbits; P<0.05). There was no significant alteration in the efficacies of NFA and A9C in eliciting a concentration-dependent relaxation of noradrenaline-induced cavernosum tone and in inhibiting neurogenic contraction of CC from diabetic rabbits. The capability of NFA (100??M) and A9C (1?mM) in augmenting nitrergic transmission was also not adversely affected by diabetes. However, in CC from diabetic rabbits, A9C markedly increased nitrergic relaxation response to 1-10?Hz by 10.6-36.6% (vs -5.1-0.8% in nondiabetic control). CaCC sensitivity to A9C appears to be enhanced in diabetic CC tissue. Inhibiting the CaCC activity in diabetes-related ED may tip the balance between proerectile/relaxant and antierectile/contractile mechanisms in favor of cavernosum relaxation. PMID:24522228

  15. The generation of HCl in the system CaCl2-H2O: Vapor-liquid relations from 380-500°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Fournier, Robert O.

    1996-01-01

    We determined vapor-liquid relations (P-T-x) and derived critical parameters for the system CaCl2-H2O from 380-500??C. Results show that the two-phase region of this system is extremely large and occupies a significant portion of the P-T space to which circulation of fluids in the Earth's crust is constrained. Results also show the system generates significant amounts of HCl (as much as 0.1 mol/kg) in the vapor phase buffered by the liquid at surprisingly high pressures (???230 bars at 380??C, <580 bars at 500??C), presumably by hydrolysis of CaCl2: CaCl2 + 2H2O = Ca(OH)2 + 2HCl. We interpret the abundance of HCl in the vapor as due to its preference for the vapor phase, and by the preference of Ca(OH)2 for either the liquid phase or solid. The recent recognition of the abundance of CaCl2 in deep brines of the Earth's crust and their hydrothermal mobilization makes the hydrolysis of CaCl2 geologically important. The boiling of Ca-rich brines produces abundant HCl buffered by the presence of the liquid at moderate pressures. The resultant Ca(OH)2 generated by this process reacts with silicates to form a variety of alteration products, such as epidote, whereas the vapor produces acid-alteration of rocks through which it ascends.

  16. Effect of soluble calcium on the renneting properties of casein micelles as measured by rheology and diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sandra, S; Ho, M; Alexander, M; Corredig, M

    2012-01-01

    Addition of calcium chloride to milk has positive effects on cheese-making because it decreases coagulation time, creates firmer gels, and increases curd yield. Although addition of calcium chloride is a widely used industrial practice, the effect of soluble calcium on the preliminary stages of gelation is not fully understood. In addition, it is not known whether the manner of addition and equilibration of the soluble calcium would affect the rennetability of the casein micelles. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to study the details of the coagulation behavior of casein micelles in the presence of additional calcium, and to elucidate whether the manner in which this cation is added (directly as calcium chloride or by gradual exchange through dialysis) affects the functionality of the micelles. Calcium was added as CaCl(2) (1 mM final added concentration) directly to skim milk or indirectly using dialysis against 50 volumes of milk. Additional soluble calcium did not affect the primary phase of the renneting reaction, as demonstrated by the analysis of the casein macropeptide (CMP) released in solution; however, it shortened the coagulation time of the micelles and increased the firmness of the gel. The turbidity parameter of samples with or without calcium showed that similar amounts of CMP were needed for particle interactions to commence. However, the amount of CMP released at the point of gelation, as indicated by rheology, was lesser for samples with added calcium, which can be attributed to a greater extent of calcium bridging on the surface or between micelles. The results also showed that the manner in which calcium was presented to the micelles did not influence the mechanism of gelation. PMID:22192185

  17. The Role of Granule Size on the Kinetics of Electrochemical Reduction of SiO2 Granules in Molten CaCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao; Yasuda, Kouji; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Hagiwara, Rika; Homma, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    As a fundamental study to develop a new process for producing solar-grade silicon, the effect of granule size on the kinetics of the electrochemical reduction of SiO2 granules in molten CaCl2 was investigated. SiO2 granules with different size ranges were electrolyzed in molten CaCl2 at 1123 K (850 °C). The reduction kinetics was evaluated on the basis of the growth rate of the reduced Si layer and the behavior of the current during electrolysis. The results indicated that finer SiO2 granules are more favorable for a high reduction rate because the contact resistance between the bottom Si plate and the reduced Si particles is small and the diffusion of O2- ions in CaCl2 inside the porous Si shell is easy. Electrolysis using SiO2 granules less than 0.1 mm in size maintained a current density of no less than 0.4 A cm-2 within 20 minutes, indicating that the electrochemical reduction of fine SiO2 granules in molten CaCl2 has the potential of becoming a high-yield production process for solar-grade silicon.

  18. A halophilic bacterium inhabiting the warm, CaCl2-rich brine of the perennially ice-covered Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, George S; Kempher, Megan L; Jung, Deborah O; Samarkin, Vladimir A; Joye, Samantha B; Madigan, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered and stratified lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The lake develops a distinct chemocline at about a 50-m depth, where the waters transition from cool, oxic, and fresh to warm, sulfidic, and hypersaline. The bottom water brine is unique, as the highly chaotropic salts CaCl2 and MgCl2 predominate, and CaCl2 levels are the highest of those in any known microbial habitat. Enrichment techniques were used to isolate 15 strains of heterotrophic bacteria from the Lake Vanda brine. Despite direct supplementation of the brine samples with different organic substrates in primary enrichments, the same organism, a relative of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), was isolated from all depths sampled. The Lake Vanda (VAN) strains were obligate aerobes and showed broad pH, salinity, and temperature ranges for growth, consistent with the physicochemical properties of the brine. VAN strains were halophilic and quite CaCl2 tolerant but did not require CaCl2 for growth. The fact that only VAN strain-like organisms appeared in our enrichments hints that the highly chaotropic nature of the Lake Vanda brine may place unusual physiological constraints on the bacterial community that inhabits it. PMID:25576606

  19. A Halophilic Bacterium Inhabiting the Warm, CaCl2-Rich Brine of the Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Vanda, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Tregoning, George S.; Kempher, Megan L.; Jung, Deborah O.; Samarkin, Vladimir A.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Vanda is a perennially ice-covered and stratified lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The lake develops a distinct chemocline at about a 50-m depth, where the waters transition from cool, oxic, and fresh to warm, sulfidic, and hypersaline. The bottom water brine is unique, as the highly chaotropic salts CaCl2 and MgCl2 predominate, and CaCl2 levels are the highest of those in any known microbial habitat. Enrichment techniques were used to isolate 15 strains of heterotrophic bacteria from the Lake Vanda brine. Despite direct supplementation of the brine samples with different organic substrates in primary enrichments, the same organism, a relative of the halophilic bacterium Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), was isolated from all depths sampled. The Lake Vanda (VAN) strains were obligate aerobes and showed broad pH, salinity, and temperature ranges for growth, consistent with the physicochemical properties of the brine. VAN strains were halophilic and quite CaCl2 tolerant but did not require CaCl2 for growth. The fact that only VAN strain-like organisms appeared in our enrichments hints that the highly chaotropic nature of the Lake Vanda brine may place unusual physiological constraints on the bacterial community that inhabits it. PMID:25576606

  20. Poly(?-glutamic acid)/Silica Hybrids with Calcium Incorporated in the Silica Network by Use of a Calcium Alkoxide Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Yu, Bobo; Tsigkou, Olga; Wang, Daming; Romer, Frederik; Bhakhri, Vineet; Giuliani, Finn; Stevens, Molly M; McPhail, David S; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Jones, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Current materials used for bone regeneration are usually bioactive ceramics or glasses. Although they bond to bone, they are brittle. There is a need for new materials that can combine bioactivity with toughness and controlled biodegradation. Sol-gel hybrids have the potential to do this through their nanoscale interpenetrating networks (IPN) of inorganic and organic components. Poly(?-glutamic acid) (?-PGA) was introduced into the sol-gel process to produce a hybrid of ?-PGA and bioactive silica. Calcium is an important element for bone regeneration but calcium sources that are used traditionally in the sol-gel process, such as Ca salts, do not allow Ca incorporation into the silicate network during low-temperature processing. The hypothesis for this study was that using calcium methoxyethoxide (CME) as the Ca source would allow Ca incorporation into the silicate component of the hybrid at room temperature. The produced hybrids would have improved mechanical properties and controlled degradation compared with hybrids of calcium chloride (CaCl2), in which the Ca is not incorporated into the silicate network. Class II hybrids, with covalent bonds between the inorganic and organic species, were synthesised by using organosilane. Calcium incorporation in both the organic and inorganic IPNs of the hybrid was improved when CME was used. This was clearly observed by using FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, which showed ionic cross-linking of ?-PGA by Ca and a lower degree of condensation of the Si species compared with the hybrids made with CaCl2 as the Ca source. The ionic cross-linking of ?-PGA by Ca resulted in excellent compressive strength and reduced elastic modulus as measured by compressive testing and nanoindentation, respectively. All hybrids showed bioactivity as hydroxyapatite (HA) was formed after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). PMID:24838668

  1. Ultrasound influence upon calcium carbonate precipitation on bacterial cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin; Jipa, Iuliana; Dobre, Tanase; Dobre, Loredana

    2012-07-01

    The effect of ultrasonic irradiation (40 kHz) on the calcium carbonate deposition on bacterial cellulose membranes was investigated using calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) and sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3)) as starting reactants. The composite materials containing bacterial cellulose-calcium carbonate were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and color measurements. The polymorphs of calcium carbonate that were deposited on bacterial cellulose membranes in the presence or in the absence of ultrasonic irradiation were calcite and vaterite. The morphology of the obtained crystals was influenced by the concentration of starting solutions and by the presence of ultrasonic irradiation. In the presence of ultrasonic irradiation the obtained crystals were bigger and in a larger variety of shapes than in the absence of ultrasounds: from cubes of calcite to spherical and flower-like vaterite particles. Bacterial cellulose could be a good matrix for obtaining different types of calcium carbonate crystals. PMID:22227555

  2. Effect of calcium source on structure and properties of sol-gel derived bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bobo; Turdean-Ionescu, Claudia A; Martin, Richard A; Newport, Robert J; Hanna, John V; Smith, Mark E; Jones, Julian R

    2012-12-18

    The aim was to determine the most effective calcium precursor for synthesis of sol-gel hybrids and for improving homogeneity of sol-gel bioactive glasses. Sol-gel derived bioactive calcium silicate glasses are one of the most promising materials for bone regeneration. Inorganic/organic hybrid materials, which are synthesized by incorporating a polymer into the sol-gel process, have also recently been produced to improve toughness. Calcium nitrate is conventionally used as the calcium source, but it has several disadvantages. Calcium nitrate causes inhomogeneity by forming calcium-rich regions, and it requires high temperature treatment (>400 °C) for calcium to be incorporated into the silicate network. Nitrates are also toxic and need to be burnt off. Calcium nitrate therefore cannot be used in the synthesis of hybrids as the highest temperature used in the process is typically 40-60 °C. Therefore, a different precursor is needed that can incorporate calcium into the silica network and enhance the homogeneity of the glasses at low (room) temperature. In this work, calcium methoxyethoxide (CME) was used to synthesize sol-gel bioactive glasses with a range of final processing temperatures from 60 to 800 °C. Comparison is made between the use of CME and calcium chloride and calcium nitrate. Using advanced probe techniques, the temperature at which Ca is incorporated into the network was identified for 70S30C (70 mol % SiO(2), 30 mol % CaO) for each of the calcium precursors. When CaCl(2) was used, the Ca did not seem to enter the network at any of the temperatures used. In contrast, Ca from CME entered the silica network at room temperature, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction, (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and dissolution studies. CME should be used in preference to calcium salts for hybrid synthesis and may improve homogeneity of sol-gel glasses. PMID:23171477

  3. The role of calcium in growth induced by indole-3-acetic acid and gravity in the leaf-sheath pulvinus of oat (Avena sativa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, T. G.; Burg, J.; Ghosheh, N. S.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1992-01-01

    Leaf-sheath pulvini of excised segments from oat (Avena sativa L.) were induced to grow by treatment with 10 micromoles indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gravistimulation, or both, and the effects of calcium, EGTA, and calcium channel blockers on growth were evaluated. Unilaterally applied calcium (10 mM CaCl2) significantly inhibited IAA-induced growth in upright pulvini but had no effect on growth induced by either gravity or gravity plus IAA. Calcium alone had no effect on upright pulvini. The calcium chelator EGTA alone (10 mM) stimulated growth in upright pulvini. However, EGTA had no effect on either IAA- or gravity-induced growth but slightly diminished growth in IAA-treated gravistimulated pulvini. The calcium channel blockers lanthanum chloride (25 mM), verapamil (2.5 mM), and nifedipine (2.5 mM) greatly inhibited growth as induced by IAA (> or = 50% inhibition) or IAA plus gravity (20% inhibition) but had no effect on gravistimulated pulvini. Combinations of channel blockers were similar in effect on IAA action as individual blockers. Since neither calcium ions nor EGTA significantly affected the graviresponse of pulvini, we conclude that apoplastic calcium is unimportant in leaf-sheath pulvinus gravitropism. The observation that calcium ions and calcium channel blockers inhibit IAA-induced growth, but have no effect on gravistimulated pulvini, further supports previous observations that gravistimulation alters the responsiveness of pulvini to IAA.

  4. Chlorotoxin does not inhibit volume-regulated, calcium-activated and cyclic AMP-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Chantal; Wei, Lin; Tytgat, Jan; Droogmans, Guy; Nilius, Bernd

    2000-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to look for a high-affinity and selective polypeptide toxin, which could serve as a probe for the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) or the calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). We have partially purified chlorotoxin, including new and homologous short chain insectotoxins, from the crude venom of Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (Lqq) by means of gel filtration chromatography. Material eluting between 280 and 420?min, corresponding to fractions 15–21, was lyophilized and tested on VRAC and CaCC, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We have also tested the commercially available chlorotoxin on VRAC, CaCC, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and on the glioma specific chloride channel (GCC). VRAC and the correspondent current, ICl,swell, was activated in Cultured Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (CPAE) cells by a 25% hypotonic solution. Neither of the fractions 16–21 significantly inhibited ICl,swell (n=4–5). Ca2+-activated Cl? currents, ICl,Ca, activated by loading T84 cells via the patch pipette with 1??M free Ca2+, were not inhibited by any of the tested fractions (15–21), (n=2–5). Chlorotoxin (625?nM) did neither effect ICl,swell nor ICl,Ca (n=4–5). The CFTR channel, transiently transfected in COS cells and activated by a cocktail containing IBMX and forskolin, was not affected by 1.2??M chlorotoxin (n=5). In addition, it did not affect currents through GCC. We conclude that submicromolar concentrations of chlorotoxin do not block volume-regulated, Ca2+-activated and CFTR chloride channels and that it can not be classified as a general chloride channel toxin. PMID:10683204

  5. Petrographic evidence of calcium oxychloride formation in mortars exposed to magnesium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Touton, Sayward . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Johnston, Dan . E-mail: Dan.Johnston@state.sd.us

    2006-08-15

    Many researchers have reported chemical interactions between CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions and hardened Portland cement paste. One potentially destructive phase reported in the literature is calcium oxychloride (3CaO.CaCl{sub 2}.15H{sub 2}O). In the past, limited numbers of researchers have reported identification of this phase by X-ray diffraction. In this work, petrographic evidence of oxychloride formation is presented based on optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis. This evidence indicates that calcium oxychloride does form in mortars exposed to MgCl{sub 2} solutions.

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than young adults. Older women need plenty of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. People who do not eat enough high-calcium foods should take a calcium supplement. NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

  7. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage cheese are good sources of ... or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look ...

  8. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fluoride levels in children, and to reduce high lead levels. Calcium carbonate is used as an antacid for “heartburn.” ... other research suggests that taking calcium reduces blood lead levels by 11%. Endometrial cancer. Taking calcium supplements might reduce the risk of developing endometrial ...

  9. EFFECTS OF pH AND OF VARIOUS CONCENTRATIONS OF SODIUM, POTASSIUM, AND CALCIUM CHLORIDE ON MUSCULAR ACTIVITY OF THE ISOLATED CROP OF PERIPLANETA AMERICANA (ORTHOPTERA)

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, James T.; Tauber, Oscar E.

    1943-01-01

    1. Twenty-five solutions which contained KCl (0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 gm. per liter), in combination with CaCl2 (0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 gm. per liter), 10.0 gm. of NaCl, and 0.2 gm. of NaHCO3 per liter of solution were tested in order to determine satisfactory KCl/CaCl2 ratios in an insect physiological salt mixture for the maintenance of muscular activity by the isolated crop of the American roach. Satisfactory activity products (0.390 to 0.549) were obtained in seven mixtures with KCl/CaCl2 ratios of 0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, 0.8/0.8, 0.2/0.4, 0.4/0.6, and 0.6/0.8, expressed as gram per liter. These ratios lie between 0.50 and 1.00. In solutions which contained calcium, but no potassium, approximately 50 per cent of the crops exhibited an initial tone increase and were arrested in rigor. See Fig. 2. In solutions which contained potassium, but no calcium, all crops showed an initial loss of tone and arrest in relaxation. See Fig. 2. 2. Seven KCl/CaCl2 ratios (see paragraph 1 above) were tested with eight NaCl concentrations (1.0, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, and 1.8 per cent) at a pH of 8.0. In these mixtures, the ones with KCl/CaCl2 ratios of less than 1.0 produced higher activity products than those with ratios equal to 1.00. The highest average activity product (0.849) was obtained in the solutions with 0.2 gm. of KCl and 0.4 gm. of CaCl2 per liter. 3. Four KCl/CaCl2 ratios (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.2/0.4, and 0.4/0.6 gm. per liter) were tested with 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6 per cent NaCl at a pH of 7.5. When analyzed with data from comparable solutions at a pH of 8.0, it was found that 1.4 per cent NaCl afforded an optimum environment for isolated crop activity. 4. Effects of hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations were studied at pH values of 6.8, 7.5, 8.0, and 8.9. The highest average activity product, 1.011, was produced at a pH of about 8.0. 5. A satisfactory physiological salt solution for the isolated foregut of the American roach, Periplaneta americana, would contain 14.0 gm. of NaCl, 0.4 gm. of CaCl2, 0.2 gm. of KCl, and 0.2 gm. of NaHCO3 per liter of solution. This mixture should have a pH value between 7.8 and 8.2. 6. Durations of crop activity extending over periods as long as 25 hours were quite common, and several crops maintained contractions for more than 30 hours. The greatest longevity was for crop 814, from a female, which continued activity for slightly more than 47 hours. 7. A significant difference between the activity products of the crops from males and the crops from females was recorded. Although there was not a significant difference in the amount of food ingested by males and females, 12 hours after feeding there was more food in the females' crops, and the food progressed more rapidly through the males' crops than through the females'. In addition, crops from the two sexes reacted differently to the effects of day old solutions. This sex difference is apparently related to an inherently increased activity of the crop from the male roach. PMID:19873366

  10. Mixing-rules of viscosity, electrical conductivity and density of NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 aqueous solutions derived from experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsch, Harald; Kallenberg, Bianca; Holzhauer, Julia; Frick, Stephanie; Blöcher, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Upper-crustal fluids often contain an abundance of dissolved ions significantly affecting their thermo-physical properties. Knowledge of these properties and their relation to both type and concentration of ionic species is of predominant importance for a variety of geotechnical applications, e.g. the provision of energy from deep-seated geothermal reservoirs. We conducted extensive and systematic series of measurements on the viscosity, electrical conductivity and density of synthetic geothermal brines containing varying amounts of dissolved NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 salts. The investigations were performed at ambient pressure and temperatures between 20°C and 80°C, using a Höppler-viscometer, a commercial hand-held four-electrode conductivity meter, and a combination of volumetric and mass measurements for density, respectively. The maximum molalities investigated were 4 mol/kg for KCl and 5 mol/kg for NaCl and CaCl2, respectively. Despite analytical simplicity the results obtained were in good to excellent agreement with tabulated values. The investigations on electrical conductivity showed excellent agreement with Kohlrausch's law of independent migration of ions as well as tabulated values for the respective limiting molar conductivities. Cation-valency strongly affects the dependence of all three thermo-physical properties on salt concentration. At a given temperature, CaCl2 brine shows a decrease in conductivity, a dramatic increase in viscosity, and a departure from linearity for density with concentration above molalities of approximately 3 mol/kg. Moreover, systematic measurements performed with mixtures of the three salts yielded mixing-rules for all three parameters. The predictions of these rules applied to a natural geothermal brine of known chemical composition were in excellent agreement with direct measurements performed with this fluid. After evaluation, such relationships then permit reasonable estimates on thermo-physical properties of fluids having more complex compositions without the need for further measurements. For example, the viscosity of a solution containing an arbitrary composition of NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 can be reasonably predicted by stoichiometrically weighting the individual viscosities measured at the total concentration of the mixture. In our contribution we will critically present the data in comparison to existing data and communicate the mixing-rules derived. Also, we will stress the validity of the conventional conductivity-viscosity relationship based on the balance between electrical and viscous forces. This will constrain the species- and concentration-dependence of both effective ionic radii and ionic mobility and finally might provide insight into the mechanistic origin of the observed valency-dependence of all three thermo-physical parameters.

  11. Human ClCa1 modulates anionic conduction of calcium-dependent chloride currents

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martine; Gibson, Adele; Davies, Noel; Jowett, Amanda; Walhin, Jean Philippe; Partington, Leanne; Affleck, Karen; Trezise, Derek; Main, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Proteins of the CLCA gene family including the human ClCa1 (hClCa1) have been suggested to constitute a new family of chloride channels mediating Ca2+-dependent Cl? currents. The present study examines the relationship between the hClCa1 protein and Ca2+-dependent Cl? currents using heterologous expression of hClCa1 in HEK293 and NCIH522 cell lines and whole cell recordings. By contrast to previous reports claiming the absence of Cl? currents in HEK293 cells, we find that HEK293 and NCIH522 cell lines express constitutive Ca2+-dependent Cl? currents and show that hClCa1 increases the amplitude of Ca2+-dependent Cl? currents in those cells. We further show that hClCa1 does not modify the permeability sequence but increases the Cl? conductance while decreasing the GSCN?/GCl? conductance ratio from ?2–3 to ?1. We use an Eyring rate theory (two barriers, one site channel) model and show that the effect of hClCa1 on the anionic channel can be simulated by its action on lowering the first and the second energy barriers. We conclude that hClCa1 does not form Ca2+-dependent Cl? channels per se or enhance the trafficking/insertion of constitutive channels in the HEK293 and NCIH522 expression systems. Rather, hClCa1 elevates the single channel conductance of endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl? channels by lowering the energy barriers for ion translocation through the pore. PMID:19307298

  12. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guidance system, ChooseMyPlate . Where can I find ... on food sources of calcium: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for calcium ( ...

