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Sample records for calcium transients delayed

  1. Delayed transient post-traumatic quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaaibi, Khaloud; Kariyattil, Rajeev

    2015-03-01

    Transient neurological deficit following cervical trauma have been reported following sports injuries, and has been referred to as cervical cord neurapraxia. The so-called "whiplash injuries" following minor motor vehicle collisions usually do not produce any neurological deficit. Here we report the case of a whiplash type of injury presenting with a delayed onset neurological deficit, which was followed by rapid and complete recovery. The patient, an otherwise healthy 34-year-old male, attended the emergency department of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital following a rear-end motor vehicle collision. We present images showing degenerative disc disease causing spinal canal narrowing and mild cord compression in the patient, but no spinal instability. Differential diagnoses are also discussed. PMID:25960840

  2. The beginning of the calcium transient in rat embryonic heart.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Maeda, Sachiko; Ichise, Nobutoshi; Sato, Tatsuya; Iwase, Takehito; Seki, Sumihiko; Yamada, Yoichi; Tohse, Noritsugu

    2011-03-01

    Although many researchers have tried to observe the beginning of the heartbeat, no study has shown the beginning of the calcium transient. Here, we evaluate the beginning of the calcium transient in the Wistar rat heart. We first tried to reveal when the heart of the Wistar rat begins to contract because no previous study has evaluated the beginning of the heartbeat in Wistar rats. Observation of embryos transferred to a small incubator mounted on a microscope revealed that the heart primordium, the so-called cardiac crescent, began to contract at embryonic day 9.99-10.13. Observation of embryos loaded with fluo-3 AM revealed that the beginning of the calcium transient precedes the initiation of contraction which precedes the appearance of the linear heart tube. Nifedipine (1 μM), but not ryanodine (1 μM), abolished the calcium transients. These results indicate that calcium transients in the early embryonic period involve exclusively calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in contrast to the situation in mature hearts. This study provides the first demonstration of the relationship between morphological changes in the heart primordium and the beginning of the calcium transient and contraction. PMID:21267689

  3. Delayed transiently chaotic neural networks and their application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shyan-Shiou

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model, a delayed transiently chaotic neural network (DTCNN), and numerically confirm that the model performs better in finding the global minimum for the traveling salesman problem (TSP) than the traditional transiently chaotic neural network. The asymptotic stability and chaotic behavior of the dynamical system with time delay are fully discussed. We not only theoretically prove the existence of Marotto's chaos for the delayed neural network without the cooling schedule by geometrically constructing a transversal homoclinic orbit, but we also discuss the stability of nonautonomous delayed systems using LaSalle's invariance principle. The result of the application to the TSP by the DTCNN might further explain the importance of systems with time delays in the neural system.

  4. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  5. Calcium-rich gap transients: tidal detonations of white dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, P. H.; Maccarone, T. J.; Kotak, R.; Knigge, C.; Sand, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesize that at least some of the recently discovered class of calcium-rich gap transients are tidal detonation events of white dwarfs (WDs) by black holes (BHs) or possibly neutron stars. We show that the properties of the calcium-rich gap transients agree well with the predictions of the tidal detonation model. Under the predictions of this model, we use a follow-up X-ray observation of one of these transients, SN 2012hn, to place weak upper limits on the detonator mass of this system that include all intermediate-mass BHs (IMBHs). As these transients are preferentially in the stellar haloes of galaxies, we discuss the possibility that these transients are tidal detonations of WDs caused by random flyby encounters with IMBHs in dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. This possibility has been already suggested in the literature but without connection to the calcium-rich gap transients. In order for the random flyby cross-section to be high enough, these events would have to be occurring inside these dense stellar associations. However, there is a lack of evidence for IMBHs in these systems, and recent observations have ruled out all but the very faintest dwarf galaxies and globular clusters for a few of these transients. Another possibility is that these are tidal detonations caused by three-body interactions, where a WD is perturbed towards the detonator in isolated multiple star systems. We highlight a number of ways this could occur, even in lower mass systems with stellar-mass BHs or neutron stars. Finally, we outline several new observational tests of this scenario, which are feasible with current instrumentation.

  6. Calcium transients caused by calcium entry are influenced by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in guinea-pig atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, P; Pott, L; Callewaert, G; Carmeliet, E

    1992-01-01

    1. Single atrial myocytes obtained by enzyme perfusion from hearts of adult guinea-pigs were investigated using whole-cell voltage clamp and Indo-1 micro-fluorometry. 2. In myocytes loaded with a solution containing citrate as a low-affinity, non-saturable Ca2+ chelator, two types of [Ca2+]i transients could be recorded during repetitive activation of L-type Ca2+ current. Both large and small [Ca2+]i transients occurred; large transients reached peak values of about 1 microM, and small transients were about 100 nM or less in amplitude. 3. In the case of the large transients, peak [Ca2+]i was usually reached with a variable delay after repolarization from a voltage step that activated calcium current (ICa). For the small transients the rise in [Ca2+]i paralleled ICa. Upon repolarization [Ca2+]i started to decay. 4. The small transients reflect entry of Ca2+ through Ca2+ channels (entry transients), whereas the large transients are due to entry and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (release transients). 5. The entry transients displayed a positive staircase pattern during trains of depolarizing voltage steps despite constant or even decreasing amplitude of ICa. The steepness of the staircase was increased by elevation of [Ca2+]o. Entry transients were always smallest immediately after a release transient. 6. After functional removal of the sarcoplasmic reticulum by caffeine (1-5 mM) the staircase pattern of the transients reflecting Ca2+ entry was abolished. 7. It is concluded that the staircase pattern is due to rapid uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum of Ca2+ entering the cell, resulting in an attenuation of the signal. The attenuation is strongest shortly after a release signal, when the rate of sequestration of Ca2+ by the SR should be highest. 8. Evidence is provided that a compartment of the SR is involved in attenuation of the entry transients. This compartment has been identified recently as a peripheral release compartment. PMID:1335504

  7. Photonic nonlinear transient computing with multiple-delay wavelength dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martinenghi, Romain; Rybalko, Sergei; Jacquot, Maxime; Chembo, Yanne K; Larger, Laurent

    2012-06-15

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a hybrid optoelectronic neuromorphic computer based on a complex nonlinear wavelength dynamics including multiple delayed feedbacks with randomly defined weights. This neuromorphic approach is based on a new paradigm of a brain-inspired computational unit, intrinsically differing from Turing machines. This recent paradigm consists in expanding the input information to be processed into a higher dimensional phase space, through the nonlinear transient response of a complex dynamics excited by the input information. The computed output is then extracted via a linear separation of the transient trajectory in the complex phase space. The hyperplane separation is derived from a learning phase consisting of the resolution of a regression problem. The processing capability originates from the nonlinear transient, resulting in nonlinear transient computing. The computational performance is successfully evaluated on a standard benchmark test, namely, a spoken digit recognition task. PMID:23004274

  8. Photonic Nonlinear Transient Computing with Multiple-Delay Wavelength Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinenghi, Romain; Rybalko, Sergei; Jacquot, Maxime; Chembo, Yanne K.; Larger, Laurent

    2012-06-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a hybrid optoelectronic neuromorphic computer based on a complex nonlinear wavelength dynamics including multiple delayed feedbacks with randomly defined weights. This neuromorphic approach is based on a new paradigm of a brain-inspired computational unit, intrinsically differing from Turing machines. This recent paradigm consists in expanding the input information to be processed into a higher dimensional phase space, through the nonlinear transient response of a complex dynamics excited by the input information. The computed output is then extracted via a linear separation of the transient trajectory in the complex phase space. The hyperplane separation is derived from a learning phase consisting of the resolution of a regression problem. The processing capability originates from the nonlinear transient, resulting in nonlinear transient computing. The computational performance is successfully evaluated on a standard benchmark test, namely, a spoken digit recognition task.

  9. Accumulation of calcium and loss of potassium in the hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia: a proton microprobe study

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, E.; Inamura, K.; Themner, K.; Malmqvist, K.G.; Siesjoe, B.K.

    1988-08-01

    This study explored (a) whether postischemic accumulation of calcium in hippocampal neurons precedes or occurs pari passu with light microscopical signs of delayed neuronal necrosis, and (b) whether calcium initially accumulates in dendritic domains, presumed to have a high density of agonist-operated calcium channels. Transient ischemia of 10-min duration was induced in rats, and the animals were studied after 1, 2, 3, and 4 days of recovery. We measured total calcium and potassium contents in the stratum oriens, pyramidale, radiatum, and moleculare of the CA1 and CA3 sectors, using particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) in the proton microprobe mode. The results showed significant accumulation of calcium and loss of potassium after 3 and 4 days of recovery in the CA1 sector, which developed neuronal necrosis, but not in the CA3 sector, which showed only occasional damage. In a few animals, calcium accumulation (and loss of potassium) was observed with no or only mild visible damage, but in the majority of animals the accumulation of calcium correlated to signs of neuronal necrosis. Since calcium accumulation was similar in all strata examined, the results failed to reveal preferential accumulation in dendritic or somal regions. Based on our results and those of Dux et al., we emphasize the possibility that delayed neuronal death is, at least in part, caused by increased calcium cycling of plasma membranes and gradual calcium overload of mitochondria.

  10. Understanding anomalous delays in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Emily; Kirk, Vivien; Osinga, Hinke M.; Sneyd, James; Wechselberger, Martin

    2010-12-01

    In many cell types, oscillations in the concentration of free intracellular calcium ions are used to control a variety of cellular functions. It has been suggested [J. Sneyd et al., "A method for determining the dependence of calcium oscillations on inositol trisphosphate oscillations," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 1675-1680 (2006)] that the mechanisms underlying the generation and control of such oscillations can be determined by means of a simple experiment, whereby a single exogenous pulse of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) is applied to the cell. However, more detailed mathematical investigations [M. Domijan et al., "Dynamical probing of the mechanisms underlying calcium oscillations," J. Nonlinear Sci. 16, 483-506 (2006)] have shown that this is not necessarily always true, and that the experimental data are more difficult to interpret than first thought. Here, we use geometric singular perturbation techniques to study the dynamics of models that make different assumptions about the mechanisms underlying the calcium oscillations. In particular, we show how recently developed canard theory for singularly perturbed systems with three or more slow variables [M. Wechselberger, "A propos de canards (Apropos canards)," Preprint, 2010] applies to these calcium models and how the presence of a curve of folded singularities and corresponding canards can result in anomalous delays in the response of these models to a pulse of IP3.

  11. Stroma Cell-Derived Factor-1α Signaling Enhances Calcium Transients and Beating Frequency in Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hadad, Ielham; Veithen, Alex; Springael, Jean–Yves; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A.; Mendes Da Costa, Agnès; Miot, Françoise; Naeije, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency. Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax. These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect. PMID:23460790

  12. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ielham; Veithen, Alex; Springael, Jean-Yves; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A; Mendes Da Costa, Agnès; Miot, Françoise; Naeije, Robert; De Deken, Xavier; Entee, Kathleen Mc

    2013-01-01

    Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect. PMID:23460790

  13. Simultaneous recording of calcium transients in skeletal muscle using high- and low-affinity calcium indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, M G; Simon, B J; Szucs, G; Schneider, M F

    1988-01-01

    To monitor cytosolic [Ca2+] over a wide range of concentrations in functioning skeletal muscle cells, we have used simultaneously the rapid but relatively low affinity calcium indicator antipyrylazo III (AP III) and the slower but higher affinity indicator fura-2 in single frog twitch fibers cut at both ends and voltage clamped with a double vaseline gap system. When both dyes were added to the end pool solution the cytosolic fura-2 concentration reached a steady level equal to the end pool concentration within approximately 2.5 h, a time when the AP III concentration was still increasing. For depolarizing pulses of increasing amplitude, the fura-2 fluorescence signal approached saturation when the simultaneously recorded AP III absorbance change was far from saturation. Comparison of simultaneously recorded fura-2 and AP III signals indicated that the mean values of the on and off rate constants for calcium binding to fura-2 in 18 muscle fibers were 1.49 x 10(8) M-1 s-1 and 11.9 s-1, respectively (mean KD = 89 nM), if all AP III in the fiber is assumed to behave as in calibrating solution and to be in instantaneous equilibrium with [Ca2+]. [Ca2+] transients calculated from the fura-2 signals using these rate constants were consistent with the [Ca2+] transients calculated from the AP III signals. Resting [Ca2+] or small changes in [Ca2+] which could not be reliably monitored with AP III could be monitored with fura-2 with little or no interference from changes in [Mg2+] or from intrinsic signals. The fura-2 signal was also less sensitive to movement artifacts than the AP III signal. After a [Ca2+] transient the fura-2 signal demonstrated a relatively small elevation of [Ca2+] that was maintained for many seconds. PMID:3395664

  14. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on intracellular calcium transients in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinhong; Sun, Junqing; Xu, Hao; Shi, Liang; Sun, Lijun; Zhang, Jianbao

    2015-03-01

    Calcium transients play an essential role in cardiomyocytes and electromagnetic fields (EMF) and affect intracellular calcium levels in many types of cells. Effects of EMF on intracellular calcium transients in cardiomyocytes are not well studied. The aim of this study was to assess whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) could affect intracellular calcium transients in cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to rectangular-wave pulsed ELF-EMF at four different frequencies (15 Hz, 50 Hz, 75 Hz and 100 Hz) and at a flux density of 2 mT. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured using Fura-2/AM and spectrofluorometry. Perfusion of cardiomyocytes with a high concentration of caffeine (10 mM) was carried out to verify the function of the cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and the activity of sarco(endo)-plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a). The results showed that ELF-EMF enhanced the activities of NCX and SERCA2a, increased [Ca(2+)]i baseline level and frequency of calcium transients in cardiomyocytes and decreased the amplitude of calcium transients and calcium level in sarcoplasmic reticulum. These results indicated that ELF-EMF can regulate calcium-associated activities in cardiomyocytes. PMID:24499289

  15. Calcium transient and sodium-calcium exchange current in human versus rabbit sinoatrial node pacemaker cells.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Arie O; van Borren, Marcel M G J; Wilders, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, focusing on the relative importance of the "membrane clock" and the "Ca(2+) clock" in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential threshold. Specifically, the debate centers around the question whether the membrane clock-driven hyperpolarization-activated current, I f , which is also known as the "funny current" or "pacemaker current," or the Ca(2+) clock-driven sodium-calcium exchange current, I NaCa, is the main contributor to diastolic depolarization. In our contribution to this journal's "Special Issue on Cardiac Electrophysiology," we present a numerical reconstruction of I f and I NaCa in isolated rabbit and human SAN pacemaker cells based on experimental data on action potentials, I f , and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)] i ) that we have acquired from these cells. The human SAN pacemaker cells have a smaller I f , a weaker [Ca(2+)] i transient, and a smaller I NaCa than the rabbit cells. However, when compared to the diastolic net membrane current, I NaCa is of similar size in human and rabbit SAN pacemaker cells, whereas I f is smaller in human than in rabbit cells. PMID:23606816

  16. Super-transient scaling in time-delay autonomous Boolean network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Huys, Otti; Lohmann, Johannes; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous Boolean networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of gene regulatory networks and allow for the prediction of stable dynamical attractors. However, most models do not account for time delays along the network links and noise, which are crucial features of real biological systems. Concentrating on two paradigmatic motifs, the toggle switch and the repressilator, we develop an experimental testbed that explicitly includes both inter-node time delays and noise using digital logic elements on field-programmable gate arrays. We observe transients that last millions to billions of characteristic time scales and scale exponentially with the amount of time delays between nodes, a phenomenon known as super-transient scaling. We develop a hybrid model that includes time delays along network links and allows for stochastic variation in the delays. Using this model, we explain the observed super-transient scaling of both motifs and recreate the experimentally measured transient distributions.

  17. Quantum shutter transient solutions and the delay time for the {delta} potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Alberto; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston

    2003-07-01

    The analytical solution to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for tunneling using cutoff plane-wave initial conditions is in general given by the sum of two types of terms that exhibit a transient behavior. The time evolution of the probability density for the {delta} potential is compared with the free case to investigate in this case the role of these transient terms for the delay time. We find, by a dynamical calculation, that the delay time arises from the interference between these transient terms and we show that at very long times it goes into the phase delay time, given by the energy derivative of the phase of the transmission amplitude.

  18. Cold Transiently Activates Calcium-Permeable Channels in Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carpaneto, Armando; Ivashikina, Natalya; Levchenko, Victor; Krol, Elzbieta; Jeworutzki, Elena; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hedrich, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Living organisms are capable of discriminating thermal stimuli from noxious cold to noxious heat. For more than 30 years, it has been known that plant cells respond to cold with a large and transient depolarization. Recently, using transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing the calcium-sensitive protein aequorin, an increase in cytosolic calcium following cold treatment was observed. Applying the patch-clamp technique to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, we could identify a transient plasma membrane conductance induced by rapid cooling. This cold-induced transient conductance was characterized as an outward rectifying 33 pS nonselective cation channel. The permeability ratio between calcium and cesium was 0.7, pointing to a permeation pore >3.34 Å (ø of cesium). Our experiments thus provide direct evidence for the predicted but not yet measured cold-activated calcium-permeable channel in plants. PMID:17114272

  19. Cyclic GMP evoked calcium transients in olfactory receptor cell growth cones.

    PubMed

    Kafitz, K W; Leinders-Zufall, T; Zufall, F; Greer, C A

    2000-03-20

    Nitric oxide-induced calcium transients in growth cones are believed to be mediated by cyclic nucleotides. Because nitric oxide is thought to influence the development of olfactory receptor cells (ORCs), we have begun to explore the effect of cyclic nucleotides on ORC growth cones. Cultured ORCs were loaded with fluo-3 AM and confocal imaging was employed to monitor calcium transients following cyclic nucleotide-gated channel activation. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP at the growth cone caused transient increases in fluorescence which were restricted to the growth cone and lasted tens of seconds. The signal was abolished by LY83583, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. 8-Bromo-cGMP also inhibited further extension of growth cones. The data indicate that ORC growth cones exhibit cGMP-dependent calcium transients that are consistent with those generated by cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. PMID:10757499

  20. Formalin Evokes Calcium Transients from the Endoplasmatic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J. M.; Soller, Kailey J.; Sauer, Susanne K.; Kalucka, Joanna; Veglia, Gianluigi; Reeh, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    The formalin test is the most widely used behavioral screening test for analgesic compounds. The cellular mechanism of action of formaldehyde, inducing a typically biphasic pain-related behavior in rodents is addressed in this study. The chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 was suggested as primary transducer, but the high concentrations used in the formalin test elicit a similar response in TRPA1 wildtype and knockout animals. Here we show that formaldehyde evokes a dose-dependent calcium release from intracellular stores in mouse sensory neurons and primary keratinocytes as well as in non-neuronal cell lines, and independent of TRPA1. The source of calcium is the endoplasmatic reticulum and inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase has a major contribution. This TRPA1-independent mechanism may underlie formaldehyde-induced pan-neuronal excitation and subsequent inflammation. PMID:25875358

  1. Formalin evokes calcium transients from the endoplasmatic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J M; Soller, Kailey J; Sauer, Susanne K; Kalucka, Joanna; Veglia, Gianluigi; Reeh, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    The formalin test is the most widely used behavioral screening test for analgesic compounds. The cellular mechanism of action of formaldehyde, inducing a typically biphasic pain-related behavior in rodents is addressed in this study. The chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 was suggested as primary transducer, but the high concentrations used in the formalin test elicit a similar response in TRPA1 wildtype and knockout animals. Here we show that formaldehyde evokes a dose-dependent calcium release from intracellular stores in mouse sensory neurons and primary keratinocytes as well as in non-neuronal cell lines, and independent of TRPA1. The source of calcium is the endoplasmatic reticulum and inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase has a major contribution. This TRPA1-independent mechanism may underlie formaldehyde-induced pan-neuronal excitation and subsequent inflammation. PMID:25875358

  2. Application of confocal microscopy on glutamate-induced intracellular calcium transient in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Geng; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Wu, Yuxiang; Luo, Qingming

    2006-02-01

    Intracellular calcium, as an important second messenger, plays a significant role in cell signaling transduction and metabolism. Glutamate can induce the intracellular calcium transient through triggering diverse signaling pathways. To test the effect of glutamate to neurons, we loaded Fluo-3/Am in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and then acquired two-dimensional fluorescent image by confocal microscopy and the analyzed fluorescent intensity. In cultured neurons, we observed two types of neurons that have different morphology: bipolar-type and pyramidal-type. Inducing [Ca 2+] i transient by glutamate, we found the amplitude and time constant of the response curves of bipolar neurons are larger than those of pyramidal neurons. Further, we induced [Ca 2+] ii transient under different concentrations of glutamate. Two different types of kinetic of the [Ca 2+] i transient have been found, corresponded to the two kinds of neuron. The amplitude of [Ca 2+] i transient increased when applying higher concentration of glutamate in pyramidal neurons; while it decreased in bipolar ones. Responses of neurons bathing in calcium-free extracellular solution to glutamate were different from those bathing in normal solution. [Ca 2+] i transient of pyramidal neurons caused by any concentration were totally blocked; while [Ca 2+] i transient in bipolar neurons caused by high concentration of glutamate (500μM) were partly inhibited. All of the phenomena suggest that different types of cultured hippocampal neurons may have different mechanism of the response to glutamate.

  3. Calcium rich transients: tidal detonations of white dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    We propose for a 40 kilosecond TOO observation of a new Ca-rich gap transient. These enigmatic objects, with properties intermediate between those of classical novae and Type Ia supernovae, can be well-explained by tidal detonations of low mass white dwarfs by intermediate mass black holes. In such a case, fall-back accretion of the tidal debris would power an X-ray source for which we propose to search. Because supermassive black holes will swallow white dwarfs whole, a successful outcome to this proposal would both explain the Ca-rich gap transients *and* establish the existence of intermediate mass black holes.

  4. Microdomains bounded by endoplasmic reticulum segregate cell cycle calcium transients in syncytial Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Huw; McDougall, Alex; Whitaker, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Cell cycle calcium signals are generated by the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3)–mediated release of calcium from internal stores (Ciapa, B., D. Pesando, M. Wilding, and M. Whitaker. 1994. Nature. 368:875–878; Groigno, L., and M. Whitaker. 1998. Cell. 92:193–204). The major internal calcium store is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); thus, the spatial organization of the ER during mitosis may be important in shaping and defining calcium signals. In early Drosophila melanogaster embryos, ER surrounds the nucleus and mitotic spindle during mitosis, offering an opportunity to determine whether perinuclear localization of ER conditions calcium signaling during mitosis. We establish that the nuclear divisions in syncytial Drosophila embryos are accompanied by both cortical and nuclear localized calcium transients. Constructs that chelate InsP3 also prevent nuclear division. An analysis of nuclear calcium concentrations demonstrates that they are differentially regulated. These observations demonstrate that mitotic calcium signals in Drosophila embryos are confined to mitotic microdomains and offer an explanation for the apparent absence of detectable global calcium signals during mitosis in some cell types. PMID:16216922

  5. Diffuse dispersive delay and the time convolution/attenuation of transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittner, Burt J.

    1991-01-01

    Test data and analytic evaluations are presented to show that relatively poor 100 KHz shielding of 12 Db can effectively provide an electromagnetic pulse transient reduction of 100 Db. More importantly, several techniques are shown for lightning surge attenuation as an alternative to crowbar, spark gap, or power zener type clipping which simply reflects the surge. A time delay test method is shown which allows CW testing, along with a convolution program to define transient shielding effectivity where the Fourier phase characteristics of the transient are known or can be broadly estimated.

  6. Implications of purinergic receptor-mediated intracellular calcium transients in neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic receptors participate, in almost every cell type, in controlling metabolic activities and many physiological functions including signal transmission, proliferation and differentiation. While most of P2Y receptors induce transient elevations of intracellular calcium concentration by activation of intracellular calcium pools and forward these signals as waves which can also be transmitted into neighboring cells, P2X receptors produce calcium spikes which also include activation of voltage-operating calcium channels. P2Y and P2X receptors induce calcium transients that activate transcription factors responsible for the progress of differentiation through mediators including calmodulin and calcineurin. Expression of P2X2 as well as of P2X7 receptors increases in differentiating neurons and glial cells, respectively. Gene expression silencing assays indicate that these receptors are important for the progress of differentiation and neuronal or glial fate determination. Metabotropic receptors, mostly P2Y1 and P2Y2 subtypes, act on embryonic cells or cells at the neural progenitor stage by inducing proliferation as well as by regulation of neural differentiation through NFAT translocation. The scope of this review is to discuss the roles of purinergic receptor-induced calcium spike and wave activity and its codification in neurodevelopmental and neurodifferentiation processes. PMID:23414261

  7. Computational reconstitution of spine calcium transients from individual proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bartol, Thomas M.; Keller, Daniel X.; Kinney, Justin P.; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Harris, Kristen M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    We have built a stochastic model in the program MCell that simulates Ca2+ transients in spines from the principal molecular components believed to control Ca2+ entry and exit. Proteins, with their kinetic models, are located within two segments of dendrites containing 88 intact spines, centered in a fully reconstructed 6 × 6 × 5 μm3 cube of hippocampal neuropil. Protein components include AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, L- and R-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases, immobile Ca2+ buffers, and calbindin. Kinetic models for each protein were taken from published studies of the isolated proteins in vitro. For simulation of electrical stimuli, the time course of voltage changes in the dendritic spine was generated with the desired stimulus in the program NEURON. Voltage-dependent parameters were then continuously re-adjusted during simulations in MCell to reproduce the effects of the stimulus. Nine parameters of the model were optimized within realistic experimental limits by a process that compared results of simulations to published data. We find that simulations in the optimized model reproduce the timing and amplitude of Ca2+ transients measured experimentally in intact neurons. Thus, we demonstrate that the characteristics of individual isolated proteins determined in vitro can accurately reproduce the dynamics of experimentally measured Ca2+ transients in spines. The model will provide a test bed for exploring the roles of additional proteins that regulate Ca2+ influx into spines and for studying the behavior of protein targets in the spine that are regulated by Ca2+ influx. PMID:26500546

  8. Enhancement of calcium signalling dynamics and stability by delayed modulation of the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Diana M; Hoth, Markus; Lewis, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    In addition to its homeostatic role of maintaining low resting levels of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase (PMCA) may actively contribute to the generation of complex Ca2+ signals. We have investigated the role of the PMCA in shaping Ca2+ signals in Jurkat human leukaemic T cells using single-cell voltage-clamp and calcium-imaging techniques. Crosslinking the T-cell receptor with the monoclonal antibody OKT3 induces a biphasic elevation in [Ca2+]i consisting of a rapid overshoot to a level > 1 μM, followed by a slow decay to a plateau of ≈0.5 μM. A similar overshoot was triggered by a constant level of Ca2+ influx through calcium-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in thapsigargin-treated cells, due to a delayed increase in the rate of Ca2+ clearance by the PMCA. Following a rise in [Ca2+]i, PMCA activity increased in two phases: a rapid increase followed by a further calcium-dependent increase of up to approximately fivefold over 10-60 s, termed modulation. After the return of [Ca2+]i to baseline levels, the PMCA recovered slowly from modulation (τ ≈4 min), effectively retaining a ‘memory’ of the previous [Ca2+]i elevation. Using a Michaelis-Menten model with appropriate corrections for cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering, we found that modulation extended the dynamic range of PMCA activity by increasing both the maximal pump rate and Ca2+ sensitivity (reduction of KM). A simple flux model shows how pump modulation and its reversal produce the initial overshoot of the biphasic [Ca2+]i response. The modulation of PMCA activity enhanced the stability of Ca2+ signalling by adjusting the efflux rate to match influx through CRAC channels, even at high [Ca2+]i levels that saturate the transport sites and would otherwise render the cell defenceless against additional Ca2+ influx. At the same time, the delay in modulation enables small Ca2+ fluxes to transiently elevate [Ca2+]i, thus enhancing Ca2+ signalling dynamics. PMID:12068047

  9. Microscopic heat pulses induce contraction of cardiomyocytes without calcium transients

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Kotaro; Mizuno, Akari; Shintani, Seine A.; Itoh, Hideki; Serizawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Norio; Suzuki, Madoka

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infra-red laser beam generates microscopic heat pulses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat pulses induce contraction of cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca{sup 2+} transients during the contraction were not detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Skinned cardiomyocytes in free Ca{sup 2+} solution also contracted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat pulses regulated the contractions without Ca{sup 2+} dynamics. -- Abstract: It was recently demonstrated that laser irradiation can control the beating of cardiomyocytes and hearts, however, the precise mechanism remains to be clarified. Among the effects induced by laser irradiation on biological tissues, temperature change is one possible effect which can alter physiological functions. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which heat pulses, produced by infra-red laser light under an optical microscope, induce contractions of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that microscopic heat pulses induce contraction of rat adult cardiomyocytes. The temperature increase, {Delta}T, required for inducing contraction of cardiomyocytes was dependent upon the ambient temperature; that is, {Delta}T at physiological temperature was lower than that at room temperature. Ca{sup 2+} transients, which are usually coupled to contraction, were not detected. We confirmed that the contractions of skinned cardiomyocytes were induced by the heat pulses even in free Ca{sup 2+} solution. This heat pulse-induced Ca{sup 2+}-decoupled contraction technique has the potential to stimulate heart and skeletal muscles in a manner different from the conventional electrical stimulations.

  10. Calcium-Voltage Coupling in the Genesis of Early and Delayed Afterdepolarizations in Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Ko, Christopher Y.; Nivala, Michael; Weiss, James N.; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) and delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) are voltage oscillations known to cause cardiac arrhythmias. EADs are mainly driven by voltage oscillations in the repolarizing phase of the action potential (AP), while DADs are driven by spontaneous calcium (Ca) release during diastole. Because voltage and Ca are bidirectionally coupled, they modulate each other’s behaviors, and new AP and Ca cycling dynamics can emerge from this coupling. In this study, we performed computer simulations using an AP model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling incorporating stochastic openings of Ca channels and ryanodine receptors to investigate the effects of Ca-voltage coupling on EAD and DAD dynamics. Simulations were complemented by experiments in mouse ventricular myocytes. We show that: 1) alteration of the Ca transient due to increased ryanodine receptor leakiness and/or sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase activity can either promote or suppress EADs due to the complex effects of Ca on ionic current properties; 2) spontaneous Ca waves also exhibit complex effects on EADs, but cannot induce EADs of significant amplitude without the participation of ICa,L; 3) lengthening AP duration and the occurrence of EADs promote DADs by increasing intracellular Ca loading, and two mechanisms of DADs are identified, i.e., Ca-wave-dependent and Ca-wave-independent; and 4) Ca-voltage coupling promotes complex EAD patterns such as EAD alternans that are not observed for solely voltage-driven EADs. In conclusion, Ca-voltage coupling combined with the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of voltage and Ca cycling play a key role in generating complex EAD and DAD dynamics observed experimentally in cardiac myocytes, whose mechanisms are complex but analyzable. PMID:25902431

  11. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced calcium transient in ovine large luteal cells: II. Modulation of the transient and resting cytosolic free calcium alters progesterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Wegner, J A; Martinez-Zaguilan, R; Gillies, R J; Hoyer, P B

    1991-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) stimulates a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels [( Ca2+]i) in ovine large luteal cells. In the present study, the magnitude of the PGF2 alpha (0.5 microM)-induced calcium transient in Hanks' medium (87 +/- 2 nM increase above resting levels) was reduced (P less than 0.05) but not completely eliminated in fura-2 loaded large luteal cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free or phosphate- and carbonate-free medium (10 +/- 1 nM, 32 +/- 6 nM, above resting levels; respectively). Preincubation for 2 min with 1 mM LaCl3 (calcium antagonist) eliminated the PGF2 alpha-induced calcium transient. The inhibitory effect of PGF2 alpha on secretion of progesterone was reduced in Ca2(+)-free medium or medium plus LaCl3. Resting [Ca2+]i levels and basal secretion of progesterone were both reduced (P less than 0.05) in large cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free medium (27 +/- 4 nM; 70 +/- 6% control, respectively) or with 5 microM 5,5'-dimethyl bis-(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (40 +/- 2 nM; 49 +/- 1% control; respectively). In addition, secretion of progesterone was inhibited (P less than 0.05) by conditions that increased (P less than 0.05) [Ca2+]i; that is LaCl3 ([Ca2+]i, 120 +/- 17 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 8% control) and PGF2 alpha ([Ca2+]i, 102 +/- 10 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 3% control). In small luteal cells, resting [Ca2+]i levels and secretion of progesterone were reduced by incubation in Ca2(+)-free Hanks ([Ca2+]i, 28 +/- 2 nM; progesterone, 71 +/- 6% control), however, neither LaCl3 nor PGF2 alpha increased [Ca2+]i levels or inhibited secretion of progesterone. The findings presented here provide evidence that extracellular as well as intracellular calcium contribute to the PGF2 alpha-induced [Ca2+]i transient in large cells. Furthermore, whereas an adequate level of [Ca2+]i is required to support progesterone production in both small and large cells, optimal progesterone production in

  12. Intracellular calcium in cardiac myocytes: calcium transients measured using fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Cannell, M B; Berlin, J R; Lederer, W J

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of Ca2+ in voltage-clamped cardiac myocytes under resting conditions and during the Ca2+ transient. We find that the resting Ca2+ level in a quiescent rat myocyte bathed in 1 mM extracellular Ca is relatively low (between 60 and 100 nM) and uniform. At the peak of the Ca2+ transient, Ca2+ can rise to a level as high as 600 nM to 1.0 microM. Furthermore, the magnitude of the Ca2+ transient is dependent on the size of the membrane depolarization. There is good agreement between measurements made using video imaging and those made using a photomultiplier tube for the value of intracellular Ca2+ at the peak of the Ca2+ transient and for the subsequent slow changes in intracellular Ca2+. On repolarization, intracellular Ca2+ falls with a half-time of approximately 100 ms. The uniform distribution of Ca2+ reported in the Ca2+ images of myocytes at rest and at the peak of the Ca2+ transient under normal conditions is in contrast to what is observed during "Ca2+ overload" when subcellular regions of elevated Ca2+ are observed to propagate along the cell. Thus, the measurement of [Ca2+]i in cardiac myocytes with fura-2 has already yielded important new information that was not available using other techniques to measure [Ca2+]i in cardiac ventricular muscle. PMID:3505361

  13. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca2+ is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics’s time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ < 0.1s, the normalized autocorrelation functions of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration show damped motion when τ is very short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store. PMID:27121687

  14. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca(2+) is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca(2+) concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics's time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s; (ii) for the case of τ < 0.1s, the normalized autocorrelation functions of cytosolic and calcium store's Ca(2+) concentration show damped motion when τ is very short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store. PMID:27121687

  15. Role of time delay on intracellular calcium dynamics driven by non-Gaussian noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wei-Long; Zeng, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    Effect of time delay (τ) on intracellular calcium dynamics with non-Gaussian noises in transmission processes of intracellular Ca2+ is studied by means of second-order stochastic Runge-Kutta type algorithm. By simulating and analyzing time series, normalized autocorrelation function, and characteristic correlation time of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration, the results exhibit: (i) intracellular calcium dynamics’s time coherence disappears and stability strengthens as τ → 0.1s (ii) for the case of τ < 0.1s, the normalized autocorrelation functions of cytosolic and calcium store’s Ca2+ concentration show damped motion when τ is very short, but they trend to a level line as τ → 0.1s, and for the case of τ > 0.1s, they show different variation as τ increases, the former changes from underdamped motion to a level line, but the latter changes from damped motion to underdamped motion; and (iii) at the moderate value of time delay, reverse resonance occurs both in cytosol and calcium store.

  16. Membrane-proximal calcium transients in stimulated neutrophils detected by total internal reflection fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Omann, G M; Axelrod, D

    1996-01-01

    A novel fluorescence microscope/laser optical system was developed to measure fast transients of membrane-proximal versus bulk cytoplasmic intracellular calcium levels in cells labeled with a fluorescent calcium indicator. The method is based on the rapid chopping of illumination of the cells between optical configurations for epifluorescence, which excites predominantly the bulk intracellular region, and total internal reflection fluorescence, which excites only the region within approximately 100 nm of the cell-substrate contact. This method was applied to Fluo-3-loaded neutrophils that were activated by the chemoattractant N-formyl-met-leu-phe. Chemoattractant-activated cells showed 1) transient increases in both membrane-proximal and bulk cytosolic Ca2+ that peaked simultaneously; 2) a larger fractional change (20-60%) in membrane-proximal Ca2+ relative to bulk cytosolic Ca2+ that peaked at a time when the main Ca2+ transient was decreasing in both regions and that persisted well after the main transient was over. This method should be applicable to a wide variety of cell types and fluorescent ion indicators in which membrane-proximal ionic transients may be different from those deeper within the cytosol. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:8913625

  17. Calcium transients in asymmetrically activated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Trube, G; Lopez, J R; Taylor, S R

    1981-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers of the frog Rana temporaria were held just taut and stimulated transversely by unidirectional electrical fields. We observed the reversible effects of stimulus duration (0.1-100 ms) and strength on action potentials, intracellular Ca2+ transients (monitored by aequorin), and contractile force during fixed-end contractions. Long duration stimuli (e.g., 10 ms) induced a maintained depolarization on the cathodal side of a cell and a maintained hyperpolarization on its anodal side. The hyperpolarization of the side facing the anode prevented the action potential from reaching mechanical threshold during strong stimuli. Variation of the duration or strength of a stimulus changed the luminescent response from a fiber injected with aequorin. Thus, the intracellular Ca2+ released during excitation-contraction coupling could be changed by the stimulus parameters. Prolongation of a stimulus at field strengths above 1.1 x rheobase decreased the amplitude of aequorin signals and the force of contractions. The decreases in aequorin and force signals from a given fiber paralleled one another and depended on the stimulus strength, but not on the stimulus polarity. These changes were completely reversible for stimulus strengths up to at least 4.2 x rheobase. The graded decreases in membrane depolarization, aequorin signals, and contractile force were correlated with the previously described folding of myofibrils in fibers allowed to shorten in response to the application of a long duration stimulus. The changes in aequorin signals and force suggest an absence of myofilament activation by Ca2+ in the section of the fiber closest to the anode. The results imply that injected aequorin distributes circumferentially in frog muscle with a coefficient of at least 10(-7) cm2/s, which is not remarkably different from the previously measured coefficient of 5 x 10(-8) cm2/s for its diffusion lengthwise. PMID:6976801

  18. Transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) reduces calcium permeability in heteromeric channel complexes.

    PubMed

    Storch, Ursula; Forst, Anna-Lena; Philipp, Maximilian; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael

    2012-01-27

    Specific biological roles of the classical transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) are still largely elusive. To investigate the function of TRPC1 proteins in cell physiology, we studied heterologously expressed TRPC1 channels and found that recombinant TRPC1 subunits do not form functional homomeric channels. Instead, by electrophysiological analysis TRPC1 was shown to form functional heteromeric, receptor-operated channel complexes with TRPC3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 indicating that TRPC1 proteins can co-assemble with all members of the TRPC subfamily. In all TRPC1-containing heteromers, TRPC1 subunits significantly decreased calcium permeation. The exchange of select amino acids in the putative pore-forming region of TRPC1 further reduced calcium permeability, suggesting that TRPC1 subunits contribute to the channel pore. In immortalized immature gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons endogenously expressing TRPC1, -2, -5, and -6, down-regulation of TRPC1 resulted in increased calcium permeability and elevated basal cytosolic calcium concentrations. We did not observe any involvement of TRPC1 in store-operated cation influx. Notably, TRPC1 suppressed the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons without affecting cell proliferation. Conversely, in TRPC1 knockdown neurons, specific migratory properties like distance covered, locomotion speed, and directionality were increased. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism relying on the expression of TRPC1 and the subsequent formation of heteromeric TRPC channel complexes with reduced calcium permeability, thereby fine-tuning neuronal migration. PMID:22157757

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 (TRPC1) Reduces Calcium Permeability in Heteromeric Channel Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Ursula; Forst, Anna-Lena; Philipp, Maximilian; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Specific biological roles of the classical transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) are still largely elusive. To investigate the function of TRPC1 proteins in cell physiology, we studied heterologously expressed TRPC1 channels and found that recombinant TRPC1 subunits do not form functional homomeric channels. Instead, by electrophysiological analysis TRPC1 was shown to form functional heteromeric, receptor-operated channel complexes with TRPC3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 indicating that TRPC1 proteins can co-assemble with all members of the TRPC subfamily. In all TRPC1-containing heteromers, TRPC1 subunits significantly decreased calcium permeation. The exchange of select amino acids in the putative pore-forming region of TRPC1 further reduced calcium permeability, suggesting that TRPC1 subunits contribute to the channel pore. In immortalized immature gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons endogenously expressing TRPC1, -2, -5, and -6, down-regulation of TRPC1 resulted in increased calcium permeability and elevated basal cytosolic calcium concentrations. We did not observe any involvement of TRPC1 in store-operated cation influx. Notably, TRPC1 suppressed the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons without affecting cell proliferation. Conversely, in TRPC1 knockdown neurons, specific migratory properties like distance covered, locomotion speed, and directionality were increased. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism relying on the expression of TRPC1 and the subsequent formation of heteromeric TRPC channel complexes with reduced calcium permeability, thereby fine-tuning neuronal migration. PMID:22157757

  20. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  1. Transient electrical coupling delays the onset of chemical neurotransmission at developing synapses.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Theresa M; Faber, Donald S; Zoran, Mark J

    2004-01-01

    The formation and subsequent elimination of electrical coupling between neurons has been demonstrated in many developing vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. The relationship between the disappearance of electrical synaptic connectivity and the appearance of chemical neurotransmission is not well understood. We report here that identified motoneurons from the snail Helisoma formed transient electrical and chemical connections during regeneration both in vivo and in vitro. Electrical connections that formed in vivo were strongest by day 2 and no longer detectable by day 7. During elimination of this electrical connection, an inhibitory chemical connection from 110 onto 19 formed. This sequence of synaptic development was recapitulated in cell culture with a similar time course. The relationship between the appearance of transient electrical coupling and its possible effects on the subsequent chemical synaptogenesis were examined by reducing transient intercellular coupling. Trophic factor-deprived medium resulted in a 66% reduction in coupling coefficient. In these conditions, the unidirectional chemical connection formed readily; in contrast, chemical synaptogenesis was delayed in cell pairs exposed to trophic factors where transient electrical coupling was strong. Dye coupling and synaptic vesicle cycling studies supported electrophysiological results. Exposure to cholinergic antagonists, curare and hexamethonium bromide, which block chemical neurotransmission in these synapses, resulted in prolonged maintenance of the electrical connection. These studies demonstrated an inverse relationship between chemical and electrical connectivity at early stages of synaptic development and suggest a dynamic interaction between these forms of neuronal communication as adult neural networks are constructed or regenerated. PMID:14715944

  2. Transient absorption spectroscopy detection of sensitized delayed fluorescence in chiral benzophenone/naphthalene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2011-10-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate the formation and decay of excited singlet states upon triplet-triplet annihilation, following T-T energy transfer from a selectively excited sensitizer. Thus, upon selective excitation of benzophenone (BZP) by laser flash photolysis (LFP) at λ = 355 nm in the presence of naphthalene (NPT), a negative band centered at 340 nm has been detected, with growth and decay in the microsecond timescale. It has been assigned to the P-type NPT delayed-fluorescence. In the case of chiral BZP/NPT systems, stereodifferentiation has been observed in the kinetics of the involved photophysical processes.

  3. Delayed Serum Calcium Biochemical Response to Successful Parathyroidectomy in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Alabdulkarim, Yousof; Nassif, Edgard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Parathyroidectomy is considered the standard treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism, however, though the onset of biochemical response is variable and is different from one patient to the other. Aim: To evaluate the onset of systemic response and the biochemical normalization of serum calcium levels to a successful surgery. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective fashion, we collected clinical data from 303 patients admitted to our hospital between 2005 and 2008, with a diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism after sestamibi localization. The pathology reports, parathyroidectomy results, the preoperative and postoperative parathormone (PTH) and serum calcium levels were reviewed. Response of each patient to the surgery was studied and all the data were analyzed to determine how fast the serum calcium levels drop. Results: The majority of patients (72.9%, 221/303) showed a decrease in their serum calcium levels to normal values within 48 h. While in 40 patients it took 72 hours and 42 patients (13.8%) had a delayed normalization for more than 72 h. The pathology in the PH group was predominantly of a single adenoma 80.9% vs.19.1 with hyperplasia with a P of 0.03. Preoperative parathyroid hormone PTH elevation was not significantly deferent between the two groups (PH and EN) with a mean of 7.9±5.36 vs. 7.41±14.5 pmol/L respectively with a P of 0.43. Conclusion: The majority of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) respond to parathyroidectomy in the form of normalization of their serum calcium levels and PTH within 48 h; however, a certain group of patients will need more than 3 days. PMID:21814399

  4. Dissociation of Calcium Transients and Force Development following a Change in Stimulation Frequency in Isolated Rabbit Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Haizlip, Kaylan M.; Milani-Nejad, Nima; Varian, Kenneth D.; Slabaugh, Jessica L.; Walton, Shane D.; Gyorke, Sandor; Davis, Jonathan P.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    As the heart transitions from one exercise intensity to another, changes in cardiac output occur, which are modulated by alterations in force development and calcium handling. Although the steady-state force-calcium relationship at various heart rates is well investigated, regulation of these processes during transitions in heart rate is poorly understood. In isolated right ventricular muscle preparations from the rabbit, we investigated the beat-to-beat alterations in force and calcium during the transition from one stimulation frequency to another, using contractile assessments and confocal microscopy. We show that a change in steady-state conditions occurs in multiple phases: a rapid phase, which is characterized by a fast change in force production mirrored by a change in calcium transient amplitude, and a slow phase, which follows the rapid phase and occurs as the muscle proceeds to stabilize at the new frequency. This second/late phase is characterized by a quantitative dissociation between the calcium transient amplitude and developed force. Twitch timing kinetics, such as time to peak tension and 50% relaxation rate, reached steady-state well before force development and calcium transient amplitude. The dynamic relationship between force and calcium upon a switch in stimulation frequency unveils the dynamic involvement of myofilament-based properties in frequency-dependent activation. PMID:25961020

  5. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  6. Transient elevations of cytosolic free calcium retard subsequent apoptosis in neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, M K; Hardwick, S J; Meagher, L C; Savill, J S; Haslett, C

    1993-01-01

    Elevation of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) has been reported to induce apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, in the neutrophil, which undergoes apoptosis constitutively during aging in vitro, activation by inflammatory mediators elevates [Ca2+]i and prolongs lifespan via inhibition of apoptosis. To examine this paradox, we investigated the effects of modulation of [Ca2+]i upon apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro. Calcium ionophores (A23187, ionomycin) retarded apoptosis in neutrophil populations after 20 h (P < 0.001). Conversely, intracellular Ca(2+)-chelation, using bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) acetoxymethyl ester (AM) promoted apoptosis (P < 0.02). W-7 (an inhibitor of calmodulin) also promoted apoptosis (P < 0.05). Measurements of [Ca2+]i, using fura-2, showed (a) increased apoptosis in neutrophil populations was not associated with elevated [Ca2+]i, (b) neutrophils cultured with ionophore at concentrations inhibiting apoptosis exhibited transient (< 1 h) elevations of [Ca2+]i, to levels previously reported with receptor-mediated stimuli, and (c) BAPTA was able to prevent the elevation of [Ca2+]i and the inhibition of apoptosis produced by ionophore. Modulation of apoptosis occurred without alterations in intracellular pH. Thus, in the neutrophil, unlike lymphoid cells, elevation of [Ca2+]i exerts an inhibitory effect upon apoptosis. Furthermore, these data suggest that transient elevation of [Ca2+]i elicits signaling events leading to prolonged inhibition of apoptosis. Images PMID:8392090

  7. Demonstration of negative signal delay with short-duration transient pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, B.

