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Sample records for calcium regulate nuclear

  1. Nuclear and cytosolic calcium are regulated independently

    PubMed Central

    Leite, M. F.; Thrower, E. C.; Echevarria, W.; Koulen, P.; Hirata, K.; Bennett, A. M.; Ehrlich, B. E.; Nathanson, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear calcium (Ca2+) regulates a number of important cellular processes, including gene transcription, growth, and apoptosis. However, it is unclear whether Ca2+ signaling is regulated differently in the nucleus and cytosol. To investigate this possibility, we examined subcellular mechanisms of Ca2+ release in the HepG2 liver cell line. The type II isoform of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) was expressed to a similar extent in the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus, whereas the type III InsP3R was concentrated in the endoplasmic reticulum, and the type I isoform was not expressed. Ca2+ signals induced by low InsP3 concentrations started earlier or were larger in the nucleus than in the cytosol, indicating higher sensitivity of nuclear Ca2+ stores for InsP3. Nuclear InsP3R channels were active at lower InsP3 concentrations than InsP3R from cytosol. Enriched expression of type II InsP3R in the nucleus results in greater sensitivity of the nucleus to InsP3, thus providing a mechanism for independent regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes in this cellular compartment. PMID:12606721

  2. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  3. Calcium-regulated nuclear enzymes: potential mediators of phytochrome-induced changes in nuclear metabolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium ions have been proposed to serve as important regulatory elements in stimulus-response coupling for phytochrome responses. An important test of this hypothesis will be to identify specific targets of calcium action that are required for some growth or development process induced by the photoactivated form of phytochrome (Pfr). Initial studies have revealed that there are at least two enzymes in pea nuclei that are stimulated by Pfr in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, a calmodulin-regulated nucleoside triphosphatase and a calmodulin-independent but Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase. The nucleoside triphosphatase appears to be associated with the nuclear envelope, while the protein kinase co-purifies with a nuclear fraction highly enriched for chromatin. This short review summarizes the latest findings on these enzymes and relates them to what is known about Pfr-regulated nuclear metabolism.

  4. Current evidence suggests independent regulation of nuclear calcium.

    PubMed

    Badminton, M N; Kendall, J M; Rembold, C M; Campbell, A K

    1998-01-01

    We review and present current evidence supporting independent regulation of nuclear Ca2+ ([Ca2+]n). The nucleus and nuclear envelope contain proteins to both regulate and respond to changes in [Ca2+]n. However, this does not prove that [Ca2+]n is independently regulated from cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c). Studies using fluorescent dyes suggested that changes in [Ca2+]n differed in magnitude from changes in [Ca2+]c. These studies have been criticised as the nuclear environment alters the fluorescent characteristics of these dyes. We have evaluated this question with aequorin targeted to the nucleus and cytoplasm and shown that the characteristics of the indicators are not altered in their respective environments. We have demonstrated that different stimuli induce changes in [Ca2+]n and [Ca2+]c that vary both temporally and in magnitude. The nucleus appeared to be shielded from increases in [Ca2+]c, either through a mechanism involving the nuclear envelope or by cytosolic buffering of localised increases in Ca2+. In addition, agonist stimulation resulted in an increase in [Ca2+]n, consistent with release from the perinuclear Ca2+ store. There was a stimulus dependence of the relation between [Ca2+]n and [Ca2+]c suggesting differential regulation of [Ca2+]n. These results have important implications for the role of Ca2+ as a specific regulator of nuclear events through Ca2+ binding proteins. In addition, they highlight the advantages of using targeted aequorin in intact cells to monitor changes in organelle [Ca2+]. PMID:9601602

  5. Calcium-dependent regulation of NEMO nuclear export in response to genotoxic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, Craig M; Wu, Zhao-Hui; Huang, Tony T; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB by genotoxic agents are not well understood. Previously, we provided evidence that a regulatory subunit of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex, NF-kappaB essential modulator (NEMO)/IKKgamma, is a component of a nuclear signal that is generated after DNA damage to mediate NF-kappaB activation. Here, we found that etoposide (VP16) and camptothecin induced increases in intracellular free calcium levels at 60 min after stimulation of CEM T leukemic cells. Inhibition of calcium increases by calcium chelators, BAPTA-AM and EGTA-AM, abrogated NF-kappaB activation by these agents in several cell types examined. Conversely, thapsigargin and ionomycin attenuated the BAPTA-AM effects and promoted NF-kappaB activation by the genotoxic stimuli. Analyses of nuclear NEMO levels in VP16-treated cells suggested that calcium was required for nuclear export of NEMO. Inhibition of the nuclear exporter CRM1 by leptomycin B did not interfere with NEMO nuclear export. Similarly, deficiency of a plausible calcium-dependent nuclear export receptor, calreticulin, failed to prevent NF-kappaB activation by VP16. However, temperature inactivation of the Ran guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in the tsBN2 cell line harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of RCC1 blocked NF-kappaB activation induced by genotoxic stimuli. Overexpression of Ran in this cell model showed that DNA damage stimuli induced formation of a complex between Ran and NEMO, suggesting that RCC1 regulated NF-kappaB activation through the modulation of RanGTP. Indeed, evidence for VP16-inducible interaction between Ran-GTP and NEMO could be obtained by means of glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays using GST fused to the Ran binding domain of RanBP2, which specifically interacts with the GTP-bound form of Ran. BAPTA-AM did not alter these interactions, suggesting that calcium is a necessary step beyond the formation of a Ran

  6. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca(2+)-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number. PMID:15325281

  7. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  8. Regulation of calcium transporters: The role of a nuclear-localized CAX-interacting protein, CXIP4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulation of calcium transporters is essential for modulating the Ca(2+) signaling and/or Ca(2+) homeostasis that are involved in the growth and adaptation of all organisms. The Arabidopsis H(+) /Ca(2+) antiporters, CAX1 and CAX1-like transporters, are autoinhibited and unable to suppress the hype...

  9. Calcium regulation of mitochondrial carriers.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Araceli; Contreras, Laura; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial function is regulated by calcium. In addition to the long known effects of matrix Ca(2+), regulation of metabolite transport by extramitochondrial Ca(2+) represents an alternative Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism to regulate mitochondrial function. The Ca(2+) regulated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs) are well suited for that role, as they contain long N-terminal extensions harboring EF-hand Ca(2+) binding domains facing the intermembrane space. They fall in two groups, the aspartate/glutamate exchangers, AGCs, major components of the NADH malate aspartate shuttle (MAS) and urea cycle, and the ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi exchangers or short CaMCs (APCs or SCaMCs). The AGCs are activated by relatively low Ca(2+) levels only slightly higher than resting Ca(2+), whereas all SCaMCs studied so far require strong Ca(2+) signals, above micromolar, for activation. In addition, AGCs are not strictly Ca(2+) dependent, being active even in Ca(2+)-free conditions. Thus, AGCs are well suited to respond to small Ca(2+) signals and that do not reach mitochondria. In contrast, ATP-Mg(2+)/Pi carriers are inactive in Ca(2+) free conditions and activation requires Ca(2+) signals that will also activate the calcium uniporter (MCU). By changing the net content of adenine nucleotides of the matrix upon activation, SCaMCs regulate the activity of the permeability transition pore, and the Ca(2+) retention capacity of mitochondria (CRC), two functions synergizing with those of the MCU. The different Ca(2+) activation properties of the two CaMCs are discussed in relation to their newly obtained structures. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27033520

  10. Regulation of Calcium signaling through spatial Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Aman; Ullah, Ghanim; Machaca, Khalid; Jung, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Calcium waves and signals in oocytes are produced and sustained by the release of Ca^2+ from the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) through clustered release channels. Changes in the spatial organization of calcium signaling effectors regulate the spatiotemporal features of the calcium signal as is e.g. observed during oocyte maturation. We report here how specific changes in the clustering of the calcium release channels in conjunction with physiologic alterations of other signaling effectors can affect a) the sensitivity of the signaling machinery to external factors, b) the time course of global intracellular signals and c), the speed and propagation range of intracellular calcium waves.

  11. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  12. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus. PMID:12717445

  13. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca{sub v}) β{sub 1a} subunit (Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}) plays an important role in excitation–contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160–244 aa) and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} NH{sub 2}-terminus (1–99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. - Highlights: • Previously, we demonstrated that Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} is a gene transcription regulator. • Here, we show that TnT3 interacts with Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a}. • We mapped TnT3 and Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} interaction domain. • TnT3 facilitates Ca{sub v}β{sub 1a} nuclear enrichment. • The two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation.

  14. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  15. Calcium-dependent regulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hochmal, Ana Karina; Schulze, Stefan; Trompelt, Kerstin; Hippler, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The understanding of calcium as a second messenger in plants has been growing intensively over the last decades. Recently, attention has been drawn to the organelles, especially the chloroplast but focused on the stromal Ca2+ transients in response to environmental stresses. Herein we will expand this view and discuss the role of Ca2+ in photosynthesis. Moreover we address of how Ca2+ is delivered to chloroplast stroma and thylakoids. Thereby, new light is shed on the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow and light-dependent metabolism by the interplay of Ca2+, thylakoid acidification and redox status. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:25687895

  16. Nuclear Calcium Signaling Induces Expression of the Synaptic Organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2*

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Stefanie N.; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2–4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. PMID:25527504

  17. Nuclear regulation and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed. (DLC)

  18. Regulation of protein degradation in muscle by calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Kameyama, Tsuneo; Matsumoto, Kazue; Bernstein, Paul; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulation of intracellular protein degradation was studied in isolated rat skeletal muscles incubated in vitro in the presence of a large variety of agents known to affect calcium movement and distribution. The effect of different classes of protease inhibitors was tested to determine the responsible proteolytic systems involved in calcium-dependent degradation. The results suggest that nonlysosomal leupetin- and E-64-c-sensitive proteases are resposible for calcium-dependent proteolysis in muscle.

  19. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  20. Simulation strategies for calcium microdomains and calcium-regulated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    von Wegner, Frederic; Wieder, Nicolas; Fink, Rainer H A

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present an overview of simulation strategies in the context of subcellular domains where calcium-dependent signaling plays an important role. The presentation follows the spatial and temporal scales involved and represented by each algorithm. As an exemplary cell type, we will mainly cite work done on striated muscle cells, i.e. skeletal and cardiac muscle. For these cells, a wealth of ultrastructural, biophysical and electrophysiological data is at hand. Moreover, these cells also express ubiquitous signaling pathways as they are found in many other cell types and thus, the generalization of the methods and results presented here is straightforward.The models considered comprise the basic calcium signaling machinery as found in most excitable cell types including Ca(2+) ions, diffusible and stationary buffer systems, and calcium regulated calcium release channels. Simulation strategies can be differentiated in stochastic and deterministic algorithms. Historically, deterministic approaches based on the macroscopic reaction rate equations were the first models considered. As experimental methods elucidated highly localized Ca(2+) signaling events occurring in femtoliter volumes, stochastic methods were increasingly considered. However, detailed simulations of single molecule trajectories are rarely performed as the computational cost implied is too large. On the mesoscopic level, Gillespie's algorithm is extensively used in the systems biology community and with increasing frequency also in models of microdomain calcium signaling. To increase computational speed, fast approximations were derived from Gillespie's exact algorithm, most notably the chemical Langevin equation and the τ-leap algorithm. Finally, in order to integrate deterministic and stochastic effects in multiscale simulations, hybrid algorithms are increasingly used. These include stochastic models of ion channels combined with deterministic descriptions of the calcium buffering

  1. PTH-independent regulation of blood calcium concentration by the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Ramakrishnan, Suresh Krishna; Wootla, Bharath; Chambrey, Régine; de la Faille, Renaud; Bourgeois, Soline; Bruneval, Patrick; Mandet, Chantal; Christensen, Erik Ilso; Faure, Hélène; Cheval, Lydie; Laghmani, Kamel; Collet, Corinne; Eladari, Dominique; Dodd, Robert H; Ruat, Martial; Houillier, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    Tight regulation of calcium levels is required for many critical biological functions. The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) expressed by parathyroid cells controls blood calcium concentration by regulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. However, CaSR is also expressed in other organs, such as the kidney, but the importance of extraparathyroid CaSR in calcium metabolism remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of extraparathyroid CaSR using thyroparathyroidectomized, PTH-supplemented rats. Chronic inhibition of CaSR selectively increased renal tubular calcium absorption and blood calcium concentration independent of PTH secretion change and without altering intestinal calcium absorption. CaSR inhibition increased blood calcium concentration in animals pretreated with a bisphosphonate, indicating that the increase did not result from release of bone calcium. Kidney CaSR was expressed primarily in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). As measured by in vitro microperfusion of cortical TAL, CaSR inhibitors increased calcium reabsorption and paracellular pathway permeability but did not change NaCl reabsorption. We conclude that CaSR is a direct determinant of blood calcium concentration, independent of PTH, and modulates renal tubular calcium transport in the TAL via the permeability of the paracellular pathway. These findings suggest that CaSR inhibitors may provide a new specific treatment for disorders related to impaired PTH secretion, such as primary hypoparathyroidism. PMID:22886306

  2. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generation, engineering, and medicine. The price of success, however, has led to a regulatory organization and philosophy characterized by complexity, confusion, public fear, and increasing economic costs. Over the past 20 years, regulatory costs in the nuclear sector have increased more than 250% in constant 1995 U.S. dollars. Costs of regulatory compliance can be reduced sharply, particularly when health and environmental benefits of risk reduction are questionable. Three key regulatory areas should be closely examined and modified to improve regulatory effectiveness and efficiency: a) radiation protection should be changed from a risk-based to dose-based system; b) the U.S. government should adopt the modern metric system (International System of Units), and radiation quantities and units should be simplified to facilitate international communication and public understanding; and c) a single, independent office is needed to coordinate nuclear regulations established by U.S. federal agencies and departments. PMID:12515683

  3. Vasopressin regulates renal calcium excretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hanouna, Guillaume; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent; Letavernier, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone or arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases water reabsorption in the collecting ducts of the kidney. Three decades ago, experimental models have shown that AVP may increase calcium reabsorption in rat kidney. The objective of this study was to assess whether AVP modulates renal calcium excretion in humans. We analyzed calcium, potassium, and sodium fractional excretion in eight patients affected by insipidus diabetes (nephrogenic or central) under acute vasopressin receptor agonist action and in 10 patients undergoing oral water load test affected or not by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Synthetic V2 receptor agonist (dDAVP) reduced significantly calcium fractional excretion from 1.71% to 0.58% (P < 0.05) in patients with central diabetes insipidus. In patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (resistant to AVP), calcium fractional excretion did not change significantly after injection (0.48–0.68%, P = NS). In normal subjects undergoing oral water load test, calcium fractional excretion increased significantly from 1.02% to 2.54% (P < 0.05). Patients affected by SIADH had a high calcium fractional excretion at baseline that remained stable during test from 3.30% to 3.33% (P = NS), possibly resulting from a reduced calcium absorption in renal proximal tubule. In both groups, there was a significant correlation between urine output and calcium renal excretion. In humans, dDAVP decreases calcium fractional excretion in the short term. Conversely, water intake, which lowers AVP concentration, increases calcium fractional excretion. The correlation between urine output and calcium excretion suggests that AVP-related antidiuresis increases calcium reabsorption in collecting ducts. PMID:26620256

  4. The importance of calcium in the regulation of megakaryocyte function.

    PubMed

    Di Buduo, Christian Andrea; Moccia, Francesco; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Mazzucato, Mario; Moratti, Remigio; Tanzi, Franco; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Platelet release by megakaryocytes is regulated by a concert of environmental and autocrine factors. We previously showed that constitutively released adenosine diphosphate by human megakaryocytes leads to platelet production. Here we show that adenosine diphosphate elicits, in human megakaryocytes, an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, followed by a plateau, which is lowered in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting the involvement of Store-Operated Calcium Entry. Indeed, we demonstrate that megakaryocytes express the major candidates to mediate Store-Operated Calcium Entry, stromal interaction molecule 1, Orai1 and canonical transient receptor potential 1, which are activated upon either pharmacological or physiological depletion of the intracellular calcium pool. This mechanism is inhibited by phospholipase C or inositol-3-phosphate receptor inhibitors and by a specific calcium entry blocker. Studies on megakaryocyte behavior, on extracellular matrix proteins that support proplatelet extension, show that calcium mobilization from intracellular stores activates signaling cascades that trigger megakaryocyte adhesion and proplatelet formation, and promotes extracellular calcium entry which is primarily involved in the regulation of the contractile force responsible for megakaryocyte motility. These findings provide the first evidence that both calcium mobilization from intracellular stores and extracellular calcium entry specifically regulate human megakaryocyte functions. PMID:24463213

  5. The importance of calcium in the regulation of megakaryocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Andrea Di Buduo, Christian; Moccia, Francesco; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Mazzucato, Mario; Moratti, Remigio; Tanzi, Franco; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Platelet release by megakaryocytes is regulated by a concert of environmental and autocrine factors. We previously showed that constitutively released adenosine diphosphate by human megakaryocytes leads to platelet production. Here we show that adenosine diphosphate elicits, in human megakaryocytes, an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, followed by a plateau, which is lowered in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting the involvement of Store-Operated Calcium Entry. Indeed, we demonstrate that megakaryocytes express the major candidates to mediate Store-Operated Calcium Entry, stromal interaction molecule 1, Orai1 and canonical transient receptor potential 1, which are activated upon either pharmacological or physiological depletion of the intracellular calcium pool. This mechanism is inhibited by phospholipase C or inositol-3-phosphate receptor inhibitors and by a specific calcium entry blocker. Studies on megakaryocyte behavior, on extracellular matrix proteins that support proplatelet extension, show that calcium mobilization from intracellular stores activates signaling cascades that trigger megakaryocyte adhesion and proplatelet formation, and promotes extracellular calcium entry which is primarily involved in the regulation of the contractile force responsible for megakaryocyte motility. These findings provide the first evidence that both calcium mobilization from intracellular stores and extracellular calcium entry specifically regulate human megakaryocyte functions. PMID:24463213

  6. Brain calcium - Role in temperature regulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanegan, J. L.; Williams, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Perfusion of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus with excess calcium ion in ground squirrels produces a drop in core temperature. The magnitude of the drop is directly dependent on ambient temperature. Respiration, heart rate, and oxygen consumption are also reduced during perfusion of calcium ion. It is concluded that the depression of body temperature during calcium ion perfusion is due to generalized depression of the neurons of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus.

  7. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  8. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) regulates the calcium threshold for the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Dipayan; Artiga, Daniel J; Abiria, Sunday A; Clapham, David E

    2016-03-29

    During the mitochondrial permeability transition, a large channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane opens, leading to the loss of multiple mitochondrial solutes and cell death. Key triggers include excessive reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial calcium overload, factors implicated in neuronal and cardiac pathophysiology. Examining the differential behavior of mitochondrial Ca(2+)overload inDrosophilaversus human cells allowed us to identify a gene,MCUR1, which, when expressed inDrosophilacells, conferred permeability transition sensitive to electrophoretic Ca(2+)uptake. Conversely, inhibiting MCUR1 in mammalian cells increased the Ca(2+)threshold for inducing permeability transition. The effect was specific to the permeability transition induced by Ca(2+), and such resistance to overload translated into improved cell survival. Thus,MCUR1expression regulates the Ca(2+)threshold required for permeability transition. PMID:26976564

  9. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  10. MicroRNA-30 family members regulate calcium/calcineurin signaling in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junnan; Zheng, Chunxia; Wang, Xiao; Yun, Shifeng; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Lin; Lu, Yuqiu; Ye, Yuting; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Changming; Shi, Shaolin; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium/calcineurin signaling is critical for normal cellular physiology. Abnormalities in this pathway cause many diseases, including podocytopathy; therefore, understanding the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of calcium/calcineurin signaling is essential. Here, we showed that critical components of calcium/calcineurin signaling, including TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3, are the targets of the microRNA-30 family (miR-30s). We found that these 5 genes are highly expressed as mRNA, but the level of the proteins is low in normal podocytes. Conversely, protein levels were markedly elevated in podocytes from rats treated with puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and from patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). In both FSGS patients and PAN-treated rats, miR-30s were downregulated in podocytes. In cultured podocytes, PAN or a miR-30 sponge increased TRPC6, PPP3CA, PPP3CB, PPP3R1, and NFATC3 expression; calcium influx; intracellular Ca2+ concentration; and calcineurin activity. Moreover, NFATC3 nuclear translocation, synaptopodin degradation, integrin β3 (ITGB3) activation, and actin fiber loss, which are downstream of calcium/calcineurin signaling, were induced by miR-30 reduction but blocked by the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Podocyte-specific expression of the miR-30 sponge in mice increased calcium/calcineurin pathway component protein expression and calcineurin activity. The mice developed podocyte foot process effacement and proteinuria, which were prevented by FK506. miR-30s also regulated calcium/calcineurin signaling in cardiomyocytes. Together, our results identify miR-30s as essential regulators of calcium/calcineurin signaling. PMID:26436650

  11. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    SciTech Connect

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  12. L-type Calcium Channel Auto-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Jonathan; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Crump, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (LTCC) impact the function of nearly all excitable cells. The classical LTCC function is to mediate trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ flux. This review focuses on the contribution of a mobile segment of the LTCC that regulates ion channel function, and also serves as a regulator of transcription in the nucleus. Specifically we highlight recent work demonstrating an auto-feedback regulatory pathway whereby the LTCC transcription factor regulates the LTCC. Also discussed is acute and long-term regulation of function by the LTCC-transcription regulator. PMID:21295347

  13. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

  14. Regulation of neurogenesis by calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Toth, Anna B; Shum, Andrew K; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-03-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling has essential roles in the development of the nervous system from neural induction to the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural cells. Ca(2+) signaling pathways are shaped by interactions among metabotropic signaling cascades, intracellular Ca(2+) stores, ion channels, and a multitude of downstream effector proteins that activate specific genetic programs. The temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca(2+) signals are widely presumed to control the highly diverse yet specific genetic programs that establish the complex structures of the adult nervous system. Progress in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the functional architecture of Ca(2+) signaling networks involved in neurogenesis. In this review, we assess the literature on the molecular and functional organization of Ca(2+) signaling networks in the developing nervous system and its impact on neural induction, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the growing evidence for the involvement of store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels in these processes. PMID:27020657

  15. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca2 + signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca2 + from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca2 + provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca2 + signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca2 + channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca2 + buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  16. Nitrogen enrichment regulates calcium sources in forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hynicka, Justin D.; Pett-Ridge, Julie C; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that shapes cycles of other essential elements in forests, including calcium (Ca). When N availability exceeds ecosystem demands, excess N can stimulate Ca leaching and deplete Ca from soils. Over the long term, these processes may alter the proportion of available Ca that is derived from atmospheric deposition vs. bedrock weathering, which has fundamental consequences for ecosystem properties and nutrient supply. We evaluated how landscape variation in soil N, reflecting long-term legacies of biological N fixation, influenced plant and soil Ca availability and ecosystem Ca sources across 22 temperate forests in Oregon. We also examined interactions between soil N and bedrock Ca using soil N gradients on contrasting basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock that differed 17-fold in underlying Ca content. We found that low-N forests on Ca-rich basaltic bedrock relied strongly on Ca from weathering, but that soil N enrichment depleted readily weatherable mineral Ca and shifted forest reliance toward atmospheric Ca. Forests on Ca-poor sedimentary bedrock relied more consistently on atmospheric Ca across all levels of soil N enrichment. The broad importance of atmospheric Ca was unexpected given active regional uplift and erosion that are thought to rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. Despite different Ca sources to forests on basaltic vs. sedimentary bedrock, we observed consistent declines in plant and soil Ca availability with increasing N, regardless of the Ca content of underlying bedrock. Thus, traditional measures of Ca availability in foliage and soil exchangeable pools may poorly reflect long-term Ca sources that sustain soil fertility. We conclude that long-term soil N enrichment can deplete available Ca and cause forests to rely increasingly on Ca from atmospheric deposition, which may limit ecosystem Ca supply in an increasingly N-rich world.

  17. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    PubMed

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power. PMID:21399415

  18. Aberrant subcellular neuronal calcium regulation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-05-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:20950656

  19. Regulation of PKC Mediated Signaling by Calcium during Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  20. Regulation of PKC mediated signaling by calcium during visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  1. Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Vaz Martins, Teresa; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Findlay, Kim; Soumpourou, Eleni; Thouin, Julien; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Sanders, Dale; Morris, Richard J; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2016-05-27

    Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions. PMID:27230377

  2. Identification and quantitive analysis of calcium phosphate microparticles in intestinal tissue by nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Thoree, Vinay; Powell, Jonathan J.; Kirkby, Karen J.; Grime, Geoffrey W.

    2006-08-01

    Microscopic particles (0.5-2 μm diameter), rich in calcium and phosphorus, are found in the lumen of the mid-distal gut of all mammals investigated, including humans, and these may play a role in immuno-surveillance and immune regulation of antigens from food and symbiotic bacteria that are contained in the gut. Whether these particles can cross in to tissue of the intestinal mucosa is unclear. If so, characterising their morphology and chemical composition is an important task in elucidating their function. The analysis of calcium phosphate in biological tissues has been approached in several ways including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and, most recently in this work, with nuclear microscopy. In this paper, we describe the use of microPIXE and microRBS to locate these particles and to determine, accurately, the ratio of phosphorus to calcium using the information on sample thickness obtained from RBS to allow the PIXE ratios to be corrected. A commercial sample of hydroxy apatite was used to demonstrate accuracy and precision of the technique. Then, in a pilot study on intestinal tissue of mice, we demonstrated the presence of calcium phosphate microparticles, consistent with confocal microscopy observations, and we identified the average molar P:Ca molar ratio as 1.0. Further work will confirm the exact chemical speciation of these particles and will examine the influence of differing calcium containing diets on the formation of these microparticles.

  3. Nuclear safety: risks and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Taking a fresh look at nuclear safety regulations, this study finds that the mandate and organization of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) militate against its making sound decisions. The author criticizes failures to make hard decisions on societal risk, to clarify responsibility, and to implement cost-effective safety measures. Among his recommendations are reorganization of the NRC under a single authoritative administrator, separation of technical issues from social ones, and reform of the Price-Anderson Act. The author concludes that the worst eventuality would be to continue the current state of indecision. 161 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  5. Sodium-Calcium Exchanger 1 Regulates Epithelial Cell Migration via Calcium-dependent Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, Sona Lakshme; Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Gangadharan, Vimal; Duncan, Randall L.; Barwe, Sonali P.