  13. Sequential application of NaHCO3, CaCl2 and Candida oleophila (isolate 13L) affects significantly Penicillum expansum growth and the infection degree in apples.

    PubMed

    Molinu, M G; Pani, G; Venditti, T; Dore, A; Ladu, G; D'Hallewin, G

    2011-01-01

    The employment of biocontrol agents to restrain postharvest pathogens is an encouraging approach, although, efficacy and consistency are still below those of synthetic pesticides. Up to date, the 'integrated control strategy' seems to be the most promising way to overcome this gap. Here, we report the feasibility to control postharvest decay caused by Penicillium expansum in apples by a 2 min, single or sequential, immersion in water with an antagonistic yeast (Candida oleophila, isolate '13L'), 2% NaHCO3 (SBC) or 1% CaCl2. The treatments were carried out, on appels cv 'Miali' either un-wounded, wounded or wound-pathogen inoculated and then stored at 2 degrees C for 30 d followed by a 6 d simulated marketing period at 20 degrees C or alternatively stored only for 7 d at 20 degrees C. As a general role, the best results were attained when CaCl2 was applied with the yeast or when preceded by the SBC treatment. When the wounding and inoculation took place 24 h before the treatment, the latter application sequence of the two salts was three times more effective compared to the treatment with the sole antagonist, and one time when performed 24 h after the treatment. Interestingly, apples immersed in the sole 2% SBC solution had the highest percentage of decay during storage and when inoculated before moving to the simulated marketing period at 20 degrees C. PMID:22702195

  14. Multisite Ion Model in Concentrated Solutions of Divalent Cations (MgCl2 and CaCl2): Osmotic Pressure Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate force field parameters for ions are essential for meaningful simulation studies of proteins and nucleic acids. Currently accepted models of ions, especially for divalent ions, do not necessarily reproduce the right physiological behavior of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. Saxena and Sept (J. Chem. Theor. Comput.2013, 9, 3538–3542) described a model, called the multisite-ion model, where instead of treating the ions as an isolated sphere, the charge was split into multiple sites with partial charge. This model provided accurate inner shell coordination of the ion with biomolecules and predicted better free energies for proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we expand and refine the multisite model to describe the behavior of divalent ions in concentrated MgCl2 and CaCl2 electrolyte solutions, eliminating the unusual ion–ion pairing and clustering of ions which occurred in the original model. We calibrate and improve the parameters of the multisite model by matching the osmotic pressure of concentrated solutions of MgCl2 to the experimental values and then use these parameters to test the behavior of CaCl2 solutions. We find that the concentrated solutions of both divalent ions exhibit the experimentally observed behavior with correct osmotic pressure, the presence of solvent separated ion pairs instead of direct ion pairs, and no aggregation of ions. The improved multisite model for (Mg2+ and Ca2+) can be used in classical simulations of biomolecules at physiologically relevant salt concentrations. PMID:25482831

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent falls in women, but not in men. Metabolic syndrome. Some evidence suggests that consuming more calcium from ... with vitamin D, lowers the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Vitamin B12 deficiency caused by the drug metformin. ...

  16. Calcium-induced tertiary structure modifications of endo-?-1,3-glucanase from Pyrococcus furiosus in 7.9 M guanidinium chloride

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The family 16 endo-?-1,3 glucanase from the extremophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is a laminarinase, which in 7.9 M GdmCl (guanidinium chloride) maintains a significant amount of tertiary structure without any change of secondary structure. The addition of calcium to the enzyme in 7.9 M GdmCl causes significant changes to the near-UV CD and fluorescence spectra, suggesting a notable increase in the tertiary structure which leads to a state comparable, but not identical, to the native state. The capability to interact with calcium in 7.9 M GdmCl with a consistent recovery of native tertiary structure is a unique property of this extremely stable endo-?-1,3 glucanase. The effect of calcium on the thermodynamic parameters relative to the GdmCl-induced equilibrium unfolding has been analysed by CD and fluorescence spectroscopy. The interaction of calcium with the native form of the enzyme is studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in the absorption region of carboxylate groups and by titration in the presence of a chromophoric chelator. A homology-based model of the enzyme is generated and used to predict the putative binding site(s) for calcium and the structural interactions potentially responsible for the unusual stability of this protein, in comparison with other family 16 glycoside hydrolases. PMID:15482259

  17. Negative Chronotropic and Antidysrhythmic Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Lemon Balm (Melissa Officinalis L.) on CaCl2-Induced Arrhythmias in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akhondali, Zahra; Dianat*, Mahin; Radan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many cases, myocardial infarction leads to arrhythmia. Since antioxidant agents have an important protective role in heart disease, these compounds in medicinal plants are used in traditional medicine. Lemon balm extract, compared to other plants of the lamiaceae family, has been proven to have significant amounts of antioxidant compounds. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on CaCl2-induced arrhythmias in rats. Methods: This research is an experimental study; male adult Sprague Dawley rats that weighed 200-250 g were divided randomly into three groups, i.e., 1) control (normal saline, 1 ml/kg/day), 2) extract (100 mg/kg), and 3) extract (200 mg/kg). The normal saline and the extracts were gavaged for 14 consecutive days. After anesthesia, lead II electrocardiograms were recorded for calculating the rats’ heart rates (HRs). Arrhythmia was induced by intravenous injection of CaCl2 solution (140 mg/kg), and the percentages of incidence of ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and ventricular premature beats (VPB) were recorded. The results were analyzed by using Fisher’s exact test and one-way ANOVA. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant level. Results: Heart rates and percentages of incidence of VPB, VT, and VF were reduced significantly in extract groups (with the highest activity at 200 mg/kg) in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: Melissa officinalis was considered to be an antiarrhythmic agent because it reduced the percentage of incidence of VPB, VT, and VF in the groups that received it. The results indicated that Melissa officinalis had a protective effect on the heart. PMID:26052407

  18. Ion-pairing in aqueous CaCl2 and RbBr solutions: simultaneous structural refinement of XAFS and XRD data

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Thai V.; Fulton, John L.

    2013-01-28

    We present a new methodology involving the simultaneous refinement of both x-ray absorption and x-ray diffraction spectra (X-ray Absorption/Diffraction Structural Refinement,XADSR), to study hydration and ion pair structure of CaCl2 and RbBr salts in concentrated aqueous solutions. The XADSR analysis includes the XAFS spectra analysis of both the cation and anion as a probe of their short-range structure with an XRD spectral analysis as a probe of the global structural. Together they deliver a comprehensive picture of the cation and anion hydration, the contact ion pair (CIP) structure and the solvent-separated ion pair (SSIP) structure. XADSR analysis of 6.0 m aqueous CaCl2 reveals that there are an insignificant number of Ca2+-Cl- CIP’s, but there are approximately 3.4 SSIP’s separated by about 4.99 Å. In contrast XADSR analysis of aqueous RbBr yields about 0.7 pair CIP at a bond length 3.51 Å. The present work demonstrates a new approach for a direct co-refinement of XRD and XAFS spectra in a simple and reliable fashion, opening new opportunities for analysis in various disordered and crystalline systems. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle.

  19. On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Derek J. Fray

    2011-11-01

    In recent years, TiAl-based intermetallic alloys are being increasingly considered for application in areas such as (i) automobile/transport sector (passenger cars, trucks and ships) (ii) aerospace industry (jet engines and High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system) and (iii) industrial gas turbines. These materials offer excellent (i) high temperature properties (at higher than 6000C) (ii) mechanical strength and (iii) resistance to corrosion and as a result have raised renewed interest. The combination of these properties make them possible replacement materials for traditional nickel-based super-alloys, which are nearly as twice as dense (than TiAl based alloys). Since the microstructures of these intermetallic alloys affect, to a significant extent, their ultimate performance, further improvements (by way of alteration/modification of these microstructures), have been the subject matter of intense research investigations. It has now been established that the presence of alloy additives, such as niobium, tantalum, manganese, boron, chromium, silicon, nickel and yttrium etc, in specific quantities, impart marked improvement to the properties, viz. fatigue strength, fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility, of these alloys. From a number of possible alloy compositions, {gamma}-TiAl and Ti-Al-Nb-Cr have, of late, emerged as two promising engineering alloys/materials. . The conventional fabrication process of these alloys include steps such as melting, forging and heat treatment/annealing of the alloy compositions. However, an electrochemical process offers an attractive proposition to prepare these alloys, directly from the mixture of the respective oxides, in just one step. The experimental approach, in this new process, was, therefore, to try to electrochemically reduce the (mixed) oxide pellet to an alloy phase. The removal of oxygen, from the (mixed) oxide pellet, was effected by polarizing the oxide pellet against a graphite electrode in a pool of molten calcium chloride at a temperature of 9000C. The dominant mechanism of the oxygen removal was the ionization of oxygen followed by its subsequent discharge, as CO2/CO, at the anode surface. The removal of oxygen from the oxide mixture helped form the alloy in situ. The presentation shall cover the detailed experimental results pertaining to the preparation, evaluation and characterization of Ti-47Al-2Nb-2Cr (atom%) alloy.

  20. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  1. Angiotensin II modulates mouse skeletal muscle resting conductance to chloride and potassium ions and calcium homeostasis via the AT1 receptor and NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cozzoli, Anna; Liantonio, Antonella; Conte, Elena; Cannone, Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Pierno, Sabata; Mantuano, Paola; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Camerino, Giulia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) plays a role in muscle wasting and remodeling; however, little evidence shows its direct effects on specific muscle functions. We presently investigated the acute in vitro effects of ANG II on resting ionic conductance and calcium homeostasis of mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle fibers, based on previous findings that in vivo inhibition of ANG II counteracts the impairment of macroscopic ClC-1 chloride channel conductance (gCl) in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. By means of intracellular microelectrode recordings we found that ANG II reduced gCl in the nanomolar range and in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.06 ?M) meanwhile increasing potassium conductance (gK). Both effects were inhibited by the ANG II receptors type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonist losartan and the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine; no antagonism was observed with the AT2 antagonist PD123,319. The scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) N-acetyl cysteine and the NADPH-oxidase (NOX) inhibitor apocynin also antagonized ANG II effects on resting ionic conductances; the ANG II-dependent gK increase was blocked by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of calcium-activated potassium channels. ANG II also lowered the threshold for myofiber and muscle contraction. Both ANG II and the AT1 agonist L162,313 increased the intracellular calcium transients, measured by fura-2, with a two-step pattern. These latter effects were not observed in the presence of losartan and of the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 and the in absence of extracellular calcium, disclosing a Gq-mediated calcium entry mechanism. The data show for the first time that the AT1-mediated ANG II pathway, also involving NOX and ROS, directly modulates ion channels and calcium homeostasis in adult myofibers. PMID:25080489

  2. Evidence for calcium/calmodulin dependence of spinule retraction in retinal horizontal cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Y; Kohler, K; Zrenner, E

    1995-01-01

    Horizontal cells of the carp retina alter their synaptic connections with cones during dark and light adaptation. At light onset, dendrites of horizontal cells, which are positioned laterally at the ribbon synapse, form "spinules," little processes with membrane densities. Spinules are retracted again during dark adaptation. Spinule retraction is also elicited upon glutamate application to the retina. In the present study, we address the question whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent pathways are involved in dark- and glutamate-evoked spinule retraction. Light-adapted retinas were isolated and subsequently dark adapted during incubation in media of different calcium concentrations. Spinule retraction was clearly blocked in low-calcium solutions (5 microM and 50 nM CaCl2). Incubation in medium containing cobalt chloride (2 mM) had the same effect. Both treatments blocked the glutamate-induced spinule retraction as well. These results indicate that spinule retraction is induced by a calcium influx into horizontal cells. To investigate whether calmodulin, the primary calcium receptor in eukaryotic cells, is present at the site of spinule formation, light- and dark-adapted retinas, embedded in LR White resin, were labelled with an antibody against calmodulin and gold-conjugated secondary antibodies. Horizontal cell dendrites at the ribbon synapse revealed strong calmodulin immunoreactivity, which was more than twice as high in light- as in dark-adapted retinas. The incubation of isolated retinas with the calmodulin antagonists W5 and W13 inhibited spinule retraction. In summary, these results suggest that spinule retraction may be regulated by calcium influx into horizontal cells and subsequent calcium/calmodulin-dependent pathways. PMID:7654601

  3. Calcium-mediated responses and glutamine synthetase expression in greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.) under diethyl phthalate-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lee-Ju; Hung, Meng-Ju; Cheng, Yen-I; Cheng, Tai-Sheng

    2013-11-15

    This study was carried out to assess the influence of diethyl phthalate (DEP) alone or associated with calcium chloride (CaCl2) on greater duckweed plants, emphasizing the implications of calcium in amelioration of DEP-induced stress on plant growth. Greater duckweed were treated with DEP in variable concentrations, as 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mM for 7 days, or treated with the same concentration either 2mM DEP or 2mM DEP plus 10mM CaCl2·2H2O in different duration 0-7 days. Treatment with 2mM DEP resulted in increasing proline content, protease activity, and ammonia accumulation in duckweed tissues. NADH-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) and ?(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR; EC 1.5.1.2), two key enzymes in the glutamate pathway of proline synthesis, showed increase in activity with DEP treatment and positively correlated with proline accumulation. No further increase in proline accumulation was observed with addition of calcium chloride to the DEP-treated cultures. However, supplementation of Ca(2+) can mitigate the adverse effect of DEP, at least in part to decrease the DEP-induced superoxide accumulation and increase in GDH activity for ammonia assimilation in duckweed fronds. In addition, effects of calcium on mitigation of DEP injury were also observed in glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) expression. Both GS1 and GS2 polypeptide accumulation and the level of total GS activity were nearly equivalent to the control. Exogenous proline protects GS2 from DEP-modulated redox damage in the chloroplast lysates but there is no remarkable protection effects on D1 (the 32kDa protein in photosystem II reaction center) degradation. In conclusion, the glutamate pathway of proline synthesis might be involved in mitigation of DEP-induced injury, and calcium plays an important role in increasing GDH, P5CR, and GS expression. PMID:24177215

  4. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride process”. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg. No. 471-34-1) is prepared...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... process”; or (3) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium chloride in the “Calcium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS...

  9. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 and chloride channel modulate chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced migration of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-07-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in nonexcitable cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we examined the role of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) and chloride channel (CLC3) in lymphatic chemokine-induced migration of DCs. The amplitude and kinetics of chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Ca(2+) influx were associated with chemokine receptor 7 expression levels, extracellular-free Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and independent of extracellular K(+). Chemokines (CCL19 and CCL21) and KCa3.1 activator (1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K(+) efflux, which was blocked by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward calcium release-activated calcium channel. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl(-) in the medium, and low dose of 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca(2+) influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and CLC3 are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca(2+) influx, and cell volume. PMID:25583444

  10. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the ?-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  11. Adsorption of iron oxide nanoclusters stabilized with sulfonated copolymers on silica in concentrated NaCl and CaCl2 brine.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Hitesh G; Neilson, Bethany M; Worthen, Andrew J; Xue, Zheng; Yoon, Ki Youl; Cheng, Victoria; Lee, Jae Ho; Velagala, Sindhuja; Huh, Chun; Bryant, Steven L; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2013-05-15

    Transport of metal oxide nanoparticles in porous rock is of interest for imaging and oil recovery in subsurface reservoirs, which often contain concentrated brine. Various copolymers composed of acrylic acid and either 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonate or styrenesulfonate were synthesized and adsorbed on iron oxide nanoclusters to provide colloidal stability and to achieve low adsorption on silica in high salinity brine composed of 8%wt. NaCl+2%wt. CaCl2. Furthermore, the degree of adsorption of the nanoparticles on silica was controlled by modifying the acrylic acid groups in the copolymers with a series of diamines and triamines to add hydrophobicity. The adsorption on colloidal silica microparticles ranged from <1 mg/m(2) for highly charged hydrophilic surfaces on the iron oxide nanoparticles to 22 mg/m(2) for the most hydrophobic amine-modified surfaces, corresponding to monolayer coverages that ranged from 0.2% to 11.5%, respectively. The specific adsorption (mg-IO/m(2)-silica), monolayer coverage, and parameters for Langmuir isotherms were evaluated for various IO nanoclusters as a function of the properties of the copolymers on their surfaces. PMID:23473572

  12. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-12-08

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early intermolecular interactions stabilizing amelogenin supramolecular assembly and the potential role of calcium ions have been discovered. Two-dimensional 1H-15N spectra were recorded for 15N-labeled amelogenin as a function of increasing Ca2+ concentration starting from monomeric conditions. Evidence for protein-protein interactions were observed between residues E18 and E40 in the N-terminus. At higher Ca2+ concentrations there was concurrent involvement of residues in both the N- (Y12-Q56) and the C-terminus (Q144-T171). Neither specific residues nor their stepwise interaction have previously been identified in the initial stages of nanosphere assembly.

  13. Application of calcium chloride as an additive for secondary refrigerant in the air conditioning system type chiller to minimized energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwono, A.; Indartono, Y. S.; Irsyad, M.; Al-Afkar, I. C.

    2015-09-01

    One way to resolve the energy problem is to increase the efficiency of energy use. Air conditioning system is one of the equipment that needs to be considered, because it is the biggest energy user in commercial building sector. Research currently developing is the use of phase change materials (PCM) as thermal energy storage (TES) in the air conditioning system to reduce energy consumption. Salt hydrates have been great potential to be developed because they have been high latent heat and thermal conductivity. This study has used a salt hydrate from calcium chloride to be tested in air conditioning systems type chiller. Thermal characteristics were examined using temperature history (T-history) test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The test results showed that the thermal characteristics of the salt hydrate has been a high latent heat and in accordance with the evaporator temperature. The use of salt hydrates in air conditioning system type chiller can reduce energy consumption by 51.5%.

  14. Effect of exogenous calcium on post-thaw growth recovery and subsequent plant regeneration of cryopreserved embryogenic calli of Hevea brasiliensis (Müll. Arg.).

    PubMed

    Lardet, Ludovic; Martin, Florence; Dessailly, Florence; Carron, Marc-Philippe; Montoro, Pascal

    2007-05-01

    A reliable cryopreservation technique was developed for friable embryogenic callus lines of Hevea brasiliensis. The study showed that reducing the CaCl(2) concentration of the pre-culture medium from 9 mM to 1 or 0 mM CaCl(2) before cryopreservation promoted post-thaw callus growth, 1 mM being the optimum CaCl(2) concentration for embryo regeneration. Post-thaw callus proliferation decreased in line with the increase of plated callus weight. The effect of cryopreservation was assessed on 39 independent lines showing that cryopreservation did not affect embryogenic and plant regeneration for a majority of lines. The decrease in CaCl(2) concentration of the pre-culture medium led to a drop in callus calcium content indicating a direct link between the CaCl(2) concentration of the pre-culture medium and the endogenous calcium content of the calli. It also highlighted the implication of tissue calcium content in cryotolerance. Callus water status and the different ways by which calcium could prevent cryoinjury is also discussed. PMID:17186244

  15. Effectiveness of hydrothermal-calcium chloride treatment and chitosan on quality retention and microbial growth during storage of fresh-cut papaya.

    PubMed

    Ayón-Reyna, Lidia E; Tamayo-Limón, Ransés; Cárdenas-Torres, Feliznando; López-López, Martha E; López-Angulo, Gabriela; López-Moreno, Héctor S; López-Cervántes, Jaime; López-Valenzuela, José A; Vega-García, Misael O

    2015-03-01

    Rapid degradation of fresh-cut papaya limits its marketability. Hydrothermal treatments in combination with a calcium dip, applied to whole fruit before slicing, and also the application of chitosan as a coating film, have been found to have very good results in maintaining the quality of fresh-cut fruits. Based on these considerations, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrothermal treatment (HT; 49 °C, 25 min) containing calcium chloride (Ca; 1%, w/v) followed by dipping in chitosan (Chit; 1%, w/v, 3 min) on the physical, chemical, and microbial qualities of papaya slices stored at 5 °C for 10 d. Pulp color, firmness, ascorbic acid, total phenolics, ?-carotene, and lycopene were evaluated every 2 d while the microbial quality (mesophilics, psychrophilics, molds, and yeasts) was evaluated every 5 d. Fruit treated with HT-Ca and HT-Ca + Chit showed better color and firmness retention than Control and Chit. Papaya slices treated with HT-Ca + Chit had higher nutritional content and lower microbial growth at the end of storage. The application of the HT-Ca + Chit could be used to reduce deterioration processes, maintaining physical, chemical, and microbial qualities and increasing the shelf life of fresh-cut papaya stored at 5 °C. PMID:25627320

  16. Influence of solution acidity and CaCl2 concentration on the removal of heavy metals from metal-contaminated rice soils.

    PubMed

    Kuo, S; Lai, M S; Lin, C W

    2006-12-01

    Soil washing is considered a useful technique for remediating metal-contaminated soils. This study examined the release edges of Cd, Zn, Ni, Cr, Cu or Pb in two contaminated rice soils from central Taiwan. The concentrations exceeding the trigger levels established by the regulatory agency of Taiwan were Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr for the Ho-Mei soil and Pb for the Nan-Tou soil. Successive extractions with HCl ranging from 0 to 0.2 M showed increased release of the heavy metals with declining pH, and the threshold pH value below which a sharp increase in the releases of the heavy metals was highest for Cd, Zn, and Ni (pH 4.6 to 4.9), intermediate for Pb and Cu (3.1 to 3.8) and lowest for Fe (2.1), Al (2.2) and Cr (1.7) for the soils. The low response slope of Ni and Cr particularly for the rice soils make soil washing with the acid up to the highest concentration used ineffective to reduce their concentrations to below trigger levels. Although soil washing with 0.1 M HCl was moderately effective in reducing Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd, which brought pH of the soils to 1.1+/-0.1 (S.D.), the concurrent release of large quantities of Fe and Al make this remediation technique undesirable for the rice soils containing high clay. Successive washings with 0.01 M HCl could be considered an alternative as the dissolution of Fe and Al was minimal, and between 46 to 64% of Cd, Zn, and Cu for the Ho-Mei soil and 45% of Pb in the Na-Tou soil were extracted after four successive extractions with this dilute acid solution. The efficacy of Cd extraction improved if CaCl2 was added to the acid solution. The correlation analysis revealed that Cr extracted was highly correlated (P < 0.001) with Fe extracted, whereas the Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd or Pb extracted was better correlated (P < 0.001) with Al than with Fe extracted. It is possible that the past seasonal soil flooding and drainage in the soils for rice production was conducive to incorporating Cr within the structure of Fe oxide, thereby making them extremely insoluble even in 0.2 M HCl solution. The formation of solid solution of Ni with Al oxide was also possible, making it far less extractable than Cd, Zn, Cu, or Pb with the acid concentrations used. PMID:16603295

  17. Effects of calcium chelators on calcium distribution and protein solubility in rennet casein dispersions.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Irene; O' Sullivan, Michael; O' Riordan, Dolores

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the effects of calcium chelating salts on calcium-ion activity (ACa(++)), calcium distribution, and protein solubility in model CaCl2 solutions (50mmolL(-1)) or rennet casein dispersions (15g/100g). Disodium phosphate and trisodium citrate at concentrations of 10 and 30mmolL(-1) and at ratios of 1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1 were added to both systems. The CaCl2 system, despite its simplicity, was a good indicator of chelating salt-calcium interactions in rennet casein dispersions. Adding trisodium citrate either alone or as part of a mixed chelating salt system resulted in high levels of dispersed "chelated" calcium; conversely, disodium phosphate addition resulted in lower levels, while the ACa(++) decreased with increasing concentration of both chelating salts. Neither chelating salt produced high levels of soluble protein. Thus calcium chelating salts may play a more subtle role in modulating hydration during manufacture of casein-based matrices than simply solubilising calcium or protein. PMID:26616945

  18. The Porcine Chloride Channel Calcium-Activated Family Member pCLCA4a Mirrors Lung Expression of the Human hCLCA4

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephanie; Grötzsch, Tanja; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Kobalz, Ursula; Gruber, Achim D.