    2011-07-01

    This paper introduces theoretic and experimental analyses of short-duration pulse propagation through a negative group delay (NGD) circuit. The basic analysis method of this electronic circuit operating in baseband and microwave frequencies is investigated. Then, its electrical fundamental characteristics vis-à-vis transient signals are developed. To validate the theoretic concept, planar hybrid devices with one- and two-stage NGD cells were designed, simulated, fabricated and tested. Transient analyses with ultra-wide band (UWB) pulse signals with different widths are realized. Then, experimental results in good agreement with the theoretical predictions were observed. Consequently, group delay going down under -2.5 ns is evidenced in baseband frequency up to 63 MHz with one-stage NGD cell. In time-domain, a Gaussian pulse in advance of about t0 = -1.5 ns or 20% of its half-height time-width was measured. This corresponds to a negative group velocity of about vg = L/t0 = -0.13c (L is the physical length of the tested device and c is light speed in the vacuum). More significant NGD value over 100-MHz bandwidth is stated with two-stage NGD cells. This results in a Gaussian pulse peak advance of about -5 ns (raising a group velocity of about vg = -0.12c) or 31% of its half-height time-width. Finally, some potential applications based on the NGD function are discussed.

  8. Rabbit tendon cells produce MMP-3 in response to fluid flow without significant calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Joanne M; Elfervig-Wall, Michelle K; Tsuzaki, Mari; Herzog, Walter; Banes, Albert J

    2002-03-01

    Forces applied to tendon during movement cause cellular deformation, as well as fluid movement. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that rabbit tendon fibroblasts detect and respond to fluid-induced shear stress. Cells were isolated from the paratenon of the rabbit Achilles tendon and then subjected to fluid flow at 1 dyn/cm(2) for 6h in a specially designed multi-slide flow device. The application of fluid flow led to an increased expression of the collagenase-1 (MMP-1), stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) genes. The release of proMMP-3 into the medium exhibited a dose-response with the level of fluid shear stress. However, not all cells aligned in the direction of flow. In other experiments, the same cells were incubated with the calcium-reactive dye FURA-2 AM, then subjected to laminar fluid flow in a parallel plate flow chamber. The cells did not significantly increase intracellular calcium concentration when exposed to fluid shear stress levels of up to 25 dyn/cm(2). These results show that gene expression in rabbit tendon cells is sensitive to fluid flow, but that signal transduction is not dependent on intracellular calcium transients. The upregulation of the MMP-1, MMP-3 and COX-2 genes shows that fluid flow could be an important mechanical stimulus for tendon remodelling or injury. PMID:11858805

  9. Neuronal damage and calcium accumulation following transient cerebral ischemia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, T.; Inoue, T.; Kato, H.; Kogure, K.; Murakami, M. )

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of neuronal damage following transient cerebral ischemia in the rat model of four-vessel occlusion utilizing light microscopy as well as {sup 45}Ca-autoradiography. Transient ischemia was induced for 30 min. The animals were allowed to survive for 7 d after ischemia. In the animals subjected to ischemia, the most frequently and seriously damaged areas were the paramedian region of hippocampus, the hippocampal CA1 sector, and the dorsolateral part of striatum, followed by the inferior colliculus, the substantia nigra, the frontal cortex, and the thalamus, which were moderate damaged. Furthermore, the cerebellar Purkinje neurons, the hippocampal CA4 sector, the medial geniculate body, and the hippocampal CA3 sector were slightly affected. {sup 45}Ca-autoradiographyic study also revealed calcium accumulation in the identical sites of ischemic neuronal damage, except for the frontal cortex. Regional cerebral blood flow during 10 min of ischemia was severely decreased in selectively vulnerable areas. The blood flow in the medial geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the inferior colliculus, and the cerebellum was less pronounced than that in the selectively vulnerable areas. The present study demonstrates that transient cerebral ischemia can produce significant neuronal damage not only in the selectively vulnerable regions, but also in the brainstem.

  10. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  11. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  12. Seronegative Maternal Ocular Myasthenia Gravis and Delayed Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Townsel, Courtney; Keller, Rebecca; Johnson, Kendall; Hussain, Naveed; Campbell, Winston A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder with fluctuating muscle weakness, divided into generalized and localized (ocular) forms. Maternal antibodies to acetylcholine receptors cross the placenta and may cause transient neonatal myasthenia gravis (TNMG). We present a case of seronegative maternal ocular MG and delayed TNMG. Case A 29-year-old G3P1011 underwent cesarean birth of a male infant who developed oxygen desaturation requiring supplemental oxygen on day of life (DOL) 3. Based on the clinical course and after exclusion of other diagnoses, the infant was diagnosed with TNMG. Infant's condition improved spontaneously and he was weaned off supplemental oxygen and discharged home on DOL 12. Conclusion Infants born to mothers with seronegative localized (ocular) MG are also susceptible to TNMG which may be late in onset. PMID:26989568

  13. Nitric oxide triggers specific and dose-dependent cytosolic calcium transients in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M; Loake, Gary J

    2009-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) transients have been shown to take place in response to diverse developmental and physiological cues. Also, it is involved in biotic and abiotic stress signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule that plays a crucial role in plant growth and development, starting from germination to flowering, ripening of fruit and senescence of organs. Moreover, it plays a pivotal role in several biotic and abiotic stress signaling processes. In the present work, the ability of NO to trigger increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) was investigated. For this purpose, transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings constitutively expressing the luminescent Ca2+-sensitive protein apoaequorin (35S::APOAEQUORIN) was employed. In chemiluminescence and in vivo Ca2+ imaging assays, the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) triggered a strong, instantaneous, reproducible, and dose-dependent rise in [Ca2+]cyt. Moreover, the observed rise in [Ca2+]cyt was shown to be NO-specific and not associated with decomposition products of SNP, as the NO-scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide (C-PTIO) significantly blunted the observed NO-mediated spike in [Ca2+]cyt. Interestingly, preincubation of 35S::APOAEQUORIN Arabidopsis seedlings with the plasma membrane channel blocker lanthanum chloride resulted in partial concentration-dependent blocking of the NO-specific Ca2+ transient. This observation indicates that, in addition to the mobilization of [Ca2+]cyt, as an external source in response to NO treatment, there also exists an appreciable contribution of an as yet unidentified internal pool. PMID:19721746

  14. Rapid dopaminergic and GABAergic modulation of calcium and voltage transients in dendrites of prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Antic, Srdjan D

    2012-01-01

    The physiological responses of dendrites to dopaminergic inputs are poorly understood and controversial. We applied dopamine on one dendritic branch while simultaneously monitoring action potentials (APs) from multiple dendrites using either calcium-sensitive dye, voltage-sensitive dye or both. Dopaminergic suppression of dendritic calcium transients was rapid (<0.5 s) and restricted to the site of dopamine application. Voltage waveforms of backpropagating APs were minimally altered in the same dendrites where dopamine was confirmed to cause large suppression of calcium signals, as determined by dual voltage and calcium imaging. The dopamine effects on dendritic calcium transients were fully mimicked by D1 agonists, partially reduced by D1 antagonist and completely insensitive to protein kinase blockade; consistent with a membrane delimited mechanism. This dopamine effect was unaltered in the presence of L-, R- and T-type calcium channel blockers. The somatic excitability (i.e. AP firing) was not affected by strong dopaminergic stimulation of dendrites. Dopamine and GABA were then sequentially applied on the same dendrite. In contrast to dopamine, the pulses of GABA prohibited AP backpropagation distally from the application site, even in neurons with natural Cl− concentration (patch pipette removed). Thus, the neocortex employs at least two distinct mechanisms (dopamine and GABA) for rapid modulation of dendritic calcium influx. The spatio-temporal pattern of dendritic calcium suppression described in this paper is expected to occur during phasic dopaminergic signalling, when midbrain dopaminergic neurons generate a transient (0.5 s) burst of APs in response to a salient event. PMID:22641784

  15. Small-signal transient response and turn-on delay of polariton laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butté, Raphaël

    2016-03-01

    We present a theoretical description of the small-signal transient response of polariton laser diodes (pol-LDs) based on simplified coupled rate equations describing the exciton reservoir and the ground-state polariton populations. The analytic expressions derived for two pumping geometries, which are valid for all inorganic semiconductors suitable for the realization of pol-LDs, are compared to exact numerical calculations performed for the specific case of GaN-based devices. The two approaches show excellent agreement provided the current step transient remains within the small-signal limit. We report that the temporal attenuation of the envelopes of the oscillations matches half the value of the damping factor ({γ }{{d}}) of the pol-LDs, which is proportional to the square of the oscillation relaxation resonance frequency. An explicit expression for the dependence of {γ }{{d}} on both the exciton-photon detuning and the driving current (equivalently the optical pump power) is also obtained. In a further step, we derive the expression for the turn-on delay (t d) associated with the build-up of the exciton reservoir population up to its threshold value before coherent light emission occurs. We show that t d has the same functional form for the two pumping geometries. It is equal to the effective exciton lifetime ({τ }{x{eff}}) weighted by a logarithmic dependence on the initial and final driving currents. In addition, {τ }{x{eff}} is shown to be approximately equal to the exciton lifetime, which proves to be the main parameter governing the build-up of polariton lasing/condensation. Beyond electrically driven polariton lasers, we highlight that the temporal shape of the transients could also be easily tested by monitoring the time dependence of the output power of optically pumped polariton lasers subjected to a sudden increase in the continuous wave pump power within the small-signal limit.

  16. Psilocybin dose-dependently causes delayed, transient headaches in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Sewell, R. Andrew; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Psilocybin is a well-characterized classic hallucinogen (psychedelic) with a long history of religious use by indigenous cultures, and nonmedical use in modern societies. Although psilocybin is structurally related to migraine medications, and case studies suggest that psilocybin may be efficacious in treatment of cluster headache, little is known about the relationship between psilocybin and headache. Methods This double-blind study examined a broad range of psilocybin doses (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg/70 kg) on headache in 18 healthy participants. Results Psilocybin frequently caused headache, the incidence, duration, and severity of which increased in a dose-dependent manner. All headaches had delayed onset, were transient, and lasted no more than a day after psilocybin administration. Conclusions Possible mechanisms for these observations are discussed, and include induction of delayed headache through nitric oxide release. These data suggest that headache is an adverse event to be expected with the nonmedical use of psilocybin-containing mushrooms as well as the administration of psilocybin in human research. Headaches were neither severe nor disabling, and should not present a barrier to future psilocybin research. PMID:22129843

  17. The neurovascular protection afforded by delayed local hypothermia after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Seo, Minchul; Han, Hyung Soo; Park, Jaechan; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a robust therapeutic tool in experimental stroke models but its clinical applications are limited. Furthermore, optimal conditions for therapeutic hypothermia, such as, temperature and the initiation and duration of cooling must be individualized. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of delayed local hypothermia, administered for 44 hr after 4 hr of reperfusion in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo), using a cooling device that allowed controlled local hypothermia (31 °C) in brain. Histological data revealed that local hypothermia significantly reduced infarct volumes and glial hypertrophic activation. Brain water contents, IgG leakage, and Evans Blue extravasation were notably reduced by local hypothermia. Furthermore, local hypothermia had strong vasculoprotective effects, as determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses for endothelial barrier antigen (EBA), laminin, aquaporin-4, and tight junction proteins in brain. Our data indicate that delayed/prolonged local hypothermia confers neurovascular protection, reduces brain edema, and inhibits inflammatory glial activation, and suggest that hypothermic conservation of vascular structures and functions account for the therapeutic effects of local hypothermia observed in this model of experimental stroke. PMID:23469955

  18. Reorientation of Seedlings in the Earth's Gravitational Field Induces Cytosolic Calcium Transients1

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Trewavas, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    The gravitational field controls plant growth, morphology, and development. However, the underlying transduction mechanisms are not well understood. Much indirect evidence has implicated the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c) as an important factor, but direct evidence for changes in [Ca2+]c is currently lacking. We now have made measurements of [Ca2+]c in groups of young seedlings of Arabidopsis expressing aequorin in the cytoplasm and reconstituted in vivo with cp-coelenterazine, a synthetic high-affinity luminophore. Distinct [Ca2+]c signaling occurs in response to gravistimulation with kinetics very different from [Ca2+]c transients evoked by other mechanical stimuli (e.g. movement and wind). [Ca2+]c changes produced in response to gravistimulation are transient but with a duration of many minutes and dependent on stimulus strength (i.e. the angle of displacement). The auxin transport blockers 2,3,5-tri-iodo benzoic acid and N-(1-naphthyl) phthalamic acid interfere with gravi-induced [Ca2+]c responses and addition of methyl indole-3-acetic acid to whole seedlings induces long-lived [Ca2+]c transients, suggesting that changes in auxin transport may interact with [Ca2+]c. Permanent nonaxial rotation of seedlings on a two-dimensional clinostat, however, produced a sustained elevation of the [Ca2+]c level. This probably reflects permanent displacement of gravity-sensing cellular components and/or disturbance of cytoskeletal tension. It is concluded that [Ca2+]c is part of the gravity transduction mechanism in young Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:12068119

  19. Calcium hydroxide mixed with camphoric p-monochlorophenol or chlorhexidine in delayed tooth replantation.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Carolina Lunardelli; Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Brandini, Daniela Atili; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Luvizuto, Eloá Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Cláudia Letícia Vendrame; Saito, Célia Tomiko Hamada Matida

    2011-11-01

    This study evaluated the repair process after delayed replantation of rat teeth, using calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) mixed with camphorated p-monochlorophenol (CMCP), chlorhexidine 2% (CHX), or saline as temporary root canal dressing to prevent and/or control inflammatory radicular resorption. Thirty Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinos) had their right upper incisor extracted, which was bench-dried for 60 minutes. The dental papilla, the enamel organ, the dental pulp, and the periodontal ligament were removed. The teeth were immersed in 2% acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride solution for 10 minutes. The root canals were dried with absorbent paper cones and divided into 3 groups of 10 animals according to root canal dressing used: group 1: Ca(OH)2 + saline, group 2: Ca(OH)2 + CMCP, and group 3: Ca(OH)2 + CHX 2%. Before replanting, the teeth sockets were irrigated with saline. Histological analysis revealed the presence of inflammatory resorption, replacement resorption, and ankylosis in all 3 groups. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between group 3 and the other groups. The use of Ca(OH)2 mixed with CMCP or CHX did not show an advantage over the use of Ca(OH)2 mixed with saline in preventing and/or controlling inflammatory resorption in delayed replantation of rat teeth. PMID:22067873

  20. Calcium-sensitive and insensitive transient outward current in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, M; Kawano, S

    1989-01-01

    1. A suction pipette whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used to record membrane currents and potentials of isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbit hearts. 2. Transient outward current (Ito) was activated by voltage steps positive to -20 mV, increasing in amplitude with further depolarization to reach a maximum around +70 mV. The current attained its peak within 10 ms and then it inactivated for 100-200 ms. 3. A large portion of Ito still remained after the calcium current (ICa) was blocked when depolarizing pulses were applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz or less. Therefore, this current component is referred to as calcium-insensitive Ito or It. 4. It showed voltage- and time-dependent inactivation similar to that observed in Purkinje fibres and other cardiac preparations. 5. The reversal potential of It depended on external K+ concentration, [K+]o, with a slope of 32 mV per 10-fold change in the presence of a normal [Na+]o (143 mM), while the slope was 48 mV per 10-fold change in low [Na+]o (1.0 mM). 6. It was completely inhibited by 2-4 mM-4-aminopyridine. Ito in the presence of ICa was also partially blocked by 4-aminopyridine and the remainder was abolished by 5 mM-caffeine. 7. The calcium-insensitive and caffeine-sensitive Ito differed in their decay rates as well as in their recovery time courses. The former was predominantly available at a slow pulsing rate, while the latter increased its amplitude with high-frequency depolarization. 8. The caffeine-sensitive Ito was inhibited by a blockade of ICa, by replacing Ca2+ with Sr2+, by external application of ryanodine and by internal application of EGTA. This indicates that the current is calcium-sensitive and is dependent on increased myoplasmic Ca2+ through Ca2+ influx via the sarcolemma and Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The current is therefore designated as IK, Ca. 9. The physiological functions of IK, Ca and It are indicated by their contribution to ventricular repolarization at fast and

  1. Calcium currents and transients of native and heterologously expressed mutant skeletal muscle DHP receptor alpha1 subunits (R528H)

    PubMed

    Jurkat-Rott, K; Uetz, U; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Powell, J; Fontaine, B; Melzer, W; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1998-02-20

    Rabbit cDNA of the alpha1 subunit of the skeletal muscle dihydropyridine (DHP) receptor was functionally expressed in a muscular dysgenesis mouse (mdg) cell line, GLT. L-type calcium currents and transients were recorded for the wild type and a mutant alpha1 subunit carrying an R528H substitution in the supposed voltage sensor of the second channel domain that is linked to a human disease, hypokalemic periodic paralysis. L-type channels expressed in GLT myotubes exhibited currents similar to those described for primary cultured mdg cells injected with rabbit wild type cDNA, indicating this system to be useful for functional studies of heterologous DHP receptors. Voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation of L-type calcium currents from mutant and wild type channels did not differ significantly. Intracellular calcium release activation measured by fura-2 microfluorimetry was not grossly altered by the mutation either. Analogous measurements on myotubes of three human R528H carriers revealed calcium transients comparable to controls while the voltage dependence of both activation and inactivation of the L-type current showed a shift to more negative potentials of approximately 6 mV. Similar effects on the voltage dependence of the fast T-type current and changes in the expression level of the third-type calcium current point to factors not primarily associated with the mutation perhaps participating in disease pathogenesis. PMID:9512357

  2. The Transient Role for Calcium and Vitamin D during the Developmental Hair Follicle Cycle.

    PubMed

    Mady, Leila J; Ajibade, Dare V; Hsaio, Connie; Teichert, Arnaud; Fong, Chak; Wang, Yongmei; Christakos, Sylvia; Bikle, Daniel D

    2016-07-01

    The role for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and/or calcium in hair follicle cycling is not clear despite their impact on keratinocyte differentiation. We found that calbindin-D9k null (knockout) pups generated from calbindin-D9k knockout females fed a vitamin D-deficient, low-calcium (0.47%) diet develop transient alopecia. The pups appear phenotypically normal until 13 days of age, after which the hair progressively sheds in a caudocephalic direction, resulting in truncal alopecia totalis by 20-23 days, with spontaneous recovery by 28 days. Histological studies showed markedly dystrophic hair follicles, loss of hair shafts with increased apoptosis, and hyperplastic epidermis during this time. Ha1 expression is lost during catagen in all mice but recovers more slowly in the knockout pups on the vitamin D-deficient, low-calcium diet. Keratin 1 expression is reduced throughout days 19-28. The expressions of involucrin, loricrin, and cathepsin L is initially increased by day 19 but subsequently falls below those of controls by day 23, as does that of desmoglein 3. Feeding the mothers a high-vitamin D/high-calcium (2%)/lactose (20%) diet lessens the phenotype, and knockout pups fostered to mothers fed a normal diet do not develop alopecia. Our results show that in calbindin-D9k knockout pups, a maternal vitamin D-deficient/low-calcium diet leads to transient noncicatricial alopecia. PMID:26994969

  3. Calcium currents in rat thalamocortical relay neurones: kinetic properties of the transient, low-threshold current.

    PubMed

    Coulter, D A; Huguenard, J R; Prince, D A

    1989-07-01

    1. Calcium currents were recorded with whole-cell voltage-clamp procedures in relay neurones of the rat thalamus which had been acutely isolated by an enzymatic dissociation procedure. 2. Low-threshold and high-threshold Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing voltage steps from holding potentials more negative than -60 mV. A transient current, analogous to the T-current in sensory neurones, was activated at low threshold near -65 mV and was completely inactivating at command steps up to -35 mV. Voltage steps to more depolarized levels activated a high-threshold current that inactivated slowly and incompletely during a 200 ms step depolarization. 3. The high-threshold current contained both non-inactivating and slowly inactivating components which were insensitive and sensitive to holding potential, respectively. 4. A 'T-type' current was prominent in relay neurones, in both absolute terms (350 pA peak current average) and in relation to high-threshold currents. The average ratio of maximum transient to maximum sustained current was greater than 2. 5. T-current could be modelled in a manner analogous to that employed for the fast Na+ current underlying action potential generation, using the m3h format. The rate of activation of T-current was voltage dependent, with a time constant (tau m) varying between 8 and 2 ms at command potentials of -60 to -10 mV at 23 degrees C. The rate of inactivation was also voltage dependent, and the time constant tau h varied between 50 and 20 ms over the same voltage range. With command potentials more positive than -35 mV, the inactivation of Ca2+ current could no longer be fitted by a single exponential. 6. Steady-state inactivation of T-current could be well fitted by a Boltzman equation with slope factor of 6.3 and half-inactivated voltage of -83.5 mV. 7. Recovery from inactivation of T-current was not exponential. The major component of recovery (70-80% of total) was not very voltage sensitive at potentials more negative

  4. Calcium currents in rat thalamocortical relay neurones: kinetic properties of the transient, low-threshold current.

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, D A; Huguenard, J R; Prince, D A

    1989-01-01

    1. Calcium currents were recorded with whole-cell voltage-clamp procedures in relay neurones of the rat thalamus which had been acutely isolated by an enzymatic dissociation procedure. 2. Low-threshold and high-threshold Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing voltage steps from holding potentials more negative than -60 mV. A transient current, analogous to the T-current in sensory neurones, was activated at low threshold near -65 mV and was completely inactivating at command steps up to -35 mV. Voltage steps to more depolarized levels activated a high-threshold current that inactivated slowly and incompletely during a 200 ms step depolarization. 3. The high-threshold current contained both non-inactivating and slowly inactivating components which were insensitive and sensitive to holding potential, respectively. 4. A 'T-type' current was prominent in relay neurones, in both absolute terms (350 pA peak current average) and in relation to high-threshold currents. The average ratio of maximum transient to maximum sustained current was greater than 2. 5. T-current could be modelled in a manner analogous to that employed for the fast Na+ current underlying action potential generation, using the m3h format. The rate of activation of T-current was voltage dependent, with a time constant (tau m) varying between 8 and 2 ms at command potentials of -60 to -10 mV at 23 degrees C. The rate of inactivation was also voltage dependent, and the time constant tau h varied between 50 and 20 ms over the same voltage range. With command potentials more positive than -35 mV, the inactivation of Ca2+ current could no longer be fitted by a single exponential. 6. Steady-state inactivation of T-current could be well fitted by a Boltzman equation with slope factor of 6.3 and half-inactivated voltage of -83.5 mV. 7. Recovery from inactivation of T-current was not exponential. The major component of recovery (70-80% of total) was not very voltage sensitive at potentials more negative

  5. Long-term transients and complex dynamics of a stage-structured population with time delay and the Allee effect.

    PubMed

    Morozov, A Yu; Banerjee, M; Petrovskii, S V

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, mathematical modeling in population ecology is mainly focused on asymptotic behavior of the model, i.e. as given by the system attractors. Recently, however, transient regimes and especially long-term transients have been recognized as playing a crucial role in the dynamics of ecosystems. In particular, long-term transients are a potential explanation of ecological regime shifts, when an apparently healthy population suddenly collapses and goes extinct. In this paper, we show that the interplay between delay in maturation and a strong Allee effect can result in long-term transients in a single species system. We first derive a simple 'conceptual' model of the population dynamics that incorporates both a strong Allee effect and maturation delay. Unlike much of the previous work, our approach is not empirical since our model is derived from basic principles. We show that the model exhibits a high complexity in its asymptotic dynamics including multi-periodic and chaotic attractors. We then show the existence of long-term transient dynamics in the system, when the population size oscillates for a long time between locally stable stationary states before it eventually settles either at the persistence equilibrium or goes extinct. The parametric space of the model is found to have a complex structure with the basins of attraction corresponding to the persistence and extinction states being of a complicated shape. This impedes the prediction of the eventual fate of the population, as a small variation in the maturation delay or the initial population size can either bring the population to extinction or ensure its persistence. PMID:26921467

  6. Mapping calcium transients in the dendrites of Purkinje cells from the guinea-pig cerebellum in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, W N; Werman, R

    1987-01-01

    1. A 10 X 10 photodiode array was used to detect stimulation-dependent absorbance changes simultaneously from many positions in the dendrite field of guinea-pig Purkinje cells which had been injected with the calcium indicator Arsenazo III in thin cerebellar slices. Signals from each element of the array were matched to positions on the cells by mapping them onto fluorescence photographs of Lucifer Yellow which had been co-injected into the cells with the Arsenazo III. 2. In response to intrasomatic stimulation the rising phase of the absorbance signals corresponded in time with the calcium spikes recorded with an intracellular electrode. There was no increase in absorbance during bursts of fast sodium spikes. Absorbance signals persisted after the sodium spikes were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX). In addition, the signals were largest at 660 nm and small signals of opposite polarity were found at 540 nm. These results indicate that the absorbance signals came from calcium entry into the cell resulting from the turning on of voltage-dependent calcium conductances. 3. In these experiments signals were usually seen all over the dendritic field and were weak or totally absent over the soma. In some cases signals were seen over a more restricted area. With a spatial resolution of 25 microns we were not able to see any evidence for highly localized sites of calcium entry. 4. Sometimes the rising phase of the calcium signals was separated by almost 13 ms in different parts of the dendritic field, too long to be explained by active propagation delay. This suggests that calcium spikes causing these signals can be evoked separately in different regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic field by long-lasting potentials which may reach local threshold at different times. 5. Calcium signals resulting from slow plateau after-potentials and the calcium spikes produced by them were also detected in all locations in the dendritic field. The relative distribution of amplitudes from

  7. Delay-Induced Transient Increase and Heterogeneity in Gene Expression in Negatively Auto-Regulated Gene Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Maithreye, R.; Sarkar, Ram Rup; Parnaik, Veena K.; Sinha, Somdatta

    2008-01-01

    A generic feature in all intracellular biochemical processes is the time required to complete the whole sequence of reactions to yield any observable quantity-from gene expression to circadian rhythms. This widespread phenomenon points towards the importance of time delay in biological functions. Theoretically time delay is known to be the source of instability, and has been attributed to lead to oscillations or transient dynamics in several biological functions. Negative feedback loops, common in biochemical pathways, have been shown to provide stability and withstand considerable variations and random perturbations of biochemical parameters. The interaction of these two opposing factors-of instability and homeostasis-are features that are widespread in intracellular processes. To test the effect of these divergent forces in the dynamics of gene expression, we have designed and constructed simple negatively auto-regulated gene circuits consisting of a basic regulator and transcriptional repressor module, and compared it with one, which has delayed repression. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that delayed repression induces transient increase and heterogeneity in gene expression before the gain of stability effected by the negative feedback. This design, therefore, seems to be suitable for conferring both stability and variability in cells required for adaptive response to a noisy environment. PMID:18698420

  8. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  9. Psoriasis is characterized by deficient negative immune regulation compared to transient delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G

    2015-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that causes delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in human skin, and is used as a topical therapeutic for alopecia areata, warts, and cutaneous melanoma metastases.  We examined peak DTH reactions induced by DPCP (3 days post-challenge) by comprehensive gene expression and histological analysis.  To better understand how these DTH reactions naturally resolve, we compared our DPCP biopsies to those from patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic inflammatory disease that does not resolve.  By both microarray and qRT-PCR, we found that psoriasis lesional skin has significantly lower expression of many negative immune regulators compared to peak DPCP reactions.  These regulators include: interleukin-10, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated 4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death 1 (PD1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PDL2), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1).  Their decreased expression was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry.  To more completely determine the balance of positive vs. negative immune regulators in both DPCP reactions and psoriasis, we developed one comprehensive gene list for positive regulatory (inflammatory) genes, and another for negative regulatory (immunosuppressive) genes, through Gene Ontology terms and literature review.  With this approach, we found that DPCP reactions have a higher ratio of negative to positive regulatory genes (both in terms of quantity and expression levels) than psoriasis lesional skin.  These data suggest that the disease chronicity that distinguishes psoriasis from transient DTH reactions may be related to absence of negative immune regulatory pathways, and induction of these is therefore of therapeutic interest.  Further study of these negative regulatory mechanisms that are present in DPCP reactions, but not in psoriasis, could reveal novel players in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation.  The DPCP system

  10. Psoriasis is characterized by deficient negative immune regulation compared to transient delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Nicholas; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that causes delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in human skin, and is used as a topical therapeutic for alopecia areata, warts, and cutaneous melanoma metastases.  We examined peak DTH reactions induced by DPCP (3 days post-challenge) by comprehensive gene expression and histological analysis.  To better understand how these DTH reactions naturally resolve, we compared our DPCP biopsies to those from patients with psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic inflammatory disease that does not resolve.  By both microarray and qRT-PCR, we found that psoriasis lesional skin has significantly lower expression of many negative immune regulators compared to peak DPCP reactions.  These regulators include: interleukin-10, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated 4 (CTLA4), programmed cell death 1 (PD1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PDL1), programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (PDL2), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1).  Their decreased expression was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemistry.  To more completely determine the balance of positive vs. negative immune regulators in both DPCP reactions and psoriasis, we developed one comprehensive gene list for positive regulatory (inflammatory) genes, and another for negative regulatory (immunosuppressive) genes, through Gene Ontology terms and literature review.  With this approach, we found that DPCP reactions have a higher ratio of negative to positive regulatory genes (both in terms of quantity and expression levels) than psoriasis lesional skin.  These data suggest that the disease chronicity that distinguishes psoriasis from transient DTH reactions may be related to absence of negative immune regulatory pathways, and induction of these is therefore of therapeutic interest.  Further study of these negative regulatory mechanisms that are present in DPCP reactions, but not in psoriasis, could reveal novel players in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation.  The DPCP system

  11. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium. PMID:10490972

  12. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  13. Micropatterning C2C12 myotubes for orderly recording of intracellular calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuzo; Wagatsuma, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of skeletal muscle myotubes in vitro using myogenic cell lines have been widely carried out to study functional properties and disease-related biological changes of myotubes, such as intracellular calcium dynamics. However, the analysis of biological signals in isolated single myotubes or interactions among several myotubes is quite difficult problem because of the randomness in size, morphology and orientation of differentiated myotubes cultured on a conventional tissue culture dish. In the present study, we attempted to form uniform-size myotubes and detect intracellular calcium dynamics from the fabricated myotubes. We modified surfaces of culture dishes using a poly(-dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp and a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer solution to form line patterns for myotube formation. We could form uniform-size and -orientation C2C12 myotubes and detect intracellular calcium dynamics from it. This simple method would be a useful for studying properties in myotubes with specific sizes and morphologies. PMID:24111271

  14. RNA editing of the human serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptor delays agonist-stimulated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Price, R D; Sanders-Bush, E

    2000-10-01

    RNA encoding the human 5-HT(2C) receptor undergoes adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing events at five positions in the putative second intracellular loop, with a corresponding reduction in receptor/G-protein coupling. Agonist-stimulated calcium release was examined in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts stably expressing the nonedited human INI (hINI) or the edited hVSV or hVGV variants. We hypothesized that different receptor isoforms would show altered dynamics of agonist-induced calcium release. The three isoforms showed a rightward shift in agonist concentration-response curves for eliciting calcium release (EC(50) values: hINI, 2.2 nM; hVSV, 15 nM; hVGV, 49 nM). Additionally, the hVGV receptor showed a blunted and delayed [Ca(2+)](i) peak compared with the hINI or hVSV receptor isoforms. These distinctions in agonist-induced [Ca(2+)](i) release imply that edited 5-HT(2C) receptors may produce distinct physiological responses within the central nervous system. PMID:10999958

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  16. The cytosolic calcium transient modulates the action potential of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    duBell, W H; Boyett, M R; Spurgeon, H A; Talo, A; Stern, M D; Lakatta, E G

    1991-01-01

    1. The modulation of the action potential by the cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai2+) transient was studied in single isolated rat ventricular myocytes loaded with the acetoxymethyl ester form of the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Indo-1. Stimulation following rest and exposure to ryanodine were used to change the amount of Ca2+ released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and thus the size of the Cai2+ transient. The Cai2+ transient was measured as the change, upon stimulation, in the ratio of Indo-1 fluorescence at 410 nm to that at 490 nm (410/490) and action potentials or membrane currents were recorded using patch-type microelectrodes. 2. When stimulation was initiated following rest, the magnitude of the Cai2+ transient decreased in a beat-dependent manner until a steady state was reached. The negative staircase in the Cai2+ transient was accompanied by a similar beat-dependent decrease in the duration of the action potential, manifested primarily as a gradual loss of the action potential plateau (approximately -45 mV). A slow terminal phase of repolarization of a few millivolts in amplitude was found to parallel the terminal decay of the Cai2+ transient. 3. The terminal portion of phase-plane loops of membrane potential (Vm) vs. Indo-1 ratio from all of the beats of a stimulus train followed a common linear trajectory even though the individual beats differed markedly in the duration and amplitude of the action potential and Cai2+ transient. 4. When the stimulation dependence of the Cai2+ transient was titrated away with submaximal exposure to ryanodine, the stimulation-dependent changes in the action potential plateau and terminal phase of repolarization were also eliminated. The same effect was noted in cells which, fortuitously, did not show a staircase in the Cai2+ transient following a period of rest. 5. When action potentials were triggered immediately following spontaneous release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which results in a small depolarization at the

  17. [Nongenomic action and mechanism of 17β-estradiol in cytosolic calcium concentration in delayed implantation mouse endometrial stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Yue, Li-Min; Zhang, Jin-Hu; Tian, Ji-Mei; He, Ya-Ping

    2008-04-25

    To investigate the existence of nongenomic action of 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in the delayed implantation mouse endometrial stromal cells, the changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and the upstream of calcium signal in vitro were detected. The experiment was composed of two parts. Firstly, the change in [Ca(2+)](i) in endometrial stromal cells induced by E(2) under different conditions was detected. The mice were divided into 6 groups as follows: 0.1% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) control group, 1×10(-8) mol/L bovine serum albumin (BSA) control group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) conjugated with BSA (E(2)-BSA) group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) + calcium-free medium group, 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) + 5 mg/mL tamoxifen group, with 4 mice in each group. The endometrial tissue was obtained from delayed implantation mice at pregnant day 7, and digested by incubation of tissue minces in Hankos balanced salts (HBSS, pH 7.2), which contained glucose (1 g/L), and collagenase I (0.125%), for 1 h at 37 degrees C. The stromal cells were preloaded with 2.5 mmol/L Fluo-3/AM, a fluorescent probe of calcium, for 30 min. A confocal laser scanning microscope, which fixed the wave length of excitation and emission at 488 nm and 526 nm, respectively, was used to detect the change in [Ca(2+)](i). Secondly, the mechanism of E(2) effects in endometrial stromal cells was investigated. Immunofluorescent method was used to detect the change in phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) before and after the stromal cells were treated with E(2) for 5 min, 15 min, and 30 min. Seven delayed implantation mice were used. The results were as follows. [Ca(2+)](i) increased immediately and reached the maximum at 15 min after the stromal cells were treated with 1×10(-8) mol/L E(2) and returned to the normal level at 30 min. In E(2)-BSA group and E(2) + calcium-free medium group the same results were obtained as that in E(2) group, but there was no increase of [Ca(2+)](i) in

  18. Calcium regulation by temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in human uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Derckx, Raissa; Reinach, Peter S; Garreis, Fabian; Böhm, Arina; Schmelzer, Lisa; Skosyrski, Sergej; Ramesh, Niraja; Abdelmessih, Suzette; Polat, Onur Kerem; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Riechardt, Aline Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is both the most common and fatal intraocular cancer among adults worldwide. As with all types of neoplasia, changes in Ca(2+) channel regulation can contribute to the onset and progression of this pathological condition. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) are two different types of Ca(2+) permeation pathways that can be dysregulated during neoplasia. We determined in malignant human UM and healthy uvea and four different UM cell lines whether there is gene and functional expression of TRP subtypes and CB1 since they could serve as drug targets to either prevent or inhibit initiation and progression of UM. RT-PCR, Ca(2+) transients, immunohistochemistry and planar patch-clamp analysis probed for their gene expression and functional activity, respectively. In UM cells, TRPV1 and TRPM8 gene expression was identified. Capsaicin (CAP), menthol or icilin induced Ca(2+) transients as well as changes in ion current behavior characteristic of TRPV1 and TRPM8 expression. Such effects were blocked with either La(3+), capsazepine (CPZ) or BCTC. TRPA1 and CB1 are highly expressed in human uvea, but TRPA1 is not expressed in all UM cell lines. In UM cells, the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-2, induced Ca(2+) transients, which were suppressed by La(3+) and CPZ whereas CAP-induced Ca(2+) transients could also be suppressed by CB1 activation. Identification of functional TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1 and CB1 expression in these tissues may provide novel drug targets for treatment of this aggressive neoplastic disease. PMID:24084605

  19. Controlling pulse delay by light and low magnetic fields: slow light in emerald induced by transient spectral hole-burning.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rajitha Papukutty; Riesen, Hans; Rebane, Aleksander

    2013-11-15

    Slow light based on transient spectral hole-burning is reported for emerald, Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18):Cr(3+). Experiments were conducted in π polarization on the R(1)(± 3/2) line (E2 ← A(2)4) at 2.2 K in zero field and low magnetic fields B||c. The hole width was strongly dependent on B||c, and this allowed us to smoothly tune the pulse delay from 40 to 154 ns between zero field and B||c = 15.2 mT. The latter corresponds to a group velocity of 16 km/s. Slow light in conjunction with a linear filter theory can be used as a powerful and accurate technique in time-resolved spectroscopy, e.g., to determine spectral hole-widths as a function of time. PMID:24322070

  20. Alcohol delays the emergence of the fetal elicited startle response, but only transiently.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Peter G; Dornan, James C; Lynch, Catherine; Maguire, Jennifer F

    2012-08-20

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol may exert a significant detrimental effect on the functioning of the individual's brain, however few studies have examined this before birth. This longitudinal study examined the effect of maternal alcohol consumption on the elicited startle response of the fetus. Two groups of fetuses were examined: one whose mothers drank alcohol (approximately 10 units per week); the other whose mothers did not drink alcohol. Fetuses were examined at 29, 32 and 35 weeks gestation and their startle response observed using ultrasound in response to 2 presentations of a pink noise (70-250Hz) at 90dB(A) separated by 30s. Fetuses exposed to alcohol exhibited a weaker startle response at 29 weeks gestation than did fetuses not exposed to alcohol. There was no difference in the response at 32 and 35 weeks gestation. To ensure that the effects were not due to a more general effect of alcohol on fetal movement, a second experiment compared the spontaneous movements (observed on ultrasound for 45 min) of fetuses whose mothers drank alcohol and fetuses of mothers who didn't drink alcohol. There were no differences in movements exhibited by the fetuses. The results suggest that exposure to alcohol delays the emergence of the elicited startle response at 29 weeks gestation but this delay has disappeared by 32 weeks gestation. The possible role of altered neural development, acute exposure to alcohol and disruptions to the fetus's behavioural repertoire, in mediating these effects are discussed. PMID:22691707

  1. Ginkgo biloba Prevents Transient Global Ischemia-Induced Delayed Hippocampal Neuronal Death Through Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tulsulkar, Jatin; Shah, Zahoor A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported neuroprotective properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in transient and permanent mouse models of brain ischemia. In a quest to extend our studies on EGB 761 and its constituents further, we used a model of transient global ischemia induced delayed hippocampal neuronal death and inflammation. Mice pretreated with different test drugs for 7 days were subjected to eight-minute bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (tBCCAO) at day 8. After 7 days of reperfusion, mice brains were dissected out for TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry. In-situ detection of fragmented DNA (TUNEL staining) showed that out of all test drugs, only EGb 761 (13.6% ± 3.2) pretreatment protected neurons in the hippocampus against global ischemia (vs. vehicle, 85.1% ± 9.9; p < 0.05). Immunofluorescence-based studies demonstrated that pretreatment with EGb 761 upregulated the expression levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as compared to the vehicle group. In addition, increased number of activated astrocytes and microglia in the vehicle group was observed to be significantly lower in the EGb 761 pretreated group. Together, these results suggest that EGb 761 is a multifunctional neuroprotective agent, and the protection is in part associated with activation of the HO1/Nrf2 pathway, upregulation of VEGF and downregulation of inflammatory mediators such as astrocytes and microglia. PMID:23228346

  2. Total-body calcium estimated by delayed gamma neutron activation analysis and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Aloia, J F; Ma, R; Vaswani, A; Feuerman, M

    1999-01-01

    Total body calcium (TBCa) in 270 black and white women age 21-79 years was measured concurrently by delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (DGNA) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The mean value for TBCa calculated from DXA was 933 g compared with 730 g for DGNA. By regression, TBCa(DXA(g)) = 1.35 x TBCa(DGNA(g)) -54 (r = 0. 90, r(2) = 81.4%, SEE = 66.9 g). This remarkable difference of 203 g suggests that one or both these methods is not accurate. Adjustment of the regression of DXA versus DGNA for body mass index or trunk thickness explained 8.5-10% of the variability between methods. The unadjusted slope for the DXA values regressed against the DGNA values was 1.35, indicating significant discordance between the methods. There is greater agreement between the two DGNA facilities (Brookhaven National Laboratory and Baylor College of Medicine) and between the various DXA instruments. Either DGNA underestimates TBCa or DXA overestimates total-body bone mineral content. Resolution of these disparate results may possibly be achieved by concurrent measurement of whole human cadavers of different sizes with chemical determination of the calcium content of the ash. In the interim, cross-calibration equations between DGNA and standardized values for DXA for total-body bone mineral content may be used, which will permit reporting of consistent values for TBCa from the two technologies. PMID:10663353

  3. The neuroprotective effects of gamma-vinyl GABA in transient global ischemia: a morphological study with early and delayed evaluations.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, A; Murabit, M A; Kanthan, R; Howlett, W; Wishart, T

    1996-02-01

    Enhancing inhibitory mechanisms has been shown to improve neuronal survival after transient focal or global ischemia. In most studies, histological evaluations have been confined to the CA1 region of the hippocampus up to 7 days after an ischemic insult. We have previously shown that continuous intra-ventricular infusion of gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG) results in significant protection after cerebral ischemia. This present study was designed to assess histological and behavioral function at 7 and 28 days after a single 5 min ischemic episode in gerbils. One set of animals received the medication 30 min before the insult and the other set at 1 h after the insult. Evaluation at 7 days showed significant protection in most regions of the brain in both the pre- and post-ischemic treated animals in comparison to the controls. Delayed evaluation at 28 days showed significant protection only in the pre-ischemic treated animals. Behavioral testing with Morris water maze showed no differences in either pre- or post-ischemic treated animals when compared to saline-treated ischemic controls. Our study clearly demonstrates the usefulness of delayed evaluation in the assessment of 'true' neuronal protection. Pre-ischemic treated animals showed persistent and true neuronal protection, in contrast to a temporary protection as seen at 7 days in the post-ischemic treated animals. The lack of behavioral improvement in the pre- and post-ischemic treated animals suggests that morphological protection alone cannot be considered as the sole criterion for successful outcome. PMID:8929963

  4. Novel features on the regulation by mitochondria of calcium and secretion transients in chromaffin cells challenged with acetylcholine at 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Caricati‐Neto, Afonso; Padín, Juan‐Fernando; Silva‐Junior, Edilson‐Dantas; Fernández‐Morales, José‐Carlos; de Diego, Antonio‐Miguel G.; Jurkiewicz, Aron; García, Antonio G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract From experiments performed at room temperature, we know that the buffering of Ca2+ by mitochondria contributes to the shaping of the bulk cytosolic calcium transient ([Ca2+]c) and secretion transients of chromaffin cells stimulated with depolarizing pulses. We also know that the mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters and the release of catecholamine are faster at 37°C with respect to room temperature. Therefore, we planned this investigation to gain further insight into the contribution of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering to the shaping of [Ca2+]c and catecholamine release transients, using some novel experimental conditions that have not been yet explored namely: (1) perifusion of bovine chromaffin cells (BCCs) with saline at 37°C and their repeated challenging with the physiological neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh); (2) separate blockade of mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (mCUP) with Ru360 or the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (mNCX) with CGP37157; (3) full blockade of the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling (mCC) by the simultaneous inhibition of the mCUP and the mNCX. Ru360 caused a pronounced delay of [Ca2+]c clearance and augmented secretion. In contrast, CGP37157 only caused a tiny delay of [Ca2+]c clearance and a mild decrease in secretion. The mCC resulting in continued Ca2+ uptake and its release back into the cytosol was interrupted by combined Ru360 + CGP37157 (Ru/CGP), the protonophore carbonyl cyanide‐p‐trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, or combined oligomycin + rotenone (O/R); these three treatments caused a mild but sustained elevation of basal [Ca2+]c that, however, was not accompanied by a parallel increase in basal secretion. Nevertheless, all treatments caused a pronounced augmentation of ACh‐induced secretion, with minor changes of the ACh‐induced [Ca2+]c transients. Combined Ru/CGP did not alter the resting membrane potential in current‐clamped cells. Additionally, Ru/CGP did not increase basal [Ca2+]c near subplasmalemmal sites and caused a