    2015-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchanger-1 (NCX1) is a major calcium extrusion mechanism in renal epithelial cells enabling the efflux of one Ca2+ ion and the influx of three Na+ ions. The gradient for this exchange activity is provided by Na,K-ATPase, a hetero-oligomer consisting of a catalytic α-subunit and a regulatory β-subunit (Na,K-β) that also functions as a motility and tumor suppressor. We showed earlier that mice with heart-specific ablation (KO) of Na,K-β had a specific reduction in NCX1 protein and were ouabain-insensitive. Here, we demonstrate that Na,K-β associates with NCX1 and regulates its localization to the cell surface. Madin-Darby canine kidney cells with Na,K-β knockdown have reduced NCX1 protein and function accompanied by 2.1-fold increase in free intracellular calcium and a corresponding increase in the rate of cell migration. Increased intracellular calcium up-regulated ERK1/2 via calmodulin-dependent activation of PI3K. Both myosin light chain kinase and Rho-associated kinase acted as mediators of ERK1/2-dependent migration. Restoring NCX1 expression in β-KD cells reduced migration rate and ERK1/2 activation, suggesting that NCX1 functions downstream of Na,K-β in regulating cell migration. In parallel, inhibition of NCX1 by KB-R7943 in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, LLC-PK1, and human primary renal epithelial cells (HREpiC) increased ERK1/2 activation and cell migration. This increased migration was associated with high myosin light chain phosphorylation by PI3K/ERK-dependent mechanism in HREpiC cells. These data confirm the role of NCX1 activity in regulating renal epithelial cell migration. PMID:25770213

  6. Calcium regulation of exocytosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y A; Scales, S J; Duvvuri, V; Murthy, M; Patel, S M; Schulman, H; Scheller, R H

    2001-07-13

    The calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of neurotransmitter release is poorly understood. Here we investigated several aspects of this process in PC12 cells. We first showed that osmotic shock by 1 m sucrose stimulated rapid release of neurotransmitters from intact PC12 cells, indicating that most of the vesicles were docked at the plasma membrane. Second, we further investigated the mechanism of rescue of botulinum neurotoxin E inhibition of release by recombinant SNAP-25 COOH-terminal coil, which is known to be required in the triggering stage. We confirmed here that Ca(2+) was required simultaneously with the SNAP-25 peptide, with no significant increase in release if either the peptide or Ca(2+) was present during the priming stage as well as the triggering, suggesting that SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor) complex assembly was involved in the final Ca(2+)-triggered event. Using this rescue system, we also identified a series of acidic surface SNAP-25 residues that rescued better than wild-type when mutated, due to broadened Ca(2+) sensitivity, suggesting that this charged patch may interact electrostatically with a negative regulator of membrane fusion. Finally, we showed that the previously demonstrated stimulation of exocytosis in this system by calmodulin required calcium binding, since calmodulin mutants defective in Ca(2+)-binding were not able to enhance release. PMID:11359785

  7. TMEM203 Is a Novel Regulator of Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis and Is Required for Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shambharkar, Prashant B.; Bittinger, Mark; Latario, Brian; Xiong, ZhaoHui; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Davis, Vanessa; Lin, Victor; Yang, Yi; Valdez, Reginald; Labow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium signaling is critical for initiating and sustaining diverse cellular functions including transcription, synaptic signaling, muscle contraction, apoptosis and fertilization. Trans-membrane 203 (TMEM203) was identified here in cDNA overexpression screens for proteins capable of modulating intracellular calcium levels using activation of a calcium/calcineurin regulated transcription factor as an indicator. Overexpression of TMEM203 resulted in a reduction of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) calcium stores and elevation in basal cytoplasmic calcium levels. TMEM203 protein was localized to the ER and found associated with a number of ER proteins which regulate ER calcium entry and efflux. Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Tmem203 deficient mice had reduced ER calcium stores and altered calcium homeostasis. Tmem203 deficient mice were viable though male knockout mice were infertile and exhibited a severe block in spermiogenesis and spermiation. Expression profiling studies showed significant alternations in expression of calcium channels and pumps in testes and concurrently Tmem203 deficient spermatocytes demonstrated significantly altered calcium handling. Thus Tmem203 is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of cellular calcium homeostasis, is required for spermatogenesis and provides a causal link between intracellular calcium regulation and spermiogenesis. PMID:25996873

  8. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, James R. Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hammer, John A.; Knight, Peter J.

    2008-04-25

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins.

  9. Two-pore channels: Regulation by NAADP and customized roles in triggering calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Marchant, Jonathan S; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2010-06-01

    NAADP is a potent regulator of cytosolic calcium levels. Much evidence suggests that NAADP activates a novel channel located on an acidic (lysosomal-like) calcium store, the mobilisation of which results in further calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the recent identification of a family of poorly characterized ion channels (the two-pore channels) as endo-lysosomal NAADP receptors. The generation of calcium signals by these channels is likened to those evoked by depolarisation during excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. We discuss the idea that two-pore channels can mediate a trigger release of calcium which is then amplified by calcium-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum. This is similar to the activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and subsequent mobilisation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in cardiac tissue. We suggest that two-pore channels may physically interact with ryanodine receptors to account for more direct release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in analogy with the conformational coupling of voltage-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors in skeletal muscle. Interaction of two-pore channels with other calcium release channels likely occurs between stores "trans-chatter" and possibly within the same store "cis-chatter". We also speculate that trafficking of two-pore channels through the endo-lysosomal system facilitates interactions with calcium entry channels. Strategic placing of two-pore channels thus provides a versatile means of generating spatiotemporally complex cellular calcium signals. PMID:20621760

  10. The regulation of neuronal mitochondrial metabolism by calcium

    PubMed Central

    Llorente-Folch, I; Rueda, C B; Pardo, B; Szabadkai, G; Duchen, M R; Satrustegui, J

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signalling is fundamental to the function of the nervous system, in association with changes in ionic gradients across the membrane. Although restoring ionic gradients is energetically costly, a rise in intracellular Ca2+ acts through multiple pathways to increase ATP synthesis, matching energy supply to demand. Increasing cytosolic Ca2+ stimulates metabolite transfer across the inner mitochondrial membrane through activation of Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial carriers, whereas an increase in matrix Ca2+ stimulates the citric acid cycle and ATP synthase. The aspartate–glutamate exchanger Aralar/AGC1 (Slc25a12), a component of the malate–aspartate shuttle (MAS), is stimulated by modest increases in cytosolic Ca2+ and upregulates respiration in cortical neurons by enhancing pyruvate supply into mitochondria. Failure to increase respiration in response to small (carbachol) and moderate (K+-depolarization) workloads and blunted stimulation of respiration in response to high workloads (veratridine) in Aralar/AGC1 knockout neurons reflect impaired MAS activity and limited mitochondrial pyruvate supply. In response to large workloads (veratridine), acute stimulation of respiration occurs in the absence of MAS through Ca2+ influx through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and a rise in matrix [Ca2+]. Although the physiological importance of the MCU complex in work-induced stimulation of respiration of CNS neurons is not yet clarified, abnormal mitochondrial Ca2+ signalling causes pathology. Indeed, loss of function mutations in MICU1, a regulator of MCU complex, are associated with neuromuscular disease. In patient-derived MICU1 deficient fibroblasts, resting matrix Ca2+ is increased and mitochondria fragmented. Thus, the fine tuning of Ca2+ signals plays a key role in shaping mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:25809592

  11. The regulation of neuronal mitochondrial metabolism by calcium.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Folch, I; Rueda, C B; Pardo, B; Szabadkai, G; Duchen, M R; Satrustegui, J

    2015-08-15

    Calcium signalling is fundamental to the function of the nervous system, in association with changes in ionic gradients across the membrane. Although restoring ionic gradients is energetically costly, a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) acts through multiple pathways to increase ATP synthesis, matching energy supply to demand. Increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) stimulates metabolite transfer across the inner mitochondrial membrane through activation of Ca(2+) -regulated mitochondrial carriers, whereas an increase in matrix Ca(2+) stimulates the citric acid cycle and ATP synthase. The aspartate-glutamate exchanger Aralar/AGC1 (Slc25a12), a component of the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS), is stimulated by modest increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and upregulates respiration in cortical neurons by enhancing pyruvate supply into mitochondria. Failure to increase respiration in response to small (carbachol) and moderate (K(+) -depolarization) workloads and blunted stimulation of respiration in response to high workloads (veratridine) in Aralar/AGC1 knockout neurons reflect impaired MAS activity and limited mitochondrial pyruvate supply. In response to large workloads (veratridine), acute stimulation of respiration occurs in the absence of MAS through Ca(2+) influx through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and a rise in matrix [Ca(2+) ]. Although the physiological importance of the MCU complex in work-induced stimulation of respiration of CNS neurons is not yet clarified, abnormal mitochondrial Ca(2+) signalling causes pathology. Indeed, loss of function mutations in MICU1, a regulator of MCU complex, are associated with neuromuscular disease. In patient-derived MICU1 deficient fibroblasts, resting matrix Ca(2+) is increased and mitochondria fragmented. Thus, the fine tuning of Ca(2+) signals plays a key role in shaping mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:25809592

  12. Physiology and Regulation of Calcium Channels in Stomatal Guard Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Julian I.

    2007-05-02

    Stomatal pores in the epidermis of leaves regulate the diffusion of CO2 into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation and control water loss of plants during drought periods. Guard cells sense CO2, water status, light and other environmental conditions to regulate stomatal apertures for optimization of CO2 intake and plant growth under drought stress. The cytosolic second messenger calcium contributes to stomatal movements by transducing signals and regulating ion channels in guard cells. Studies suggest that both plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels and vacuolar/organellar Ca2+ release channels contribute to ABA-induced Ca2+ elevations in guard cells. Recent research in the P.I.'s laboratory has led to identification of a novel major cation-selective Ca2+-permeable influx channel (Ica) in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis guard cells. These advances will allow detailed characterization of Ica plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels in guard cells. The long term goal of this research project is to gain a first detailed characterization of these novel plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channel currents in Arabidopsis guard cells. The proposed research will investigate the hypothesis that Ica represents an important Ca2+ influx pathway for ABA and CO2 signal transduction in Arabidopsis guard cells. These studies will lead to elucidation of key signal transduction mechanisms by which plants balance CO2 influx into leaves and transpirational water loss and may contribute to future strategies for manipulating gas exchange for improved growth of crop plants and for biomass production.

  13. Nuclear proton dynamics and interactions with calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Biochemical signals acting on the nucleus can regulate gene expression. Despite the inherent affinity of nucleic acids and nuclear proteins (e.g. transcription factors) for protons, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate nuclear pH (pHnuc), and how these could be exploited to control gene expression. Here, we show that pHnuc dynamics can be imaged using the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Nuclear pores allow the passage of medium-sized molecules (calcein), but protons must first bind to mobile buffers in order to gain access to the nucleoplasm. Fixed buffering residing in the nucleus of permeabilized cells was estimated to be very weak on the basis of the large amplitude of pHnuc transients evoked by photolytic H(+)-uncaging or exposure to weak acids/bases. Consequently, the majority of nuclear pH buffering is sourced from the cytoplasm in the form of mobile buffers. Effective proton diffusion was faster in nucleoplasm than in cytoplasm, in agreement with the higher mobile-to-fixed buffering ratio in the nucleus. Cardiac myocyte pHnuc changed in response to maneuvers that alter nuclear Ca(2+) signals. Blocking Ca(2+) release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors stably alkalinized the nucleus. This Ca(2+)-pH interaction may arise from competitive binding to common chemical moieties. Competitive binding to mobile buffers may couple the efflux of Ca(2+)via nuclear pores with a counterflux of protons. This would generate a stable pH gradient between cytoplasm and nucleus that is sensitive to the state of nuclear Ca(2+) signaling. The unusual behavior of protons in the nucleus provides new mechanisms for regulating cardiac nuclear biology. PMID:26183898

  14. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  15. Calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels mediate the β(2)-adrenergic regulation of Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Keller, Michael J; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Budinger, G R Scott; Sznajder, Jacob I

    2014-12-20

    β2-Adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  16. Calcium Release-Activated Calcium (CRAC) Channels Mediate the β2-Adrenergic Regulation of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael J.; Lecuona, Emilia; Prakriya, Murali; Cheng, Yuan; Soberanes, Saul; Scott Budinger, G.R.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2014-01-01

    β2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to regulate Na,K-ATPase in the alveolar epithelium by recruiting Na,K-ATPase-containing vesicles to the plasma membrane of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC). Here, we provide evidence that β2-agonists induce store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in AECs. This calcium entry is necessary for β2-agonist-induced recruitment of Na,K-ATPase to the plasma membrane of AECs. Specifically, we show that β2-agonists induce SOCE via stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1)-associated calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of SOCE affects the abundance of Na,K-ATPase at the plasma membrane of AECs. PMID:25447523

  17. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  18. Presynaptic Calcium Channel Localization and Calcium Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Regulated by the Fuseless Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, A. Ashleigh; Kim, Eunju; Leung, Hung-Tat; Woodruff, Elvin; An, Lingling; Doerge, R. W.; Pak, William L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    Summary A systematic forward genetic Drosophila screen for electroretinogram mutants lacking synaptic transients identified the fuseless (fusl) gene, which encodes a predicted 8-pass transmembrane protein in the presynaptic membrane. Null fusl mutants display >75% reduction in evoked synaptic transmission but, conversely, a ~3-fold increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion events. These neurotransmission defects are rescued by a wildtype fusl transgene targeted only to the presynaptic cell, demonstrating a strictly presynaptic requirement for Fusl function. Defects in FM dye turnover at the synapse show a severely impaired exo-endo synaptic vesicle cycling pool. Consistently, ultrastructural analyses reveal accumulated vesicles arrested in clustered and docked pools at presynaptic active zones. In the absence of Fusl, calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release is dramatically compromised and there is little enhancement of synaptic efficacy with elevated external Ca2+ concentrations. These defects are causally linked with severe loss of the Cacophony voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which fail to localize normally at presynaptic active zone domains in the absence of Fusl. These data indicate that Fusl regulates assembly of the presynaptic active zone Ca2+ channel domains required for efficient coupling of the Ca2+ influx and synaptic vesicle exocytosis during neurotransmission. PMID:18385325

  19. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  20. Discrete-State Stochastic Models of Calcium-Regulated Calcium Influx and Subspace Dynamics Are Not Well-Approximated by ODEs That Neglect Concentration Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Seth H.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte calcium signaling is often modeled using deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and mass-action kinetics. However, spatially restricted “domains” associated with calcium influx are small enough (e.g., 10−17 liters) that local signaling may involve 1–100 calcium ions. Is it appropriate to model the dynamics of subspace calcium using deterministic ODEs or, alternatively, do we require stochastic descriptions that account for the fundamentally discrete nature of these local calcium signals? To address this question, we constructed a minimal Markov model of a calcium-regulated calcium channel and associated subspace. We compared the expected value of fluctuating subspace calcium concentration (a result that accounts for the small subspace volume) with the corresponding deterministic model (an approximation that assumes large system size). When subspace calcium did not regulate calcium influx, the deterministic and stochastic descriptions agreed. However, when calcium binding altered channel activity in the model, the continuous deterministic description often deviated significantly from the discrete stochastic model, unless the subspace volume is unrealistically large and/or the kinetics of the calcium binding are sufficiently fast. This principle was also demonstrated using a physiologically realistic model of calmodulin regulation of L-type calcium channels introduced by Yue and coworkers. PMID:23509597

  1. Store-operated channels regulate intracellular calcium in mammalian rods.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Tünde; Barabas, Peter; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Punzo, Claudio; Kefalov, Vladimir; Križaj, David

    2012-08-01

    Exposure to daylight closes cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) and voltage-operated Ca(2+) -permeable channels in mammalian rods. The consequent lowering of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), if protracted, can contribute to light-induced damage and apoptosis in these cells. We here report that mouse rods are protected against prolonged lowering of [Ca(2+)](i) by store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Ca(2+) stores were depleted in Ca(2+)-free saline supplemented with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) sequestration blocker cyclopiazonic acid. Store depletion elicited [Ca(2+)](i) signals that exceeded baseline [Ca(2+)](i) by 5.9 ± 0.7-fold and were antagonized by an inhibitory cocktail containing 2-APB, SKF 96365 and Gd(3+). Cation influx through SOCE channels was sufficient to elicit a secondary activation of L-type voltage-operated Ca2+ entry. We also found that TRPC1, the type 1 canonical mammalian homologue of the Drosophila photoreceptor TRP channel, is predominantly expressed within the outer nuclear layer of the retina. Rod loss in Pde6b(rdl) (rd1), Chx10/Kip1(-/-rdl) and Elovl4(TG2) dystrophic models was associated with ∼70% reduction in Trpc1 mRNA content whereas Trpc1 mRNA levels in rodless cone-full Nrl(-/-) retinas were decreased by ∼50%. Genetic ablation of TRPC1 channels, however, had no effect on SOCE, the sensitivity of the rod phototransduction cascade or synaptic transmission at rod and cone synapses. Thus, we localized two new mechanisms, SOCE and TRPC1, to mammalian rods and characterized the contribution of SOCE to Ca(2+) homeostasis. By preventing the cytosolic [Ca(2+)](i) from dropping too low under sustained saturating light conditions, these signalling pathways may protect Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms within the ER and the cytosol without affecting normal rod function. PMID:22674725

  2. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  3. Calcium in the regulation of gravitropism by light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. O.; LaFavre, A. K.; Leopold, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    The red light requirement for positive gravitropism in roots of corn (Zea mays cv "Merit") provides an entry for examining the participation of calcium in gravitropism. Applications of calcium chelators inhibit the light response. Calcium channel blockers (verapamil, lanthanum) can also inhibit the light response, and a calcium ionophore, A23187, can substitute for light. One can substitute for red light by treatments which have elsewhere been shown to trigger Ca2+ influx into the cytosol, e.g. heat or cold shock. Agents which are known to be agonists of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system (serotonin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, deoxycholate) can each partially substitute for the red light, and Li+ can inhibit the light effect. These experiments suggest that the induction of positive gravitropism by red light involves a rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and that a contribution to this end may be made by the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system.

  4. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  5. Cellular Architecture Regulates Collective Calcium Signaling and Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Hoying, James B.; Deymier, Pierre A.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    A key feature of multicellular systems is the ability of cells to function collectively in response to external stimuli. However, the mechanisms of intercellular cell signaling and their functional implications in diverse vascular structures are poorly understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and plasma lithography micropatterning, we investigate the roles of structural arrangement of endothelial cells in collective calcium signaling and cell contractility. Under histamine stimulation, endothelial cells in self-assembled and microengineered networks, but not individual cells and monolayers, exhibit calcium oscillations. Micropatterning, pharmacological inhibition, and computational modeling reveal that the calcium oscillation depends on the number of neighboring cells coupled via gap junctional intercellular communication, providing a mechanistic basis of the architecture-dependent calcium signaling. Furthermore, the calcium oscillation attenuates the histamine-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell contraction, resulting in differential cell responses in an architecture-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial cells can sense and respond to chemical stimuli according to the vascular architecture via collective calcium signaling. PMID:27196735

  6. Space-flight simulations of calcium metabolism using a mathematical model of calcium regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a series of simulation studies of calcium matabolic changes which have been recorded during human exposure to bed rest and space flight are presented. Space flight and bed rest data demonstrate losses of total body calcium during exposure to hypogravic environments. These losses are evidenced by higher than normal rates of urine calcium excretion and by negative calcium balances. In addition, intestinal absorption rates and bone mineral content are assumed to decrease. The bed rest and space flight simulations were executed on a mathematical model of the calcium metabolic system. The purpose of the simulations is to theoretically test hypotheses and predict system responses which are occurring during given experimental stresses. In this case, hypogravity occurs through the comparison of simulation and experimental data and through the analysis of model structure and system responses. The model reliably simulates the responses of selected bed rest and space flight parameters. When experimental data are available, the simulated skeletal responses and regulatory factors involved in the responses agree with space flight data collected on rodents. In addition, areas within the model that need improvement are identified.

  7. Calcium-dependent regulation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor signalling by copine.

    PubMed Central

    Tomsig, Jose Luis; Sohma, Hitoshi; Creutz, Carl E

    2004-01-01

    The role of copines in regulating signalling from the TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) receptor was probed by the expression of a copine dominant-negative construct in HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells. The construct was found to reduce activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB) by TNF-alpha. The introduction of calcium into HEK293 cells either through the activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors or through the application of the ionophore A23187 was found to enhance TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappaB. This effect of calcium was completely blocked by the copine dominant-negative construct. TNF-alpha was found to greatly enhance the expression of endogenous copine I, and the responsiveness of the TNF-alpha signalling pathway to muscarinic stimulation increased in parallel with the increased copine I expression. The copine dominant-negative construct also inhibited the TNF-alpha-dependent degradation of IkappaB, a regulator of NF-kappaB. All of the effects of the dominant-negative construct could be reversed by overexpression of full-length copine I, suggesting that the construct acts specifically through competitive inhibition of copine. One of the identified targets of copine I is the NEDD8-conjugating enzyme UBC12 (ubiquitin C12), that promotes the degradation of IkappaB through the ubiquitin ligase enzyme complex SCF(betaTrCP). Therefore the copine dominant-negative construct might inhibit TNF-alpha signalling by dysregulation or mislocalization of UBC12. Based on these results, a hypothesis is presented for possible roles of copines in regulating other signalling pathways in animals, plants and protozoa. PMID:14674885

  8. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Heven Sze

    2008-06-22

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionally express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca and Mn

  9. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  10. Paramecium calmodulin mutants defective in ion channel regulation can bind calcium and undergo calcium-induced conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Jaren, O R; Harmon, S; Chen, A F; Shea, M A

    2000-06-13

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic protein that binds calcium ions cooperatively at four EF-hand binding sites to regulate signal transduction pathways. Interactions between the apo domains of vertebrate CaM reduce the calcium affinities of sites I and II below their intrinsic values, allowing sequential opening of the two hydrophobic clefts in CaM. Viable domain-specific mutants of Parameciumcalmodulin (PCaM) differentially affect ion channels and provide a unique opportunity to dissect the roles of the two highly homologous half-molecule domains. Calcium binding induced an increase in the level of ordered secondary structure and a decrease in Stokes radius in these mutants; such changes were identical in direction to those of wild type CaM, but the magnitude depended on the mutation. Calcium titrations monitored by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of Y138 in site IV showed that the affinities of sites III and IV of wild type PCaM were (i) higher than those of the same sites in rat CaM, (ii) equivalent to those of the same sites in PCaM mutants altered between sites I and II, and (iii) higher than those of PCaM mutants modified in sites III and IV. Thus, calcium saturation drove all mutants to undergo conformational switching in the same direction but not to the same extent as wild type PCaM. The disruption of the allosteric mechanism that is manifest as faulty channel regulation may be explained by altered properties of switching among the 14 possible partially saturated species of PCaM rather than by an inability to adopt two end-state conformations or target interactions similar to those of the wild type protein. PMID:10841769

  11. In or out? Regulating nuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Hood, J K; Silver, P A

    1999-04-01

    The compartmentalization of proteins within the nucleus or cytoplasm of a eukaryotic cell offers opportunity for regulation of cell cycle progression and signalling pathways. Nuclear localization of proteins is determined by their ability to interact with specific nuclear import and export factors. In the past year, substrate phosphorylation has emerged as a common mechanism for controlling this interaction. PMID:10209150

  12. Members of the thrombospondin gene family bind stromal interaction molecule 1 and regulate calcium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Mark; Nadler, Monica; Okuhara, Dayne; Thompson, Jill; Shuttleworth, Trevor; Lawler, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The thrombospondins (TSPs) are a family of matricellular proteins that regulate cellular phenotype through interactions with a myriad of other proteins and proteoglycans. We have identified a novel interaction of the members of the TSP gene family with stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). This association is robust since it is preserved in Triton X-100, can be detected with multiple anti-TSP-1 and anti-STIM1 antibodies, and is detected in a wide range of cell types. We have also found that STIM1 co-immunoprecipitates with TSP-4 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and that a recombinant version of the N-terminal domain of STIM1 binds to the signature domain of TSP-1 and COMP. The association of the TSPs with STIM1 is observed in both the presence and absence of calcium indicating that the calcium-dependent conformation of the signature domain of TSPs is not required for binding. Thus, this interaction could occur in the ER under conditions of normal or low calcium concentration. Furthermore, we observed that the expression of COMP in HEK 293 cells decreases STIM1-mediated calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channel currents and increases arachidonic acid calcium (ARC) channel currents. These data indicate that the TSPs regulate STIM1 function and participate in the reciprocal regulation of two channels that mediate calcium entry into the cell. PMID:24845346

  13. Skeletal muscle sarcolemma in malignant hyperthermia: evidence for a defect in calcium regulation.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, J R; Ross, J A; Hyslop, R J; Gallant, E M; Louis, C F

    1987-03-12

    Sarcolemmal properties implicated in the skeletal muscle disorder, malignant hyperthermia (MH), were examined using sarcolemma-membrane vesicles isolated from normal and MH-susceptible (MHS) porcine skeletal muscle. MHS and normal sarcolemma did not differ in the distribution of the major proteins, cholesterol or phospholipid content, vesicle size and sidedness, (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity, ouabain binding, or adenylate cyclase activity (total and isoproterenol sensitivity). The regulation of the initial rates of MHS and normal sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport (calcium uptake after 1 min) by Ca2+ (K1/2 = 0.64-0.81 microM), calmodulin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase were similar. However, when sarcolemmal calcium content was measured at either 2 or 20 min after the initiation of active calcium transport, a significant difference between MHS and normal sarcolemmal calcium uptake became apparent, with MHS sarcolemma accumulating approximately 25% less calcium than normal sarcolemma. Calcium transport by MHS and normal sarcolemma, at 2 or 20 min, had a similar calmodulin dependence (C1/2 = 150 nM), and was stimulated to a similar extent by cAMP-dependent protein kinase or calmodulin. Halothane inhibited MHS and normal sarcolemmal active calcium uptake in a similar fashion (half-maximal inhibition at 10 mM halothane), while dantrolene (30 microM) and nitrendipine (1 microM) had little effect on either MHS or normal sarcolemmal calcium transport. After 20 min of ATP-supported calcium uptake, 2 mM EGTA plus 10 microM sodium orthovanadate were added to initiate sarcolemmal calcium efflux. Following an initial rapid phase of calcium release, an extended slow phase of calcium efflux (k = 0.012 min-1) was similar for both MHS and normal sarcolemma vesicles. We conclude that although a number of sarcolemmal properties, including passive calcium permeability, are normal in MH, a small but significant defect in MHS sarcolemmal ATP-dependent calcium transport may

  14. Depletion of calcium stores regulates calcium influx and signal transmission in rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Szikra, Tamas; Cusato, Karen; Thoreson, Wallace B; Barabas, Peter; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Krizaj, David

    2008-01-01

    Tonic synapses are specialized for sustained calcium entry and transmitter release, allowing them to operate in a graded fashion over a wide dynamic range. We identified a novel plasma membrane calcium entry mechanism that extends the range of rod photoreceptor signalling into light-adapted conditions. The mechanism, which shares molecular and physiological characteristics with store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), is required to maintain baseline [Ca2+]i in rod inner segments and synaptic terminals. Sustained Ca2+ entry into rod cytosol is augmented by store depletion, blocked by La3+ and Gd3+ and suppressed by organic antagonists MRS-1845 and SKF-96365. Store depletion and the subsequent Ca2+ influx directly stimulated exocytosis in terminals of light-adapted rods loaded with the activity-dependent dye FM1–43. Moreover, SOCE blockers suppressed rod-mediated synaptic inputs to horizontal cells without affecting presynaptic voltage-operated Ca2+ entry. Silencing of TRPC1 expression with small interference RNA disrupted SOCE in rods, but had no effect on cone Ca2+ signalling. Rods were immunopositive for TRPC1 whereas cone inner segments immunostained with TRPC6 channel antibodies. Thus, SOCE modulates Ca2+ homeostasis and light-evoked neurotransmission at the rod photoreceptor synapse mediated by TRPC1. PMID:18755743