    2012-01-01

    Pig models of cystic fibrosis (CF) have recently been established that are expected to mimic the human disease closer than mouse models do. The human CLCA (originally named chloride channels, calcium-activated) member hCLCA4 is considered a potential modifier of disease severity in CF, but its murine ortholog, mCLCA6, is not expressed in the mouse lung. Here, we have characterized the genomic structure, protein processing, and tissue expression patterns of the porcine ortholog to hCLCA4, pCLCA4a. The genomic structure and cellular protein processing of pCLCA4a were found to closely mirror those of hCLCA4 and mCLCA6. Similar to human lung, pCLCA4a mRNA was strongly expressed in porcine lungs, and the pCLCA4a protein was immunohistochemically detected on the apical membranes of tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells. This stands in sharp contrast to mouse mCLCA6, which has been detected exclusively in intestinal epithelia but not the murine lung. The results may add to the understanding of species-specific differences in the CF phenotype and support the notion that the CF pig model may be more suitable than murine models to study the role of hCLCA4. PMID:22205680

  19. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  20. Internal pressures and molecular dimensions in aqueous solutions of some chlorides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslaender, D.; Lenart, I.; Rus, E.; Ciupe, A.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of measurements of the velocity of ultrasounds in aqueous solutions of some alkaline-earth chlorides (MgCl2, CaCl2, BaCl2) the concentration and temperature dependences of the internal pressure were determined. Using these results, as well as surface tension measurements, the mean diameters of the molecular species as a function of concentration and temperature, were determined.

  1. Deep formation waters of Western Europe, Russia and North America characterised by sodium, calcium, magnesium and chloride concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozau, Elke; Hemme, Christina; Sattler, Carl-Diedrich; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Deep formation water can be classified according to depth, temperature, and salinity (e.g., Graf et al. 1966, Kharaka & Hanor 2007). Most of the deep formation waters contain dissolved solids in excess of sea water. The hydrogeochemical development of formation water has been discussed for a long time. It is widely accepted that deep aquifers are influenced by the meteoric cycle and geochemical processes within the crust (e.g., Hebig et al. 2012). Similar hydrogeochemical signatures are found in deep formation waters of all continents and can be explained by general geochemical processes within the deep reservoirs (e.g., Land 1995). Therefore, data of deep formation waters from Western Europe, Russia, and North America are collected and classified by the major water components. The data are used to identify important hydrogeochemical processes (e.g., halite dissolution and albitisation) leading to different compositions of formation water. Two significant water types are identified: Na-Cl water and Na-Ca-Cl water. Based on the collected hydrogeochemical data, development trends are stated for the formation waters, and albitisation is favoured as the main process for calcium enrichment. Furthermore, differences of formation water according to stratigraphical units are shown for deep reservoirs of the North German Basin and the North Sea. References: Graf, D.L., 1982. Chemical osmosis, reverse chemical osmosis, and the origin of subsurface brines. Geochimica Cosmochimica Acta 46, 1431-1448. Hebig, K.H., Ito, N., Scheytt, T., Marui, A., 2012. Review: Deep groundwater research with focus on Germany. Hydrogeology Journal 20, 227-243. Kharaka, Y.K., Hanor, J.S., 2007. Deep fluids in continents: I. Sedimentary Basins. Treatise on Geochemistry 5, 1-48. Land, L.S., 1995. The role of saline formation water in the crustal cycling. Aquatic Geochemistry 1, 137-145. Acknowledgements: The presented data are results of the collaborative research program "gebo" (Geothermal energy and high performance drilling), financed by the Ministry of Science and Culture of the Federal State of Lower Saxony and industry partner Baker Hughes Celle.

  2. Effect of Calcium Ions on Dewaterability of Enzymatic-Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion Sludge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Yang, Qi; Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Ying; Pang, Ya; Li, Xue; Liao, Xing-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Waste-activated sludge (WAS) solubilized remarkably after enzymatic-enhanced anaerobic digestion, but its dewaterability was deteriorated. In this study, a novel method was performed to improve the dewaterability of enzymatic-enhanced anaerobic digestion sludge by adding CaCl2 (0.01~1.00 g/g total sludge). The capillary suction time (CST), moisture content, and filtrate turbidity were employed to characterize the dewaterability of WAS, and the possible mechanisms involved were clarified. The results showed the dewaterability did not worsen when CaCl2 was added before sludge digestion, and the CST, moisture content, and filtrate turbidity were notably reduced with the increase of CaCl2 dosage. It also shown that calcium ions played an important role in the bioflocculation of digested sludge by neutralizing negative charges on the surface of sludge. In addition, soluble protein initially lowered a little and then observably improved with the addition of CaCl2, while soluble carbohydrate was reduced sharply first and then bounced back afterwards. The interactions between calcium ions and the biopolymer further enhanced the dewatering of sludge through bridging of colloidal particles together. PMID:26129703

  3. 9-Anthracene carboxylic acid is more suitable than DIDS for characterization of calcium-activated chloride current during canine ventricular action potential.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Krisztina; Hegyi, Bence; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Kistamás, Kornél; Horváth, Balázs; Bányász, Tamás; Nánási, Péter P; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Magyar, János

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of ionic currents in shaping the cardiac action potential (AP) has great importance as channel malfunctions can lead to sudden cardiac death by inducing arrhythmias. Therefore, researchers frequently use inhibitors to selectively block a certain ion channel like 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (9-AC) for calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca)). This study aims to explore which blocker is preferable to study ICl(Ca). Whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to record ICa,L, IKs, IKr and IK1, while action potentials were measured using sharp microelectrodes. DIDS- (0.2 mM) and 9-AC-sensitive (0.5 mM) currents were identical in voltage-clamp conditions, regardless of intracellular Ca(2+) buffering. DIDS-sensitive current amplitude was larger with the increase of stimulation rate and correlated well with the rate-induced increase of calcium transients. Both drugs increased action potential duration (APD) to the same extent, but the elevation of the plateau potential was more pronounced with 9-AC at fast stimulation rates. On the contrary, 9-AC did not influence either the AP amplitude or the maximal rate of depolarization (V max), but DIDS caused marked reduction of V max. Both inhibitors reduced the magnitude of phase-1, but, at slow stimulation rates, this effect of DIDS was larger. All of these actions on APs were reversible upon washout of the drugs. Increasing concentrations of 9-AC between 0.1 and 0.5 mM in a cumulative manner gradually reduced phase-1 and increased APD. 9-AC at 1 mM had no additional actions upon perfusion after 0.5 mM. The half-effective concentration of 9-AC was approximately 160 ?M with a Hill coefficient of 2. The amplitudes of ICa,L, IKs, IKr and IK1 were not changed by 0.5 mM 9-AC. These results suggest that DIDS is equally useful to study ICl(Ca) during voltage-clamp but 9-AC is superior in AP measurements for studying the physiological role of ICl(Ca) due to the lack of sodium channel inhibition. 9-AC has also no action on other ion currents (ICa,L, IKr, IKs, IK1); however, ICa,L tracings can be contaminated with ICl(Ca) when measured in voltage-clamp condition. PMID:25344201

  4. Local Effects in the X-ray Absorption Spectrum of CaCl2, MgCl2, and NaCl Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kulik, H J; Correa Tedesco, A A; Schwegler, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G

    2010-04-12

    Both first principles molecular dynamics and theoretical X-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to investigate the aqueous solvation of cations in 0.5 M MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, and NaCl solutions. We focus here on the species-specific effects that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Na{sup +}, have on the X-ray absorption spectrum of the respective solutions. For the divalent cations, we find that the hydrogen bonding characteristics of the more rigid magnesium first shell water molecules differ from those in the more flexible solvation shell surrounding calcium. In particular, the first solvation shell water molecules of calcium are accessible to forming acceptor hydrogen bonds, and this results in an enhancement of a post-edge peak near 540 eV. The absence of acceptor hydrogen bonds for magnesium first shell water molecules provides an explanation for the experimental and theoretical observation of a lack of enhancement at the post-main-edge peak. For the sodium monovalent cation we find that the broad tilt angle distribution results in a broadening of post-edge features, despite populations in donor-and-acceptor configurations consistent with calcium. We also present the re-averaged spectra of the MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, and NaCl solutions and show that trends apparent with increasing concentration (0.5 M, 2.0 M, 4.0 M) are consistent with experiment. Finally, we examine more closely both the effect that cation coordination number has on the hydrogen bonding network and the relative perturbation strength of the cations on lone pair oxygen orbitals.

  5. Crystal Screen HT -Scoring Sheet A1. 30% MPD, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.02 M Calcium Chloride

    E-print Network

    Hill, Chris

    .2 M Magnesium Chloride A7. 1.4 M Sodium Acetate, 0.1 M Na Cacodylate pH 6.5 A8. 30% iso-Propanol, 0 Phosphate, 0.1 M Na Citrate pH 5.6 A12. 30% iso-Propanol, 0.1 M Na Hepes pH 7.5, 0.2 M Magnesium Chloride B1H 8.5, 0.2 M Sodium Acetate B11. 30% PEG 400, 0.1 M Na Hepes pH 7.5, 0.2 M Magnesium Chloride B12. 20

  6. Crystal Screen Lite -Scoring Sheet 1. 15% MPD, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.02 M Calcium Chloride

    E-print Network

    Hill, Chris

    .2 M Magnesium Chloride 7. 0.7 M Sodium Acetate, 0.1 M Na Cacodylate pH 6.5 8. 15% iso-Propanol, 0.1 M.1 M Na Citrate pH 5.6 12. 15% iso-Propanol, 0.1 M Na Hepes pH 7.5, 0.2 M Magnesium Chloride 13. 15.2 M Sodium Acetate 23. 15% PEG 400, 0.1 M Na Hepes pH 7.5, 0.2 M Magnesium Chloride 24. 10% iso

  7. Characteristics of the interaction of calcium with casein submicelles as determined by analytical affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, H.D.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Interaction of calcium with casein submicelles was investigated in CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers and with synthetic milk salt solutions using the technique of analytical affinity chromatography. Micelles that had been prepared by size exclusion chromatography with glycerolpropyl controlled-pore glass from fresh raw skim milk that had never been cooled, were dialyzed at room temperature against calcium-free imidazole buffer, pH 6.7. Resulting submicelles were covalently immobilized on succinamidopropyl controlled-pore glass (300-nm pore size). Using 45Ca to monitor the elution retardation, the affinity of free Ca2+ and calcium salt species was determined at temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees C and pH 6.0 to 7.5. Increasing the pH in this range or increasing the temperature strengthened the binding of calcium to submicelles, similar to previous observations with individual caseins. However, the enthalpy change obtained from the temperature dependence was considerably greater than that reported for alpha s1- and beta-caseins. Furthermore, the elution profiles for 45Ca in milk salt solutions were decidedly different from those in CaCl2 or calcium phosphate buffers and the affinities were also greater. For example, at pH 6.7 and 30 degrees C the average dissociation constant for the submicelle-calcium complex is 0.074 mM for CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers, vs 0.016 mM for the milk salt solution. The asymmetric frontal boundaries and higher average affinities observed with milk salts may be due to binding of calcium salts with greater affinity in addition to the binding of free Ca2+ in these solutions.

  8. [Pretreatment technology for fly ash from MSWI and the corresponding study of chloride behavior].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fen-Fen; Takaoka, Masaki; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Jiang, Hui-Min; Kitajima, Yoshinori

    2013-06-01

    The introduced pretreatment technology, WCCB (Washing + Calcination), was effective to reduce chlorides in fly ash by consuming relatively low energy for recycling fly ash as the raw material for cement industry. The washing conditions are: twice-washing, liquid/solid = 3, mixing speed = 150 r x min(-1), 1st mixing time = 5 min, and 2nd mixing time = 10 min. The original incinerator was used for the calcination process, 1 000 degrees C, 10% O2 and dwelling time of 1 hour were adopted. By adopting X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction, the behavior of chlorides was explained and NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 are the main form of chlorides existing in fly ash. The reagent used in the air pollution control system to neutralize the acid component in the discharged gas surely acted a very important role in the formation of chlorides. The insoluble chlorides in fly ash had a very similar structure as that of Friedel's salt, which was related with CaCl2. PMID:23947072

  9. Calcium fluoride window mounting

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.D.

    1982-10-01

    A technique has been developed for joining a large calcium fluoride crystal to a stainless-steel flange by means of a silver transition ring. The process involves both vacuum brazing using a copper-silver alloy and air brazing using silver chloride. This paper describes the procedure used in fabricating a high-vacuum leak-tight calcium fluoride window assembly.

  10. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 31 (2012) 492498 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    El-Naggar, Moh

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 microbial fuel cells using calcium chloride Lisa A. Fitzgeralda , Emily R Keywords: Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Microbial fuel cell Calcium chloride EIS a b s t r a c by adding calcium chloride to the culture medium. The current output from each CaCl2 concentration tested

  11. Vinyl Chloride

    Cancer.gov

    Vinyl chloride is a colorless gas that burns easily. It does not occur naturally and must be produced industrially for its commercial uses. Vinyl chloride is used primarily to make polyvinyl chloride (PVC); PVC is used to make a variety of plastic products, including pipes, wire and cable coatings, and packaging materials. Vinyl chloride is also produced as a combustion product in tobacco smoke.

  12. Probing the role of chloride in Photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus by exchanging chloride for iodide

    E-print Network

    quinones, 3­4 calcium ions, one of which in the Mn4CaO5 clus- ter, 3 chloride ions, among these three onlyProbing the role of chloride in Photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus by exchanging chloride for iodide Alain Boussac a, , Naoko Ishida a , Miwa Sugiura b,c , Fabrice Rappaport d a i

  13. Environ. Scl. Technol. 1994, 28, 277-283 Effects of Salts on Preparation and Use of Calcium Silicates for Flue Gas

    E-print Network

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    and Clinch River power plants, were examined. The addition of gypsum (CaS04.2HzO) or calcium chloride the salts used (calcium chloride and calcium nitrate). Solids made without the deliquescent salts exhibited. The salts examined in this study include calcium chloride, sodium nitrate, sodium chloride

  14. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a white precipitate by mixing calcium chloride and sodium stearate in aqueous solution. (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2,...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a white precipitate by mixing calcium chloride and sodium stearate in aqueous solution. (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2,...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a white precipitate by mixing calcium chloride and sodium stearate in aqueous solution. (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2,...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a white precipitate by mixing calcium chloride and sodium stearate in aqueous solution. (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... calcium chloride and sodium stearate in aqueous solution. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is...

  19. Calcium phosphates in Ca(2+)-fortified milk: phase identification and quantification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Martha; Swedlund, Peter J; Hemar, Yacine; McKinnon, Ian R

    2014-12-17

    Calcium phosphate nanoclusters (CPNs) are important for the structure, function, and nutrient density of many dairy products. Phosphorylated amino acids in caseins stabilize calcium phosphate as nanoclusters which are amorphous to X-ray diffraction and exist within casein micelles, and these CPNs play a key role in micelle stability. Addition of calcium to milk results in further calcium phosphate removal from the serum, and there is uncertainty about the nature of the material formed and its stability. In this work we investigate both the solution and colloidal phases in CaCl2 enriched bovine milk to identify, quantify, and determine the solubility of the calcium phosphate material formed in response to calcium addition to milk. The P-O stretching bands are quite distinct in the Raman spectra of the main synthetic calcium phosphate mineral phases, including the amorphous calcium phosphate phase. In response to adding between 5 and 40 mM CaCl2 to milk, the serum phosphate concentration decreased asymptotically from 7.5 ± 0.2 to 0.54 ± 0.05 mM. Using Raman spectroscopy with a combination of internal and external standards, it was possible to show that the calcium phosphate material formed after Ca(2+) addition to milk was the same as amorphous calcium phosphate nanoclusters present in the absence of added calcium. The use of an internal standard allowed a quantitative analysis of the spectra which demonstrated that the amorphous calcium phosphate formed accounted for all of the calcium and phosphate that was removed from solution in response to calcium addition. PMID:25414967

  20. Secondary calcium solid electrolyte high temperature battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammells, A. F.; Schumacher, B.

    1986-01-01

    The application of polycrystalline Ca(2+) conducting beta-double prime alumina solid electrolytes to a new type of high temperature battery is investigated, experimentally. The negative electrode in the battery consisted of a calcium-silicon alloy whose redox electrochemistry was mediated by the solid electrolyte via molten salt eutectic CaCl2 (51.4 m/o), and CaI2 (mp 550 C). The molten salt and the calcium alloy material were separated from the positive active material via the Ca2 Ca(2+) conducting polycrystalline electrolyte. The positive electrode consisted of a solid-state matrix having related crystallographic structure. The electrochemical reversibility of the cells was measured at 580 C. The charge-discharge characteristics of the cells are plotted vs. time in a graph.

  1. Experimental evaluation of water mist with metal chloride additives for suppressing CH4/air cup-burner flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianghong; Cong, Beihua

    2013-06-01

    In order to investigate the fire suppression effectiveness of water mist with metal chloride additives, ultrafine water mists of these salts with diameters about 10?m were introduced into CH4/air non-premixed flame in the cup burner. Results showed that these droplets hard to make itself to the flame front under the cup burner flow conditions functioned as a carrier of the vaporized solid particles or its decomposed materials. The metal chloride improved fire suppression efficacy of water mist which were affected by the type and concentration of metal chloride. On a mass basis, there is a fire suppression effectiveness relationship of MgCl2chlorides improves as the concentration of metal chlorides increase. However, upper additive limits exist due to the associated limiting vapour pressure of the additive.

  2. Use of a D-optimal mixture design to estimate the effects of diverse chloride salts on the growth parameters of Lactobacillus pentosus.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F N; Bautista-Gallego, J; Chiesa, A; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2009-06-01

    The effects of NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), and MgCl(2) and their mixtures on the ionic strength (IS) of the medium and the growth parameters of Lactobacillus pentosus were studied by means of a D-optimal mixture experimental design with constrains (total salt concentrationCaCl(2)>NaCl>KCl. Within the experimental region, the lag phase duration (lambda) was mainly affected by NaCl and CaCl(2) and the interaction KCl with MgCl(2). The maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) decreased as NaCl (the highest effect), CaCl(2), and MgCl(2) increased (regardless of the presence or not of previous NaCl); low KCl concentrations had a stimulating effect on mu(max), but its overall effect showed a similar trend to the other salts. The maximum population reached (N(max)) was the least affected parameter and decreased as NaCl and CaCl(2) concentrations increased regardless of the presence of the other salts. The equations that expressed the growth parameters as a function of the diverse chloride salts, within the limits assayed, were developed and the corresponding z- and harmonic Z-values were estimated. PMID:19376461

  3. Synthesis and thermal properties of strontium and calcium peroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H.; Kraft, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    A practical synthesis and a discussion of some chemical properties of pure strontium peroxide and calcium peroxide are presented. The general synthesis of these peroxides involves precipitation of their octahydrates by addition of H2O2 to aqueous ammoniacal Sr(NO3)2 or CaCl2. The octahydrates are converted to the anhydrous peroxides by various dehydration techniques. A new x-ray diffraction powder pattern for CaO2 x 8H2O is given from which lattice parameters a=6.212830 and c=11.0090 were calculated on the basis of the tetragonal crystal system.

  4. Mass concentration and ion composition of coarse and fine particles in an urban area in Beirut: effect of calcium carbonate on the absorption of nitric and sulfuric acids and the depletion of chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, H.; Saliba, N. A.

    2006-05-01

    Levels of coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particles were determined between February 2004 and January 2005 in the city of Beirut, Lebanon. While low PM mass concentrations were measured in the rainy season, elevated levels were detected during sand storms originating from Arabian desert and/or Africa. Using ATR-FTIR and IC, it was shown that nitrate, sulfate, carbonate and chloride were the main anionic constituents of the coarse particles, whereas sulfate was mostly predominant in the fine particles in the form of (NH4)2SO4. Ammonium nitrate was not expected to be important because the medium was defined as ammonium poor. In parallel, the cations Ca2+ and Na+ dominated in the coarse, and NH4+, Ca2+ and Na+ in the fine particles. Coarse nitrate and sulfate ions resulted from the respective reactions of nitric and sulfuric acid with a relatively high amount of calcium carbonate. Both CaCO3 and Ca(NO3)2 crystals identified by ATR-FTIR in the coarse particles were found to be resistant to soaking in water for 24 h but became water soluble when they were formed in the fine particles suggesting, thereby, different growth and adsorption phenomena. The seasonal variational study showed that nitrate and sulfate ion concentrations increased in the summer due to the enhancement of photochemical reactions which facilitated the conversion of NO2 and SO2 gases into NO3- and SO42-, respectively. While nitrate was mainly due to local heavy traffic, sulfates were due to local and long-range transport phenomena. Using the air mass trajectory HYSPLIT model, it was found that the increase in the sulfate concentration correlated with wind vectors coming from Eastern and Central Europe. Chloride levels, on the other hand, were high when wind originated from the sea and low during sand storms. In addition to sea salt, elevated levels of chloride were also attributed to waste mass burning in proximity to the site. In comparison to other neighboring Mediterranean countries, relatively higher concentrations of calcium in Beirut were good indication of calcitic crustal abundance. Considering the importance of the health and climate impacts of aerosols locally and regionally, this study constitutes a point of reference for eastern Mediterranean transport modeling studies and local regulatory and policy makers.

  5. Study of the physical properties of calcium alginate hydrogel beads containing vineyard pruning waste for dye removal.