  5. Transient CD4+ T Cell Depletion Results in Delayed Development of Functional Vaccine-Elicited Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Bricault, Christine A.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Larocca, Rafael A.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Seaman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently demonstrated that CD4+ T cell help is required at the time of adenovirus (Ad) vector immunization for the development of functional CD8+ T cell responses, but the temporal requirement for CD4+ T cell help for the induction of antibody responses remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that induction of antibody responses in C57BL/6 mice can occur at a time displaced from the time of Ad vector immunization by depletion of CD4+ T cells. Transient depletion of CD4+ T cells at the time of immunization delays the development of antigen-specific antibody responses but does not permanently impair their development or induce tolerance against the transgene. Upon CD4+ T cell recovery, transgene-specific serum IgG antibody titers develop and reach a concentration equivalent to that in undepleted control animals. These delayed antibody responses exhibit no functional defects with regard to isotype, functional avidity, expansion after boosting immunization, or the capacity to neutralize a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Env-expressing pseudovirus. The development of this delayed transgene-specific antibody response is temporally linked to the expansion of de novo antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses, which develop after transient depletion of CD4+ T cells. These data demonstrate that functional vaccine-elicited antibody responses can be induced even if CD4+ T cell help is provided at a time markedly separated from the time of vaccination. IMPORTANCE CD4+ T cells have a critical role in providing positive help signals to B cells, which promote robust antibody responses. The paradigm is that helper signals must be provided immediately upon antigen exposure, and their absence results in tolerance against the antigen. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to the current model that the absence of CD4+ T cell help at priming results in long-term antibody nonresponsiveness, antibody responses can be induced by adenovirus vector immunization or alum

  6. Simultaneous measurement of calcium transients and motion in cultured heart cells.

    PubMed

    Peeters, G A; Hlady, V; Bridge, J H; Barry, W H

    1987-12-01

    The fluorescent Ca2+ probe indo-1 is a new intracellular Ca2+ concentration [( Ca2+]i) indicator that may be suitable for measurement of [Ca2+]i transients in intact heart cells. We exposed spontaneously contracting cultured chick embryo ventricular cells (37 degrees C) to the membrane-permeable indo-1-acetoxymethyl ester (indo-1 AM). Indo-1 loading was associated with a decrease in the amplitude of contraction measured with a video motion detector, but contractility returned to control levels during a subsequent 30-min wash. Analysis of emission spectra of dye obtained by digitonin permeabilization of cells loaded in indo-1 AM showed that the active intracellular dye was not pure indo-1 but probably includes partially deesterified molecules. With the use of an inverted X40 objective epifluorescence system, washed cells containing indo-1 were excited at 360 nm, and fluorescence intensity was measured at 410 nm (increases with increasing [Ca2+]) and 480 nm (decreases with increasing [Ca2+]). Calibration of the [Ca2+]i signals, reflected by the ratio of 410 to 480 nm fluorescence, was achieved by use of ethylen-glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)-Ca2+ buffered solutions containing the nonfluorescent Ca2+ ionophore Bromo-A23187. Average end-diastolic and peak-systolic [Ca2+]i were 328 +/- 32 and 813 +/- 72 nM (means +/- SE, n = 8). The onset of the [Ca2+]i transient preceded motion by 27 +/- 5 ms (means +/- SE, n = 4), but generally resembled the motion signals in contour. These findings indicate that indo-1 may be used to detect [Ca2+]i transients in isolated ventricular cells without causing significant alterations in mechanical performance. PMID:3122589

  7. GFP Facilitates Native Purification of Recombinant Perlucin Derivatives and Delays the Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Eva; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2012-01-01

    Insolubility is one of the possible functions of proteins involved in biomineralization, which often limits their native purification. This becomes a major problem especially when recombinant expression systems are required to obtain larger amounts. For example, the mollusc shell provides a rich source of unconventional proteins, which can interfere in manifold ways with different mineral phases and interfaces. Therefore, the relevance of such proteins for biotechnological processes is still in its infancy. Here we report a simple and reproducible purification procedure for a GFP-tagged lectin involved in biomineralization, originally isolated from mother-of-pearl in abalone shells. An optimization of E. coli host cell culture conditions was the key to obtain reasonable yields and high degrees of purity by using simple one-step affinity chromatography. We identified a dual functional role for the GFP domain when it became part of a mineralizing system in vitro. First, the GFP domain improved the solubility of an otherwise insoluble protein, in this case recombinant perlucin derivatives. Second, GFP inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation in a concentration dependent manner. This was demonstrated here using a simple bulk assay over a time period of 400 seconds. At concentrations of 2 µg/ml and higher, the inhibitory effect was observed predominantly for HCO3− as the first ionic interaction partner, but not necessarily for Ca2+. The interference of GFP-tagged perlucin derivatives with the precipitation of calcium carbonate generated different types of GFP-fluorescent composite calcite crystals. GFP-tagging offers therefore a genetically tunable tool to gently modify mechanical and optical properties of synthetic biocomposite minerals. PMID:23056388

  8. GFP facilitates native purification of recombinant perlucin derivatives and delays the precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Weber, Eva; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2012-01-01

    Insolubility is one of the possible functions of proteins involved in biomineralization, which often limits their native purification. This becomes a major problem especially when recombinant expression systems are required to obtain larger amounts. For example, the mollusc shell provides a rich source of unconventional proteins, which can interfere in manifold ways with different mineral phases and interfaces. Therefore, the relevance of such proteins for biotechnological processes is still in its infancy. Here we report a simple and reproducible purification procedure for a GFP-tagged lectin involved in biomineralization, originally isolated from mother-of-pearl in abalone shells. An optimization of E. coli host cell culture conditions was the key to obtain reasonable yields and high degrees of purity by using simple one-step affinity chromatography. We identified a dual functional role for the GFP domain when it became part of a mineralizing system in vitro. First, the GFP domain improved the solubility of an otherwise insoluble protein, in this case recombinant perlucin derivatives. Second, GFP inhibited calcium carbonate precipitation in a concentration dependent manner. This was demonstrated here using a simple bulk assay over a time period of 400 seconds. At concentrations of 2 µg/ml and higher, the inhibitory effect was observed predominantly for HCO(3) (-) as the first ionic interaction partner, but not necessarily for Ca(2+). The interference of GFP-tagged perlucin derivatives with the precipitation of calcium carbonate generated different types of GFP-fluorescent composite calcite crystals. GFP-tagging offers therefore a genetically tunable tool to gently modify mechanical and optical properties of synthetic biocomposite minerals. PMID:23056388

  9. Neurally Evoked Calcium Transients in Terminal Schwann Cells at the Neuromuscular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reist, Noreen E.; Smith, Stephen J.

    1992-08-01

    We examined the effects of motor-nerve stimulation on the intracellular Ca2+ levels of Schwann cells, the glial cells at the frog neuromuscular junction. Schwann cells, which were loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and examined by confocal microscopy, showed a transient increase in free Ca2+ within a few seconds of the onset of tetanic stimulation of the motor nerve. The Ca2+ response was specific to the synapse in that it was found in the terminal Schwann cells at the junction but not in the myelinating Schwann cells along the axon. The Ca2+ transients occurred in the presence of d-tubocurare, indicating that they were not mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and recurred when the stimulus was repeated. The Ca2+ response persisted after degeneration of the postsynaptic muscle fiber, demonstrating that the terminal Schwann cell was stimulated directly by presynaptic activity. The finding that terminal Schwann cells at the neuromuscular junction respond to presynaptic activity suggests that glial-cell function is modulated by synaptic transmission.

  10. TRPV channel-mediated calcium transients in nociceptor neurons are dispensable for avoidance behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Lindy, Amanda S.; Parekh, Puja K.; Zhu, Richard; Kanju, Patrick; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Tsvilovskyy, Volodymyr; Patterson, Randen L.; Anishkin, Andriy; van Rossum, Damian B.; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Animals need to sense and react to potentially dangerous environments. TRP ion channels participate in nociception, presumably via Ca2+ influx, in most animal species. However, the relationship between ion permeation and animals’ nocifensive behaviour is unknown. Here we use an invertebrate animal model with relevance for mammalian pain. We analyse the putative selectivity filter of OSM-9, a TRPV channel, in osmotic avoidance behaviour of Caenorhabditis elegans. Using mutagenized OSM-9 expressed in the head nociceptor neuron, ASH, we study nocifensive behaviour and Ca2+ influx. Within the selectivity filter, M601-F609, Y604G strongly reduces avoidance behaviour and eliminates Ca2+ transients. Y604F also abolishes Ca2+ transients in ASH, while sustaining avoidance behaviour, yet it disrupts behavioral plasticity. Homology modelling of the OSM-9 pore suggests that Y604 may assume a scaffolding role. Thus, aromatic residues in the OSM-9 selectivity filter are critical for pain behaviour and ion permeation. These findings have relevance for understanding evolutionary roots of mammalian nociception. PMID:25178952

  11. Milrinone enhances cytosolic calcium transient and contraction in rat cardiac myocytes during beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, S; Ferroni, C; Spurgeon, H A; Capogrossi, M C

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism that underlies the absence of a positive inotropic effect of milrinone on rat myocardium. The twitch characteristics of enzymatically dissociated left ventricular myocytes from the adult rat and guinea pig were assessed by edge tracking during field stimulation. In some rat myocytes loaded with the ester derivative of the Ca2+ probe Indo-1 we simultaneously measured changes in cell length and in the associated cytosolic Ca2+ (Cai) transient. Our results show that in guinea pig myocytes bathed in 0.5 mM [Ca2+] and field stimulated at 1 Hz, milrinone (10 microM) had a positive inotropic effect. In contrast milrinone had no effect on the contractile properties of rat myocytes studied under similar conditions and field stimulated at 0.2 Hz. In rat myocytes bathed in 0.5 mM [Ca2+] and stimulated at 0.2 Hz isoproterenol (1 nM) increased the amplitude and shortened the duration of the contraction and of the associated Cai transient; these effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation were further enhanced by the addition of milrinone (10 microM) in the presence of isoproterenol. Under conditions of higher cell Ca2+ loading achieved by raising bathing [Ca2+] to 1 mM and isoproterenol to 3 nM the positive inotropic effect of milrinone (10 microM) in rat myocytes saturated when spontaneous oscillatory Ca2+ release appeared in the diastolic intervals between electrically stimulated twitches. Our results suggest that an enhancement in the baseline beta-adrenergic stimulation is required for milrinone to exercise a positive inotropic action on rat myocardial tissue. PMID:2576017

  12. Calibration of the Brookhaven National Laboratory delayed gamma neutron activation facility to measure total body calcium.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Stamatelatos, I E; Yasumura, S

    2000-05-01

    Differences in body size and shape can cause large variances in the in vivo results of neutron activation analysis. To introduce corrections for body size for the delayed gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, "reference man"-sized and "reference woman"-sized phantoms were constructed. Simulation results using the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport code also provided correction factors for people of different sizes. For individuals with a body mass index (BMI = weight (kg)/height (m)2) between 20 and 30, no correction was required. At BMIs greater than 30, the effects of neutron attenuation were significant and a correction factor of CF = -0.0192 x BMI + 1.5635 can be applied. PMID:10865727

  13. Myofilament calcium sensitization delays decompensated hypertrophy differently between the sexes following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Shioura, Krystyna M.; Farjah, Mariam; Geenen, David L.; Solaro, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Contractile dysfunction is common to many forms of cardiovascular disease. Approaches directed at enhancing cardiac contractility at the level of the myofilaments during heart failure (HF) may provide a means to improve overall cardiovascular function. We are interested in gender-based differences in cardiac function and the effect of sarcomere activation agents that increase contractility. Thus, we studied the effect of gender and time on integrated arterial-ventricular function (A-V relationship) following myocardial infarction (MI). In addition, transgenic mice that overexpress the slow skeletal troponin I isoform were used to determine the impact of increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity following MI. Based on pressure-volume (P-V) loop measurements, we used derived parameters of cardiovascular function to reveal the effects of sex, time, and increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity among groups of post-MI mice. Analysis of the A-V relationship revealed that the initial increase was similar between the sexes, but the vascular unloading of the heart served to delay the decompensated stage in females. Conversely, the vascular response at 6 and 10 wk post-MI in males contributed to the continuous decline in cardiovascular function. Increasing the myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity appeared to provide sufficient contractile support to improve contractile function in both male and female transgenic mice. However, the improved contractile function was more beneficial in males as the concurrent vascular response contributed to a delayed decompensated stage in female transgenic mice post-MI. This study represents a quantitative approach to integrating the vascular-ventricular relationship to provide meaningful and diagnostic value following MI. Consequently, the data provide a basis for understanding how the A-V relationship is coupled between males and females and the enhanced ability of the cardiovascular system to tolerate pathophysiological stresses associated with HF in

  14. Forced-exercise delays neuropathic pain in experimental diabetes: effects on voltage-activated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S; Stubbs, Evan B

    2011-07-01

    Physical exercise produces a variety of psychophysical effects, including altered pain perception. Elevated levels of centrally produced endorphins or endocannabinoids are implicated as mediators of exercise-induced analgesia. The effect of exercise on the development and persistence of disease-associated acute/chronic pain remains unclear. In this study, we quantified the physiological consequence of forced-exercise on the development of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain. Euglycemic control or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic adult male rats were subdivided into sedentary or forced-exercised (2-10 weeks, treadmill) subgroups and assessed for changes in tactile responsiveness. Two weeks following STZ-treatment, sedentary rats developed a marked and sustained hypersensitivity to von Frey tactile stimulation. By comparison, STZ-treated diabetic rats undergoing forced-exercise exhibited a 4-week delay in the onset of tactile hypersensitivity that was independent of glucose control. Exercise-facilitated analgesia in diabetic rats was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by naloxone. Small-diameter (< 30 μm) DRG neurons harvested from STZ-treated tactile hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited an enhanced (2.5-fold) rightward (depolarizing) shift in peak high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) current density with a concomitant appearance of a low-voltage activated (LVA) Ca(2+) current component. LVA Ca(2+) currents present in DRG neurons from hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited a marked depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation. Forced-exercise attenuated diabetes-associated changes in HVA Ca(2+) current density while preventing the depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation of LVA Ca(2+) currents. Forced-exercise markedly delays the onset of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain, in part, by attenuating associated changes in HVA and LVA Ca(2+) channel function within small-diameter DRG neurons possibly by altering opioidergic tone. PMID:21554321

  15. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; Appel, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  16. Live cell imaging using confocal microscopy induces intracellular calcium transients and cell death.

    PubMed

    Knight, Martin M; Roberts, Susan R; Lee, David A; Bader, Dan L

    2003-04-01

    Isolated chondrocytes stained with fluo 4-AM and visualized using standard confocal microscopy techniques exhibited Ca2- transients and oscillations. Decreasing the power of the laser light decreased the percent-age of cells exhibiting these Ca2+ signals. Treatment with the antioxidant ascorbate reduced the Ca2+ response, suggesting that it was mediated by light-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell viability 24 h after the 1-h confocal imaging period was approximately 90% for cells that were neither fluorescently stained nor subjected to laser excitation. By contrast, fluorescently stained cells imaged for 1 h exhibited greatly reduced viability. Treatment with ascorbate reduced the level of cell death, suggesting that the effect was mediated by release of exogenous ROS associated with the interaction of light and the fluorochrome. Ca2+ oscillations were not always associated with cell death, suggesting that separate light-sensitive pathways mediate the two processes. Light-activated Ca2+ signaling may trigger alterations in numerous cell processes and thereby represent an important and hitherto overlooked artifact in fluorescent microscopy of viable cells. PMID:12661552

  17. The atrazine metabolite diaminochlorotriazine suppresses LH release from murine LβT2 cells by suppressing GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Gregory P.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Hanneman, William H.

    2013-01-01

    The primary metabolite of the herbicide atrazine (ATRA), diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), has been suggested to cause disruption in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) release. DACT is a reactive electrophile known to form covalent protein adducts both in vitro and in vivo following ATRA exposure and maybe targeting proteins involved in GnRH-induced calcium signaling and subsequent LH release. To test this hypothesis, LβT2 pituitary cells were exposed to 300 μM DACT for 24 hrs and examined by fluorescence microscopy for GnRH-induced changes in intracellular calcium and LH release. LβT2 cells exposed to DACT had markedly diminished GnRH-induced intracellular calcium transients and a significant decreased LH release in response to GnRH. DACT appeared to cause a selective decrease in caffeine-sensitive ryanodine receptor-operated calcium stores in LβT2 cells, rather than in thapsigargin-sensitive ER calcium stores. This sensitivity correlated with the formation of covalent protein adducts by DACT, as determined by mass spectrometry. ERp57 was identified by mass spectrometry as a target of DACT adduction in the ER that could potentially mediate the effects of DACT on inhibition of GnRH-induced calcium signaling and inhibition of LH release. Intracellular calcium responses to GnRH and release of LH were restored in DACT-treated cells with the addition of a calcium ionophore (A23187). These data suggest that DACT forms adducts on proteins involved in calcium handling within the ER and that dysfunction in this critical signaling system is associated with loss of normal sensitivity to GnRH and subsequent decreased release of LH. PMID:24052811

  18. Single event transient modeling and mitigation techniques for mixed-signal delay locked loop (DLL) and clock circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, Pierre

    The purpose of this PhD work has been to investigate, model, test, develop and provide hardening techniques and guidelines for the mitigation of single event transients (SETs) in analog mixed-signal (AMS) delay locked loops (DLLs) for radiation-hardened applications. Delay-locked-loops (DLLs) are circuit substructures that are present in complex ASIC and system-on-a-chip designs. These circuits are widely used in on-chip clock distribution systems to reduce clock skew, to reduce jitter noise, and to recover clock signals at regional points within a global clock distribution system. DLLs are critical to the performance of many clock distribution systems, and in turn, the overall performance of the associated integrated system; as such, complex systems often employ multiple DLLs for clock deskew and distribution tasks. In radiation environments such as on-orbit, these critical circuits represent at-risk points of malfunction for large sections of integrated circuits due to vulnerabilities to radiation-generated transients (i.e. single event transients) that fan out across the system. The analysis of single event effects in analog DLLs has shown that each DLL sub-circuit primitive is vulnerable to single event transients. However, we have identified the voltage controlled delay line (VCDL) sub-circuit as the most sensitive to radiation-induced single event effects generating missing clock pulses that increase with the operating frequency of the circuit. This vulnerability increases with multiple instantiation of DLLs as clock distribution nodes throughout an integrated system on a chip. To our knowledge, no complete work in the rad-hard community regarding the hardening of mixed-signal DLLs against single event effects (missing pulses) has been developed. Most of the work present in the literature applies the "brute force" and well-established digital technique of triple modular redundancy (TMR) to the digital subcomponents. We have developed two novel design

  19. Mesenchymal stromal cells transiently alter the inflammatory milieu post-transplant to delay graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Melinda E.; Turner, Brie E.; Sinfield, Laura J.; Kollar, Katarina; Cullup, Hannah; Waterhouse, Nigel J.; Hart, Derek N.J.; Atkinson, Kerry; Rice, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells suppress T-cell function in vitro, a property that has underpinned their use in treating clinical steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However the potential of mesenchymal stromal cells to resolve graft-versus-host disease is confounded by a paucity of pre-clinical data delineating their immunomodulatory effects in vivo. Design and Methods We examined the influence of timing and dose of donor-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on the kinetics of graft-versus-host disease in two murine models of graft-versus-host disease (major histocompatibility complex-mismatched: UBI-GFP/BL6 [H-2b]→BALB/c [H-2d] and the sibling transplant mimic, UBI-GFP/BL6 [H-2b]→BALB.B [H-2b]) using clinically relevant conditioning regimens. We also examined the effect of mesenchymal stromal cell infusion on bone marrow and spleen cellular composition and cytokine secretion in transplant recipients. Results Despite T-cell suppression in vitro, mesenchymal stromal cells delayed but did not prevent graft-versus-host disease in the major histocompatibility complex-mismatched model. In the sibling transplant model, however, 30% of mesenchymal stromal cell-treated mice did not develop graft-versus-host disease. The timing of administration and dose of the mesenchymal stromal cells influenced their effectiveness in attenuating graft-versus-host disease, such that a low dose of mesenchymal stromal cells administered early was more effective than a high dose of mesenchymal stromal cells given late. Compared to control-treated mice, mesenchymal stromal cell-treated mice had significant reductions in serum and splenic interferon-γ, an important mediator of graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Mesenchymal stromal cells appear to delay death from graft-versus-host disease by transiently altering the inflammatory milieu and reducing levels of interferon-γ. Our data suggest that both the

  20. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  1. Efficient entry of cell-penetrating peptide nona-arginine into adherent cells involves a transient increase in intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Melikov, Kamran; Hara, Ann; Yamoah, Kwabena; Zaitseva, Elena; Zaitsev, Eugene; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of entry of cationic peptides such as nona-arginine (R9) into cells remains an important challenge to their use as efficient drug-delivery vehicles. At nanomolar to low micromolar R9 concentrations and at physiological temperature, peptide entry involves endocytosis. In contrast, at a concentration ≥10 μM, R9 induces a very effective non-endocytic entry pathway specific for cationic peptides. We found that a similar entry pathway is induced at 1–2 μM concentrations of R9 if peptide application is accompanied by a rapid temperature drop to 15°C. Both at physiological and at sub-physiological temperatures, this entry mechanism was inhibited by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool. Intriguingly, we found that R9 at 10–20 μM and 37°C induces repetitive spikes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This Ca2+ signalling correlated with the efficiency of the peptide entry. Pre-loading cells with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid) inhibited both Ca2+ spikes and peptide entry, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ precedes and is required for peptide entry. One of the hallmarks of Ca2+ signalling is a transient cell-surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), a lipid normally residing only in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Blocking the accessible PS with the PS-binding domain of lactadherin strongly inhibited non-endocytic R9 entry, suggesting the importance of PS externalization in this process. To conclude, we uncovered a novel mechanistic link between calcium signalling and entry of cationic peptides. This finding will enhance our understanding of the properties of plasma membrane and guide development of future drug-delivery vehicles. PMID:26272944

  2. Transient Growth Theory Prediction of Optimal Placing of Passive and Active Flow Control Devices for Separation Delay in LPT Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Skan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point. At very low Reynolds numbers, there is a possibility to enhance the transient energy growth by means of wall cooling.

  3. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae. I. Electrically-induced intracellular calcium transient and protein release during the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Yu, X C; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The present study was designed to compare the cardiac actions of the extract and individual components, tetrandrine (Tet) and fangchinoline (Fan), of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST). We measured the electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient in single rat ventricular myocytes and protein release following perfusion with a Ca2+ free solution (the Ca2+ paradox) from the isolated perfused rat heart, both of which are known to relate to Ca2+ influx. We found that Tet inhibited both electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient and protein release during the Ca2+ paradox, while Fan had no significant effects. The RST extract containing 9% Tet and 6% Fan by weight also affected the [Ca2+]i transient, and was only slightly, though significantly, less effective/potent than Tet alone. On the other hand, RST extract had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on protein release during the Ca2+ paradox than Tet alone. The observations suggest that the RST extract, which contains a mixture of components, may have more potent effects in the heart than its main active component. PMID:11432451

  4. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  5. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1(G93A) mouse lumbar motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Katharina A; Lamano, Jonathan B; Samuels, Julienne; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca(2+) entry was investigated using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11) motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca(2+) Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including (1) dye filling and laser penetration, (2) dendritic anatomy, and (3) the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca(2+) Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca(2+) transients (area under the curve) from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 h (data thereafter was dropped). However, Ca(2+) transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca(2+) signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca(2+) channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca(2+) transients in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca(2+) transients, but these transients are smaller overall in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons. PMID:25914627

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection of Host Epithelial Cells via Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transiently Induces Calcium Release from Intracellular Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Räth, Susann; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) that interacts in a human-specific manner with the ectodomain of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) produced by respiratory epithelial cells. This interaction promotes bacterial colonization and bacterial internalization by initiating host signal transduction cascades. Here, we examined alterations of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels in epithelial cells during host cell infections with pneumococci via the PspC-hpIgR mechanism. The release of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores in host cells was significantly increased by wild-type pneumococci but not by PspC-deficient pneumococci. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on phospholipase C as pretreatment of cells with a phospholipase C-specific inhibitor U73122 abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we demonstrated the effect of [Ca2+]i on pneumococcal internalization by epithelial cells. Uptake of pneumococci was significantly increased after pretreatment of epithelial cells with the cell-permeable calcium chelator 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid-tetraacetoxymethyl ester or use of EGTA as an extracellular Ca2+-chelating agent. In contrast, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase, which increases [Ca2+]i in a sustained fashion, significantly reduced pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, pneumococcal adherence to pIgR-expressing cells was not altered in the presence of inhibitors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that pneumococcal infections induce mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores. This may constitute a defense response of host cells as the experimental reduction of intracellular calcium levels facilitates pneumococcal internalization by pIgR-expressing cells, whereas elevated calcium levels diminished bacterial internalization by host epithelial

  7. Role of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in the regulation of calcium transients in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zheng; Zhang, Heping; Lin, Na; Kang, Man; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Li, Chen; Xu, Pingxiang; Wu, Yongquan; Luo, Dali

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the regulatory effect of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) on the basal Ca(2+) transients in cardiomyocytes. In cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) at different densities, we used confocal microscopy to assess the effect of IP3Rs on the endogenous spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations through specific activation of IP3Rs with myo-IP3 hexakis (butyryloxymethyl) ester (IP3BM), a membrane permeable IP3, and interference of IP3R expression with shRNA. We found that NRVMs at the monolayer state displayed coordinated Ca(2+) transients with less rate, shorter duration, and higher amplitude compared to single NRVMs. In addition, monolayer NRVMs exhibited 4 or 10 times more increased Ca(2+) transients in response to phenylephrine, an α-adrenergic receptor agonist, or IP3BM than single NRVMs did, while the transient pattern remained unaltered, suggesting that the sensitivity of intracellular Ca(2+) response to IP3R activation is different between single and monolayer NRVMs. However, interference of IP3R expression with shRNA reduced the frequency and amplitude of the spontaneous Ca(2+) fluctuates similarly in both densities of NRVMs, resembling the effects of ryanodine receptor inhibition by ryanodine or tetracaine. Our findings suggest that IP3Rs are involved, in part, in the regulation of native Ca(2+) transients, in profiles of their initiation and Ca(2+) release extent, in developing cardiomyocytes. In addition, caution should be paid in evaluating the behavior of Ca(2+) signaling in primary cultured cardiomyocytes at different densities. PMID:25242084

  8. Free-calcium and force transients during depolarization and pharmacomechanical coupling in guinea-pig smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Himpens, B; Somlyo, A P

    1988-01-01

    1. Fura2 was loaded by permeation and hydrolysis of the acetoxymethyl ester into smooth muscle cells of intact thin sheets of the longitudinal layer of the small intestine of the guinea-pig, to record Ca2+ transients during contraction. 2. Cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) was monitored by computing the ratio of the fluorescence signal excited at 340 and 380 nm wavelengths. The dye loading and the exposure to UV light required for the experiments had no significant effect on the contractile parameters observed. 3. Spontaneous, rhythmic increases in [Ca2+]i were often observed, preceding the onset of force. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ caused a very transient increase in [Ca2+]i accompanied by a phasic force transient; this was followed by a decline in [Ca2+]i and tension below control levels. Elevated Ca2+ from 1.2 to 15 mM also caused a fall in [Ca2+]i and a relaxation of basal tension. 4. Elevation of [K+]o increased [Ca2+]i. Graded concentrations of K+ caused graded changes in both fluorescence ratio and tension. 5. Carbachol evoked a transient increase in [Ca2+]i and contraction. Thereafter, in spite of the continued presence of the drug, both signals declined, presumably as the result of cholinergic desensitization. The initial phasic force response to carbachol was usually followed by an 'after-contraction', that was only occasionally accompanied by a similar (small) secondary rise in the fluorescence signal. 6. In depolarized smooth muscle, both in the presence and in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, carbachol induced a transient increase in [Ca2+]i, indicating that Ca2+ release from intracellular stores is a major mechanism of pharmacomechanical coupling. 7. In some preparations an applied stretch caused, after a few seconds, a rise in [Ca2+]i and force development. PMID:3137325

  9. Calcium channels in PDGF-stimulated A172 cells open after intracellular calcium release and are not voltage-dependent.

    PubMed

    Szöllösi, J; Feuerstein, B G; Vereb, G; Pershadsingh, H A; Marton, L J

    1991-07-01

    Using laser image cytometry and Indo-1 fluorescence, we investigated the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of confluent A172 human glioblastoma cells stimulated by the BB homodimer of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). The shape of the calcium transients and the delay time between stimulation and the beginning of the transient varied considerably. The percentage of responsive cells, the peak [Ca2+]i and the duration of the response were directly related to PDGF-BB dose, while the delay time was inversely related; the maximal response occurred at a PDGF-BB concentration of 20 ng/ml. Studies with EGTA and inorganic calcium-channel blockers (Ni2+, La3+) showed that the increase of [Ca2+]i resulted from initial release of intracellular stores and subsequent calcium influx across the plasma membrane. Opening of calcium channels in the plasma membrane, monitored directly by studying Mn2+ quenching of Indo-1 fluorescence, was stimulated by PDGF-BB and blocked by La3+; the opening occurred 55 +/- 10 s after the initial increase in [Ca2+]i. Therefore, in these tumor cells, intracellular release always occurs before channel opening in the plasma membrane. Depolarization of cells with high extracellular [K+] did not generally induce calcium transients but did decrease calcium influx. L-type calcium-channel blockers (verapamil, nifedipine, and diltiazem) had little or no effect on the calcium influx induced by PDGF-BB. These results indicate that PDGF-BB induces calcium influx by a mechanism independent of voltage-sensitive calcium channels in A172 human glioblastoma cells. PMID:1657394

  10. Use-dependent effects of the class III antiarrhythmic agent NE-10064 (azimilide) on cardiac repolarization: block of delayed rectifier potassium and L-type calcium currents.

    PubMed

    Fermini, B; Jurkiewicz, N K; Jow, B; Guinosso, P J; Baskin, E P; Lynch, J J; Salata, J J

    1995-08-01

    We studied the effects of NE-10064 (azimilide), a new antiarrhythmic agent reported to be a selective blocker of the slowly activating component of the delayed rectifier, IKs. In ferret papillary muscles, NE-10064 increased effective refractory period (ERP) and decreased isometric twitch tension in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-30 microM). Increases in ERP showed reverse use-dependence, and were greater at 1 than at 3 Hz. In contrast, changes in tension were use dependent, with larger decreases observed at 3 than at 1 Hz. In guinea pig ventricular myocytes, NE-10064 (0.3-3 microM) significantly prolonged action potential duration (APD) at 1 Hz. At 3 Hz, NE-10064 (0.3-1 microM) increased APD only slightly, and at 10 microM decreased APD and the plateau potential. NE-10064 potently blocked the rapidly activating component of the delayed rectifier, IKr (IC50 0.4 microM), and inhibited IKs (IC50 3 microM) with nearly 10-fold less potency. NE-10064 (10 microM) did not block the inward rectifier potassium current (IKl). NE-10064 (10 microM) blocked the L-type calcium current (ICa) in a use-dependent manner; block was greater at 3 than at 1 Hz. We conclude that (a) NE-10064's block of potassium currents is relatively selective for IKr over IKs, (b) NE-10064 inhibits ICa in a use-dependent fashion, and (c) NE-10064's effects on ERP and tension in papillary muscle as well as APD and action potential plateau level in myocytes may be explained by its potassium and calcium channel blocking properties. PMID:7475051

  11. Delayed postnatal loss of P/Q type calcium channels recapitulates the absence epilepsy, dyskinesia, and ataxia phenotypes of genomic Cacna1A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Melanie D.; Maejima, Takashi; Kuckelsberg, Denise; Yoo, Jong W.; Hyde, Robert A.; Shah, Viral; Gutierrez, Davina; Moreno, Rosa L.; Kruse, Wolfgang; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Herlitze, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Inherited loss of P/Q-type calcium channel function causes human absence epilepsy, episodic dyskinesia, and ataxia, but the molecular ‘birthdate’ of the neurological syndrome and its dependence on prenatal pathophysiology is unknown. Since these channels mediate transmitter release at synapses throughout the brain and are expressed early in embryonic development, delineating the critical circuitry and onset underlying each of the emergent phenotypes requires targeted control of gene expression. To visualize P/Q-type Ca2+ channels and dissect their role in neuronal networks at distinct developmental stages, we created a novel conditional Cacna1a knock-in mouse by inserting the floxed GFP derivative Citrine into the first exon of Cacna1a, then crossing it with a postnatally expressing PCP2-Cre line for delayed Purkinje cell (PC) gene deletion within the cerebellum and sparsely in forebrain (purky). PCs in purky mice lacked P/Q-type calcium channel protein and currents within the first month after birth, displayed altered spontaneous firing, and showed impaired neurotransmission. Unexpectedly, adult purky mice exhibited the full spectrum of neurological deficits seen in mice with genomic Cacna1a ablation. Our results show that the ataxia, dyskinesia and absence epilepsy due to inherited disorders of the P/Q-type channel arise from signaling defects beginning in late infancy, revealing an early window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21411672

  12. Analysis of the healing process in delayed tooth replantation after root canal filling with calcium hydroxide, Sealapex and Endofill: a microscopic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Negri, Márcia Regina; Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos; Saito, Célia Tomiko Matida Hamata

    2008-12-01

    The major concern in the therapeutics of tooth replantation refers to the occurrence of root resorption and different approaches have been proposed to prevent or treat these complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tissue response to delayed replantation of anterior rat teeth treated endodontically using calcium hydroxide, Sealapex, and Endofill without the placement of gutta-percha cones. Thirty rats had their right upper incisor extracted and maintained in dry storage for 60 min. After removal of the dental papilla, enamel organ, pulp tissue, and periodontal ligament remnants, the teeth were immersed in 2% sodium fluoride phosphate acidulated, pH 5.5, for 10 min. The root canals were dried with absorbent paper points and the teeth were assigned to three groups (n = 10) according to the filling material. Group I - calcium hydroxide and propyleneglycol paste, Group II - Sealapex, and Group III - Endofill. The sockets were irrigated with saline and the teeth were replanted. Replacement resorption, inflammatory resorption and ankylosis were observed in all groups. Although the occurrence of inflammatory resorption was less frequent in Group I, there were no statistically significant differences among the groups. It may be concluded that compared to the paste, filling the root canals with Sealapex and Endofill sealers without the placement of gutta-percha cones did not provide better results. PMID:19021658

  13. SKF-96365 activates cytoprotective autophagy to delay apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of the calcium/CaMKIIγ/AKT-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing; Yao, Junlin; Xie, Jiansheng; Jiang, Liming; Zhou, Yubin; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2016-03-28

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) inhibitors are emerging as an attractive new generation of anti-cancer drugs. Here, we report that SKF-96365, an SOCE inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-neoplastic activity by inducing cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. In the meantime, SKF-96365 also induces cytoprotective autophagy to delay apoptosis by preventing the release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. Mechanistically, SKF-96365 treatment inhibited the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ)/AKT signaling cascade in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of CaMKIIγ or AKT abolished the effects of SKF-96365 on cancer cells, suggesting a critical role of the CaMKIIγ/AKT signaling pathway in SFK-96365-induced biological effects. Moreover, Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an FDA-approved drug used to inhibit autophagy, could significantly augment the anti-cancer effect of SFK-96365 in a mouse xenograft model. To our best knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that calcium/CaMKIIγ/AKT signaling can regulate apoptosis and autophagy simultaneously in cancer cells, and the combination of the SOCE inhibitor SKF-96365 with autophagy inhibitors represents a promising strategy for treating patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:26803057

  14. Inhibition of presynaptic calcium transients in cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum by metabotropic GABAB and mGlu2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kupferschmidt, David A; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) are dynamically regulated during skill learning and habit formation, and are dysregulated in disorders characterized by impaired action control. Therefore, a mechanistic investigation of the processes regulating corticostriatal transmission is key to understanding DLS-associated circuit function, behaviour and pathology. Presynaptic GABAB and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptors exert marked inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamate release in the DLS, yet the signalling pathways through which they do so are unclear. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 to assess presynaptic Ca2+ in corticostriatal projections to the DLS. Using simultaneous photometric presynaptic Ca2+ and striatal field potential recordings, we report that relative to P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, N-type channels preferentially contributed to evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx in motor cortex projections to, and excitatory transmission in, the DLS. Activation of GABAB or mGlu2/3 receptors inhibited both evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients and striatal field potentials. mGlu2/3 receptor-mediated depression did not require functional N-type Ca2+ channels, but was attenuated by blockade of P/Q-type channels. These findings reveal presynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory modulation of corticostriatal function that probably contribute to the selection and shaping of behavioural repertoires. Key points Plastic changes at cortical inputs to the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) underlie skill learning and habit formation, so characterizing the mechanisms by which these inputs are regulated is important for understanding the neural basis of action control. We developed a novel approach using the genetically encoded calcium (Ca2+) indicator GCaMP6 and brain slice photometry to assess evoked presynaptic Ca2+ transients in cortical inputs to the DLS and study their regulation by GABAB and mGlu2

  15. A transient increase in lipid peroxidation primes preadipocytes for delayed mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and ATP depletion during prolonged exposure to fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Carlyle; Davis, Barbara; Neufer, P Darrell; Murphy, Michael P; Anderson, Ethan J; Robidoux, Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Preadipocytes are periodically subjected to fatty acid (FA) concentrations that are potentially cytotoxic. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure of preadipocytes of human origin to a physiologically relevant mix of FAs leads to mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) permeabilization and ultimately to mitochondrial crisis. We found that exposure of preadipocytes to FAs led to progressive cyclosporin A-sensitive MIM permeabilization, which in turn caused a reduction in MIM potential, oxygen consumption, and ATP synthetic capacity and, ultimately, death. Additionally, we showed that FAs induce a transient increase in intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxide production, lasting roughly 30 and 120min for the ROS and lipid peroxides, respectively. MIM permeabilization and its deleterious consequences including mitochondrial crisis and cell death were prevented by treating the cells with the mitochondrial FA uptake inhibitor etomoxir, the mitochondrion-selective superoxide and lipid peroxide antioxidants MitoTempo and MitoQ, or the lipid peroxide and reactive carbonyl scavenger l-carnosine. FAs also promoted a delayed oxidative stress phase. However, the beneficial effects of etomoxir, MitoTempo, and l-carnosine were lost by delaying the treatment by 2h, suggesting that the initial phase was sufficient to prime the cells for the delayed MIM permeabilization and mitochondrial crisis. It also suggested that the second ROS production phase is a consequence of this loss in mitochondrial health. Altogether, our data suggest that approaches designed to diminish intramitochondrial ROS or lipid peroxide accumulation, as well as MIM permeabilization, are valid mechanism-based therapeutic avenues to prevent the loss in preadipocyte metabolic fitness associated with prolonged exposure to elevated FA levels. PMID:24269897

  16. Cytosolic calcium transients are a determinant of contraction-induced HSP72 transcription in single skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Stary, Creed M; Hogan, Michael C

    2016-05-15

    The intrinsic activating factors that induce transcription of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle following exercise remain unclear. We hypothesized that the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with depolarization is a determinant. We utilized intact, single skeletal muscle fibers from Xenopus laevis to test the role of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient and several other exercise-related factors (fatigue, hypoxia, AMP kinase, and cross-bridge cycling) on the activation of HSP72 transcription. HSP72 and HSP60 mRNA levels were assessed with real-time quantitative PCR; cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) was assessed with fura-2. Both fatiguing and nonfatiguing contractions resulted in a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. As expected, peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained tightly coupled with peak developed tension in contracting fibers. Pretreatment with N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) resulted in depressed peak developed tension with stimulation, while peak [Ca(2+)]cyt remained largely unchanged from control values. Despite excitation-contraction uncoupling, BTS-treated fibers displayed a significant increase in HSP72 mRNA. Treatment of fibers with hypoxia (Po2: <3 mmHg) or AMP kinase activation had no effect on HSP72 mRNA levels. These results suggest that the intermittent cytosolic Ca(2+) transient that occurs with skeletal muscle depolarization provides a sufficient activating stimulus for HSP72 transcription. Metabolic or mechanical factors associated with fatigue development and cross-bridge cycling likely play a more limited role. PMID:26869714

  17. Transient Increased Calcium and Calcitriol Requirements After Discontinuation of Human Synthetic Parathyroid Hormone 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Rachel I; Guthrie, Lori C; Kelly, Marilyn H; Brillante, Beth A; Christie, C Michele; Reynolds, James C; Yovetich, Nancy A; James, Robert; Collins, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic human PTH 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism maintains eucalcemia and converts quiescent bone to high-turnover bone. However, the skeletal and metabolic effects of drug discontinuation have not been reported. Nine subjects with hypoparathyroidism received subcutaneous injections of hPTH 1-34 two to three times daily for 19.8 to 61.3 months and then transitioned back to calcium and calcitriol. Biochemistries and bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were assessed at baseline, while on treatment, and at follow-up 3 to 12 months after drug discontinuation. Two subjects developed hypocalcemia when hPTH 1-34 was abruptly discontinued. Thus, to avoid hypocalcemia, subjects were slowly weaned from hPTH 1-34 over several weeks. When hPTH 1-34 was stopped, subjects were requiring two to three times pretreatment doses of calcitriol and calcium to maintain blood calcium levels. Doses were gradually reduced over many weeks until calcium levels were stable on doses similar to baseline. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), N-telopeptide (NTX), and osteocalcin (OC) increased significantly with hPTH 1-34; at follow-up, BSAP and NTX had returned to baseline while OC was still slightly elevated. During treatment, BMD was unchanged at the hip and lateral spine but declined at the anterior-posterior (AP) spine, radius, and total body. During weaning, BMD increased, with the hip and lateral spine exceeding pre-hPTH 1-34 values and the whole body returning to baseline. AP spine was increased non-significantly compared to baseline at follow-up. hPTH 1-34 must be gradually weaned in hypoparathyroid patients with high doses of oral medications given to avoid hypocalcemia. The transient increased requirements accompanied by increased BMD after long-term hPTH 1-34 therapy suggest a reversal of the expanded remodeling space favoring bone formation as the skeleton returns to a low-turnover state, reminiscent of the hungry

  18. Time-delayed behaviors of transient four-wave mixing signal intensity in inverted semiconductor with carrier-injection pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Gao, Shen; Xiang, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    An analytical expression of transient four-wave mixing (TFWM) in inverted semiconductor with carrier-injection pumping was derived from both the density matrix equation and the complex stochastic stationary statistical method of incoherent light. Numerical analysis showed that the TFWM decayed decay is towards the limit of extreme homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in atoms and the decaying time is inversely proportional to half the power of the net carrier densities for a low carrier-density injection and other high carrier-density injection, while it obeys an usual exponential decay with other decaying time that is inversely proportional to half the power of the net carrier density or it obeys an unusual exponential decay with the decaying time that is inversely proportional to a third power of the net carrier density for a moderate carrier-density injection. The results can be applied to studying ultrafast carrier dephasing in the inverted semiconductors such as semiconductor laser amplifier and semiconductor optical amplifier.