  15. Hormonal Regulation of Nuclear Permeability*◆

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Elizabeth M.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Sehgal, Sona; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Transport into the nucleus is critical for regulation of gene transcription and other intranuclear events. Passage of molecules into the nucleus depends in part upon their size and the presence of appropriate targeting sequences. However, little is known about the effects of hormones or their second messengers on transport across the nuclear envelope. We used localized, two-photon activation of a photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to investigate whether hormones, via their second messengers, could alter nuclear permeability. Vasopressin other hormones that increase cytosolic Ca2+ and activate protein kinase C increased permeability across the nuclear membrane of SKHep1 liver cells in a rapid unidirectional manner. An increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was both necessary and sufficient for this process. Furthermore, localized photorelease of caged Ca2+ near the nuclear envelope resulted in a local increase in nuclear permeability. Neither activation nor inhibition of protein kinase C affected nuclear permeability. These findings provide evidence that hormones linking to certain G protein-coupled receptors increase nuclear permeability via cytosolic Ca2+. Short term regulation of nuclear permeability may provide a novel mechanism by which such hormones permit transcription factors and other regulatory molecules to enter the nucleus, thereby regulating gene transcription in target cells. PMID:17158097

  16. Synaptic Calcium Regulation in Hair Cells of the Chicken Basilar Papilla

    PubMed Central

    Im, Gi Jung; Moskowitz, Howard S.; Lehar, Mohammed; Hiel, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic inhibition of hair cells occurs by activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. A near-membrane postsynaptic cistern has been proposed to serve as a store from which calcium is released to supplement influx through the ionotropic ACh receptor. However, the time and voltage dependence of acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked potassium currents reveal a more complex relationship between calcium entry and release from stores. The present work uses voltage steps to regulate calcium influx during the application of ACh to hair cells in the chicken basilar papilla. When calcium influx was terminated at positive membrane potential, the ACh-evoked potassium current decayed exponentially over ∼100 ms. However, at negative membrane potentials, this current exhibited a secondary rise in amplitude that could be eliminated by dihydropyridine block of the voltage-gated calcium channels of the hair cell. Calcium entering through voltage-gated channels may transit through the postsynaptic cistern, since ryanodine and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase blockers altered the time course and magnitude of this secondary, voltage-dependent contribution to ACh-evoked potassium current. Serial section electron microscopy showed that efferent and afferent synaptic structures are juxtaposed, supporting the possibility that voltage-gated influx at afferent ribbon synapses influences calcium homeostasis during long-lasting cholinergic inhibition. In contrast, spontaneous postsynaptic currents (“minis”) resulting from stochastic efferent release of ACh were made briefer by ryanodine, supporting the hypothesis that the synaptic cistern serves primarily as a calcium barrier and sink during low-level synaptic activity. Hypolemmal cisterns such as that at the efferent synapse of the hair cell can play a dynamic role in segregating near-membrane calcium for short-term and long-term signaling. PMID:25505321

  17. [The role of calcium, calcitriol and their receptors in parathyroid regulation].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-López, N; Fernández-Martín, J L; Cannata-Andía, J B

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of regulation of Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is complex, and diverse factors are involved: the fundamental ones are calcium, calcitriol and phosphorus. Calcium and calcitriol's mechanism of action takes place through its specific receptors, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) and the Vitamin D Receptor (VDR). These two factors have an effect not only on its specific receptors, but also they can modify the other receptor in a positive manner, promoting its actions and demonstrating a cooperative effect between the two. Along with calcium and calcitriol, drugs used in the treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral Bone Disorders (CKD-MBD) also act directly or indirectly on CaR and VDR and therefore are also responsible for the regulation of the parathyroid gland. PMID:19396314

  18. Calcium-induced contraction of sarcomeres changes the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Anmann, Tiia; Eimre, Margus; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Andrienko, Tatiana; Kaambre, Tuuli; Sikk, Peeter; Seppet, Evelin; Tiivel, Toomas; Vendelin, Marko; Seppet, Enn; Saks, Valdur A

    2005-06-01

    The relationships between cardiac cell structure and the regulation of mitochondrial respiration were studied by applying fluorescent confocal microscopy and analysing the kinetics of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration, during calcium-induced contraction in permeabilized cardiomyocytes and myocardial fibers, and in their 'ghost' preparations (after selective myosin extraction). Up to 3 microm free calcium, in the presence of ATP, induced strong contraction of permeabilized cardiomyocytes with intact sarcomeres, accompanied by alterations in mitochondrial arrangement and a significant decrease in the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP and ATP in the kinetics of mitochondrial respiration. The V(max) of respiration showed a moderate (50%) increase, with an optimum at 0.4 microm free calcium and a decrease at higher calcium concentrations. At high free-calcium concentrations, the direct flux of ADP from ATPases to mitochondria was diminished compared to that at low calcium levels. All of these effects were unrelated either to mitochondrial calcium overload or to mitochondrial permeability transition and were not observed in 'ghost' preparations after the selective extraction of myosin. Our results suggest that the structural changes transmitted from contractile apparatus to mitochondria modify localized restrictions of the diffusion of adenine nucleotides and thus may actively participate in the regulation of mitochondrial function, in addition to the metabolic signalling via the creatine kinase system. PMID:15955072

  19. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  20. The plasma membrane protein Rch1 is a negative regulator of cytosolic calcium homeostasis and positively regulated by the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathway in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunying; Yan, Hongbo; Happeck, Ricardo; Peiter-Volk, Tina; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Yan; Peiter, Edgar; van Oostende Triplet, Chloë; Whiteway, Malcolm; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rch1 is structurally similar to both the vertebrate solute carrier SLC10A7 and Candida albicans Rch1. We show here that ScRCH1 is a functional homolog of CaRCH1. In S. cerevisiae, overexpression of ScRCH1 suppresses, but deletion of ScRCH1 does not affect, the lithium and rapamycin tolerance of pmr1 cells. Overexpression of ScRCH1 reduces expression of ENA1, prevents sustained accumulation of cytosolic calcium and reduces the activation level of calcium/calcineurin signaling in pmr1 cells. Therefore, similar to the situation in the pathogen C. albicans, ScRch1 negatively regulates the cytosolic homeostasis in response to high levels of extracellular calcium. ScRch1 proteins distribute as multiple foci in the plasma membrane prior to cell division, move toward and concentrate at the bud neck as the bud grows in size, and disperse again along the plasma membrane immediately prior to cytokinesis. Furthermore, our genetic and biochemical data also demonstrate that transcriptional expression of RCH1 is positively regulated by calcium/calcineurin signaling through the sole CDRE element in its promoter. PMID:26832117

  1. Proton enhanced scattering and nuclear reaction analysis microcharacterization of ternary graphite-lithium-calcium intercalation compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Pruvost, S.; Hérold, C.; Lagrange, P.

    2004-06-01

    Intercalation of lithium into graphite is of great interest, due to its largely expanded use as negative electrode material in the Li-ion batteries, especially the LiC 6 compound. Recently, the first ternary intercalation compounds associating lithium with a second metallic element were synthesized by immersing pyrographite platelet in a molten Ca-Li alloy. Photonic and neutronic diffractions on these graphite-lithium-calcium compounds reveal that lithium and calcium layers are intercalated between graphene sheets. However, the precise elemental composition still lacks. Chemical analysis gives an average composition but carbon is not measured in the same sample as calcium and lithium. Electron microprobe, SEM and TEM do not allow to determine lithium concentration and its distribution in these compounds. This paper reports the first elemental characterization of carbon-calcium-lithium intercalation compounds by means of nuclear microprobe. Using a 3.1 MeV proton beam, both lithium, calcium and carbon can be determined within a single measurement, from the 7Li(p,α) 4He nuclear reaction and from elastic scattering for calcium and carbon respectively. In the graphite-lithium-calcium system, three different intercalation compounds were synthesized, containing low to high lithium content. The mapping of the samples reveals lateral and also mainly in depth heterogeneity (along the c axis).

  2. Localization of the calcium-regulated citrate transport process in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Hering-Smith, Kathleen S; Mao, Weibo; Schiro, Faith R; Coleman-Barnett, Joycelynn; Pajor, Ana M; Hamm, L Lee

    2014-06-01

    Urinary citrate is an important inhibitor of calcium-stone formation. Most of the citrate reabsorption in the proximal tubule is thought to occur via a dicarboxylate transporter NaDC1 located in the apical membrane. OK cells, an established opossum kidney proximal tubule cell line, transport citrate but the characteristics change with extracellular calcium such that low calcium solutions stimulate total citrate transport as well as increase the apparent affinity for transport. The present studies address several fundamental properties of this novel process: the polarity of the transport process, the location of the calcium-sensitivity and whether NaDC1 is present in OK cells. OK cells grown on permeable supports exhibited apical >basolateral citrate transport. Apical transport of both citrate and succinate was sensitive to extracellular calcium whereas basolateral transport was not. Apical calcium, rather than basolateral, was the predominant determinant of changes in transport. Also 2,3-dimethylsuccinate, previously identified as an inhibitor of basolateral dicarboxylate transport, inhibited apical citrate uptake. Although the calcium-sensitive transport process in OK cells is functionally not typical NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in OK cells by Western blot and PCR. By immunolocalization studies, NaDC1 was predominantly located in discrete apical membrane or subapical areas. However, by biotinylation, apical NaDC1 decreases in the apical membrane with lowering calcium. In sum, OK cells express a calcium-sensitive/regulated dicarboxylate process at the apical membrane which responds to variations in apical calcium. Despite the functional differences of this process compared to NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in these cells, but predominantly in subapical vesicles. PMID:24652587

  3. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o)) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) signalling in the CAS signalling pathway in guard cells in response to Ca(2+)(o). Here it is shown that Ca(2+)(o) could induce H(2)O(2) and NO production from guard cells but only H(2)O(2) from chloroplasts, leading to stomatal closure. In addition, the CASas mutant, the atrbohD/F double mutant, and the Atnoa1 mutant were all insensitive to Ca(2+)(o)-stimulated stomatal closure, as well as H(2)O(2) and NO elevation in the case of CASas. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant system might function as a mediator in Ca(2+)(o) and H(2)O(2) signalling in guard cells. The results suggest a hypothetical model whereby Ca(2+)(o) induces H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation in guard cells through the CAS signalling pathway, which further triggers Ca(2+)(i) transients and finally stomatal closure. The possible cross-talk of Ca(2+)(o) and abscisic acid signalling as well as the antioxidant system are discussed. PMID:21940718

  4. Structural and mechanistic insights into MICU1 regulation of mitochondrial calcium uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lele; Yang, Xue; Li, Siwei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yu; Feng, Jianrong; Zhu, Yushan; Shen, Yuequan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uptake is a critical event in various cellular activities. Two recently identified proteins, the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU), which is the pore-forming subunit of a Ca2+ channel, and mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1), which is the regulator of MCU, are essential in this event. However, the molecular mechanism by which MICU1 regulates MCU remains elusive. In this study, we report the crystal structures of Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound human MICU1. Our studies reveal that Ca2+-free MICU1 forms a hexamer that binds and inhibits MCU. Upon Ca2+ binding, MICU1 undergoes large conformational changes, resulting in the formation of multiple oligomers to activate MCU. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the affinity of MICU1 for Ca2+ is approximately 15–20 μM. Collectively, our results provide valuable details to decipher the molecular mechanism of MICU1 regulation of mitochondrial calcium uptake. PMID:24514027

  5. Regulation of Multi-drug Resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is TRPC6/Calcium Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liang; Liang, Chao; Chen, Enjiang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Feng; Zhi, Xiao; Wei, Tao; Xue, Fei; Li, Guogang; Yang, Qi; Gong, Weihua; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy because of its tendency to develop multi-drug resistance (MDR), whose various underlying mechanisms make it difficult to target. The calcium signalling pathway is associated with many cellular biological activities, and is also a critical player in cancer. However, its role in modulating tumour MDR remains unclear. In this study, stimulation by doxorubicin, hypoxia and ionizing radiation was used to induce MDR in HCC cells. A sustained aggregation of intracellular calcium was observed upon these stimuli, while inhibition of calcium signalling enhanced the cells’ sensitivity to various drugs by attenuating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), Hif1-α signalling and DNA damage repair. The effect of calcium signalling is mediated via transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a subtype of calcium-permeable channel. An in vivo xenograft model of HCC further confirmed that inhibiting TRPC6 enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin. In addition, we deduced that STAT3 activation is a downstream signalling pathway in MDR. Collectively, this study demonstrated that the various mechanisms regulating MDR in HCC cells are calcium dependent through the TRPC6/calcium/STAT3 pathway. We propose that targeting TRPC6 in HCC may be a novel antineoplastic strategy, especially combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27011063

  6. Possible site of calcium regulation in rat exocrine pancreas cells: an X-ray microanalytical study

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, N.

    1988-03-01

    We analysed four subcellular compartments in rat exocrine pancreas cells, zymogen granules, cytoplasm surrounding the zymogen granules, mitochondria and cytoplasm in the basal part of the cells for sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium and calcium content, using ultrathin frozen-dried cryosections. The highest concentrations of calcium were measured in the zymogen granules and the surrounding apical part of the cell containing Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and condensing vacuoles. Calcium concentrations in the basal part of the cells (mostly rough endoplasmic reticulum) were 60% lower than in the apical part of the cells. The lowest calcium concentrations were measured in mitochondria. The results suggest that other subcellular compartments than the rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria might be involved in the intracellular Ca2+ regulation.

  7. Calcium binding to calmodulin mutants having domain-specific effects on the regulation of ion channels.

    PubMed

    VanScyoc, Wendy S; Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Shea, Madeline A

    2006-12-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential, eukaryotic protein comprised of two highly homologous domains (N and C). CaM binds four calcium ions cooperatively, regulating a wide array of target proteins. A genetic screen of Paramecia by Kung [Kung, C. et al. (1992) Cell Calcium 13, 413-425] demonstrated that the domains of CaM have separable physiological roles: "under-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent sodium currents mapped to the N-domain, while "over-reactive" mutations affecting calcium-dependent potassium currents localized to the C-domain of CaM. To determine whether and how these mutations affected intrinsic calcium-binding properties of CaM domains, phenylalanine fluorescence was used to monitor calcium binding to sites I and II (N-domain) and tyrosine fluorescence was used to monitor sites III and IV (C-domain). To explore interdomain interactions, binding properties of each full-length mutant were compared to those of its corresponding domain fragments. The calcium-binding properties of six under-reactive mutants (V35I/D50N, G40E, G40E/D50N, D50G, E54K, and G59S) and one over-reactive mutant (M145V) were indistinguishable from those of wild-type CaM, despite their deleterious physiological effects on ion-channel regulation. Four over-reactive mutants (D95G, S101F, E104K, and H135R) significantly decreased the calcium affinity of the C-domain. Of these, one (E104K) also increased the calcium affinity of the N-domain, demonstrating that the magnitude and direction of wild-type interdomain coupling had been perturbed. This suggests that, while some of these mutations alter calcium-binding directly, others probably alter CaM-channel association or calcium-triggered conformational change in the context of a ternary complex with the affected ion channel. PMID:17128970

  8. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. PMID:25982429

  9. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca(2+) uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  10. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca2+ uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  11. Differential expression of calcium-regulated SlSRs in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in tomato fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium has been shown to increase stress tolerance, enhance fruit firmness and reduce decay. Previously we reported that seven tomato SlSRs encode calcium/calmodulin-regulated proteins, and that their expressions are developmentally regulated during fruit development and ripening, and are also resp...

  12. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  13. CBL1, a calcium sensor that differentially regulates salt, drought, and cold responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Yong Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Nam; Pandey, Girdhar K; Gupta, Rajeev; Grant, John J; Luan, Sheng

    2003-08-01

    Although calcium is a critical component in the signal transduction pathways that lead to stress gene expression in higher plants, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying calcium function. It is believed that cellular calcium changes are perceived by sensor molecules, including calcium binding proteins. The calcineurin B-like (CBL) protein family represents a unique group of calcium sensors in plants. A member of the family, CBL1, is highly inducible by multiple stress signals, implicating CBL1 in stress response pathways. When the CBL1 protein level was increased in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, it altered the stress response pathways in these plants. Although drought-induced gene expression was enhanced, gene induction by cold was inhibited. In addition, CBL1-overexpressing plants showed enhanced tolerance to salt and drought but reduced tolerance to freezing. By contrast, cbl1 null mutant plants showed enhanced cold induction and reduced drought induction of stress genes. The mutant plants displayed less tolerance to salt and drought but enhanced tolerance to freezing. These studies suggest that CBL1 functions as a positive regulator of salt and drought responses and a negative regulator of cold response in plants. PMID:12897256

  14. Alpha-1 giardin is an annexin with highly unusual calcium-regulated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Weeratunga, Saroja K; Osman, Asiah; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wang, Conan K; Mason, Lyndel; Svärd, Staffan; Hope, Greg; Jones, Malcolm K; Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-10-19

    Alpha-giardins constitute the annexin proteome (group E annexins) in the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia and, as such, represent the evolutionary oldest eukaryotic annexins. The dominance of alpha-giardins in the cytoskeleton of Giardia with its greatly reduced actin content emphasises the importance of the alpha-giardins for the structural integrity of the parasite, which is particularly critical in the transformation stage between cyst and trophozoite. In this study, we report the crystal structures of the apo- and calcium-bound forms of α1-giardin, a protein localised to the plasma membrane of Giardia trophozoites that has recently been identified as a vaccine target. The calcium-bound crystal structure of α1-giardin revealed the presence of a type III site in the first repeat as known from other annexin structures, as well as a novel calcium binding site situated between repeats I and IV. By means of comparison, the crystal structures of three different alpha-giardins known to date indicate that these proteins engage different calcium coordination schemes, among each other, as well as compared to annexins of groups A-D. Evaluation of the calcium-dependent binding to acidic phosphoplipid membranes revealed that this process is not only mediated but also regulated by the environmental calcium concentration. Uniquely within the large family of annexins, α1-giardin disengages from the phospholipid membrane at high calcium concentrations possibly due to formation of a dimeric species. The observed behaviour is in line with changing calcium levels experienced by the parasite during excystation and may thus provide first insights into the molecular mechanisms underpinning the transformation and survival of the parasite in the host. PMID:22796298

  15. [Roles of intracellular calcium and monomeric G-proteins in regulating exocytosis of human neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Jun-Han; Wu, Jian-Min; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Chun-Guang

    2003-12-25

    Neutrophils play a major role in host defense against microbial infection. There are some clues indicate that neutrophils may also play a role in the pathophysiology of the airway obstruction in chronic asthma. We studied the roles of intracellular calcium and GTP gamma S in the regulation of neutrophils exocytosis using pipette perfusion and membrane capacitance measurement technique in whole cell patch clamp configuration. The results showed that the membrane capacitance increase induced by calcium revealed a biphasic process. The first phase occurred when the calcium level was between 0.2-14 micromol/L with a plateau amplitude of 1.23 pF and a calcium EC50 of 1.1 micromol/L. This phase might correspond to the release of the tertiary granules. The second phase occurred when the calcium concentration was between 20-70 micromol/L with a plateau increment of 6.36 pF, the calcium EC50 being about 33 micromol/L. This phase might represent the release of the primary and secondary granules. Intracellular calcium also simultaneously increased the exocytotic rate and the eventual extent in neutrophils. On the other hand, GTP gamma S can increase the exocytotic rate in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the eventual extent of membrane capacitance increment (>6 pF) if the cell was stimulated for a long period (>20 min). GTP gamma S (ranging from 20 to 100 micromol/L) induced the neutrophils to release all four types of the granules at very low intracellular calcium level. PMID:14695488

  16. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P; Vezina, Chad M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood) into the ductal lumen (milk). Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2) and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1) membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2). Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2) are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:25299122

  17. Peripheral Serotonin Regulates Maternal Calcium Trafficking in Mammary Epithelial Cells during Lactation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P.; Vezina, Chad M.; Hernandez, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood) into the ductal lumen (milk). Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2) and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1) membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2). Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2) are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:25299122

  18. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  19. Mechanical regulation of nuclear structure and function.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rui P; Finan, John D; Guilak, Farshid; Lee, David A

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical loading induces both nuclear distortion and alterations in gene expression in a variety of cell types. Mechanotransduction is the process by which extracellular mechanical forces can activate a number of well-studied cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Inevitably, such signals are transduced to the nucleus and induce transcription factor-mediated changes in gene expression. However, gene expression also can be regulated through alterations in nuclear architecture, providing direct control of genome function. One putative transduction mechanism for this phenomenon involves alterations in nuclear architecture that result from the mechanical perturbation of the cell. This perturbation is associated with direct mechanical strain or osmotic stress, which is transferred to the nucleus. This review describes the current state of knowledge relating the nuclear architecture and the transfer of mechanical forces to the nucleus mediated by the cytoskeleton, the nucleoskeleton, and the LINC (linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex. Moreover, remodeling of the nucleus induces alterations in nuclear stiffness, which may be associated with cell differentiation. These phenomena are discussed in relation to the potential influence of nuclear architecture-mediated mechanoregulation of transcription and cell fate. PMID:22655599

  20. Coping with Stresses: Roles of Calcium- and Calcium/Calmodulin-Regulated Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anireddy S.N.; Ali, Gul S.; Celesnik, Helena; Day, Irene S.

    2011-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stresses are major limiting factors of crop yields and cause billions of dollars of losses annually around the world. It is hoped that understanding at the molecular level how plants respond to adverse conditions and adapt to a changing environment will help in developing plants that can better cope with stresses. Acquisition of stress tolerance requires orchestration of a multitude of biochemical and physiological changes, and most of these depend on changes in gene expression. Research during the last two decades has established that different stresses cause signal-specific changes in cellular Ca2+ level, which functions as a messenger in modulating diverse physiological processes that are important for stress adaptation. In recent years, many Ca2+ and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binding transcription factors (TFs) have been identified in plants. Functional analyses of some of these TFs indicate that they play key roles in stress signaling pathways. Here, we review recent progress in this area with emphasis on the roles of Ca2+- and Ca2+/CaM-regulated transcription in stress responses. We will discuss emerging paradigms in the field, highlight the areas that need further investigation, and present some promising novel high-throughput tools to address Ca2+-regulated transcriptional networks. PMID:21642548

  1. A G-protein subunit translocation embedded network motif underlies GPCR regulation of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K V; Gautam, N

    2014-07-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  2. Subcellular localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity during nuclear maturation in Bufo arenarum oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inés; Cisint, Susana B; Crespo, Claudia A; Medina, Marcela F; Fernández, Silvia N

    2009-08-01

    The localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity in Bufo arenarum oocytes was investigated by ultracytochemical techniques during progesterone-induced nuclear maturation, under in vitro conditions. No Ca2+ deposits were detected in either control oocytes or progesterone-treated ones for 1-2 h. At the time when nuclear migration started, electron dense deposits of Ca2+ were visible in vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and in the space between the annulate lamellae membranes. Furthermore, Ca-ATPase activity was also detected in these membrane structures. As maturation progressed, the cation deposits were observed in the cytomembrane structures, which underwent an important reorganization and redistribution. Thus, they moved from the subcortex and became located predominantly in the oocyte cortex area when nuclear maturation ended. Ca2+ stores were observed in vesicles surrounding or between the cortical granules, which are aligned close to the plasma membrane. The positive Ca-ATPase reaction in these membrane structures could indicate that the calcium deposit is an ATP-dependent process. Our results suggest that during oocyte maturation calcium would be stored in membrane structures where it remains available for release at the time of fertilization. Data obtained under our experimental conditions indicate that calcium from the extracellular medium would be important for the oocyte maturation process. PMID:19397840

  3. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 regulates calcium homeostasis and electrophysiological activities of HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chazo, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone with antidiabetic effects through stimulating insulin secretion, β cell neogenesis, satiety sensation, and inhibiting glucagon secretion. Administration of GLP-1 provides cardioprotective effects through attenuating cardiac inflammation and insulin resistance. GLP-1 also modulates the heart rate and systolic pressure, which suggests that GLP-1 may have cardiac electrical effects. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate whether GLP-1 has direct cardiac effects and identify the underlying mechanisms. Patch clamp, confocal microscopy with Fluo-3 fluorescence, and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics, calcium homeostasis, and calcium regulatory proteins in HL-1 atrial myocytes with and without GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) incubation for 24h. GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) and control cells had similar action potential durations. However, GLP-1 at 10nM significantly increased calcium transients and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) contents. Compared to the control, GLP-1 (10nM)-treated cells significantly decreased phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor at S2814 and total phospholamban, but there were similar protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase and the sodium-calcium exchanger. Moreover, exendin (9-39) amide (a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, 10nM) attenuated GLP-1-mediated effects on total SR content and phosphorylated ryanodine receptor S2814. This study demonstrates GLP-1 may regulate HL-1 cell arrhythmogenesis through modulating calcium handling proteins. PMID:26930508

  5. Effects of adrenalectomy on the control and adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenrich, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adrenalectomy on the control and ..cap alpha..-adrenergic regulation of the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca/sub i/) in hepatocytes. In hepatocytes isolated from adrenalectomized (adx) and sham-operated male rats 7-1 days after surgery, Ca/sub i/ at rest and in response to epinephrine (EPI) was measured with the calcium-sensitive photoprotein aequorin, /sup 45/Ca efflux was measured, and Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular stores in response to inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) was measured in saponin-permeabilized cells. Liver calmodulin content was also assayed by radioimmunoassay. It was found in adx rats that the resting Ca/sub i/ was elevated, the rise in Ca/sub i/ during EPI stimulation was reduced at physiological EPI concentrations, and the rise in calcium efflux evoked by EPI was reduced. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca/sub i/ and calcium efflux was reduced 60% in adx. Adx did not alter the characteristics of Ca/sup 2 +/ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP/sub 3/ in permeabilized cells. Finally, the liver calmodulin contents were not significantly different between the 2 groups.

  6. LRRK2 Regulates Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Cade; Sears, Catherine; Perez-Carrion, Maria; Piccoli, Giovanni; Condliffe, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type (wt) LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how mutations in LRRK2

  7. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  8. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters Program Offices § 1.43 Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation— (a) Develops, promulgates and...

  9. Distinct regulation of dopamine D2S and D2L autoreceptor signaling by calcium.

    PubMed

    Gantz, Stephanie C; Robinson, Brooks G; Buck, David C; Bunzow, James R; Neve, Rachael L; Williams, John T; Neve, Kim A

    2015-01-01

    D2 autoreceptors regulate dopamine release throughout the brain. Two isoforms of the D2 receptor, D2S and D2L, are expressed in midbrain dopamine neurons. Differential roles of these isoforms as autoreceptors are poorly understood. By virally expressing the isoforms in dopamine neurons of D2 receptor knockout mice, this study assessed the calcium-dependence and drug-induced plasticity of D2S and D2L receptor-dependent G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) currents. The results reveal that D2S, but not D2L receptors, exhibited calcium-dependent desensitization similar to that exhibited by endogenous autoreceptors. Two pathways of calcium signaling that regulated D2 autoreceptor-dependent GIRK signaling were identified, which distinctly affected desensitization and the magnitude of D2S and D2L receptor-dependent GIRK currents. Previous in vivo cocaine exposure removed calcium-dependent D2 autoreceptor desensitization in wild type, but not D2S-only mice. Thus, expression of D2S as the exclusive autoreceptor was insufficient for cocaine-induced plasticity, implying a functional role for the co-expression of D2S and D2L autoreceptors. PMID:26308580

  10. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension.