    PubMed

    Vecino, X; Devesa-Rey, R; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B

    2015-01-22

    In this work the morphological and surface properties of a biocomposite formulated with vineyard pruning waste entrapped in calcium alginate hydrogel beads were studied. The formulation of the calcium alginate hydrogel beads, containing vineyard pruning waste, was based on the capacity of this green adsorbent to remove dye compounds from wastewater, observing that in the optimum condition (1.25% of cellulosic residue, 2.2% of sodium alginate and 0.475 mol L(-1) CaCl2) the percentage of dyes was reduced up to 74.6%. At lower concentration of CaCl2, high-resolution optical images show that the elongation of the vineyard-alginate biocomposite decreased, whereas the compactness increased. Moreover, higher concentrations of cellulosic residue increased the biocomposite roundness in comparison with biocomposite without the cellulosic residue. Interferometric perfilometry analysis (Ra, Rq, Rz and Rt) revealed that high concentrations of CaCl2 increased the roughness of the of the calcium alginate hydrogel beads observing vesicles in the external surface. PMID:25439877

  6. Process analysis and mechanism investigation of low temperature synthesis of nanoscale calcium hexaboride powder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Feng, Gang; Min, Guanghui

    2014-10-01

    The synthesis of nanoscale CaB6 powder via the low temperature chemical reaction of Calcium chloride (CaCl2) with Sodium Borohyride (NaBH4) in vacuum has been investigated in this study. The reaction temperature was determined by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (DSC and TG). Crystallization process was provided through studying the influence of heat preservation time on the crystal particles morphologies in vacuum. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the phase and structure of CaB6. The characterization for microstructure was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The elemental analysis was conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is concluded that CaB6 nanoparticles can be successfully prepared under low temperature at 500 degrees C. The results showed that in vacuum, 2 hours heat preservation time is enough for the reaction to complete at this temperature. The average size of crystal grains is 25.1 nm with high crystallinity and cubic shaped, which particles size is at the range of 20-100 nm. Longer heat preservation time more than 2 hours will make CaB6 particles connected together to form hard aggregations, that is the sintering process occurred under this temperature. However, the crystal grain size changed unobviously accompanying the holding time prolong due to the high chemical stability of CaB6. The atomic ratio of B to Ca is 5.37:1, less than but close to its stoichiometric ratio 6:1. The synthesis process and mechanism were investigated in this paper. PMID:25942928

  7. A glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide-, fluoride-, and chloride-containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, Ian W.; Metcalfe, Brian; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2007-03-31

    The presence of halide anions in four types of wastes arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium required an immobilization process to be developed in which not only the actinide cations but also the halide anions were immobilized in a durable waste form. At AWE, we have developed such a process using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Successful trials of the process with actinide- and Cl-bearing Type I waste were carried out at PNNL where the immobilization of the waste in a form resistant to aqueous leaching was confirmed. Normalized mass losses determined at 40°C and 28 days were 12 x 10-6 g?m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g?m-2 for Pu and Cl, respectively. Accelerated radiation-induced damage effects are being determined with specimens containing 238Pu. No changes in the crystalline lattice have been detected with XRD after the 239Pu equivalent of 400 years ageing. Confirmation of the process for Type II waste (a oxyhydroxide-based waste) is currently underway at PNNL. Differences in the ionic state of Pu in the four types of waste have required different surrogates to be used. Samarium chloride was used successfully as a surrogate for both Pu(III) and Am(III) chlorides. Initial investigations into the use of HfO2 as the surrogate for Pu(IV) oxide in Type II waste indicated no significant differences.

  8. Additive Screen HTTM -HR2-138 Scoring Sheet 1. (A1) 0.1 M Barium Chloride

    E-print Network

    Hill, Chris

    . (A6) 0.1 M Magnesium Chloride 7. (A7) 0.1 M Manganese (II) Chloride 8. (A8) 0.1 M Strontium ChlorideAdditive Screen HTTM - HR2-138 Scoring Sheet 1. (A1) 0.1 M Barium Chloride 2. (A2) 0.1 M Cadmium Chloride 3. (A3) 0.1 M Calcium Chloride 4. (A4) 0.1 M Cobaltous Chloride 5. (A5) 0.1 M Cupric Chloride 6

  9. Effect of calcium ions on staphylococcal alpha-toxin-induced hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Harshman, S; Sugg, N

    1985-01-01

    Calcium in millimolar concentrations protected rabbit erythrocytes from hemolysis caused by staphylococcal alpha-toxin. This effect was maximal at 30 mM CaCl2 and required the continued presence of calcium. The protection was not absolute and could be overcome by increased concentrations of alpha-toxin. Calcium did not block the binding of alpha-toxin to erythrocytes but inhibited the alpha-toxin-induced release of small ions from the cell as measured by 86Rb release. The transient removal of calcium was sufficient to abrogate its protective effect, suggesting that its action involves a reversible alteration in the state of the membrane. The three steps of the alpha-toxin-induced hemolytic sequence are: (i) binding to specific receptors, (ii) formation of transmembrane pores, and (iii) cell lysis. We concluded that calcium acted at step ii by impeding the lateral movement of alpha-toxin necessary to form the transmembrane hexamer pores. PMID:3965408

  10. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  11. EDTA-insoluble, calcium-binding proteoglycan in bovine bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Y.; Lester, G. E.; Caterson, B.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A calcium ion precipitable, trypsin-generated proteoglycan fragment has been isolated from the demineralized, EDTA-insoluble matrices of bone. The demineralized matrix was completely digested with trypsin, increasing concentrations of CaCl2 were added to the supernatant, and the resulting precipitates were analyzed. The amount of precipitate gradually increased with higher concentrations of calcium and was reversibly solubilized by EDTA. After molecular sieve and anion exchange chromatography, a proteoglycan-containing peak was obtained. Immunochemical analysis showed that this peak contained chondroitin 4-sulfate and possibly keratan sulfate. Amino acid analysis showed that this proteoglycan contained high amounts of aspartic acid/asparagine (Asx), serine (Ser), glutamic acid/glutamine (Glx), proline (Pro), and glycine (Gly); however, it contained little leucine (Leu) which suggests that it is not a member of the leucine-rich small proteoglycan family. In addition, significant amounts of phosphoserine (P-Ser) and hydroxyproline (Hyp) were identified in hydrolysates of this fraction. A single band (M(r) 59 kDa) was obtained on SDS-PAGE that stained with Stains-all but not with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250. If bone powder was trypsinized prior to demineralization, this proteoglycan-containing fraction was not liberated. Collectively, these results indicate that a proteoglycan occurs in the demineralized matrix that is precipitated with CaCl2 and is closely associated with both mineral and collagen matrices. Such a molecule might facilitate the structural network for the induction of mineralization in bone.

  12. Calcium binding properties of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CaCDPK1) from Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ajay Kumar; Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2015-05-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role as a secondary messenger in all aspects of plant growth, development and survival. Calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are the major calcium decoders, which couple the changes in calcium level to an appropriate physiological response. The mechanism by which calcium regulates CDPK protein is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the interactions of Ca(2+) ions with the CDPK1 isoform of Cicer arietinum (CaCDPK1) using a combination of biophysical tools. CaCDPK1 has four different EF hands as predicted by protein sequence analysis. The fluorescence emission spectrum of CaCDPK1 showed quenching with a 5 nm red shift upon addition of calcium, indicating conformational changes in the tertiary structure. The plot of changes in intensity against calcium concentrations showed a biphasic curve with binding constants of 1.29 ?M and 120 ?M indicating two kinds of binding sites. Isothermal calorimetric (ITC) titration with CaCl2 also showed a biphasic curve with two binding constants of 0.027 ?M and 1.7 ?M. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed two prominent peaks at 208 and 222 nm indicating that CaCDPK1 is a ?-helical rich protein. Calcium binding further increased the ?-helical content of CaCDPK1 from 75 to 81%. Addition of calcium to CaCDPK1 also increased fluorescence of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) indicating exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. Thus, on the whole this study provides evidence for calcium induced conformational changes, exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and heterogeneity of EF hands in CaCDPK1. PMID:25855000

  13. Modelling the New Soil Improvement Method Biogrout: Extension to 3D

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    /2/ and calcium chloride (CaCl2)) are flushed through the soil, resulting in calcium carbonate (CaCO3 in calcium carbonate precipitation and consequent soil reinforcement. A mathemat- ical model was created calcium carbonate, the decreasing porosity (due to precipitation) and the flow. The partial differential

  14. Prostaglandin E2 induces chloride secretion through crosstalk between cAMP and calcium signaling in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Thomas, Sheela V.; Kathpalia, Paru P.; Chen, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Under conditions of high dietary salt intake, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production is increased in the collecting duct and promotes urinary sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion; however, the molecular mechanisms by which PGE2 increases NaCl excretion in this context have not been clearly defined. We used the mouse inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD)-K2 cell line to characterize mechanisms underlying PGE2-regulated NaCl transport. When epithelial Na+ channels were inhibited, PGE2 exclusively stimulated basolateral EP4 receptors to increase short-circuit current (IscPGE2). We found that IscPGE2 was sensitive to inhibition by H-89 and CFTR-172, indicating that EP4 receptors signal through protein kinase A to induce Cl? secretion via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Unexpectedly, we also found that IscPGE2 was sensitive to inhibition by BAPTA-AM (Ca2+ chelator), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) (inositol triphosphate receptor blocker), and flufenamic acid (FFA) [Ca2+-activated Cl? channel (CACC) inhibitor], suggesting that EP4 receptors also signal through Ca2+ to induce Cl? secretion via CACC. Additionally, we observed that PGE2 stimulated an increase in Isc through crosstalk between cAMP and Ca2+ signaling; BAPTA-AM or 2-APB inhibited a component of IscPGE2 that was sensitive to CFTR-172 inhibition; H-89 inhibited a component of IscPGE2 that was sensitive to FFA inhibition. Together, our findings indicate that PGE2 activates basolateral EP4 receptors and signals through both cAMP and Ca2+ to stimulate Cl? secretion in IMCD-K2 cells. We propose that these signaling pathways, and the crosstalk between them, may provide a concerted mechanism for enhancing urinary NaCl excretion under conditions of high dietary NaCl intake. PMID:24284792

  15. Calcium chloride brines: The vital component in the hydrothermal brine-hydrothermal ore deposit-evaporite-basinal brine cycle in continental rift basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, L. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science)

    1992-01-01

    Nonmarine evaporites are forming today in chloride-rich saline lakes in a number of arid continental rift and strike-slip basins that are characterized by upwelling of subsurface CaCl[sub 2]-bearing brines driven by forced convection of cool basinal brines or by free convection of hydrothermal brines which reach the surface as brine springs. The compositions of these upwelling brines are distinctively different from that of seawater or typical continental waters due primarily to their high proportion of Ca and low proportion of SO[sub 4]. The most viable explanation for the CaCl[sub 2] composition of these upwelling brines is the interaction between hot convecting groundwaters and bedrock at or above zeolite facies temperatures, as for example occurs in the modern Salton Sea basin. Such upwelling CaCl[sub 2] brines in extensional fault basins can explain the puzzling chemical composition of MgSO[sub 4]-poor potash evaporites, the least understood of all ancient salt deposits. In this regard it is suggested that the following cyclic succession of processes occurs in active continental rift basins during a magmatically-driven thermal event: (1) hydrothermal convection of the ambient porewaters in the rift sediments, (2) dissolution of buried evaporites and hydrothermal metamorphism of the rift sediments, (3) hydrothermal ore deposition in fault-related fractures and within the rift sediments, (4) upwelling brine springs add CaCl[sub 2] and KCl components to the surface lake waters, which on evaporation produce MgSO[sub 4]-poor potash evaporites, (5) decay of the thermal event leads to cool down of the hot brines, which now migrate gravitationally to the deeper parts of the basin to become static Na-Ca-Cl basinal brines.

  16. Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles Synthesis Make sure the hood is clean and free of all chemicals other than the ones required.

    E-print Network

    Burgess, Kevin

    10-2 M calcium chloride solution in the above degassed water (make sure to sonicate for 10 min to dissolve calcium chloride completely). · Likewise prepare 6 x 10-3 M disodium phosphate solution from the above degassed water. · Disodium phosphate is less soluble in water than calcium chloride; please stir

  17. Corrosion Resistances of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals with Yttrium and Tungsten Additions in Hot Calcium Chloride Brine & Natural Seawater: Fe48Mo14CR15Y2C15B6 and Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peter, W; Payer, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, M B; Aprigliano, L

    2006-10-12

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of stainless steels and Ni-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022), based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Electrochemical studies of the passive film stability of SAM1651 are reported here. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). Yttrium-containing SAM1651, also known as SAM7 (Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0}), has a critical cooling rate (CCR) of approximately 80 Kelvin per second, while yttrium-free SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) has a higher critical cooling rate of approximately 600 Kelvin per second. SAM1651's low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. While the yttrium enables a low CCR to be achieved, it makes the material relatively difficult to atomize, due to increases in melt viscosity. Consequently, the powders have irregular shape, which makes pneumatic conveyance during thermal spray deposition difficult. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying, due to the formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which depletes the matrix of key alloy elements, whereas SAM1651 can be applied as coatings with the same corrosion resistance as a fully-dense completely amorphous melt-spun ribbon, provided that its amorphous nature is preserved during thermal spraying. Materials synthesis and characterization is discussed. Data showing the corrosion resistance of SAM1651 in hot concentrated calcium chloride, as well as natural seawater are presented, and compared to a number of reference materials.

  18. Molecular Simulations of Aqueous Electrolyte Solubility: 1. The Expanded-Ensemble Osmotic Molecular Dynamics Method for the Solution Phase

    E-print Network

    Lisal, Martin

    such as sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl2) whose aqueous solutions conduct an electric current such as mercury(II) chloride (HgCl2), only a small fraction of the atoms dissociate into free ions (HgCl+, Hg2

  19. Evaluation of PFP Furnace Systems for Thermal Stabilization of Washed High Chloride Plutonium Oxide Items

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Christopher M.; Elmore, Monte R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2002-12-17

    High chloride content plutonium (HCP) oxides are impure plutonium oxide scrap which contains NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and/or CaCl2 salts at potentially high concentrations and must be stabilized at 950 C per the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000. The chlorides pose challenges to stabilization because volatile chloride salts and decomposition products can corrode furnace heating elements and downstream ventilation components. A high-temperature furnace (same make and model as used at the RMC at Plutonium Finishing Plant) and the associated offgas system were set up at PNNL to identify system vulnerabilities and to investigate alternative materials and operating conditions that would mitigate any corrosion and plugging of furnace and offgas components. The key areas of interest for this testing were the furnace heating elements, the offgas line located inside the furnace, the offgas line between the furnace and the filter/knockout pot, the filter/knockout pot, the sample boat, and corrosion coupons to evaluate alternative materials of construction. The evaluation was conducted by charging the furnace with CeO2 that had been impregnated with a mixture of chloride salts (selected to represent the expected residual chloride salt level in washed high chloride items) and heated in the furnace in accordance with the temperature ramp rates and hold times used at PFP.

  20. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  1. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  2. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  3. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  6. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635R - 00 / 004 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF VINYL CHLORIDE ( CAS No . 75 - 01 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) May 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S

  7. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R01 / 003 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHYL CHLORIDE ( CAS No . 74 - 87 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2001 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.

  8. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet. PMID:25095643

  9. Iontophoresis and chloride-containing compounds: parameters required for killing.

    PubMed

    Davis, C P; Wagel, N; Anderson, M D; Warren, M M

    1993-10-01

    Fungi, and gram-positive and gram-negative organisms were susceptible to iontophoretic killing in simple media. Iontophoresis did not depend on electrode type but did require chloride-containing compounds in the medium. All organisms could be killed efficiently if chloride-containing compounds (for example sodium chloride and calcium chloride) were present in physiological concentrations. Effectiveness of iontophoretic killing could be reduced by nonphysiologically elevated concentrations of other substances (for example creatinine and albumin). The data suggest that iontophoresis should function well in urine, since chloride-containing compounds are present in adequate concentrations even if some naturally occurring compounds, such as creatinine or albumin, are elevated. PMID:8371382

  10. Effect of sodium and calcium ingestion on thermoregulation during exercise in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Morse, J. T.; Van Beaumont, W.; Montgomery, L. D.; Convertino, V. A.; Mangseth, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of hypertonic sodium and calcium ingestion on body temperature during exercise in cool and hot environments are investigated. Rectal and mean skin temperatures, sweat rates and arm and leg total blood flows were measured in men during periods of rest, submaximal exercise and recovery at temperatures of 26.5 C and 39.4 C after ingestion of NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. In both environments, higher rectal temperatures are observed after hypertonic sodium ingestion, which is also associated with attenuated blood flow in the extremities, lower sweat rates and slightly higher skin temperature in the heat, indicating significant thermoregulatory responses. Hypertonic calcium and isotonic sodium cause no temperature change, although calcium caused a reduction of blood flow in the extremities.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...chapter; 0.2 percent for gravies and sauces as defined in § 170.3(n)(24) of this chapter; 0.1 percent for commercial jams and jellies as defined in § 170.3(n)(28) of this chapter; 0.25 percent for meat products as defined in §...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...chapter; 0.2 percent for gravies and sauces as defined in § 170.3(n)(24) of this chapter; 0.1 percent for commercial jams and jellies as defined in § 170.3(n)(28) of this chapter; 0.25 percent for meat products as defined in §...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...chapter; 0.2 percent for gravies and sauces as defined in § 170.3(n)(24) of this chapter; 0.1 percent for commercial jams and jellies as defined in § 170.3(n)(28) of this chapter; 0.25 percent for meat products as defined in §...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...chapter; 0.2 percent for gravies and sauces as defined in § 170.3(n)(24) of this chapter; 0.1 percent for commercial jams and jellies as defined in § 170.3(n)(28) of this chapter; 0.25 percent for meat products as defined in §...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...chapter; 0.2 percent for gravies and sauces as defined in § 170.3(n)(24) of this chapter; 0.1 percent for commercial jams and jellies as defined in § 170.3(n)(28) of this chapter; 0.25 percent for meat products as defined in §...

  16. Reversible loss of gravitropic sensitivity in maize roots after tip application of calcium chelators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The application of calcium chelating agents (EDTA or EGTA) to the tips of maize roots caused a loss of gravitropic sensitivity. When the chelator was replaced with calcium chloride, gravitropic sensitivity was restored. Asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tip of a vertical root caused curvature toward the calcium source. When the calcium was applied to the upper surface of the tip of a root oriented horizontally, the root curved upward even though control roots exhibited strong downward curvature. Application of calcium chloride to the tips of decapped roots, which are known to be gravitropically insensitive, did not restore gravitropic sensitivity. However, asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tips of decapped roots caused curvature toward the calcium source. Calcium may play a key role in linking gravity detection to gravitropic curvature in roots.

  17. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePLUS

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  18. Antibacterial and bioactive calcium titanate layers formed on Ti metal and its alloys.

    PubMed

    Kizuki, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    An antibacterial and bioactive titanium (Ti)-based material was developed for use as a bone substitute under load-bearing conditions. As previously reported, Ti metal was successively subjected to NaOH, CaCl2, heat, and water treatments to form a calcium-deficient calcium titanate layer on its surface. When placed in a simulated body fluid (SBF), this bioactive Ti formed an apatite layer on its surface and tightly bonded to bones in the body. To address concerns regarding deep infection during orthopedic surgery, Ag(+) ions were incorporated on the surface of this bioactive Ti metal to impart antibacterial properties. Ti metal was first soaked in a 5 M NaOH solution to form a 1 ?m-thick sodium hydrogen titanate layer on the surface and then in a 100 mM CaCl2 solution to form a calcium hydrogen titanate layer via replacement of the Na(+) ions with Ca(2+) ions. The Ti material was subsequently heated at 600 °C for 1 h to transform the calcium hydrogen titanate into calcium titanate. This heat-treated titanium metal was then soaked in 0.01-10 mM AgNO3 solutions at 80 °C for 24 h. As a result, 0.1-0.82 at.% Ag(+) ions and a small amount of H3O(+) ions were incorporated into the surface calcium titanate layers. The resultant products formed apatite on their surface in an SBF, released 0.35-3.24 ppm Ag(+) ion into the fetal bovine serum within 24 h, and exhibited a strong antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus. These results suggest that the present Ti metals should exhibit strong antibacterial properties in the living body in addition to tightly bonding to the surrounding bone through the apatite layer that forms on their surfaces in the body. PMID:24682896

  19. Furnace System Testing to Support Lower-Temperature Stabilization of High Chloride Plutonium Oxide Items at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Elmore, Monte R.

    2003-04-16

    High chloride content plutonium (HCP) oxides are impure plutonium oxide scrap which contains NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and/or CaCl2 salts at potentially high concentrations and must be stabilized at 950 C per the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000. The chlorides pose challenges to stabilization because volatile chloride salts and decomposition products can corrode furnace heating elements and downstream ventilation components. Thermal stabilization of HCP items at 750 C (without water washing) is being investigated as an alternative method for meeting the intent of DOE STD 3013-2000. This report presents the results from a series of furnace tests conducted to develop material balance and system operability data for supporting the evaluation of lower-temperature thermal stabilization.

  20. The influence of sulphates on chloride binding and pore solution chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and OPC/ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) 65% cements containing 2.0 to 9.0% sulphates derived from sodium sulphate and calcium sulphate were investigated in respect to their chloride binding properties and the concentrations of chloride and hydroxyl ions in the pore solutions. Chlorides derived from sodium and calcium chlorides were introduced at the time of mixing. The results indicate that calcium sulphate has a different effect on chloride binding and the pore solution chemistry than sodium sulphate. The slag cement has higher chloride binding capacities as a result of simple replacement for OPC, but at the same sulphate contents, the slag cement does not give the expected higher binding capacities, suggesting that the difference in sulphate content between the two cements may be the main reason for their different chloride binding behavior.

  1. Effect of water hardness on the ability of water to rinse bacteria from the skin of processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of water hardness on the ability of water to rinse bacteria from the skin of processed broiler chickens was examined. Artificial hard water with a total hardness of 200 ppm (very hard water) was prepared by dissolving calcium chloride (CaCl2) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate (MgCl2 •6H2...

  2. Influence of water hardness on the ability of water to rinse bacteria from the skin of processed broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of water hardness on the ability of water to rinse bacteria from the skin of processed broiler chickens. Very hard water (200 ppm total hardness) was prepared by dissolving 0.38 g calcium chloride (CaCl2) and 0.175 g magnesium chloride hexahydrate (Mg...

  3. Role of water hardness in rinsing bacteria from the skin of processed broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of water hardness on the ability of water to rinse bacteria from the skin of processed broiler chickens was examined. Artificial hard water with a total hardness of 200 ppm (very hard water) was prepared by dissolving calcium chloride (CaCl2) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate (MgCl2 •6H2...