  19. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  20. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  1. Lack of nitric oxide- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-dependent regulation of α-thrombin-induced calcium transient in endothelial cells of spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Failli, Paola; Fazzini, Alessandro; Ruocco, Carlo; Mazzetti, Luca; Cecchi, Enrica; Giovannelli, Lisa; Marra, Fabio; Milani, Stefano; Giotti, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    While the expression and/or activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been characterized in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) hearts, in coronary endothelial cells (ECs) from both strains, the effect of NO on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is still unknown. Coronary microvascular ECs were isolated from SHR and WKY and characterized. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis showed that eNOS was similarly expressed in ECs from both strains. Measuring [Ca2+]i by imaging analysis of fura-2-loaded cells, we demonstrated that α-thrombin (3−180 U l−1) induced a superimposable dose-dependent calcium transient in ECs from both strains. In WKY ECs, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) dose-dependently (10–100 μM) and 0.1 μM atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) reduced the maximum and the decay time of α-thrombin-induced calcium transient. The inhibitory effects of SNAP and ANF were prevented by blocking cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. Non selective eNOS inhibitors prolonged the decay time of α-thrombin-induced calcium transient, while the selective inducible NOS inhibitor 1400 W was ineffective. SNAP (100 μM) and 0.1 μM ANF increased cyclic GMP content up to 22.9 and 42.3 fold respectively. In SHR ECs, α-thrombin-induced calcium transient was not modified by SNAP, ANF or eNOS inhibition. SNAP (100 μM) and 0.1 μM ANF increased cyclic GMP content up to 9.3 and 51 fold respectively. In WKY ECs, SNAP dose-dependently (10–100 μM) reduced also bradykinin-induced calcium transient, while in SHR ECs was ineffective. We concluded that in SHR ECs, the cyclic GMP-dependent regulation of calcium transient is lost. PMID:10928946

  2. Transient inhibition of protein synthesis in the rat insular cortex delays extinction of conditioned taste aversion with cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Hadamitzky, Martin; Orlowski, Kathrin; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Bösche, Katharina; Unteroberdörster, Meike; Bendix, Ivo; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2016-09-01

    Conditioned responses gradually weaken and eventually disappear when subjects are repeatedly exposed to the conditioned stimulus (CS) in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus (US), a process called extinction. Studies have demonstrated that extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) can be prevented by interfering with protein synthesis in the insular cortex (IC). However, it remained unknown whether it is possible to pharmacologically stabilize the taste aversive memory trace over longer periods of time. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the time frame during which extinction of CTA can be efficiently prevented by blocking protein synthesis in the IC. Employing an established conditioning paradigm in rats with saccharin as CS, and the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) as US, we show here that daily bilateral intra-insular injections of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (120μg/μl) immediately after retrieval significantly diminished CTA extinction over a period of five retrieval days and subsequently reached levels of saline-infused controls. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to efficiently delay but not to fully prevent CTA extinction during repeated retrieval trials by blocking protein translation with daily bilateral infusions of anisomycin in the IC. These data confirm and extent earlier reports indicating that the role of protein synthesis in CTA extinction learning is not limited to gastrointestinal malaise-inducing drugs such as lithium chloride (LiCl). PMID:27311758

  3. Physiological increases in lactate inhibit intracellular calcium transients, acidify myocytes and decrease force in term pregnant rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Jacqui-Ann; Weeks, Andrew; Wray, Susan

    2015-10-15

    Lactate is increased in myometrial capillary blood from women in slow or non-progressive labour (dystocia), suggesting that it is detrimental to uterine contractions. There are, however, no studies of the effect of lactate on the myometrium. We therefore investigated its effects and mechanism of action on myometrial strips from term pregnant rats. The effects on spontaneous and oxytocin-induced contractility in response to sodium lactate and other weak acids (1-20 mM) were studied. In some experiments, simultaneous force and intracellular Ca(2+) or pH (pH(i)) were measured with Indo-1 or Carboxy-SNARF, respectively. Statistical differences were tested using non-parametric tests. Lactate significantly decreased spontaneous contractility with an EC50 of 3.9 mM. Propionate, butyrate and pyruvate also reduced contractions with similar potency. The effects of lactate were reduced in the presence of oxytocin but remained significant. Lactate decreased pH(i) and nulling the decrease in pH(i) abolished its effects. We also show that lactate inhibited Ca(2+) transients, with these changes mirroring those produced on force. If Ca(2+) entry was enhanced by depolarization (high KCl) or applying the Ca(2+) channel agonist, Bay K 4644, the effects of lactate were abolished. Taken together, these data show that lactate in the physiological range potently decreases myometrial contractility as a result of its inhibition of Ca(2+) transients, which can be attributed to the induced acidification. The present study suggests that the accumulation of extracellular lactate will reduce myometrial contractions and could therefore contribute to labour dystocia. PMID:26223765

  4. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Hibah O.; Gonzalez, Larry P.; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000–30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8–11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4–6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5–6). PMID:26136722

  5. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p < 0.05; n = 8-11). Interestingly, anxiety symptoms were absent at days 22 and 48 post-blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p < 0.05; n = 4-6) and returned to sham levels by day 9. Our results indicate a transient increase in cerebral metabolism following a blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6). PMID:26136722

  6. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  7. Delayed hippocampal neuronal death in young gerbil following transient global cerebral ischemia is related to higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the ischemic hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Joo; Chen, Bai Hui; Yan, Bing Chun; Shin, Bich Na; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae Chul; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Hong, Seongkweon; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Lee, Yun Lyul; Won, Moo-Ho; Park, Joon Ha

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p63 is one of p53 family members and plays a vital role as a regulator of neuronal apoptosis in the development of the nervous system. However, the role of p63 in mature neuronal death has not been addressed yet. In this study, we first compared ischemia-induced effects on p63 expression in the hippocampal regions (CA1–3) between the young and adult gerbils subjected to 5 minutes of transient global cerebral ischemia. Neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region of young gerbils was significantly slow compared with that in the adult gerbils after transient global cerebral ischemia. p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the sham-operated young group was significantly low compared with that in the sham-operated adult group. p63 immunoreactivity was apparently changed in ischemic hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. In the ischemia-operated adult groups, p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased at 4 days post-ischemia; however, p63 immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated young group was significantly higher than that in the ischemia-operated adult group. At 7 days post-ischemia, p63 immunoreactivity was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. Change patterns of p63 level in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult and young gerbils after ischemic damage were similar to those observed in the immunohistochemical results. These findings indicate that higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the hippocampal CA1 region of the young gerbils after ischemia/reperfusion may be related to more delayed neuronal death compared to that in the adults. PMID:26199612

  8. Role of the calcium-independent transient outward current I(to1) in shaping action potential morphology and duration.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, J L; Wu, R; Po, S; Tomaselli, G F; Winslow, R L

    2000-11-24

    The Kv4.3-encoded current (I:(Kv4.3)) has been identified as the major component of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-independent transient outward current (I:(to1)) in human and canine ventricular cells. Experimental evidence supports a correlation between I:(to1) density and prominence of the phase 1 notch; however, the role of I:(to1) in modulating action potential duration (APD) remains unclear. To help resolve this role, Markov state models of the human and canine Kv4.3- and Kv1.4-encoded currents at 35 degrees C are developed on the basis of experimental measurements. A model of canine I:(to1) is formulated as the combination of these Kv4.3 and Kv1.4 currents and is incorporated into an existing canine ventricular myocyte model. Simulations demonstrate strong coupling between L-type Ca(2+) current and I:(Kv4.3) and predict a bimodal relationship between I:(Kv4.3) density and APD whereby perturbations in I:(Kv4.3) density may produce either prolongation or shortening of APD, depending on baseline I:(to1) current level. PMID:11090548

  9. Role of transient receptor potential C3 in TNF-alpha-enhanced calcium influx in human airway myocytes.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas A; Xue, Ailing; Chini, Eduardo N; Thompson, Michael; Sieck, Gary C; Wylam, Mark E

    2006-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha, contributes to airway hyperresponsivness by altering airway smooth muscle (ASM) Ca(2+) responses to agonist stimulation. The present study examined the effects of TNF-alpha on Ca(2+) influx pathways in cultured human ASM cells (HASMCs). Proteins encoded by the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family function as channels through which receptor-operated and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) occur. In the present study, the presence of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC6 mRNA and protein expression was confirmed in cultured HASMCs using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. TNF-alpha treatment significantly increased TRPC3 mRNA and protein levels in HASMCs as well as SOCE. TNF-alpha treatment also increased both the peak and plateau intracellular Ca(2+) concentration responses in HASMCs elicited by acetylcholine and bradykinin. The effects of TNF-alpha treatment on SOCE and agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration responses were attenuated using small interfering RNA transfection, which knocked down TRPC3 expression. Thus, in inflammatory airway diseases, TNF-alpha treatment may result in increased myocyte activation due to altered Ca(2+) influx pathways. These results suggest that TRPC3 may be an important therapeutic target in inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:16574942

  10. Signaling Microdomains Regulate Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate-Mediated Intracellular Calcium Transients in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Simon N.; Choe, Chi-Un; Uhlen, Per; DeGray, Brenda; Yeckel, Mark F.; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+signals in neurons use specific temporal and spatial patterns to encode unambiguous information about crucial cellular functions. To understand the molecular basis for initiation and propagation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-mediated intracellular Ca2+ signals, we correlated the subcellular distribution of components of the InsP3 pathway with measurements of agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ transients in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and pheochromocytoma cells. We found specialized domains with high levels of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate kinase (PIPKIγ) and chromogranin B (CGB), proteins acting synergistically to increase InsP3 pumps in the plasma membrane (PMCA) and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum receptor (InsP3R) activity and sensitivity. In contrast, Ca2+ as well as buffers that antagonize the rise in intracellular Ca2+ were distributed uniformly. By pharmacologically blocking phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase and PIPKIγ or disrupting the CGB–InsP3R interaction by transfecting an interfering polypeptide fragment, we produced major changes in the initiation site and kinetics of the Ca2+signal. This study shows that a limited number of proteins can reassemble to form unique, spatially restricted signaling domains to generate distinctive signals in different regions of the same neuron. The finding that the subcellular location of initiation sites and protein microdomains was cell type specific will help to establish differences in spatiotemporal Ca2+signaling in different types of neurons. PMID:15772345

  11. A transient outward current related to calcium release and development of tension in elephant seal atrial fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Maylie, J; Morad, M

    1984-01-01

    Membrane currents and development of tension in atrial trabeculae from elephant seal hearts were studied using a single sucrose-gap voltage-clamp technique. A transient outward current (Ito) was observed with kinetics, voltage and beat dependence, similar to those of tension. Ito had a bell-shaped voltage dependence similar to that of tension and the slow inward current (Isi). Ito, unlike Isi, showed beat dependence quite similar to developed tension. Increases in [Ca]o, frequency of stimulation, and addition of adrenaline enhanced Ito and developed tension. Ito was suppressed by addition of Mn2+, tetracaine, or by depolarizing pre-pulses (to -40 mV for 250 ms). Caffeine at low concentrations (1 mM) blocked beat dependence of Ito. At higher concentrations (greater than 5 mM) caffeine suppressed the activation of Ito, phasic tension, and the second component of the birefringence signal (related to Ca2+-releasing activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.]. Similar to Isi phasic tension and Ito, the voltage dependence of the second component of the birefringence signal was bell-shaped. Our studies suggest that activation of Ito is related to triggered release of Ca2+ from the s.r. which generates the phasic tension. An excitation-contraction coupling scheme is presented which incorporates these findings and suggests that Ito may be responsible for shorter action potentials found in atrial fibres. Images Plate 1 PMID:6512692

  12. Calcium homeostasis in human melanocytes: role of transient receptor potential melastatin 1 (TRPM1) and its regulation by ultraviolet light

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Sulochana; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Maddodi, Nityanand; Bhat, Kumar M. R.; Weber, Craig S.; Valdivia, Hector

    2009-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) is a subfamily of ion channels that are involved in sensing taste, ambient temperature, low pH, osmolarity, and chemical ligands. Melastatin 1/TRPM1, the founding member, was originally identified as melanoma metastasis suppressor based on its expression in normal pigment cells in the skin and the eye but not in aggressive, metastasis-competent melanomas. The role of TRPM1 and its regulation in normal melanocytes and in melanoma progression is not understood. Here, we studied the relationship of TRPM1 expression to growth and differentiation of human epidermal melanocytes. TRPM1 expression and intracellular Ca2+ levels are significantly lower in rapidly proliferating melanocytes compared to the slow growing, differentiated melanocytes. We show that lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRPM1 results in reduced intracellular Ca2+ and decreased Ca2+ uptake suggesting a role for TRPM1 in Ca2+ homeostasis in melanocytes. TRPM1 knockdown also resulted in a decrease in tyrosinase activity and intracellular melanin pigment. Expression of the tumor suppressor p53 by transfection or induction of endogenous p53 by ultraviolet B radiation caused repression of TRPM1 expression accompanied by decrease in mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ and uptake of extracellular Ca2+. These data suggest a role for TRPM1-mediated Ca2+ homeostasis, which is also regulated by ultraviolet B, in melanogenesis. PMID:19587221

  13. Effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate on L-type calcium current and Ca(2+) transient in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel Eroume-A; Bae, James S H; Capel, Rebecca; Richards, Mark; Ke, Yunbo; Pharithi, Rebabonye B; Maher, Vincent; Kruzliak, Peter; Lei, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis in cardiac myocytes plays a major role in beat-to-beat regulation of heart function. Previous studies suggest that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a biologically active sphingomyelin metabolite, regulates Ca(2+) handling in cardiac myocytes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that S1P-induced functional alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) handling includes the L-type calcium channel current (ICa,L) via a signalling pathway involving P21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1). Our results show that, in rat ventricular myocytes, S1P (100 nM) does not affect the basal activity of ICa,L but is able to partially reverse the effect of the β-adrenergic agonist Isoproterenol (ISO, 100 nM) on ICa,L. S1P (25 nM) also significantly prevents ISO (5 nM)-induced Ca(2+) waves and diastolic Ca(2+) release in these cells. Our further molecular characterisation demonstrates that Pak1 activity is increased in myocytes treated with S1P (25 nM) compared with those myocytes without treatment of S1P. By immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that Pak1 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) are associated in ventricular tissue indicating their functional interaction. Thus the results indicate that S1P attenuates β-adrenergic stress-induced alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) release and L-type Ca(2+) channel current at least in part via Pak1-PP2A-mediated signalling. PMID:27372350

  14. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4)-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse oesophageal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Boudaka, Ammar; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Tominaga, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a multi-factorial disease that may involve oesophageal hypersensitivity to mechanical or heat stimulus as well as acids. Intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) are the most prominent terminal structures of oesophageal vagal mechanosensitive afferents and may modulate mechanotransduction via purinergic receptors. Transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) can detect various stimuli such as warm temperature, stretch and some chemicals, including 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD) and GSK1016790A. TRPV4 is expressed in many tissues, including renal epithelium, skin keratinocytes and urinary bladder epithelium, but its expression and function in the oesophagus is poorly understood. Here, we show anatomical and functional TRPV4 expression in mouse oesophagus and its involvement in ATP release. TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in oesophageal keratinocytes. Several known TRPV4 activators (chemicals, heat and stretch stimulus) increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in cultured WT keratinocytes but not in TRPV4 knockout (KO) cells. Moreover, the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A and heat stimulus evoked TRPV4-like current responses in isolated WT keratinocytes, but not in TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A and heat stimulus also significantly increased ATP release from WT oesophageal keratinocytes compared to TRPV4KO cells. The vesicle-trafficking inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA) inhibited the ATP release. This ATP release could be mediated by the newly identified vesicle ATP transporter, VNUT, which is expressed by oesophageal keratinocytes at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, in response to heat, chemical and possibly mechanical stimuli, TRPV4 contributes to ATP release in the oesophagus. Thus, TRPV4 could be involved in oesophageal mechano- and heat hypersensitivity. PMID:21540339

  15. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  16. Effects of aluminum chloride on sodium current, transient outward potassium current and delayed rectifier potassium current in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Nie, Aifang; Bai, Wei; Meng, Ziqiang

    2004-09-01

    The effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on sodium current (INa), the transient outward potassium (IA) and delayed rectifier potassium currents (IK) in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats were studied using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. AlCl3 decreased INa, IA, and IK in a partly reversible, dose and voltage-dependent manner. AlCl3 prolonged the time to peak of INa, and increased the inactivation time constants of INa and IA . In addition, 1000 microM AlCl3 shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation of INa, IA and IK toward positive potential, and the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation of INa, IA toward negative potential. These results imply that AlCl3 could affect the activation and inactivation courses of sodium current and potassium current of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, which may contribute to damage of the central nervous system by aluminum. PMID:15234075

  17. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  18. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  19. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  20. Differential effects of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibition on charge movements and calcium transients in intact amphibian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sangeeta; Skepper, Jeremy N; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2002-03-15

    A hypothesis in which intramembrane charge reflects a voltage sensing process allosterically coupled to transitions in ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca(2+) release channels as opposed to one driven by release of intracellularly stored Ca(2+) would predict that such charging phenomena should persist in skeletal muscle fibres unable to release stored Ca(2+). Charge movement components were accordingly investigated in intact voltage-clamped amphibian fibres treated with known sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) pretreatment abolished Ca(2+) transients in fluo-3-loaded fibres following even prolonged applications of caffeine (10 mM) or K(+) (122 mM). Both CPA and thapsigargin (TG) transformed charge movements that included delayed (q(gamma)) "hump" components into simpler decays. However, steady-state charge-voltage characteristics were conserved to values (maximum charge, Q(max) approximately equal to 20-25 nC microF(-1); transition voltage, V* approximately equal to -40 to-50 mV; steepness factor, k approximately equal to 6-9 mV; holding voltage -90 mV) indicating persistent q(gamma) charge. The features of charge inactivation similarly suggested persistent q(beta) and q(gamma) charge contributions in CPA-treated fibres. Perchlorate (8.0 mM) restored the delayed kinetics shown by "on" q(gamma) charge movements, prolonged their "off" decays, conserved both Q(max) and k, yet failed to restore the capacity of such CPA-treated fibres for Ca(2+) release. Introduction of perchlorate (8.0 mM) or caffeine (0.2 mM) to tetracaine (2.0 mM)-treated fibres, also known to restore q(gamma) charge, similarly failed to restore Ca(2+) transients. Steady-state intramembrane q(gamma) charge thus persists with modified kinetics that can be restored to its normally complex waveform by perchlorate, even in intact muscle fibres unable to release Ca(2+). It is thus unlikely that q(gamma) charge movement is a consequence of SR Ca(2+) release rather than

  1. Detection, Properties, and Frequency of Local Calcium Release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Teleost Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Tort, Lluis; Benítez, Raul; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a central role in the regulation of cardiac contraction and rhythm in mammals and humans but its role is controversial in teleosts. Since the zebrafish is an emerging model for studies of cardiovascular function and regeneration we here sought to determine if basic features of SR calcium release are phylogenetically conserved. Confocal calcium imaging was used to detect spontaneous calcium release (calcium sparks and waves) from the SR. Calcium sparks were detected in 16 of 38 trout atrial myocytes and 6 of 15 ventricular cells. The spark amplitude was 1.45±0.03 times the baseline fluorescence and the time to half maximal decay of sparks was 27±3 ms. Spark frequency was 0.88 sparks µm−1 min−1 while calcium waves were 8.5 times less frequent. Inhibition of SR calcium uptake reduced the calcium transient (F/F0) from 1.77±0.17 to 1.12±0.18 (p = 0.002) and abolished calcium sparks and waves. Moreover, elevation of extracellular calcium from 2 to 10 mM promoted early and delayed afterdepolarizations (from 0.6±0.3 min−1 to 8.1±2.0 min−1, p = 0.001), demonstrating the ability of SR calcium release to induce afterdepolarizations in the trout heart. Calcium sparks of similar width and duration were also observed in zebrafish ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study to consistently report calcium sparks in teleosts and demonstrate that the basic features of calcium release through the ryanodine receptor are conserved, suggesting that teleost cardiac myocytes is a relevant model to study the functional impact of abnormal SR function. PMID:21897853

  2. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  3. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  4. Combined system for high-time-resolution dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and fluorescence imaging of calcium transients in single normal and diseased skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Fast photometric measurements and video-imaging of fluorescent indicators both are powerful tools in measuring the intracellular free calcium concentration of muscle and many other cells. as photometric systems yield a high temporal resolution, calcium imaging systems have high spatial but significantly reduced temporal resolution. Therefore we have developed an integrated system combining both methods and based mostly on standard components. As a common, sensitive Ca2+- indicator we used the fluorescent probe Fura-2, which is alternatingly excited for ratio measurements at 340/380 nm. We used a commercially available dual excitation photometric system (OSP-3; Olympus) for attaching a CCD-camera and a frame grabber board. To achieve the synchronization we had to design circuitries for external triggering, synchronization and accurate control of the filter changer, which we added to the system. Additionally, the software for a triggered image acquisition was developed. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode (ratio frequency 100 Hz) and the imaging mode (ratio frequency 4.17 Hz). The calcium images are correlated with the 25 times faster spot measurements and are analyzed by means of image processing. With this combined system we study release and uptake of calcium ions of normal and diseased skeletal muscle from mdx mice. Such a system will also be important for other cellular studies in which fluorescence indicators are used to monitor similar time dependent alterations as well as changes in cellular distributions of calcium.

  5. Combined use of UV-labile calcium chelators and calcium-sensitive dyes in a microscope with two light sources influencing different regions in a group of coordinated contracting cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarczyk, Goetz; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1997-12-01

    The coordination of excitation in a biological system of cells such as cardiac myocytes in heart tissue has crucial influence on the function of the entire organ. This coordinated behavior can be visualized in a small group of embryonic cardiac myocytes derived from the hearts of unborn chicken. Loaded with a calcium sensitive dye the excitation can be imaged via the occurring transient rise in cytosolic calcium concentration. It can be shown that in regions with physiological or morphological restrictions the transient rise in cytosolic calcium occurs with a temporal delay compared to the ordinary array of coupled myocytes. The height of the transient rise of cytosolic calcium is related to the ability of the individual cell to participate in the coordinated contraction. The free cytosolic calcium concentration is decreased with the UV-labile calcium, chelator diazo-2. Our setup allows to decrease the free cytosolic calcium in a single cell of the contracting array of cells. This allows us to introduce mismatches in selected regions of the coordinated contraction and to visualize the effects simultaneously.

  6. Rapid intracellular calcium changes in U937 monocyte cell line: transient increases in response to platelet-activating factor and chemotactic peptide but not interferon-gamma or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Maudsley, D J; Morris, A G

    1987-06-01

    The dye fura-2, a potentially more sensitive successor to quin2 for measuring intracellular free calcium ion concentrations [(Ca2+]i), has been applied here to investigate the possible involvement of early changes in [Ca2+]i in the stimulation of the human monocyte-macrophage-like cell line U937. The calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin, known pharmacological stimuli for macrophages, were found to cause sharp rises in [Ca2+]i as expected. Responses analogous to those reported for a murine macrophage cell (J774) were obtained on stimulation of U937 cells with ATP which caused rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 200 mM). In addition to ATP, several agents known to activate macrophages were used as stimuli. In particular, platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) was found to cause rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 400 nM) even at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. This contrasts with responses to ATP that were markedly reduced at 10(-6) M compared with 10(-5) M or above, suggesting that PAF is a highly potent stimulus for intracellular calcium mobilization in macrophages. Similar responses were obtained with chemotactic peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine). On the other hand, two agents known to be potent activators of macrophages, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide, had no rapid effect on [Ca2+]i. This may reflect differences in the kinetics of signal-response coupling or alternatively a different mechanism of action by-passing the need for rapid elevation of [Ca2+]i. PMID:3110054

  7. Mitochondrial calcium transients in adult rabbit cardiac myocytes: inhibition by ruthenium red and artifacts caused by lysosomal loading of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores.

    PubMed Central

    Trollinger, D R; Cascio, W E; Lemasters, J J

    2000-01-01

    A cold/warm loading protocol was used to ester-load Rhod 2 into mitochondria and other organelles and Fluo 3 into the cytosol of adult rabbit cardiac myocytes for confocal fluorescence imaging. Transient increases in both cytosolic Fluo 3 and mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence occurred after electrical stimulation. Ruthenium red, a blocker of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, inhibited mitochondrial Rhod 2 fluorescence transients but not cytosolic Fluo 3 transients. Thus the ruthenium red-sensitive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter catalyzes Ca(2+) uptake during beat-to-beat transients of mitochondrial free Ca(2+), which in turn may help match mitochondrial ATP production to myocardial ATP demand. After ester loading, substantial amounts of Ca(2+)-indicating fluorophores localized into an acidic lysosomal/endosomal compartment. This lysosomal fluorescence did not respond to electrical stimulation. Because fluorescence arose predominantly from lysosomes after the cold loading/warm incubation procedure, total cellular fluorescence failed to track beat-to-beat changes of mitochondrial fluorescence. Only three-dimensionally resolved confocal imaging distinguished the relatively weak mitochondrial signal from the bright lysosomal fluorescence. PMID:10866936

  8. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  9. Evaluation of cellular mechanisms for modulation of calcium transients using a mathematical model of fura-2 Ca2+ imaging in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, H; Zablow, L; Sabatini, B

    1992-10-01

    A theoretical model of [Ca++]i diffusion, buffering, and extrusion was developed for Aplysia sensory neurons, and integrated with the measured optical transfer function of our fura-2 microscopic recording system, in order to fully simulate fura-2 video or photomultiplier tube measurements of [Ca++]i. This allowed an analysis of the spatial and temporal distortions introduced during each step of fura-2 measurements of [Ca++]i in cells. In addition, the model was used to evaluate the plausibility of several possible mechanisms for modulating [Ca++]i transients evoked by action potentials. The results of the model support prior experimental work (Blumenfeld, Spira, Kandel, and Siegelbaum, 1990. Neuron. 5: 487-499), suggesting that 5-HT and FMRFamide modulate action potential-induced [Ca++]i transients in Aplysia sensory neurons through changes in Ca++ influx, and not through changes in [Ca++]i homeostasis or release from internal stores. PMID:1420931

  10. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30 mM KCl for 2 min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1 μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested. PMID:26708558

  11. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  12. There and back again: Iterating between population-based modeling and experiments reveals surprising regulation of calcium transients in rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Devenyi, Ryan A; Sobie, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    While many ion channels and transporters involved in cardiac cellular physiology have been identified and described, the relative importance of each in determining emergent cellular behaviors remains unclear. Here we address this issue with a novel approach that combines population-based mathematical modeling with experimental tests to systematically quantify the relative contributions of different ion channels and transporters to the amplitude of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. Sensitivity analysis of a mathematical model of the rat ventricular cardiomyocyte quantified the response of cell behaviors to changes in the level of each ion channel and transporter, and experimental tests of these predictions were performed to validate or invalidate the predictions. The model analysis found that partial inhibition of the transient outward current in rat ventricular epicardial myocytes was predicted to have a greater impact on Ca(2+) transient amplitude than either: (1) inhibition of the same current in endocardial myocytes, or (2) comparable inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA). Experimental tests confirmed the model predictions qualitatively but showed some quantitative disagreement. This guided us to recalibrate the model by adjusting the relative importance of several Ca(2+) fluxes, thereby improving the consistency with experimental data and producing a more predictive model. Analysis of human cardiomyocyte models suggests that the relative importance of outward currents to Ca(2+) transporters is generalizable to human atrial cardiomyocytes, but not ventricular cardiomyocytes. Overall, our novel approach of combining population-based mathematical modeling with experimental tests has yielded new insight into the relative importance of different determinants of cell behavior. PMID:26235057

  13. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  14. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  15. Blockade of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor or Its Receptors Transiently Delays but Does Not Prevent Fibrous Cap Formation in ApoE Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kozaki, Koichi; Kaminski, Wolfgang E.; Tang, Jingjing; Hollenbach, Stan; Lindahl, Per; Sullivan, Carol; Yu, Jin-Chen; Abe, Keith; Martin, Paul J.; Ross, Russell; Betsholtz, Christer; Giese, Neill A.; Raines, Elaine W.

    2002-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent stimulant of smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation in culture. To test the role of PDGF in the accumulation of smooth muscle cells in vivo, we evaluated ApoE −/− mice that develop complex lesions of atherosclerosis. Fetal liver cells from PDGF-B-deficient embryos were used to replace the circulating cells of lethally irradiated ApoE −/− mice. One month after transplant, all monocytes in PDGF-B −/− chimeras are of donor origin (lack PDGF), and no PDGF-BB is detected in circulating platelets, primary sources of PDGF in lesions. Although lesion volumes are comparable in the PDGF-B +/+ and −/− chimeras at 35 weeks, lesions in PDGF-B −/− chimeras contain mostly macrophages, appear less mature, and have a reduced frequency of fibrous cap formation as compared with PDGF-B +/+ chimeras. However, after 45 weeks, smooth muscle cell accumulation in fibrous caps is indistinguishable in the two groups. Comparison of elicited peritoneal macrophages by RNase protection assay shows an altered cytokine and cytokine receptor profile in PDGF-B −/− chimeras. ApoE −/− mice were also treated for up to 50 weeks with a PDGF receptor antagonist that blocks all three PDGF receptor dimers. Blockade of the PDGF receptors similarly delays, but does not prevent, accumulation of smooth muscle and fibrous cap formation. Thus, elimination of PDGF-B from circulating cells or blockade of PDGF receptors does not appear sufficient to prevent smooth muscle accumulation in advanced lesions of atherosclerosis. PMID:12368212

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of CaM-kinase kinase via transient receptor potential canonical channels induces the translation and synaptic incorporation of GluA1-containing calcium-permeable AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Dale A; Srivastava, Taasin; Dwarakanath, Diya; Pierre, Philippe; Nygaard, Sean; Derkach, Victor A; Soderling, Thomas R

    2012-06-13

    Glutamatergic synapses in early postnatal development transiently express calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs). Although these GluA2-lacking receptors are essential and are elevated in response to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), little is known regarding molecular mechanisms that govern their expression and synaptic insertion. Here we show that BDNF-induced GluA1 translation in rat primary hippocampal neurons requires the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) via calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK). Specifically, BDNF-mediated phosphorylation of threonine 308 (T308) in AKT, a known substrate of CaMKK and an upstream activator of mTOR-dependent translation, was prevented by (1) pharmacological inhibition of CaMKK with STO-609, (2) overexpression of a dominant-negative CaMKK, or (3) short hairpin-mediated knockdown of CaMKK. GluA1 surface expression induced by BDNF, as assessed by immunocytochemistry using an extracellular N-terminal GluA1 antibody or by surface biotinylation, was impaired following knockdown of CaMKK or treatment with STO-609. Activation of CaMKK by BDNF requires transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels as SKF-96365, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist d-APV, prevented BDNF-induced GluA1 surface expression as well as phosphorylation of CaMKI, AKT(T308), and mTOR. Using siRNA we confirmed the involvement of TRPC5 and TRPC6 subunits in BDNF-induced AKT(T308) phosphorylation. The BDNF-induced increase in mEPSC was blocked by IEM-1460, a selected antagonist of CP-AMPARs, as well as by the specific repression of acute GluA1 translation via siRNA to GluA1 but not GluA2. Together these data support the conclusion that newly synthesized GluA1 subunits, induced by BDNF, are readily incorporated into synapses where they enhance the expression of CP-AMPARs and synaptic strength. PMID:22699894

  17. Delayed-rectifier (KV2.1) regulation of pancreatic beta-cell calcium responses to glucose: inhibitor specificity and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tamarina, Natalia A; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2005-10-01

    The delayed-rectifier (voltage-activated) K(+) conductance (K(V)) in pancreatic islet beta-cells has been proposed to regulate plasma membrane repolarization during responses to glucose, thereby determining bursting and Ca(2+) oscillations. Here, we verified the expression of K(V)2.1 channel protein in mouse and human islets of Langerhans. We then probed the function of K(V)2.1 channels in islet glucose responses by comparing the effect of hanatoxin (HaTx), a specific blocker of K(V)2.1 channels, with a nonspecific K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA). Application of HaTx (1 microM) blocked delayed-rectifier currents in mouse beta-cells, resulting in a 40-mV rightward shift in threshold of activation of the voltage-dependent outward current. In the presence of HaTx, there was negligible voltage-activated outward current below 0 mV, suggesting that K(V)2.1 channels form the predominant part of this current in the physiologically relevant range. We then employed HaTx to study the role of K(V)2.1 in the beta-cell Ca(2+) responses to elevated glucose in comparison with TEA. Only HaTx was able to induce slow intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) oscillations in cells stimulated with 20 mM glucose, whereas TEA induced an immediate rise in [Ca(2+)](i) followed by rapid oscillations. In human islets, HaTx acted in a similar fashion. The data were analyzed using a detailed mathematical model of ionic flux and Ca(2+) regulation in beta-cells. The results can be explained by a specific HaTx effect on the K(V) current, whereas TEA affects multiple K(+) conductances. The results underscore the importance of K(V)2.1 channel in repolarization of the pancreatic beta-cell plasma membrane and its role in regulating insulin secretion. PMID:16014354

  18. The canonical transient receptor potential 6 channel as a putative phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive calcium entry system.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ping-Hui; Lin, Ho-Pi; Hu, Hongzhen; Wang, Chunbo; Zhu, Michael Xi; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2004-09-21

    We previously reported that phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)), a lipid product of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), induced Ca(2+) influx via a noncapacitative pathway in platelets, Jurkat T cells, and RBL-2H3 mast cells. The identity of this Ca(2+) influx system, however, remains unclear. Here, we investigate a potential link between PIP(3)-sensitive Ca(2+) entry and the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels by developing stable human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC5, and TRPC6. Two lines of evidence support TRPC6 as a putative target by which PIP(3) induces Ca(2+) influx. First, Fura-2 fluorometric Ca(2+) analysis shows the ability of PIP(3) to selectively stimulate [Ca(2+)](i) increase in TRPC6-expressing cells. Second, pull-down analysis indicates specific interactions between biotin-PIP(3) and TRPC6 protein. Our data indicate that PIP(3) activates store-independent Ca(2+) entry in TRPC6 cells via a nonselective cation channel. Although the activating effect of PIP(3) on TRPC6 is reminiscent to that of 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol, this activation is not attributable to the diacylglycerol substructure of PIP(3) since other phosphoinositides failed to trigger Ca(2+) responses. The PIP(3)-activated Ca(2+) entry is inhibited by known TRPC6 inhibitors such as Gd(3+) and SKF96365 and is independent of IP(3) production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TRPC6 overexpression or antisense downregulation significantly alters the amplitude of PIP(3)- and anti-CD3-activated Ca(2+) responses in Jurkat T cells. Consequently, the link between TRPC6 and PIP(3)-mediated Ca(2+) entry provides a framework to account for an intimate relationship between PI3K and PLCgamma in initiating Ca(2+) response to agonist stimulation in T lymphocytes. PMID:15362854

  19. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  20. Regionalized calcium signaling in zebrafish fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dipika; Kinsey, William H

    2008-01-01

    Fertilization involves an initial, highly localized signal delivered by the sperm, which becomes amplified by a signal transduction cascade to impact the entire oocyte cytoplasm. The zebrafish oocyte presents a unique opportunity to study this process since fertilization always occurs at the micropyle, allowing the investigator to image the earliest steps in the oocyte activation process. The objective of the present study was to characterize the amplification of the sperm-induced calcium transient in the zebrafish oocyte and test the role of Fyn kinase in this process. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the sperm-induced calcium transient was composed of two elements, one of which was unique to the oocyte cortex and a second, slower transient that occurred in the central cytoplasm of the oocyte. The cortical transient was initiated immediately deep to the micropyle, became amplified at the animal pole, and progressed peripherally through the oocyte cortex. This was followed by a slower transient that occurred in the central cytoplasm of the oocyte. Several lines of evidence indicate that calcium release in these two compartments may be regulated differently. The calcium transient in the oocyte cortex is highly sensitive to inhibition by Fyn-SH2 domain containing fusion proteins, while the central cytoplasmic transient is relatively resistant to this treatment. Oocytes stimulated by injection of a soluble extract prepared from zebrafish sperm respond only with a cortical calcium transient initiated at the micropyle, while oocytes stimulated parthenogenetically by hypotonic shock exhibit a defective cortical transient but a normal transient in the central cytoplasm. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of Fyn kinase and the IP3 receptor reveal that these important signaling components are highly enriched in the oocyte cortex, a factor which may facilitate a faster propagation of the calcium transient in this compartment. In summary, analysis of

  1. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    PubMed Central

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2015-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity. PMID:25709579

  2. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  3. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  4. Spatiotemporal Effects of Sonoporation Measured by Real-Time Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumon, R. E.; Aehle, M.; Sabens, D.; Parikh, P.; Han, Y. W.; Kourennyi, D.; Deng, C. X.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effects of sonoporation, spatiotemporal evolution of ultrasound-induced changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) was determined using real time fura-2AM fluorescence imaging. Monolayers of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to 1-MHz ultrasound tone burst (0.2 s, 0.45 MPa) in the presence of Optison™ microbubbles. At extracellular [Ca2+]o of 0.9 mM, ultrasound application generated both non-oscillating and oscillating (periods 12–30 s) transients (changes of [Ca2+]i in time) with durations of 100–180 s. Immediate [Ca2+]i transients after ultrasound application were induced by ultrasound-mediated microbubble–cell interactions. In some cases, the immediately-affected cells did not return to pre-ultrasound equilibrium [Ca2+]i levels, thereby indicating irreversible membrane damage. Spatial evolution of [Ca2+]i in different cells formed a calcium wave and was observed to propagate outward from the immediately-affected cells at 7–20 μm/s over a distance greater than 200 μm, causing delayed transients in cells to occur sometimes 60 s or more after ultrasound application. In calcium-free solution, ultrasound-affected cells did not recover, consistent with the requirement of extracellular Ca2+ for cell membrane recovery subsequent to sonoporation. In summary, ultrasound application in the presence of Optison™ microbubbles can generate transient [Ca2+]i changes and oscillations at a focal site and in surrounding cells via calcium waves that last longer than the ultrasound duration and spread beyond the focal site. These results demonstrate the complexity of downstream effects of sonoporation beyond the initial pore formation and subsequent diffusion-related transport through the cellular membrane. PMID:19010589

  5. The relationship between the intracellular Ca2+ transient and the isometric twitch force in frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y B; Lou, F; Edman, K A

    1996-09-01

    The calcium-sensitive fluorescent indicator fluo-3 was used to monitor the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) during isometric twitches in twenty-nine single muscle fibres from the anterior tibialis muscle of Rana temporaria (sarcomere length, 2.2 microns; 2-4 degrees C). The transient change in [Ca2+]i in response to a single stimulus was very brief. The time to peak and the duration of the Ca2+ signal, measured at 50% of the peak amplitude, were 8.3 +/- 0.2 and 22.1 +/- 1.4 ms (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 29), respectively. The mean peak amplitude of the Ca2+ transient was 3.2 +/- 0.1 microM, ranging from 2.46 to 3.92 microM among the different fibres. The isometric force started to rise 2.5 ms before [Ca2+]i reached its maximum value. When peak twitch force was attained, [Ca2+]i had already declined to approximately 10% of its maximum value. The peak force produced during a twitch was closely related to the decay phase of the Ca2+ transient, a slower decay of [Ca2+]i being associated with a greater amplitude of the twitch. The amplitude and duration of the Ca2+ transient varied in a systematic way relative to one another in different fibres, in that a greater amplitude was associated with a more rapid decay of the Ca2+ transient. NO3- and Zn2+ added to the external medium greatly enhanced the peak twitch force without markedly affecting the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient. However, both agents delayed the decay of [Ca2+]i. It is concluded that the decay phase of the Ca2+ transient is a more important determinant of the mechanical response during an isometric twitch than is the peak amplitude of the transient. PMID:8889472

  6. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  7. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function. PMID:26814587

  8. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  9. Transient performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnock, Barry

    Gas turbine engine transient behavior, that which is concerned with the changes in engine parameters during acceleration or decceleration of an engine from one steady state point to a different steady state point, is considered. An engine can also experience cyclic aerodynamic phenomena which occur at a nominally steady condition; examples are compressor rotator stall and intake or afterburner buzz. The following are discussed: certification requirements; mechanism of acceleration; compressor working lines and surge; and some important factors (pressure level, moment of inertia, heat soakage, clearances, measurement of transients, thrust reversal, and transient maneuvers which involve significant changes to the shaft speeds of the engine). A set of graphics illustrating transient performance is presented.

  10. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  11. Influence of sodium borate on the early age hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cement

    SciTech Connect

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Dhoury, Mélanie; Cau Dit Coumes, Céline; Mercier, Cyrille; Revel, Bertrand; Le Bescop, Patrick; Damidot, Denis

    2015-04-15

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are potential candidates for the conditioning of radioactive wastes with high sodium borate concentrations. This work thus investigates early age hydration of two CSA cements with different gypsum contents (0 to 20%) as a function of the mixing solution composition (borate and NaOH concentrations). Gypsum plays a key role in controlling the reactivity of cement. When the mixing solution is pure water, increasing the gypsum concentration accelerates cement hydration. However, the reverse is observed when the mixing solution contains sodium borate. Until gypsum exhaustion, the pore solution pH remains constant at ~ 10.8, and a poorly crystallized borate compound (ulexite) precipitates. A correlation is established between this transient precipitation and the hydration delay. Decreasing the gypsum content in the binder, or increasing the sodium content in the mixing solution, are two ways of reducing the stability of ulexite, thus decreasing the hydration delay.

  12. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  13. Delayed discharge.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Essential facts Delays in discharging older peo ple from hospital cost the NHS £820 million a year, according to a report from the National Audit Office (NAO). Last year in acute hospitals, 1.15 million bed days were lost to delayed transfers of care, an increase of 31% since 2013. The NAO says rising demand for NHS services is compounded by reduced local authority spending on adult social care - down by 10% since 2009-10. PMID:27380673

  14. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  15. Calcium Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Sarcopenia Skeletal Rare Disorders Data & Publications Facts and Statistics Vitamin D map Fracture Risk Map Hip Fracture ... Training Courses Working Groups Regional Audits Reports Facts and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What ...

  16. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels. These may include abnormal blood levels of albumin or immunoglobulins. Normal Results Children: 4.8 to ... 2016:chap 245. Read More Acute kidney failure Albumin - blood (serum) test Bone tumor Calcium blood test ...

  17. Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al Omari, M M H; Rashid, I S; Qinna, N A; Jaber, A M; Badwan, A A

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound with the formula CaCO3 formed by three main elements: carbon, oxygen, and calcium. It is a common substance found in rocks in all parts of the world (most notably as limestone), and is the main component of shells of marine organisms, snails, coal balls, pearls, and eggshells. CaCO3 exists in different polymorphs, each with specific stability that depends on a diversity of variables. PMID:26940168

  18. Calcium orthophosphates

    PubMed Central

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. This type of materials is of special significance for human beings, because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and antlers) and pathological (i.e., those appearing due to various diseases) calcified tissues of mammals. For example, atherosclerosis results in blood vessel blockage caused by a solid composite of cholesterol with calcium orthophosphates, while dental caries and osteoporosis mean a partial decalcification of teeth and bones, respectively, that results in replacement of a less soluble and harder biological apatite by more soluble and softer calcium hydrogenphosphates. Therefore, the processes of both normal and pathological calcifications are just an in vivo crystallization of calcium orthophosphates. Similarly, dental caries and osteoporosis might be considered an in vivo dissolution of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, calcium orthophosphates hold a great significance for humankind, and in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided. PMID:23507744

  19. Calcium Hydroxylapatite

    PubMed Central

    Yutskovskaya, Yana Alexandrovna; Philip Werschler, WM.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite is one of the most well-studied dermal fillers worldwide and has been extensively used for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial lines and folds and to replenish lost volume. Objectives: To mark the milestone of 10 years of use in the aesthetic field, this review will consider the evolution of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine, provide a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach, and examine how the unique properties of calcium hydroxylapatite provide it with an important place in today’s market. Methods: This article is an up-to-date review of calcium hydroxylapatite in aesthetic medicine along with procedures for its use, including a detailed injection protocol for a global facial approach by three expert injectors. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxylapatite is a very effective agent for many areas of facial soft tissue augmentation and is associated with a high and well-established safety profile. Calcium hydroxylapatite combines high elasticity and viscosity with an ability to induce long-term collagen formation making it an ideal agent for a global facial approach. PMID:25610523

  20. Altered Calcium Signaling Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Weber, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Cell death and dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by a primary phase, related to direct mechanical disruption of the brain, and a secondary phase which consists of delayed events initiated at the time of the physical insult. Arguably, the calcium ion contributes greatly to the delayed cell damage and death after TBI. A large, sustained influx of calcium into cells can initiate cell death signaling cascades, through activation of several degradative enzymes, such as proteases and endonucleases. However, a sustained level of intracellular free calcium is not necessarily lethal, but the specific route of calcium entry may couple calcium directly to cell death pathways. Other sources of calcium, such as intracellular calcium stores, can also contribute to cell damage. In addition, calcium-mediated signal transduction pathways in neurons may be perturbed following injury. These latter types of alterations may contribute to abnormal physiology in neurons that do not necessarily die after a traumatic episode. This review provides an overview of experimental evidence that has led to our current understanding of the role of calcium signaling in death and dysfunction following TBI. PMID:22518104

  1. Electrical synapse formation disrupts calcium-dependent exocytosis, but not vesicle mobilization.

    PubMed

    Neunuebel, Joshua P; Zoran, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Electrical coupling exists prior to the onset of chemical connectivity at many developing and regenerating synapses. At cholinergic synapses in vitro, trophic factors facilitated the formation of electrical synapses and interfered with functional neurotransmitter release in response to photolytic elevations of intracellular calcium. In contrast, neurons lacking trophic factor induction and electrical coupling possessed flash-evoked transmitter release. Changes in cytosolic calcium and postsynaptic responsiveness to acetylcholine were not affected by electrical coupling. These data indicate that transient electrical synapse formation delayed chemical synaptic transmission by imposing a functional block between the accumulation of presynaptic calcium and synchronized, vesicular release. Despite the inability to release neurotransmitter, neurons that had possessed strong electrical coupling recruited secretory vesicles to sites of synaptic contact. These results suggest that the mechanism by which neurotransmission is disrupted during electrical synapse formation is downstream of both calcium influx and synaptic vesicle mobilization. Therefore, electrical synaptogenesis may inhibit synaptic vesicles from acquiring a readily releasable state. We hypothesize that gap junctions might negatively interact with exocytotic processes, thereby diminishing chemical neurotransmission. PMID:15765535

  2. Blockade of intracellular actions of calcium may protect against ischaemic damage to the gerbil brain.

    PubMed Central

    Asano, T.; Ikegaki, I.; Satoh, S.; Mochizuki, D.; Hidaka, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Shibuya, M.; Sugita, K.

    1991-01-01

    1. The brain cytoprotective effects of a putative calcium-associated protein kinase inhibitor, HA1077, as well as a calcium entry blocker nicardipine were evaluated in models of cerebral ischaemia in Mongolian gerbils. Morphological changes characterizing delayed neuronal death of selectively vulnerable CA1 pyramidal neurones in the hippocampus of the Mongolian gerbil brain occurred 7 days after transient bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. 2. A single injection of HA1077 (1 and 3 mg kg-1, i.p.) 5 min after the occlusion led to a dose-dependent protection of the CA1 neurones. Repeated administrations of HA1077 (1 and 3 mg kg-1, i.p., twice daily for 7 days post-ischaemia) revealed an increase in the number of normal cells, compared to findings with a single administration. 3. In contrast to HA1077, nicardipine (0.3 and 1 mg kg-1, i.p.) did not reduce neuronal degeneration. 4. HA1077 did not interact with the ion channel within which MK-801 binds, as determined by receptor binding. 5. The calcium ionophore, A23187, caused a tonic contraction in canine cerebral arterial strips. HA1077, but not nicardipine, relaxed the A23187-induced contraction, concentration-dependently. 6. These results suggest that blockade of the intracellular actions of calcium may provide protection against ischaemic damage in the brain. Images Figure 1 PMID:1912980

  3. Average Transient Lifetime and Lyapunov Dimension for Transient Chaos in a High-Dimensional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Jian-Xin; Tang, Shao-Yan; Xiang, Hong; Chen, Xin

    2001-11-01

    The average transient lifetime of a chaotic transient versus the Lyapunov dimension of a chaotic saddle is studied for high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems. Typically the average lifetime depends upon not only the system parameter but also the Lyapunov dimension of the chaotic saddle. The numerical example uses the delayed feedback differential equation.