    PubMed

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  11. Nuclear myosin I regulates cell membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Venit, Tomáš; Kalendová, Alžběta; Petr, Martin; Dzijak, Rastislav; Pastorek, Lukáš; Rohožková, Jana; Malohlava, Jakub; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane tension is an important feature that determines the cell shape and influences processes such as cell motility, spreading, endocytosis and exocytosis. Unconventional class 1 myosins are potent regulators of plasma membrane tension because they physically link the plasma membrane with adjacent cytoskeleton. We identified nuclear myosin 1 (NM1) - a putative nuclear isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c) - as a new player in the field. Although having specific nuclear functions, NM1 localizes predominantly to the plasma membrane. Deletion of NM1 causes more than a 50% increase in the elasticity of the plasma membrane around the actin cytoskeleton as measured by atomic force microscopy. This higher elasticity of NM1 knock-out cells leads to 25% higher resistance to short-term hypotonic environment and rapid cell swelling. In contrast, overexpression of NM1 in wild type cells leads to an additional 30% reduction of their survival. We have shown that NM1 has a direct functional role in the cytoplasm as a dynamic linker between the cell membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, regulating the degree of effective plasma membrane tension. PMID:27480647

  12. Motility initiation in herring sperm is regulated by reverse sodium-calcium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Vines, Carol A.; Yoshida, Kaoru; Griffin, Frederick J.; Pillai, Murali C.; Morisawa, Masaaki; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Cherr, Gary N.

    2002-01-01

    Sperm of the Pacific herring, Clupea pallasi, are unique in that they are immotile upon spawning in the environment. Herring sperm have evolved to remain motionless for up to several days after spawning, yet are still capable of fertilizing eggs. An egg chorion ligand termed “sperm motility initiation factor” (SMIF) induces motility in herring sperm and is required for fertilization. In this study, we show that SMIF induces calcium influx, sodium efflux, and a membrane depolarization in herring sperm. Sperm motility initiation by SMIF depended on decreased extracellular sodium (<350 mM) and could be induced in the absence of SMIF in very low sodium seawater. Motility initiation depended on ≥ 1 mM extracellular calcium. Calcium influx caused by SMIF involved both the opening of voltage-gated calcium channels and reverse sodium–calcium (Na+/Ca2+) exchange. Membrane depolarization was slightly inhibited by a calcium channel blocker and markedly inhibited by a Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor. Sodium efflux caused by SMIF-initiated motility was observed when using both extracellular and intracellular sodium probes. A Na+/Ca2+ exchange antigen was shown to be present on the surface of the sperm, primarily over the midpiece, by using an antibody to the canine Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. This antibody recognized a 120-kDa protein that comigrated with the canine myocyte Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Sperm of Pacific herring are now shown to use reverse Na+/Ca2+ exchange in motility initiation. This mechanism of regulation of motility initiation may have evolved for both maintenance of immotility after spawning as well as ligand-induced motility initiation. PMID:11842223

  13. Calcium Induced Regulation of Skeletal Troponin — Computational Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Genchev, Georgi Z.; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Lu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between calcium and the regulatory site(s) of striated muscle regulatory protein troponin switches on and off muscle contraction. In skeletal troponin binding of calcium to sites I and II of the TnC subunit results in a set of structural changes in the troponin complex, displaces tropomyosin along the actin filament and allows myosin-actin interaction to produce mechanical force. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the calcium dependent dynamics of the fast skeletal troponin molecule and its TnC subunit in the calcium saturated and depleted states. We focused on the N-lobe and on describing the atomic level events that take place subsequent to removal of the calcium ion from the regulatory sites I and II. A main structural event - a closure of the A/B helix hydrophobic pocket results from the integrated effect of the following conformational changes: the breakage of H-bond interactions between the backbone nitrogen atoms of the residues at positions 2, 9 and sidechain oxygen atoms of the residue at position 12 (N2-OE12/N9-OE12) in sites I and II; expansion of sites I and II and increased site II N-terminal end-segment flexibility; strengthening of the β-sheet scaffold; and the subsequent re-packing of the N-lobe hydrophobic residues. Additionally, the calcium release allows the N-lobe to rotate relative to the rest of the Tn molecule. Based on the findings presented herein we propose a novel model of skeletal thin filament regulation. PMID:23554884

  14. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  15. Bone Is a Major Target of PTH/PTHrP Receptor Signaling in Regulation of Fetal Blood Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Takao; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Nishimori, Shigeki; Karaplis, Andrew C.; Goltzman, David

    2015-01-01

    The blood calcium concentration during fetal life is tightly regulated within a narrow range by highly interactive homeostatic mechanisms that include transport of calcium across the placenta and fluxes in and out of bone; the mechanisms of this regulation are poorly understood. Our findings that endochondral bone-specific PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR) knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of fetal blood calcium concentration compared with that of control littermates at embryonic day 18.5 led us to focus on bone as a possibly major determinant of fetal calcium homeostasis. We found that the fetal calcium concentration of Runx2 KO mice was significantly higher than that of control littermates, suggesting that calcium flux into bone had a considerable influence on the circulating calcium concentration. Moreover, Runx2:PTH double mutant fetuses showed calcium levels similar to those of Runx2 KO mice, suggesting that part of the fetal hypocalcemia in PTH KO mice was caused by the increment of the mineralized bone mass allowed by the formation of osteoblasts. Finally, Rank:PTH double mutant mice had a blood calcium concentration even lower than that of the either Rank KO or PTH KO mice alone at embryonic day 18.5. These observations in our genetic models suggest that PTH/PTHrP receptor signaling in bones has a significant role of the regulation of fetal blood calcium concentration and that both placental transport and osteoclast activation contribute to PTH's hypercalcemic action. They also show that PTH-independent deposition of calcium in bone is the major controller of fetal blood calcium level. PMID:26052897

  16. Bone Is a Major Target of PTH/PTHrP Receptor Signaling in Regulation of Fetal Blood Calcium Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Nishimori, Shigeki; Karaplis, Andrew C; Goltzman, David; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-08-01

    The blood calcium concentration during fetal life is tightly regulated within a narrow range by highly interactive homeostatic mechanisms that include transport of calcium across the placenta and fluxes in and out of bone; the mechanisms of this regulation are poorly understood. Our findings that endochondral bone-specific PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR) knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of fetal blood calcium concentration compared with that of control littermates at embryonic day 18.5 led us to focus on bone as a possibly major determinant of fetal calcium homeostasis. We found that the fetal calcium concentration of Runx2 KO mice was significantly higher than that of control littermates, suggesting that calcium flux into bone had a considerable influence on the circulating calcium concentration. Moreover, Runx2:PTH double mutant fetuses showed calcium levels similar to those of Runx2 KO mice, suggesting that part of the fetal hypocalcemia in PTH KO mice was caused by the increment of the mineralized bone mass allowed by the formation of osteoblasts. Finally, Rank:PTH double mutant mice had a blood calcium concentration even lower than that of the either Rank KO or PTH KO mice alone at embryonic day 18.5. These observations in our genetic models suggest that PTH/PTHrP receptor signaling in bones has a significant role of the regulation of fetal blood calcium concentration and that both placental transport and osteoclast activation contribute to PTH's hypercalcemic action. They also show that PTH-independent deposition of calcium in bone is the major controller of fetal blood calcium level. PMID:26052897

  17. Interactions between calcium and phosphorus in the regulation of the production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Stephen J.; Thomsen, Alex R. B.; Pang, Jian L.; Kantham, Lakshmi; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Pollak, Martin; Goltzman, David

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and phosphorus homeostasis are highly interrelated and share common regulatory hormones, including FGF23. However, little is known about calcium's role in the regulation of FGF23. We sought to investigate the regulatory roles of calcium and phosphorus in FGF23 production using genetic mouse models with targeted inactivation of PTH (PTH KO) or both PTH and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR; PTH-CaSR DKO). In wild-type, PTH KO, and PTH-CaSR DKO mice, elevation of either serum calcium or phosphorus by intraperitoneal injection increased serum FGF23 levels. In PTH KO and PTH-CaSR DKO mice, however, increases in serum phosphorus by dietary manipulation were accompanied by severe hypocalcemia, which appeared to blunt stimulation of FGF23 release. Increases in dietary phosphorus in PTH-CaSR DKO mice markedly decreased serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] despite no change in FGF23, suggesting direct regulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 synthesis by serum phosphorus. Calcium-mediated increases in serum FGF23 required a threshold level of serum phosphorus of about 5 mg/dl. Analogously, phosphorus-elicited increases in FGF23 were markedly blunted if serum calcium was less than 8 mg/dl. The best correlation between calcium and phosphorus and serum FGF23 was found between FGF23 and the calcium × phosphorus product. Since calcium stimulated FGF23 production in the PTH-CaSR DKO mice, this effect cannot be mediated by the full-length CaSR. Thus the regulation of FGF23 by both calcium and phosphorus appears to be fundamentally important in coordinating the serum levels of both mineral ions and ensuring that the calcium × phosphorus product remains within a physiological range. PMID:23233539

  18. Focal adhesion kinases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases regulate protein tyrosine phosphorylation in stallion sperm.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Lauro; Macías-García, Beatriz; Loux, Shavahn C; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PY) is a hallmark of sperm capacitation. In stallion sperm, calcium inhibits PY at pH <7.8, mediated by calmodulin. To explore the mechanism of that inhibition, we incubated stallion sperm in media without added calcium, with calcium, or with calcium plus the calmodulin inhibitor W-7 (Ca/W-7 treatment). Treatment with inhibitors of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, protein kinase A (PRKA), or Src family kinases suppressed the PY induced by the absence of added calcium, but not that induced by the Ca/W-7 treatment, indicating that PY in the absence of added calcium occurred via the canonical PRKA pathway, but that PY in the Ca/W-7 treatment did not. This suggested that when calmodulin was inhibited, calcium stimulated PY via a noncanonical pathway. Incubation with PF-431396, an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinases (FAKs), a family of calcium-induced protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the PY induced both by the absence of added calcium and by the Ca/W-7 treatment. Western blotting demonstrated that both FAK family members, protein tyrosine kinases 2 and 2B, were phosphorylated in the absence of added calcium and in the Ca/W-7 treatment, but not in the presence of calcium without calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibition of FAK proteins inhibited PY in stallion sperm incubated under capacitating conditions (in the presence of calcium, bovine serum albumin, and bicarbonate at pH >7.8). These results show for the first time a role for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases in PRKA-dependent sperm PY; a non-PRKA-dependent pathway regulating sperm PY; and the apparent involvement of the FAK family of protein tyrosine kinases downstream in both pathways. PMID:23595906

  19. Trpm4 differentially regulates Th1 and Th2 function by altering calcium signaling and NFAT localization

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Hildner, Kai; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Allen, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    T helper cell subsets have unique calcium (Ca2+) signals when activated with identical stimuli. The regulation of these Ca2+ signals and their correlation to the biological function of each T cell subset remains unclear. Trpm4 is a Ca2+-activated cation channel that we found is expressed at higher levels in Th2 cells compared to Th1 cells. Inhibition of Trpm4 expression increased Ca2+ influx and oscillatory levels in Th2 cells and decreased influx and oscillations in Th1 cells. This inhibition of Trpm4 expression also significantly altered T cell cytokine production and motility. Our experiments revealed that decreasing Trpm4 levels divergently regulates nuclear localization of NFATc1. Consistent with this, gene profiling did not show Trpm4 dependent transcriptional regulation and T-bet and GATA-3 levels remain identical. Thus, Trpm4 is expressed at different levels on T helper cells and plays a distinctive role in T cell function by differentially regulating Ca2+ signaling and NFATc1 localization. PMID:20656926

  20. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development.

    PubMed

    Stith, Bradley J

    2015-05-15

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  1. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  2. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  3. The Plasma Membrane Ca2+ ATPase and the Plasma Membrane Sodium Calcium Exchanger Cooperate in the Regulation of Cell Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is an ambivalent signal: it is essential for the correct functioning of cell life, but may also become dangerous to it. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) and the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) are the two mechanisms responsible for Ca2+ extrusion. The NCX has low Ca2+ affinity but high capacity for Ca2+ transport, whereas the PMCA has a high Ca2+ affinity but low transport capacity for it. Thus, traditionally, the PMCA pump has been attributed a housekeeping role in maintaining cytosolic Ca2+, and the NCX the dynamic role of counteracting large cytosolic Ca2+ variations (especially in excitable cells). This view of the roles of the two Ca2+ extrusion systems has been recently revised, as the specific functional properties of the numerous PMCA isoforms and splicing variants suggests that they may have evolved to cover both the basal Ca2+ regulation (in the 100 nM range) and the Ca2+ transients generated by cell stimulation (in the μM range). PMID:21421919

  4. Fission yeast homolog of neuronal calcium sensor-1 (Ncs1p) regulates sporulation and confers calcium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Molchanova, Tatiana; Takeda, Kazuyo; Ames, James B

    2004-03-26

    The neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins (e.g. recoverin, neurocalcins, and frequenin) are expressed at highest levels in excitable cells, and some of them regulate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors. Here we present NMR analysis and genetic functional studies of an NCS homolog in fission yeast (Ncs1p). Ncs1p binds three Ca2+ ions at saturation with an apparent affinity of 2 microm and Hill coefficient of 1.9. Analysis of NMR and fluorescence spectra of Ncs1p revealed significant Ca2+-induced protein conformational changes indicative of a Ca2+-myristoyl switch. The amino-terminal myristoyl group is sequestered inside a hydrophobic cavity of the Ca2+-free protein and becomes solvent-exposed in the Ca2+-bound protein. Subcellular fractionation experiments showed that myristoylation and Ca2+ binding by Ncs1p are essential for its translocation from cytoplasm to membranes. The ncs1 deletion mutant (ncs1Delta) showed two distinct phenotypes: nutrition-insensitive sexual development and a growth defect at high levels of extracellular Ca2+ (0.1 m CaCl(2)). Analysis of Ncs1p mutants lacking myristoylation (Ncs1p(G2A)) or deficient in Ca2+ binding (Ncs1p(E84Q/E120Q/E168Q)) revealed that Ca2+ binding was essential for both phenotypes, while myristoylation was less critical. Exogenous cAMP, a key regulator for sexual development, suppressed conjugation and sporulation of ncs1Delta, suggesting involvement of Ncs1p in the adenylate cyclase pathway turned on by the glucose-sensing G protein-coupled receptor Git3p. Starvation-independent sexual development of ncs1Delta was also complemented by retinal recoverin, which controls Ca2+-regulated desensitization of rhodopsin. In contrast, the Ca2+-intolerance of ncs1Delta was not affected by cAMP or recoverin, suggesting that the two ncs1Delta phenotypes are mechanistically independent. We propose that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ncs1p negatively regulates sporulation perhaps by controlling Ca2+-dependent desensitization

  5. Hyperoside regulates the level of thymic stromal lymphopoietin through intracellular calcium signalling.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Ra; Go, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Hyperoside (HYP) is the principle active component of Crataegus pinnatifida. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions. Here, we investigated how HYP regulates the levels of TSLP in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. We analyzed the levels of TSLP by treatment with HYP in phorbol myristate acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated HMC-1 cells with ELISA and a polymerase chain reaction analysis. We also analyzed the pathway that HYP regulates TSLP by measuring the level of fluorescent intracellular calcium and using a Western blot analysis. HYP decreased the level of intracellular calcium in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It also significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of TSLP in stimulated HMC-1 cells. It significantly decreased the levels of receptor-interacting protein 2 and active caspase-1 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. HYP significantly decreased the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus and degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Furthermore, it significantly decreased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our findings establish HYP as a potential agent for the treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:24338918

  6. Regulation of Angiogenic Functions by Angiopoietins through Calcium-Dependent Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pafumi, Irene; Favia, Annarita; Gambara, Guido; Papacci, Francesca; Ziparo, Elio; Palombi, Fioretta; Filippini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietins are vascular factors essential for blood vessel assembly and correct organization and maturation. This study describes a novel calcium-dependent machinery activated through Angiopoietin-1/2-Tie receptor system in HUVECs monolayer. Both cytokines were found to elicit intracellular calcium mobilization. Targeting intracellular Ca2+ signaling, antagonizing IP3 with 2-APB or cADPR with 8Br-cADPR, was found to modulate in vitro angiogenic responses to Angiopoietins in a specific way. 2-APB and 8Br-cADPR impaired the phosphorylation of AKT and FAK induced by Ang-1 and Ang-2. On the other hand, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38, as well as cell proliferation, was not affected by either inhibitor. The ability of ECs to migrate following Angs stimulation, evaluated by “scratch assay,” was reduced by either 2-APB or 8Br-cADPR following Ang-2 stimulation and only slightly affected by 2-APB in cells stimulated with Ang-1. These results identify a novel calcium-dependent machinery involved in the complex interplay regulating angiogenic processes showing that IP3- and cADPR-induced Ca2+ release specifically regulates distinct Angs-mediated angiogenic steps. PMID:26146638

  7. IGF-1 induces IP3 -dependent calcium signal involved in the regulation of myostatin gene expression mediated by NFAT during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Juan A; Flores, Sylvia; Fuentes, Eduardo N; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Jaimovich, Enrique; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-07-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation is a complex and highly regulated process characterized by cell cycle arrest, which is associated with morphological changes including myoblast alignment, elongation, and fusion into multinucleated myotubes. This is a balanced process dynamically coordinated by positive and negative signals such as the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) and myostatin (MSTN), respectively. In this study, we report that the stimulation of skeletal myoblasts during differentiation with IGF-1 induces a rapid and transient calcium increase from intracellular stores, which are principally mediated through the phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ)/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 )-dependent signaling pathways. This response was completely blocked when myoblasts were incubated with LY294002 or transfected with the dominant-negative p110 gamma, suggesting a fundamental role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in PLCγ activation. Additionally, we show that calcium released via IP3 and induced by IGF-1 stimulates NFAT-dependent gene transcription and nuclear translocation of the GFP-labeled NFATc3 isoform. This activation was independent of extracellular calcium influx and calcium release mediated by ryanodine receptor (RyR). Finally, we examined mstn mRNA levels and mstn promoter activity in myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents and in reporter activity, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A, 11R-VIVIT, and by inhibitors of the PI3Kγ, PLCγ, and IP3 receptor. Our results strongly suggest that IGF-1 regulates myostatin transcription through the activation of the NFAT transcription factor in an IP3 /calcium-dependent manner. This is the first study to demonstrate a role of calcium-dependent signaling pathways in the mRNA expression of myostatin. PMID:23255067

  8. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  9. Regulation of gamma T-cell antigen receptor expression by intracellular calcium in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line DND41.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Martínez-Valdez, H; Madrid-Marina, V

    1996-01-01

    The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, promotes an increase of intracellular calcium and regulates mRNA expression of gamma/delta-TcR gene in human T lymphocytes. The mechanism of this regulation is not yet clear. Thus, the regulation by intracellular calcium requires elucidation. We studied the gamma-TcR gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line DND41 (CD4- CD8-) by Northern blot and flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA levels of gamma-TcR increased by ionomycin, anti-CD3, and with TPA. TPA had an antagonistic effect to both ionomycin and anti-CD3. Also, TPA inhibits the increased intracellular calcium promoted by ionomycin but not the increase promoted by anti-CD3 and ionomycin. Our results suggest that intracellular calcium induces mRNA and protein expression of gamma-TcR chain. This effect is antagonized by protein kinase C-activation. Thus, we conclude that the target cells of the differential regulation on gamma-TcR mRNA expression by intracellular calcium modulators are the CD4- CD8- cells, and this is due to cytosolic calcium mobilization. PMID:8854386

  10. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation. PMID:26739326

  11. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J.; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I.; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E.; Reitz, Allen B.; Dye, John M.; Harty, Ronald N.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  12. Calcium Regulation of Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Budding: Mechanistic Implications for Host-Oriented Therapeutic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J; Herbert, Andrew; Prugar, Laura I; Ruthel, Gordon; Lu, Jianhong; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaohong; Wrobel, Jay E; Reitz, Allen B; Dye, John M; Harty, Ronald N; Freedman, Bruce D

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses, including the filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and arenaviruses (Lassa and Junín viruses), are serious human pathogens for which there are currently no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines. Importantly, transmission of these viruses, and specifically late steps of budding, critically depend upon host cell machinery. Consequently, strategies which target these mechanisms represent potential targets for broad spectrum host oriented therapeutics. An important cellular signal implicated previously in EBOV budding is calcium. Indeed, host cell calcium signals are increasingly being recognized to play a role in steps of entry, replication, and transmission for a range of viruses, but if and how filoviruses and arenaviruses mobilize calcium and the precise stage of virus transmission regulated by calcium have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that expression of matrix proteins from both filoviruses and arenaviruses triggers an increase in host cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration by a mechanism that requires host Orai1 channels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orai1 regulates both VLP and infectious filovirus and arenavirus production and spread. Notably, suppression of the protein that triggers Orai activation (Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, STIM1) and genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of Orai1 channels inhibits VLP and infectious virus egress. These findings are highly significant as they expand our understanding of host mechanisms that may broadly control enveloped RNA virus budding, and they establish Orai and STIM1 as novel targets for broad-spectrum host-oriented therapeutics to combat these emerging BSL-4 pathogens and potentially other enveloped RNA viruses that bud via similar mechanisms. PMID:26513362

  13. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD (171EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF195) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48EF49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48EF49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium. PMID:15896312

  14. CASK regulates CaMKII autophosphorylation in neuronal growth, calcium signaling, and learning

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, John M.; Hodge, James J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activity plays a fundamental role in learning and memory. A key feature of CaMKII in memory formation is its ability to be regulated by autophosphorylation, which switches its activity on and off during synaptic plasticity. The synaptic scaffolding protein CASK (calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) associated serine kinase) is also important for learning and memory, as mutations in CASK result in intellectual disability and neurological defects in humans. We show that in Drosophila larvae, CASK interacts with CaMKII to control neuronal growth and calcium signaling. Furthermore, deletion of the CaMK-like and L27 domains of CASK (CASK β null) or expression of overactive CaMKII (T287D) produced similar effects on synaptic growth and Ca2+ signaling. CASK overexpression rescues the effects of CaMKII overactivity, consistent with the notion that CASK and CaMKII act in a common pathway that controls these neuronal processes. The reduction in Ca2+ signaling observed in the CASK β null mutant caused a decrease in vesicle trafficking at synapses. In addition, the decrease in Ca2+ signaling in CASK mutants was associated with an increase in Ether-à-go-go (EAG) potassium (K+) channel localization to synapses. Reducing EAG restored the decrease in Ca2+ signaling observed in CASK mutants to the level of wildtype, suggesting that CASK regulates Ca2+ signaling via EAG. CASK knockdown reduced both appetitive associative learning and odor evoked Ca2+ responses in Drosophila mushroom bodies, which are the learning centers of Drosophila. Expression of human CASK in Drosophila rescued the effect of CASK deletion on the activity state of CaMKII, suggesting that human CASK may also regulate CaMKII autophosphorylation. PMID:24062638

  15. Calmodulin effects on steroids-regulated plasma membrane calcium pump activity.

    PubMed

    Zylinska, Ludmila; Kowalska, Iwona; Ferenc, Bozena

    2009-03-01

    It is now generally accepted that non-genomic steroids action precedes their genomic effects by modulation of intracellular signaling pathways within seconds after application. Ca(2+) is a very potent and ubiquitous ion in all cells, and its concentration is precisely regulated. The most sensitive on Ca(2+) increase is ATP-consuming plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). The enzyme is coded by four genes, but isoforms diversity was detected in excitable and non-excitable cells. It is the only ion pump stimulated directly by calmodulin (CaM). We examined the role of PMCA isoforms composition and CaM effect in regulation of Ca(2+) uptake by estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pregnenolone (PREG), and their sulfates in a concentration range from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M, using the membranes from rat cortical synaptosomes, differentiated PC12 cells, and human erythrocytes. In excitable membranes with full set of PMCAs steroids apparently increased Ca(2+) uptake, although to a variable extent. In most of the cases, CaM decreased transport by 30-40% below controls. Erythrocyte PMCA was regulated by the steroids somewhat differently than excitable cells. CaM strongly increased the potency for Ca(2+) extrusion in membranes incubated with 17-beta-estradiol and PREG. Our results indicated that steroids may sufficiently control cytoplasmic calcium concentration within physiological and therapeutic range. The response depended on the cell type, PMCA isoforms expression profile, CaM presence, and the steroids structure. PMID:19226536

  16. Atypical calcium regulation of the PKD2-L1 polycystin ion channel.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Liu, Xiaowen; Abiria, Sunday; Clapham, David E

    2016-01-01

    Native PKD2-L1 channel subunits are present in primary cilia and other restricted cellular spaces. Here we investigate the mechanism for the channel's unusual regulation by external calcium, and rationalize this behavior to its specialized function. We report that the human PKD2-L1 selectivity filter is partially selective to calcium ions (Ca(2+)) moving into the cell, but blocked by high internal Ca(2+)concentrations, a unique feature of this transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family member. Surprisingly, we find that the C-terminal EF-hands and coiled-coil domains do not contribute to PKD2-L1 Ca(2+)-induced potentiation and inactivation. We propose a model in which prolonged channel activity results in calcium accumulation, triggering outward-moving Ca(2+) ions to block PKD2-L1 in a high-affinity interaction with the innermost acidic residue (D523) of the selectivity filter and subsequent long-term channel inactivation. This response rectifies Ca(2+) flow, enabling Ca(2+) to enter but not leave small compartments such as the cilium. PMID:27348301

  17. Atypical calcium regulation of the PKD2-L1 polycystin ion channel

    PubMed Central

    DeCaen, Paul G; Liu, Xiaowen; Abiria, Sunday; Clapham, David E

    2016-01-01

    Native PKD2-L1 channel subunits are present in primary cilia and other restricted cellular spaces. Here we investigate the mechanism for the channel's unusual regulation by external calcium, and rationalize this behavior to its specialized function. We report that the human PKD2-L1 selectivity filter is partially selective to calcium ions (Ca2+) moving into the cell, but blocked by high internal Ca2+concentrations, a unique feature of this transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family member. Surprisingly, we find that the C-terminal EF-hands and coiled-coil domains do not contribute to PKD2-L1 Ca2+-induced potentiation and inactivation. We propose a model in which prolonged channel activity results in calcium accumulation, triggering outward-moving Ca2+ ions to block PKD2-L1 in a high-affinity interaction with the innermost acidic residue (D523) of the selectivity filter and subsequent long-term channel inactivation. This response rectifies Ca2+ flow, enabling Ca2+ to enter but not leave small compartments such as the cilium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13413.001 PMID:27348301