  4. Use of biopolymers as oriented supports for the stabilization of different polymorphs of biomineralized calcium carbonate with complex shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Dosque, Mario; Aranda, Pilar; Darder, Margarita; Retuert, Jaime; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad; Luis Arias, José; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    This work concerns the use of different biopolymers such as chitosan, alginate or ?-carrageenan as substrates to contribute to the study of the crystallization of calcium carbonate. The experimental biomimetic approach involves the preparation of mixtures of biopolymer solutions with a solution of CaCl 2, which is processed by means of spin-coating and then exposed to CO 2 by a slow diffusion method for the growth of CaCO 3. The obtained crystals show that each biopolymer has different effects on the crystallization habit. Different agglomerations of calcium carbonate crystals are initially the vaterite phase, which is subsequently stabilized as calcite. Biomineralization on each biopolymer gave rise to complex structures very different to those normally found in vitro, but similar to those observed in Nature. This confirms the strong influence of the macromolecules with ionizable groups on the stabilization of a determined polymorph and also on the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystals.

  5. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  6. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2014-08-01

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na+ and Ca2+ for [CaCl2] ranging from 10-8 to 10-2 M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  7. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2014-08-21

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na(+) and Ca(2+) for [CaCl2] ranging from 10(-8) to 10(-2) M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation-that includes both steric and correlation effects-is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant. PMID:25149816

  8. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePLUS

    This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order to work. ... A 24-hour urine sample is usually needed: On day 1, urinate into the toilet when you wake up in the morning. Collect ...

  9. Porous microspheres of amorphous calcium phosphate: block copolymer templated microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis and application in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guan-Jun; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Qi, Chao; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Wu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) microspheres with a porous and hollow structure have been prepared using an aqueous solution containing CaCl2 as a calcium source, adenosine triphosphate disodium salt (Na2ATP) as a phosphorus source in the presence of a block copolymer methoxyl poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D,L-lactide) (mPEG-PLA) by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The effects of microwave hydrothermal temperature and the concentrations of CaCl2 and Na2ATP on the crystal phase and morphology of the product are investigated. The as-prepared ACP porous hollow microspheres have a relatively high specific surface area of 232.9 m(2) g(-1) and an average pore size of 9.9 nm. A typical anticancer drug, docetaxel, is used to evaluate the drug loading ability and drug release behavior of ACP porous hollow microspheres in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) with different pH values of 4.5 and 7.4. The experiments reveal that the ACP porous hollow microspheres have a high drug loading capacity and favorable pH-responsive drug release property, and the ACP porous hollow microsphere drug delivery system shows a high ability to damage tumor cells. It is expected that the as-prepared ACP porous hollow microspheres are promising for the applications in various biomedical fields such as drug delivery. PMID:25535849

  10. Study of the Influence Between Barium Ions and Calcium Ions on Morphology and Size of Coprecipitation in Microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nong; Meng, Qing Luo

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we systematically drew a series of inverse-microemulsion quasi-ternary system phase diagrams of OP-10+C8H17OH+C6H12+brine (CaCl2/BaCl2) by adjusting the ratio of CaCl2 and BaCl2. On this basis, microemulsions have been prepared with seven different molar ratios of Ca2+/Ba2+, and calcium carbonate and barium carbonate coprecipitation products were obtained by reaction with an equimolar amount of sodium carbonate. The influence of barium ion to morphology and composition of nanometer calcium carbonate were studied. These samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM photographs indicated that when the content of Ca2+ was higher, some incomplete large cube of coprecipitation particles were formed in solution, but with the content of Ba2+ increased gradually, they formed a large number of small spherical particles, with the further increase of Ba2+ concentration, the particles mainly had structures of irregular polyhedron eventually. The measurement results of FTIR and XRD indicated that CaCO3 coprecipitation products gradually changed from calcite to the vaterite, eventually turned into being aragonite with the further increase of Ba2+ concentration.

  11. Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corry, Ben; Hool, Livia

    Ion channels underlie the electrical activity of cells. Calcium channels have a unique functional role, because not only do they participate in this activity, they form the means bywhich electrical signals are converted to responses within the cell. Calcium concentrations in the cytoplasm of cells are maintained at a low level, and calcium channels activate quickly such that the opening of ion channels can rapidly change the cytoplasmic environment. Once inside the cell, calcium acts as a "second messenger" prompting responses by binding to a variety of calcium sensitive proteins. Calcium channels are known to play an important role in stimulating muscle contraction, in neurotransmitter secretion, gene regulation, activating other ion channels, controlling the shape and duration of action potentials and many other processes. Since calcium plays an integral role in cell function, and since excessive quantities can be toxic, its movement is tightly regulated and controlled through a large variety of mechanisms.

  12. Comparison of intrinsic and extrinsic tracer methods for estimating calcium bioavailability to rats from dairy foods

    SciTech Connect

    Buchowski, M.S.; Sowizral, K.C.; Lengemann, F.W.; Van Campen, D.; Miller, D.D.

    1989-02-01

    Dairy products doubly labeled with 45Ca and 47Ca were used to evaluate an extrinsic labeling procedure for calcium bioavailability determination. Nonfat milk, yogurt, and fresh cheese curd were prepared from caprine milk that was intrinsically labeled with 45Ca. The products were then labeled extrinsically with 47Ca and administered to rats by gavage. The 47Ca to 45Ca ratio in bone and teeth averaged about 1.00 with either milk, yogurt, or CaCl2, but the ratio was about 1.04 when dosed with cheese curd. Ca absorption, determined by whole-body counting of 47Ca, was lower (P less than 0.05) in cheese curd (59%) than in either milk (69%), yogurt (72%), or CaCl2 (72%). Expressed as percent of dose, the absorption of 47Ca was highly correlated with bone 47Ca (r = 0.973) and with bone 45Ca (r = 0.946). Correlation between tibia 47Ca and tibia 45Ca was r = 0.923. For the dairy products tested, our results indicated that extrinsic 47Ca was absorbed similarly to intrinsic 45Ca. Moreover, the percent of radioactive dose retained in bone appears to be a valid indicator of relative bioavailability of food Ca.

  13. Investigation of factors influencing chloride extraction efficiency during electrochemical chloride extraction from reinforcing concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Stephen R.

    2005-11-01

    Electrochemical chloride extraction (ECE) is an accelerated bridge restoration method similar to cathodic protection, but operates at higher current densities and utilizes a temporary installation. Both techniques prolong the life of a bridge by reducing the corrosion rate of the reinforcing bar when properly applied. ECE achieves this by moving chlorides away from the reinforcement and out of the concrete while simultaneously increasing the alkalinity of the electrolyte near the reinforcing steel. Despite the proven success, significant use of ECE has not resulted in part due to an incomplete understanding in the following areas: (1) An estimation of the additional service life that can be expected following treatment when the treated member is again subjected to chlorides; (2) The cause of the decrease in current flow and, therefore, chloride removal rate during treatment; (3) Influence of water-to-cement (w/c) ratio and cover depth on the time required for treatment. This dissertation covers the research that is connected to the last two areas listed above. To begin examining these issues, plain carbon steel reinforcing bars (rebar) were embedded in portland cement concrete slabs of varying water-to-cement (w/c) ratios and cover depths, and then exposed to chlorides. A fraction of these slabs had sodium chloride added as an admixture, with all of the slabs subjected to cyclical ponding with a saturated solution of sodium chloride. ECE was then used to remove the chlorides from these slabs while making electrical measurements in the different layers between the rebar (cathode) and the titanium mat (anode) to follow the progress of the ECE process. During this study, it was revealed that the resistance of the outer concrete surface layer increases during ECE, inevitably restricting current flow, while the resistance of the underlying concrete decreases or remains constant. During ECE treatment, a white residue formed on the surface of the concrete. Analyses of the residue revealed that it contains calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, and other yet unidentified minor components when calcium hydroxide was used as the electrolyte. The surface film can be completely removed mechanically or to some extent inhibited chemically, with both of these processes resulting in an increase in the efficiency of the electrochemical chloride extraction process. In addition, an obvious relationship between the cover depth, water-to-cement ratio, and chloride extraction efficiency does not exist, however, cover depth does influence the current density. The final phase of this study will be presented in a VTRC/FHWA final report. This report will include the results that are presented in this dissertation, in addition to the results from the ongoing research. It will also include an estimation of the additional service life that can be expected following treatment.

  14. ARTICLE IN PRESS Oxalate, calcium and ash intake and excretion balances in fat sand rats

    E-print Network

    Vatnick, Itzick

    the solubility of calcium oxalate in solution, we examined whether a change in the intake of chloride saltsARTICLE IN PRESS Oxalate, calcium and ash intake and excretion balances in fat sand rats (Psammomys high concentrations of chloride salts (NaCl, KCl) and oxalate salts. Ingestion of large quantities

  15. Mutations in the putative calcium-binding domain of polyomavirus VP1 affect capsid assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Chang, D.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Calcium ions appear to play a major role in maintaining the structural integrity of the polyomavirus and are likely involved in the processes of viral uncoating and assembly. Previous studies demonstrated that a VP1 fragment extending from Pro-232 to Asp-364 has calcium-binding capabilities. This fragment contains an amino acid stretch from Asp-266 to Glu-277 which is quite similar in sequence to the amino acids that make up the calcium-binding EF hand structures found in many proteins. To assess the contribution of this domain to polyomavirus structural integrity, the effects of mutations in this region were examined by transfecting mutated viral DNA into susceptible cells. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that although viral protein synthesis occurred normally, infective viral progeny were not produced in cells transfected with polyomavirus genomes encoding either a VP1 molecule lacking amino acids Thr-262 through Gly-276 or a VP1 molecule containing a mutation of Asp-266 to Ala. VP1 molecules containing the deletion mutation were unable to bind 45Ca in an in vitro assay. Upon expression in Escherichia coli and purification by immunoaffinity chromatography, wild-type VP1 was isolated as pentameric, capsomere-like structures which could be induced to form capsid-like structures upon addition of CaCl2, consistent with previous studies. However, although VP1 containing the point mutation was isolated as pentamers which were indistinguishable from wild-type VP1 pentamers, addition of CaCl2 did not result in their assembly into capsid-like structures. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy studies of transfected mammalian cells provided in vivo evidence that a mutation in this region affects the process of viral assembly.

  16. Chloride - urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    The urine chloride test measures the amount of chloride in a certain volume of urine. ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested in the lab. If needed, the health care provider may ask you to collect your urine ...

  17. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different ... poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric chloride. This is for information only and not for ...

  18. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 2004.

  19. Endotrophic Calcium, Strontium, and Barium Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus1

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (The University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Endotrophic calcium, strontium, and barium spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus. J. Bacteriol. 91:1333–1345. 1966.—Spores were produced by washed vegetative cells suspended in deionized water supplemented with CaCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2. Normal, refractile spores were produced in each case; a portion of the barium spores lost refractility and darkened. Thin-section electron micrographs revealed no apparent anatomical differences among the three types of spores. Analyses revealed that the different spore types were enriched specifically in the metal to which they were exposed during sporogenesis. The calcium content of the strontium and the barium spores was very small. From binary equimolar mixtures of the metal salts, endotrophic spores accumulated both metals to nearly the same extent. Viability of the barium spores was considerably less than that of the other two types. Strontium and barium spores were heat-resistant; however, calcium was essential for maximal heat resistance. Significant differences existed in the rates of germination; calcium spores germinated fastest, strontium spores were slower, and barium spores were slowest. Calcium-barium and calcium-strontium spores germinated readily. Endotrophic calcium and strontium spores germinated without the prior heat activation essential for growth spores. Chemical germination of the different metal-type spores with n-dodecylamine took place at the same relative rates as physiological germination. Heat-induced release of dipicolinic acid occurred much faster with barium and strontium spores than with calcium spores. The washed “coat fraction” from disrupted spores contained little of the spore calcium but most of the spore barium. The metal in this fraction was released by dilute acid. The demineralized coats reabsorbed calcium and barium at neutral pH. Images PMID:4956334

  20. Calcium-induced proline accumulation contributes to amelioration of NaCl injury and expression of glutamine synthetase in greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tai-Sheng; Hung, Meng-Ju; Cheng, Yen-I; Cheng, Lee-Ju

    2013-11-15

    The calcium-mediated proline accumulation is a critical response under NaCl stress and the function of the induced proline as a glutamine synthetase (GS) protectant in greater duckweed was investigated. The plants were treated with solutions containing 100mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl plus 10mM CaCl2, or 10mM CaCl2 alone for 4 days. At the end of the experiment, the fronds of inoculum treated with 200 mM NaCl showed the chlorotic effect, higher glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH) activity and lower GS activity. At the lower salinity, the activities of GS and NADH-GDH were not altered markedly. A significant accumulation of proline was not found under either low or high salinity. The activity of ?(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) was enhanced only at 200 mM NaCl but remained unchanged at 100mM NaCl. The activity of ?(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) did not change under salinity-stressed. Addition of CaCl2 to the salt stressed plants not only lowered NaCl injury but also showed an elevated level of proline contents in response to the salinity treatment. In addition, both GS activity and corresponding polypeptides were expressed close to the level of control. Exogenous proline protects GS2 and the 32 kDa protein in photosystem II reaction center (D1) from H2O2-induced redox degradation in the chloroplast lysates of duckweed. The results suggest that calcium-induced proline accumulation may play an important role as a GS protectant under NaCl exposure in S. polyrhiza. PMID:24200992

  1. Influence of calcium ions on the crystallization of sodium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Demilie, Paul; Davoine, Perrine; Cartage, Thierry; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2005-02-01

    In industrial crystallization of sodium bicarbonate (sodium hydrogenocarbonate), the presence of calcium ions in solutions is unavoidable due to the production process. The understanding of the Ca 2+ role in NaHCO 3 crystallization would be helpful for improving the quality of the final products. The influence of calcium ions on NaHCO 3 crystallization was investigated in a 5-l mixed suspension mixed product removal crystallizer under controlled conditions. A density meter was used for continuous supersaturation monitoring. After a steady state had been reached, different CaCl 2 amounts were added at a constant flow rate. It was found that limited calcium ion levels in the system reduce drastically the nucleation frequency of NaHCO 3 and has a limited influence on crystal growth rate. The supersaturation measurements and other methods confirmed this phenomenon. The relationship between the Ca 2+ influence on NaHCO 3 crystallization, the calcium carbonate solubility and its metastable zone in concentrated NaHCO 3 solution was established. In fact, Ca 2+ has a maximum effect on NaHCO 3 crystallization kinetics when the saturation of calcium carbonate in NaHCO 3 solution has been reached, and the effect is constant in the metastable zone. The excess of Ca 2+ precipitates in NaHCO 3 solution as CaCO 3, as observed by energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction. This explained why an increasing Ca 2+ concentration in the solution has a limited influence on NaHCO 3 crystal size distribution and habit, but decreases the crystal purity. It is also confirmed that an impurity as Ca 2+ has no influence on the equilibrium NaHCO 3-Na 2CO 3.

  2. Pyramidal cells accumulate chloride at seizure onset Kyle P Lillisa,b, Mark A Kramerc, Jerome Mertzd, Kevin J Staleya,b, and John A Whitee

    E-print Network

    Kramer, Mark A.

    to the initiation of seizure activity. Keywords epilepsy; ictogenesis; chloride accumulation; ion imaging; calciumPyramidal cells accumulate chloride at seizure onset Kyle P Lillisa,b, Mark A Kramerc, Jerome cells during the onset of seizure-like activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Both calcium imaging

  3. [The role of calcium in IAA-induced swelling of protoplasts isolated from hypocotyl of etiolated mung bean seedlings].

    PubMed

    Li, D H; Wang, X J; Pan, R C

    1999-03-01

    This paper studied on the role of calcium in IAA-induced swelling of protoplasts isolated from hypocotyl in etiolated mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L.) seedlings. Protoplasts incubated in CaCl2-bearing medium without hormone maintained a constant volume and a consistent intensity of 45Ca2+ radioactivity. To treat with IAA, they began to swell and continually swelled to the maximum volume 30 minutes later (Fig. 2). However, the protoplasts could not swell when IAA was added into the medium without CaCl2 (Fig. 1). It was suggested that Ca2+ may be necessary for IAA to induce protoplast swelling. And also, IAA enabled the protoplasts to swell in less extent with K+, Zn2+, Ba2+ or Mg2+ instead of Ca2+ (Fig. 3). Radioisotope experiments showed that K+ influx increased when K+ replaced Ca2+ (Fig. 4), and water absorption plays a role in the swelling (Fig. 5). 45Ca2+ accumulation in protoplasts treated by IAA was much higher than that of control, and the time course of 45Ca2+ accumulation was similar to that of protoplasts swelling (Fig. 6). 45Ca2+ level and the swelling of protoplasts sharply declined when EGTA, verapamil or LaCl3 was added into the medium (Table 1, 2 and 3). These results indicated that Ca2+ may play an important role in IAA-induced swelling. PMID:12548795

  4. A Proposed Mechanism for the Thermal Denaturation of a Recombinant Bacillus Halmapalus Alpha-amylase - the Effect of Calcium Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Anders D.; Pusey, Marc L.; Fuglsang, Claus C.; Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stability of a recombinant alpha-amylase from Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) has been investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This alpha-amylase is homologous to other Bacillus alpha-amylases where previous crystallographic studies have identified the existence of 3 calcium binding sites in the structure. Denaturation of BHA is irreversible with a Tm of approximately 89 C, and DSC thermograms can be described using a one-step irreversible model. A 5 C increase in T(sub m) in the presence of 10 fold excess CaCl2 was observed. However, a concomitant increase in the tendency to aggregate was also observed. The presence of 30-40 fold excess calcium chelator (EDTA or EGTA) results in a large destabilization of BHA corresponding to about 40 C lower T(sub m), as determined by both CD and DSC. Ten fold excess EGTA reveals complex DSC thermograms corresponding to both reversible and irreversible transitions, which possibly originate from different populations of BHA:calcium complexes. The observations in the present study have, in combination with structural information of homologous alpha-amylases, provided the basis for the proposal of a simple denaturation mechanism of BHA. The proposed mechanism describes the irreversible thermal denaturation of different BHA:calcium complexes and the calcium binding equilibrium involved. Furthermore, the model accounts for a temperature induced reversible structural change associated with calcium binding.

  5. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Germany - Greece - Guatemala - Hong Kong - Hungary - Iceland - India - Indonesia - Iran, Islamic Republic of - Iraq - Ireland - Israel - Italy - ... Calculator Printer friendly Email Share Tweet Like The development of this calcium calculator was supported by Also ...

  6. Calcium Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  7. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100oC and up to 600 bar

    SciTech Connect

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-13

    Correlations presented by Spycher et al. (2003) to compute the mutual solubilities of CO2 and H2O are extended to include the effect of chloride salts in the aqueous phase. This is accomplished by including, in the original formulation, activity coefficients for aqueous CO2 derived from several literature sources, primarily for NaCl solutions. Best results are obtained when combining the solubility correlations of Spycher et al. (2003) with the activity coefficient formulation of Rumpf et al. (1994) and Duan and Sun (2003), which can be extended to chloride solutions other than NaCl. This approach allows computing mutual solubilities in a noniterative manner with an accuracy typically within experimental uncertainty for solutions up to 6 molal NaCl and 4 molal CaCl2.

  8. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  9. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  10. Calcium dependence of rapid auxin action in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and auxin on root elongation in seedlings of Zea mays L. The seedlings were raised either in the presence of Ca2+ (high calcium; HC = imbibed and raised in 10 millimolar CaCl2), in the absence of additional Ca2+ (intermediate calcium; IC = imbibed and raised in distilled H2O, calcium supply from seed only), or without additional Ca2+ and subsequently depleting them of Ca2+ (low calcium; LC = imbibed and raised in distilled H2O and subsequently treated with 1 millimolar ethyleneglycol-bis-[beta-aminoethylether]-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid [EGTA]). Exposure of roots of either HC or IC seedlings to auxin concentrations from 0.1 to 10 micromolar resulted in strong inhibition of elongation. In roots of LC seedlings, on the other hand, auxin concentrations as high as 10 micromolar caused only slight inhibition of elongation. Adding 0.5 millimolar Ca2+ to LC roots in the presence of IAA allowed normal expression of the inhibitory action of the hormone. Inhibition of elongation in IC roots by indoleacetic acid was reversible upon treatment of the roots with 1 millimolar EGTA. The inhibitory action of auxin could then be re-established by supplying 0.5 millimolar Ca2+. The data indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary to the growth-regulating action of auxin. The significance of this finding is discussed with respect to the potential role of Ca2+ as a second messenger of auxin action and the relevance of this model to recent evidence for gravi-induced redistribution of Ca2+ and its role in establishing gravitropic curvature.

  11. R u t c o r R e p o r t

    E-print Network

    ) is a leading manufacturer and sup- plier in the global market of soda ash and calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) , with approximately $300 million of revenue in 2000. The company has 2.8 million tons of annual capacity for soda ash of the major competitive strengths of the company is its low-cost high-quality natural soda ash US facility

  12. Calcium antagonistic activity of Bacopa monniera in guinea-pig trachea

    PubMed Central

    Channa, Shabana; Dar, Ahsana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the calcium antagonistic property of ethanol extract of Bacopa monniera in guinea-pig trachea. Materials and Methods: The dose response curves of CaCl2 (1 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 M) were constructed in the absence and presence of ethanol extract of Bacopa monniera (100, 500 and 700 ?g/ml) or nifedipine (1 × 10-6 M) in guinea-pig trachea in calcium free high K+-MOPS-PSS (3-(N-morpholino)-propanesulphonic acid physiological salt solution). The data was analyzed by ANOVA followed by least significant difference test or by Student's ‘t’ test for unequal variance when appropriate. A probability of at least P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The plant extract (500 and 700 ?g/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) depressed and shifted the calcium concentration-response curves (1 × 10-3- 1 × 10-1 M) to rightward similar to that of nifedipine. Conclusions: Bacopa monniera extract exhibited calcium channel blocking activity in guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscles that may rationalize its relaxant action on guinea-pig trachea and its traditional use in respiratory disorders. PMID:23087517

  13. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  14. Calcium and Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    A fact sheet that summarizes the results of studies on calcium and cancer prevention. It includes information about dietary recommendations for calcium, and the amount of calcium in foods and calcium supplements.