  4. Developmental delay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  5. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  6. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  7. Calcium carbonate overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  8. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  9. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells in vitro induces calcium influx and IP3-dependent release of calcium stores

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Klinger, Alexandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Gas embolism is a serious complication of decompression events and clinical procedures, but the mechanism of resulting injury remains unclear. Previous work has demonstrated that contact between air microbubbles and endothelial cells causes a rapid intracellular calcium transient and can lead to cell death. Here we examined the mechanism responsible for the calcium rise. Single air microbubbles (50–150 μm), trapped at the tip of a micropipette, were micromanipulated into contact with individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) loaded with Fluo-4 (a fluorescent calcium indicator). Changes in intracellular calcium were then recorded via epifluorescence microscopy. First, we confirmed that HUVECs rapidly respond to air bubble contact with a calcium transient. Next, we examined the involvement of extracellular calcium influx by conducting experiments in low calcium buffer, which markedly attenuated the response, or by pretreating cells with stretch-activated channel blockers (gadolinium chloride or ruthenium red), which abolished the response. Finally, we tested the role of intracellular calcium release by pretreating cells with an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (xestospongin C) or phospholipase C inhibitor (neomycin sulfate), which eliminated the response in 64% and 67% of cases, respectively. Collectively, our results lead us to conclude that air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes an influx of calcium through a stretch-activated channel, such as a transient receptor potential vanilloid family member, triggering the release of calcium from intracellular stores via the IP3 pathway. PMID:21633077

  10. Redox control of brain calcium in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Cecilia; Carrasco, M Angélica

    2011-04-01

    Calcium ion is a highly versatile cellular messenger. Calcium signals-defined as transient increments in intracellular-free calcium concentration-elicit a multiplicity of responses that depend on cell type and signal properties such as their intensity, duration, cellular localization, and frequency. The vast literature available on the role of calcium signals in brain cells, chiefly centered on neuronal cells, indicates that calcium signals regulate essential neuronal functions, including synaptic transmission, gene expression, synaptic plasticity processes underlying learning and memory, and survival or death. The eight articles comprising this forum issue address different and novel aspects of calcium signaling in normal neuronal function, including how calcium signals interact with the generation of reactive species of oxygen/nitrogen with various functional consequences, and focus also on how abnormal calcium homeostasis and signaling, plus oxidative stress, affect overall brain physiology during aging and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. PMID:21050143

  11. Measurement of calcium release due to inositol trisphosphate receptors in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Casas, Mariana; Altamirano, Francisco; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calcium transients elicited by IP(3) receptors upon electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells (slow calcium signals) are often hard to visualize due to their relatively small amplitude compared to the large transient originated from ryanodine receptors associated to excitation-contraction coupling. The study of slow calcium transients, however, is relevant due to their function in regulation of muscle gene expression and in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Discussed here are the procedures used to record slow calcium signals from both cultured mouse myotubes and from cultured adult skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:22130849

  12. Canonical transient receptor potential 5.

    PubMed

    Beech, D J

    2007-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential 5 TRPC5 (also TrpC5, trp-5 or trp5) is one of the seven mammalian TRPC proteins. Its known functional property is that of a mixed cationic plasma membrane channel with calcium permeability. It is active alone or as a heteromultimeric assembly with TRPC1; TRPC4 and TRPC3 may also be involved. Multiple activators of TRPC5 are emerging, including various G protein-coupled receptor agonists, lysophospholipids, lanthanide ions and, in some contexts, calcium store depletion. Intracellular calcium has complex impact on TRPC5, including a permissive role for other activators, as well as inhibition at high concentrations. Protein kinase C is inhibitory and mediates desensitisation following receptor activation. Tonic TRPC5 activity is detected and may reflect the presence of constitutive activation signals. The channel has voltage dependence but the biological significance of this is unknown; it is partially due to intracellular magnesium blockade at aspartic acid residue 633. Protein partners include calmodulin, CaBP1, enkurin, Na(+)-H+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF) and stathmin. TRPC5 is included in local vesicular trafficking regulated by growth factors through phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase, Rac1 and PIP-5-kinase. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase suppresses TRPC5, possibly via an effect on trafficking. Biological roles of TRPC5 are emerging but more reports on this aspect are needed. One proposed role is as a mediator of calcium entry and excitation in smooth muscle, another as an inhibitor of neuronal growth cone extension. The latter is intriguing in view of the original cloning of the human TRPC5 gene from a region of the X chromosome linked to mental retardation. TRPC5 is a broadly expressed calcium channel with capability to act as an integrator of extracellular and intracellular signals at the level of calcium entry. PMID:17217053

  13. Optical transient monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernas, Martin; Páta, Petr; Hudec, René; Soldán, Jan; Rezek, Tomáš; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.

    1998-05-01

    Although there are several optical GRB follow-up systems in operation and/or in development, some of them with a very short response time, they will never be able to provide true simultaneous (no delay) and pre-burst optical data for GRBs. We report on the development and tests of a monitoring experiment expected to be put into test operation in 1998. The system should detect Optical Transients down to mag 6-7 (few seconds duration assumed) over a wide field of view. The system is based on the double CCD wide-field cameras ST8. For the real time evaluation of the signal from both cameras, two TMS 320C40 processors are used. Using two channels differing in spectral sensitivity and processing of temporal sequence of images allows us to eliminate man-made objects and defects of the CCD electronics. The system is controlled by a standard PC computer.

  14. An Attempt to Induce Transient Immunosuppression Pre-erythrocytapheresis in a Girl With Sickle Cell Disease, a History of Severe Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions and Need for Hip Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cattoni, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Perseghin, Paolo; Zatti, Giovanni; Gaddi, Diego; Cossio, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Corti, Paola; Masera, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) occurred 7 days after an erythrocytapheresis or eritroexchange procedure (EEX) treated with rituximab and glucocorticoids in a 15-years old patient with sickle cell disease. EEX was performed despite a previous diagnosis of alloimmunization, in order to reduce hemoglobin S rate before a major surgery for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A first dose of rituximab was administered before EEX. However, rituximab couldn’t prevent DHTR that occurred with acute hemolysis, hemoglobinuria and hyperbilirubinemia. A further dose of rituximab and three boli of methylprednisolone were given after the onset of the reaction. It is likely that the combined use of rituximab and steroids managed to gradually improve both patient’s general conditions and hemoglobin levels. Nor early or late side effects were registered in a 33-months follow-up period. This report suggests the potential effectiveness and safety of rituximab in combination with steroids in managing and mitigating the symptoms of delayed post-transfusional hemolytic reactions in alloimmunized patients affected by sickle cell disease with absolute need for erythrocytapheresis. PMID:23888247

  15. Measurand transient signal suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A transient signal suppressor for use in a controls system which is adapted to respond to a change in a physical parameter whenever it crosses a predetermined threshold value in a selected direction of increasing or decreasing values with respect to the threshold value and is sustained for a selected discrete time interval is presented. The suppressor includes a sensor transducer for sensing the physical parameter and generating an electrical input signal whenever the sensed physical parameter crosses the threshold level in the selected direction. A manually operated switch is provided for adapting the suppressor to produce an output drive signal whenever the physical parameter crosses the threshold value in the selected direction of increasing or decreasing values. A time delay circuit is selectively adjustable for suppressing the transducer input signal for a preselected one of a plurality of available discrete suppression time and producing an output signal only if the input signal is sustained for a time greater than the selected suppression time. An electronic gate is coupled to receive the transducer input signal and the timer output signal and produce an output drive signal for energizing a control relay whenever the transducer input is a non-transient signal which is sustained beyond the selected time interval.

  16. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time. PMID:26955048

  17. Charge movement and SR calcium release in frog skeletal muscle can be related by a Hodgkin-Huxley model with four gating particles.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, B. J.; Hill, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Charge movement currents (IQ) and calcium transients (delta[Ca2+]) were measured simultaneously in frog skeletal muscle fibers, voltage clamped in a double vaseline gap chamber, using Antipyrylazo III as the calcium indicator. The rate of release of calcium from the SR (Rrel) was calculated from the calcium transients using the removal model of Melzer, W., E. Rios, and M. F. Schneider (1987. Biophys. J. 51:849-863.). IQ and delta [Ca2+] were calculated for 100 ms depolarizing test pulses to membrane potentials from -30 to +20 mV. To eliminate an inactivating component of Rrel, each test pulse was preceded by a large, fixed prepulse to +20 mV. The resulting Rrel records, which represent the noninactivating component of Rrel, were compared with integral of IQdt.(Q), the total charge that moves. The voltage dependence of the steady state Rrel was steeper then that of Q and shifted to the right. During depolarization, the Rrel waveform was similar to that of Q but was delayed by several ms, while, during repolarization, Rrel preceded Q. All of these results could be explained with a Hodgkin-Huxley type model for E-C coupling in which four voltage sensors in the t-tubule membrane which give rise to IQ must all be in their activating positions for the calcium release channel in the SR membrane to open. his model is consistent with the structural architecture of the triadic junction in which four dihydropyridine receptors (the voltage sensors for E-C coupling) in the t-tubule membrane are closely associated with each ryanodine receptor(the calcium release channel) in the SR membrane [Block, B. A., T. Imagawa, K. P. Campbell, and C. Franzini-Armstrong. 1988. J.Cell. Biol. 107:2587-2600.]). Some aspects of this work have appeared in abstract form (Simon, B. J., and D. Hill. 1991. Biophys. J.59:64a. ([Abstr.]). PMID:1318090

  18. Delaying obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Rob

    2015-04-01

    This paper argues that those who emphasise that designers and engineers need to plan for obsolescence are too conservative. Rather, in addition to planning for obsolescence, designers and engineers should also think carefully about what they could do in order delay obsolescence. They should so this by thinking about the design itself, thinking of ways in which products could be useful and appealing for longer before becoming obsolete, as well thinking about the wider context in terms of the marketing of products, and also the social and legal. The paper also considers objections that these suggestions are unrealistically idealistic, failing to recognise the economic realities. I respond to these objections appealing to research in advertising, psychology, cognitive linguistics, philosophy, history, and economics, as well as drawing on the Statement of Ethical Principles developed by the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Engineering Council. PMID:24792878

  19. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling. Typically about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and replaced each day. To supply this amount, one would need to consume about 600 mg of calcium, since calcium is not very efficiently absorbed. Calcium ...

  20. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  1. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  2. Calcium source (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  3. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  4. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  5. Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Cholecystokinin and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Release in the STC-1 Enteroendocrine Cell Model Is Mediated by Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2015-06-01

    Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a common foodborne contaminant. Although studies in the mouse suggest that DON suppresses food intake by aberrantly inducing the release of satiety hormones from enteroendocrine cells (EECs) found in the gut epithelium, the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not understood. To address this gap, we employed the murine neuroendocrine tumor STC-1 cell line, a widely used EEC model, to test the hypothesis that DON-induced hormone exocytosis is mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated Ca(2+) signaling. The results indicate for the first time that DON elicits Ca(2)-dependent secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36) amide (GLP-1), hormones that regulate food intake and energy homeostasis and that are products of 2 critical EEC populations--I cells of the small intestine and L cells of the large intestine, respectively. Furthermore, these effects were mediated by the GPCR Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) and involved the following serial events: (1)PLC-mediated activation of the IP3 receptor and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, (2) activation of transient receptor potential melastatin-5 ion channel and resultant L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel-facilitated extracellular Ca(2+) entry, (3) amplification of extracellular Ca(2+) entry by transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel activation, and finally (4) Ca(2+)-driven CCK and GLP-1 excytosis. These in vitro findings provide a foundation for future investigation of mechanisms by which DON and other trichothecenes modulate EEC function in ex vivo and in vivo models. PMID:25787141

  6. Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)-Induced Cholecystokinin and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Release in the STC-1 Enteroendocrine Cell Model Is Mediated by Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Food refusal is a hallmark of exposure of experimental animals to the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a common foodborne contaminant. Although studies in the mouse suggest that DON suppresses food intake by aberrantly inducing the release of satiety hormones from enteroendocrine cells (EECs) found in the gut epithelium, the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not understood. To address this gap, we employed the murine neuroendocrine tumor STC-1 cell line, a widely used EEC model, to test the hypothesis that DON-induced hormone exocytosis is mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated Ca2+ signaling. The results indicate for the first time that DON elicits Ca2-dependent secretion of cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-17-36 amide (GLP-1), hormones that regulate food intake and energy homeostasis and that are products of 2 critical EEC populations—I cells of the small intestine and L cells of the large intestine, respectively. Furthermore, these effects were mediated by the GPCR Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) and involved the following serial events: (1)PLC-mediated activation of the IP3 receptor and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores, (2) activation of transient receptor potential melastatin-5 ion channel and resultant L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel-facilitated extracellular Ca2+ entry, (3) amplification of extracellular Ca2+ entry by transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 channel activation, and finally (4) Ca2+-driven CCK and GLP-1 excytosis. These in vitro findings provide a foundation for future investigation of mechanisms by which DON and other trichothecenes modulate EEC function in ex vivo and in vivo models. PMID:25787141

  7. Sodium-calcium exchange during the action potential in guinea-pig ventricular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, T M; Noble, D; Noble, S J; Powell, T; Spindler, A J; Twist, V W

    1989-01-01

    1. Slow inward tail currents attributable to electrogenic sodium-calcium exchange can be recorded by imposing hyperpolarizing voltage clamp pulses during the normal action potential of isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells. The hyperpolarizations return the membrane to the resting potential (between -65 and -88 m V) allowing an inward current to be recorded. This current usually has peak amplitude when repolarization is imposed during the first 50 ms after the action potential upstroke, but becomes negligible once the final phase of repolarization is reached. The envelope of peak current tail amplitudes strongly resembles that of the intracellular calcium transient recorded in other studies. 2. Repetitive stimulation producing normal action potentials at a frequency of 2 Hz progressively augments the tail current recorded immediately after the stimulus train. Conversely, if each action potential is prematurely terminated at 0.1 Hz, repetitive stimulation produces a tail current much smaller than the control value. The control amplitude of inward current is only maintained if interrupted action potentials are separated by at least one full 'repriming' action potential. These effects mimic those on cell contraction (Arlock & Wohlfart, 1986) and suggest that progressive changes in tail current are controlled by variations in the amplitude and time course of the intracellular calcium transient. 3. When intracellular calcium is buffered sufficiently to abolish contraction, the tail current is abolished. Substitution of calcium with strontium greatly reduces the tail current. 4. The inward tail current can also be recorded at more positive membrane potentials using standard voltage clamp pulse protocols. In this way it was found that temperature has a large effect on the tail current, which can change from net inward at 22 degrees C to net outward at 37 degrees C. The largest inward currents are usually recorded at about 30 degrees C. It is shown that this effect is

  8. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  9. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. PMID:26613410

  10. Transient simulation of absorption machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, D. K.; Allen, R. W.; Kumar, B.

    A model for a water-cooled Lithium-Bromide/water absorption chiller is presented. Its transient response both during the start-up phase and during the shut-off period is predicted. The simulation model incorporates such influencing factors as the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid, the absorbent, the heat-transfer configuration of different components of the chiller and related physical data. The time constants of different components are controlled by a set of key parameters that have been identified. The results show a variable but at times significant amount of time delay before the chiller capacity gets close to its steady-state value. The model is intended to provide an insight into the mechanism of build-up to steady-state performance. By recognizing the significant factors contributing to transient degradation, steps can be taken to reduce such degradation.

  11. Depletion of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M F; Simon, B J; Szucs, G

    1987-11-01

    1. Free intracellular calcium transients (delta[Ca2+] were monitored in cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibres voltage clamped in a double Vaseline-gap chamber and stretched to sarcomere lengths that eliminated fibre movement. The measured calcium transients were used to calculate the rate of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) as previously described (Melzer, Rios & Schneider, 1984, 1987). 2. Conditioning pulses were found to suppress the rate of calcium release in test pulses applied after the conditioning pulse. Various combinations of conditioning and test pulses were used to investigate the basis of the suppression of calcium release by the conditioning pulse. 3. Using a constant test pulse applied at varying intervals after a constant conditioning pulse, recovery from suppression of release was found to occur in two phases. During the fast phase of recovery, which was completed within about 1 s, the rate of calcium release was smaller and had a different wave form than the unconditioned control release. The early peak in release that is characteristic of the control release wave form was absent or depressed. During the slow phase of recovery, which required about 1 min for completion, the release wave form was the same as control but was simply scaled down compared to the control. 4. Conditioning pulses also slowed the rate of decay of delta[Ca2+] after a constant test pulse, probably due to an increased occupancy by calcium of slowly equilibrating myoplasmic sites that bind some of the calcium released by the conditioning pulse. Since calcium binding to these sites contributes to the decay of delta[Ca2+], their increased occupancy would slow the decay of delta[Ca2+] following the test pulse. This effect was used to estimate the calcium occupancy of the slowly equilibrating sites. 5. Comparison of the time course of the slow recovery from suppression of release following a constant conditioning pulse with the time course of the loss of

  12. Eag1, Eag2, and SK3 potassium channel expression in the rat hippocampus after global transient brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, R M Weffort; Martin, S; de Oliveira, C Lino; Milani, H; Schiavon, A P; Joca, S; Pardo, L A; Stühmer, W; Del Bel, E A

    2012-03-01

    Transient global brain ischemia causes delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus that has been associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent brain function, such as mood, learning, and memory. We investigated the expression of voltage-dependent Kcnh1 and Kcnh5, ether à go-go-related Eag1 and Eag2 (K(V) 10.1 and K(V) 10.2), and small-conductance calcium-activated SK3 (K(Ca) 2.3, Kcnn3) K(+) channels in the hippocampus in rats after transient global brain ischemia. We tested whether the expression of these channels is associated with behavioral changes by evaluating the animals in the elevated plus maze and step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Seven or tweny-eight days after transient global brain ischemia, one group of rats had the hippocampus bilaterally dissected, and mRNA levels were determined. Seven days after transient global brain ischemia, the rats exhibited a decrease in anxiety-like behavior and memory impairments. An increase in anxiety levels was detected 28 days after ischemia. Eag2 mRNA downregulation was observed in the hippocampus 7 days after transient global brain ischemia, whereas Eag1 and SK3 mRNA expression remained unaltered. This is the first experimental evidence that transient global brain ischemia temporarily alters Eag2. The number of intact-appearing pyramidal neurons was substantially decreased in CA1 and statistically measurable in CA2, CA3, and CA4 hippocampal subfields compared with sham control animals 7 or 28 days after ischemia. mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus. The present results provide further information for the characterization of the physiological role of Eag2 channels in the central nervous system. PMID:22006722

  13. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  14. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1. PMID:25428882

  15. Pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony suppresses heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G; Kass, David A

    2015-12-23

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with biventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), improves both. However, not every patient qualifies for CRT. We show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of right ventricular paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest that PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction who are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  16. Pacemaker-Induced Transient Asynchrony Suppresses Heart Failure Progression

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jonathan A.; Chakir, Khalid; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Karst, Edward; Holewinski, Ronald J.; Pironti, Gianluigi; Tunin, Richard S.; Pozios, Iraklis; Abraham, Theodore P.; de Tombe, Pieter; Rockman, Howard A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Craig, Roger; Farazi, Taraneh G.; Kass, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Uncoordinated contraction from electromechanical delay worsens heart failure pathophysiology and prognosis, but restoring coordination with bi-ventricular pacing, known as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves both. Not every patient, however, qualifies for CRT. Here we show that heart failure with synchronous contraction is improved by inducing dyssynchrony for 6 hours daily by right-ventricular pacing using an intracardiac pacing device, in a process we call pacemaker-induced transient asynchrony (PITA). In dogs with heart failure induced by 6 weeks of atrial tachypacing, PITA (starting on week 3) suppressed progressive cardiac dilation as well as chamber and myocyte dysfunction. PITA enhanced β-adrenergic responsiveness in vivo and normalized it in myocytes. Myofilament calcium response declined in dogs with synchronous heart failure, which was accompanied by sarcomere disarray and generation of myofibers with severely reduced function, and these changes were absent in PITA-treated hearts. The benefits of PITA were not replicated when the same number of RV-paced beats was randomly distributed throughout the day, indicating that continuity of dyssynchrony exposure is necessary to trigger the beneficial biological response upon resynchronization. These results suggest PITA could bring the benefits of CRT to the many heart failure patients with synchronous contraction that are not CRT candidates. PMID:26702095

  17. Cytoplasmic alkalization reduces calcium buffering in molluscan central neurons.

    PubMed

    Zucker, R S

    1981-11-23

    The effect of raised cytoplasmic pH (pHi) on intracellular concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients following calcium influx during membrane depolarization was studied in identified neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. The pHi was monitored with pH-sensitive microelectrodes. Sea water containing 15 mM NH4Cl at pH 7.7 elevated pHi about 0.35 pH units from the normal level of 7.17. These cells have an estimated buffering power of about 60 mM/pH unit. Calcium influx was elicited by depolarizing pulses under voltage clamp and [Ca2+]i transients were monitored with the photoprotein aequorin or the metallochromic dye arsenazo III. Aequorin photo-emissions increased by 21--131% (mean, 48%) and arsenazo III absorbance changes accompanying depolarization increased by 9--33% (mean, 20%) after 30 min in NH4+, corresponding roughly to a 14% increase in [Ca2+]i transients. Calcium-dependent potassium tail currents following a depolarizing pulse were somewhat slower and 4--91% (mean, 38%) large in NH4+. The magnitude and time- and voltage-dependence of the membrane calcium conductance was studied using calcium tail currents following depolarizing pulses. The calcium current was unaffected by NH4+, so the enhanced [Ca2+]i transients must reflect reduced calcium buffering at high pHi. Either reduced cytoplasmic calcium binding or slowed active extrusion of calcium may be responsible for this effect. PMID:6271335

  18. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  19. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  20. Delayed coker fractionator advanced control

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisinghani, R.; Minter, B. ); Tica, A.; Puglesi, A.; Ojeda, R. )

    1993-08-01

    In a delayed coking process, as coke drum switches are made, rapid changes occur in both the fractionator feed rate and composition. With conventional control, it is not unusual to see long transient behavior of large swings in both quality and flowrates of coker gas oils. This can extract a heavy economic toll, not only in coker operation, but in the operation of downstream units as the upset is propagated. An advanced process control application (APC) was recently implemented on the coker fractionator at the Yacimentos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), Lujan de Cuyo Refinery, in Mendoza, Argentina. This coker fractionator control design was unique as it handled two different operating objectives: control of product qualities via tower temperature profile during normal operation and control of gas oil product flow ratio during drum switch. This combination of control objectives in one multivariable predictive control program was achieved by including special logic to decouple the individual tuning requirements. Also, additional logic was included to unambiguously detect and identify drum switch and drum steam out as discrete events within 30 seconds of their actual occurrence. These discrete events were then used as disturbance variables to minimize fractionator transient behavior. As a performance measure, the overhead temperature was controlled within 2 C to 2.5 C of its target, gas oil flows were stabilized during drum switches and steam generation via pump around was maximized. Overall, implementing advanced control for the delayed coker fractionator resulted in substantial benefits from product quality control, product flow control and minimized energy consumption.

  1. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  2. The importance of calcium in the regulation of megakaryocyte function.

    PubMed

    Di Buduo, Christian Andrea; Moccia, Francesco; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Mazzucato, Mario; Moratti, Remigio; Tanzi, Franco; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    Platelet release by megakaryocytes is regulated by a concert of environmental and autocrine factors. We previously showed that constitutively released adenosine diphosphate by human megakaryocytes leads to platelet production. Here we show that adenosine diphosphate elicits, in human megakaryocytes, an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, followed by a plateau, which is lowered in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting the involvement of Store-Operated Calcium Entry. Indeed, we demonstrate that megakaryocytes express the major candidates to mediate Store-Operated Calcium Entry, stromal interaction molecule 1, Orai1 and canonical transient receptor potential 1, which are activated upon either pharmacological or physiological depletion of the intracellular calcium pool. This mechanism is inhibited by phospholipase C or inositol-3-phosphate receptor inhibitors and by a specific calcium entry blocker. Studies on megakaryocyte behavior, on extracellular matrix proteins that support proplatelet extension, show that calcium mobilization from intracellular stores activates signaling cascades that trigger megakaryocyte adhesion and proplatelet formation, and promotes extracellular calcium entry which is primarily involved in the regulation of the contractile force responsible for megakaryocyte motility. These findings provide the first evidence that both calcium mobilization from intracellular stores and extracellular calcium entry specifically regulate human megakaryocyte functions. PMID:24463213

  3. The importance of calcium in the regulation of megakaryocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Andrea Di Buduo, Christian; Moccia, Francesco; Battiston, Monica; De Marco, Luigi; Mazzucato, Mario; Moratti, Remigio; Tanzi, Franco; Balduini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Platelet release by megakaryocytes is regulated by a concert of environmental and autocrine factors. We previously showed that constitutively released adenosine diphosphate by human megakaryocytes leads to platelet production. Here we show that adenosine diphosphate elicits, in human megakaryocytes, an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, followed by a plateau, which is lowered in the absence of extracellular calcium, suggesting the involvement of Store-Operated Calcium Entry. Indeed, we demonstrate that megakaryocytes express the major candidates to mediate Store-Operated Calcium Entry, stromal interaction molecule 1, Orai1 and canonical transient receptor potential 1, which are activated upon either pharmacological or physiological depletion of the intracellular calcium pool. This mechanism is inhibited by phospholipase C or inositol-3-phosphate receptor inhibitors and by a specific calcium entry blocker. Studies on megakaryocyte behavior, on extracellular matrix proteins that support proplatelet extension, show that calcium mobilization from intracellular stores activates signaling cascades that trigger megakaryocyte adhesion and proplatelet formation, and promotes extracellular calcium entry which is primarily involved in the regulation of the contractile force responsible for megakaryocyte motility. These findings provide the first evidence that both calcium mobilization from intracellular stores and extracellular calcium entry specifically regulate human megakaryocyte functions. PMID:24463213

  4. Reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage underlies the reduced vulnerability of excitotoxicity-tolerant hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Watts, Charlotte A; Brantner, Christine A; Smith, Carolyn L; Andrews, S Brian

    2008-03-01

    In central neurons, over-stimulation of NMDA receptors leads to excessive mitochondrial calcium accumulation and damage, which is a critical step in excitotoxic death. This raises the possibility that low susceptibility to calcium overload-induced mitochondrial damage might characterize excitotoxicity-resistant neurons. In this study, we have exploited two complementary models of preconditioning-induced excitotoxicity resistance to demonstrate reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage in NMDA-tolerant hippocampal neurons. We have further identified adaptations in mitochondrial calcium handling that account for enhanced mitochondrial integrity. In both models, enhanced tolerance was associated with improved preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and structure. In the first model, which exhibited modest neuroprotection, mitochondria-dependent calcium deregulation was delayed, even though cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium loads were quantitatively unchanged, indicating that enhanced mitochondrial calcium capacity accounts for reduced injury. In contrast, the second model, which exhibited strong neuroprotection, displayed further delayed calcium deregulation and reduced mitochondrial damage because downregulation of NMDA receptor surface expression depressed calcium loading. Reducing calcium entry also modified the chemical composition of the calcium-buffering precipitates that form in calcium-loaded mitochondria. It thus appears that reduced mitochondrial calcium loading is a major factor underlying the robust neuroprotection seen in highly tolerant cells. PMID:18036152

  5. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting. PMID:18429501

  6. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  7. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies, and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6°C.

  8. Transient combustion in hybrid rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabeyoglu, Mustafa Arif

    1998-09-01

    Hybrid rockets regained interest recently as an alternative chemical propulsion system due to their advantages over the solid and liquid systems that are currently in use. Development efforts on hybrids revealed two important problem areas: (1) low frequency instabilities and (2) slow transient response. Both of these are closely related to the transient behavior which is a poorly understood aspect of hybrid operation. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical study of transient combustion in hybrid rockets. We follow the methodology of identifying and modeling the subsystems of the motor such as the thermal lags in the solid, boundary layer combustion and chamber gasdynamics from a dynamic point of view. We begin with the thermal lag in the solid which yield the regression rate for any given wall heat flux variation. Interesting phenomena such as overshooting during throttling and the amplification and phase lead regions in the frequency domain are discovered. Later we develop a quasi-steady transient hybrid combustion model supported with time delays for the boundary layer processes. This is integrated with the thermal lag system to obtain the thermal combustion (TC) coupled response. The TC coupled system with positive delays generated low frequency instabilities. The scaling of the instabilities are in good agreement with actual motor test data. Finally, we formulate a gasdynamic model for the hybrid chamber which successfully resolves the filling/emptying and longitudinal acoustic behavior of the motor. The TC coupled system is later integrated to the gasdynamic model to obtain the overall response (TCG coupled system) of gaseous oxidizer motors with stiff feed systems. Low frequency instabilities were also encountered for the TCG coupled system. Apart from the transient investigations, the regression rate behavior of liquefying hybrid propellants such as solid cryogenic materials are also studied. The theory is based on the possibility of enhancement

  9. Computing using delayed feedback systems: towards photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appeltant, L.; Soriano, M. C.; Van der Sande, G.; Danckaert, J.; Massar, S.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Mirasso, C. R.; Fischer, I.

    2012-06-01

    Reservoir computing has recently been introduced as a new paradigm in the eld of machine learning. It is based on the dynamical properties of a network of randomly connected nodes or neurons and shows to be very promising to solve complex classication problems in a computationally ecient way. The key idea is that an input generates nonlinearly transient behavior rendering transient reservoir states suitable for linear classication. Our goal is to study up to which extent systems with delay, and especially photonic systems, can be used as reservoirs. Recently an new architecture has been proposed1 , based on a single nonlinear node with delayed feedback. An electronic1 and an opto-electronic implementation2, 3 have been demonstrated and both have proven to be very successful in terms of performance. This simple conguration, which replaces an entire network of randomly connected nonlinear nodes with one single hardware node and a delay line, is signicantly easier to implement experimentally. It is no longer necessary to construct an entire network of hundreds or even thousands of circuits, each one representing a node. With this approach one node and a delay line suce to construct a computational unit. In this manuscript, we present a further investigation of the properties of delayed feedback congurations used as a reservoir. Instead of quantifying the performance as an error obtained for a certain benchmark, we now investigate a task-independent property, the linear memory of the system.

  10. Calcium Imaging of Sonoporation of Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabens, David; Aehle, Matthew; Steyer, Grant; Kourennyi, Dmitri; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound mediated delivery of compounds is a relatively recent development in drug delivery and gene transfection techniques. Due to the lack of methods for real-time monitoring of sonoporation at the cellular level, the efficiency of drug/gene delivery and sonoporation associated side effects, such as the loss of cell viability and enhanced apoptosis, have been studied only through post US exposure analyses, requiring days for cell incubation. Furthermore, because microporation appears to be transient in nature, it was not possible to correlate transfection with microporation on an individual cellular basis. By studying the role of calcium in the cell and using fluorescent calcium imaging to study sonoporation it is possible to quantify both cell porosity and sonoporation side effects. Since both post sonoporation cell survival and delivery efficiency are related to the dynamic process of the cell membrane poration, calcium imaging of sonoporation will provide important knowledge to obtain improved understanding of sonoporation mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of calcium imaging of sonoporation in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We have measured the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration using Fura-2, a fluorescent probe, which indicate influx or flow of Calcium across the cell membrane. Analysis of data identified key aspects in the dynamic sonoporation process including the formation of pores in the cell membrane, and the relative temporal duration of the pores and their resealing. These observations are obtained through the analysis of the rate the calcium concentration changes within the cells, making it possible to visualize membrane opening and repair in real-time through such changes in the intracellular calcium concentration.

  11. Calcium and Vitamin D

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your weekly shopping list. Produce Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Collard greens, frozen 8 oz 360 mg ... Oranges 1 whole 55 mg Seafood Serving Size Estimated Calcium* Sardines, canned with bones 3 oz 325 ...

  12. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  13. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  14. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  15. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Bones, like other tissues in the body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their ...

  16. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    TTN; Wet lungs - newborns; Retained fetal lung fluid; Transient RDS; Prolonged transition; Neonatal - transient tachypnea ... As the baby grows in the womb, the lungs make a special fluid. This fluid fills the ...

  17. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  18. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  19. Transient drainage summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

  20. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the roles of calcium and vitamin D in bone health. Calcium is required for the bone formation phase of bone remodeling and it also affects bone mass through its impact on the remodeling rate. Typically, about 5 nmol (200 mg) of calcium is removed from the adult skeleton and ...

  1. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... or if your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ... injury. As you age, your body still needs calcium to keep your bones dense and strong. Most experts recommend at least ...

  2. Dysgraphia in Children: Lasting Psychomotor Deficiency or Transient Developmental Delay?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C. M.; Van Galen, Gerard P.

    1997-01-01

    Used writing tasks recorded on a computer-monitored XY tablet to differentiate between normal variations in psychomotor development and dysgraphia in 16 young children. Found that control of spatial accuracy, not allograph retrieval or size control, discriminated dysgraphic children from others. Poor writers were less accurate than proficient…

  3. Calcium bioavailability from calcium fortified food products.

    PubMed

    Kohls, K

    1991-08-01

    The calcium balance of 12 presumed healthy human young adult subjects was assessed. Subjects consumed a constant laboratory-controlled diet supplemented with one of four calcium-fortified food products: orange juice (OJ), milk (M), experimental pasteurized processed cheese (T), soda (S), or a calcium carbonate plus vitamin D tablet (CC). Study length was 6 weeks with seven-day experimental periods (2-days allowed for adjustment with 5-days combined for purposes of analysis). All urine and fecal samples were collected by the subjects for the duration of the study. Blood samples were drawn at the end of each experimental period. Urine and fecal calcium contents were determined. Blood samples were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase. Results of this study indicate a higher fecal calcium content (mg/day) when subjects consumed CC and T, and when subjects consumed self-selected diets, than when given S, M, or OJ. Urinary calcium excretion was significantly lower when subjects consumed OJ than when they consumed M, T, or their self-selected diets. A significantly larger positive calcium balance was demonstrated when subjects consumed OJ as compared to T. Fecal transmit time did not vary significantly. Serum alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower when subjects consumed T than when they consumed self-selected diets. PMID:1765836

  4. A functional study of plasma-membrane calcium-pump isoform 2 mutants causing digenic deafness

    PubMed Central

    Ficarella, R.; Di Leva, F.; Bortolozzi, M.; Ortolano, S.; Donaudy, F.; Petrillo, M.; Melchionda, S.; Lelli, A.; Domi, T.; Fedrizzi, L.; Lim, D.; Shull, G. E.; Gasparini, P.; Brini, M.; Mammano, F.; Carafoli, E.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ enters the stereocilia of hair cells through mechanoelectrical transduction channels opened by the deflection of the hair bundle and is exported back to endolymph by an unusual splicing isoform (w/a) of plasma-membrane calcium-pump isoform 2 (PMCA2). Ablation or missense mutations of the pump cause deafness, as described for the G283S mutation in the deafwaddler (dfw) mouse. A deafness-inducing missense mutation of PMCA2 (G293S) has been identified in a human family. The family also was screened for mutations in cadherin 23, which accentuated hearing loss in a previously described human family with a PMCA2 mutation. A T1999S substitution was detected in the cadherin 23 gene of the healthy father and affected son but not in that of the unaffected mother, who presented instead the PMCA2 mutation. The w/a isoform was overexpressed in CHO cells. At variance with the other PMCA2 isoforms, it became activated only marginally when exposed to a Ca2+ pulse. The G293S and G283S mutations delayed the dissipation of Ca2+ transients induced in CHO cells by InsP3. In organotypic cultures, Ca2+ imaging of vestibular hair cells showed that the dissipation of stereociliary Ca2+ transients induced by Ca2+ uncaging was compromised in the dfw and PMCA2 knockout mice, as was the sensitivity of the mechanoelectrical transduction channels to hair bundle displacement in cochlear hair cells. PMID:17234811

  5. [The role of gastro-intestinal tract in the calcium absorption].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Akiko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Calcium is associated with various functions of clinical importance. Its unique distribution;low intracellular and high extracellular concentration, is crucial for the neuro-muscular function. Calcium is also indispensable for the vascular contraction and blood coagulation. Thus, circulating calcium concentration must be strictly maintained within a narrow range, for which parathyroid hormone(PTH), vitamin D, and calcitonin contribute. Food-derived protein-bound calcium must be first released in the acidic condition. Thus, gastric acid is essential for the effective calcium absorption. Intestinal calcium absorption occurs via both active transport and passive transport. For the former, such molecules as transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6(TRPV6), calbindin 9k, and Ca²⁺-ATPase contribute. In the adult, calcium absorption rate is approximately 30% under the ordinary condition. Lower calcium intake is associated with increased calcium absorption and decreased urinary excretion. In the Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese, calcium requirement is determined based on factorial method. Recommended Dietary Allowance(RDA)for calcium ranges from 600-800 mg/day for adult. However, the average calcium intake is far lower than Estimated Average Requirement(EAR). Thus, an effort to increase the calcium intake, rather than considering the detailed calcium absorption rate, is most essential in Japan. PMID:26503863

  6. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. PMID:26439762

  7. Signal delay and input synchronization in passive dendritic structures.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Snir, H; Segev, I

    1993-11-01

    1. A novel approach for analyzing transients in passive structures called "the method of moments" is introduced. It provides, as a special case, an analytic method for calculating the time delay and speed of propagation of electrical signals in any passive dendritic tree without the need for numerical simulations. 2. Total dendritic delay (TD) between two points (y, x) is defined as the difference between the centroid (the center of gravity) of the transient current input, I, at point y[tI(y)] and the centroid of the transient voltage response, V, at point x [tV(x)]. The TD measured at the input points is nonzero and is called the local delay (LD). Propagation delay, PD(y, x), is then defined as TD(y, x)--LD(y) whereas the net dendritic delay, NDD(y, 0), of an input point, y, is defined as TD(y, 0) - LD(0), where 0 is the target point, typically the soma. The signal velocity at a point x0 in the tree, theta(x0), is defined as [1/(dtv(x)/dx)[x = x0. 3. With the use of these definitions, several properties of dendritic delay exist. First, the delay between any two points in a given tree is independent of the properties (shape and duration) of the transient current input. Second, the velocity of the signal at any given point (y) in a given direction from (y) does not depend on the morphology of the tree "behind" the signal, and of the input location. Third, TD(y, x) = TD(x, y), for any two points, x, y. 4. Two additional properties are useful for efficiently calculating delays in arbitrary passive trees. 1) The subtrees connected at the ends of any dendritic segment can each be functionally lumped into an equivalent isopotential R-C compartment. 2) The local delay at any given point (y) in a tree is the mean of the local delays of the separate structures (subtrees) connected at y, weighted by the relative input conductance of the corresponding subtrees. 5. Because the definitions for delays utilize difference between centroids, the local delay and the total delay can

  8. Speech and Language Delay

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Speech and Language Delay Overview How do I know if my child has speech delay? Every child develops at his or her ... of the same age, the problem may be speech delay. Your doctor may think your child has ...

  9. Delay Discounting and Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Gregory J.; Francisco, Monica T.; Brewer, Adam T.; Stein, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Delay discounting describes the decline in the value of a reinforcer as the delay to that reinforcer increases. A review of the available studies revealed that steep delay discounting is positively correlated with problem or pathological gambling. One hypothesis regarding this correlation derives from the discounting equation proposed by Mazur (1989). According to the equation, steeper discounting renders the difference between fixed-delayed rewards and gambling-like variable-delayed rewards larger; with the latter being more valuable. The present study was designed to test this prediction by first assessing rats’ impulsive choices across four delays to a larger-later reinforcer. A second condition quantified strength of preference for mixed- over fixed-delays, with the duration of the latter adjusted between sessions to achieve indifference. Strength of preference for the mixed-delay alternative is given by the fixed delay at indifference (lower fixed-delay values reflect stronger preferences). Percent impulsive choice was not correlated with the value of the fixed delay at indifference and, therefore, the prediction of the hyperbolic model of gambling was not supported. A follow-up assessment revealed a significant decrease in impulsive choice after the second condition. This shift in impulsive choice could underlie the failure to observe the predicted correlation between impulsive choice and degree of preference for mixed- over fixed delays. PMID:21352902

  10. Calcium buffering in rodent olfactory bulb granule cells and mitral cells.

    PubMed

    Egger, Veronica; Stroh, Olga

    2009-09-15

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb, axonless granule cells (GCs) mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between mitral cells (MCs) via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. Calcium signals in the GC dendrites and reciprocal spines appear to decay unusually slowly, hence GC calcium handling might contribute to the known asynchronous release at this synapse. By recording fluorescence transients of different Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes at variable concentrations evoked by backpropagating action potentials (APs) and saturating AP trains we extrapolated Ca(2+) dynamics to conditions of zero added buffer for juvenile rat GC apical dendrites and spines and MC lateral dendrites. Resting [Ca(2+)] was at approximately 50 nM in both GC dendrites and spines. The average endogenous GC buffer capacities (kappa(E)) were within a range of 80-90 in the dendrites and 110-140 in the spines. The extrusion rate (gamma) was estimated as 570 s(-1) for dendrites and 870 s(-1) for spines and the decay time constant as approximately 200 ms for both. Single-current-evoked APs resulted in a [Ca(2+)] elevation of approximately 250 nM. Calcium handling in juvenile and adult mouse GCs appeared mostly similar. In MC lateral dendrites, we found AP-mediated [Ca(2+)] elevations of approximately 130 nM with a similar decay to that in GC dendrites, while kappa(E) and gamma were roughly 4-fold higher. In conclusion, the slow GC Ca(2+) dynamics are due mostly to sluggish Ca(2+) extrusion. Under physiological conditions this slow removal may well contribute to delayed release and also feed into other Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms that foster asynchronous output from the reciprocal spine. PMID:19635818

  11. Recommendations for the Avoidance of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the possible causes of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which include buildup of lactic acid in muscle, increased intracellular calcium concentration, increased intramuscular inflammation, and muscle fiber and connective tissue damage. Proposed methods to reduce DOMS include warming up before exercise and performing repeated bouts…

  12. Functional Calcium Imaging in Developing Cortical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Hjorth, J.J. Johannes; Meredith, Rhiannon M.

    2011-01-01

    , synaptogenesis and plasticity (Rakic & Komuro, 1995; Spitzer et al., 2004) are of critical importance for the correct development and maturation of the cortical circuitry. In this JoVE video, we demonstrate the methods used to image spontaneous activity in developing cortical networks. Calcium-sensitive indicators, such as Fura 2-AM ester diffuse across the cell membrane where intracellular esterase activity cleaves the AM esters to leave the cell-impermeant form of indicator dye. The impermeant form of indicator has carboxylic acid groups which are able to then detect and bind calcium ions intracellularly.. The fluorescence of the calcium-sensitive dye is transiently altered upon binding to calcium. Single or multi-photon imaging techniques are used to measure the change in photons being emitted from the dye, and thus indicate an alteration in intracellular calcium. Furthermore, these calcium-dependent indicators can be combined with other fluorescent markers to investigate cell types within the active network. PMID:22041662

  13. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation on cytokine secretion from skeletal muscle cells: involvement of calcium in the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Fidi; Adamek, Mariusz; Brodie, C.; Shainberg, Asher

    1997-12-01

    Low energy laser irradiation has an effect on Nerve Growth Factor and anti mitotic factors release from rat and mouse skeletal muscle cultures. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation. Calcium changes were detected by dynamic video imaging systems and with a photometric system. Pre incubation of the myotubes with photosensitizers enhance the elevation of both cytosolic calcium and cytokines release from the cells after Helium/Neon irradiation with energy of 3-10 J/cm2. These findings can lead to an hypothesis that transient changes in calcium can accelerate cytokines release from the myotubes.

  14. Optical & NIR Transient Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Nicholas J. G.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2012-04-01

    A workshop on Optical & Near Infrared Transients took place during the first afternoon of the Symposium. It ran for two sessions. The first was given over to talks about various current optical and near-infrared transient surveys, focussing on the Vista surveys, the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, Pan-STARRS, Gaia, TAOS and TAOS2. The second session was a panel-led discussion about coordinating multi-wavelength surveys and associated follow-ups.

  15. Nonlinear femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy using a power-encoded soliton delay line.

    PubMed

    Saint-Jalm, Sarah; Andresen, Esben Ravn; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Rigneault, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    We show femtosecond time-resolved nonlinear pump-probe spectroscopy using a fiber soliton as the probe pulse. Furthermore, we exploit soliton dynamics to record an entire transient trace with a power-encoded delay sweep. The power-encoded delay line takes advantage of the dependency of the soliton trajectory in the (λ,z) space upon input power; the difference in accumulated group delay between trajectories converts a fast power sweep into a fast delay sweep. We demonstrate the concept by performing transient absorption spectroscopy in a test sample and validate it against a conventional pump-probe setup. PMID:26696172

  16. Transient simulation of absorption machines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, D.K.; Allen, R.W.; Kumar, B.

    1982-08-01

    This paper presents a model for a water-cooled Lithium-Bromide/water absorption chiller and predicts its transient response both during the start-up phase and during the shutoff period. The simulation model incorporates such influencing factors as the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid, the absorbent, the heat-transfer configuration of different components of the chiller and related physical data. The time constants of different components are controlled by a set of key parameters that have been identified in this study. The results show a variable but at times significant amount of time delay before the chiller capacity gets close to its steadystate value. The model is intended to provide an insight into the mechanism of build-up to steady-state performance. By recognizing the significant factors contributing to transient degradation, steps can be taken to reduce such degradation. The evaluation of the residual capacity in the shut-off period will yield more realistic estimates of chiller COP for a chiller satisfying dynamic space cooling load.