  18. Hyphal Orientation of Candida albicans Is Regulated by a Calcium-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Alexandra; Shanks, Scott; Duncan, Vanessa M.S.; Yang, Meng; Mackenzie, Kevin; Gow, Neil A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells from fungal hyphae to neurites that grow by polarized extension must coordinate cell growth and cell orientation to enable them to exhibit growth tropisms and to respond to relevant environmental cues. Such cells generally maintain a tip-high Ca2+ cytoplasmic gradient, which is correlated with their ability to exhibit polarized tip growth and to respond to growth-directing extracellular signals [1–5]. In yeast and other fungi, the polarisome, exocyst, Arp2/3, and Spitzenkörper protein complexes collectively orchestrate tip growth and cell polarity, but it is not clear whether these molecular complexes also regulate cell orientation or whether they are influenced by cytoplasmic Ca2+ gradients. Hyphae of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans reorient their growth axis in response to underlying surface topography (thigmotropism) [6] and imposed electric fields (galvanotropism) [7]. The establishment and maintenance of directional growth in relation to these environmental cues was Ca2+ dependent. Tropisms were attenuated in media containing low Ca2+, or calcium-channel blockers, and in mutants where calcium channels or elements of the calcium signaling pathway were deleted. Therefore galvanotropism and thigmotropism may both be mediated by localized Ca2+ influx at sites of polarized growth via Ca2+ channels that are activated by appropriate environmental signals. PMID:17275302

  19. Calcium participates in feedback regulation of the oscillating ROP1 Rho GTPase in pollen tubes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, An; Xu, Guanshui; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2009-01-01

    Biological oscillation occurs at various levels, from cellular signaling to organismal behaviors. Mathematical modeling has allowed a quantitative understanding of slow oscillators requiring changes in gene expression (e.g., circadian rhythms), but few theoretical studies have focused on the rapid oscillation of cellular signaling. The tobacco pollen tube, which exhibits growth bursts every 80 s or so, is an excellent system for investigating signaling oscillation. Pollen tube growth is controlled by a tip-localized ROP1 GTPase, whose activity oscillates in a phase about 90 degrees ahead of growth. We constructed a mathematical model of ROP1 activity oscillation consisting of interlinking positive and negative feedback loops involving F-actin and calcium, ROP1-signaling targets that oscillate in a phase about 20 degrees and 110 degrees behind ROP1 activity, respectively. The model simulates the observed changes in ROP1 activity caused by F-actin disruption and predicts a role for calcium in the negative feedback regulation of the ROP1 activity. Our experimental data strongly support this role of calcium in tip growth. Thus, our findings provide insight into the mechanism of pollen tube growth and the oscillation of cellular signaling. PMID:19955439

  20. The calcium-sensing receptor as a regulator of cellular fate in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Diez-Fraile, A; Lammens, T; Benoit, Y; D'Herde, K G M A

    2013-02-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of plasma membrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Early studies identified an essential role for the CaSR in systemic calcium homeostasis through its ability to sense small changes in circulating calcium concentration and to couple this information to intracellular signaling pathways that influence parathyroid hormone secretion. However, the presence of CaSR protein in tissues is not directly involved in regulating mineral ion homeostasis points to a role for the CaSR in other cellular functions including the control of cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. This position at the crossroads of cellular fate designates the CaSR as an interesting study subject is likely to be involved in a variety of previously unconsidered human pathologies, including cancer, atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Here, we will review the recent discoveries regarding the relevance of CaSR signaling in development and disease. Furthermore, we will discuss the rational for developing and using CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:23228129

  1. Regulation of nuclear radiation exposures in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, U C

    2004-01-01

    India has a long-term program of wide spread applications of nuclear radiations and radioactive sources for peaceful applications in medicine, industry, agriculture and research and is already having several thousand places in the country where such sources are being routinely used. These places are mostly outside the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) installations. DAE supplies such sources. The most important application of nuclear energy in DAE is in electricity generation through nuclear power plants. Fourteen such plants are operating and many new plants are at various stages of construction. In view of the above mentioned wide spread applications, Indian parliament through an Act, called Atomic Energy Act, 1964 created an autonomous body called Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) with comprehensive authority and powers. This Board issues codes, guides, manuals, etc., to regulate such installations so as to ensure safe use of such sources and personnel engaged in such installations and environment receives radiation exposures within the upper bounds prescribed by them. Periodic reports are submitted to AERB to demonstrate compliance of its directives. Health, Safety and Environment Group of Bhabha Atomic Research Centres, Mumbai carries out necessary surveillance and monitoring of all installations of the DAE on a routine basis and also periodic inspections of other installations using radiation sources. Some of the nuclear fuel cycle plants like nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing involve large radioactive source inventories and have potential of accidental release of radioactivity into the environment, an Environmental Surveillance Laboratory (ESL) is set up at each such site much before the facility goes into operation. These ESL's collect baseline data and monitor the environment throughout the life of the facilities including the decommissioning stage. The data is provided to AERB and is available to members of the public. In addition, a multi

  2. Oxidative Stress in the Hypothalamus: the Importance of Calcium Signaling and Mitochondrial ROS in Body Weight Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gyengesi, Erika; Paxinos, George; Andrews, Zane B

    2012-01-01

    A considerable amount of evidence shows that reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mammalian brain are directly responsible for cell and tissue function and dysfunction. Excessive reactive oxygen species contribute to various conditions including inflammation, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation, and mental disorders such as depression. Increased intracellular calcium levels have toxic roles leading to cell death. However, the exact connection between reactive oxygen production and high calcium stress is not yet fully understood. In this review, we focus on the role of reactive oxygen species and calcium stress in hypothalamic arcuate neurons controlling feeding. We revisit the role of NPY and POMC neurons in the regulation of appetite and energy homeostasis, and consider how ROS and intracellular calcium levels affect these neurons. These novel insights give a new direction to research on hypothalamic mechanisms regulating energy homeostasis and may offer novel treatment strategies for obesity and type-2 diabetes. PMID:23730258

  3. Forskolin Regulates L-Type Calcium Channel through Interaction between Actinin 4 and β3 Subunit in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Peng, Wen; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels that permit cellular calcium influx are essential in calcium-mediated modulation of cellular signaling. Although the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels is linked to many factors including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity and actin cytoskeleton, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying the regulation in osteoblasts. Our present study investigated the modulation of L-type calcium channel activities through the effects of forskolin on actin reorganization and on its functional interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4. The results showed that forskolin did not significantly affect the trafficking of pore forming α1c subunit and its interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4, whereas it significantly increased the expression of β3 subunit and its interaction with actinin 4 in osteoblast cells as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, and immunostaining. Further mapping showed that the ABD and EF domains of actinin 4 were interaction sites. This interaction is independent of PKA phosphorylation. Knockdown of actinin 4 significantly decreased the activities of L-type calcium channels. Our study revealed a new aspect of the mechanisms by which the forskolin activation of adenylyl cyclase - cAMP cascade regulates the L-type calcium channel in osteoblast cells, besides the PKA mediated phosphorylation of the channel subunits. These data provide insight into the important role of interconnection among adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, PKA, the actin cytoskeleton, and the channel proteins in the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cells. PMID:25902045

  4. Calcium and Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling Regulate Granulocyte-Monocyte Progenitor Cell Cycle via Flt3-L

    PubMed Central

    Fric, Jan; Lim, Clarice XF; Mertes, Alexandra; Lee, Bernett TK; Viganò, Elena; Chen, Jinmiao; Zolezzi, Francesca; Poidinger, Michael; Larbi, Anis; Strobl, Herbert; Zelante, Teresa; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Maintenance of myeloid progenitor cells is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms and is orchestrated by multiple different transcription factors. Here, we report that the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) by calcium-sensing protein calcineurin inhibits the proliferation of myeloid granulocyte–monocyte progenitors (GMPs). Myeloid progenitor subtypes exhibit variable sensitivity to induced Ca2+ entry and consequently display differential engagement of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. This study shows that inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway enhances the proliferation of GMPs both in vitro and in vivo and demonstrates that calcineurin-NFAT signaling in GMPs is initiated by Flt3-L. Inhibition of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway modified expression of the cell cycle regulation genes Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdkn1a (p21), thus enabling rapid cell cycle progression specifically in GMPs. NFAT inhibitor drugs are extensively used in the clinic to restrict the pathological activation of lymphoid cells, and our data reveal for the first time that these therapies also exert potent effects on maintenance of the myeloid cell compartment through specific regulation of GMP proliferation. Stem Cells 2014;32:3232–3244 PMID:25100642

  5. TRPM7 Regulates Cell Adhesion by Controlling the Calcium-dependent Protease Calpain*S

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Ting; Agapito, Maria A.; Li, Mingjiang; Simonson, William T. N.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Habas, Raymond; Yue, Lixia; Runnels, Loren W.

    2011-01-01

    m-Calpain is a protease implicated in the control of cell adhesion through focal adhesion disassembly. The mechanism by which the enzyme is spatially and temporally controlled is not well understood, particularly because the dependence of calpain on calcium exceeds the submicromolar concentrations normally observed in cells. Here we show that the channel kinase TRPM7 localizes to peripheral adhesion complexes with m-calpain, where it regulates cell adhesion by controlling the activity of the protease. Our research revealed that overexpression of TRPM7 in cells caused cell rounding with a concomitant loss of cell adhesion that is dependent upon the channel of the protein but not its kinase activities. Knockdown of m-calpain blocked TRPM7-induced cell rounding and cell detachment. Silencing of TRPM7 by RNA interference, however, strengthened cell adhesion and increased the number of peripheral adhesion complexes in the cells. Together, our results suggest that the ion channel TRPM7 regulates cell adhesion through m-calpain by mediating the local influx of calcium into peripheral adhesion complexes. PMID:16436382

  6. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Evan W.; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca2+]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca2+]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca2+]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca2+]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca2+]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca2+ channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca2+]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  7. The regulation of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPases (SERCA).

    PubMed

    Stammers, Andrew N; Susser, Shanel E; Hamm, Naomi C; Hlynsky, Michael W; Kimber, Dustin E; Kehler, D Scott; Duhamel, Todd A

    2015-10-01

    The sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) is responsible for transporting calcium (Ca(2+)) from the cytosol into the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) following muscular contraction. The Ca(2+) sequestering activity of SERCA facilitates muscular relaxation in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. There are more than 10 distinct isoforms of SERCA expressed in different tissues. SERCA2a is the primary isoform expressed in cardiac tissue, whereas SERCA1a is the predominant isoform expressed in fast-twitch skeletal muscle. The Ca(2+) sequestering activity of SERCA is regulated at the level of protein content and is further modified by the endogenous proteins phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN). Additionally, several novel mechanisms, including post-translational modifications and microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as integral regulators of Ca(2+) transport activity. These regulatory mechanisms are clinically relevant, as dysregulated SERCA function has been implicated in the pathology of several disease states, including heart failure. Currently, several clinical trials are underway that utilize novel therapeutic approaches to restore SERCA2a activity in humans. The purpose of this review is to examine the regulatory mechanisms of the SERCA pump, with a particular emphasis on the influence of exercise in preventing the pathological conditions associated with impaired SERCA function. PMID:25730320

  8. TRPC6 is the endothelial calcium channel that regulates leukocyte transendothelial migration during the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Weber, Evan W; Han, Fei; Tauseef, Mohammad; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mehta, Dolly; Muller, William A

    2015-10-19

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) is a tightly regulated, multistep process that is critical to the inflammatory response. A transient increase in endothelial cytosolic free calcium ion concentration (↑[Ca(2+)]i) is required for TEM. However, the mechanism by which endothelial ↑[Ca(2+)]i regulates TEM and the channels mediating this ↑[Ca(2+)]i are unknown. Buffering ↑[Ca(2+)]i in endothelial cells does not affect leukocyte adhesion or locomotion but selectively blocks TEM, suggesting a role for ↑[Ca(2+)]i specifically for this step. Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a Ca(2+) channel expressed in endothelial cells, colocalizes with platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM) to surround leukocytes during TEM and clusters when endothelial PECAM is engaged. Expression of dominant-negative TRPC6 or shRNA knockdown in endothelial cells arrests neutrophils apically over the junction, similar to when PECAM is blocked. Selectively activating endothelial TRPC6 rescues TEM during an ongoing PECAM blockade, indicating that TRPC6 functions downstream of PECAM. Furthermore, endothelial TRPC6 is required for trafficking of lateral border recycling compartment membrane, which facilitates TEM. Finally, mice lacking TRPC6 in the nonmyeloid compartment (i.e., endothelium) exhibit a profound defect in neutrophil TEM with no effect on leukocyte trafficking. Our findings identify endothelial TRPC6 as the calcium channel mediating the ↑[Ca(2+)]i required for TEM at a step downstream of PECAM homophilic interactions. PMID:26392222

  9. Phospho-regulation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of CrzA in response to calcium and alkaline-pH stress in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ortiz, Patricia; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2013-08-01

    Tolerance to abiotic stresses by microorganisms require of appropriate signalling and regulatory pathways. Calcineurin phosphatases mediate calcium-dependent signalling pathways which are widely distributed among phylogeny. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcineurin mediates the post-translational modification of downstream effectors, most of them transcription factors, being the best-characterized calcineurin-regulated zinc-finger factor 1, Crz1p. Here we study the signalling process of CrzA, a filamentous fungal Crz orthologue, in response to calcium and ambient-pH alkalinization. In Aspergillus nidulans resting cells CrzA locates in the cytoplasm being excluded from nuclei. CrzA is a phospho-protein and upon calcium, manganese or alkaline-pH stresses, accumulates in nuclei in a calcineurin-dependent manner. Functional analysis of CrzA defined the presence of a nuclear-export and two nuclear-localization signals as well as a PSINVE sequence that constitutes the major calcineurin-docking domain. First 450 amino acids of CrzA contain these functional motifs and in this region is where phosphorylated residues locate. Different phosphorylation steps are identified in CrzA and activities of casein kinase 1 homologue, CkiA, and of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, identified for the first time here as GskA, are involved. The phospho-signalling process and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of CrzA shows similarities to those described in yeast for Crz1p homologues and of NFATs in mammals. PMID:23772954

  10. Calcium regulates independently ciliary beat and cell contraction in Paramecium cells.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is a well-known signal regulator for various physiological activities. In many cases, Ca(2+) simultaneously regulates individual functions in single cells. How can Ca(2+) regulate these functions independently? In Paramecium cells, the contractile cytoskeletal network and cilia are located close to each other near the cell surface. Cell body contraction, ciliary reversal, and rises in ciliary beat frequency are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, they are not always triggered simultaneously. We injected caged calcium into Paramecium caudatum cells and continuously applied weak ultraviolet light to the cells to slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The cell bodies began to contract just after the start of ultraviolet light application, and the degree of contraction increased gradually thereafter. On the other hand, cilia began to reverse 1.4s after the start of ultraviolet application and reversed completely within 100ms. Ciliary beat frequency in the reverse direction was significantly higher than in the normal direction. These results indicate that cell body contraction is regulated by Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner in living P. caudatum. On the other hand, ciliary reversal and rise in ciliary beat frequency are triggered by Ca(2+) in an all-or-none manner. PMID:18179819

  11. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaqin; Liu, Jiane; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s) underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA) treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade. PMID:26263390

  12. Calcium-dependent immediate-early gene induction in lymphocytes is negatively regulated by p21Ha-ras.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C Y; Forman, L W; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    The induction of immediate-early (IE) response genes, such as egr-1, c-fos, and c-jun, occurs rapidly after the activation of T lymphocytes. The process of activation involves calcium mobilization, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and phosphorylation of tyrosine kinases. p21(ras), a guanine nucleotide binding factor, mediates T-cell signal transduction through PKC-dependent and PKC-independent pathways. The involvement of p21(ras) in the regulation of calcium-dependent signals has been suggested through analysis of its role in the activation of NF-AT. We have investigated the inductions of the IE genes in response to calcium signals in Jurkat cells (in the presence of activated p21(ras)) and their correlated consequences. The expression of activated p21(ras) negatively regulated the induction of IE genes by calcium ionophore. This inhibition of calcium-activated IE gene induction was reversed by treatment with cyclosporin A, suggesting the involvement of calcineurin in this regulation. A later result of inhibition of this activation pathway by p21(ras) was down-regulation of the activity of the transcription factor AP-1 and subsequent coordinate reductions in IL-2 gene expression and protein production. These results suggest that p2l(ras) is an essential mediator in generating not only positive but also negative modulatory mechanisms controlling the competence of T cells in response to inductive stimulations. PMID:8887687

  13. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells. PMID:18094031

  14. Analysis of Conditional Paralytic Mutants in Drosophila Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase Reveals Novel Mechanisms for Regulating Membrane Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, S.; Consoulas, C.; Kuromi, H.; Basole, A.; Mukai, L.; Kidokoro, Y.; Krishnan, K. S.; Ramaswami, M.

    2005-01-01

    Individual contributions made by different calcium release and sequestration mechanisms to various aspects of excitable cell physiology are incompletely understood. SERCA, a sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, being the main agent for calcium uptake into the ER, plays a central role in this process. By isolation and extensive characterization of conditional mutations in the Drosophila SERCA gene, we describe novel roles of this key protein in neuromuscular physiology and enable a genetic analysis of SERCA function. At motor nerve terminals, SERCA inhibition retards calcium sequestration and reduces the amplitude of evoked excitatory junctional currents. This suggests a direct contribution of store-derived calcium in determining the quantal content of evoked release. Conditional paralysis of SERCA mutants is also marked by prolonged neural activity-driven muscle contraction, thus reflecting the phylogenetically conserved role of SERCA in terminating contraction. Further analysis of ionic currents from mutants uncovers SERCA-dependent mechanisms regulating voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-activated potassium channels that together control muscle excitability. Finally, our identification of dominant loss-of-function mutations in SERCA indicates novel intra- and intermolecular interactions for SERCA in vivo, overlooked by current structural models. PMID:15520268

  15. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist. PMID:23659057

  16. Regulation of Differentiation by Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Normal and Tumoral Developing Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García, Marta; Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J.; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    During normal development of the nervous system (NS), neural progenitor cells (NPCs) produce specialized populations of neurons and glial cells upon cell fate restriction and terminal differentiation. These sequential processes require the dynamic regulation of thousands of genes. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is temporally and spatially regulated in both neurons and glial cells during development of the NS. In particular, CaSR expression and function have been shown to play a significant role during differentiation of NPCs toward the oligodendrocyte lineage and also in maturation of cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs). Moreover, CaSR regulates axonal and dendritic growth in both central and peripheral nervous systems (PNSs), a process necessary for proper construction of mature neuronal networks. On the other hand, several lines of evidence support a role for CaSR in promotion of cell differentiation and inhibition of proliferation in neuroblastoma, a tumor arising from precursor cells of developing PNS. Thus, among the variety of NS functions in which the CaSR participates, this mini-review focuses on its role in differentiation of normal and tumoral cells. Current knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for CaSR regulation and function in these contexts is also discussed, together with the therapeutic opportunities provided by CaSR allosteric modulators. PMID:27242543

  17. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    SciTech Connect

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-09-21

    Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

  18. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility.

    PubMed

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D L; Coggan, Kimberly A; Sperlazza, Justin R; Heiniger, Ryan W; Wolfgang, Matthew C; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2010-01-19

    Several bacterial pathogens require the "twitching" motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 A resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified beta-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner--by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility. PMID:20080557

  19. Mechanical regulation of cardiac muscle by coupling calcium kinetics with cross-bridge cycling: a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, A; Sideman, S

    1994-08-01

    This study describes the regulation of mechanical activity in the intact cardiac muscle, the effects of the free calcium transients and the mechanical constraints, and emphasizes the central role of the troponin complex in regulating muscle activity. A "loose coupling" between calcium binding to troponin and cross-bridge cycling is stipulated, allowing the existence of cross bridges in the strong conformation without having bound calcium on the neighboring troponin. The model includes two feedback mechanisms: 1) a positive feedback, or cooperativity, in which the cycling cross bridges affect the affinity of troponin for calcium, and 2) a negative mechanical feedback, where the filament-sliding velocity affects cross-bridge cycling. The model simulates the reported experimental force-length and force-velocity relationships at different levels of activation. The dependence of the shortening velocity on calcium concentration, sarcomere length, internal load, and rate of cross-bridge cycling is described analytically in agreement with reported data. Furthermore, the model provides an analytic solution for Hill's equation of the force-velocity relationship and for the phenomena of unloaded shortening velocity and force deficit. The model-calculated changes in free calcium in various mechanical conditions are in good agreement with the available experimental results. PMID:8067434

  20. Inhibition of calmodulin - regulated calcium pump activity in rat brain by toxaphene

    SciTech Connect

    Trottman, C.H.; Moorthy, K.S.

    1986-03-05

    In vivo effects of toxaphene on calcium pump activity in rat brain synaptosomes was studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with toxaphene at 0,25,50, and 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days and sacrificed 24 h after last dose. Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca uptake were determined in brain P/sub 2/ fraction. Toxaphene inhibited both Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and the inhibition was dose dependent. Both substrate and Ca/sup 2 +/ activation kinetics of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase indicated non-competitive type of inhibition as evidenced by decreased catalytic velocity but not enzyme-substrate affinity. The inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake were restored to normal level by exogenously added calmodulin which increased both velocity and affinity. The inhibition of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity and Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and restoration by calmodulin suggests that toxaphene may impair active calcium transport mechanisms by decreasing regulator protein calmodulin levels.

  1. Calcium regulates the interaction of amyloid precursor protein with Homer3 protein.

    PubMed

    Kyratzi, Elli; Efthimiopoulos, Spiros

    2014-09-01

    Ca(2+) dysregulation is an important factor implicated in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms mediating the reciprocal regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis and amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism, function, and protein interactions are not well known. We have previously shown that APP interacts with Homer proteins, which inhibit APP processing toward amyloid-β. In this study, we investigated the effect of Ca(2+) homeostasis alterations on APP/Homer3 interaction. Influx of extracellular Ca(2+) upon treatment of HEK293 cells with the ionophore A23187 or addition of extracellular Ca(2+) in cells starved of calcium specifically reduced APP/Homer3 but not APP/X11a interaction. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) store depletion by thapsigargin followed by store-operated calcium entry also decreased the interaction. Interestingly, application of a phospholipase C stimulator, which causes inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release, caused dissociation of APP/Homer3 complex. In human neuroblastoma cells, membrane depolarization also disrupted the interaction. This is the first study showing that changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis affect APP protein interactions. Our results suggest that Ca(2+) and Homers play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease pathology. PMID:24792907

  2. A forward genetic screen reveals that calcium-dependent protein kinase 3 regulates egress in Toxoplasma.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Erin; Treeck, Moritz; Ehret, Emma; Butz, Heidi; Garbuz, Tamila; Oswald, Benji P; Settles, Matt; Boothroyd, John; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Egress from the host cell is a crucial and highly regulated step in the biology of the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Active egress depends on calcium fluxes and appears to be a crucial step in escaping the attack from the immune system and, potentially, in enabling the parasites to shuttle into appropriate cells for entry into the brain of the host. Previous genetic screens have yielded mutants defective in both ionophore-induced egress and ionophore-induced death. Using whole genome sequencing of one mutant and subsequent analysis of all mutants from these screens, we find that, remarkably, four independent mutants harbor a mis-sense mutation in the same gene, TgCDPK3, encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase. All four mutations are predicted to alter key regions of TgCDPK3 and this is confirmed by biochemical studies of recombinant forms of each. By complementation we confirm a crucial role for TgCDPK3 in the rapid induction of parasite egress and we establish that TgCDPK3 is critical for formation of latent stages in the brains of mice. Genetic knockout of TgCDPK3 confirms a crucial role for this kinase in parasite egress and a non-essential role for it in the lytic cycle. PMID:23209419

  3. Calcium-dependent growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cells by neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Gudermann, Thomas; Roelle, Susanne

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 15-25% of all primary cancers of the lung are classified histologically as small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), a subtype characterized by rapid growth and a poor prognosis. Neuropeptide hormones like bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide, bradykinin or galanin are the principal mitogenic stimuli of this tumour entity. The mitogenic signal is transmitted into the cell via heptahelical neuropeptide hormone receptors, which couple to the heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gq/11 familiy. Subsequent activation of phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) entails the activation of protein kinase C and the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration. There is mounting evidence to support the notion that calcium mobilization is the key event that initiates different mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. Neuropeptide-dependent proliferation of SCLC cells relies on parallel activation of the Gq/11/PLCbeta/Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the c-jun N-terminal kinase pathways, while selective engagement of either signalling cascade alone results in growth arrest and differentiation or apoptotic cell death. Basic experimental research has the potential to identify and validate novel therapeutic targets located at critical points of convergence of different mitogenic signal transduction pathways. In the case of SCLC, targeting the distinct components of the Ca2+ influx pathway as well as critical Ca2+-dependent cellular effectors may be rewarding in this regard. PMID:17158754

  4. State regulation of nuclear power and national energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, J.W.

    1992-12-31

    In April 1983 and January 1984, the United States Supreme Court rendered two decisions that redefined the metes and bounds of federal preemption of commercial nuclear power plant regulation. In Pacific Gas & Electric Co. v. State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (PG&E), the court decided that the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (the Act), did not preempt a California state law that established a moratorium on commercial nuclear power plant construction. In Silkwood v. Kerr-McGee Corporation, the Court also decided that the Act did not preempt a claim for damages under state tort law for radiological injuries suffered in a nuclear fuel facility regulated by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The two decisions redefined the extent of federal preemption, under the Act and other federal law, of nuclear plant regulation as well as the extend of state regulation of nuclear plants. In the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, numerous other developments have eroded further the breadth of federal preemption of commercial nuclear power plant regulation. This Article explores the developments, since PG&E and Silkwood, that have expanded further the scope of state and local regulation of commercial nuclear power plants. Specifically, the Article first identifies the extent of state and local participation in nuclear power regulation provided by the Act and other federal loan relevant to commercial nuclear power. Second, it discusses in detail the PG&E and Silkwood decisions. The Article also considers the impact of seven specific developments on the legislative implementation of a national energy policy that contemplates a role for nuclear power.