  15. Electrothermal vaporization on a tungsten filament for the determination of arsenic in chloride solutions by low-pressure helium ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Tanaka, T; Hiraide, M

    2001-01-01

    A combined method of electrothermal vaporization and low-pressure helium ICP-MS was developed for the determination of traces of arsenic in chloride solutions, because serious spectral interference occurred in conventional argon ICP-MS. On a tungsten filament was placed 5 microl of a sample and heated electrothermally to remove the solvent. The resulting residue on the filament was covered with a vaporization chamber, and after reducing the pressure to ca. 5 Torr, it was rapidly heated by discharging a high-capacity condenser (0.22 F). The vapor of arsenic was transferred to a helium plasma with a stream of carrier gas for the determination. The background was not observed at m/z of 75, which allowed the determination of arsenic at ng/ml levels in chloride solutions. Sodium chloride significantly enhanced the intensity of the arsenic signal, whereas other chlorides, including KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 and NH4Cl, suppressed the analytical signals. This enhancement due to sodium ions seems to be a peculiar phenomenon to the helium ICP. The proposed method can be applied to direct determinations of as low as 0.9 ng/ml of arsenic in seawater. PMID:11993658

  16. Project Calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Allan, S.E.; Bieber, J.

    1992-09-01

    Fouling problems in utility boilers have been classified into two principal types: high-temperature and low-temperature fouling. A multiclient-sponsored program was initiated at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to better understand the causes of low-temperature fouling when burning high-calcium western US coals. The goals of Project Calcium were to define the low-temperature deposition problem, identify the calcium-based components that are responsible for the formation of the deposits, develop ways to predict their formation, and identify possible methods to mitigate the formation of these deposits. To achieve the goals of Project Calcium, detailed sampling of utility boilers and laboratory-scale studies coupled with state-of-the-art methods to determine the inorganic components in coals and coal ash-derived materials were conducted. Boiler Sampling was also performed. The work involved sampling coal, entrained ash, deposits and slags from five full-scale utility boilers combined with detailed advanced characterization of the materials. The results of this work aided in identifying the key phenomena to focus the laboratory studies and in model verification. Field testing was conducted at three utilities.

  17. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  18. Novel Roles for Chloride Channels, Exchangers, and Regulators in Chronic Inflammatory Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Yurtsever, Zeynep; Berry, Kayla N.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Chloride transport proteins play critical roles in inflammatory airway diseases, contributing to the detrimental aspects of mucus overproduction, mucus secretion, and airway constriction. However, they also play crucial roles in contributing to the innate immune properties of mucus and mucociliary clearance. In this review, we focus on the emerging novel roles for a chloride channel regulator (CLCA1), a calcium-activated chloride channel (TMEM16A), and two chloride exchangers (SLC26A4/pendrin and SLC26A9) in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26612971

  19. Hydration of the calcium(II) ion in an aqueous solution of common anions (ClO4-, Cl-, Br-, and NO3-).

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Wolfram W; Irmer, Gert

    2013-03-21

    Raman spectra of aqueous calcium salt solutions, Ca(ClO(4))(2), CaCl(2), CaBr(2), and Ca(NO(3))(2), were measured from the concentrated solution stage to more dilute solutions (6.08-0.1 mol L(-1)) at 23 °C in water and heavy water down to 40 cm(-1). In aqueous Ca(ClO(4))(2) solutions a strongly polarized band at 283 cm(-1) (full width at half height (fwhh) = 68 cm(-1)) was observed. The mode at 283 cm(-1) was assigned to the Ca-O symmetric stretching vibration of the hexa-aqua Ca(2+) ion, [Ca(OH(2))(6)](2+), and the integrated band intensity showed a linear dependency with Ca(ClO(4))(2) concentration. In a Ca(ClO(4))(2) solution of heavy water a similar band was observed at 268 cm(-1) (fwhh = 64 cm(-1)) of the deuterated species, [Ca(OD(2))(6)](2+). In the OH stretching region of water a band of weakly H-bonded O-H oscillators was detected at 3550 cm(-1) due to O-H···ClO(4)(-). In D(2)O solutions a similar band was found at 2590 cm(-1) due to O-D···ClO(4)(-). The band at 283 cm(-1), in addition to the restricted translation mode of water at ~180 cm(-1), was also observed in dilute to moderately concentrated CaCl(2) and CaBr(2) solutions. This fact is strong evidence that neither Cl(-) nor Br(-) penetrate the first hydration sphere of Ca(2+) in solution with mol ratio H(2)O : CaCl(2)/CaBr(2)? 18 : 1 and the coordination number is unchanged. Furthermore, the influence of CaCl(2) on the water bands of the librational band region (300-900 cm(-1)), the deformation band of water and the O-H stretching region has been described. In a hydrate melt and very concentrated solutions of CaCl(2) with a mol ratio H(2)O : CaCl(2)? 9 : 1, however, contact ion pairs between Ca(2+) and Cl(-) are formed and the 283 cm(-1) band vanishes. Preliminary DFT calculations on the contact ion pair, [Ca(OH(2))(5)Cl](+), confirm its existence in such hydrate melts. In aqueous solutions of Ca(NO(3))(2), NO(3)(-) penetrates the first hydration sphere and spectroscopic evidence of weak nitrato-complex formation could be detected. This is the first comprehensive report on the symmetric stretching vibration of the hydrated Ca(2+) ion, [Ca(OH(2))(6)](2+), in aqueous solution. DFT calculations concerning geometry optimizations and frequency calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level on the hexa-aqua Ca(2+) ion in the gas phase and including a solvation-sphere were performed. The calculations on [Ca(OH(2))(6)](2+) and [Ca(OD(2))(6)](2+) with a solvation-sphere allowed the determination of the six CaO(6) skeletal modes and supported the assignment of the symmetric stretching mode, ?(1)CaO(6) of [Ca(OH(2))(6)](2+) and [Ca(OD(2))(6)](2+). Discrete cluster calculations on a cluster with six inner sphere and twelve outer sphere water molecules, [Ca(OH(2))(6)(OH(2))(12)](2+) at the same level of theory, led to a Ca-O internuclear distance at 2.383 Å and 4.475 Å for the inner sphere and the outer sphere respectively. PMID:23334569

  20. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity-i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+) . Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner. PMID:26179212

  1. The effect of the initial reactant molar ratio and doping with Fe3+ on the formation of calcium bilirubinate in water-oil microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siyun; Zhu, Jinmiao; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian; Zhang, Chunyan; Qiu, Lingguang

    2007-07-01

    A series of calcium bilirubinate nanoparticles were synthesized in microemulsions consisting of polyoxyethylene octylphenol ether (Triton X-100), n-hexyl alcohol (n-C6H13OH), cyclohexane (c-C6H12), and an aqueous solution. The particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and zeta potential measurements. The results showed that the initial CaCl2/Na2BR molar ratio and the molar ratio of water to surfactant (?0) influenced the morphology and microstructure of calcium bilirubinate nanoparticles and the sites of Ca2+ coordination to BR2-. The composition of synthesized calcium bilirubinate was nonstoichiometric. The stability of calcium bilirubinate nanoparticles dispersed in water changes as the Ca2+/BR2- molar ratio and solution pH varied. Dopant Fe2+ ions played a certain role in the simulated mineralization of calcium bilirubinate. A possible mechanism of calcium bilirubinate formation in inverse microemulsions is discussed.

  2. Determination of cytoplasmic calcium concentration in Dryopteris spores: a developmentally non-disruptive technique for loading of the calcium indicator fura-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuerlein, R.; Schmidt, K.; Poenie, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Germination of Dryopteris spores is mediated by the physiologically active, far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome, Pfr, and external Ca2+ is necessary for the transduction of the light signal. Because knowledge about the cytoplasmic calcium ion concentration, [Ca2+]i, is of great importance for understanding the role of calcium during signal transduction, this value was measured using fura-2 in fern spores undergoing the normal developmental progression into germination. Fura-2 was loaded into the spores by electroporation, which does not disrupt the normal process of germination. The intensity of the fluorescence emission of the loaded fura-2 was analysed by a microspectrophotometric assay of single spores, and successful loading could be obtained by the application of ten electrical pulses (field strength 7.5 kV cm-1, half-life (time constant) 230 microseconds). Fura-2 was alternately excited by light of wavelengths 355 and 385 nm through an inverted fluorescence microscope, and the emitted fura-2 fluorescence was collected by a silicon-intensified video camera. The cytoplasmic calcium ion concentration was calculated from the ratio of the camera output obtained for both wavelengths and displayed by a pseudo-color technique. Spores responded to changes of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration, and this observation is considered as evidence that fura-2 is loaded into the cytoplasm. The substitution of a low external [Ca2+] (1 mM ethyleneglycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)) by 1 mM CaCl2 caused a fast increase of [Ca2+]i from approx. 50 nM to above 500 nM. In contrast, the subsequent substitution of CaCl2 by EGTA decreased [Ca2+]i again below 100 nM within 0.5 h. Furthermore, the application of ionomycin could initiate a change in [Ca2+]i according to the Ca2+ gradient established between the extracellular medium and cytoplasm. In spores sown on a Ca(2+) -free medium, [Ca2+]i, analysed in a buffer containing EGTA, was found to be around 50 nM during the first days of cultivation, independent of the irradiation protocol. However, if spores were grown in darkness on a Ca(2+) -containing medium and analysed in EGTA, [Ca2+]i was significantly higher (> or = 500 nM). In red-light-irradiated spores, [Ca2+]i was found to decrease with increasing time after irradiation, and was determined to be less than 100 nM when analysis was done 44 h after germination was initiated by the light treatment.

  3. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  4. A membrane model for cytosolic calcium oscillations. A study using Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jafri, M S; Vajda, S; Pasik, P; Gillo, B

    1992-01-01

    Cytosolic calcium oscillations occur in a wide variety of cells and are involved in different cellular functions. We describe these calcium oscillations by a mathematical model based on the putative electrophysiological properties of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The salient features of our membrane model are calcium-dependent calcium channels and calcium pumps in the ER membrane, constant entry of calcium into the cytosol, calcium dependent removal from the cytosol, and buffering by cytoplasmic calcium binding proteins. Numerical integration of the model allows us to study the fluctuations in the cytosolic calcium concentration, the ER membrane potential, and the concentration of free calcium binding sites on a calcium binding protein. The model demonstrates the physiological features necessary for calcium oscillations and suggests that the level of calcium flux into the cytosol controls the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The model also suggests that the level of buffering affects the frequency and amplitude of the oscillations. The model is supported by experiments indirectly measuring cytosolic calcium by calcium-induced chloride currents in Xenopus oocytes as well as cytosolic calcium oscillations observed in other preparations. Images PLATE 1 PMID:1420870

  5. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  6. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Injectable hydrogels derived from phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Sem; Song, Minsoo; Lee, Eun-Jung; Shin, Ueon Sang

    2015-06-01

    Phosphorylation of sodium alginate salt (NaAlg) was carried out using H3PO4/P2O5/Et3PO4 followed by acid-base reaction with Ca(OAc)2 to give phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes (CaPAlg), as a water dispersible alginic acid derivative. The modified alginate derivatives including phosphorylated alginic acid (PAlg) and CaPAlg were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for (1)H, and (31)P nuclei, high resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. CaPAlg hydrogels were prepared simply by mixing CaPAlg solution (2w/v%) with NaAlg solution (2w/v%) in various ratios (2:8, 4:6, 6:4, 8:2) of volume. No additional calcium salts such as CaSO4 or CaCl2 were added externally. The gelation was completed within about 3-40min indicating a high potential of hydrogel delivery by injection in vivo. Their mechanical properties were tested to be ?6.7kPa for compressive strength at break and about 8.4kPa/mm for elastic modulus. SEM analysis of the CaPAlg hydrogels showed highly porous morphology with interconnected pores of width in the range of 100-800?m. Cell culture results showed that the injectable hydrogels exhibited comparable properties to the pure alginate hydrogel in terms of cytotoxicity and 3D encapsulation of cells for a short time period. The developed injectable hydrogels showed suitable physicochemical and mechanical properties for injection in vivo, and could therefore be beneficial for the field of soft tissue engineering. PMID:25842118

  8. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    Calcium carbonate is an ingredient that is commonly found in antacids (for heartburn) and some dietary supplements. Calcium carbonate overdose occurs when someone accidentally or intentionally takes ...

  9. PHOTOOXIDATION OF ALLYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photooxidation of allyl chloride was studied by irradiation either in 100-L Teflon bags or in a 22.7-cu m Teflon smog chamber in the presence of added NOx. In the absence of added hydrocarbons, the reaction involves a Cl atom chain, which leads to a highly reactive system. A ...

  10. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: POLYVINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry. PVC is manufactured by 20 companies at 35 plants. Each plant uses one or more of four possible polymerization processes: (1) suspension polymerization, (2) emulsion polymerization, (3) bulk p...

  11. The effect of the electrochemical chloride extraction treatment on steel-reinforced mortar. Part II: Microstructural characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, T.D.; Hansson, C.M.; Hope, B.B.

    1999-10-01

    A study has been made of the changes in cement composition and microstructures resulting from electrochemical chloride extraction applied to mortar samples in which the chlorides were added with the mixing water, ingressed by ponding with an NaCl solution, or both. After exposure for 1 year, specimens with and without chlorides were subjected to an electrochemical chloride extraction treatment. Microstructural analyses of fracture surfaces through the steel/mortar interface revealed a significant alteration of the cementitious phases. In untreated samples, calcium-silicon-rich phases consistent with Types I and II calcium silicate hydrate were observed. After the extraction treatment, these phases were not detectable and instead, sodium-rich, iron-rich, and calcium-aluminum-rich phases were observed.

  12. Toxicity of calcium salts to aqueous microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhina, K.G.; Dolganova, A.V.; Yakobi, L.K.

    1983-03-01

    This article investigates the toxicity of calcium to aqueous microogranisms by means of a procedure developed by VNII VODGEO (All-Union Scientific-Research Institute of Water Supply, Sewer Systems, Hydrotechnical Facilities, and Engineering Hydrogeology), with certain changes in the preparation of the culture water. Proposes that with this method, calcium toxicity can be determined for groups of microorganisms that are among the most important in biochemical wastewater treatment and self-purification of water bodies (saprophytes, phase I and II nitrifiers). Finds that calcium in the form of the hydroxide and chloride is nontoxic under the following conditions: for protozoa in concentrations up to 2 g/liter, for saprophytic bacteria up to 3 g/liter, for phase I nitrifiers up to 1 g/liter, and for phase II nitrifiers up to 0.1 g/liter.

  13. Calcium and nitrogen balance, experiment M007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whedon, G. D.; Lutwak, L.; Neuman, W. F.; Lachance, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    The collection of data on the response of the skeletal and muscular systems to 14-day space flights was evaluated for loss of calcium, nitrogen, and other metabolically related elements. Considerable interindividual variability was demonstrated in all experimental factors that were measured. Calcium balance became less positive and urinary phosphate excretion increased substantially in flight despite a reduction in phosphate intake. Patterns of excretion of magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride were different for each subject, and, in part, could be correlated with changes in adrenocortical steroid production. The principal hormonal change was a striking decrease during flight in the urinary excretion of 17-hydroxycortocosteroids. Dermal losses of calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and phosphate were insignificant during all three phases.

  14. Electrochemical studies of calcium chloride-based molten salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, T.P. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    Conductance and EMF studies of CaCl{sub 2}-based melts were performed in the temperature range 790--990 C. Conductivity data collected using magnesia tubes and capillaries showed deviations from the data recommended by the National Bureau of Standards. These deviations are attributed to the slow dissolution of magnesia by the CaCl{sub 2}-CaO melt. Conductivity data for molten CaCl{sub 2} using a pyrolytic boron nitride capillary were in reasonable agreement with the recommended data; however, undissolved CaO in CaCl{sub 2} may have caused blockage of the pyrolytic boron nitride capillary, resulting in fluctuations in the measured resistance. The utility of the AgCl/Ag reference electrode in CaCl{sub 2}-AgCl and CaCl{sub 2}-CaO-AgCl melts, using asbestos diaphragms and Vycor glass as reference half-cell membranes, was also investigated. Nernstian behavior was observed using both types of reference half-cell membranes in CaCl{sub 2}-AgCl melts. The AgCl/Ag reference electrode also exhibited Nernstian behavior in CaCl{sub 2}-CaO-AgCl melts using a Vycor reference half-cell membrane and a magnesia crucible. The use of CaCl{sub 2} as a solvent is of interest since it is used in plutonium metal purification, as well as various other commercial applications. 97 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Sodium Chloride (Catheter Flush) Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use a sodium chloride flush several times a day. Your health care provider will determine the number of sodium chloride flushes you will need a day. ... health care provider probably will give you several days supply of sodium chloride. You will be told ...

  16. Recovery of soluble chloride salts from the wastewater generated during the washing process of municipal solid wastes incineration fly ash.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailong; Erzat, Aris; Liu, Yangsheng

    2014-01-01

    Water washing is widely used as the pretreatment method to treat municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, which facilitates the further solidification/stabilization treatment or resource recovery of the fly ash. The wastewater generated during the washing process is a kind of hydrosaline solution, usually containing high concentrations of alkali chlorides and sulphates, which cause serious pollution to environment. However, these salts can be recycled as resources instead of discharge. This paper explored an effective and practical recovery method to separate sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride salts individually from the hydrosaline water. In laboratory experiments, a simulating hydrosaline solution was prepared according to composition of the waste washing water. First, in the three-step evaporation-crystallization process, pure sodium chloride and solid mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides were obtained separately, and the remaining solution contained potassium and calcium chlorides (solution A). And then, the solid mixture was fully dissolved into water (solution B obtained). Finally, ethanol was added into solutions A and B to change the solubility of sodium, potassium, and calcium chlorides within the mixed solvent of water and ethanol. During the ethanol-adding precipitation process, each salt was separated individually, and the purity of the raw production in laboratory experiments reached about 90%. The ethanol can be recycled by distillation and reused as the solvent. Therefore, this technology may bring both environmental and economic benefits. PMID:25176491

  17. Fabrication of Flexible Porous Calcium-Deficient Apatite -Alginate Composite and Its Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukuda, Souichirou; Umeda, Tomohiro; Koda, Seiichiro; Itatani, Kiyoshi

    2011-10-01

    The calcium-deficient apatite (Ca9.36(HPO4)0.74(PO4)5.26(OH)1.26·nH2O (Ca/P ratio=1.56): DAp) - alginate (AG) composite was fabricated by the ice crystal sublimation technique. The starting whisker-like calcium-deficient apatite (w-DAp) powder with long-axis length of 62.6 ?m and short-axis length of 2.85 ?m was prepared by the homogeneous precipitation technique. After mixing the w-DAp with AG paste (DAp/AG ratio: 10), the mixture was flash frozen at a temperature between -5 and -196°C. The frozen materials were further lyophilized at -50°C for 24 h under reduced pressure and put into 1 mol-dm-3 CaCl2 solution at room temperature for 24 h The microscopic observation showed that the pore size of w-DAp-AG composite increased from ~20 to ~100 ?m with decreasing concentration of starting AG paste from 7.5 to 2.5 mass% and with decreasing freezing temperature from -196°C down to -5°C. The maximum porosity of w-DAp-AG composite, which was fabricated using 2.5 mass% AG at the freezing temperature of -5°C, attained 92.3%.

  18. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. PMID:26117783

  19. Fermentation profile of green Spanish-style Manzanilla olives according to NaCl content in brine.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Romero-Gil, V; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; García-García, P; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2015-08-01

    This work studies the effects of the partial substitution of NaCl with potassium and calcium chloride salts on the fermentation profile of Spanish-style green Manzanilla olives. For this purpose, response surface methodology based in an enlarged simplex centroid mixture design with constrain (?salts = 100 g/L) was used. Regarding to physicochemical characteristics, pH decreased when CaCl2 increased, titratable acidity was lower in presence of KCl while combined acidity increased as the contents of KCl and CaCl2 were close to the barycentre of the experiment (?33.33% each salt). Regarding to microbiological profile, Enterobacteriaceae growth was slight stimulated in presence of high CaCl2 contents, yeast patterns were not linked to the initial brine compositions, while the maximum lactic acid bacteria population decreased slightly as KCl and CaCl2 increased in the proportion 1:1, although a moderate (equilibrated) content of both may be stimulating. Results obtained in this work show that Spanish-style green Manzanilla cv. can be fermented in diverse mixtures of chloride salts, albeit the initial CaCl2 should be limited to 20-30 g/L to prevent excessive Enterobacteriaceae growth; combining it with a similar proportion of KCl may also improve LAB predominance. PMID:25846915

  20. Incorporation of calcium salts into xanthan gum matrices: hydration, erosion and drug release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Groves, Emma; Chaw, Cheng Shu

    2015-01-01

    Xanthan gum (XG), a hydrophilic biopolymer with modified release properties, was used to produce directly compressed matrix tablets containing a model drug, sodium p-aminosalicylate. Three formulations were prepared, each containing a different calcium dihydrate salt: calcium chloride, calcium sulfate or dibasic calcium phosphate. The aim of the investigation was to relate the calcium ion content and solubility of the calcium salt to the in vitro drug release profile of the xanthan matrices. Tablet hydration, erosion and drug release were determined in distilled water using the British Pharmacopoeia (BP) paddle method. The data showed that the overall drug release was the greatest with addition of calcium sulfate, followed by calcium chloride and dibasic calcium phosphate. The chloride salt formulation displayed the greatest percentage erosion due to rapid mass loss during the initial phase, followed by those with sulfate or phosphate salts. As xanthan gel viscosity increased and drug release was also found to be lower, it can be concluded that drug release is influenced by the solubility of the salt present in the formulation, since these parameters determine the viscosity and structure of the gel layer. PMID:25371230

  1. Monitoring personnel exposure to vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride and methyl chloride in an industrial work environment.

    PubMed

    Severs, L W; Skory, L K

    1975-09-01

    Pittsburgh PCB 12 times 30 activated carbon is found to be the most suitable of the commerically available carbons tested for personnel sampling of vinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, and methyl chloride. The carbon is desorbed with CS2 at dry ice temperature or with a thermal desorption technique. PMID:1180218

  2. Effects of Increasing Potassium Chloride and Calcium Chloride Ionic Strength on Pesticide Sorption by Potassium- and Calcium-smectite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Smectite clays have demonstrated high affinity for many pesticides in aqueous solution, which is influenced by the intrinsic natures of smectite clays (e.g., surface charge density and location), exchangeable cations, and clay interlayer hydration status. The amount and the type of salts present in ...

  3. Measurement of shift in K X-ray peak energies of potassium and calcium in different compounds using EDXRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kamaldip; Mittal, Raj

    2014-12-01

    Energy shifts in K X-ray peaks of potassium and calcium in different chemical compounds have been determined from their X-ray spectra recorded in an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) set-up. The set-up comprises low-power X-ray tube photon source and Si(PIN) detector (AMPTEK model XR-100 CR). A statistical procedure has been followed to determine the shifts and t-test was applied to find the statistical significance of the results. The shifts were determined in potassium compounds; KCl, KBr, KI, K2CO3, K2Cr2O7, K2CrO4, K2SO4, K3Fe(CN)6, K4Fe(CN)6, KHSO4, KMnO4 and KSCN with KNO3 as reference and in calcium compounds; Ca(NO3)2 · 4H2O, Ca(OH)2, CaCl2, CaCO3, CaSO3 and CaSO4 · 2H2O with CaO as reference and correlated with differences in electro-negativity, number of ligands, structural changes, type of bonding, axial distances, etc. in the compounds. The shifts in potassium compounds have been evaluated for the first time while the same for calcium compounds almost agree well with the earlier reported measurements in literature.