  17. Transient simulation of absorption machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, D. K.; Allen, R. W.; Kumar, B.

    1982-08-01

    This paper presents a model for a water-cooled Lithium-Bromide/water absorption chiller and predicts its transient response both during the start-up phase and during the shutoff period. The simulation model incorporates such influencing factors as the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid, the absorbent, the heat-transfer configuration of different components of the chiller and related physical data. The time constants of different components are controlled by a set of key parameters that have been identified in this study. The results show a variable but at times significant amount of time delay before the chiller capacity gets close to its steady-state value. The model is intended to provide an insight into the mechanism of build-up to steady-state performance. By recognizing the significant factors contributing to transient degradation, steps can be taken to reduce such degradation. The evaluation of the residual capacity in the shut-off period will yield more realistic estimates of chiller COP for a chiller satisfying dynamic space cooling load.

  18. Microheterogeneity of calcium signalling in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Pozzo-Miller, L D; Connor, J A; Andrews, S B

    2000-05-15

    Transient changes in the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) originating from voltage- or ligand-gated influx and by ligand- or Ca2+-gated release from intracellular stores, trigger or modulate many fundamental neuronal processes, including neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Of the intracellular compartments involved in Ca2+ clearance, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has received the most attention because it expresses Ca2+ pumps and Ca2+ channels, thus endowing it with the potential to act as both an intracellular calcium sink and store. We review here our ongoing work on the role of calcium sequestration into, and release from, ER cisterns and the role that this plays in the generation and termination of free [Ca2+]i transients in dendrites of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices during and after synaptic activity. These studies have been approached by combining parallel microfluorometric measurements of free cytosolic [Ca2+]i transients with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalytical measurements of total Ca content within specific dendritic compartments at the electron microscopy level. Our observations support the emerging realization that specific subsets of dendritic ER cisterns provide spatial and temporal microheterogeneity of Ca2+ signalling, acting not only as a major intracellular Ca sink involved in active clearance mechanisms after voltage- and ligand-gated Ca2+ influx, but also as an intracellular Ca2+ source that can be mobilized by a signal cascade originating at activated synapses. PMID:10811724

  19. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  20. SERCA1 truncated proteins unable to pump calcium reduce the endoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration and induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chami, M; Gozuacik, D; Lagorce, D; Brini, M; Falson, P; Peaucellier, G; Pinton, P; Lecoeur, H; Gougeon, M L; le Maire, M; Rizzuto, R; Bréchot, C; Paterlini-Bréchot, P

    2001-06-11

    By pumping calcium from the cytosol to the ER, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in the control of calcium signaling. We describe two SERCA1 splice variants (S1Ts) characterized by exon 4 and/or exon 11 splicing, encoding COOH terminally truncated proteins, having only one of the seven calcium-binding residues, and thus unable to pump calcium. As shown by semiquantitative RT-PCR, S1T transcripts are differentially expressed in several adult and fetal human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle and heart. S1T proteins expression was detected by Western blot in nontransfected cell lines. In transiently transfected cells, S1T homodimers were revealed by Western blot using mildly denaturing conditions. S1T proteins were shown, by confocal scanning microscopy, to colocalize with endogenous SERCA2b into the ER membrane. Using ER-targeted aequorin (erAEQ), we have found that S1T proteins reduce ER calcium and reverse elevation of ER calcium loading induced by SERCA1 and SERCA2b. Our results also show that SERCA1 variants increase ER calcium leakage and are consistent with the hypothesis of a cation channel formed by S1T homodimers. Finally, when overexpressed in liver-derived cells, S1T proteins significantly induce apoptosis. These data reveal a further mechanism modulating Ca(2+) accumulation into the ER of nonmuscle cells and highlight the relevance of S1T proteins to the control of apoptosis. PMID:11402072

  1. Serca1 Truncated Proteins Unable to Pump Calcium Reduce the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Concentration and Induce Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chami, Mounia; Gozuacik, Devrim; Lagorce, David; Brini, Marisa; Falson, Pierre; Peaucellier, Gérard; Pinton, Paolo; Lecoeur, Hervé; Gougeon, Marie-Lyse; le Maire, Marc; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bréchot, Christian; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2001-01-01

    By pumping calcium from the cytosol to the ER, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in the control of calcium signaling. We describe two SERCA1 splice variants (S1Ts) characterized by exon 4 and/or exon 11 splicing, encoding COOH terminally truncated proteins, having only one of the seven calcium-binding residues, and thus unable to pump calcium. As shown by semiquantitative RT-PCR, S1T transcripts are differentially expressed in several adult and fetal human tissues, but not in skeletal muscle and heart. S1T proteins expression was detected by Western blot in nontransfected cell lines. In transiently transfected cells, S1T homodimers were revealed by Western blot using mildly denaturing conditions. S1T proteins were shown, by confocal scanning microscopy, to colocalize with endogenous SERCA2b into the ER membrane. Using ER-targeted aequorin (erAEQ), we have found that S1T proteins reduce ER calcium and reverse elevation of ER calcium loading induced by SERCA1 and SERCA2b. Our results also show that SERCA1 variants increase ER calcium leakage and are consistent with the hypothesis of a cation channel formed by S1T homodimers. Finally, when overexpressed in liver-derived cells, S1T proteins significantly induce apoptosis. These data reveal a further mechanism modulating Ca2+ accumulation into the ER of nonmuscle cells and highlight the relevance of S1T proteins to the control of apoptosis. PMID:11402072

  2. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weihua; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC), T-type calcium channels (TTCC), sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX), transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26078804

  3. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  4. Perception of acoustic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The research investigates the role of knowledge based or top-down processing in the perception of nonlinguistic, transient signals. The experiments address issues in transient pattern classification, target observation, attentional focusing, auditory induction, and computer based performance aids. The theoretical significance and naval relevance of the research is considered.

  5. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-04-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). PMID:10753088

  6. Lead in calcium supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Scelfo, G M; Flegal, A R

    2000-01-01

    Intercalibrated measurements of lead in calcium supplements indicate the importance of rigorous analytical techniques to accurately quantify contaminant exposures in complex matrices. Without such techniques, measurements of lead concentrations in calcium supplements may be either erroneously low, by as much as 50%, or below the detection limit needed for new public health criteria. In this study, we determined the lead content of 136 brands of supplements that were purchased in 1996. The calcium in the products was derived from natural sources (bonemeal, dolomite, or oyster shell) or was synthesized and/or refined (chelated and nonchelated calcium). The dried products were acid digested and analyzed for lead by high resolution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The method's limit of quantitation averaged 0.06 microg/g, with a coefficient of variation of 1.7% and a 90-100% lead recovery of a bonemeal standard reference material. Two-thirds of those calcium supplements failed to meet the 1999 California criteria for acceptable lead levels (1.5 microg/daily dose of calcium) in consumer products. The nonchelated synthesized and/or refined calcium products, specifically antacids and infant formulas, had the lowest lead concentrations, ranging from nondetectable to 2.9 microg Pb/g calcium, and had the largest proportion of brands meeting the new criteria (85% of the antacids and 100% of the infant formulas). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753088

  7. Localised calcium release events in cells from the muscle of guinea-pig gastric fundus

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, S P; Bolton, T B

    2004-01-01

    After enzymatic dispersion of the muscle of the guinea-pig gastric fundus, single elongated cells were observed which differed from archetypal smooth muscle cells due to their knurled, tuberose or otherwise irregular surface morphology. These, but not archetypal smooth muscle cells, consistently displayed spontaneous localized (i.e. non-propagating) intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) release events. Such calcium events were novel in their magnitude and kinetic profiles. They included short transient events, plateau events and events which coalesced spatially or temporally (compound events). Quantitative analysis of the events with an automatic detection programme showed that their spatio-temporal characteristics (full width and full duration at half-maximum amplitude) were approximately exponentially distributed. Their amplitude distribution suggested the presence of two release modes. Carbachol application caused an initial cell-wide calcium transient followed by an increase in localized calcium release events. Pharmacological analysis suggested that localized calcium release was largely dependent on external calcium entry acting on both inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs) to release stored calcium. Nominally calcium-free external solution immediately and reversibly abolished all localized calcium release without blocking the initial transient calcium release response to carbachol. This was inhibited by 2-APB (100 μm), ryanodine (10 or 50 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm). 2-APB (100 μm), xestospongin C (XeC, 10 μm) or U-73122 (1 μm) blocked both spontaneous localized calcium release and localized release stimulated by 10 μm carbachol. Ryanodine (50 μm) also inhibited spontaneous release, but enhanced localized release in response to carbachol. This study represents the first characterization of localized calcium release events in cells from the gastric fundus. PMID:14608011

  8. Calcium dynamics and buffering in motoneurones of the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Palecek, J; Lips, M B; Keller, B U

    1999-10-15

    1. A quantitative analysis of endogenous calcium homeostasis was performed on 65 motoneurones in slices of the lumbar spinal cord from 2- to 8-day-old mice by simultaneous patch-clamp and microfluorometric calcium measurements. 2. Somatic calcium concentrations were monitored with a temporal resolution in the millisecond time domain. Measurements were performed by using a monochromator for excitation and a photomultiplier detection system. 3. Somatic calcium signalling was investigated during defined voltage-clamp protocols. Calcium responses were observed for membrane depolarizations positive to -50 mV. A linear relation between depolarization time and free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) indicated that voltage-dependent calcium influx dominated the response. 4. Endogenous calcium homeostasis was quantified by using the 'added buffer' approach. In the presence of fura-2 and mag-fura-5, calcium transients decayed according to a monoexponential function. Decay-time constants showed a linear dependence on dye concentration and the extrapolated constant in the absence of indicator dye was 371 +/- 120 ms (n = 13 cells, 21 C). 5. For moderate elevations (< 1 microM), recovery kinetics of depolarization-induced calcium transients were characterized by a calcium-independent, 'effective' extrusion rate gamma = 140 +/- 47 s-1 (n = 13 cells, 21 C). 6. The endogenous calcium binding ratio for fixed buffers in spinal motoneurones was kappaB' = 50 +/- 17 (n = 13 cells), indicating that less than 2 % of cytosolic calcium ions contributed to [Ca2+]i. 7. Endogenous binding ratios in spinal motoneurones were small compared to those found in hippocampal or cerebellar Purkinje neurones. From a functional perspective, they provided motoneurones with rapid dynamics of cytosolic [Ca2+]i for a given set of influx, extrusion and uptake mechanisms. 8. With respect to pathophysiological conditions, our measurements are in agreement with a model where the selective vulnerability of spinal

  9. Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone promotes higher calcium mobilization to induce apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Pei, Xu-Yang; Zhao, Wen-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-07-01

    Calcium ions are essential secondary messengers that regulate diverse cellular processes including gene transcription, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) promotes programmed cell death during insect metamorphosis, whereas juvenile hormone (JH) counteracts 20E activity to prevent metamorphosis. Both 20E and JH can induce cellular calcium increase; however, the mechanisms and physiological consequences resulting from calcium increase caused by the two counteracting hormones are unclear. Here, using Helicoverpa armigera epidermal cell line, we show that 20E via a G-protein-coupled receptor induced a major calcium rise in the cells, whereas JH via receptor tyrosine kinase induced a minor calcium increase. The calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1 (Orai1) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were necessary for 20E-induced rapid calcium influx. A higher calcium level was maintained in a long time and more genes including Orai1 and TRP channels showed elevated expression after the treatment of 20E than did after JH treatment. Caspase3/7 activation, cell death and pro-apoptotic gene expression were elicited by 20E induction, but not by JH. JH could repress 20E-induced calcium influx, caspase3/7 activation and gene expression. Higher calcium levels induced apoptosis. These results suggest that 20E and JH via different pathways regulate calcium mobilization and homeostasis at different levels, thus inform different gene expression and cellular responses. PMID:27209368

  10. Molecular Determinants of Cav1.2 Calcium Channel Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to transient increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration that initiates a number of essential cellular functions including cardiac and vascular muscle contraction, gene expression, neuronal plasticity, and exocytosis. Inactivation or spontaneous termination of the calcium current through Cav1.2 is a critical step in regulation of these processes. The pathophysiological significance of this process is manifested in hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmia, and a number of other diseases where acceleration of the calcium current decay should present a benefit function. The central issue of this paper is the inactivation of the Cav1.2 calcium channel mediated by multiple determinants.

  11. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  12. Effects of calcium entry blockers on calcium-dependent contractions of rat portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Dacquet, C.; Mironneau, C.; Mironneau, J.

    1987-01-01

    1 The effects of six calcium entry blockers belonging to the dihydropyridine (isradipine or PN 200-110, nifedipine, nicardipine), verapamil (D888 or desmethoxyverapamil, D600 or gallopamil) and diltiazem classes were investigated on isometric spontaneous contractions and contractions induced by high-K+ solutions, noradrenaline, acetylcholine and caffeine. 2 The rank order of potency was PN 200-110 greater than nicardipine = nifedipine = D888 greater than D600 greater than diltiazem from experiments on spontaneous contractions and high-K+ induced contractions. With depolarized preparations, the concentration-response curves for nicardipine, PN 200-110, nifedipine and D600 were significantly shifted to the left indicating that the calcium entry blockers show voltage-dependent inhibitory properties. This effect was not significant with D888 and diltiazem. 3 All the calcium entry blockers strongly reduced the noradrenaline (NA)- and acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions at concentrations which produced complete inhibition of spontaneous contractions. They had a slight effect on caffeine-induced contractions. 4 In Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing solutions, both ACh, NA and caffeine produced transient contractions, the amplitude of which could be taken as a measurement of the amount of internal calcium present in a drug-sensitive calcium store. The filling of the calcium store was maximal after 10-12 min of calcium loading in 2.1 mM Ca2+, while the depletion was complete after 4-6 min of perfusion in Ca2+-free solution. 5 At concentrations which abolished spontaneous contractions, PN 200-110, nifedipine, D888 and D600 had no appreciable effect on contractions evoked in Ca2+-free solutions by ACh, NA and caffeine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2959345

  13. Calcium signaling and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during fertilization in marine protostome worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A

    2014-08-01

    Metaphase-I-arrested eggs of marine protostome worms in the phylum Nemertea generate a series of point-source calcium waves during fertilization. Such calcium oscillations depend on inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores that undergo structural reorganizations prior to and after fertilization. This article reviews fertilization-induced calcium transients and ER dynamics in nemertean eggs and compares these topics to what has been reported for other animals in order to identify unifying characteristics and distinguishing features of calcium responses during fertilization across the animal kingdom. PMID:24721427

  14. Calcium-dependent regulation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hochmal, Ana Karina; Schulze, Stefan; Trompelt, Kerstin; Hippler, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The understanding of calcium as a second messenger in plants has been growing intensively over the last decades. Recently, attention has been drawn to the organelles, especially the chloroplast but focused on the stromal Ca2+ transients in response to environmental stresses. Herein we will expand this view and discuss the role of Ca2+ in photosynthesis. Moreover we address of how Ca2+ is delivered to chloroplast stroma and thylakoids. Thereby, new light is shed on the regulation of photosynthetic electron flow and light-dependent metabolism by the interplay of Ca2+, thylakoid acidification and redox status. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:25687895

  15. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  16. PAR-1-Stimulated Factor IXa Binding to a Small Platelet Subpopulation Requires a Pronounced and Sustained Increase of Cytoplasmic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    London, Fredda S.; Marcinkiewicz, Mariola; Walsh, Peter N.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that only a subpopulation of PAR-1-stimulated platelets binds coagulation factor IXa, since confirmed by other laboratories. Since calcium changes have been implicated in exposure of procoagulant aminophospholipids, we have now examined calcium fluxes in this subpopulation by measuring fluorescence changes in Fura Red/AM-loaded platelets following PAR-1 stimulation. While fluorescence changes in all platelets indicated calcium release from internal stores and influx of external calcium, a subpopulation of platelets displayed a pronounced increase in calcium transients by 15 seconds and positive factor IXa binding by 2 minutes, with calcium transients sustained for 45 minutes. Pretreatment of platelets with Xestospongin C to inhibit IP3-mediated dense tubule calcium release, and the presence of impermeable calcium channel blockers nifedipine, SKF96365 or LaCl3, inhibited PAR-1-induced development of a subpopulation with pronounced calcium transients, factor IXa binding, and platelet support of FXa generation, suggesting the importance of both release of calcium from internal stores and influx of extracellular calcium. When platelets were stimulated in EDTA for 5 to 20 minutes before addition of calcium, factor IXa binding sites developed on a smaller subpopulation but with unchanged rate indicating sustained opening of calcium channels and continued availability of signaling elements required for binding site exposure. While pretreatment of platelets with 100 μM BAPTA/AM (Kd 160 nM) had minimal effects, 100 μM 5, 5′-dimethylBAPTA/AM (Kd 40 nM) completely inhibited the appearance and function of the platelet subpopulation, indicating the importance of minor increases of cytoplasmic calcium. We conclude that PAR-1-stimulated development of factor IXa binding sites in a subpopulation of platelets is dependent upon release of calcium from internal stores leading to sustained and pronounced calcium transients. PMID:16752917

  17. High-energy transients.

    PubMed

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K

    2013-06-13

    We present an overview of high-energy transients in astrophysics, highlighting important advances over the past 50 years. We begin with early discoveries of γ-ray transients, and then delve into physical details associated with a variety of phenomena. We discuss some of the unexpected transients found by Fermi and Swift, many of which are not easily classifiable or in some way challenge conventional wisdom. These objects are important insofar as they underscore the necessity of future, more detailed studies. PMID:23630376

  18. Transient nucleation in glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Nucleation rates in condensed systems are frequently not at their steady state values. Such time dependent (or transient) nucleation is most clearly observed in devitrification studies of metallic and silicate glasses. The origin of transient nucleation and its role in the formation and stability of desired phases and microstructures are discussed. Numerical models of nucleation in isothermal and nonisothermal situations, based on the coupled differential equations describing cluster evolution within the classical theory, are presented. The importance of transient nucleation in glass formation and crystallization is discussed.

  19. Pharmacological effects of carvedilol on T-type calcium current in murine HL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunyu; Rao, Fang; Wu, Shulin; Kuang, Sujuan; Liu, Xiaoying; Zhou, Zhiling; Shan, Zhixin; Lin, Qiuxiong; Qian, Weimin; Yang, Min; Geng, Qingshan; Zhang, Youyi; Yu, Xiyong; Lin, Shuguang

    2009-10-25

    Carvedilol is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases including atrial fibrillation. T-type Ca(2+) channels have been recognized recently in the mechanisms underlying atrial arrhythmias. However, it is unclear whether carvedilol may affect the T-type Ca(2+) channel. The present study evaluated the pharmacological effects of carvedilol on T-type calcium current (I(Ca,T)) in the murine HL-1 cell line. I(Ca)(,T) was recorded by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium transient was monitored by the fluorescent dye Fluo-4/AM and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Carvedilol reversibly inhibited I(Ca)(,T) in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 2.1 microM. 3 microM carvedilol was found to decrease the peak I(Ca)(,T) amplitude at -20 mV from 20.1+/-1.8pA/pF to 10.9+/-2.1pA/pF. Carvedilol significantly shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of I(Ca)(,T) towards more negative potential by 12.8 mV, while the activation curve was not significantly altered. Carvedilol delayed recovery from inactivation of I(Ca)(,T), time constant (tau) was 112.4+/-3.5 ms in control and 270.1+/-4.7 ms in carvedilol. Carvedilol-induced inhibition rate in I(Ca)(,T) was enhanced with the increase in stimuli frequency, the inhibitory rate was 23.2+/-4.1% at 0.2 Hz and 47.2+/-0.6% at 2 Hz. Carvedilol still produced the significant decrease in the amplitude of I(Ca)(,T) in the presence of H-89, PKA inhibitor. Carvedilol significantly inhibited the amplitude of the calcium transient in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings indicate that carvedilol inhibits I(Ca)(,T) in atrial cells by mechanisms involving preferential interaction with the inactivated state of T-type Ca(2+) channel. PMID:19744474

  20. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population. PMID:25862324

  1. Calcium signals in T lymphocytes from old mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A

    1996-01-01

    Mitogen-induced increases in free calcium ion concentration ([Ca]i) are a key element of the process by which T lymphocytes are induced to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells. T cells from old mice exhibit lower average rises in calcium concentration than T cells from young donors when stimulated with either mitogenic lectins or antibodies to the CD3 chains of the antigen receptor. The decline with age in calcium signal generation is largely attributable to a shift from naïve to memory T cells, in that memory T cells, from mice of any age, are more resistant to mitogen-induced changes in [Ca]i. The decline in calcium signal generation is likely to be functionally significant, since T cells isolated on the basis of poor calcium signals show diminished ability to produce and to respond to the growth factor IL-2. Con A induces a transient increase in uptake of radiolabeled calcium from extracellular sources, and the extent of this increase declines with age. Alterations in production of inositol tris-phosphate (IP3) seem not to contribute to age-related changes in calcium signal generation. T cells from old mice, and memory T cells from mice of any age, are relatively resistant to increases in [Ca]i even when these are induced by receptor-independent stimuli such as the calcium ionophore ionomycin. The ionomycin-resistance of memory T cells suggests that these cells may have an augmented ability to buffer changes in [Ca]i, perhaps by increased activity of the ATP-dependent plasma membrane calcium pump. It seems likely that age-related declines in calcium signal generation contribute to the functional immunodeficiency of old age. PMID:8761335

  2. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Javier; Mediero, Matías; Lozano, Graciela M; Bejarano, Ignacio; Ortiz, Águeda; García, Juan F; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest that spermatozoa from

  3. Measuring intracellular calcium dynamics of HeLa cells exposed to nitric oxide by microplate fluorescence reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to have the ability to promote or inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. It appears to have an effect on inducing calcium transient, which participates in essential cellular signaling in the physiological and pathological processes. Our work was intended to study the effects of exogenous NO on intracellular calcium dynamics of HeLa cells with Fluo-3, a calcium fluorescent indicator by microplate fluorescence reader. The results showed that after NO donor was injected into the wells, intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence intensity increased significantly compared with that of control group. Furthermore, the calcium transient activated by NO was mainly due to the calcium release from intracellular calcium stores. These would be helpful to further recognize the role of NO involved in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis.

  4. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  5. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  6. A theoretical model of cytosolic calcium elevation following wounding in urothelial cell monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Peter A.; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2013-02-01

    Scratch wounding of a urothelial cell monolayer triggers a number of events including the release of soluble, diffusible signalling factors and mechanical stimulation of cells at the wound edge. These events cause a sustained elevation in cytosolic calcium concentration in the cells surrounding the wound and a transient rise in those further away. The precise form of this calcium transient is believed to play a central role in determining the subsequent response of individual cells and ultimately leads to a co-ordinated, population-level response that rapidly closes the wound. Here we present a framework for modelling the initial phases of this process. We combine a PDE model of diffusion in the extracellular medium and an ODE model of calcium signalling that has been tailored to represent urothelial cells. The ODE model is capable of generating a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. In multi-cell simulations of scratch wounding in a perfusion flow we find that the spatial position of the cells relative to the wound site leads to distinct classes of calcium response, with cells proximal to the wound exhibiting a sustained elevation and cells distal to the wound exhibiting a more transient elevation. We compare these results to existing experimental data and generate a number of novel predictions that could be used to test the model experimentally.

  7. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... level based on scientific research evidence. Adequate Intake (AI): This level is established when there is not ... enough calcium from the foods they eat. Infants (AI) 0 to 6 months: 200 milligrams per day ( ...

  8. Get Enough Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Previous section Overview 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of ... Foods and Vitamins 3 of 4 sections Take Action: Vitamin D Get enough vitamin D. Vitamin D ...

  9. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  10. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Calcium-dependent physiologic and pathologic stimulus-metabolic response coupling in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaspers, Lawrence D; Mémin, Elisabeth; Thomas, Andrew P

    2012-07-01

    A recurrent paradigm in calcium signaling is the coordination of the target response of the calcium signal with activation of metabolic energy production to support that response. This occurs in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle where contractile activity and ATP production are coordinately regulated by the frequency and amplitude of calcium transients, endocrine and exocrine cells that use calcium to drive the secretory process, and hepatocytes where the downstream targets of calcium include both catabolic and anabolic processes. The primary mechanism by which calcium enhances the capacity for energy production is through calcium-dependent stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, achieved by increasing NADH production and respiratory chain flux. Although this enhances energy supply, it also has the potential for deleterious consequences resulting from increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The negative consequences of calcium-dependent mitochondrial activation can be ameliorated when the underlying cytosolic calcium signals occur as brief calcium spikes or oscillations, with signal strength encoded through the spike frequency (frequency modulation). Frequency modulation increases signal fidelity, and reduces pathological effects of calcium, including excess mitochondrial ROS production and apoptotic or necrotic outcomes. The present article reviews these issues using data obtained in hepatocytes under physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:22564906

  12. Calcium-Dependent Physiologic and Pathologic Stimulus-Metabolic Response Coupling in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gaspers, Lawrence D.; Mémin, Elisabeth; Thomas, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent paradigm in calcium signaling is the coordination of the target response of the calcium signal with activation of metabolic energy production to support that response. This occurs in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle where contractile activity and ATP production are coordinately regulated by the frequency and amplitude of calcium transients, endocrine and exocrine cells that use calcium to drive the secretory process, and hepatocytes where the downstream targets of calcium include both catabolic and anabolic processes. The primary mechanism by which calcium enhances the capacity for energy production is through calcium-dependent stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, achieved by increasing NADH production and respiratory chain flux. Although this enhances energy supply, it also has the potential for deleterious consequences resulting from increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The negative consequences of calcium-dependent mitochondrial activation can be ameliorated when the underlying cytosolic calcium signals occur as brief calcium spikes or oscillations, with signal strength encoded through the spike frequency (frequency modulation). Frequency modulation increases signal fidelity, and reduces pathological effects of calcium, including excess mitochondrial ROS production and apoptotic or necrotic outcomes. The present article reviews these issues using data obtained in hepatocytes under physiologic and pathologic conditions. PMID:22564906

  13. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up. PMID:25912729

  14. Voltage transients elicited by sudden step-up of auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    It is hypothesized (i) that the molecular mechanism for the reception of friction and flexure and the mechanism by which auxin enhances ethylene production have in common a release of free calcium into the cytosol, (ii) that elevated cytosolic calcium initiates vesicle exocytosis, and (iii) that the vesicles release a factor or set of factors which depolarizes the plasmalemma and promotes ethylene synthesis. One consequence of such exocytosis should be small, extracellularly observable voltage transients. Transients, ranging in size up to 600 microvolts and possessing risetimes (10-90%) of approximately 200 ms, are known to be elicited in etiolated stems of Pisum sativum L. by friction and are here shown to be elicited by sudden increase of auxin concentration and also by a Ca2+ ionophore.

  15. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  16. Cytosolic organelles shape calcium signals and exo-endocytotic responses of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    García, Antonio G; Padín, Fernando; Fernández-Morales, José C; Maroto, Marcos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The concept of stimulus-secretion coupling was born from experiments performed in chromaffin cells 50 years ago. Stimulation of these cells with acetylcholine enhances calcium (Ca(2+)) entry and this generates a transient elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) that triggers the exocytotic release of catecholamines. The control of the [Ca(2+)](c) signal is complex and depends on various classes of plasmalemmal calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the uptake and release of Ca(2+) from cytoplasmic organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, chromaffin vesicles and the nucleus, and Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms, such as the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase, and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Computation of the rates of Ca(2+) fluxes between the different cell compartments support the proposal that the chromaffin cell has developed functional calcium tetrads formed by calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria nearby the exocytotic plasmalemmal sites. These tetrads shape the Ca(2+) transients occurring during cell activation to regulate early and late steps of exocytosis, and the ensuing endocytotic responses. The different patterns of catecholamine secretion in response to stress may thus depend on such local [Ca(2+)](c) transients occurring at different cell compartments, and generated by redistribution and release of Ca(2+) by cytoplasmic organelles. In this manner, the calcium tetrads serve to couple the variable energy demands due to exo-endocytotic activities with energy production and protein synthesis. PMID:22209033

  17. Delayed voice communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Reagan, Marcum L.

    2013-10-01

    We present results from simulated deep-space exploration missions that investigated voice communication with significant time delays. The simulations identified many challenges: confusion of sequence, blocked calls, wasted crew time, impaired ability to provide relevant information to the other party, losing track of which messages have reached the other party, weakened rapport between crew and ground, slow response to rapidly changing situations, and reduced situational awareness. These challenges were met in part with additional training; greater attention and foresight; longer, less frequent transmissions; meticulous recordkeeping and timekeeping; and specific alerting and acknowledging calls. Several simulations used both delayed voice and text messaging. Text messaging provided a valuable record of transmissions and allowed messages to be targeted to subsets of the flight and ground crew, but it was a poor choice for high-workload operators such as vehicle drivers and spacewalkers. Even with the foregoing countermeasures, delayed voice communication is difficult. Additional aids such as automatic delay timers and voice-to-text transcription would help. Tests comparing delays of 50 and 300 s unexpectedly revealed that communicating with the shorter delay was just as challenging as with the longer one.

  18. Action potentials induce uniform calcium influx in mammalian myelinated optic nerves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan-Li; Wilson, J Adam; Williams, Justin; Chiu, Shing Yan

    2006-08-01

    The myelin sheath enables saltatory conduction by demarcating the axon into a narrow nodal region for excitation and an extended, insulated internodal region for efficient spread of passive current. This anatomical demarcation produces a dramatic heterogeneity in ionic fluxes during excitation, a classical example being the restriction of Na influx at the node. Recent studies have revealed that action potentials also induce calcium influx into myelinated axons of mammalian optic nerves. Does calcium influx in myelinated axons show spatial heterogeneity during nerve excitation? To address this, we analyzed spatial profiles of axonal calcium transients during action potentials by selectively staining axons with calcium indicators and subjected the data to theoretical analysis with parameters for axial calcium diffusion empirically determined using photolysis of caged compounds. The results show surprisingly that during action potentials, calcium influx occurs uniformly along an axon of a fully myelinated mouse optic nerve. PMID:16835363

  19. Calmidazolium evokes high calcium fluctuations in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Budu, Alexandre; Gomes, Mayrim M; Melo, Pollyana M; El Chamy Maluf, Sarah; Bagnaresi, Piero; Azevedo, Mauro F; Carmona, Adriana K; Gazarini, Marcos L

    2016-03-01

    Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) are important players in eukaryote cell signaling. In the present study, by using a knockin approach, we demonstrated the expression and localization of CaM in all erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Under extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, calmidazolium (CZ), a potent CaM inhibitor, promoted a transient cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase in isolated trophozoites, indicating that CZ mobilizes intracellular sources of calcium. In the same extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, the [Ca(2+)]cyt rise elicited by CZ treatment was ~3.5 fold higher when the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store was previously depleted ruling out the mobilization of calcium from the ER by CZ. The effects of the Ca(2+)/H(+) ionophore ionomycin (ION) and the Na(+)/H(+) ionophore monensin (MON) suggest that the [Ca(2+)]cyt-increasing effect of CZ is driven by the removal of Ca(2+) from at least one Ca(2+)-CaM-related (CaMR) protein as well as by the mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular acidic calcium stores. Moreover, we showed that the mitochondrion participates in the sequestration of the cytosolic Ca(2+) elicited by CZ. Finally, the modulation of membrane Ca(2+) channels by CZ and thapsigargin (THG) was demonstrated. The opened channels were blocked by the unspecific calcium channel blocker Co(2+) but not by 2-APB (capacitative calcium entry inhibitor) or nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor). Taken together, the results suggested that one CaMR protein is an important modulator of calcium signaling and homeostasis during the Plasmodium intraerythrocytic cell cycle, working as a relevant intracellular Ca(2+) reservoir in the parasite. PMID:26689736

  20. The LOFAR Transients Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, John D.; Staley, Tim D.; Molenaar, Gijs J.; Rol, Evert; Rowlinson, Antonia; Scheers, Bart; Spreeuw, Hanno; Bell, Martin E.; Broderick, Jess W.; Carbone, Dario; Garsden, Hugh; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Law, Casey J.; Wise, Michael; Breton, Rene P.; Cendes, Yvette; Corbel, Stéphane; Eislöffel, Jochen; Falcke, Heino; Fender, Rob; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stappers, Benjamin W.; Stewart, Adam J.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Wijnands, Rudy; Zarka, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissioned, low-frequency radio interferometer, based in the Netherlands and with stations across Europe. The identification of and response to transients is one of LOFAR's key science goals. However, the large data volumes which LOFAR produces, combined with the scientific requirement for rapid response, make automation essential. To support this, we have developed the LOFAR Transients Pipeline, or TraP. The TraP ingests multi-frequency image data from LOFAR or other instruments and searches it for transients and variables, providing automatic alerts of significant detections and populating a lightcurve database for further analysis by astronomers. Here, we discuss the scientific goals of the TraP and how it has been designed to meet them. We describe its implementation, including both the algorithms adopted to maximize performance as well as the development methodology used to ensure it is robust and reliable, particularly in the presence of artefacts typical of radio astronomy imaging. Finally, we report on a series of tests of the pipeline carried out using simulated LOFAR observations with a known population of transients.

  1. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA gene family during tomato fruit development and ripening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that calcium treatment delays fruit ripening and senescence. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies have shown that calcium/calmodulin-regulated SR/CAMTA genes are important for modulation of disease resistance, cold sensitivity and wound...

  2. Protein kinases as mediators of fluid shear stress stimulated signal transduction in endothelial cells: a hypothesis for calcium-dependent and calcium-independent events activated by flow.

    PubMed

    Berk, B C; Corson, M A; Peterson, T E; Tseng, H

    1995-12-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates endothelial cell function, but the signal transduction mechanisms involved in mechanotransduction remain unclear. Recent findings demonstrate that several intracellular kinases are activated by mechanical forces. In particular, members of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family are stimulated by hyperosmolarity, stretch, and stress such as heat shock. We propose a model for mechanotransduction in endothelial cells involving calcium-dependent and calcium-independent protein kinase pathways. The calcium-dependent pathway involves activation of phospholipase C, hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), increases in intracellular calcium and stimulation of kinases such as calcium-calmodulin and C kinases (PKC). The calcium-independent pathway involves activation of a small GTP-binding protein and stimulation of calcium-independent PKC and MAP kinases. The calcium-dependent pathway mediates the rapid, transient response to fluid shear stress including activation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and ion transport. In contrast, the calcium-independent pathway mediates a slower response including the sustained activation of NOS and changes in cell morphology and gene expression. We propose that focal adhesion complexes link the calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways by regulating activity of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) 5-kinase (which regulates PIP2 levels) and p125 focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which phosphorylates paxillin and interacts with cytoskeletal proteins). This model predicts that dynamic interactions between integrin molecules present in focal adhesion complexes and membrane events involved in mechanotransduction will be integrated by calcium-dependent and calcium-independent kinases to generate intracellular signals involved in the endothelial cell response to flow. PMID:8666584

  3. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  4. The Transient Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappee, Benjamin John

    When one looks at the night sky, one usually gets the impression of a static and constant universe. Quite apart from appearances, the sky is teeming with violent, variable, and transient events that shape our universe. These capricious objects are not only penetrating probes into physical conditions too extreme for earthbound laboratories, but they are also useful tools to measure the universe. In this dissertation, I investigate the observational and theoretical properties of three classes of transient/variable objects: thermonuclear supernovae, Cepheid variable stars, and active galactic nuclei.

  5. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  6. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-31

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously. PMID:26274420

  7. The Vernier delay unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.B.

    1985-02-01

    One of the most critical timing specifications for the SLC machine occurs at the injector and ejector magnets for the Damping Ring. It has been determined that the trigger pulses to the magnets must be controlled to 0.1 ns. The primary source for all trigger pulses for the SLC machine is the Programmable Delay Unit (PDU). The PDU generates a 67.2 ns wide pulse with delay increments of 8.7 ns. The gap between the required accuracy and that available from the PDU requires the design of a new module that is called the Vernier Delay Unit (VDU). This module accepts the 67.2 ns pulse from the PDU and is capable of increasing the delay in steps of 0.1 ns from 0 to 10.7 ns plus the minimum 9 ns delay. The module has two totally independent channels. The pulse input to the module is software selectable from either the auxiliary backplane or a front panel Lemo connector. The auxiliary backplane pulses are to be the 67 ns differential ECL pulses from the PDU. The front panel input is to be a NIM level (-0.7 V 50 termination).

  8. Modelling of calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderin Hidalgo, Lazaro Juan

    This work is a contribution to a large scale joint experimental and theoretical effort to understand the biological properties of silicon doped calcium phosphates undertaken by Queen's University and Millenium Biologix Corp. We have modeled calcium phosphates and silicon doped calcium phosphates in close relation to experiment in order to study possible location of silicon in the lattice. Density functional theory has been used to study the structural and dynamical properties of small systems of calcium phosphates to gain preliminary information on phosphates and the performance of the theoretical methods. The same methods were used to investigate structural and electronic properties of larger scale calcium phosphate systems, while a classical shell model was developed to investigate the dynamical properties of such large and complex systems. In the context of the shell model a method was devised to calculate the dynamical matrix corrected for the long range Coulomb interaction in the long wave length limit. It was necessary also to develop a theoretical expression for the dielectric function in the context of the shell model. Infrared spectra and thermal parameters were calculated based on these methods. We also propose some directions for future research.

  9. Delays and Growth Rates of Multiple TEOAE Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Shawn S.; Mertes, Ian B.; Scheperle, Rachel A.

    2011-11-01

    Bandpass-filtered transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) show multiple energy peaks with time delays that are invariant with level and growth rates that vary with delay and stimulus level, suggesting that multiple generation mechanisms may be involved at moderate and high stimulus levels. We measured delays and magnitude growths of multiple TEOAE energy peaks and compared the results obtained from linear and nonlinear extraction methods. To test the hypothesis that early components are generated at the basal portion of the cochlea, delays and growth rates were also measured in the presence of highpass masking noise for a subset of subjects. No effect of the highpass masking was seen. The results are discussed in terms of potential generation mechanisms of the multiple energy peaks.

  10. Calcium homeostasis is altered in skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats: cytofluorimetric and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Cannone, Maria; Pierno, Sabata; De Bellis, Michela; Conte, Elena; Fraysse, Bodvael; Tricarico, Domenico; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is often associated with skeletal muscle pathological conditions related to function and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the development of these pathological conditions remain undefined. Because calcium homeostasis is a biomarker of muscle function, we assessed whether it is altered in hypertensive muscles. We measured resting intracellular calcium and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by cytofluorimetric technique and determined the expression of SOCE gene machinery by real-time PCR. Hypertension caused a phenotype-dependent dysregulation of calcium homeostasis; the resting intracellular calcium of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of SHRs were differently altered with respect to the related muscle of normotensive animals. In addition, soleus muscles of SHR showed reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and decreased sarcolemmal calcium permeability at rest and after SOCE activation. Accordingly, we found an alteration of the expression levels of some SOCE components, such as stromal interaction molecule 1, calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1. The hypertension-induced alterations of calcium homeostasis in the soleus muscle of SHRs occurred with changes of some functional outcomes as excitability and resting chloride conductance. We provide suitable targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at counterbalancing muscle performance decline in hypertension, and propose the reported calcium-dependent parameters as indexes to predict how the antihypertensive drugs could influence muscle function. PMID:25084345

  11. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  12. Measuring Transient Memory Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanner, Eric; Shiner, Sandra

    1976-01-01

    Two experiments are reported in which subjects performed simple mental arithmetic problems which were presented visually in a sequential fashion. At some point in the presentation of each problem, the sequential display was interrupted and a memory task introduced. The purpose was to validate a measure of transient memory load. (Author/RM)

  13. Rotor transient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Choy, K. C.; Gunter, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    Undamped modes approximate dynamic behavior of rotors and bearings. Application of modal analysis to uncouple equations of motion simplifies stability, steady-state unbalance response, and transient response analysis of system; nonlinear stability is predicted from calculated frequency spectra. Analysis provides designers with complete information without involving large-scale computational costs. Programs are written in FORTRAN IV for use on CDC 6600 computer.

  14. [Mitochondria, calcium homeostasis and calcium signaling].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, I B

    2016-03-01

    Са2+ is a very important and versatile intracellular signal which controls numerous biochemical and physiological (pathophysiological) processes in the cell. Good evidence exists that mitochondria are sensors, decoders and regulators of calcium signaling. Precise regulation of calcium signaling in the cell involves numerous molecular targets, which induce and decode changes of Са2+ concentrations in the cell (pumps, channels, Са2+-binding proteins, Са2+-dependent enzymes, localized in the cytoplasm and organelles). Mitochondrial Са2+ uniporter accumulates excess of Са2+ in mitochondria, while Na+/Са2+- and H+/Са2+-antiporters extrude Са2+ in the cytoplasm. Mitochondrial Са2+ overloading results in formation of mitochondria permeability transition pores which play an important role in cell death under many pathological conditions. Mitochondria regulate Са2+ homeostasis and control important cellular functions such as metabolism, proliferation, survival. Identification of cellular and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters and understanding their functional mechanisms open up new prospects for their using as therapeutic targets. PMID:27420625

  15. Dissociation of force decline from calcium decline by preload in isolated rabbit myocardium.

    PubMed

    Monasky, Michelle M; Varian, Kenneth D; Davis, Jonathan P; Janssen, Paul M L

    2008-05-01

    It is well known that the rate of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) decline is an important factor governing relaxation in unloaded myocardium. However, it remains unclear to what extent, under near physiological conditions, the intracellular calcium transient amplitude and kinetics contribute to the length-dependent increase in force and increase in duration of relaxation. We hypothesize that myofilament properties rather than calcium transient decline primarily determines the duration of relaxation in adult mammalian myocardium. To test this hypothesis, we simultaneously measured force of contraction and calibrated [Ca2+]i transients in isolated, thin rabbit trabeculae at various lengths at 37 degrees C. Time from peak tension to 50% relaxation (RT50(tension)) increases significantly with length (from 49.8+/-3.4 to 83.8+/-7.4 ms at an [Ca2+]o of 2.5 mM), whereas time from peak calcium to 50% decline (RT50(calcium)) was not prolonged (from 124.8+/-5.3 to 107.7+/-11.4 ms at an [Ca2+]o of 2.5 mM). Analysis of variance revealed that RT50(tension) is significantly correlated with length (P<0.0001). At optimal length, varying the extracellular calcium concentration increased both developed force and calcium transient amplitude, but RT50(tension) remained unchanged (P=0.90), whereas intracellular calcium decline actually accelerated (P<0.05). Thus, an increase in muscle length will result in an increase in both force and duration of relaxation, whereas the latter is not primarily governed by the rate of [Ca2+]i decline. PMID:18057959

  16. Calcium and olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Winegar, B D; Rosick, E R; Schafer, R

    1988-01-01

    1. Inorganic cations, organic calcium antagonists, and calmodulin antagonists were applied to olfactory epithelia of frogs (Rana pipiens) while recording electroolfactogram (EOG) responses. 2. Inorganic cations inhibited EOGs in a rank order, reflecting their calcium channel blocking potency: La3+ greater than Zn2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Al3+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Sr2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mg2+. Barium ion significantly enhanced EOGs immediately following application. 3. Diltiazem and verapamil produced dose-dependent EOG inhibition. 4. Calmodulin antagonists inhibited EOGs without correlation to their anti-calmodulin potency. PMID:2904344

  17. Calcium metabolism in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Heer, M; Kamps, N; Biener, C; Korr, C; Boerger, A; Zittermann, A; Stehle, P; Drummer, C

    1999-09-01

    Unloading of weight bearing bones as induced by microgravity or immobilization has significant impacts on the calcium and bone metabolism and is the most likely cause for space osteoporosis. During a 4.5 to 6 month stay in space most of the astronauts develop a reduction in bone mineral density in spine, femoral neck, trochanter, and pelvis of 1%-1.6% measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorption (DEXA). Dependent on the mission length and the individual turnover rates of the astronauts it can even reach individual losses of up to 14% in the femoral neck. Osteoporosis itself is defined as the deterioration of bone tissue leading to enhanced bone fragility and to a consequent increase in fracture risk. Thinking of long-term missions to Mars or interplanetary missions for years, space osteoporosis is one of the major concerns for manned spaceflight. However, decrease in bone density can be initiated differently. It either can be caused by increases in bone formation and bone resorption resulting in a net bone loss, as obtained in fast looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. On the other hand decrease in bone formation and increase in bone resorption also leads to bone losses as obtained in slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis or in Anorexia Nervosa patients. Biomarkers of bone turnover measured during several missions indicated that the pattern of space osteoporosis is very similar to the pattern of Anorexia Nervosa patients or slow looser postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, beside unloading, other risk factors for space osteoporosis exist such as stress, nutrition, fluid shifts, dehydration and bone perfusion. Especially nutritional factors may contribute considerably to the development of osteoporosis. From earthbound studies it is known that calcium supplementation in women and men can prevent bone loss of 1% bone per year. Based on these results we studied the calcium intake during several European missions and performed an experiment during the German MIR 97 mission

  18. Intersecting roles of protein tyrosine kinase and calcium signaling during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, William H

    2013-01-01

    The oocyte is a highly specialized cell that must respond to fertilization with a preprogrammed series of signal transduction events that establish a block to polyspermy, trigger resumption of the cell cycle and execution of a developmental program. The fertilization-induced calcium transient is a key signal that initiates the process of oocyte activation and studies over the last several years have examined the signaling pathways that act upstream and downstream of this calcium transient. Protein tyrosine kinase signaling was found to be an important component of the upstream pathways that stimulated calcium release at fertilization in oocytes from animals that fertilize externally, but a similar pathway has not been found in mammals which fertilize internally. The following review will examine the diversity of signaling in oocytes from marine invertebrates, amphibians, fish and mammals in an attempt to understand the basis for the observed differences. In addition to the pathways upstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient, recent studies are beginning to unravel the role of protein tyrosine kinase signaling downstream of the calcium transient. The PYK2 kinase was found to respond to fertilization in the zebrafish system and seems to represent a novel component of the response of the oocyte to fertilization. The potential impact of impaired PTK signaling in oocyte quality will also be discussed. PMID:23201334

  19. The removal of myoplasmic free calcium following calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, W; Ríos, E; Schneider, M F

    1986-01-01

    Transient changes in intracellular free calcium concentration (delta [Ca2+]) in response to pulse depolarizations were monitored in isolated segments of single frog skeletal muscle fibres cut at both ends and voltage clamped at a holding potential of -90 mV in a double-Vaseline-gap chamber. Calcium transients were monitored optically using the metallochromic indicator dye Antipyrylazo III (APIII), which entered the fibre by diffusion from the solution applied to the cut ends. Optical artifacts due to fibre movement were minimized or eliminated by stretching the fibres to sarcomere lengths at which there was little or no overlap of thick and thin contractile filaments. Remaining movement-independent optical changes intrinsic to the fibre and unrelated to the dye were monitored at 850 nm, where free and dye-bound APIII have no absorbance. These 850 nm signals scaled by lambda -1.2 were used to remove intrinsic components from the signals at 700 or 720 nm, wave-lengths at which the APIII absorbance increases when calcium is bound. The corrected 700 or 720 nm signals were used to calculate delta [Ca2+]. The decay of delta [Ca2+] following fibre repolarization at the termination of a depolarizing pulse was well described by a single exponential plus a constant. The exponential rate constant for the decay of delta [Ca2+] decreased and the final 'steady' level that delta [Ca2+] appeared to be approaching increased with increasing amplitude and/or duration of the depolarizing pulse. Both the decreasing decay rate and the build up of the 'steady' level can be accounted for using a two-component model for the removal of free calcium from the myoplasm. One component consists of a set number of a single type of saturable calcium binding site in the myoplasm. The second component is a non-saturable, first-order uptake mechanism operating in parallel with the saturable binding sites. The removal model parameter values were adjusted to fit simultaneously the decay of delta [Ca2

  20. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  1. Effects of gastrin on calcium homeostasis in chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.; Gagnemo-Persson, R.; Orberg, J.; Chen, D.; Hakanson, R. )

    1991-09-01

    As in the rat, gastrin and an extract of the acid-producing part of the stomach (proventriculus) were found to lower the blood Ca2+ concentration in the chicken. Furthermore, gastrin enhanced the uptake of 45Ca into the femur. It has been suggested previously that gastrin causes hypocalcemia in the rat by releasing gastrocalcin, a hypothetical hormone thought to reside in the acid-producing part of the stomach. The results of the present study in the chicken are in agreement with this concept. Not only exogenous, but also endogenous gastrin lowered blood calcium levels. Thus, the serum gastrin concentration was increased in response to ranitidine-evoked blockade of the gastric acid output; the rise in gastrin was associated with a transient drop in blood calcium. Also, food intake produced a rise in the serum gastrin concentration and a transient drop in blood calcium. However, injection of ranitidine or food intake in proventriclectomized (acid-producing part of the stomach extirpated) chickens failed to lower blood calcium, supporting the view that the gastrin-evoked hypocalcemia depends upon an agent in the gastric (proventriculus) mucosa. The authors suggest that endogenous and exogenous gastrin evoke hypocalcemia in the chicken by the same mechanism as that which has been postulated in the rat, i.e. by mobilization of the candidate hormone gastrocalcin from endocrine cells in the acid-producing gastric mucosa.