  5. Red Liriope platyphylla stimulated the insulin secretion through the regulation of calcium concentration in rat insulinoma cells and animal models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Young-Ju; Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Im, Dong-Soon; Hwang, Dae-Youn

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red L. platyphylla (RLP) on calcium and glucose levels during insulin secretion. To achieve this, alteration of insulin and calcium concentrations was measured in rat insulinoma-1 (INS-1) cells and animal models in response to RLP treatment. In INS-1 cells, maximum secretion of insulin was detected upon treatment with 200 µg/mL of RLP for 20 min. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, effectively inhibited insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Regarding calcium levels, the maximum concentration of intracellular calcium in INS-1 cells was obtained by treatment with 100 µg/mL of RLP, whereas this level was reduced under conditions of 200 µg/mL of RLP. Further, RLP-treated INS-1 cells showed a higher level of intracellular calcium than that of L. platyphylla (LP), Korea White Ginseng (KWG), or Korea Red Ginseng (KRG)-treated cells. This RLP-induced increase in intracellular calcium was abrogated but not completely abolished upon treatment with 40 µM nifedipine in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the insulin level was dramatically elevated upon co-treatment with high concentrations of glucose and RLP, whereas it was maintained at a low level in response to glucose and RLP co-treatment at low concentrations. In an animal experiment, the serum concentration of calcium increased or decreased upon RLP treatment according to glucose level compared to vehicle treatment. Therefore, these results suggest that insulin secretion induced by RLP treatment may be tightly correlated with calcium regulation, which suggests RLP is an excellent candidate for diabetes treatment. PMID:23825481

  6. Red Liriope platyphylla stimulated the insulin secretion through the regulation of calcium concentration in rat insulinoma cells and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Young-Ju; Kwak, Moon-Hwa; Im, Dong-Soon

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Red L. platyphylla (RLP) on calcium and glucose levels during insulin secretion. To achieve this, alteration of insulin and calcium concentrations was measured in rat insulinoma-1 (INS-1) cells and animal models in response to RLP treatment. In INS-1 cells, maximum secretion of insulin was detected upon treatment with 200 µg/mL of RLP for 20 min. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, effectively inhibited insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Regarding calcium levels, the maximum concentration of intracellular calcium in INS-1 cells was obtained by treatment with 100 µg/mL of RLP, whereas this level was reduced under conditions of 200 µg/mL of RLP. Further, RLP-treated INS-1 cells showed a higher level of intracellular calcium than that of L. platyphylla (LP), Korea White Ginseng (KWG), or Korea Red Ginseng (KRG)-treated cells. This RLP-induced increase in intracellular calcium was abrogated but not completely abolished upon treatment with 40 µM nifedipine in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the insulin level was dramatically elevated upon co-treatment with high concentrations of glucose and RLP, whereas it was maintained at a low level in response to glucose and RLP co-treatment at low concentrations. In an animal experiment, the serum concentration of calcium increased or decreased upon RLP treatment according to glucose level compared to vehicle treatment. Therefore, these results suggest that insulin secretion induced by RLP treatment may be tightly correlated with calcium regulation, which suggests RLP is an excellent candidate for diabetes treatment. PMID:23825481

  7. Regulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Honkakoski, P; Negishi, M

    2000-01-01

    Members of the nuclear-receptor superfamily mediate crucial physiological functions by regulating the synthesis of their target genes. Nuclear receptors are usually activated by ligand binding. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms often catalyse both formation and degradation of these ligands. CYPs also metabolize many exogenous compounds, some of which may act as activators of nuclear receptors and disruptors of endocrine and cellular homoeostasis. This review summarizes recent findings that indicate that major classes of CYP genes are selectively regulated by certain ligand-activated nuclear receptors, thus creating tightly controlled networks. PMID:10749660

  8. Regulation of human myometrial contractility during pregnancy and labour: are calcium homeostatic pathways important?

    PubMed

    Tribe, R M

    2001-03-01

    If we are to develop new strategies for the treatment and management of preterm and dysfunctional term labour, it is imperative that we improve current understanding of the control of human uterine activity. Despite many studies of animal pregnancy, there is a paucity of knowledge relating to the complex control of human myometrium during pregnancy. It is hypothesized that human myometrium is relatively quiescent during the majority of pregnancy and that as term approaches there is cascade of molecular events that prepare the uterus for labour. This review will consider the cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of human myometrial activity and the modulation of these by hormonal and mechanical signals. In particular, the contribution of calcium homeostatic pathways to the control of human myometrial contractility during gestation will be discussed. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.2, 247-254. PMID:11429641

  9. Human water, sodium, and calcium regulation during space flight and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, S. E.; Seagrave, R. C.

    2000-05-01

    When one is exposed to microgravity, fluid which is normally pooled in the lower extremities is redistributed headward and weight bearing bones begin to demineralize due to reduced mechanical stresses. The kidney, which is the primary regulator of body fluid volume and composition, responds to the fluid shift and bone demineralization by increasing the urinary output of water, sodium, and calcium. This research involves developing a mathematical description of how water and electrolytes are internally redistributed and exchanged with the environment during space flight. This model consequently involves kidney function and the associated endocrine system. The model agrees well with actual data, including that a low sodium diet can prevent bone demineralization. Therefore, assumptions made to develop the model are most likely valid. Additionally, various levels of activity are also considered in the model since exercise may help to eliminate some of the undesired effects of space flight such as muscle atrophy and bone demineralization.

  10. Human water, sodium, and calcium regulation during space flight and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, S. E.; Seagrave, R. C.

    When one is exposed to microgravity, fluid which is normally pooled in the lower extremities is redistributed headward and weight bearing bones begin to demineralize due to reduced mechanical stresses. The kidney, which is the primary regulator of body fluid volume and composition, responds to the fluid shift and bone demineralization by increasing the urinary output of water, sodium, and calcium. This research involves developing a mathematical description of how water and electrolytes are internally redistributed and exchanged with the environment during space flight. This model consequently involves kidney function and the associated endocrine system. The model agrees well with actual data, including that a low sodium diet can prevent bone demineralization. Therefore, assumptions made to develop the model are most likely valid. Additionally, various levels of activity are also considered in the model since exercise may help to eliminate some of the undesired effects of space flight such as muscle atrophy and bone demineralization.

  11. Calcium-regulated in vivo protein phosphorylation in Zea mays L. root tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghothama, K. G.; Reddy, A. S.; Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium dependent protein phosphorylation was studied in corn (Zea mays L.) root tips. Prior to in vivo protein phosphorylation experiments, the effect of calcium, ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N-N' -tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and calcium ionophore (A-23187) on phosphorus uptake was studied. Calcium increased phosphorus uptake, whereas EGTA and A-23187 decreased it. Consequently, phosphorus concentration in the media was adjusted so as to attain similar uptake in different treatments. Phosphoproteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Distinct changes in phosphorylation were observed following altered calcium levels. Calcium depletion in root tips with EGTA and A-23187 decreased protein phosphorylation. However, replenishment of calcium following EGTA and ionophore pretreatment enhanced phosphorylation of proteins. Preloading of the root tips with 32P in the presence of EGTA and A-23187 followed by a ten minute calcium treatment, resulted in increased phosphorylation indicating the involvement of calcium, calcium and calmodulin-dependent kinases. Calmodulin antagonist W-7 was effective in inhibiting calcium-promoted phosphorylation. These studies suggest a physiological role for calcium-dependent phosphorylation in calcium-mediated processes in plants.

  12. Regulation of T-type calcium channel expression by sodium butyrate in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Erika M; Zamora, Francis J; Puplampu-Dove, Yvonne A; Kiessu, Ezechielle; Hearne, Jennifer L; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2015-02-15

    Several cellular mechanisms contribute to the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, including exposure to sodium butyrate (NaBu), a naturally occurring salt of the short chain fatty acid n-butyric acid. NaBu belongs to a class of histone deacetylase inhibitors with potential anticancer function. T-type calcium channel expression constitutes an important route for calcium influx in tumor cells that may trigger changes in cell proliferation and differentiation. In this work we investigated the role NaBu on the differentiation of lymph node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) cells and its effect on T-type Ca(2+) channel expression. NaBu stimulates the morphological and molecular differentiation of LNCaP cells. Stimulation of LNCaP cells with NaBu evokes a significant increase in the expression of the Cav3.2 T-type channel subunits. Furthermore, the increased Cav3.2 expression promotes membrane insertion of T-type Ca(2+) channels capable of generating fast inactivating Ca(2+) currents, sensitive to 100μM Ni(2+) ions. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channel function reduces the outgrowth of neurite-like processes in LNCaP cells. NaBu-evoked expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels is also involved in the regulation of cell viability. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channels causes a significant reduction in the viability of LNCaP cells treated with 1mM NaBu, suggesting that Ca(2+) influx via T-type channels can promote cell proliferation. However, increased expression of T-type Ca(2+) channels enhanced the cytotoxic effect of thapsigargin and paclitaxel on cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate that NaBu stimulates T-type Ca(2+) channel expression, thereby regulating both the morphological differentiation and growth of prostate cancer cells. PMID:25557765

  13. TRPC3 is the erythropoietin-regulated calcium channel in human erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qin; Hirschler-Laszkiewicz, Iwona; Zhang, Wenyi; Conrad, Kathleen; Neagley, David W; Barber, Dwayne L; Cheung, Joseph Y; Miller, Barbara A

    2008-04-18

    Erythropoietin (Epo) stimulates a significant increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) through activation of the murine transient receptor potential channel TRPC2, but TRPC2 is a pseudogene in humans. TRPC3 expression increases on normal human erythroid progenitors during differentiation. Here, we determined that erythropoietin regulates calcium influx through TRPC3. Epo stimulation of HEK 293T cells transfected with Epo receptor and TRPC3 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which required extracellular calcium influx. Treatment with the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122 or down-regulation of PLCgamma1 by RNA interference inhibited the Epo-stimulated increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in TRPC3-transfected HEK 293T cells and in primary human erythroid precursors, demonstrating a requirement for PLC. TRPC3 associated with PLCgamma, and substitution of predicted PLCgamma Src homology 2 binding sites (Y226F, Y555F, Y648F, and Y674F) on TRPC3 reduced the interaction of TRPC3 with PLCgamma and inhibited the rise in [Ca(2+)](i). Substitution of Tyr(226) alone with phenylalanine significantly reduced the Epo-stimulated increase in [Ca(2+)](i) but not the association of PLCgamma with TRPC3. PLC activation results in production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)). To determine whether IP(3) is involved in Epo activation of TRPC3, TRPC3 mutants were prepared with substitution or deletion of COOH-terminal IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) binding domains. In cells expressing TRPC3 with mutant IP(3)R binding sites and Epo receptor, interaction of IP(3)R with TRPC3 was abolished, and Epo-modulated increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was reduced. Our data demonstrate that Epo modulates TRPC3 activation through a PLCgamma-mediated process that requires interaction of PLCgamma and IP(3)R with TRPC3. They also show that TRPC3 Tyr(226) is critical in Epo-dependent activation of TRPC3. These data demonstrate a redundancy of TRPC channel activation mechanisms by

  14. Regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels by S-palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Shipston, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    BK (large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium) channels are important determinants of physiological control in the nervous, endocrine and vascular systems with channel dysfunction associated with major disorders ranging from epilepsy to hypertension and obesity. Thus the mechanisms that control channel surface expression and/or activity are important determinants of their (patho)physiological function. BK channels are S-acylated (palmitoylated) at two distinct sites within the N- and C-terminus of the pore-forming α-subunit. Palmitoylation of the N-terminus controls channel trafficking and surface expression whereas palmitoylation of the C-terminal domain determines regulation of channel activity by AGC-family protein kinases. Recent studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic insights into how palmitoylation controls channel trafficking and cross-talk with phosphorylation-dependent signalling pathways. Intriguingly, each site of palmitoylation is regulated by distinct zDHHCs (palmitoyl acyltransferases) and APTs (acyl thioesterases). This supports that different mechanisms may control substrate specificity by zDHHCs and APTs even within the same target protein. As palmitoylation is dynamically regulated, this fundamental post-translational modification represents an important determinant of BK channel physiology in health and disease. PMID:23356260

  15. Movement of scallop myosin on Nitella actin filaments: regulation by calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Vale, R D; Szent-Gyorgyi, A G; Sheetz, M P

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine if Ca2+ regulates scallop myosin movement on actin, we have measured motility of scallop myosin along actin filaments using a direct visual assay. This procedure consists of covalently linking myosin to 1-micron beads and pipetting them onto a parallel array of actin filaments located on the cytoplasmic face of a Nitella internodal cell. In the absence of Ca2+, scallop myosin-coated beads exhibit no directed motion; however, in the presence of pCa2+ of greater than 5.84, these beads undergo linear translocations with average velocities of 2.0 micron/s. This Ca2+ -sensitive motility requires the presence of regulatory light chains on the scallop myosin. Removal of regulatory light chains with 10 mM EDTA produces a "desensitized" myosin, no longer sensitive to Ca2+, which moves at rates of 0.09-0.3 micron in the presence or absence of Ca2+. Readdition of regulatory light chains to preparations of desensitized myosin once again confers Ca2+-sensitive motility. The Ca2+ dependence of scallop-myosin motility shows a sharp transition, consistent with the Ca2+ activation sensitivity of the actin-activated ATPase. Furthermore, relative rates of movement of calcium-regulated myosins from various molluscan species are consistent with their respective rates of ATP hydrolysis. Thus, myosin motility along actin filaments provides a sensitive and direct assay of myosin activity and is suitable for studying myosin regulation. PMID:6238334

  16. Light-regulated root gravitropism: a role for, and characterization of, a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y. T.; Feldman, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Roots of many species grow downward (orthogravitropism) only when illuminated. Previous work suggests that this is a calcium-regulated response and that both calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases participate in transducing gravity and light stimuli. A genomic sequence has been obtained for a calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase homolog (MCK1) expressed in root caps, the site of perception for both light and gravity. This homolog consists of 7265 base pairs and contains 11 exons and 10 introns. Since MCK1 is expressed constitutively in both light and dark, it is unlikely that the light directly affects MCK1 expression, though the activity of the protein may be affected by light. In cultivars showing light-regulated gravitropism, we hypothesize that MCK1, or a homolog, functions in establishing the auxin asymmetry necessary for orthogravitropism.

  17. ER-Mitochondria contact sites: A new regulator of cellular calcium flux comes into play.

    PubMed

    Krols, Michiel; Bultynck, Geert; Janssens, Sophie

    2016-08-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria membrane contacts are hotspots for calcium signaling. In this issue, Raturi et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201512077) show that the thioredoxin TMX1 inhibits the calcium pump SERCA2b at ER-mitochondria contact sites, thereby affecting ER-mitochondrial calcium transfer and mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:27528654

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of MicroRNAs Controlling CLDN14 Expression as a Mechanism for Renal Calcium Handling

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yongfeng; Himmerkus, Nina; Plain, Allein; Bleich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The kidney has a major role in extracellular calcium homeostasis. Multiple genetic linkage and association studies identified three tight junction genes from the kidney—claudin-14, -16, and -19—as critical for calcium imbalance diseases. Despite the compelling biologic evidence that the claudin-14/16/19 proteins form a regulated paracellular pathway for calcium reabsorption, approaches to regulate this transport pathway are largely unavailable, hindering the development of therapies to correct calcium transport abnormalities. Here, we report that treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors downregulates renal CLDN14 mRNA and dramatically reduces urinary calcium excretion in mice. Furthermore, treatment of mice with HDAC inhibitors stimulated the transcription of renal microRNA-9 (miR-9) and miR-374 genes, which have been shown to repress the expression of claudin-14, the negative regulator of the paracellular pathway. With renal clearance and tubule perfusion techniques, we showed that HDAC inhibitors transiently increase the paracellular cation conductance in the thick ascending limb. Genetic ablation of claudin-14 or the use of a loop diuretic in mice abrogated HDAC inhibitor-induced hypocalciuria. The genetic mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor from patients with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) repressed the transcription of miR-9 and miR-374 genes, and treatment with an HDAC inhibitor rescued the phenotypes of cell and animal models of ADH. Furthermore, systemic treatment of mice with antagomiRs against these miRs relieved claudin-14 gene silencing and caused an ADH-like phenotype. Together, our findings provide proof of concept for a novel therapeutic principle on the basis of epigenetic regulation of renal miRs to treat hypercalciuric diseases. PMID:25071082

  19. Regulation of calf renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-hydroxylase activities by calcium-regulating hormones.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, G W; Goff, J P; Horst, R L; Reinhardt, T A

    1987-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 had opposite effects on calf renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 24-, 23-, and 1 alpha-hydroxylase activities. Parathyroid hormone administration increased renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity 7-fold while 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-23- and 24-hydroxylase activities were essentially the same as controls. Administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-23-hydroxylase and 24-hydroxylase activities 4-fold and decreased 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity to undetectable concentrations. Vitamin D deficiency increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-1 alpha -hydroxylase activity 13-fold, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-23-hydroxylase and 24-hydroxylase activities were undetectable. These results confirm previous reports with regard to control of renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase and 1 alpha -hydroxylase in other species and represent new findings relative to the control of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-23-hydroxylase. Plasma P was lower and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 higher in calves treated with parathyroid hormone, and Ca and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 were lower in the vitamin D-deficient calves. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated calves had higher plasma P and lower Mg than controls. Further studies using this calf model should lead to better understanding of Ca-regulating hormones control of vitamin D metabolism. PMID:3693631

  20. Calcium signals inhibition sensitizes ovarian carcinoma cells to anti-Bcl-xL strategies through Mcl-1 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Bonnefond, Marie-Laure; Lambert, Bernard; Giffard, Florence; Abeilard, Edwige; Brotin, Emilie; Louis, Marie-Hélène; Gueye, Mor Sény; Gauduchon, Pascal; Poulain, Laurent; N'Diaye, Monique

    2015-04-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer in the developed world and is characterized by acquired chemoresistance leading to an overall 5-year survival rate of about 30 %. We previously showed that Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 cooperatively protect platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells from apoptosis. Despite BH3-mimetics represent promising drugs to target Bcl-xL, anti-Mcl-1 strategies are still in pre-clinical studies and required new investigations. Calcium is a universal second messenger and dysregulation of calcium signal is often observed during carcinogenesis. As change in cytosolic free calcium concentration [Ca(2+)]i is known to control the fate of the cell by regulating Bcl-2 family members, we wonder if calcium signal could impact on Mcl-1 expression and if its pharmacological inhibition could be useful to sensitize ovarian carcinoma cells to anti-Bcl-xL strategies. We therefore studied the effect of different calcium signals inhibitors in ovarian carcinoma cell lines SKOV3 and IGROV1-R10 and analysed their effects on proliferation and Mcl-1 expression. We also exposed these cells to these inhibitors in combination with anti-Bcl-xL strategies (siRNA or BH3-mimetic: ABT-737). We found that calcium signaling regulates Mcl-1 through translational events and a calmodulin-mediated pathway. BAPTA-AM and calmodulin inhibitor combination with ABT-737 leads to apoptosis, a process that is reversed by Mcl-1 enforced expression. As Mcl-1 represents a crucial hurdle to the success of chemotherapy, these results could open to new area of investigation using calcium modulators to directly or indirectly target Mcl-1 and thus efficiently sensitize ovarian carcinoma cells to anti-Bcl-xL strategies. PMID:25627260

  1. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. PMID:26139029

  2. The calcium response of mouse sperm flagella: role of calcium ions in the regulation of dynein activity.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; Kelsch, Courtney B; Ponichter, Kristen L; Dionne, Benjamin J; Dang, Loan; Lindemann, Charles B

    2012-04-01

    Triton X-100-extracted mouse sperm treated with 0.1 mM ATP and 1.0 mM Ca(2+) exhibit an extremely coiled configuration that has been previously described as a curlicue. Sperm in the curlicue configuration exhibit a monotonically curved flagellum where the shear angle of the flagellum can reach a value as high as 14 radians at the flagellar tip. We utilized this strong reaction to Ca(2+) to elucidate the mechanism of the calcium response. The disintegration of the axoneme was facilitated by the use of an extraction procedure that removed the mitochondrial sheath without eliminating the calcium response. The order of emergence of the doublet microtubule outer dense fiber complexes was observed in the presence and absence of added Ca(2+). The identity of the emergent elements was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Ca(2+) altered the order of emergence of internal axoneme elements to favor the appearance of the elements of the 9-1-2 side of the axoneme. These elements are propelled baseward by the action of dyneins on doublets 1 and 2. It was also possible to establish that the motive force for maintaining the curlicue configuration is dynein-based. The curlicues were relaxed by inhibition with 50 μM NaVO(3) and were reestablished by disinhibiting the vanadate with 2.5 mM catechol. PMID:22262695

  3. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... produced at facilities licensed under 10 CFR parts 50, 52, and 54; (3) Operators of such facilities; (4... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION...

  4. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... produced at facilities licensed under 10 CFR parts 50, 52, and 54; (3) Operators of such facilities; (4... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION...

  5. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... produced at facilities licensed under 10 CFR parts 50, 52, and 54; (3) Operators of such facilities; (4... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION...

  6. 10 CFR 1.43 - Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... produced at facilities licensed under 10 CFR parts 50, 52, and 54; (3) Operators of such facilities; (4... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. 1.43 Section 1.43 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION...

  7. Calcium regulation in frog peripheral nerve by the blood-nerve barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwani, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: (a) to investigate the characteristics of calcium transport across the perineurium and the endoneurial capillaries, and (b) to gain a better understanding of the extent of calcium homeostasis in the endoneurial space. To study the nature of calcium transport across the perineurium, the flux of radiotracer /sup 45/Ca was measured through the perineurial cylinder, isolated from the frog sciatic nerve, and through the perineurium into the nerve in situ. To study the nature of calcium transport across the endoneurial capillaries, the permeability-surface area product (PA) of /sup 45/Ca was determined as a function of the calcium concentration in the blood. To study calcium homeostasis, the calcium content of the frog sciatic nerve was determined as a function of chronic changes in plasma (Ca).

  8. Sex and age dependent effects of androgens on glutamate-induced cell death and intracellular calcium regulation in the developing hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zup, Susan L.; Edwards, N. Shalon; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons must maintain control over cytosolic calcium levels, especially during development, as excitation and calcium flux is necessary for proper growth and function. But excessive calcium can lead to excitotoxic cell death. Previous work suggests that neonatal male and female hippocampal neurons regulate cytosolic calcium differently, thereby leading to differential susceptibility to excitotoxic damage. Hippocampal neurons are also exposed to gonadal hormones during development and express high levels of androgen receptors. Androgens have both neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects in adults and developing animals. The present study sought to examine the effect of androgen on cell survival after an excitatory stimulus in the developing hippocampus, and whether androgen mediated calcium regulation was the governing mechanism. We observed that glutamate did not induce robust or sexually dimorphic apoptosis in cultured hippocampal neurons at an early neonatal time point, but did five days later – only in males. Further, pretreatment with the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) protected males from apoptosis during this time, but had no effect on females. Calcium imaging of sex specific cultures revealed that DHT decreased the peak of intracellular calcium induced by glutamate, but only in males. To determine a possible mechanism for this androgen neuroprotection and calcium regulation, we quantified three calcium regulatory proteins, plasma membrane calcium ATPase1 (PMCA1), sodium/calcium exchanger1 (NCX1), and the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2). Surprisingly, there was no sex difference in the level of any of the three proteins. Treatment with DHT significantly decreased PMCA1 and NCX1, but increased SERCA2 protein levels in very young animals but not at a later timepoint. Taken together, these data suggest a complex interaction of sex, hormones, calcium regulation and developmental age; however androgens acting during the first

  9. Antagonistic Regulation of Parvalbumin Expression and Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Capacity in Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henzi, Thomas; Schwaller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a cytosolic Ca2+-binding protein acting as a slow-onset Ca2+ buffer modulating the shape of Ca2+ transients in fast-twitch muscles and a subpopulation of neurons. PV is also expressed in non-excitable cells including distal convoluted tubule (DCT) cells of the kidney, where it might act as an intracellular Ca2+ shuttle facilitating transcellular Ca2+ resorption. In excitable cells, upregulation of mitochondria in “PV-ergic” cells in PV-/- mice appears to be a general hallmark, evidenced in fast-twitch muscles and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Using Gene Chip Arrays and qRT-PCR, we identified differentially expressed genes in the DCT of PV-/- mice. With a focus on genes implicated in mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and membrane potential, uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2), mitocalcin (Efhd1), mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (Micu1), mitochondrial calcium uniporter (Mcu), mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (Mcur1), cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1), and ATP synthase subunit β (Atp5b) were found to be up-upregulated. At the protein level, COX1 was increased by 31 ± 7%, while ATP-synthase subunit β was unchanged. This suggested that these mitochondria were better suited to uphold the electrochemical potential across the mitochondrial membrane, necessary for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Ectopic expression of PV in PV-negative Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells decreased COX1 and concomitantly mitochondrial volume, while ATP synthase subunit β levels remained unaffected. Suppression of PV by shRNA in PV-expressing MDCK cells led subsequently to an increase in COX1 expression. The collapsing of the mitochondrial membrane potential by the uncoupler CCCP occurred at lower concentrations in PV-expressing MDCK cells than in control cells. In support, a reduction of the relative mitochondrial mass was observed in PV-expressing MDCK cells. Deregulation of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffer PV in kidney cells was counterbalanced in vivo and in vitro by

  10. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  11. Hippuric Acid as a Significant Regulator of Supersaturation in Calcium Oxalate Lithiasis: The Physiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Atanassova, Stoyanka S.; Gutzow, Ivan S.