  4. Extracellular calcium is involved in egg yolk-induced head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Yang, D H; McMillan, A G; Standley, N T; Shannon, P; Xu, Z Z

    2012-10-15

    Head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm occurs when semen is highly diluted in an egg yolk-citrate diluent without streptomycin. The objectives were to investigate causes of sperm agglutination and the underlying mechanism. Aliquots of bull semen were diluted in a base diluent (BD) supplemented with various test components and the percentage of agglutinated sperm (% AggSp) was quantified at 1, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. When sperm were incubated at 22 °C, no agglutination was observed in BD for up to 72 h, whereas the % AggSp was 5.0, 41.7, 72.2, 91.1, and 92.8% in BD + 5% egg yolk (BD + EY) at 1, 5, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. However, no sperm agglutination was observed in BD + EY if incubation temperature was 37 °C. Addition of 5 or 10 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid to BD + EY reduced the % AggSp from 95% to <5% at 72 h (P < 0.001), but addition of 5 mM CaCl(2) to BD failed to induce sperm agglutination in the absence of egg yolk, implicating calcium and other factors in egg yolk. Addition of the citrate-soluble fraction (CSF) of egg yolk to BD induced sperm agglutination similar to whole egg yolk, whereas water- and saline-soluble fractions of egg yolk were ineffective. The sperm-agglutinating efficacy of CSF (the % AggSp = 95% at 72 h) was reduced by dialysis (20%; P < 0.05), partially restored by addition of 5 mM CaCl2 (70%; P < 0.05), but the calcium effect was neutralized by addition of 5 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid (1.7%; P < 0.05), again implicating calcium. Addition of 30 ?M of a protein kinase A inhibitor (H-89) to an agglutinating diluent failed to inhibit sperm agglutination, whereas addition of 2 mM of a cAMP analogue, dbcAMP, to a nonagglutinating diluent failed to induce sperm agglutination. Agglutination status had no effect on sperm plasma membrane/acrosome status and mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, calcium and other component(s) in the CSF of egg yolk induced head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. Although the mechanism of agglutination was not determined, the cAMP- protein kinase A signaling pathway was not involved. PMID:22925643

  5. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Takuo; Ishida, Hiromi; Fujii, Yoshio; Ohue, Mutsumi; Kaji, Hiroshi; Hirai, Midori; Kakumoto, Mikio; Abrams, Steven A

    2010-07-01

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In 10 postmenopausal women volunteers aged 59 to 77 years (mean ± S.D., 67 ± 5.3), the fractional calcium absorption of AAACa and CaCO(3) was measured by a dual stable isotope method. (44)Ca-enriched CaCO(3) and AAACa were administered in all subjects one month apart. After a fixed-menu breakfast and pre-test urine collection (Urine 0), (42)Ca-enriched CaCl(2) was intravenously injected, followed by oral administration of (44)Ca-enriched CaCO(3) without carrier 15 minutes later, and complete urine collection for the next 24 hours (Urine 24). The fractional calcium absorption was calculated as the ratio of Augmentation of (44)Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24/ augmentation of (42)Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24. Differences and changes of (44)Ca and (42)Ca were corrected by comparing each with (43)Ca. Fractional absorption of AAACa (mean ± S.D., 23.1 ± 6.4), was distinctly and significantly higher than that of CaCO(3 )(14.7 ± 6.4; p = 0.0060 by paired t-test). The mean fractional absorption was approximately 1.57-times higher for AAACa than for CaCO(3). The serum 25(OH) vitamin D level was low (mean ± S.D., 14.2 ± 4.95 ng/ml), as is common in this age group in Japan. Among the parameters of the bone and mineral metabolism measured, none displayed a significant correlation with the fractional absorption of CaCO(3) and AAACa. Higher fractional absorption of AAACa compared with CaCO(3) supports previous reports on the more beneficial effect of AAACa than CaCO(3) for osteoporosis. PMID:22254052

  6. Cch1 and Mid1 Are Functionally Required for Vegetative Growth under Low-Calcium Conditions in the Phytopathogenic Ascomycete Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Harren, Karin

    2013-01-01

    In the filamentous phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea, the Ca2+/calcineurin signaling cascade has been shown to play an important role in fungal growth, differentiation, and virulence. This study deals with the functional characterization of two components of this pathway, the putative calcium channel proteins Cch1 and Mid1. The cch1 and mid1 genes were deleted, and single and double knockout mutants were analyzed during different stages of the fungal life cycle. Our data indicate that Cch1 and Mid1 are functionally required for vegetative growth under conditions of low extracellular calcium, since the growth of both deletion mutants is strongly impaired when they are exposed to the Ca2+-chelating agents EGTA and 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N?,N?-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). The impact of external Ca2+ was investigated by supplementing with CaCl2 and the ionophore A23187, both of which resulted in elevated growth for all mutants. However, deletion of either gene had no impact on germination, sporulation, hyphal morphology, or virulence. By use of the aequorin reporter system to measure intracellular calcium levels, no differences between the mutant strains and the wild type were obtained. Localization studies revealed a subcellular distribution of the Mid1–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein in network-like filaments, probably the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, indicating that Mid1 is not a plasma membrane-located calcium channel in B. cinerea. PMID:23475703

  7. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

  8. Laboratory study on the high-temperature capture of HCl gas by dry-injection of calcium-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Shemwell, B; Levendis, Y A; Simons, G A

    2001-01-01

    This is a laboratory study on the reduction of combustion-generated hydrochloric acid (HCl) emissions by in-furnace dry-injection of calcium-based sorbents. HCl is a hazardous gaseous pollutant emitted in significant quantities by municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, coal-fired power plants, and other industrial furnaces. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory furnace at gas temperatures of 600-1000 degrees C. HCl gas diluted with N2, and sorbent powders fluidized in a stream of air were introduced into the furnace concurrently. Chlorination of the sorbents occurred in the hot zone of the furnace at gas residence times approximately 1 s. The sorbents chosen for these experiments were calcium formate (CF), calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), calcium propionate (CP), calcium oxide (CX), and calcium carbonate (CC). Upon release of organic volatiles, sorbents calcine to CaO at approximately 700 degrees C, and react with the HCl according to the reaction CaO + 2HCl <=> CaCl2 + H2O. At the lowest temperature case examined herein, 600 degrees C, direct reaction of HCl with CaCO3 may also be expected. The effectiveness of the sorbents to capture HCl was interpreted using the "pore tree" mathematical model for heterogeneous diffusion reactions. Results show that the thin-walled, highly porous cenospheres formed from the pyrolysis and calcination of CF, CMA, and CP exhibited high relative calcium utilization at the upper temperatures of this study. Relative utilizations under these conditions reached 80%. The less costly low-porosity sorbents, calcium carbonate and calcium oxide also performed well. Calcium carbonate reached a relative utilization of 54% in the mid-temperature range, while the calcium oxide reached an 80% relative utilization at the lowest temperature examined. The data matched theoretical predictions of sorbent utilization using the mathematical model, with activation energy and pre-exponential factors for the calcination reaction of 17,000 K and 300,000 (g gas/cm2/s/atm gas), respectively. Thus, the kinetics of the calcination reaction were found to be much faster (approximately 500 times) than those of the sulfation reaction examined previously in this laboratory. PMID:11219704

  9. Oxomemazine hydro-chloride.

    PubMed

    Siddegowda, M S; Butcher, Ray J; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H S; Ramesh, A R

    2011-08-01

    IN THE TITLE COMPOUND [SYSTEMATIC NAME: 3-(5,5-dioxo-phen-othia-zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl-propanaminium chloride], C(18)H(23)N(2)O(2)S(+)·Cl(-), the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia-zine unit is 30.5?(2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N-H?Cl and C-H?Cl hydrogen bonds and C-H?? inter-actions. PMID:22090928

  10. Oxomemazine hydro­chloride

    PubMed Central

    Siddegowda, M. S.; Butcher, Ray J.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Yathirajan, H. S.; Ramesh, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound [systematic name: 3-(5,5-dioxo­phen­othia­zin-10-yl)-N,N,2-trimethyl­propanaminium chloride], C18H23N2O2S+·Cl?, the dihedral angle between the two outer aromatic rings of the phenothia­zine unit is 30.5?(2)°. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H?Cl and C—H?Cl hydrogen bonds and C—H?? inter­actions. PMID:22090928

  11. Studies on reduction of chloride matrix interferences on determination of germanium using zirconium ruthenium and palladium magnesium modifiers by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeravali, Noorbasha N.; Reddy, M. A.; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2007-05-01

    The performance of the Zr-Ru permanent chemical modifier has been compared with the conventional Pd-Mg modifier for the determination of germanium in chloride matrix. Interferences from different matrices such as NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2, CaCl 2, FeCl 3 and HCl were studied, in a transverse heated graphite atomizer (THGA) with and without end caps. End capped tubes coated with Zr-Ru showed less interference due to chloride matrix compared to Pd-Mg also measured in end capped tube. The linear calibration range is up to 1.6 mg l - 1 , nearly three orders of magnitude when the Zr-Ru coated end capped THGA tube is used. The precision of the measurements (RSD, N = 3) was 0.6-3% for 1.6-0.01 mg l - 1 Ge solution and the limit of detection was 0.002 mg l - 1 . The characteristic mass was 30 ± 5 pg for Zr-Ru and 90 ± 10 pg for Pd-Mg modifiers. A GBW 07312 stream sediment certified reference material was used to check validity of the method.

  12. Insolubilization of potassium chloride crystals in Tradescantia pallida.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, M; Montenegro, T; Carjuzaa, P; Maldonado, S

    2007-01-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals are by far the most prevalent and widely distributed mineral deposits in higher plants. In Tradescantia pallida, an evergreen perennial plant widely used as an ornamental plant, calcium oxalate crystals occur in the parenchymal tissues of stem, leaf, and root, as well as in flower organs, in the form of either raphides or tetragonal prismatic crystals or both. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that C, O, and Ca were the main elements; and K, Cl, and Si, the minor elements. Infrared and X-ray analyses of crystals collected from these tissues detected the coexistence of two calcium oxalate chemical forms, i.e., whewellite and weddellite, as well as calcite, opal, and sylvite. Here, we show for the first time the occurrence of epitaxy in mineral crystals of plants. Epitaxy, which involves the oriented overgrowth of one crystal onto a second crystalline substrate, might explain how potassium chloride (sylvite)--one of the most water-soluble salts--stays insoluble in crystal form when coated with a calcium oxalate epilayer. The results indicate the potential role of crystals in regulating the ionic equilibrium of both calcium and potassium ions. PMID:17762907

  13. 10 / JOURNAL OF MATERIALS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2001 INHIBITING ACTION OF CALCIUM NITRITE ON CARBON STEEL REBARS

    E-print Network

    10 / JOURNAL OF MATERIALS IN CIVIL ENGINEERING / JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2001 INHIBITING ACTION OF CALCIUM on carbon steel rebar samples under different pH conditions and in the presence and absence of chloride ions in solution. A known amount of calcium nitrite was added as an inhibitor and the mechanism of inhibition

  14. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The...

  18. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... But over time, some causes of high blood calcium can lead to osteoporosis (thinning of the bones) and kidney stones. Very high blood calcium can cause more serious problems, including kidney failure, ...

  19. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and buttermilk contain a form of calcium ... the amount of calcium in a dairy product. Yogurt, most cheeses, and buttermilk are excellent sources of ...

  20. Calcium-Rich Foods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 130 Waffle 80 g 47 Meat, fish and eggs Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Egg 50 g 27 Red meat 120 g 7 ... foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Quiche (cheese, eggs) 200 g 212 Omelette with cheese 120 g ...

  1. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected joint. CPPD ... using a microscope to see small calcium pyrophosphate crystals in joint fluid. Anti-inflammatory medications reduce pain ...

  2. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  3. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  4. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following...

  5. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following...

  6. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375 Food and...Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No. 123-93-5) may be...

  7. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food...Chemical Preservatives § 582.3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  8. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375 Food and...Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No. 123-03-05) may be...

  11. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375 Food and...Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No. 123-93-5) may be...

  12. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food...Chemical Preservatives § 582.3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section 173.400 Food and...Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 75 FR 33824 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ...731-TA-149 (Third Review)] Barium Chloride From China Determination On the basis...the antidumping duty order on barium chloride from China would be likely to lead to...4157 (June 2010), entitled Barium Chloride from China: Investigation No....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section 173.400 Food and...Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance...

  20. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances § 173.255 Methylene chloride. Methylene chloride may be present in food under the following...

  1. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375 Food and...Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No. 123-93-5) may be...

  2. 75 FR 19657 - Barium Chloride From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...731-TA-149 (Third Review)] Barium Chloride From China AGENCY: United States International...the antidumping duty order on barium chloride from China...the antidumping duty order on barium chloride from China would be likely to lead...

  3. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section 173.400 Food and...Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance...

  4. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food...Chemical Preservatives § 582.3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 173.375 - Cetylpyridinium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cetylpyridinium chloride. 173.375 Section 173.375 Food and...Usage Additives § 173.375 Cetylpyridinium chloride. Cetylpyridinium chloride (CAS Reg. No. 123-03-05) may be...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section 173.400 Food and...Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food...Chemical Preservatives § 582.3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food...Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 173.400 - Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. 173.400 Section 173.400 Food and...Additives § 173.400 Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride. Dimethyldialkylammonium chloride may be safely used in food in accordance...

  15. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food...Chemical Preservatives § 582.3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  16. Novel technique for phosphorus recovery from aqueous solutions using amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (A-CSHs).

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Uemoto, Masahide; Kagami, Jumpei; Miura, Keiichi; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Toda, Masaya; Honda, Kohsuke; Ohtake, Hisao

    2013-05-01

    A novel technique for phosphorus (P) recovery from aqueous solutions was developed using amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (A-CSHs). A-CSHs, which have a high Ca/Si molar ratio of 2.0 or greater, could be synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as siliceous shale and calcium hydroxide. A-CSHs showed high performance for P recovery from an anaerobic sludge digestion liquor (ASDL) and the synthetic model liquor (s-ASDL) containing 89 mg PO4-P/L. After 20 min mixing, 1.5 g/L A-CSHs could remove approximately 69 and 73% PO4-P from ASDL and s-ASDL, respectively. By contrast, autoclaved lightweight concrete particles, which contained crystalline calcium silicate hydrates as a principal component, removed only 10 and 6% PO4-P from ASDL and s-ASDL, respectively, under the same experimental conditions. When A-CSHs were washed with deionized water to remove free Ca(OH)2, P removability was significantly improved (up to 82%) despite the reduction in the amount of Ca(2+) released. Unlike in the case of Ca(OH)2, no significant carbonate inhibition was observed with P removal by A-CSHs. Moreover, P removed by A-CSHs showed better settleability, filterability, and dewaterability than P precipitated with conventional CaCl2 and Ca(OH)2. The present study demonstrated that A-CSHs have great potential as a novel, beneficial material for P recovery and recycling. PMID:23497975

  17. A laboratory assessment of bacterial leakage in MTA apical plugs exposed to phosphate-buffered saline.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Josiane; Pimenta, Andrea L; Felippe, Wilson T

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the exposure of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) - with and without calcium chloride (CaCl2) -to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) on apical microleakage. Sixty root segments were divided into 4 experimental groups (n=15). Apical cavities were filled with MTA with or without CaCl2, and the root canals dressed with a moistened cotton pellet or PBS: 1) MTA/cotton pellet; 2) MTA/PBS; 3) MTA+ 10%CaCl2/cotton pellet; 4) MTA+10%CaCl2/PBS. After 2 months, E. faecalis penetration was analyzed along the apical plugs. Samples were observed weekly for 70 days, and leakage was detected by turbidity of the medium in contact with the root segment. Teeth in the control groups (n=2) were either made completely impermeable or kept without an apical plug. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival and the Logrank test was used to compare the survival curves (p<0.05). All specimens in the positive control group showed evidence of leakage within 24h, while none in the negative control group showed leakage up to 70 days. There was no statistically significant difference among the experimental groups (p=0.102). The use of PBS as intracanal dressing may improve MTA sealing ability, but cannot prevent bacterial leakage. The addition of CaCl2 to the MTA did not improve MTA sealing ability. PMID:26355884

  18. Calcium bioavailability from calcium fortified food products.

    PubMed

    Kohls, K

    1991-08-01

    The calcium balance of 12 presumed healthy human young adult subjects was assessed. Subjects consumed a constant laboratory-controlled diet supplemented with one of four calcium-fortified food products: orange juice (OJ), milk (M), experimental pasteurized processed cheese (T), soda (S), or a calcium carbonate plus vitamin D tablet (CC). Study length was 6 weeks with seven-day experimental periods (2-days allowed for adjustment with 5-days combined for purposes of analysis). All urine and fecal samples were collected by the subjects for the duration of the study. Blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. Urine and fecal calcium contents were determined. Blood samples were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase. Results of this study indicate a higher fecal calcium content (mg/day) when subjects consumed CC and T, and when subjects consumed self-selected diets, than when given S, M, or OJ. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly lower when subjects consumed OJ than when they consumed M, T, or their self-selected diets. A significantly larger positive calcium balance was demonstrated when subjects consumed OJ as compared to T. Fecal transmit time did not vary significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower when subjects consumed T than when they consumed self-selected diets. PMID:1765836

  19. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++CO3-- molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  20. A rice tonoplastic calcium exchanger, OsCCX2 mediates Ca2+/cation transport in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Akhilesh K.; Shankar, Alka; Jha, Saroj K.; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    In plant cell, cations gradient in cellular compartments is maintained by synergistic action of various exchangers, pumps and channels. The Arabidopsis exchanger family members (AtCCX3 and AtCCX5) were previously studied and belong to CaCA (calcium cation exchangers) superfamily while none of the rice CCXs has been functionally characterized for their cation transport activities till date. Rice genome encode four CCXs and only OsCCX2 transcript showed differential expression under abiotic stresses and Ca2+ starvation conditions. The OsCCX2 localized to tonoplast and suppresses the Ca2+ sensitivity of K667 (low affinity Ca2+ uptake deficient) yeast mutant under excess CaCl2 conditions. In contrast to AtCCXs, OsCCX2 expressing K667 yeast cells show tolerance towards excess Na+, Li+, Fe2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ and suggest its ability to transport both mono as well as divalent cations in yeast. Additionally, in contrast to previously characterized AtCCXs, OsCCX2 is unable to complement yeast trk1trk2 double mutant suggesting inability to transport K+ in yeast system. These finding suggest that OsCCX2 having distinct metal transport properties than previously characterized plant CCXs. OsCCX2 can be used as potential candidate for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance in plants as well as for phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26607171

  1. Reversible alkaline inactivation of lignin peroxidase involves the release of both the distal and proximal site calcium ions and bishistidine co-ordination of the haem.

    PubMed Central

    George, S J; Kvaratskhelia, M; Dilworth, M J; Thorneley, R N

    1999-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase isoenzyme H2 (LiP H2) exhibits a transition to a stable, inactive form at pH 9.0 with concomitant spectroscopic changes. The Söret peak intensity decreases some 55% with a red shift from 408 to 412 nm; the bands at 502 nm and 638 nm disappear and the peak at 536 nm increases. The EPR spectrum changes from a signal typical of high spin ferric haem to an exclusively low spin spectrum with g=2.92, 2.27, 1.50. These data indicate that the active pentaco-ordinated haem is converted into a hexaco-ordinated species at alkaline pH. Room temperature near-IR MCD data coupled with the EPR spectrum allow us to assign the haem co-ordination of alkali-inactivated enzyme as bishistidine. Re-acidification of the alkali-inactivated enzyme to pH 6 induces further spectroscopic changes and generates an irreversibly inactivated species. By contrast, a pH shift from 9.0 to 6.0 with simultaneous addition of 50 mM CaCl(2) results in the recovery of the initial activity together with the spectroscopic characteristics of the native ferric enzyme. Incubating with 50 mM CaCl(2) at a pH between 6.0 and 9.0 can also re-activate the enzyme. Divalent metals other than Ca(2+) do not result in restoration of activity. Experiments with (45)Ca indicate that two tightly bound calcium ions per enzyme monomer are lost during inactivation and reincorporated during subsequent re-activation, consistent with the presence of two structural Ca(2+) ions in LiP H2. It is concluded that both the structural Ca(2+) ions play key roles in the reversible alkaline inactivation of LiP H2. PMID:10548556

  2. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Calcium Phosphate Stones in a Model of Hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy S; Asplin, John R; Frick, Kevin K; Granja, Ignacio; Culbertson, Christopher D; Ng, Adeline; Grynpas, Marc D; Bushinsky, David A

    2015-12-01

    Potassium citrate is prescribed to decrease stone recurrence in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate binds intestinal and urine calcium and increases urine pH. Citrate, metabolized to bicarbonate, should decrease calcium excretion by reducing bone resorption and increasing renal calcium reabsorption. However, citrate binding to intestinal calcium may increase absorption and renal excretion of both phosphate and oxalate. Thus, the effect of potassium citrate on urine calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation and stone formation is complex and difficult to predict. To study the effects of potassium citrate on urine supersaturation and stone formation, we utilized 95th-generation inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats. Rats were fed a fixed amount of a normal calcium (1.2%) diet supplemented with potassium citrate or potassium chloride (each 4 mmol/d) for 18 weeks. Urine was collected at 6, 12, and 18 weeks. At 18 weeks, stone formation was visualized by radiography. Urine citrate, phosphate, oxalate, and pH levels were higher and urine calcium level was lower in rats fed potassium citrate. Furthermore, calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation were higher with potassium citrate; however, uric acid supersaturation was lower. Both groups had similar numbers of exclusively calcium phosphate stones. Thus, potassium citrate effectively raises urine citrate levels and lowers urine calcium levels; however, the increases in urine pH, oxalate, and phosphate levels lead to increased calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation. Potassium citrate induces complex changes in urine chemistries and resultant supersaturation, which may not be beneficial in preventing calcium phosphate stone formation. PMID:25855777

  3. AHR-16303B, a novel antagonist of 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.J.; Appell, K.C.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Proakis, A.G.; Nolan, J.C.; Walsh, D.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro methods were used to characterize AHR-16303B, a novel compound with antagonistic action at 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels. The 5-HT2 receptor-antagonistic properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)ketanserin binding to rat cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 165 nM); (b) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced foot edema in rats (minimum effective dose, (MED) = 0.32 mg/kg orally, p.o.); (c) 5-HT-induced vasopressor responses in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (ID50 = 0.18 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), 1.8 mg/kg p.o.), (d) 5-HT-induced antidiuresis in rats (MED = 1 mg/kg p.o.), and (e) platelet aggregation induced by 5-HT + ADP (IC50 = 1.5 mM). The calcium antagonist properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)nimodipine binding to voltage-sensitive calcium channels on rabbit skeletal muscle membranes (IC50 = 15 nM), (b) KCl-stimulated calcium flux into cultured PC12 cells (IC50 = 81 nM), and (c) CaCl2-induced contractions of rabbit thoracic aortic strips (pA2 = 8.84). AHR-16303B had little or no effect on binding of radioligands to dopamine2 (DA2) alpha 1, alpha 2, H1, 5-HT1 alpha, beta 2, muscarinic M1, or sigma opioid receptors; had no effect on 5-HT3 receptor-mediated vagal bradycardia; and had only minor negative inotropic, chronotropic, and dromotropic effects on isolated guinea pig atria. In conscious SHR, 30 mg/kg p.o. AHR-16303B completely prevented the vasopressor responses to i.v. 5-HT, and decreased blood pressure (BP) by 24% 3 h after dosing.