  2. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    The regulation of bone turnover is a complex and finely tuned process. Many factors regulate bone remodeling, including hormones, growth factors, cytokines etc. However, little is known about the signals coupling bone formation to bone resorption, and how mechanical forces are translated into biological effects in bone. Intercellular calcium waves are increases in intracellular calcium concentration in single cells, subsequently propagating to adjacent cells, and can be a possible mechanism for the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption. The aim of the present studies was to investigate whether bone cells are capable of communicating via intercellular calcium signals, and determine by which mechanisms the cells propagate the signals. First, we found that osteoblastic cells can propagate intercellular calcium transients upon mechanical stimulation, and that there are two principally different mechanisms for this propagation. One mechanism involves the secretion of a nucleotide, possibly ATP, acting in an autocrine action to purinergic P2Y2 receptors on the neighboring cells, leading to intracellular IP3 generation and subsequent release of calcium from intracellular stores. The other mechanism involves the passage of a small messenger through gap junctions to the cytoplasm of the neighboring cells, inducing depolarization of the plasma membrane with subsequent opening of membrane bound voltage-operated calcium channels. Next, we found that osteoblasts can propagate these signals to osteoclasts as well. We demonstrated that paracrine action of ATP was responsible for the wave propagation, but now the purinergic P2X7 receptor was involved. Thus, the studies demonstrate that calcium signals can be propagated not only among osteoblasts, but also between osteoblasts and osteoclasts in response to mechanical stimulation. Thus, intercellular calcium signaling can be a mechanism by which mechanical stimuli on bone are translated into biological signals in bone cells

  3. Monitoring of intracellular free calcium in perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ruttner, Z; Ligeti, L; Reinlib, L; Hines, K; McLaughlin, A C

    1993-06-01

    Fluorescent calcium indicators have been widely used to assess cytoplasmic calcium concentration in cells. To examine the role of calcium ions on different physiological functions (e.g. in case of liver; bile secretion, glucose metabolism, etc.) there is a need for whole organ studies. We have developed a technique to estimate intracellular free calcium changes in perfused rat liver. Krebs-Henseleit perfused livers were loaded with 7 microM or 35 microM Indo-1/AM. An area 3 mm in diameter and approximately 300 microns in depth was illuminated at 340 nm. Fluorescence was monitored with photomultiplier tubes at 3 wavelengths (400 nm for Ca-bound dye, 504 nm for free dye and 464 nm for NADH). The viability of liver preparations was assessed by measurement of the concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase and alanine aminotransferase in the effluent. Loading of the livers with 7 microM Indo-1/AM via the portal vein resulted in a 5-fold increase of fluorescence at 400 nm. However the dye 'leaked' out of the liver with a half-time of 18 min. Probenecid (a specific anion carrier blocker) inhibited loss of dye in a dose dependent fashion (2.5-10 mM). Transient calcium elevations were observed in response to vasopressin (5-50 nM) at physiological levels, ethanol (0.3-0.8 M) and the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Certain limitations were apparent with this approach: (1) it was necessary to use an anion carrier blocker to maintain a relatively steady dye concentration; (2) endogenous NADH fluorescence interfered with the calcium signal; and (3) absolute values of calcium concentration could not be determined. PMID:8358770

  4. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts. PMID:27449401

  5. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  6. Estimating Delays In ASIC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary; Nesheiwat, Jeffrey; Su, Ling

    1994-01-01

    Verification is important aspect of process of designing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). Design must not only be functionally accurate, but must also maintain correct timing. IFA, Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying timing of ASIC early in design process. This program speeds design-and-verification cycle by estimating delays before layouts completed. Written in C language.

  7. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    The combination of calcium carbonate and magnesium is commonly found in antacids. These medicines provide heartburn relief. Calcium carbonate with magnesium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  8. Calcium Content of Common Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... 130 Waffle 80 g 47 Meat, fish and eggs Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Egg 50 g 27 Red meat 120 g 7 ... foods Food Serving Size Calcium (mg) Quiche (cheese, eggs) 200 g 212 Omelette with cheese 120 g ...

  9. Intestinal Stem Cells: Got Calcium?

    PubMed

    Nászai, Máté; Cordero, Julia B

    2016-02-01

    Calcium ions are well-known intracellular signalling molecules. A new study identifies local cytoplasmic calcium as a central integrator of metabolic and proliferative signals in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. PMID:26859268

  10. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  11. Calcium current in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, N M; Lederer, W J

    1987-01-01

    1. Calcium currents (ICa) from neonatal rat ventricular heart muscle cells grown in primary culture were examined using the 'whole-cell' voltage-clamp technique (Hamill, Marty, Neher, Sakmann & Sigworth, 1981). Examination of ICa was limited to one calcium channel type, 'L' type (Nilius, Hess, Lansman & Tsien, 1985), by appropriate voltage protocols. 2. We measured transient and steady-state components of ICa, and could generally describe ICa in terms of the steady-state activation (d infinity) and inactivation (f infinity) parameters. 3. We observed that the reduction of ICa by the calcium channel antagonist D600 can be explained by both a shift of d infinity to more positive potentials as well as a slight reduction of ICa conductance. D600 did not significantly alter either the rate of inactivation of ICa or the voltage dependence of f infinity. 4. The calcium channel modulator BAY K8644 shifted both d infinity and f infinity to more negative potentials. Additionally, BAY K8644 increased the rate of inactivation at potentials between +5 and +55 mV. Furthermore, BAY K8644 also increased ICa conductance, a change consistent with a promotion of 'mode 2' calcium channel activity (Hess, Lansman & Tsien, 1984). 5. We conclude that, as predicted by d infinity and f infinity, there is a significant steady-state component of ICa ('window current') at plateau potentials in neonatal rat heart cells. Modulation of the steady-state and transient components of ICa by various agents can be attributed both to specific alterations in d infinity and f infinity and to more complicated alterations in the mode of calcium channel activity. PMID:2451004

  12. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  13. Fibrinogen degradation by two neutral granulocyte proteinases. Influence of calcium on the generation of fibrinogen degradation products with anticlotting properties.

    PubMed

    Bingenhkeimer, C; Gramse, M; Egbring, R; Havemann, K

    1981-07-01

    Degradation of human fibrinogen by elastase-like proteinase, chymotrypsin-like proteinase and plasmin, was done in the presence and absence of calcium ions, respectively. The resulting fibrinogen degradation products were tested for their coagulant and anti-coagulant properties. The results show that 1. fibrinogenolysis is delayed in the presence of calcium ions. Higher enzyme concentrations are required to get unclottable split products when calcium ions are present. 2. The fibrinogen fragments obtained in the presence of calcium are different in their molecular weights and anticoagulant activities compared to those obtained in the absence of calcium ions. This effect of calcium is most striking during fibrinogen cleavage by chymotrypsin-like proteinase. Elastase and plasmin-induced fibrinogenolysis was substantially influenced by calcium only at a late degradation stage. PMID:6456216

  14. Calcium and phosphorus fluxes during hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate.

    PubMed

    Hou, S H; Zhao, J; Ellman, C F; Hu, J; Griffin, Z; Spiegel, D M; Bourdeau, J E

    1991-08-01

    We evaluated the acute effects of varying dialysate calcium concentration on plasma concentrations and dialyzer fluxes of calcium and phosphorus in adult hemodialysis patients. Seven individuals with stable end-stage renal failure were dialyzed 4 hours, three times weekly. The effects of dialysates containing 1.75, 1.25, or 0.75 mmol/L (70.1, 50.1, or 30.1 mg/L) of calcium were compared. Each patient was studied once at each bath calcium concentration. Compared with the predialysis mean value of 2.27 mmol/L (9.1 mg/dL), plasma total calcium concentration increased, remained constant, or decreased with the 1.75-, 1.25-, or 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysates, respectively. The 0.75-mmol/L calcium dialysate did not cause signs or symptoms of hypocalcemia (and the plasma calcium concentration did not fall below 1.80 mmol/L [7.2 mg/dL]). Plasma phosphorus concentrations decreased equally from a predialysis mean value of 2.16 mmol/L (6.7 mg/dL), regardless of the dialysate calcium concentration. After 4 hours of treatment with the three different dialysates, the cumulative calcium fluxes were significantly different. With 1.75 mmol/L calcium, mean bodily calcium accumulation was 21.9 mmol (879 mg). With 1.25 mmol/L, there was no net calcium flux. With 0.75 mmol/L, mean patient calcium loss was 5.8 mmol (231 mg). Mean phosphorus removal after 4 hours was 32.5 mmol (1,006 mg) and was unaffected by dialysate calcium concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1867178

  15. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate intakes of vitamin D and calcium are essential preventative measures and essential components of any therapeutic regimen for osteoporosis. Vitamin D is also important for the prevention of falls. Current evidence suggests that a 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 75 nmol/L (30 ng/ml) or higher ...

  16. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sarcoidosis • Hormone disorders, such as overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) • A genetic condition called familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia • Kidney ... topics: www.hormone.org (search for PHPT, calcium, hyperthyroidism, or osteoporosis) • MedlinePlus (National Institutes of Health-NIH): ...

  17. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  18. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  19. Calcium biofortification of crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than half of the world's population is deficient in calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se), or zinc (Zn). The consumption of plants, directly or via livestock, containing inadequate concentrations of particular minerals causes these deficiencies. Agronomic and geneti...

  20. Dynamical singularities in adaptive delayed-feedback control.

    PubMed

    Saito, Asaki; Konishi, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate the dynamical characteristics of adaptive delayed-feedback control systems, exploiting a discrete-time adaptive control method derived for carrying out detailed analysis. In particular, the systems exhibit singularities such as power-law decay of the distribution of transient times and almost zero finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We can explain these results by characterizing such systems as having (1) a Jacobian matrix with unity eigenvalue in the whole phase space, and (2) parameters approaching a stability boundary proven to be identical with that of (nonadaptive) delayed-feedback control. PMID:22060398

  1. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  2. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  3. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  4. Transient infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F.

    1989-04-01

    Transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new method that produces analytically useful emission spectra from optically thick, solid samples by greatly reducing self-absorption of emitted radiation. The method reduces self-absorption by creating a thin, short-lived, heated layer at the sample surface and collecting the transient emission from this layer. The technique requires no sample preparation and may be applied to both moving and stationary samples. The single-ended, noncontact TIRES measurement geometry is ideal for on-line and other remote-sensing applications. TIRES spectra acquired via a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on moving samples of coal, plastic, and paint are presented and compared to photoacoustic absorption spectra of these materials. The TIRES and photoacoustic results are in close agreement as predicted by Kirchhoff's law.

  5. The VAO Transient Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, Andrew; Mahabal, Ashish; Williams, Roy; Seaman, Rob

    2012-04-01

    The time-domain community wants robust and reliable tools to enable the production of, and subscription to, community-endorsed event notification packets (VOEvent). The Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) Transient Facility (VTF) is being designed to be the premier brokering service for the community, both collecting and disseminating observations about time-critical astronomical transients but also supporting annotations and the application of intelligent machine-learning to those observations. Two types of activity associated with the facility can therefore be distinguished: core infrastructure, and user services. We review the prior art in both areas, and describe the planned capabilities of the VTF. In particular, we focus on scalability and quality-of-service issues required by the next generation of sky surveys such as LSST and SKA.

  6. Reactor System Transient Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-14

    RELAP3B describes the behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactors during postulated accidents or power transients, such as large reactivity excursions, coolant losses or pump failures. The program calculates flows, mass and energy inventories, pressures, temperatures, and steam qualities along with variables associated with reactor power, reactor heat transfer, or control systems. Its versatility allows one to describe simple hydraulic systems as well as complex reactor systems.

  7. Functional separation of deep cytoplasmic calcium from subplasmalemmal space calcium in cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Young, Roger C; Zhang, PeiSheng

    2004-07-01

    For smooth muscle, two important functions of free intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(i)) are modulation of plasma membrane excitability properties and modulation of the contractile apparatus. As proposed by van Breemen, Ca(2+)(i) can be divided into the subplasmalemmal space (Ca(2+)(sps)) and the deep cytosol (Ca(2+)(d)) by the superficial calcium buffer barrier. Using these distinctions, Ca(2+)(sps) activates the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK), and Ca(2+)(d) binds calcium-dependent fluorescent probes in the cytoplasm. We present here combined fluorescence-patch clamp experiments designed to simultaneously assess Ca(2+)(d) and Ca(2+)(sps) in cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells. Open probabilities (P(o)) of the BK channel were measured using the cell-attached patch clamp technique. P(o) was used to approximate changes of [Ca(2+)(sps)]. Relative concentrations of Ca(2+)(d) were approximated by observing fluorescence of Calcium green-1 (F). Under control conditions, we found similar time courses for rises of P(o) and F following 10nM oxytocin (OT) addition. In parallel experiments, but with lanthanum (La(3+)) added to the bath to block transmembrane calcium flux, P(o) was only slightly affected, but F increases were delayed and blunted. These data paradoxically indicate that following OT stimulation, the primary source of calcium for Ca(2+)(sps) is internal stores, and calcium entry from the extracellular space is required to raise Ca(2+)(d). When cells were exposed to cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to release SR calcium stores, P(o) increased slowly, then persisted at large values. The persistence of P(o) rises suggests that removal of calcium from the subplasmalemmal space is primarily via reuptake into the SR. In the presence of La(3+), OT-induced rises of F were slightly prolonged, suggesting that transmembrane calcium flux contributes to decreasing Ca(2+)(d), but is not the primary mechanism. In summary, these data demonstrate that Ca(2

  8. Two Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Two transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  9. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Young, D. R.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-08-01

    Six bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  10. Bright Transients discovered by PSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Denneau, L.; Stalder, B.; Heinze, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven bright transients have been discovered as part of the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST). Information on all objects discovered by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients is available at http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/ (see Huber et al. ATel #7153).

  11. Changes in synaptic plasticity and expression of glutamate receptor subunits in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin-Jia; Shi, Zhong-Shan; Xia, Luo-Xing; Zhu, Li-Hui; Zeng, Ling; Nie, Jun-Hua; Xu, Zao-Cheng; Ruan, Yi-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Excess glutamate release from the presynaptic membrane has been thought to be the major cause of ischemic neuronal death. Although both CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons receive presynaptic glutamate input, transient cerebral ischemia induces CA1 neurons to die while CA3 neurons remain relatively intact. This suggests that changes in the properties of pyramidal cells may be the main cause related to ischemic neuronal death. Our previous studies have shown that the densities of dendritic spines and asymmetric synapses in the CA1 area are increased at 12h and 24h after ischemia. In the present study, we investigated changes in synaptic structures in the CA3 area and compared the expression of glutamate receptors in the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions of rats after ischemia. Our results demonstrated that the NR2B/NR2A ratio became larger after ischemia although the expression of both the NR2B subunit (activation of apoptotic pathway) and NR2A subunit (activation of survival pathway) decreased in the CA1 area from 6h to 48h after reperfusion. Furthermore, expression of the GluR2 subunit (calcium impermeable) of the AMPA receptor class significantly decreased while the GluR1 subunit (calcium permeable) remained unchanged at the same examined reperfusion times, which subsequently caused an increase in the GluR1/GluR2 ratio. Despite these notable differences in subunit expression, there were no obvious changes in the density of synapses or expression of NMDAR and AMPAR subunits in the CA3 area after ischemia. These results suggest that delayed CA1 neuronal death may be related to the dramatic fluctuation in the synaptic structure and relative upregulation of NR2B and GluR1 subunits induced by transient global ischemia. PMID:27090818

  12. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  13. Advanced PFBC transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Bonk, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Transient modeling and analysis of advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigation by the US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters that affect plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX{trademark}, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants burn coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC, and the high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When it is utilized, the low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to raise and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

  14. Preservation of the secretory response of peritoneal mast cells in the absence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C; Gies, J P; Vallé, A; Landry, Y

    1987-12-01

    The transfer of rat peritoneal mast cells from balanced salt solution to calcium-free buffer led to a time-dependent decrease in their response to compound 48/80 and to ionophore A23187. The concomittant absence of potassium from the calcium-free buffer enabled the mast cells to retain their secretory response. The increase in potassium level, with a parallel decrease in sodium to maintain osmolarity, led to a slight potentiation of the response to 48/80 and to a large but transient potentiation of the response to A23187. Mast cells can be considered nonexcitable. The apparent dependency upon extracellular calcium of mast cell secretory responses might be related to the presumed tight equilibrium between endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores and extracellular calcium. The control of this equilibrium by transmembrane gradients of monovalent ions is proposed. PMID:2446099

  15. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  16. Time course of transmitter release calculated from simulations of a calcium diffusion model.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, W M; Zucker, R S

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional presynaptic calcium diffusion model developed to account for characteristics of transmitter release was modified to provide for binding of calcium to a receptor and subsequent triggering of exocytosis. When low affinity (20 microM) and rapid kinetics were assumed for the calcium receptor triggering exocytosis, and stimulus parameters were selected to match those of experiments, the simulations predicted a virtual invariance of the time course of transmitter release to paired stimulation, stimulation with pulses of different amplitude, and stimulation in different calcium solutions. The large temperature sensitivity of experimental release time course was explained by a temperature sensitivity of the model's final rate limiting exocytotic process. Inclusion of calcium tail currents and a saturable buffer with finite binding kinetics resulted in high peak calcium transients near release sites, exceeding 100 microM. Models with a single class of calcium binding site to the secretory trigger molecule failed to produce sufficient synaptic facilitation under this condition. When at least one calcium ion binds to a different site having higher affinity and slow kinetics, facilitation again reaches levels similar to those seen experimentally. It is possible that the neurosecretory trigger molecule reacts with calcium at more than one class of binding site. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:1354503

  17. Spatiotemporal calcium signaling in a Drosophila melanogaster cell line stably expressing a Drosophila muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cordova, D; Delpech, V Raymond; Sattelle, D B; Rauh, J J

    2003-11-01

    A muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), DM1, expressed in the nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster, has been stably expressed in a Drosophila S2 cell line (S2-DM1) and used to investigate spatiotemporal calcium changes following agonist activation. Carbamylcholine (CCh) and oxotremorine are potent agonists, whereas application of the vertebrate M1 mAChR agonist, McN-A-343, results in a weak response. Activation of S2-DM1 receptors using CCh resulted in an increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) that was biphasic. Two distinct calcium sources were found to contribute to calcium signaling: (1) internal stores that are sensitive to both thapsigargin and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and (2) capacitative calcium entry. Spatiotemporal imaging of individual S2-DM1 cells showed that the CCh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transient resulted from a homogeneous calcium increase throughout the cell, indicative of calcium release from internal stores. In contrast, ionomycin induced the formation of a "calcium ring" at the cell periphery, consistent with external calcium influx. PMID:12827518

  18. Controlled environment life support system: Calcium-related leaf injuries on plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium related injuries to plants grown in controlled environments under conditions which maximize plant growth rates are described. Procedures to encourage movement of calcium into developing leaves of lettuce plants were investigated. The time course and pattern of calcium accumulation was determined to develop effective control procedures for this injury, termed tipburn. Procedures investigated were: (1) increasing the relative humidity to saturation during the dark period and altering root temperatures, (2) maximizing water stress during light and minimizing water stress during dark periods, (3) shortening the light-dark cycle lengths in combination with elevated moisture levels during the dark cycles, (4) reducing nutrient concentrations and (5) vibrating the plants. Saturated humidities at night increased the rate of growth and the large fluctuation in plant water potential encouraged calcium movement to the young leaves and delayed tipburn. Root temperature regulation between 15 and 26 C was not effective in preventing tipburn. Attempts to modulate water stress produced little variation, but no difference in tipburn development. Variations in light-dark cycle lengths also had no effect on calcium concentrations within developing leaves and no variation in tipburn development. Low concentrations of nutrient solution delayed tipburn, presumably because of greater calcium transport in the low concentration plants. Shaking of the plants did not prevent tipburn, but did delay it slightly.

  19. [Acromegaly: reducing diagnostic delay].

    PubMed

    Giustina, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic delay of acromegaly is still very relevant (6-8 years on average) without substantial changes in last twenty years. Clinical impact of this diagnostic delay is significant: tumor growth (2/3 of the patients at diagnosis bear a pituitary macroadenoma), development of irreversible complications (arthropathy, sleep apnea) and in all increased mortality. Reasons for this delay are related to the disease itself (facial and acral changes are very slow and subtle) but also to medical unawareness. Simple tools based on a few sufficiently sensitive and specific signs and symptoms which can trigger the diagnostic suspect would be useful in clinical practice. Global evaluation during follow-up (tumor volume, signs and symptoms, complications, circulating levels of growth hormone and its peripheral mediator IGF-I) has become crucial for the therapeutic decision making. In this regard, tools like SAGIT are now under validation and are expected to improve management of acromegaly. In fact, in the last 30 years there has been a relevant growth of the medical options to treat acromegaly and in the near future there will be an expansion of the medical options. This will greatly help the needed personalization of treatment which necessarily should consider patient convenience and preference and control of complications such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:27571562

  20. Time-Delay Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurandhar, Sanjeev V.; Tinto, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Equal-arm interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers), the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called Time-Delay Interferometry (TDI). This article provides an overview of the theory and mathematical foundations of TDI as it will be implemented by the forthcoming space-based interferometers such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. We have purposely left out from this first version of our "Living Review" article on TDI all the results of more practical and experimental nature, as well as all the aspects of TDI that the data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the LISA TDI data combinations. Our forthcoming "second edition" of this review paper will include these topics.

  1. Time Delay Integration: A Wide-Field Survey Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Robert; Hill, E.; Leimer, L.; McMillian, K.; Miller, A.; Prindle, A.

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Placement Physics class of Orange Lutheran High School has conducted a survey-imaging pro-ject using a Time Delay Integration (TDI) technique. TDI enables very wide-field images to be collected in the form of long strips of the sky. A series of five consecutive nights were captured, calibrated and compared to re-veal possible transient phenomena such as supernovae, asteroids, and other events that have a noticeable change over 24-hour intervals.

  2. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol on recovery and resolution of late transient neonatal hypocalcemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Late transient neonatal hypocalcemia with hyperphosphatemia is potentially life-threatening. The use of 1.25 dihydroxycholecalciferol in the management of neonatal hypocalcemia is unexplored. We hypothesized adding 1.25 dihydroxycholecalciferol to intravenous continuous calcium infusion (CaI) will a...

  3. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  4. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  5. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  6. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Chernov, Mykyta M.; Chen, Brenda R.; Grosberg, Lauren E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  7. 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D AND 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D-MEDIATED REGULATION OF TRPV6 (A PUTATIVE EPITHELIAL CALCIUM CHANNEL) MRNA EXPRESSION IN CACO-2 CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TRPV6 is a member of the vanilloid subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins and likely functions as an epithelial calcium channel in calcium-transporting organs, such as the intestine, kidney, and placenta. TRPV6 mRNA expression is strongly regulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the a...

  8. Assessing delay discounting in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting (also intertemporal choice or impulsive choice) is the process by which delayed outcomes, such as delayed food delivery, are valued less than the same outcomes delivered immediately or with a shorter delay. This process is of interest because many psychopathologies, including substance dependence, pathological gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder, are characterized by heightened levels of delay discounting. Some of these disorders are heritable, and data indicate that delay discounting also has a genetic component. To identify the genes underlying the delay discounting decision-making process and genetic correlates of heightened discounting, researchers have used mouse models. This unit describes a protocol for generating delay discounting behavior in mice and discusses analysis techniques for such behavior. PMID:24510779

  9. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Delayed Speech or Language Development KidsHealth > For Parents > Delayed Speech or Language ... your child is right on schedule. Normal Speech & Language Development It's important to discuss early speech and ...

  10. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which the tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  11. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  12. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  13. Nutrition in calcium nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease with a complex pathogenesis due to genetic and environmental factors. The importance of social and health effects of nephrolithiasis is further highlighted by the strong tendency to relapse of the disease. Long-term prospective studies show a peak of disease recurrence within 2–3 years since onset, 40-50% of patients have a recurrence after 5 years and more than 50-60% after 10 years. International nutritional studies demonstrated that nutritional habits are relevant in therapy and prevention approaches of nephrolithiasis. Water, right intake of calcium, low intake of sodium, high levels of urinary citrate are certainly important for the primary and secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis. In this review is discussed how the correction of nutritional mistakes can reduce the incidence of recurrent nephrolithiasis. PMID:23634702

  14. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    DOEpatents

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  15. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  16. Complexometric Determination of Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) complexes with numerous mineral ions, including calcium and magnesium. This reaction can be used to determine the amount of these minerals in a sample by a complexometric titration. Endpoints in the titration are detected using indicators that change color when they complex with mineral ions. Calmagite and eriochrome black T (EBT) are such indicators that change from blue to pink when they complex with calcium and magnesium. In the titration of a mineral-containing solution with EDTA, the solution turns from pink to blue at the endpoint with either indicator. The pH affects a complexometric EDTA titration in several ways, and must be carefully controlled. A major application of EDTA titration is testing the hardness of water, for which the method described is an official one (Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, Method 2340C; AOAC Method 920.196).

  17. PYK2: a calcium-sensitive protein tyrosine kinase activated in response to fertilization of the zebrafish oocyte.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dipika; Kinsey, William H

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization begins with binding and fusion of a sperm with the oocyte, a process that triggers a high amplitude calcium transient which propagates through the oocyte and stimulates a series of preprogrammed signal transduction events critical for zygote development. Identification of the pathways downstream of this calcium transient remains an important step in understanding the basis of zygote quality. The present study demonstrates that the calcium-calmodulin sensitive protein tyrosine kinase PYK2 is a target of the fertilization-induced calcium transient in the zebrafish oocyte and that it plays an important role in actin-mediated events critical for sperm incorporation. At fertilization, PYK2 was activated initially at the site of sperm-oocyte interaction and was closely associated with actin filaments forming the fertilization cone. Later PYK2 activation was evident throughout the entire oocyte cortex, however activation was most intense over the animal hemisphere. Fertilization-induced PYK2 activation could be blocked by suppressing calcium transients in the ooplasm via injection of BAPTA as a calcium chelator. PYK2 activation could be artificially induced in unfertilized oocytes by injection of IP3 at concentrations sufficient to induce calcium release. Functionally, suppression of PYK2 activity by chemical inhibition or by injection of a dominant-negative construct encoding the N-terminal ERM domain of PKY2 inhibited formation of an organized fertilization cone and reduced the frequency of successful sperm incorporation. Together, the above findings support a model in which PYK2 responds to the fertilization-induced calcium transient by promoting reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton to form the fertilization cone. PMID:23084926

  18. Prebiotics and calcium bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    A prebiotic substance has been defined as a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon. Therefore, compared to probiotics, which introduce exogenous bacteria into the colonic microflora, a prebiotic aims at stimulating the growth of one or a limited number of the potentially health-promoting indigenous micro-organisms, thus modulating the composition of the natural ecosystem. In recent years, increasing attention has been focussed on the possible beneficial effects of prebiotics, such as enhanced resistance to invading pathogens, improved bowel function, anti-colon cancer properties, lipid lowering action, improved calcium bioavailability, amongst others. The objective of this review is to critically assess the available data on the effects of prebiotics on calcium bioavailability, and place it in the context of human physiology and, when possible, explain the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. The review will also try to highlight future areas of research that may help in the evaluation of prebiotics as potential ingredients for functional foods aimed at enhancing calcium bioavailability and protecting against osteoporosis. PMID:12691259

  19. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOEpatents

    DeRyckere, John F.; Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank Nolan

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  20. PKA Controls Calcium Influx into Motor Neurons during a Rhythmic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine) rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels. PMID:24086161

  1. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  2. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

    1989-07-18

    A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

  3. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  4. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and < 0.16″ in the near infrared leading to an increase of the infrared point-source sensitivity against the sky background by a factor of ~9, crucial for efficient near-infrared spectroscopy.RTS will allow us to map the dark matter distribution in the z < 0.1 local universe with ten times better accuracy and precision than previous experiments. ATLAS will discover several thousand SNIae per year, measuring SNIa peak brightness, and decline rates, while RTS will measure reddening by dust, confirm SN type and

  5. Transient mitochondrial permeability transition mediates excitotoxicity in glutamate-sensitive NSC34D motor neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Shangcheng; Wang, Pei; Wang, Wang

    2015-09-01

    Excitotoxicity plays a critical role in neurodegenerative disease. Cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial dysfunction are among the major mediators of high level glutamate-induced neuron death. Here, we show that the transient opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (tMPT) bridges cytosolic calcium signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction and mediates glutamate-induced neuron death. Incubation of the differentiated motor neuron-like NSC34D cells with glutamate (1mM) acutely induces cytosolic calcium transient (30% increase). Glutamate also stimulates tMPT opening, as reflected by a 2-fold increase in the frequency of superoxide flash, a bursting superoxide production event in individual mitochondria coupled to tMPT opening. The glutamate-induced tMPT opening is attenuated by suppressing cytosolic calcium influx and abolished by inhibiting mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) with Ru360 (100 μM) or MCU shRNA. Further, increased cytosolic calcium is sufficient to induce tMPT in a mitochondrial calcium dependent manner. Finally, chronic glutamate incubation (24h) persistently elevates the probability of tMPT opening, promotes oxidative stress and induces neuron death. Attenuating tMPT activity or inhibiting MCU protects NSC34D cells from glutamate-induced cell death. These results indicate that high level glutamate-induced neuron toxicity is mediated by tMPT, which connects increased cytosolic calcium signal to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26024861

  6. Adaptive Phase Delay Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    There are several experimental setups involving rotating machinery that require some form of synchronization. The adaptive phase delay generator (APDG) the Bencic-1000 is a flexible instrument that allows the user to generate pulses synchronized to the rising edge of a tachometer signal from any piece of rotating machinery. These synchronized pulses can vary by the delay angle, pulse width, number of pulses per period, number of skipped pulses, and total number of pulses. Due to the design of the pulse generator, any and all of these parameters can be changed independently, yielding an unparalleled level of versatility. There are two user interfaces to the APDG. The first is a LabVIEW program that has the advantage of displaying all of the pulse parameters and input signal data within one neatly organized window on the PC monitor. Furthermore, the LabVIEW interface plots the rpm of the two input signal channels in real time. The second user interface is a handheld portable device that goes anywhere a computer is not accessible. It consists of a liquid-crystal display and keypad, which enable the user to control the unit by scrolling through a host of command menus and parameter listings. The APDG combines all of the desired synchronization control into one unit. The experimenter can adjust the delay, pulse width, pulse count, number of skipped pulses, and produce a specified number of pulses per revolution. Each of these parameters can be changed independently, providing an unparalleled level of versatility when synchronizing hardware to a host of rotating machinery. The APDG allows experimenters to set up quickly and generate a host of synchronizing configurations using a simple user interface, which hopefully leads to faster results.

  7. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials. PMID:24090874

  8. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  9. Transient Observations with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2010-12-01

    In the coming decade, LSST';s combination of all-sky coverage, consistent long-term monitoring, and flexible criteria for event identification will revolutionize studies of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. The umbrella of time domain science with LSST encompasses objects both familiar and exotic, from classical variables within our Galaxy to explosive cosmological events. LSST will make localization for gravity wave events possible, identify counterparts to GRBs and X-ray flashes, and discover new supernovae. Increased sample sizes of known-but-rare observational phenomena will quantify their distributions for the first time, thus challenging existing theory. Perhaps most excitingly, LSST will provide the opportunity to sample previously untouched regions of parameter space, where transient events are expected on theoretical grounds, but have not yet been observed. LSST will generate "alerts" within 60 seconds of detecting a new transient, permitting the community t o follow up unusual events in greater detail. Here, I highlight some of the scientific opportunities LSST will provide, as well as the challenges we face and opportunities for community involvement.

  10. Arrhythmogenic consequences of intracellular calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Weiss, James N

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+)) waves are known to cause delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs), which have been associated with arrhythmias in cardiac disease states such as heart failure, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and digitalis toxicity. Here we show that, in addition to DADs, Ca(i)(2+) waves also have other consequences relevant to arrhythmogenesis, including subcellular spatially discordant alternans (SDA, in which the amplitude of the local Ca(i)(2+) transient alternates out of phase in different regions of the same cell), sudden repolarization changes promoting the dispersion of refractoriness, and early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Ca(i)(2+) was imaged using a charge-coupled device-based system in fluo-4 AM-loaded isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes paced at constant or incrementally increasing rates, using either field stimulation, current clamp, or action potential (AP) clamp. Ca(i)(2+) waves were induced by Bay K 8644 (50 nM) + isoproterenol (100 nM), or low temperature. When pacing was initiated during a spontaneous Ca(i)(2+) wave, SDA occurred abruptly and persisted during pacing. Similarly, during rapid pacing, SDA typically arose suddenly from spatially concordant alternans, due to an abrupt phase reversal of the subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient in a region of the myocyte. Ca(i)(2+) waves could be visualized interspersed with AP-triggered Ca(i)(2+) transients, producing a rich variety of subcellular Ca(i)(2+) transient patterns. With free-running APs, complex Ca(i)(2+) release patterns were associated with DADs, EADs, and sudden changes in AP duration. These findings link Ca(i)(2+) waves directly to a variety of arrhythmogenic phenomena relevant to the intact heart. PMID:19561309

  11. Rapid Transcriptome Changes Induced by Cytosolic Ca2+ Transients Reveal ABRE-Related Sequences as Ca2+-Responsive cis Elements in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R.; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10−13) comprising two abscisic acid–specific cis elements: the abscisic acid–responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/A]). Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca2+ transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca2+ transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca2+-responsive cis elements. PMID:16980540

  12. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    PubMed

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet. PMID:25095643

  13. Delayed rule following

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Although the elements of a fully stated rule (discriminative stimulus [SD], some behavior, and a consequence) can occur nearly contemporaneously with the statement of the rule, there is often a delay between the rule statement and the SD. The effects of this delay on rule following have not been studied in behavior analysis, but they have been investigated in rule-like settings in the areas of prospective memory (remembering to do something in the future) and goal pursuit. Discriminative events for some behavior can be event based (a specific setting stimulus) or time based. The latter are more demanding with respect to intention following and show age-related deficits. Studies suggest that the specificity with which the components of a rule (termed intention) are stated has a substantial effect on intention following, with more detailed specifications increasing following. Reminders of an intention, too, are most effective when they refer specifically to both the behavior and its occasion. Covert review and written notes are two effective strategies for remembering everyday intentions, but people who use notes appear not to be able to switch quickly to covert review. By focusing on aspects of the setting and rule structure, research on prospective memory and goal pursuit expands the agenda for a more complete explanation of rule effects. PMID:22478363

  14. Calcium Kinetics During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Wastney, Meryl E.; OBrien, Kimberly O.; Lane, Helen W.

    1999-01-01

    Bone loss is one of the most detrimental effects of space flight, threatening to limit the duration of human space missions. The ability to understand and counteract this loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after extended-duration missions. The hypotheses to be tested in this project are that space flight alters calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism, and that calcium homeostasis and bone mineral metabolism will return to baseline within days to weeks of return to Earth. These hypotheses will be evidenced by elevated rates of bone mineral resorption and decreased bone mineral deposition, decreased absorption of dietary calcium, altered calcitropic endocrine profiles, elevated excretion of calcium in urine and feces, and elevated excretion of markers of bone resorption. The second hypothesis will be evidenced by return of indices of calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism to preflight levels within days to weeks of return to Earth. Studies will be conducted on International Space Station astronauts before, during, and after extended-duration flights. Measurements of calcium kinetics, bone mass, and endocrine/biochemical markers of bone and calcium homeostasis will be conducted. Kinetic studies utilizing dual isotope tracer kinetic studies and mathematical modeling techniques will allow for determination of bone calcium deposition, bone calcium resorption, dietary calcium absorption and calcium excretion (both urinary and endogenous fecal excretion). These studies will build upon preliminary work conducted on the Russian Mir space station. The results from this project will be critical for clarifying how microgravity affects bone and calcium homeostasis, and will provide an important control point for assessment of countermeasure efficacy. These results are expected to aid in developing countermeasures for bone loss, both for space crews and for individuals on Earth who have metabolic bone diseases.

  15. The joy of transient chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Tél, Tamás

    2015-09-15

    We intend to show that transient chaos is a very appealing, but still not widely appreciated, subfield of nonlinear dynamics. Besides flashing its basic properties and giving a brief overview of the many applications, a few recent transient-chaos-related subjects are introduced in some detail. These include the dynamics of decision making, dispersion, and sedimentation of volcanic ash, doubly transient chaos of undriven autonomous mechanical systems, and a dynamical systems approach to energy absorption or explosion.

  16. Effects of mechanical signaling on plant cell cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Haley, A; Russell, A J; Wood, N; Allan, A C; Knight, M; Campbell, A K; Trewavas, A J

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical signals are important influences on the development and morphology of higher plants. Using tobacco transformed with the Ca(2+)-sensitive luminescent protein aequorin, we recently reported the effects of mechanical signals of touch and wind on the luminescence and thus intracellular calcium of young seedlings. When mesophyll protoplasts are isolated from these transgenic tobacco plants and mechanically stimulated by swirling them in solution, cytoplasmic Ca2+ increases immediately and transiently up to 10 microM, and these transients are unaffected by an excess of EGTA in the medium. The size of the transient effect is related to the strength of swirling. Epidermal strips isolated from transgenic tobacco leaves and containing only viable guard cells and trichomes also respond to the strength of swirling in solution and can increase their cytoplasmic Ca2+ transiently up to 10 microM. Finally, the moss Physcomitrella patens containing recombinant aequorin exhibits transient increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+ up to 5 microM when swirled in solution. This effect is strongly inhibited by ruthenium red. Our data indicate that the effect of mechanical stimulation can be found in a number of different cell types and in a lower plant as well as tobacco and suggest that mechanoperception and the resulting increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ may be widespread. PMID:11536690

  17. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) has been designed with a singular focus: a systematic exploration of the night sky at a magnitude level well suited for spectral classification and follow up with the existing class of 4-m to 10-m class telescopes. ZTF is the successor to the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The discovery engine for ZTF is a 47 square degree camera (realized through 16 e2V monolithic CCDs) that fills the entire focal plane of the 48-inch Oschin telescope of the Palomar Observatory. Single 30-s epoch sensitivity is about 20.5 in g and R bands. The Infarared Processing & Analysis Center (IPAC) is the data center for ZTF. ZTF is a public-private partnership with equal contributions from a consortium of world-wide partners and an NSF MSIP grant. Forty percent of ZTF time is set aside for two major community surveys: a 3-day cadence survey of high latitudes (to mimic LSST) and a time domain survey of the entire Northern Galactic plane. We expect first light in February 2017 and begin a 3-year survey starting summer of 2017. The first year will be spent on building up deep reference images of the sky (a must for transient surveys). During the second year IPAC will deliver near archival quality photometric products within 12 hours of observations. By comparison to reference images photometric alerts will be sent out. Year 3 will see the near real-time release of image differencing products. A Community Science Advisory Committee (CSAC), chaired by S. Ridgway (NOAO), has been set up to both advise the PI and to ensure that the US community's interests are well served. Astronomers interested in getting a head start on ZTF may wish to peruse the data releases from PTF. Young people (or young at heart) may wish to attend the annual summer school on PTF/ZTF (August, Caltech campus). The Principal Investigator (PI) for the project is S. Kulkarni and the Project Scientist is Eric Bellm.For further details please consult http://www.ptf.caltech.edu/ztf

  18. Mechanisms of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2003-02-01

    Calcium is absorbed in the mammalian small intestine by two general mechanisms: a transcellular active transport process, located largely in the duodenum and upper jejunum; and a paracellular, passive process that functions throughout the length of the intestine. The transcellular process involves three major steps: entry across the brush border, mediated by a molecular structure termed CaT1, intracellular diffusion, mediated largely by the cytosolic calcium-binding protein (calbindinD(9k) or CaBP); and extrusion, mediated largely by the CaATPase. Chyme travels down the intestinal lumen in approximately 3 h, spending only minutes in the duodenum, but over 2 h in the distal half of the small intestine. When calcium intake is low, transcellular calcium transport accounts for a substantial fraction of the absorbed calcium. When calcium intake is high, transcellular transport accounts for only a minor portion of the absorbed calcium, because of the short sojourn time and because CaT1 and CaBP, both rate-limiting, are downregulated when calcium intake is high. Biosynthesis of CaBP is fully and CaT1 function is approximately 90% vitamin D-dependent. At high calcium intakes CaT1 and CaBP are downregulated because 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the active vitamin D metabolite, is downregulated. PMID:12520541

  19. Calcium channel blockers and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Nimmrich, V; Eckert, A

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative dementia is mainly caused by Alzheimer's disease and/or cerebrovascular abnormalities. Disturbance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis is central to the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, enhanced calcium load may be brought about by extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β. Recent studies suggest that soluble forms facilitate influx through calcium-conducting ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to excitotoxic neurodegeneration. Calcium channel blockade attenuates amyloid-β-induced neuronal decline in vitro and is neuroprotective in animal models. Vascular dementia, on the other hand, is caused by cerebral hypoperfusion and may benefit from calcium channel blockade due to relaxation of the cerebral vasculature. Several calcium channel blockers have been tested in clinical trials of dementia and the outcome is heterogeneous. Nimodipine as well as nilvadipine prevent cognitive decline in some trials, whereas other calcium channel blockers failed. In trials with a positive outcome, BP reduction did not seem to play a role in preventing dementia, indicating a direct protecting effect on neurons. An optimization of calcium channel blockers for the treatment of dementia may involve an increase of selectivity for presynaptic calcium channels and an improvement of the affinity to the inactivated state. Novel low molecular weight compounds suitable for proof-of-concept studies are now available. PMID:23638877

  20. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity.

  1. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity. PMID:27586618

  2. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown algae. Calcium alginate is prepared...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL- racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate ((C9H16NO5)2Ca, CAS Reg. No. of the D... calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium pantothenate is prepared synthetically...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1212 - Calcium pantothenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate. 184.1212 Section 184.1212... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1212 Calcium pantothenate. (a) Calcium pantothenate... and the DL-racemic mixture of calcium pantothenate are used in food. Commercial calcium...

  8. Transient complex peroxisomal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Schrader, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are ubiquitous subcellular organelles that fulfill essential metabolic functions, rendering them indispensable for human development and health. Both are highly dynamic organelles that can undergo remarkable changes in morphology and number to accomplish cellular needs. While mitochondrial dynamics are also regulated by frequent fusion events, the fusion of mature peroxisomes in mammalian cells remained a matter of debate. In our recent study, we clarified systematically that there is no complete fusion of mature peroxisomes analogous to mitochondria. Moreover, in contrast to key division components such as DLP1, Fis1 or Mff, mitochondrial fusion proteins were not localized to peroxisomes. However, we discovered and characterized novel transient, complex interactions between individual peroxisomes which may contribute to the homogenization of the often heterogeneous peroxisomal compartment, e.g., by distribution of metabolites, signals or other “molecular information” via interperoxisomal contact sites. PMID:23336019

  9. Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dentrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle flights (STS-62, STS-75, and STS-87) of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dentrites. Shown here is a cutaway of the isothermal bath containing its growth cell at the heart of the TDSE. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Note: an Acrobat PDF version is available from http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery

  10. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  11. Transient heliosheath modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenby, J. J.; Webber, W. R.