    2013-01-01

    At present, the clinical significance of existing physicochemical and biological evidence and especially the results we have obtained from our previous in vitro experiments have been analyzed, and we have come to the conclusion that hippuric acid (C6H5CONHCH2COOH) is a very active solvent of Calcium Oxalate (CaOX) in physiological solutions. Two types of experiments have been discussed: clinical laboratory analysis on the urine excretion of hippuric acid (HA) in patients with CaOX lithiasis and detailed measurements of the kinetics of the dissolution of CaOX calculi in artificial urine, containing various concentrations of HA. It turns out that the most probable value of the HA concentration in the control group is approximately ten times higher than the corresponding value in the group of the stone-formers. Our in vitro analytical measurements demonstrate even a possibility to dissolve CaOX stones in human urine, in which increased concentration of HA have been established. A conclusion can be that drowning out HA is a significant regulator of CaOX supersaturation and thus a regulation of CaOX stone formation in human urine. Discussions have arisen to use increased concentration of HA in urine both as a solubilizator of CaOX stones in the urinary tract and on the purpose of a prolonged metaphylactic treatment. PMID:24307993

  12. A STIM2 splice variant negatively regulates store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Miederer, Anna-Maria; Alansary, Dalia; Schwär, Gertrud; Lee, Po-Hsien; Jung, Martin; Helms, Volkhard; Niemeyer, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis relies upon precise regulation of Ca2+ concentration. Stromal interaction molecule (STIM) proteins regulate store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by sensing Ca2+ concentration in the ER and forming oligomers to trigger Ca2+ entry through plasma membrane-localized Orai1 channels. Here we characterize a STIM2 splice variant, STIM2.1, which retains an additional exon within the region encoding the channel-activating domain. Expression of STIM2.1 is ubiquitous but its abundance relative to the more common STIM2.2 variant is dependent upon cell type and highest in naive T cells. STIM2.1 knockdown increases SOCE in naive CD4+ T cells, whereas knockdown of STIM2.2 decreases SOCE. Conversely, overexpression of STIM2.1, but not STIM2.2, decreases SOCE, indicating its inhibitory role. STIM2.1 interaction with Orai1 is impaired and prevents Orai1 activation, but STIM2.1 shows increased affinity towards calmodulin. Our results imply STIM2.1 as an additional player tuning Orai1 activation in vivo. PMID:25896806

  13. Cdk9 T-loop Phosphorylation is Regulated by the Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Rajesh; Rice, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation is a tightly regulated process and is dependent upon positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb). The core P-TEFb complex is composed of Cdk9 and Cyclin T and is essential for the expression of most protein coding genes. Cdk9 kinase function is dependent upon phosphorylation of Thr186 in its T-loop. In this study, we examined kinases and signaling pathways that influence Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Using an RNAi screen in HeLa cells, we found that Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation is regulated by Calcium/Calmodulin- dependent kinase 1D (CaMK1D). Using small molecules inhibitors in HeLa cells and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes, we found that the Ca2+ signaling pathway is required for Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Inhibition of Ca2+ signaling led to dephosphorylation of Thr186 on Cdk9. In reporter plasmid assays, inhibition of the Ca2+ signaling pathway repressed the PCNA promoter and HIV-1 Tat transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR, but not HTLV-1 Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR, suggesting that perturbation of the Ca2+ pathway and reduction of Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation inhibits transcription units that have a rigorous requirement for P-TEFb function. PMID:21448926

  14. Serotonin Regulates Calcium Homeostasis in Lactation by Epigenetic Activation of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P.; Weaver, Samantha R.; Cronick, Callyssa M.; Prichard, Austin P.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Heyne, Galen W.; Vezina, Chad M.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. We previously showed that nonneuronal/peripheral serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] causes the lactating mammary gland to synthesize and secrete PTHrP in an acute fashion. Here, using a mouse model, we found that genetic inactivation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in peripheral 5-HT synthesis, reduced circulating and mammary PTHrP expression, osteoclast activity, and maternal circulating calcium concentrations during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Tph1 inactivation also reduced sonic hedgehog signaling in the mammary gland during lactation. Each of these deficiencies was rescued by daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (an immediate precursor of 5-HT) to Tph1-deficient dams. We used immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts to demonstrate that 5-HT induces PTHrP through a sonic hedgehog-dependent signal transduction mechanism. We also found that 5-HT altered DNA methylation of the Shh gene locus, leading to transcriptional initiation at an alternate start site and formation of a variant transcript in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mammary tissue in vivo. These results support a new paradigm of 5-HT-mediated Shh regulation involving DNA methylation remodeling and promoter switching. In addition to having immediate implications for lactation biology, identification and characterization of a novel functional regulatory relationship between nonneuronal 5-HT, hedgehog signaling, and PTHrP offers new avenues for the study of these important factors in development and disease. PMID:25192038

  15. Ryanodine receptors are involved in nuclear calcium oscillation in primary pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Wenxuan; Miao, Lin; Zhou, Zhansong; Ji, Guangju

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results demonstrate that ryanodine-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} stores exist and have function in the pancreatic {beta}-cell nucleus. -- Abstract: Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are mainly located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and play an important role in regulating glucose-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in pancreatic {beta}-cells. However, subcellular locations and functions of RyRs on other cell organelles such as nuclear envelope are not well understood. In order to investigate the role of RyRs in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation we designed and conducted experiments in intact primary pancreatic {beta}-cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine the expression of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the function of RYRs on the nuclear envelope. We found that RyRs are expressed on the nuclear envelope in single primary pancreatic {beta}-cells and isolated nuclei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy studies indicated that application of glucose to the cells co-incubated with Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fluo-4 AM and cell-permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342 resulted in nuclear Ca{sup 2+} oscillation. The pattern of glucose-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the nucleus and cytosol was similar. The reduction of Ca{sup 2+} oscillation amplitude by ryanodine was much greater in the nucleus though both the cytosol and the nucleus Ca{sup 2+} amplitude decreased by ryanodine. Our results suggest that functional ryanodine receptors not only exist in endoplasmic reticulum but are also expressed in nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells.

  16. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  17. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  18. T-Type voltage-sensitive calcium channels mediate mechanically-induced intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes by regulating endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Genevieve N; Leong, Pui L; Guo, X Edward

    2016-07-01

    One of the earliest responses of bone cells to mechanical stimuli is a rise in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)), and osteocytes in particular exhibit robust oscillations in Ca(2+) when subjected to loading. Previous studies implicate roles for both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and T-Type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC) in these responses, but their interactions or relative contributions have not been studied. By observing Ca(2+) dynamics in the cytosol (Ca(2+)cyt) and the ER (Ca(2+)ER), the focus of this study was to explore the role of the ER and T-Type channels in Ca(2+) signaling in bone cells. We demonstrate that inhibition of T-Type VSCC in osteocytes significantly reduces the number of Ca(2+)cyt responses and affects Ca(2+)ER depletion dynamics. Simultaneous observation of Ca(2+) exchange among these spaces revealed high synchrony between rises in Ca(2+)cyt and depressions in Ca(2+)ER, and this synchrony was significantly reduced by challenging T-Type VSCC. We further confirmed that this effect was mediated directly through the ER and not through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathways. Taken together, our data suggests that T-Type VSCC facilitate the recovery of Ca(2+)ER in osteocytes to sustain mechanically-induced Ca(2+) oscillations, uncovering a new mechanism underlying the behavior of osteocytes as mechanosensors. PMID:27108342

  19. Microtubule-Dependent Mitochondria Alignment Regulates Calcium Release in Response to Nanomechanical Stimulus in Heart Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Miragoli, Michele; Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L; Bhargava, Anamika; Wright, Peter T; Sikkel, Markus; Schobesberger, Sophie; Diakonov, Ivan; Novak, Pavel; Castaldi, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Paola; Lyon, Alexander R; Lab, Max J; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenesis during heart failure is a major clinical problem. Regional electrical gradients produce arrhythmias, and cellular ionic transmembrane gradients are its originators. We investigated whether the nanoscale mechanosensitive properties of cardiomyocytes from failing hearts have a bearing upon the initiation of abnormal electrical activity. Hydrojets through a nanopipette indent specific locations on the sarcolemma and initiate intracellular calcium release in both healthy and heart failure cardiomyocytes, as well as in human failing cardiomyocytes. In healthy cells, calcium is locally confined, whereas in failing cardiomyocytes, calcium propagates. Heart failure progressively stiffens the membrane and displaces sub-sarcolemmal mitochondria. Colchicine in healthy cells mimics the failing condition by stiffening the cells, disrupting microtubules, shifting mitochondria, and causing calcium release. Uncoupling the mitochondrial proton gradient abolished calcium initiation in both failing and colchicine-treated cells. We propose the disruption of microtubule-dependent mitochondrial mechanosensor microdomains as a mechanism for abnormal calcium release in failing heart. PMID:26725114

  20. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission at the Caenorhabditis elegans M4 Neuromuscular Junction by an Antagonistic Relationship Between Two Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Steciuk, Mark; Cheong, Mi Cheong; Waite, Christopher; You, Young-Jai; Avery, Leon

    2014-01-01

    In wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans, the synapse from motor neuron M4 to pharyngeal terminal bulb (TB) muscles is silent, and the muscles are instead excited by gap junction connections from adjacent muscles. An eat-5 innexin mutant lacking this electrical connection has few TB contractions and is unable to grow well on certain foods. We showed previously that this defect can be overcome by activation of the M4 → TB synapse. To identify genes that negatively regulate synaptic transmission, we isolated new suppressors of eat-5. To our surprise, these suppressors included null mutations in NPQR-type calcium channel subunit genes unc-2 and unc-36. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that Ca2+ entry through the NPQR-type channel inhibits synaptic transmission by activating the calcium-activated K+ channel SLO-1, thus antagonizing the EGL-19 L-type calcium channel. PMID:25378475

  1. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  2. Mechanism of the calcium-regulation of muscle contraction — In pursuit of its structural basis —

    PubMed Central

    WAKABAYASHI, Takeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The author reviewed the research that led to establish the structural basis for the mechanism of the calcium-regulation of the contraction of striated muscles. The target of calcium ions is troponin on the thin filaments, of which the main component is the double-stranded helix of actin. A model of thin filament was generated by adding tropomyosin and troponin. During the process to provide the structural evidence for the model, the troponin arm was found to protrude from the calcium-depleted troponin and binds to the carboxyl-terminal region of actin. As a result, the carboxyl-terminal region of tropomyosin shifts and covers the myosin-binding sites of actin to block the binding of myosin. At higher calcium concentrations, the troponin arm changes its partner from actin to the main body of calcium-loaded troponin. Then, tropomyosin shifts back to the position near the grooves of actin double helix, and the myosin-binding sites of actin becomes available to myosin resulting in force generation through actin-myosin interactions. PMID:26194856

  3. REGULATION OF SPERM NUCLEAR REACTIVATION DURING FERTILIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Upon fusion of sperm and oocyte at fertilization, a series of events is initiated whereby the highly compacted sperm nucleus expands and is transformed into a male pronucleus capable of DNA synthesis. The regulation of these early post-fusion fertilization events has been studied...

  4. State-federal interactions in nuclear regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A.D.; Budnitz, R.J.

    1987-12-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 established, and later Congressional amendments have confirmed, that except in areas which have been explicitly granted to the states, the federal government possesses preemptive authority to regulate radiation hazards associated with the development and use of atomic energy. Since the passage of the original Act, numerous decisions by the courts have reaffirmed the legitimacy of federal preemption, and have defined and redefined its scope. In this study, the aim is to explore the underlying issues involved in federal preemption of radiation-hazard regulation, and to recommend actions that the Department of Energy and other agencies and groups should consider undertaking in the near term to protect the preemption principle. Appropriate roles of the states are discussed, as well as recent state-level activities and their rationale, and several current arenas in which state-federal conflicts about regulation of hazards are being played out. The emphasis here is on four particular arenas that are now important arenas of conflict, but the issues discussed are far broader in scope. These four arenas are: state-level moratorium activity; emergency planning for reactors; conflicts arising from state financial regulation; and inroads in federal preemption through litigation under state law.

  5. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor regulates human fetal lung development via CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Wilkinson, William J.; Tseng, Hsiu-Er; Finney, Brenda; Monk, Bethan; Dibble, Holly; Quilliam, Samantha; Warburton, David; Galietta, Luis J.; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Optimal fetal lung growth requires anion-driven fluid secretion into the lumen of the developing organ. The fetus is hypercalcemic compared to the mother and here we show that in the developing human lung this hypercalcaemia acts on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, to promote fluid-driven lung expansion through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. Several chloride channels including TMEM16, bestrophin, CFTR, CLCN2 and CLCA1, are also expressed in the developing human fetal lung at gestational stages when CaSR expression is maximal. Measurements of Cl−-driven fluid secretion in organ explant cultures show that pharmacological CaSR activation by calcimimetics stimulates lung fluid secretion through CFTR, an effect which in humans, but not mice, was also mimicked by fetal hypercalcemic conditions, demonstrating that the physiological relevance of such a mechanism appears to be species-specific. Calcimimetics promote CFTR opening by activating adenylate cyclase and we show that Ca2+-stimulated type I adenylate cyclase is expressed in the developing human lung. Together, these observations suggest that physiological fetal hypercalcemia, acting on the CaSR, promotes human fetal lung development via cAMP-dependent opening of CFTR. Disturbances in this process would be expected to permanently impact lung structure and might predispose to certain postnatal respiratory diseases. PMID:26911344

  6. Calmodulin and lipid binding to synaptobrevin regulates calcium-dependent exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Stephanie; Iborra, Cecile; Sasakawa, Nobuyuki; De Haro, Luc; Kumakura, Konosuke; Sato, Kazuki; Leveque, Christian; Seagar, Michael

    2002-08-01

    Neurotransmitter release involves the assembly of a heterotrimeric SNARE complex composed of the vesicle protein synaptobrevin (VAMP 2) and two plasma membrane partners, syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25. Calcium influx is thought to control this process via Ca(2+)-binding proteins that associate with components of the SNARE complex. Ca(2+)/calmodulin or phospholipids bind in a mutually exclusive fashion to a C-terminal domain of VAMP (VAMP(77-90)), and residues involved were identified by plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Microinjection of wild-type VAMP(77-90), but not mutant peptides, inhibited catecholamine release from chromaffin cells monitored by carbon fibre amperometry. Pre-incubation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells with the irreversible calmodulin antagonist ophiobolin A inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent human growth hormone release in a permeabilized cell assay. Treatment of permeabilized cells with tetanus toxin light chain (TeNT) also suppressed secretion. In the presence of TeNT, exocytosis was restored by transfection of TeNT-resistant (Q(76)V, F(77)W) VAMP, but additional targeted mutations in VAMP(77-90) abolished its ability to rescue release. The calmodulin- and phospholipid-binding domain of VAMP 2 is thus required for Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis, possibly to regulate SNARE complex assembly. PMID:12145198

  7. A Calcium-dependent switch in a CREST-BRG1 complex regulates activity-dependent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zilong; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2009-01-01

    Activity-dependent gene expression plays an important role in mediating the effects of sensory experience on nervous system development and function. While several activity-dependent transcription factors have been identified, the mechanism by which calcium signaling converts a promoter from a silenced to an active state is not well understood. Here we show that a CREST-BRG1 complex plays a critical role in regulating promoter activation by orchestrating a calcium-dependent release of a repressor complex, and a recruitment of an activator complex. In resting neurons, transcription of the c-fos promoter is inhibited by BRG1-dependent recruitment of a phospho-Rb-HDAC repressor complex. Upon calcium influx, Rb becomes dephosphorylated at Serine 795 by Calcineurin, which leads to release of the repressor complex. At the same time there is increased recruitment of CBP to the promoter by a CREST-dependent mechanism, which leads to transcriptional activation. The CREST-BRG1 also binds to the NR2B promoter and activity-dependent induction of NR2B expression involves a release of HDAC1 and recruitment of CBP, suggesting that this mechanism may be generally involved in regulating calcium-dependent transcription of neuronal genes. PMID:19081374

  8. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  9. Differential neurotrophic regulation of sodium and calcium channels in an adult sympathetic neuron.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher P; Wong, Kenneth V; Lu, Van B; Posse de Chaves, Elena; Smith, Peter A

    2008-03-01

    Adult neuronal phenotype is maintained, at least in part, by the sensitivity of individual neurons to a specific selection of neurotrophic factors and the availability of such factors in the neurons' environment. Nerve growth factor (NGF) increases the functional expression of Na(+) channel currents (I(Na)) and both N- and L-type Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca,N) and I(Ca,L)) in adult bullfrog sympathetic ganglion (BFSG) B-neurons. The effects of NGF on I(Ca) involve the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Prolonged exposure to the ganglionic neurotransmitter luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) also increases I(Ca,N) but the transduction mechanism remains to be elucidated as does the transduction mechanism for NGF regulation of Na(+) channels. We therefore exposed cultured BFSG B-neurons to chicken II LHRH (0.45 microM; 6-9 days) or to NGF (200 ng/ml; 9-10 days) and used whole cell recording, immunoblot analysis, and ras or rap-1 pulldown assays to study effects of various inhibitors and activators of transduction pathways. We found that 1) LHRH signals via ras-MAPK to increase I(Ca,N), 2) this effect is mediated via protein kinase C-beta (PKC-beta-IotaIota), 3) protein kinase A (PKA) is necessary but not sufficient to effect transduction, 4) NGF signals via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) to increase I(Na), and 5) long-term exposure to LHRH fails to affect I(Na). Thus downstream signaling from LHRH has access to the ras-MAPK pathway but not to the PI3K pathway. This allows for differential retrograde and anterograde neurotrophic regulation of sodium and calcium channels in an adult sympathetic neuron. PMID:18216230

  10. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603

  11. Regulation of myofibrillar accumulation in chick muscle cultures - Evidence for the involvement of calcium and lysosomes in non-uniform turnover of contractile proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Geri; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of calcium on the synthesis and the degradation of individual myofibrillar proteins were investigated using primary chick-leg skeletal muscle cultures labeled with S-35-methionine (for protein accumulation experiments) or Ca(2+)-45 (for calcium efflux experiments). It was found that the turnover of individual contractile proteins is regulated nonuniformly by a calcium-dependent mechanism involving lysosomes. The results also indicate that contractile proteins are released from the myofibril before their breakdown to amino acids.

  12. Dominant regulation of interendothelial cell gap formation by calcium-inhibited type 6 adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Donna L.; Moore, Timothy M.; Schaack, Jerry; Creighton, Judy R.; Cooper, Dermot M.F.; Stevens, Troy

    2002-01-01

    Acute transitions in cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) through store-operated calcium entry channels catalyze interendothelial cell gap formation that increases permeability. However, the rise in [Ca2+]i only disrupts barrier function in the absence of a rise in cAMP. Discovery that type 6 adenylyl cyclase (AC6; EC 4.6.6.1) is inhibited by calcium entry through store-operated calcium entry pathways provided a plausible explanation for how inflammatory [Ca2+]i mediators may decrease cAMP necessary for endothelial cell gap formation. [Ca2+]i mediators only modestly decrease global cAMP concentrations and thus, to date, the physiological role of AC6 is unresolved. Present studies used an adenoviral construct that expresses the calcium-stimulated AC8 to convert normal calcium inhibition into stimulation of cAMP, within physiologically relevant concentration ranges. Thrombin stimulated a dose-dependent [Ca2+]i rise in both pulmonary artery (PAECs) and microvascular (PMVEC) endothelial cells, and promoted intercellular gap formation in both cell types. In PAECs, gap formation was progressive over 2 h, whereas in PMVECs, gap formation was rapid (within 10 min) and gaps resealed within 2 h. Expression of AC8 resulted in a modest calcium stimulation of cAMP, which virtually abolished thrombin-induced gap formation in PMVECs. Findings provide the first direct evidence that calcium inhibition of AC6 is essential for endothelial gap formation. PMID:12082084

  13. Regulation of Cellular Calcium in Vestibular Supporting Cells by Otopetrin 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Euysoo; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Speck, Judith; Lundberg, Yunxia W.; Salles, Felipe T.; Kachar, Bechara; Goldberg, Mark P.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Otopetrin 1 (OTOP1) is a multitransmembrane domain protein, which is essential for mineralization of otoconia, the calcium carbonate biominerals required for vestibular function, and the normal sensation of gravity. The mechanism driving mineralization of otoconia is poorly understood, but it has been proposed that supporting cells and a mechanism to maintain high concentrations of calcium are critical. Using Otop1 knockout mice and a utricular epithelial organ culture system, we show that OTOP1 is expressed at the apex of supporting cells and functions to increase cytosolic calcium in response to purinergic agonists, such as adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). This is achieved by blocking mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores in an extracellular calcium-dependent manner and by mediating influx of extracellular calcium. These data support a model in which OTOP1 acts as a sensor of the extracellular calcium concentration near supporting cells and responds to ATP in the endolymph to increase intracellular calcium levels during otoconia mineralization. PMID:20554841

  14. The role of calcium in the regulation of hormone transport in gravistimulated roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael L.; Young, Linda M.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Prior research has shown that gravistimulation induces preferential movement of calcium toward the lower side of the tips of maize roots and that roots depleted of calcium show impaired gravitropism. To further investigate the role of calcium in root gravitropism, we examined the effects of calcium on auxin movement in both vertical and gravistimulated roots of maize. Longitudinal movement of auxin was basipetally polar in intact roots but acropetally polar in decapped roots. Treatment of the root tip with calcium increased basipetal auxin movement in both intact and decapped roots. Gravistimulation induced asymmetric auxin movement toward the lower side of the root tip. Both asymmetric auxin movement and gravicurvature were inhibited by treatment of the root tip with auxin transport inhibitors or with EGTA. The results indicate that there is a close correlation between curvature and gravity-induced asymmetric auxin movement across the root cap. Since gravistimulation causes calcium movement toward the lower side of the root tip, our observation that calcium promotes basipetal auxin movement supports the idea that gravity-induced calcium asymmetry is a key step linking gravistimulation to the establishment of auxin asymmetry during root gravitropism.

  15. Transduction of the Root Gravitropic Stimulus: Can Apical Calcium Regulate Auxin Distribution?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that calcium, asymmetrically distributes in the root cap upon reorientation to gravity, affects auxin transport and thereby auxin distribution at the elongation zone. It is assumed that calcium exists in the root cap and is asymmetrically transported in root caps altered from a vertical to a horizontal position and that the meristem, the tissue immediately adjacent to the root cap and lying between the site of gravity perception and the site of gravity response, is essential for mediation of gravitropism. Tip calcium in root gravicurvature was implicated. The capstone evidence is that the root cap has the capacity to polarly translocate exogenous calcium downward when tissue is oriented horizontally, and that exogenous calcium, when supplied asymmetrically at the root tip, induces curvature and dictates the direction of curvature in both vertical and horizontal corn roots.

  16. Identification and purification of a calcium-binding protein in hepatic nuclear membranes.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, J S; Pierce, G N

    1993-02-25

    Recent evidence suggests that nuclei possess Ca2+ transport mechanisms to regulate nucleoplasmic/cytosolic Ca2+ gradients. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that Ca(2+)-binding proteins may also exist within the nucleus. Electrophoretic analysis revealed the presence of an acidic 93-kDa protein (p93) in the membranes of isolated nuclei. p93 stained blue with "Stains-All" in SDS-polyacrylamide gels and was the major 45Ca(2+)- and ruthenium red-binding nuclear envelope protein in electroblot overlays. p93 was resistant to extraction by 6 M urea but was solubilized in 2% Triton X-100. Citric acid was highly effective in removing the outer nuclear membrane (ER) with concomitant reduction (< 10-fold) of mannose-6-phosphatase activity, but not p93. 45Ca(2+)-binding assays of purified p93 revealed the presence of high capacity Ca(2+)-binding sites comparable to calreticulin. This evidence strongly suggests that p93 is a major Ca(2+)-binding protein of the inner nuclear envelope membrane. Partial amino acid sequence analysis revealed that p93 was close to 100% homologous with a recently identified ER Ca(2+)-binding protein known as calnexin. It is likely, therefore, that p93 is calnexin. However, mild CHAPS detergent treatment of nuclear envelopes and ER revealed distinctly different solubility properties of each membrane for the extraction of p93. This, together with the citrate data, strongly suggests that p93/calnexin, in isolated nuclear envelopes, is mostly bound to the inner membrane. It is possible that p93 may be involved with the regulation of Ca2+ transients between the nucleoplasm and perinuclear space. PMID:8440713

  17. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  18. Reciprocal regulation of calcium-/phosphate-regulating hormones in cyclists during the Giro d'Italia 3-week stage race.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Corsetti, R; Lanteri, P; Grasso, D; Vianello, E; Marazzi, M G; Graziani, R; Colombini, A; Galliera, E; Corsi Romanelli, M M; Banfi, G

    2014-10-01

    Calcium and phosphate are essential for cell functions, and their serum concentrations result from the balance between intestinal absorption, bony storage, and urinary excretion. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), expressed by osteocytes and osteoblasts, acts in the kidney, leading to hypophosphatemia and low 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol synthesis, but suppresses parathyroid function. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of a high-energy demanding cycling race on this bone-kidney-parathyroid axis. We studied nine cyclists during the 2011 Giro d'Italia stage race. Pre-analytical and analytical phases followed academic and anti-doping recommendations. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25(OH)D, total calcium, inorganic phosphorus, and plasma FGF23 were measured on days -1, 12, and 22 and corrected for changes in plasma volume. Dietary calcium and phosphorus, anthropometric parameters (height, weight, and body mass index) and indexes of metabolic effort (net energy expenditure, power output) were recorded. Dietary calcium and phosphorus intakes were kept at the same levels throughout the race. Twenty-five (OH)D, PTH, and calcium concentrations remained stable. FGF23 increased 50% with a positive correlation with the indexes of metabolic effort and, consequently, phosphorous decreased, although only in the first half. The strong metabolic effort acts on the bone-kidney-parathyroid system, and the rise in FGF23 plasma concentration might be aimed at maintaining calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. PMID:23647316

  19. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  20. Fetal Calcium Regulates Branching Morphogenesis in the Developing Human and Mouse Lung: Involvement of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Finney, Brenda A.; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E.; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9–17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5–16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (∼1.7 in the fetus vs. ∼1.1–1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  1. 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D AND 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D-MEDIATED REGULATION OF TRPV6 (A PUTATIVE EPITHELIAL CALCIUM CHANNEL) MRNA EXPRESSION IN CACO-2 CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TRPV6 is a member of the vanilloid subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins and likely functions as an epithelial calcium channel in calcium-transporting organs, such as the intestine, kidney, and placenta. TRPV6 mRNA expression is strongly regulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the a...

  2. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 by Calcium Signaling in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Laura N.; Guerra, Mateus T.; Kruglov, Emma; Mennone, Albert; Garcia, Celia R. S.; Chen, Ju; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2) is a canalicular transporter responsible for organic anion secretion into bile. Mrp2 activity is regulated by insertion into the plasma membrane; however, the factors that control this are not understood. Calcium (Ca2+) signaling regulates exocytosis of vesicles in most cell types, and the type II inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R2) regulates Ca2+ release in the canalicular region of hepatocytes. However, the role of InsP3R2 and of Ca2+ signals in canalicular insertion and function of Mrp2 is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the role of InsP3R2-mediated Ca2+ signals in targeting Mrp2 to the canalicular membrane. Livers, isolated hepatocytes, and hepatocytes in collagen sandwich culture from wild-type (WT) and InsP3R2 knockout (KO) mice were used for western blots, confocal immunofluorescence, and time-lapse imaging of Ca2+ signals and of secretion of a fluorescent organic anion. Plasma membrane insertion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Mrp2 expressed in HepG2 cells was monitored by total internal reflection microscopy. InsP3R2 was concentrated in the canalicular region of WT mice but absent in InsP3R2 KO livers, whereas expression and localization of InsP3R1 was preserved, and InsP3R3 was absent from both WT and KO livers. Ca2+ signals induced by either adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or vasopressin were impaired in hepatocytes lacking InsP3R2. Canalicular secretion of the organic anion 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) was reduced in KO hepatocytes, as well as in WT hepatocytes treated with 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Moreover, the choleretic effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) was impaired in InsP3R2 KO mice. Finally, ATP increased GFP-Mrp2 fluorescence in the plasma membrane of HepG2 cells, and this also was reduced by BAPTA. Conclusion InsP3R2-mediated Ca2+ signals enhance organic anion secretion into bile by targeting Mrp2 to

  3. Multiplexed Dendritic Targeting of α Calcium Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II, Neurogranin, and Activity-regulated Cytoskeleton-associated Protein RNAs by the A2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Korza, George; Levin, Mikhail K.