  4. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  5. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  6. Effects of brine chemistry and polymorphism on clumped isotopes revealed by laboratory precipitation of mono- and multiphase calcium carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; John, Cédric M.

    2015-07-01

    Carbonate clumped isotopes are applied to an increasing number of geological archives to address a wide range of Earth science questions. However, the effect of changes in salinity on the carbonate clumped isotope technique has not been investigated experimentally yet. In particular, evaporated sea water and diagenetic fluids differ substantially from solutions used to calibrate the clumped isotope thermometer as they exhibit high ionic concentrations of e.g., Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Cl-. High ionic concentrations are known to have an impact on ?18O values, and could potentially impact the successful application of clumped isotopes to the reconstruction of diagenetic processes, including precipitation temperatures and the origin of the diagenetic fluid. In order to address the potential influence of salt ions on the clumped isotope ?47 value we precipitated CaCO3 minerals (calcite, aragonite and vaterite), hydromagnesite and mixtures of these minerals in the laboratory from solutions containing different salt ions (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-) at various concentrations and temperatures. The precipitation of some mineralogies was restricted to solutions with specific ionic concentrations, limiting direct comparability. NaCl-rich solutions mostly led to vaterite formation. In control experiments CaCO3 minerals (calcite and aragonite) were precipitated from a CaCO3 supersaturated solution without addition of any other ions. Our results show that calcium carbonates precipitated from high NaCl concentrations yield ?47 values identical to our NaCl-free control solution. Although addition of Mg led to the formation of hydromagnesite, it also follows the same ?47-T calibration as calcite. In contrast, ?47 values increase together with increased CaCl2 concentrations, and deviate by a few 0.01‰ from expected equilibrium values. Overall, clumped isotope values of CaCO3 minerals precipitated between 23 °C and 91 °C (with and without NaCl addition) follow a line with a slope close to results from statistical thermodynamics. We conclude for calcium carbonate and hydromagnesite that the combined effect of salt ion concentration, acid fractionation and polymorphism is negligible for Cl- and Na+ with respect to clumped isotope geochemistry, but that offsets are possible in brines containing high concentrations of CaCl2.

  7. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution....

  9. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution....

  12. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium...

  18. Calcium Intake and Bone health

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Calcium_Intake_100115.html Calcium Intake and Bone health HealthDay News Video - October 2, 2015 To use ... reading – health news for healthier living. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bone Diseases Calcium Fractures Seniors' Health About ...

  19. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disorders - Osteoporosis - Prevention - Calcium - Calcium content of common foods Printer friendly Email Share Tweet Like Below is ... Green/French beans 90 g cooked 50 Starchy foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Pasta (cooked) 180 ...

  20. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  1. Hydrothermal Formation of Calcium Copper Tetrasilicate.

    PubMed

    Johnson-McDaniel, Darrah; Comer, Sara; Kolis, Joseph W; Salguero, Tina T

    2015-12-01

    We describe the first hydrothermal synthesis of CaCuSi4 O10 as micron-scale clusters of thin platelets, distinct from morphologies generated under salt-flux or solid-state conditions. The hydrothermal reaction conditions are surprisingly specific: too cold, and instead of CaCuSi4 O10 , a porous calcium copper silicate forms; too hot, and calcium silicate (CaSiO3 ) forms. The precursors also strongly impact the course of the reaction, with the most common side product being sodium copper silicate (Na2 CuSi4 O10 ). Optimized conditions for hydrothermal CaCuSi4 O10 formation from calcium chloride, copper(II) nitrate, sodium silicate, and ammonium hydroxide are 350?°C at 3000?psi for 72?h; at longer reaction times, competitive delamination and exfoliation causes crystal fragmentation. These results illustrate that CaCuSi4 O10 is an even more unique material than previously appreciated. PMID:26482329

  2. Fundamental Characteristics of Bioprint on Calcium Alginate Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezu, Shinjiro; Hatta, Tatsuru; Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this study is to fabricate precision three-dimensional (3D) biodevices those are micro fluidics and artificial organs utilizing digital fabrication. Digital fabrication is fabrication method utilizing inkjet technologies. Electrostatic inkjet is one of the inkjet technologies. The electrostatic inkjet method has following two merits; those are high resolution to print and ability to eject highly viscous liquid. These characteristics are suitable to print biomaterials precisely. We are now applying for bioprint. In this paper, the electrostatic inkjet method is applied for fabrication of 3D biodevices that has cave like blood vessel. When aqueous solution of sodium alginate is printed to aqueous solution of calcium chloride, calcium alginate is produced. 3D biodevices are fabricated in case that calcium alginate is piled.

  3. Alternative technique for calcium phosphate coating on titanium alloy implants

    PubMed Central

    Le, Van Quang; Pourroy, Geneviève; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I; Mohammed, Hadeer I; Carradò, Adele

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative technique for calcium phosphate coating on titanium alloys, we propose to functionalize the metal surface with anionic bath containing chlorides of palladium or silver as activators. This new deposition route has several advantages such as controlled conditions, applicability to complex shapes, no adverse effect of heating, and cost effectiveness. A mixture of hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate hydrate is deposited on the surface of Ti–6Al–4V. Calcium phosphate coating is built faster compared with the one by Simulated Body Fluid. Cell morphology and density are comparable to the control one; and the results prove no toxic compound is released into the medium during the previous seven days of immersion. Moreover, the cell viability is comparable with cells cultivated with the virgin medium. These experimental treatments allowed producing cytocompatible materials potentially applicable to manufacture implantable devices for orthopedic and oral surgeries. PMID:24646569

  4. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a donnan potential model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Ephraim, J.H.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 X 10-4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log ??app) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log ??app = 2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential corrrection term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log??= 1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, Mu??nchen.

  5. Calcium-43 chemical shift and electric field gradient tensor interplay: a sensitive probe of structure, polymorphism, and hydration.

    PubMed

    Widdifield, Cory M; Moudrakovski, Igor; Bryce, David L

    2014-07-14

    Calcium is the 5th most abundant element on earth, and is found in numerous biological tissues, proteins, materials, and increasingly in catalysts. However, due to a number of unfavourable nuclear properties, such as a low magnetogyric ratio, very low natural abundance, and its nuclear electric quadrupole moment, development of solid-state (43)Ca NMR has been constrained relative to similar nuclides. In this study, 12 commonly-available calcium compounds are analyzed via(43)Ca solid-state NMR and the information which may be obtained by the measurement of both the (43)Ca electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift tensors (the latter of which are extremely rare with only a handful of literature examples) is discussed. Combined with density functional theory (DFT) computations, this 'tensor interplay' is, for the first time for (43)Ca, illustrated to be diagnostic in distinguishing polymorphs (e.g., calcium formate), and the degree of hydration (e.g., CaCl2·2H2O and calcium tartrate tetrahydrate). For Ca(OH)2, we outline the first example of (1)H to (43)Ca cross-polarization on a sample at natural abundance in (43)Ca. Using prior knowledge of the relationship between the isotropic calcium chemical shift and the calcium quadrupolar coupling constant (CQ) with coordination number, we postulate the coordination number in a sample of calcium levulinate dihydrate, which does not have a known crystal structure. Natural samples of CaCO3 (aragonite polymorph) are used to show that the synthetic structure is present in nature. Gauge-including projector augmented-wave (GIPAW) DFT computations using accepted crystal structures for many of these systems generally result in calculated NMR tensor parameters which are in very good agreement with the experimental observations. This combination of (43)Ca NMR measurements with GIPAW DFT ultimately allows us to establish clear correlations between various solid-state (43)Ca NMR observables and selected structural parameters, such as unit cell dimensions and average Ca-O bond distances. PMID:24874995

  6. Development of a ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Aqueous Chloride and Copper Chloride Obaidur Rahaman,

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Development of a ReaxFF Reactive Force Field for Aqueous Chloride and Copper Chloride Obaidur-derived energies for condensed-phase copper-chloride clusters as well as chloride/water and copper-chloride with the DFT-derived values. We have performed MD simulations on chloride/water and copper-chloride

  7. Stochastic calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Keener, James P

    2006-03-01

    While the oscillatory release of calcium from intracellular stores is comprised of fundamentally stochastic events, most models of calcium oscillations are deterministic. As a result, the transition to calcium oscillations as parameters, such as IP(3) concentration, are changed is not described correctly. The fundamental difficulty is that whole-cell models of calcium dynamics are based on the assumptions that the calcium concentration is spatially homogeneous, and that there are a sufficiently large number of release sites per unit volume so that the law of large numbers is applicable. For situations where these underlying assumptions are not applicable, a new modelling approach is needed. In this paper, we present a model and its analysis of calcium dynamics that incorporates the fundamental stochasticity of release events. The model is based on the assumptions that release events are rapid, while reactivation is slow. The model presented here is comprised of two parts. In the first, a stochastic version of the fire-diffuse-fire model is studied in order to understand the spark-to-wave transition and the probability of sparks resulting in abortive waves versus whole-cell calcium release. In the second, this information about the spark-to-wave transition is incorporated into a stochastic model (a Chapman-Kolmogorov equation) that tracks the number of activated and inactivated calcium release sites as a function of time. By solving this model numerically, information about the timing of whole-cell calcium release is obtained. The results of this analysis show a transition to oscillations that agrees well with data and with Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:16517550

  8. 76 FR 51991 - Determination That PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM (Trisodium Calcium Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ...FDA-2010-P-0628] Determination That PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM (Trisodium Calcium Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) Solution for...Administration (FDA) has determined that PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM (trisodium calcium...

  9. Modeling calcium waves in cardiac myocytes: importance of calcium diffusion.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Under certain conditions, cardiac myocytes engage in a mode of calcium signaling in which calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) to myoplasm occurs in self-propagating succession along the length of the cell. This event is called a calcium wave and is fundamentally a diffusion-reaction phenomenon. We present a simple, continuum mathematical model that simulates calcium waves. The framework features calcium diffusion within the SR and myoplasm, and dual modulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) release channels by myoplasmic and SR calcium. The model is used to illustrate the effect of varying RyR permeability, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activity and calcium ion mobility in myoplasm and SR on wave velocity. The model successfully reproduces calcium waves using experimentally-derived variables. It also supports the proposal for wave propagation driven by the diffusive spread of myoplasmic calcium, and highlights the importance of SR calcium load on wave propagation. PMID:20036839

  10. A CERAMIC WASTEFORM FOR THE IMMOBILIZATION OF CHLORIDE-CONTAINING RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, Ian W.; Metcalfe, Brian; Scheele, Randall D.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2003-07-15

    The preparation and properties of a calcium phosphate ceramic wasteform based on the mineral phases apatite and spodiosite are described. This particular ceramic has been found to be an effective host for immobilizing the chloride constituents obtained from the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. We discuss the crystal phases present in the solids as determined by XRD and the chemical durability of the product in aqueous solution.

  11. Solubility of some alkali and alkaline earth chlorides in water at moderate temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Potter, R.W., II

    1979-01-01

    Solubilities for the binary systems, salt-H2O, of the chlorides of lithium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, and barium from near 0??C to the saturated boiling point are reported. The experimental data and coefficients of an equation for a smoothed curve describing each system are listed in the tables. The data are improvements on those previously reported in the literature, having a precision on the average of ??0.09%.

  12. Effects of Two Salts Compounds on Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Spore Germination of Six Isolates of Botrytis cinerea in the Western North of Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Boumaaza, Boualem; Benkhelifa, Mohamed; Belkhoudja, Moulay

    2015-01-01

    Six isolates of Botrytis cinerea were isolated from leaves and stems of different tomato varieties taken from four areas in the northwest of Algeria where tomato is mostly grown in greenhouses and high tunnels. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of two salts, NaCl and CaCl2, on three stages of Botrytis cinerea's life cycle. All isolates tested were stimulated in 50 to 150?ppm; NaCl was the most effective treatment to increase mycelial growth at two tested concentrations. However, at 300?ppm concentration, CaCl2 completely inhibited the growth of mycelium; they reach 34.78% for the isolate TR46 and 26.72% for isolate F27. The sodium and calcium salts stimulated conidia production in liquid culture. We noticed that the effect of calcium chloride on sporulation was average while sodium chloride. In the medium containing 50?ppm, calcium chloride and sodium chloride increased the germination capacity of most isolates compared with the control. Other calcium salts, at 100 or 300?ppm, decreased the germination percentage of the conidia. With the exception of sodium salts, the inhibitions of germination reduce at 150 or 300 compared with the control. Conidial germination was slightly inhibited by sodium chloride only when the concentration was over 300?ppm. PMID:25883657

  13. CHEMILUMINESCENT MONITOR FOR VINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monitor for vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in ambient air was constructed using commercially available components of a gas chromatograph (GC) coupled with a chemiluminescence ozone analyzer slightly modified to make it suitable for use as a GC detector. The specificity for VCM is...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations...EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations...EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1152 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1152 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1152 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations...CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations...CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations...CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations...EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  11. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations...EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1152 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations...CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1117 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1926.1117 Section 1926.1117 Labor Regulations...CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1117 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.1017 - Vinyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl chloride. 1915.1017 Section 1915.1017 Labor Regulations...EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1017 Vinyl chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1152 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1926.1152 Section 1926.1152 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1152 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.1052 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylene chloride. 1915.1052 Section 1915.1052 Labor Regulations... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1052 Methylene chloride. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard...

  19. Calcium and Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with calcium 260 milligrams 6 ounces (177 milliliters) yogurt 225 milligrams ½ cup (118 milliliters) collard greens ( ... as cheddar) are also lower in lactose, and yogurts that contain active cultures are easier to digest ...

  20. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  1. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis . Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  2. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M [Stanford, CA; Muller, Jochen A [Baltimore, MD; Rosner, Bettina M [Berlin, DE; Von Abendroth, Gregory [Mannheim, DE; Meshulam-Simon, Galit [Los Angeles, CA; McCarty, Perry L [Stanford, CA

    2014-02-11

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  3. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

    DOEpatents

    Spormann, Alfred M. (Stanford, CA); Muller, Jochen A. (Baltimore, MD); Rosner, Bettina M. (Berlin, DE); Von Abendroth, Gregory (Nannhein, DE); Meshulam-Simon, Galit (Los Altos, CA); McCarty, Perry L (Stanford, CA)

    2011-11-22

    Compositions and methods are provided that relate to the bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes, particularly the bioremediation of vinyl chloride by Dehalococcoides-like organisms. An isolated strain of bacteria, Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS, that metabolizes vinyl chloride is provided; the genetic sequence of the enzyme responsible for vinyl chloride dehalogenation; methods of assessing the capability of endogenous organisms at an environmental site to metabolize vinyl chloride; and a method of using the strains of the invention for bioremediation.

  4. Chloride secretagogues stimulate inositol phosphate formation in shark rectal gland tubules cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Ecay, T.W.; Valentich, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Neuroendocrine activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland cells is associated with increases in cellular cAMP, cGMP, and free calcium concentrations. We report here on the effects of several chloride secretagogues on inositol phosphate formation in cultured rectal gland tubules. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), atriopeptin (AP), and ionomycin increase the total inositol phosphate levels of cultured tubules, as measured by ion exchange chromatography. Forskolin, a potent chloride secretagogue, has no effect on inositol phosphate formation. The uptake of {sup 3}H-myo-inositol into phospholipids is very slow, preventing the detection of increased levels of inositol trisphosphate. However, significant increases in inositol monophosphate (IP1) and inositol biphosphate (IP2) were measured. The time course of VIP- and AP-stimulated IP1 and IP2 formation is similar to the effects of these agents on the short-circuit current responses of rectal gland monolayer cultures. In addition, aluminum fluoride, an artificial activator of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, stimulates IP1 and IP2 formation. We conclude that rectal gland cells contain VIP and AP receptors coupled to the activation of phospholipase C. Coupling may be mediated by G-proteins. Receptor-stimulated increases in inositol phospholipid metabolism is one mechanism leading to increased intracellular free calcium concentrations, an important regulatory event in the activation of transepithelial chloride secretion by shark rectal gland epithelial cells.

  5. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  16. Chloride Channels: Often Enigmatic, Rarely Predictable

    E-print Network

    Chloride Channels: Often Enigmatic, Rarely Predictable Charity Duran,1 Christopher H. Thompson,2C: 9-gene family of chloride channels Transporter: a protein that uses energy of one ion to transport another ion uphill A SHORT HISTORY OF CHLORIDE IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS Not long ago, Cl- channels were

  17. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely...

  1. interdisciplinary Effects of cadmium chloride on mouse

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    interdisciplinary Effects of cadmium chloride on mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells Eun of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) was evaluated on renal inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD3). The 24 hr sensitive to CdCl2 exposure. KEY WORDS: cadmium chloride; cytotoxicity; kidney; mIMCD3 cells Correspondence

  2. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  4. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and...Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color retention in...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  6. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and...Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color retention in...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7)...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  9. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and...Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color retention in...

  10. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and...Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color retention in...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7)...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7)...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2 ·4H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  14. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and...Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color retention in...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7)...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12 ·6H2 O, CAS Reg. No....

  17. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7786-30-3) is a... prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS... mineral bischofite. It is prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in...

  2. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely...

  3. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  4. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  5. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for color retention in asparagus packed...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride....

  8. 49 CFR 173.322 - Ethyl chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ethyl chloride. 173.322 Section 173.322 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.322 Ethyl chloride. Ethyl chloride must...

  9. 21 CFR 172.180 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Stannous chloride. 172.180 Section 172.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.180 Stannous chloride. The food additive stannous chloride may be safely used for...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O,...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O,...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 184.1446 Section 184.1446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a...

  16. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese chloride. 582.5446 Section 582.5446 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 182.8252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 182.8252 Section 182.8252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5252 - Choline chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Choline chloride. 582.5252 Section 582.5252 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5252 Choline chloride. (a) Product. Choline chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.3845 - Stannous chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stannous chloride. 582.3845 Section 582.3845 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3845 Stannous chloride. (a) Product. Stannous chloride. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride hexahydrate (iron (III) chloride hexahydrate, FeC13 . 6H2 0, CAS Reg. No. 10025-77-1)...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  10. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 582.5985 Section 582.5985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 182.8985 - Zinc chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc chloride. 182.8985 Section 182.8985 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8985 Zinc chloride. (a) Product. Zinc chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  16. Effects of Inclusions in HSLA Carbon Steel on Pitting Corrosion in CaCl2

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ziomek-Moroz; S. Bullard; K. Rozman; J.J. Kruzic

    2011-12-05

    Susceptibility of high strength low alloy steel to localized corrosion was studied in 6.7 M CaCl{sub 2} for oil and natural gas drilling applications. Results of the immersion and electrochemical experiments showed that the steel is susceptible to pitting corrosion. Optical microscopy investigations of the polished samples revealed that 10% of the surface area was occupied by defects in the form of pits. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) chemical analyses revealed higher concentrations of Mn and S compared to the metal matrix in defected areas. These areas served as the sites for development of corrosion pits during both immersion and electrochemical experiments. The fatigue results of the corroded samples indicate that if the pit was the most significant defect, the fatigue crack initiated and propagated at this site.

  17. Transformation of E. coli: CaCl2-method PCG Solution

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    .0. Adjust volume to 200 ml. Autoclave or filter sterilize (50-100 ml aliquots). NB: LB plus 10 mM MgSO4. Heat shock cells for 45 seconds in a 42°C water bath. Place tubes on ice for 2 minutes. 4. Add 0.9 ml

  18. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  19. [Why must we manufacture vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride?].

    PubMed

    Bauer, H

    1976-09-16

    The manufacture of PVC is necessary for supplying the demands of modern society, for maintaining the equilibrium in the chemical industry such as the manufacture of caustic soda solution-chlorine by means of rocksalt electrolysis, and for the safe disposal of chlorine for environmental reasons. The manufacture of vinyl chloride and dichloroethane is illustrated. The conventional processing of PVC into consumer goods, after treatment of rigid and plasticized PVC compounds or granulate, is demonstrated. PMID:976919

  20. Mitigation of chloride and sulfate based corrosion in reinforced concrete via electrokinetic nanoparticle treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    Concrete is a porous material which is susceptible to the migration of highly deleterious species such as chlorides and sulfates. Various external sources, including sea salt spray, direct seawater wetting, deicing salts and chlorides can contaminate reinforced concrete. Chlorides diffuse into the capillary pores of concrete and come into contact with the reinforcement. When chloride concentration at the reinforcement exceeds a threshold level it breaks down the passive oxide layer, leading to chloride induced corrosion. The application of electrokinetics using positively charged nanoparticles for corrosion protection in reinforced concrete structures is an emerging technology. This technique involves the principle of electrophoretic migration of nanoparticles to hinder chloride diffusion in the concrete. The return of chlorides is inhibited by the electrodeposited assembly of the nanoparticles at the reinforcement interface. This work examined the nanoparticle treatment impact on chloride and sulfate induced corrosion in concrete. Electrokinetic Nanoparticle (EN) treatments were conducted on reinforced cylindrical concrete, rectangular ASTM G109 specimens that simulate a bridge deck and full scale beam specimens. EN treatment to mitigate external sulfate attack in concrete was performed on cylindrical concrete specimens. Corrosion results indicated lower corrosion potentials and rates as compared to the untreated specimens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed a dense microstructure within the EN treated specimens. Chemical analysis (Raman spectroscopy, X ray-diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FTIR) showed the presence of strength enhancing phases such as calcium aluminate hydrate (C-A-H) and increased amounts of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) within the EN treated specimens. Strength and porosity results showed an increase in strength and a reduction in porosity among the EN treated specimens. EN treatment acted as a protective barrier that formed primarily at the reinforcement surface where it inhibited the ingress of chlorides. When applied to sulfate attack, EN treatment was found to extract sulfate ions. This treatment also reduced porosity and increased concrete strength. The strength increases were limited by the accumulation of spallation damage that was accrued during the sulfate exposure period of the work. This demonstrated that treatment for sulfate attack was best suited to early stages of degradation or as a preventive measure.