    2008-01-01

    In neurons, many different RNAs are targeted to dendrites where local expression of the encoded proteins mediates synaptic plasticity during learning and memory. It is not known whether each RNA follows a separate trafficking pathway or whether multiple RNAs are targeted to dendrites by the same pathway. Here, we show that RNAs encoding α calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, neurogranin, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein are coassembled into the same RNA granules and targeted to dendrites by the same cis/trans-determinants (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein [hnRNP] A2 response element and hnRNP A2) that mediate dendritic targeting of myelin basic protein RNA by the A2 pathway in oligodendrocytes. Multiplexed dendritic targeting of different RNAs by the same pathway represents a new organizing principle for coordinating gene expression at the synapse. PMID:18305102

  4. Potential role of cytoplasmic calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport in renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Frindt, G; Lee, C O; Yang, J M; Windhager, E E

    1988-01-01

    Experimental maneuvers that increase intracellular calcium ion levels inhibit sodium transport by renal tubules. In the isolated perfused renal tubule, intracellular calcium ion activity (aiCa) changes in response to alterations in the magnitude of the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the basolateral cell membrane. However, a potassium-induced depolarization of this cell boundary does not cause a rise but rather a fall in intracellular calcium ion levels. Ionomycin raises aiCa without causing intracellular acidification. This observation does not support the view that high cytosolic calcium produces intracellular acidification. At least in the case of ionomycin, the inhibition of sodium transport appears to be due to ionophore-induced increases in aiCa. The changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration found in the different experimental conditions studied were consistent with the notion that cytosolic calcium ions may mediate a feedback mechanism that links the luminal entry to the peritubular extrusion of sodium ions. The mechanisms by which cytosolic calcium alters entry is not yet clear but recent experiments suggest an indirect effect on sodium channel activity. PMID:3279295

  5. Extracellular calcium regulates keratinocyte proliferation and HPV 16 E6 RNA expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Turunen, Aaro; Syrjänen, Stina

    2014-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are known to immortalize oral keratinocytes in vitro, but the underlying mechanisms causing the following resistance to differentiation remain unclear. We investigated the effect of extracellular calcium on the proliferation of HPV16-positive keratinocytes and on the mRNA expression of the viral E6-oncogene. HPV16-positive hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells (UD-SCC-2), spontaneously immortalized- (HMK) and HPV16 E6/E7-immortalized human gingival keratinocytes (IHGK) were grown for 3, 6 and 9 days in Keratinocyte Serum-free Medium with calcium concentrations ranging from 0 mM to 6 mM. Calcium concentrations up to 0.09 mM increased cellular proliferation, which decreased at higher concentrations. A shift of calcium concentration from 0 to 4 mM increased E6 expression in UD-SCC-2 cells 2.4-fold by day 9. Simultaneously, E2 expression increased. The most significant upregulation of E6 and E2 expressions was observed at day 9, grown in high-calcium media and the increase in E6 expression coincided with an increase in involucrin expression, likely indicating cell differentiation. Despite this, HPV-positive cells continued to proliferate even at high-calcium media in contrast to HPV-negative cells. Overexpression of E6 mRNA may be an important feature of HPV16-positive cells to resist the natural calcium gradient in differentiating keratinocytes allowing cell proliferation. PMID:25295350

  6. Mechanics regulates ATP-stimulated collective calcium response in fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Lembong, Josephine; Sabass, Benedikt; Sun, Bo; Rogers, Matthew E; Stone, Howard A

    2015-07-01

    Cells constantly sense their chemical and mechanical environments. We study the effect of mechanics on the ATP-induced collective calcium response of fibroblast cells in experiments that mimic various tissue environments. We find that closely packed two-dimensional cell cultures on a soft polyacrylamide gel (Young's modulus E = 690 Pa) contain more cells exhibiting calcium oscillations than cultures on a rigid substrate (E = 36 000 Pa). Calcium responses of cells on soft substrates show a slower decay of calcium level relative to those on rigid substrates. Actin enhancement and disruption experiments for the cell cultures allow us to conclude that actin filaments determine the collective Ca(2+) oscillatory behaviour in the culture. Inhibition of gap junctions results in a decrease of the oscillation period and reduced correlation of calcium responses, which suggests additional complexity of signalling upon cell-cell contact. Moreover, the frequency of calcium oscillations is independent of the rigidity of the substrate but depends on ATP concentration. We compare our results with those from similar experiments on individual cells. Overall, our observations show that collective chemical signalling in cell cultures via calcium depends critically on the mechanical environment. PMID:26063818

  7. Mechanics regulates ATP-stimulated collective calcium response in fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Lembong, Josephine; Sabass, Benedikt; Sun, Bo; Rogers, Matthew E.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells constantly sense their chemical and mechanical environments. We study the effect of mechanics on the ATP-induced collective calcium response of fibroblast cells in experiments that mimic various tissue environments. We find that closely packed two-dimensional cell cultures on a soft polyacrylamide gel (Young's modulus E = 690 Pa) contain more cells exhibiting calcium oscillations than cultures on a rigid substrate (E = 36 000 Pa). Calcium responses of cells on soft substrates show a slower decay of calcium level relative to those on rigid substrates. Actin enhancement and disruption experiments for the cell cultures allow us to conclude that actin filaments determine the collective Ca2+ oscillatory behaviour in the culture. Inhibition of gap junctions results in a decrease of the oscillation period and reduced correlation of calcium responses, which suggests additional complexity of signalling upon cell–cell contact. Moreover, the frequency of calcium oscillations is independent of the rigidity of the substrate but depends on ATP concentration. We compare our results with those from similar experiments on individual cells. Overall, our observations show that collective chemical signalling in cell cultures via calcium depends critically on the mechanical environment. PMID:26063818

  8. PP2A Regulates HDAC4 Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Paroni, Gabriela; Cernotta, Nadia; Dello Russo, Claudio; Gallinari, Paola; Pallaoro, Michele; Foti, Carmela; Talamo, Fabio; Orsatti, Laura; Steinkühler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Different signal-regulated serine/threonine kinases phosphorylate class II histone deacetylases (HDACs) to promote nuclear export, cytosolic accumulation, and activation of gene transcription. However, little is known about mechanisms operating in the opposite direction, which, possibly through phosphatases, should promote class II HDACs nuclear entry and subsequent gene repression. Here we show that HDAC4 forms a complex with the PP2A holoenzyme Cα, Aα, B/PR55α. In vitro and in vivo binding studies demonstrate that the N-terminus of HDAC4 interacts with the catalytic subunit of PP2A. HDAC4 is dephosphorylated by PP2A and experiments using okadaic acid or RNA interference have revealed that PP2A controls HDAC4 nuclear import. Moreover, we identified serine 298 as a putative phosphorylation site important for HDAC4 nuclear import. The HDAC4 mutant mimicking phosphorylation of serine 298 is defective in nuclear import. Mutation of serine 298 to alanine partially rescues the defect in HDAC4 nuclear import observed in cells with down-regulated PP2A. These observations suggest that PP2A, via the dephosphorylation of multiple serines including the 14-3-3 binding sites and serine 298, controls HDAC4 nuclear import. PMID:18045992

  9. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P.; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  10. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  11. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  12. Calcium-dependent regulation of Rab activation and vesicle fusion by an intracellular P2X ion channel.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Katie; Baines, Abigail E; Keller, Thomas; Gruenheit, Nicole; Bragg, Laricia; North, R Alan; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2014-01-01

    Rab GTPases play key roles in the delivery, docking and fusion of intracellular vesicles. However, the mechanism by which spatial and temporal regulation of Rab GTPase activity is controlled is poorly understood. Here we describe a mechanism by which localized calcium release through a vesicular ion channel controls Rab GTPase activity. We show that activation of P2XA, an intracellular ion channel localized to the Dictyostelium discoideum contractile vacuole system, results in calcium efflux required for downregulation of Rab11a activity and efficient vacuole fusion. Vacuole fusion and Rab11a downregulation require the activity of CnrF, an EF-hand-containing Rab GAP found in a complex with Rab11a and P2XA. CnrF Rab GAP activity for Rab11a is enhanced by the presence of calcium and the EF-hand domain. These findings suggest that P2XA activation results in vacuolar calcium release, which triggers activation of CnrF Rab GAP activity and subsequent downregulation of Rab11a to allow vacuole fusion. PMID:24335649

  13. Calciotropic hormones and lipolysis of human adipose tissue: role of extracellular calcium as conditioning but not regulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Jobst, W; Minne, H; Faulhaber, J D

    1980-01-01

    The influences of different calcium concentrations (0, 0.924 and 2.772 mMol/l) on lipolysis of in vitro incubated human adipose tissue slices or adipocytes were studied under the conditions of stimulation with isoproterenol and parathyroid hormone preparations or inhibition by insulin. Extractive bovine PTH (as well as synthetic PTH 1--34) stimulated glycerol release in a biphasic pattern similarly to isoproterenol; PTH was about half as potent as isoproterenol. The optimal conditions for lipolysis were observed using a calcium concentration of 0.924 mMol/l, whereas lipolysis was distinctly impaired at concentrations of 0 or 2.772 mMol/l; this was true for basal as well as isoproterenol- and PTH stimulated lipolysis or the inhibitory effect of insulin. In contrast to partially purified extractive calcitonin, pure synthetic calcitonin did not inhibit lipolysis. Isoproterenol- and PTH-administrations led to cAMP accumulation in the adipose tissue, this process was also diminished at the non-optimal calcium concentrations. The results suggest a conditioning, but not a regulating significance of extracellular calcium for lipolysis, whereas the importance of the lipolytic potency of PTH remains to be elucidated. PMID:6245862

  14. Mechanical stretch regulates TRPC expression and calcium entry in human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, A; Mahn, K; Poston, L; Songu-Mize, E; Tribe, R M

    2007-03-01

    Stretch is known to stimulate myometrial hyperplasia and hypertrophy in early pregnancy and uterine contraction at term. We propose that transduction of the stretch signal involves alteration of intracellular calcium signalling, including changes in transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) isoform expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of prolonged mechanical (tonic) stretch in vitro on human myometrial smooth muscle cell calcium signalling and TRPC expression. Cells were cultured from myometrial biopsies, obtained from women undergoing elective Caesarean section at term, grown on Flexiplates and subjected to 25% tonic mechanical stretch for 1, 4 and 14 h. Time-matched control cells were not stretched. Mechanical stretch (14 h) increased basal calcium entry and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced calcium/Mn(2+) entry (P < 0.05) in Fura-2 loaded cells. The calcium selectivity of CPA-thapsigarin induced inward currents, measured by patch clamp electrophysiology, was also increased in stretched cells compared with control cells (P < 0.05). Real time PCR and Western blot data demonstrated that TRPC3 and TRPC4 mRNA and TRPC3 protein expression were increased by stretch (P < 0.05), respectively. These data support the hypothesis that uterine stretch modulates uterine growth and contractility in pregnancy via alterations in calcium signalling. PMID:17208928

  15. Differential regulation of calcium signalling pathways by components of Piper methysticum ('Awa).

    PubMed

    Shimoda, L M N; Showman, A; Baker, J D; Lange, I; Koomoa, D L; Stokes, A J; Borris, R P; Turner, H

    2015-04-01

    Kava is a soporific, anxiolytic and relaxant in widespread ritual and recreational use throughout the Pacific. Traditional uses of kava by indigenous Pacific Island peoples reflect a complex pharmacopeia, centered on GABA-ergic effects of the well-characterized kavalactones. However, peripheral effects of kava suggest active components other than the CNS-targeted kavalactones. We have previously shown that immunocytes exhibit calcium mobilization in response to traditionally prepared kava extracts, and that the kavalactones do not induce these calcium responses. Here, we characterize the complex calcium-mobilizing activity of traditionally prepared and partially HPLC-purified kava extracts, noting induction of both calcium entry and store release pathways. Kava components activate intracellular store depletion of thapsigargin-sensitive and -insensitive stores that are coupled to the calcium release activated (CRAC) current, and cause calcium entry through non-store-operated pathways. Together with the pepper-like potency reported by kava users, these studies lead us to hypothesize that kava extracts contain one or more ligands for the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels. Indeed, TRP-like conductances are observed in kava-treated cells under patch clamp. Thus TRP-mediated cellular effects may be responsible for some of the reported pharmacology of kava. PMID:25640812

  16. Differential regulation of calcium signalling pathways by components of Piper methysticum (‘Awa)

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, L.M.N; Showman, A.; Baker, J.D.; Lange, I.; Koomoa, D.L.; Stokes, A.J.; Borris, R.P.; Turner, H.

    2015-01-01

    Kava is a soporific, anxiolytic and relaxant in widespread ritual and recreational use throughout the Pacific. Traditional uses of kava by indigenous Pacific Island peoples reflect a complex pharmacopeia, centered on GABA-ergic effects of the well-characterized kavalactones. However, peripheral effects of kava suggest active components other than the CNS-targeted kavalactones. We have previously shown that immunocytes exhibit calcium mobilization in response to traditionally-prepared kava extracts, and that the kavalactones do not induce these calcium responses. Here, we characterize the complex calcium-mobilizing activity of traditionally-prepared and partially HPLC-purified kava extracts, noting induction of both calcium entry and store release pathways. Kava components activate intracellular store depletion of thapsigargin-sensitive and –insensitive stores that are coupled to the calcium release activated (CRAC) current, and cause calcium entry through non-store-operated pathways. Together with the pepper-like potency reported by kava users, these studies lead us to hypothesize that kava extracts contain one or more ligands for the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels. Indeed, TRP-like conductances are observed in kava-treated cells under patch clamp. Thus TRP-mediated cellular effects may be responsible for some of the reported pharmacology of kava. PMID:25640812

  17. The role of research in nuclear regulation: A Korean perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Won-Hyo

    1997-01-01

    Korea has carried out a very ambitious nuclear power program since the 1970`s as part of the nation`s industrialization policy. Ever since, Korea has also maintained a strong commitment to nuclear power development as an integral part of the national energy policy which aims at reducing external vulnerability and ensuring against a global fossil fuel shortage. The introduction of nuclear power into Korea has progressed through three stages: the first was a turn-key package supplied by the manufacturer; the second involved a major contractor who was responsible for project management, and design and construction was contracted out, with Korean industry becoming more involved; the third stage has seen Korean industries involved as main contractors based on experience gained from earlier plants. The success of Korea`s nuclear power program depends in large part on how to insure safety. Safety has the highest priority in nuclear energy development. Public acceptance has been the most critical problem faced by the nuclear industry in Korea. The public demands the highest level of safety all through the design, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. Korea has learned that a nuclear plant designed with well addressed safety, implementation of a well grounded QA program during construction, and operated with a proven record of safety, are the only ways to earn public support. Competent and efficient regulation with a strong safety culture and openness in all issues is the most desirable image for regulators to strive for. Korea established a ten year R & D program to obtain self-reliance in nuclear technology and international competitiveness by the early 2000`s in 1992. It has actively participated in coordinated research programs in safety issues with bodies including the USNRC, AECB of Canada, IAEA, and OECD/NEA.

  18. Reprint of "Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis".

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-06-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator – the γ-TuRC complex – and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. PMID:26196321

  19. Statin Therapy and the Expression of Genes that Regulate Calcium Homeostasis and Membrane Repair in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Draeger, Annette; Sanchez-Freire, Verónica; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Hoppeler, Hans; Mueller, Matthias; Breil, Fabio; Mohaupt, Markus G.; Babiychuk, Eduard B.

    2010-01-01

    In skeletal muscle of patients with clinically diagnosed statin-associated myopathy, discrete signs of structural damage predominantly localize to the T-tubular region and are suggestive of a calcium leak. The impact of statins on skeletal muscle of non-myopathic patients is not known. We analyzed the expression of selected genes implicated in the molecular regulation of calcium and membrane repair, in lipid homeostasis, myocyte remodeling and mitochondrial function. Microscopic and gene expression analyses were performed using validated TaqMan custom arrays on skeletal muscle biopsies of 72 age-matched subjects who were receiving statin therapy (n = 38), who had discontinued therapy due to statin-associated myopathy (n = 14), and who had never undergone statin treatment (n = 20). In skeletal muscle, obtained from statin-treated, non-myopathic patients, statins caused extensive changes in the expression of genes of the calcium regulatory and the membrane repair machinery, whereas the expression of genes responsible for mitochondrial function or myocyte remodeling was unaffected. Discontinuation of treatment due to myopathic symptoms led to a normalization of gene expression levels, the genes encoding the ryanodine receptor 3, calpain 3, and dystrophin being the most notable exceptions. Hence, even in clinically asymptomatic (non-myopathic) patients, statin therapy leads to an upregulation in the expression of genes that are concerned with skeletal muscle regulation and membrane repair. PMID:20489141

  20. Effects of adrenalectomy on the alpha-adrenergic regulation of cytosolic free calcium in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenrich, C.C.; Borle, A.B.

    1988-06-25

    We have previously published that bilateral adrenalectomy in the rat reduces the Ca2+-mediated alpha-adrenergic activation of hepatic glycogenolysis, while it increases the cellular calcium content of hepatocytes. In the experiments presented here, the concentration of cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+i) at rest and in response to epinephrine was measured in aequorin-loaded hepatocytes isolated from sham and adrenalectomized male rats. We found that in adrenalectomized rats the resting Ca2+i was elevated, the rise in Ca2+i evoked by epinephrine was reduced, and the rise in /sup 45/Ca efflux that follows such stimulation was depressed. Furthermore, the slope of the relationship between Ca2+i and calcium efflux was decreased 60% in adrenalectomized. Adrenalectomy did not change Ca2+ release from intracellular calcium pools in response to IP3 in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes. The EC50 for inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and the maximal Ca2+ released were similar in both sham and adrenalectomized animals. Finally, the liver calmodulin content determined by radioimmunoassay was not significantly different between sham and adrenalectomized rats. These results suggest that 1) adrenalectomy reduces calcium efflux from the hepatocyte, probably by an effect on the plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)-ATPase-dependent Ca2+ pump and thus alters cellular calcium homeostasis; 2) adrenalectomy decreases the rise in Ca2+i in response to epinephrine; 3) this decreased rise in Ca2+i is not due to defects in the intracellular Ca2+ storage and mobilization processes; and 4) the effects of adrenalectomy on cellular calcium metabolism and on alpha-adrenergic activation of glycogenolysis are not caused by a reduction in soluble calmodulin.

  1. Regulation of mammalian transcription and splicing by Nuclear RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Roya; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known as a mechanism for controlling mammalian mRNA translation in the cytoplasm, but what would be the consequences if it also functions in cell nuclei? Although RNAi has also been found in nuclei of plants, yeast, and other organisms, there has been relatively little progress towards understanding the potential involvement of mammalian RNAi factors in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. This review summarizes evidence for mammalian RNAi factors in cell nuclei and mechanisms that might contribute to the control of gene expression. When RNAi factors bind small RNAs, they form ribonucleoprotein complexes that can be selective for target sequences within different classes of nuclear RNA substrates. The versatility of nuclear RNAi may supply a previously underappreciated layer of regulation to transcription, splicing, and other nuclear processes. PMID:26612865

  2. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Jin; Jeong, Jaehoon; Park, Young-Un; Park, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Haeryun; Lee, Namgyu; Kim, Sung-Mo; Kuroda, Keisuke; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Park, Sang Ki

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has emerged as a convincing susceptibility gene for multiple mental disorders, but its mechanistic link to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia related psychiatric conditions is yet to be further understood. Here, we showed that DISC1 localizes to the outer surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). EXOC1, a subunit of the exocyst complex, interacted with DISC1 and affected its recruitment to inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1). Notably, knockdown of DISC1 and EXOC1 elicited an exaggerated ER calcium response upon stimulation of IP3R agonists. Similar abnormal ER calcium responses were observed in hippocampal neurons from DISC1-deficient mutant mice. Moreover, perturbation of ER calcium dynamics upon DISC1 knockdown was effectively reversed by treatment with antipsychotic drugs, such as clozapine and haloperidol. These results collectively indicate that DISC1 is a regulatory factor in ER calcium dynamics, linking a perturbed intracellular calcium signaling and schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25732993

  3. The calcium sensor Copine-6 regulates spine structural plasticity and learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Judith R.; Kriz, Alexander; Galic, Milos; Angliker, Nico; Rajalu, Mathieu; Vogt, Kaspar E.; Ruegg, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) represents the cellular response of excitatory synapses to specific patterns of high neuronal activity and is required for learning and memory. Here we identify a mechanism that requires the calcium-binding protein Copine-6 to translate the initial calcium signals into changes in spine structure. We show that Copine-6 is recruited from the cytosol of dendrites to postsynaptic spine membranes by calcium transients that precede LTP. Cpne6 knockout mice are deficient in hippocampal LTP, learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons from Cpne6 knockouts lack spine structural plasticity as do wild-type neurons that express a Copine-6 calcium mutant. The function of Copine-6 is based on its binding, activating and recruiting the Rho GTPase Rac1 to cell membranes. Consistent with this function, the LTP deficit of Cpne6 knockout mice is rescued by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. These data show that Copine-6 links activity-triggered calcium signals to spine structural plasticity necessary for learning and memory. PMID:27194588

  4. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Jin; Jeong, Jaehoon; Park, Young-Un; Park, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Haeryun; Lee, Namgyu; Kim, Sung-Mo; Kuroda, Keisuke; Nguyen, Minh Dang; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Park, Sang Ki

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has emerged as a convincing susceptibility gene for multiple mental disorders, but its mechanistic link to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia related psychiatric conditions is yet to be further understood. Here, we showed that DISC1 localizes to the outer surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). EXOC1, a subunit of the exocyst complex, interacted with DISC1 and affected its recruitment to inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1). Notably, knockdown of DISC1 and EXOC1 elicited an exaggerated ER calcium response upon stimulation of IP3R agonists. Similar abnormal ER calcium responses were observed in hippocampal neurons from DISC1-deficient mutant mice. Moreover, perturbation of ER calcium dynamics upon DISC1 knockdown was effectively reversed by treatment with antipsychotic drugs, such as clozapine and haloperidol. These results collectively indicate that DISC1 is a regulatory factor in ER calcium dynamics, linking a perturbed intracellular calcium signaling and schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25732993

  5. Modulation of iron metabolism by iron chelation regulates intracellular calcium and increases sensitivity to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Yalcintepe, Leman; Halis, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Increased intracellular iron levels can both promote cell proliferation and death, as such; iron has a “two-sided effect” in the delicate balance of human health. Though the role of iron in the development of cancer remains unclear, investigations of iron chelators as anti-tumor agents have revealed promising results. Here, we investigated the influence of iron and desferrioxamine (DFO), the iron chelating agent on intracellular calcium in a human leukemia cell line, K562. Iron uptake is associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Therefore, we showed that iron also caused dose-dependent ROS generation in K562 cells. The measurement of intracellular calcium was determined using Furo-2 with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The iron delivery process to the cytoplasmic iron pool was examined by monitoring the fluorescence of cells loaded with calcein-acetoxymethyl. Our data showed that iron increased intracellular calcium, and this response was 8 times higher when cells were incubated with DFO. K562 cells with DFO caused a 3.5 times increase of intracellular calcium in the presence of doxorubicin (DOX). In conclusion, DFO induces intracellular calcium and increases their sensitivity to DOX, a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26773173

  6. The calcium sensor Copine-6 regulates spine structural plasticity and learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Judith R; Kriz, Alexander; Galic, Milos; Angliker, Nico; Rajalu, Mathieu; Vogt, Kaspar E; Ruegg, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) represents the cellular response of excitatory synapses to specific patterns of high neuronal activity and is required for learning and memory. Here we identify a mechanism that requires the calcium-binding protein Copine-6 to translate the initial calcium signals into changes in spine structure. We show that Copine-6 is recruited from the cytosol of dendrites to postsynaptic spine membranes by calcium transients that precede LTP. Cpne6 knockout mice are deficient in hippocampal LTP, learning and memory. Hippocampal neurons from Cpne6 knockouts lack spine structural plasticity as do wild-type neurons that express a Copine-6 calcium mutant. The function of Copine-6 is based on its binding, activating and recruiting the Rho GTPase Rac1 to cell membranes. Consistent with this function, the LTP deficit of Cpne6 knockout mice is rescued by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. These data show that Copine-6 links activity-triggered calcium signals to spine structural plasticity necessary for learning and memory. PMID:27194588

  7. Cytosolic and nuclear calcium signaling in atrial myocytes: IP3-mediated calcium release and the role of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hohendanner, Felix; Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2015-01-01

    In rabbit atrial myocytes Ca signaling has unique features due to the lack of transverse (t) tubules, the spatial arrangement of mitochondria and the contribution of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor-induced Ca release (IICR). During excitation-contraction coupling action potential-induced elevation of cytosolic [Ca] originates in the cell periphery from Ca released from the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR) and then propagates by Ca-induced Ca release from non-junctional (nj-) SR toward the cell center. The subsarcolemmal region between j-SR and the first array of nj-SR Ca release sites is devoid of mitochondria which results in a rapid propagation of activation through this domain, whereas the subsequent propagation through the nj-SR network occurs at a velocity typical for a propagating Ca wave. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca uptake with the Ca uniporter blocker Ru360 accelerates propagation and increases the amplitude of Ca transients (CaTs) originating from nj-SR. Elevation of cytosolic IP3 levels by rapid photolysis of caged IP3 has profound effects on the magnitude of subcellular CaTs with increased Ca release from nj-SR and enhanced CaTs in the nuclear compartment. IP3 uncaging restricted to the nucleus elicites ‘mini’-Ca waves that remain confined to this compartment. Elementary IICR events (Ca puffs) preferentially originate in the nucleus in close physical association with membrane structures of the nuclear envelope and the nucleoplasmic reticulum. The data suggest that in atrial myocytes the nucleus is an autonomous Ca signaling domain where Ca dynamics are primarily governed by IICR. PMID:25891132

  8. Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Aquaporin-2 in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Bing; Guan, You-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is a vasopressin-regulated water channel responsible for regulating water reabsorption through the apical plasma membrane of the principal cells of renal collecting ducts. It has been found that dysregulation and dysfunction of AQP2 cause many disorders related to water balance in people and animals, including polyuria and dilutional hyponatremia. Classically, AQP2 mRNA and protein expression and its membrane translocation are regulated by systemic vasopressin involving short-term regulation of AQP2 trafficking to and from the apical plasma membrane and long-term regulation of the total amount of the AQP2 protein in the cell. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated that collecting duct AQP2 expression and membrane translocation are also under the control of many other local factors, especially nuclear receptors. Here, we briefly review the progress of studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of water reabsorption via affecting AQP2 expression and function. PMID:27409611

  9. Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Aquaporin-2 in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Bing; Guan, You-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is a vasopressin-regulated water channel responsible for regulating water reabsorption through the apical plasma membrane of the principal cells of renal collecting ducts. It has been found that dysregulation and dysfunction of AQP2 cause many disorders related to water balance in people and animals, including polyuria and dilutional hyponatremia. Classically, AQP2 mRNA and protein expression and its membrane translocation are regulated by systemic vasopressin involving short-term regulation of AQP2 trafficking to and from the apical plasma membrane and long-term regulation of the total amount of the AQP2 protein in the cell. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated that collecting duct AQP2 expression and membrane translocation are also under the control of many other local factors, especially nuclear receptors. Here, we briefly review the progress of studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of water reabsorption via affecting AQP2 expression and function. PMID:27409611

  10. Cellular stress induces Bax-regulated nuclear bubble budding and rupture followed by nuclear protein release.

    PubMed

    Lindenboim, Liora; Sasson, Tiki; Worman, Howard J; Borner, Christoph; Stein, Reuven

    2014-01-01

    Cellular stress triggers many pathways including nuclear protein redistribution. We previously discovered that this process is regulated by Bax but the underlying mechanism has not yet been studied. Here we define this mechanism by showing that apoptotic stimuli cause Bax-regulated disturbances in lamin A/C and nuclear envelope (NE)-associated proteins which results in the generation and subsequent rupture of nuclear protein-containing bubbles. The bubbles do not contain DNA and are encapsulated by impaired nuclear pore-depleted NE. Stress-induced generation and rupture of nuclear bubbles ultimately leads to the discharge of nuclear proteins into the cytoplasm. This process precedes morphological changes of apoptosis and occurs independently of caspases. Rescue experiments revealed that this Bax effect is non-canonical, i.e. it requires the BH3 domain and α-helices 5 and 6 but it is not inhibited by Bcl(-)xL. Targeting Bax to the NE by the Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 homology (KASH) domain effectively triggers the generation and rupture of nuclear bubbles. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a novel stress-response, which is regulated by a non-canonical action of Bax on the NE. PMID:25482068