    2015-10-01

    Voyager 1 has explored the solar wind-interstellar medium interaction region between the terminal shock and heliopause, following the intensity distribution of Galactic cosmic ray protons above 200 MeV energy. Before this component reached the expected galactic flux level at 121.7 au from the Sun, four episodes of rapid intensity change occurred with a behaviour similar to that found in Forbush Decreases in the inner Solar system, rather than that expected from a mechanism related to models for the long-term modulation found closer to the Sun. Because the mean solar wind flow is both expected and observed to be perpendicular to the radial direction close to the heliopause, an explanation is suggested in terms of transient radial flows related to possible heliopause boundary flapping. It is necessary that the radial flows are of the order either of the sound speed found for conditions downstream of the terminal shock or of the fluctuations found near the boundary by the Voyager 1 Low Energy Charged Particle detector and that the relevant cosmic ray diffusion perpendicular to the mean field is controlled by `slab' fluctuations accounting for about 20 per cent of the total power in the field variance. However, additional radial drift motion related to possible north to south gradients in the magnetic field may allow the inclusion of some diffusion according to the predictions of a theory based upon the presence of 2D turbulence. The required field gradients may arise due to field variation in the field carried by solar plasma flow deflected away from the solar equatorial plane. Modulation amounting to a total 30 per cent drop in galactic intensity requires explanation by a combination of transient effects.

  12. Calcium antagonist property of CPU228, a dofetilide derivative, contributes to its low incidence of torsades de pointes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Jiang; Dai, De-Zai; Li, Na; Na, Tao; Ji, Min; Dai, Yin

    2007-04-01

    1. Torsades de pointes (TDP) is a severe adverse effect during the clinical use of dofetilide, a selective blocker of the rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium channel (I(Kr)). The present study was designed to test whether CPU228, a derivative of dofetilide with calcium (Ca(2+)) antagonist properties, could reduce TDP without reducing the blockade of I(Kr). 2. The incidence of TDP in a rabbit model and the effective refractory period (ERP) were measured and compared for dofetilide and CPU228. Suppression of I(Kr) and the L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) and the Ca(2+) transients of isolated cardiomyocytes were investigated by whole-cell patch-clamp and Fluo-3 dye spectrophotometry. 3. The incidence of TDP was greatly reduced by CPU228 relative to dofetilide, occurring in only one of six rabbits compared with five of six rabbits following dofetilide (P < 0.05). In isolated atria, prolongation of ERP by CPU228 was less than that of dofetilide and no reverse frequency dependence was observed. Negative inotropism by CPU228 was significant against positive inotropism by dofetilide. CPU228 inhibited both I(Kr) and I(Ca,L) currents and the IC(50) for I(Ca,L) inhibition was 0.909 micromol/L. At 3 micromol/L, CPU228 significantly suppressed the Ca(2+) transients. 4. CPU228 is able to block I(Ca,L), contributing to decreased TDP, while also blocking I(Kr) activity. By combined blockade of I(Kr) and I(Ca,L), CPU228 shares the property of complex Class III anti-arrhythmic agents. PMID:17324143

  13. Soviet delays raise prices

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-01-15

    The breakup of the Soviet Union is causing massive disruptions to methanol exports. The changeover to a Commonwealth of independent States has created logistical problems which have led some shipments of Russian methanol to be cancelled and delayed other deliveries by up to two weeks. In recent years the Soviet Union has exported 700,000 m.t./year-900,000 m.t./year of methanol, mainly to Western Europe. The product is made at 750,000-m.t./year plants at Tomsk and Gubakha in Russia and transported by rail for shipment from the ports of Ventspils, Latvia, on the Baltic Sea and Yuzhnyy in Ukraine, on the Black Sea. The exports were handled by state export agency Soyuzagrochim, mainly under contract to West European traders and consumers in areas like Scandinavia and France.

  14. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  15. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  16. Compact Dielectric-Rod White-Light Delay Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    Optical delay lines of a proposed type would be made from rods of such dielectric materials as calcium fluoride, fused silica, or sapphire. These would offer advantages over prior optical delay lines, as summarized below. Optical delay lines are key components of opto-electronic microwave oscillators, narrow-band opto-electronic microwave filters, evanescent-field optical biochemical detectors, and some Fourier-Transform spectrum analyzers. Heretofore, optical delay lines used in such applications have been of two types: resonators and coiled long optical fibers, both of which have disadvantages: Resonators are compact, but excitation must be provided by narrow-band lasers. Wide-band (including noisy) laser light cannot be coupled efficiently to narrow-band resonators. When light is coupled into a narrowband resonator from a source of reasonably high power, a significant amount of optical energy circulates within the resonator, causing nonlinear loss and significant noise. Typically, a coil-type optical delay line is made of fused-silica fiber, which exhibits fundamental loss. To overcome the limit imposed by the optical loss in fused silica, it would be necessary to use fibers having crystalline cores. Although space is saved by winding fibers into coils, fiber-coil delay lines are still inconveniently bulky. The proposed compact dielectric-rod delay lines would exploit the special class of non-diffracting light beams that are denoted Bessel beams because their amplitudes are proportional to Bessel functions of the radii from their central axes. High-order Bessel beams can have large values of angular momentum. They can be generated with the help of whispering-gallery-mode optical resonators, as described, for example, in "Simplified Generation of High-Angular-Momentum Light Beams" (NPO-42965) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 3 (March 2007), page 8a. In a delay line according to the proposal, the dielectric rod would be dimensioned to function as a multimode

  17. Establishment of a transient expression system for Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, P K; Ahern, K G; Firtel, R A

    1988-01-01

    We have established a rapid and sensitive transient expression system for Dictyostelium discoideum. We constructed a gene fusion containing the promoter from the Dictyostelium Actin 15 gene fused to the firefly luciferase gene. The enzymatic activity of this gene fusion, expressed at very high levels in stable transformants, was measured to determine optimum conditions for transient expression using electroporation to introduce the DNA into cells. With these conditions, we show that a luciferase gene fusion driven by a prestalk, cell-type specific promoter from the pst-cathepsin gene expresses luciferase at the appropriate developmental stage. In addition, we present results suggesting that the system will be useful for expressing genes in non-axenic cell lines. Finally, we observe that electroporation is more efficient for obtaining stable transformations than the standard calcium phosphate procedure using extrachromosomally replicating shuttle vectors but less efficient for vectors that integrate into the Dictyostelium chromosomes. PMID:3362676

  18. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  19. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  20. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  1. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate...

  2. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for...

  3. Superfluorescence from optically trapped calcium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumarakrishnan, A.; Han, X. L.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied superfluorescence (SF) under highly unfavorable conditions of rapid collisional and radiative distribution in a Doppler-broadened medium. Nanosecond SF pulses at 5.5 μm were generated on the Ca 4s4p 1P1-3d4s 1D2 transition from a column of calcium vapor buffered with Ar by optically pumping the 4s2 1S0-4s4p 1P1 transition. The Rabi frequency associated with the intense pump pulse prevents the occurrence of SF while the pump laser is on. As a result, the predicted scaling laws that describe the properties of SF in a transversely excited system, such as peak heights, pulse widths, and delay times, are shown to apply in our situation in which the conditions resemble swept excitation. The delay times were found to be in agreement with a fully quantum mechanical calculation which describes the initiation of SF. Measurements of the densities of the three levels, the absolute SF photon yield, and the spatial distribution of the excited states indicate that the system has a quantum yield of unity. The SF intensity increases with an increase in Ar pressure due to collisional redistribution until the collisional dephasing rate inhibits SF. The conditions describing the transition of SF to amplified spontaneous emission allow us to measure the collisional broadening rate for the SF transition.

  4. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2014-01-01

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay. PMID:24880267

  5. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  6. Recent developments in intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2009-02-01

    Calcium absorption proceeds by transcellular and paracellular flux, with the latter accounting for most absorbed calcium when calcium intake is adequate. Vitamin D helps regulate transcellular calcium transport by increasing calcium uptake via a luminal calcium channel and by inducing the cytosolic calcium transporting protein, calbindinD(9k). Recent studies utilizing knockout mice have challenged the functional importance of the channel and calbindin. To integrate the new findings with many previous studies, the function of the two molecules must be evaluated in the calcium transport and economy of mice. When calcium intake is high, transcellular calcium transport contributes little to total calcium absorption. Therefore, increasing calcium intake seems the most effective nutritional approach to ensure adequate absorption and prevent bone loss. PMID:19178653

  7. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing features ... maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are given ...

  8. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  9. Calcium transporters: From fields to the table

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium transporters regulate calcium fluxes within cells. Plants, like all organisms, contain channels, pumps, and exchangers to carefully modulate intracellular calcium levels. This review presents a summary of the recent advances in cloning and characterizing of these transporters and highlight...

  10. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  11. Transients by substructuring with DMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    Automated substructuring in level 16 of NASTRAN was employed as a preface to the solution of a direct transient analysis. The DMAP ALTER statements written to adapt the substructuring for transient purposes are explained. Data recovery was accomplished with transfer functions. Proof of the success of the method is presented with an application to a missile structure.

  12. Major Minerals - Calcium, Magnesium, Phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium, magnesium and phosphorus are essential elements critically important for the function of the musculoskeletal system, including the formation and transduction of energy and the maintenance of healthy bone. The major calcium concern for physically active healthy middle-aged adults is to consu...

  13. Calcium Intake: A Lifelong Proposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amschler, Denise H.

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews the current problem of low calcium intake in the United States among all age groups, the role of calcium in the formation and maintenance of bone mass, and major factors influencing absorption. Osteoporosis is discussed, and current recommendations for Recommended Dietary allowance are provided. (Author/MT)

  14. Electrochemical cell with calcium anode

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Hosmer, Pamela K.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1979-01-01

    An electrochemical cell comprising a calcium anode and a suitable cathode in an alkaline electrolyte consisting essentially of an aqueous solution of an hydroxide and a chloride. Specifically disclosed is a mechanically rechargeable calcium/air fuel cell with an aqueous NaOH/NaCl electrolyte.

  15. Dynamic and static calcium gradients inside large snail (Helix aspersa) neurones detected with calcium-sensitive microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roger C.; Postma, Marten

    2007-01-01

    We have used quartz Ca2+-sensitive microelectrodes (CASMs) in large voltage-clamped snail neurones to investigate the inward spread of Ca2+ after a brief depolarisation. Both steady state and [Ca2+]i transients changed with depth of penetration. When the CASM tip was within 20 μm of the far side of the cell the [Ca2+]i transient time to peak was 4.4 ± 0.5 s, rising to 14.7 ± 0.7 s at a distance of 80 μm. We estimate that the Ca2+ transients travelled centripetally at an average speed of 6 μm2 s−1 and decreased in size by half over a distance of about 45 μm. Cyclopiazonic acid had little effect on the size and time to peak of Ca2+ transients but slowed their recovery significantly. This suggests that the endoplasmic reticulum curtails rather than reinforces the transients. Injecting the calcium buffer BAPTA made the Ca2+ transients more uniform in size and increased their times to peak and rates of recovery near the membrane. We have developed a computational model for the transients, which includes diffusion, uptake and Ca2+ extrusion. Good fits were obtained with a rather large apparent diffusion coefficient of about 90 ± 20 μm2 s−1.This may assist fast recovery by extrusion. PMID:16962659

  16. The calcium sensor synaptotagmin 7 is required for synaptic facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Skyler L.; Turecek, Josef; Belinsky, Justine E.

    2015-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that synaptic strength is dynamically regulated in a use-dependent manner1. At synapses with a low initial release probability, closely spaced presynaptic action potentials can result in facilitation, a short-term form of enhancement where each subsequent action potential evokes greater neurotransmitter release2. Facilitation can enhance neurotransmitter release manyfold and profoundly influence information transfer across synapses3, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. Among the proposed mechanisms is that a specialized calcium sensor for facilitation transiently increases the probability of release2,4 and is distinct from the fast sensors that mediate rapid neurotransmitter release. Yet such a sensor has never been identified, and its very existence has been disputed5,6. Here we show that synaptotagmin 7 (syt7) is a calcium sensor that is required for facilitation at multiple central synapses. In syt7 knockout mice, facilitation is eliminated even though the initial probability of release and presynaptic residual calcium signals are unaltered. Expression of wild-type syt7 in presynaptic neurons restored facilitation, whereas expression of a mutated syt7 with a calcium-insensitive C2A domain did not. By revealing the role of syt7 in synaptic facilitation, these results resolve a longstanding debate about a widespread form of short-term plasticity, and will enable future studies that may lead to a deeper understanding of the functional importance of facilitation. PMID:26738595

  17. The calcium sensor synaptotagmin 7 is required for synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Skyler L; Turecek, Josef; Belinsky, Justine E; Regehr, Wade G

    2016-01-01

    It has been known for more than 70 years that synaptic strength is dynamically regulated in a use-dependent manner. At synapses with a low initial release probability, closely spaced presynaptic action potentials can result in facilitation, a short-term form of enhancement in which each subsequent action potential evokes greater neurotransmitter release. Facilitation can enhance neurotransmitter release considerably and can profoundly influence information transfer across synapses, but the underlying mechanism remains a mystery. One proposed mechanism is that a specialized calcium sensor for facilitation transiently increases the probability of release, and this sensor is distinct from the fast sensors that mediate rapid neurotransmitter release. Yet such a sensor has never been identified, and its very existence has been disputed. Here we show that synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7) is a calcium sensor that is required for facilitation at several central synapses. In Syt7-knockout mice, facilitation is eliminated even though the initial probability of release and the presynaptic residual calcium signals are unaltered. Expression of wild-type Syt7 in presynaptic neurons restored facilitation, whereas expression of a mutated Syt7 with a calcium-insensitive C2A domain did not. By revealing the role of Syt7 in synaptic facilitation, these results resolve a longstanding debate about a widespread form of short-term plasticity, and will enable future studies that may lead to a deeper understanding of the functional importance of facilitation. PMID:26738595

  18. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca2+ response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca2+]i response, whereas the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca2+]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca2+ channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  19. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca(2+) response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca(2+)]i response, whereas the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca(2+) channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  20. Diffusion in calcium oxide/calcium sulfate pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.L.

    1981-10-01

    Diffusion rates in calcium oxide pellets after partial conversion to calcium sulfate were measured. A Wicke-Kallenbach type diffusion cell operated in the pulse-response mode was used to measure effective diffusivity. Cylindrical calcium oxide pellets were formed from the powder using pelletizing pressures of 10,000, 20,000 and 30,000 psi. The pellets were reacted at 325, 500 and 600/sup 0/C with sulfur dioxide and oxygen to form calcium sulfate. The volume of calcium sulfate is 2.7 times that of calcium oxide, so partial pore closure occurs. The diffusivity was measured in the original pellet and in pellets partially reacted to several different conversion levels. The effective diffusivity decreases as conversion decreases and is roughly inversely proportional to pellet porosity squared for low conversions. However, the porosity and diffusion rate do not become zero when the reaction rate approaches zero. Pore closure is, therefore, not the mechanism which limits the ultimate conversion. A large diffusion resistance through the calcium sulfate product layer probably causes the reaction to stop before total conversion. The final conversion obtainable increases as reaction temperature increases and decreases as pelletizing pressure increases.

  1. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + O (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: Δ G° = -64,300(±700) + 19.8(±3.5) T J/mol (1373 to 1623 K) The activities of calcium in the CaOsatd-Ca- MF2 ( M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaOsatd-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF2, BaF2, and MgF2 at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  2. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + {und O} (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}64,300({+-}700) + 19.8({+-}3.5)T J/mol (1,373 to 1,623 K). The activities of calcium in the CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-MF{sub 2} (M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1,473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2} at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  3. Transient compartment-like syndrome and normokalaemic periodic paralysis due to a Cav1.1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chunxiang; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Weber, Marc-André; Bednarz, Marcin; Groome, James R.; Jonsson, Malin K. B.

    2013-01-01

    We studied a two-generation family presenting with conditions that included progressive permanent weakness, myopathic myopathy, exercise-induced contracture before normokalaemic periodic paralysis or, if localized to the tibial anterior muscle group, transient compartment-like syndrome (painful acute oedema with neuronal compression and drop foot). 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging displayed myoplasmic sodium overload, and oedema. We identified a novel familial Cav1.1 calcium channel mutation, R1242G, localized to the third positive charge of the domain IV voltage sensor. Functional expression of R1242G in the muscular dysgenesis mouse cell line GLT revealed a 28% reduced central pore inward current and a −20 mV shift of the steady-state inactivation curve. Both changes may be at least partially explained by an outward omega (gating pore) current at positive potentials. Moreover, this outward omega current of 27.5 nS/nF may cause the reduction of the overshoot by 13 mV and slowing of the upstroke of action potentials by 36% that are associated with muscle hypoexcitability (permanent weakness and myopathic myopathy). In addition to the outward omega current, we identified an inward omega pore current of 95 nS/nF at negative membrane potentials after long depolarizing pulses that shifts the R1242G residue above the omega pore constriction. A simulation reveals that the inward current might depolarize the fibre sufficiently to trigger calcium release in the absence of an action potential and therefore cause an electrically silent depolarization-induced muscle contracture. Additionally, evidence of the inward current can be found in 23Na magnetic resonance imaging-detected sodium accumulation and 1H magnetic resonance imaging-detected oedema. We hypothesize that the episodes are normokalaemic because of depolarization-induced compensatory outward potassium flux through both delayed rectifiers and omega pore. We conclude that the position of the R1242G residue

  4. Phorbol ester stimulates calcium sequestration in saponized human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Nachmias, V.T.

    1987-11-25

    When platelets are activated by agonists, calcium (Ca2+) is released from an intracellular storage site. Recent studies using fura-2 show that, after thrombin stimulation, the rise in free calcium is transient and returns to base-line levels in 2-3 min, while the transient following ADP stimulation lasts only 15-20 s. We reported previously that the phorbol ester 12,13-phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), added at nanomolar levels after thrombin, immediately accelerated the rate of return of calcium to the base line severalfold. In the present study, we used both intact and saponized platelets to determine whether this is due to stimulation of calcium sequestration. Using fura-2 and intact platelets, we found 1) that PMA stimulated the restoration of free Ca2+ levels after ADP as well as after thrombin, and 2) that H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme), slowed the return of Ca2+ to baseline levels. Using saponized platelets, we also found 3) that pretreatment of platelets with PMA before saponin treatment increased the ATP-dependent /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake 2-fold, with a half-maximal effect at 5 nm; 4) that most of the Ca2+ released by ionomycin or by myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; and 5) that a GTP-binding protein inhibitor, guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), decreased basal or PMA-stimulated /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake in saponin-treated platelets. Our data suggest that activation of protein kinase C stimulates the sequestration of Ca2+ independently of cAMP or myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

  5. Calcium in Plants

    PubMed Central

    WHITE, PHILIP J.; BROADLEY, MARTIN R.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient. It is required for various structural roles in the cell wall and membranes, it is a counter‐cation for inorganic and organic anions in the vacuole, and the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) is an obligate intracellular messenger coordinating responses to numerous developmental cues and environmental challenges. This article provides an overview of the nutritional requirements of different plants for Ca, and how this impacts on natural flora and the Ca content of crops. It also reviews recent work on (a) the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across cellular membranes, (b) understanding the origins and specificity of [Ca2+]cyt signals and (c) characterizing the cellular [Ca2+]cyt‐sensors (such as calmodulin, calcineurin B‐like proteins and calcium‐dependent protein kinases) that allow plant cells to respond appropriately to [Ca2+]cyt signals. PMID:12933363

  6. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M; Schoenbach, Karl H; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. PMID:23284682

  7. Expression and function of transient receptor potential channels in the female bovine reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Ghavideldarestani, Maryam; Atkin, Stephen L; Leese, Henry J; Sturmey, Roger G

    2016-07-15

    The epithelium lining the oviduct is critical for early reproductive events, many of which are mediated via intracellular calcium ions. Despite this, little is known about the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the oviductal epithelium. Epithelial transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) modulate calcium flux in other tissues, and their expression and functional regulation have therefore been examined using the bovine oviduct as a model for the human. The effects of FSH, LH, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone on TRPCs expression and intracellular calcium flux were determined. Transient receptor potential channels 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 were expressed in the bovine reproductive tract, and their gene expression varied throughout the estrous cycle. In more detailed studies undertaken on TRPC1 and 6, we show that protein expression varied through the estrus cycle; specifically, 17β-estradiol, FSH, and LH individually and in combination upregulated TRPC1 and 6 expression in cultured bovine oviduct epithelial cells although progesterone antagonized these effects. Functional studies showed changes in calcium mobilization in bovine oviduct epithelial cells were dependent on TRPCs. In conclusion, TRPC1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 are present in the epithelium lining the bovine oviduct, and TRPC1 and 6 vary through the estrous cycle suggesting an important role in early reproductive function. PMID:27001231

  8. Can Palomar Transient Factory Survey Data Be Used to Confirm Gravitationally Lensed Quasar Candidates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Isaac; Quimby, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Strongly lensed quasars can be used to study the Hubble constant and the lens mass by measuring time delay and image separation. These objects can require years of data to confirm however, so using data from preexisting surveys could greatly reduce the amount of time required to study them. We attempt to use Palomar Transient Factory survey data to detect variability in strongly lensed quasars and to measure time delays between the quasar images. We test our procedure using known gravitationally lensed quasars with measured time delays.

  9. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  10. Delayed unlatching mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2015-05-19

    In various embodiments an apparatus is presented for securing a structure such as a door, window, hatch, or gate that moves between an open and a closed position relative to a fixed structure to provide or deny access to a compartment, a room, an outdoor area, or a facility. Various embodiments provide a delay in opening the closure of sufficient duration to frustrate a rapid activation that might be desired by a person who is attempting to pass through the closure for some illicit purpose. Typically, hydraulics are used to activate the apparatus and no electrical energy or electronic signals are employed. In one embodiment, a plurality of actuations of a hand lever operates a hydraulic pump that moves a locking bolt from a first position in which a locking bolt is engaged with a recess in the fixed structure (preventing opening of a gate) to a second position in which the locking bolt is disengaged from the recess to permit opening of the gate.

  11. Sustained Perceptual Deficits from Transient Sensory Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Sanes, Dan H.

    2015-01-01

    displays an increased vulnerability to the sensory environment. Here, we identify a precise developmental window during which mild hearing loss affects the maturation of an auditory perceptual cue that is known to support animal communication, including human speech. Furthermore, animals reared with transient hearing loss display deficits in perceptual learning. Our results suggest that speech and language delays associated with transient or permanent childhood hearing loss may be accounted for, in part, by deficits in central auditory processing mechanisms. PMID:26224865

  12. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  13. Sensitivity to calcium intake in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1996-01-01

    The absorptive or renal origin of hypercalciuria can be discriminated using an acute oral calcium load test (ACLT). Of 86 patients with calcium oxalate kidney stones, 28 (23%) were found to be hypercalciuric (HCa) and 58 (67%) normocalciuric (NCa) on their customary free diet, containing 542 +/- 29 mg/day (mean +/- SE) of calcium. Since the apparently normal 24-hour calcium excretion of many calcium stone formers (CSF) may be due to a combination of high calcium absorption with moderately low calcium intake, all patients were investigated by ACLT. Of 28 HCa patients, 13 (46%) were classified as absorptive (AH) and 15 (54%) as renal hypercalciuria (RH). Of the 58 NCa patients, 38 (65%) presented features of intestinal hyperabsorption and were therefore designated as AH-like, and 20 (35%) as RH-like. To further elucidate the role of dietary calcium in these CSF, a chronic calcium load test (CCLT), consisting of 1 g/day of oral Ca for 7 days, was designed. A positive response to the CCLT was considered to occur when urinary calcium (uCa) was > or = 4 mg/ kg/24 h on the 7th day. Among NCa patients, 29% of AH-like subjects responded to the CCLT and 71% did not; 50% of RH-like subjects also responded and 50% did not. In HCa patients, 85% of AH and 67% of RH subjects maintained uCa > or = 4 mg/kg/24 h after the CCLT and 15% of AH and 23% of RH subjects did not. However, a significant additional increase in mean uCa was not observed among HCa patients. All patients were submitted to a second evaluation of fasting calciuria (Ca/Cr). A modification of this parameter was noticed in 89% of RH-like and 78% of RH patients. In conclusion, these data suggest the presence of subpopulations of patients sensitive or not to calcium intake, regardless of whether the acute response to a calcium overload test suggested AH or RH. The CCLT disclosed dietary hypercalciuria in 21/58 (36%) of previously NCa patients. In these NCa patients, the ACLT may be replaced by the CCLT. The distinction

  14. Photoluminescent thermometry based on europium-activated calcium sulphide.

    PubMed

    Samulski, T V; Chopping, P T; Haas, B

    1982-01-01

    A photoluminescent thermometer, based on the transient emission response of a europium-activated calcium sulphide phosphor, is described in detail. This optical thermometry system has special advantages for temperature measurements in microwave and RF fields and potential application in electromagnetically induced clinical hyperthermia. A laboratory system has been constructed which utilises a fibreoptic probe with external diameter 0.8 mm. A system temperature resolution of 0.1 degree C has been achieved in the range 37-47 degrees C. PMID:6965160

  15. Calibrating for Ionospheric Phase Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Technique determines ionospheric phase delay on real-time universally applicable basis in terms of electrons per meter squared by coherently modulating two L-band carrier frequencies received from two Global Positioning System satelites. Two pseudorandom number sequences cross-correlated to derive delay time.

  16. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  17. Linear rotary optical delay lines.

    PubMed

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2014-05-19

    I present several classes of analytical and semi-analytical solutions for the design of high-speed rotary optical delay lines that use a combination of stationary and rotating curvilinear reflectors. Detailed analysis of four distinct classes of optical delay lines is presented. Particularly, I consider delay lines based on a single rotating reflector, a single rotating reflector and a single stationary reflector, two rotating reflectors, and two rotating reflectors and a single stationary reflector. I demonstrate that in each of these cases it is possible to design an infinite variety of the optical delay lines featuring linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle. This is achieved via shape optimization of the rotating and stationary reflector surfaces. Moreover, in the case of two rotating reflectors a convenient spatial separation of the incoming and outgoing beams is possible. For the sake of example, all the blades presented in this paper are chosen to fit into a circle of 10 cm diameter and these delay lines feature in excess of 600 ps of optical delay. Finally, two prototypes of rotary delay lines were fabricated using CNC machining, and their optical properties are characterized. PMID:24921303

  18. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  19. Delayed Reinforcement of Operant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement but also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between…

  20. Transient critical heat flux and blowdown heat-transfer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, J.C.

    1980-05-01

    Objective of this study is to give a best-estimate prediction of transient critical heat flux (CHF) during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents. To accomplish this task, a predictional method has been developed. Basically it involves the thermal-hydraulic calculation of the heated core with boundary conditions supplied from experimental measurements. CHF predictions were based on the instantaneous ''local-conditions'' hypothesis, and eight correlations (consisting of round-tube, rod-bundle, and transient correlations) were tested against most recent blowdown heat-transfer test data obtained in major US facilities. The prediction results are summarized in a table in which both CISE and Biasi correlations are found to be capable of predicting the early CHF of approx. 1 s. The Griffith-Zuber correlation is credited for its prediction of the delay CHF that occurs in a more tranquil state with slowly decaying mass velocity. In many instances, the early CHF can be well correlated by the x = 1.0 criterion; this is certainly indicative of an annular-flow dryout-type crisis. The delay CHF occurred at near or above 80% void fraction, and the success of the modified Zuber pool-boiling correlation suggests that this CHF is caused by flooding and pool-boiling type hydrodynamic crisis.

  1. Reactor transient analyses with KIN3D/PARTISN

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielli, F.; Rineiski, A.; Maschek, W.; Marchetti, M.

    2013-07-01

    Efforts are going on at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to extend the kinetics capability of the PARTISN code in order to run in parallel two- and three-dimensional transient analyses with the quasistatic method, while taking into account delayed neutrons. In the original code version, time-dependent transport problems are solved by employing a semi-implicit direct kinetics option, the delayed neutrons being not taken into account. The PARTISN 5.97 code has been extended and then coupled with KIN3D, a time-dependent model embedded in the ERANOS code system. In the coupled code, PARTISN 5.97 is used as neutron transport solver to perform transient analyses while employing direct and quasi-static kinetics options of KIN3D. The coupled code can be also applied for first-order and exact perturbation theory calculations. In the paper, the PARTISN 5.97 extensions and coupling procedure are described and the performances of the KIN3D/PARTISN coupled code are investigated by analyzing transients induced by a source-jerk in a three-dimensional ADS model driven by an external source. (authors)

  2. Sodium induces simultaneous changes in cytosolic calcium and pH in salt-tolerant quince protoplasts.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Cladio; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments with salt-resistant quince BA29 (Cydonia oblonga cv. Mill.) have shown that this cultivar takes up sodium transiently into the cytosol of shoot protoplasts only in the absence of calcium chloride, or at <1mM calcium chloride. Addition of NaCl > or =100mM to single protoplasts from in vitro-cultivated quince in the presence of 1.0mM calcium induced instant changes in the cytosolic concentrations of calcium and protons. These changes were investigated by use of tetra [acetoxymethyl] esters of the fluorescent stilbene chromophores Fura 2 and bis-carboxyethyl-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), respectively. The cytosolic Ca(2+) dynamics in the protoplasts were dependent on the concentration of NaCl added. The changes in calcium differed in amplitude and final concentration and were correlated in time mainly with changes in pH. Addition of 100-400mM NaCl to the protoplasts caused an oscillating increase in the cytosolic level of calcium, and then a decrease. Addition of mannitol, of equiosmolar concentration to NaCl, did not increase the cytosolic calcium concentration. Moreover, there was no increase in cytosolic calcium when NaCl was added in the presence of calcium binding ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA), or lantan or verapamil, two inhibitors of plasma membrane calcium channels. Therefore, we conclude that, in salt-resistant quince, sodium induces an influx of calcium into the cytosol by plasma membrane calcium channels, and a simultaneous increase in cytosolic pH. Because these changes were obtained in the presence of 1mM calcium in the medium, they were not due to sodium uptake into the cytosol. PMID:19556023

  3. Delay discounting of different commodities.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N; Terrell, Heather K; Derenne, Adam

    2010-01-01

    When outcomes are delayed, their value is decreased. Delay discounting is a much-studied topic because it is correlated with certain disorders (e.g., pathological gambling). The present study attempts to determine how people would delay discount a number of different commodities, ranging from money to dating partners to federal education legislation. Participants completed delay discounting tasks pertaining to 5 different commodities, with a different set of 5 commodities for 2 groups. Results showed that different commodities were often discounted differently. Both data sets were also subjected to factor analysis. A 2-factor solution was found for both, suggesting that there are multiple "domains" of commodities. This finding is of interest because it suggests that measuring delay discounting for one commodity within a particular domain of commodities will be predictive of how people discount other commodities within that domain but will not be predictive of how they discount commodities within another domain. PMID:20718227

  4. Initiation of a coronal transient

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B.C.; Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.

  5. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2012-07-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of -261 pA was measured at -50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction. PMID:22732308

  6. Impaired Cellular Bioenergetics Causes Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Defects in MT-ND5 Mutant Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease, a group of metabolic disorders that affect both children and adults. Interestingly, individual mtDNA mutations can cause very different clinical symptoms, however the factors that determine these phenotypes remain obscure. Defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation can disrupt cell signaling pathways, which may shape these disease phenotypes. In particular, mitochondria participate closely in cellular calcium signaling, with profound impact on cell function. Here, we examined the effects of a homoplasmic m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 on cellular calcium handling using transmitochondrial cybrids (ND5 mutant cybrids). We found that the oxidation of NADH and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were significantly reduced in ND5 mutant cybrids. These metabolic defects were associated with a significant decrease in calcium uptake by ND5 mutant mitochondria in response to a calcium transient. Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not affect cytosolic calcium levels in control cybrids, but caused an increase in cytosolic calcium in ND5 mutant cybrids. This suggests that glycolytically-generated ATP is required not only to maintain Δψm in ND5 mutant mitochondria but is also critical for regulating cellular calcium homeostasis. We conclude that the m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 causes defects in both mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial calcium sequestration. This disruption of mitochondrial calcium handling, which leads to defects in cellular calcium homeostasis, may be an important contributor to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:27110715

  7. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  8. Transient upsets in microprocessor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. E.; Masson, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The modeling and analysis of transient faults in microprocessor based controllers are discussed. Such controllers typically consist of a microprocessor, read only memory storing and application program, random access memory for data storage, and input/output devices for external communications. The effects of transient faults on the performance of the controller are reviewed. An instruction level perspective of performance is taken which is the basis of a useful high level program state description of the microprocessor controller. A transition matrix is defined which determines the controller's response to transient fault arrivals.

  9. Transient Photoconduction in Phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, David Matthew

    1991-02-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Photoconduction occurs when illumination interacts with a sample to cause a change in the flow of current through that sample. The work described in this thesis is centred on the investigation of the processes which effect photoconduction. These processes include the way in which charge carriers move the electrodes, the way in which charge carriers transit the bulk and the way in which charge carriers are excited and relax. The thesis is divided into three parts. Part I is essentially a literature survey of the theories which describe photoconduction. An overview of photoconduction at a microscopic level in all types of sample is given. By categorising the sample as neutral or supporting a single carrier space charge, the mathematical description of photoconduction behaviour can be simplified. In Part II existing theories which describe photoconduction in charged samples are reviewed. A new theory yields two important equations: (i) the Plasma equation which describes the conditions for a neutral sample and those for a single carrier space charge, (ii) the BUIC (Bulk Uniform Injected Charge) equation which describes the time and field dependence of a photoconductor which supports a single carrier space charge. The BUIC equation is compared with existing theories and its ability to describe photoconduction in sandwich cells of phthalocyanine compounds is discussed. Part III contains an investigation of photoconduction in phthalocyanines. Steady state and chopped light transient photoconduction experiments are carried out on nine different Phthalocyanine compounds under a variety of conditions. The results obtained are interpreted using the BUIC, Plasma equations and neutral photoconductor theories.

  10. Nuclear Calcium Signaling Induces Expression of the Synaptic Organizers Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2*

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Stefanie N.; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium transients in the cell nucleus evoked by synaptic activity in hippocampal neurons function as a signaling end point in synapse-to-nucleus communication. As an important regulator of neuronal gene expression, nuclear calcium is involved in the conversion of synaptic stimuli into functional and structural changes of neurons. Here we identify two synaptic organizers, Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2, as targets of nuclear calcium signaling. Expression of both Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 increased in a synaptic NMDA receptor- and nuclear calcium-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons within 2–4 h after the induction of action potential bursting. Induction of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2 occurred independently of the need for new protein synthesis and required calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and the nuclear calcium signaling target CREB-binding protein. Analysis of reporter gene constructs revealed a functional cAMP response element in the proximal promoter of Lrrtm2, indicating that at least Lrrtm2 is regulated by the classical nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV-CREB/CREB-binding protein pathway. These results suggest that one mechanism by which nuclear calcium signaling controls neuronal network function is by regulating the expression of Lrrtm1 and Lrrtm2. PMID:25527504

  11. Role of the JP45-Calsequestrin Complex on Calcium Entry in Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles*

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Barbara; Eckhardt, Jan; Bergamelli, Leda; Treves, Susan; Bongianino, Rossana; De Negri, Marco; Priori, Silvia G.; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We exploited a variety of mouse models to assess the roles of JP45-CASQ1 (CASQ, calsequestrin) and JP45-CASQ2 on calcium entry in slow twitch muscles. In flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers isolated from JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO mice, calcium transients induced by tetanic stimulation rely on calcium entry via La3+- and nifedipine-sensitive calcium channels. The comparison of excitation-coupled calcium entry (ECCE) between FDB fibers from WT, JP45KO, CASQ1KO, CASQ2KO, JP45-CASQ1 double KO, JP45-CASQ2 double KO, and JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO shows that ECCE enhancement requires ablation of both CASQs and JP45. Calcium entry activated by ablation of both JP45-CASQ1 and JP45-CASQ2 complexes supports tetanic force development in slow twitch soleus muscles. In addition, we show that CASQs interact with JP45 at Ca2+ concentrations similar to those present in the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum at rest, whereas Ca2+ concentrations similar to those present in the SR lumen after depolarization-induced calcium release cause the dissociation of JP45 from CASQs. Our results show that the complex JP45-CASQs is a negative regulator of ECCE and that tetanic force development in slow twitch muscles is supported by the dynamic interaction between JP45 and CASQs. PMID:27189940

  12. Altered mechanical properties of titin immunoglobulin domain 27 in the presence of calcium.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Michael M; Gifford, Jessica L; Amrein, Matthias; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    Titin (connectin) based passive force regulation has been an important physiological mechanism to adjust to varying muscle stretch conditions. Upon stretch, titin behaves as a spring capable of modulating its elastic response in accordance with changes in muscle biochemistry. One such mechanism has been the calcium-dependent stiffening of titin domains that renders the spring inherently more resistant to stretch. This transient titin-calcium interaction may serve a protective function in muscle, which could preclude costly unfolding of select domains when muscles elongate to great lengths. To test this idea, fluorescence spectroscopy was performed revealing a change in the microenvironment of the investigated immunoglobulin domain 27 (I27) of titin with calcium. Additionally, an atomic force microscope was used to evaluate the calcium-dependent regulation of passive force by stretching eight linked titin I27 domains until they unfolded. When stretching in the presence of calcium, the I27 homopolymer chain became stabilized, displaying three novel properties: (1) higher stretching forces were needed to unfold the domains, (2) the stiffness, measured as a persistence length (PL), increased and (3) the peak-to-peak distance between adjacent I27 domains increased. Furthermore, a peak order dependence became apparent for both force and PL, reflecting the importance of characterizing the dynamic unfolding history of a polymer with this approach. Together, this novel titin Ig-calcium interaction may serve to stabilize the I27 domain permitting titin to tune passive force within stretched muscle in a calcium-dependent manner. PMID:23224300

  13. Role of the JP45-Calsequestrin Complex on Calcium Entry in Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Barbara; Eckhardt, Jan; Bergamelli, Leda; Treves, Susan; Bongianino, Rossana; De Negri, Marco; Priori, Silvia G; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We exploited a variety of mouse models to assess the roles of JP45-CASQ1 (CASQ, calsequestrin) and JP45-CASQ2 on calcium entry in slow twitch muscles. In flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers isolated from JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO mice, calcium transients induced by tetanic stimulation rely on calcium entry via La(3+)- and nifedipine-sensitive calcium channels. The comparison of excitation-coupled calcium entry (ECCE) between FDB fibers from WT, JP45KO, CASQ1KO, CASQ2KO, JP45-CASQ1 double KO, JP45-CASQ2 double KO, and JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO shows that ECCE enhancement requires ablation of both CASQs and JP45. Calcium entry activated by ablation of both JP45-CASQ1 and JP45-CASQ2 complexes supports tetanic force development in slow twitch soleus muscles. In addition, we show that CASQs interact with JP45 at Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum at rest, whereas Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in the SR lumen after depolarization-induced calcium release cause the dissociation of JP45 from CASQs. Our results show that the complex JP45-CASQs is a negative regulator of ECCE and that tetanic force development in slow twitch muscles is supported by the dynamic interaction between JP45 and CASQs. PMID:27189940

  14. Regulation of Multi-drug Resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is TRPC6/Calcium Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Liang; Liang, Chao; Chen, Enjiang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Feng; Zhi, Xiao; Wei, Tao; Xue, Fei; Li, Guogang; Yang, Qi; Gong, Weihua; Feng, Xinhua; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy because of its tendency to develop multi-drug resistance (MDR), whose various underlying mechanisms make it difficult to target. The calcium signalling pathway is associated with many cellular biological activities, and is also a critical player in cancer. However, its role in modulating tumour MDR remains unclear. In this study, stimulation by doxorubicin, hypoxia and ionizing radiation was used to induce MDR in HCC cells. A sustained aggregation of intracellular calcium was observed upon these stimuli, while inhibition of calcium signalling enhanced the cells’ sensitivity to various drugs by attenuating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), Hif1-α signalling and DNA damage repair. The effect of calcium signalling is mediated via transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6), a subtype of calcium-permeable channel. An in vivo xenograft model of HCC further confirmed that inhibiting TRPC6 enhanced the efficacy of doxorubicin. In addition, we deduced that STAT3 activation is a downstream signalling pathway in MDR. Collectively, this study demonstrated that the various mechanisms regulating MDR in HCC cells are calcium dependent through the TRPC6/calcium/STAT3 pathway. We propose that targeting TRPC6 in HCC may be a novel antineoplastic strategy, especially combined with chemotherapy. PMID:27011063

  15. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    PubMed

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait. PMID:26374900

  16. Intra-axonal calcium changes after axotomy in wild-type and slow Wallerian degeneration axons.

    PubMed

    Adalbert, R; Morreale, G; Paizs, M; Conforti, L; Walker, S A; Roderick, H L; Bootman, M D; Siklós, L; Coleman, M P

    2012-12-01

    Calcium accumulation induces the breakdown of cytoskeleton and axonal fragmentation in the late stages of Wallerian degeneration. In the early stages there is no evidence for any long-lasting, extensive increase in intra-axonal calcium but there does appear to be some redistribution. We hypothesized that changes in calcium distribution could have an early regulatory role in axonal degeneration in addition to the late executionary role of calcium. Schmidt-Lanterman clefts (SLCs), which allow exchange of metabolites and ions between the periaxonal and extracellular space, are likely to have an increased role when axon segments are separated from the cell body, so we used the oxalate-pyroantimonate method to study calcium at SLCs in distal stumps of transected wild-type and slow Wallerian degeneration (Wld(S)) mutant sciatic nerves, in which Wallerian degeneration is greatly delayed. In wild-type nerves most SLCs show a step gradient of calcium distribution, which is lost at around 20% of SLCs within 3mm of the lesion site by 4-24h after nerve transection. To investigate further the association with Wallerian degeneration, we studied nerves from Wld(S) rats. The step gradient of calcium distribution in Wld(S) is absent in around 20% of the intact nerves beneath SLCs but 4-24h following injury, calcium distribution in transected axons remained similar to that in uninjured nerves. We then used calcium indicators to study influx and buffering of calcium in injured neurites in primary culture. Calcium penetration and the early calcium increase in this system were indistinguishable between Wld(S) and wild-type axons. However, a significant difference was observed during the following hours, when calcium increased in wild-type neurites but not in Wld(S) neurites. We conclude that there is little relationship between calcium distribution and the early stages of Wallerian degeneration at the time points studied in vivo or in vitro but that Wld(S) neurites fail to show a later

  17. Delayed Geodynamo in Hadean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2014-12-01

    Paleointensity measurements of Archean rocks reveal a strong geodynamo at ~3.45 Ga, while excess nitrogen content of lunar soil samples implies no geodynamo at ~3.9 Ga. Here I propose that initiation of a strong geodynamo is delayed due to accretion style of Earth, involving collision and merging of a few dozen Moon to Mars size planetary embryos. Two accretion scenarios consisting of 25 and 50 embryos are investigated. The collision of an embryo heats the proto-Earth's core differentially and the rotating low-viscosity core stably stratifies, creating a spherically symmetric and radially increasing temperature distribution. Convection starts in the outer core after each impact but is destroyed by the next impact. The iron core of an impacting embryo descends in the mantle and merges to the proto-Earth's core. Both adiabatic and non-adiabatic merging cases are studied. A major part of the gravitational energy released due to core merging is used to lift up the upper portion of the core to emplace the impactor core material at the neutrally buoyant level in the proto-Earth's core. The remaining energy is converted to heat. In the adiabatic case the merging embryo's core retains all of the remaining energy, while in the non-adiabatic merging 50% of the remaining energy is shared with the outer part of the proto-Earth's core where the embryo's core descends. The two merging models result in significantly different temperature distributions in the core at the end of accretion. After the accretion, the convecting shell in the outer core grows monotonically and generates geodynamo gradually. It takes about 50-100 Myr for the convecting shell to generate a strong dipole field at the surface, 50,000 to 100,000 nT, in the presence of a large stably stratified liquid inner core when the convecting outer core thickness exceeds about one half the radius of the Earth's core.

  18. Ryanodine receptors selectively contribute to the formation of taste-evoked calcium signals in mouse taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Michelle R.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral taste system uses multiple signaling pathways to transduce a stimulus into an output signal that activates afferent neurons. All of these signaling pathways depend on transient increases in intracellular calcium but the current understanding of these calcium signals is not well-developed. Using molecular and physiological techniques, this study establishes that ryanodine receptors (RyRs), specifically isoform 1, are expressed in taste cells and that their physiological function differs among cell types employing different signaling pathways. RyR1 contributes to some taste-evoked signals that rely on calcium release from internal stores but can also supplement the calcium signal that is initiated by opening VGCCs. In taste cells expressing both signaling pathways, RyR1 contributes to the depolarization-induced calcium signal but not to the calcium signal that depends on calcium release from stores. These data suggest that RyR1 is an important regulator of calcium signaling and that its physiological role in taste cells is dictated by the nature of the calcium signaling mechanisms expressed. PMID:20955474

  19. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-02-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi /sup 45/Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of /sup 45/Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and /sup 45/Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on /sup 45/Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and /sup 45/Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly.

  20. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  1. Identification of a Calcium Signalling Pathway of S-[6]-Gingerol in HuH-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Tran, Van H.; Li, Yi-Ming; Duke, Colin C.; Heather, Alison K.; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium signals in hepatocytes control cell growth, proliferation, and death. Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel superfamily are candidate calcium influx channels. NFκB activation strictly depends on calcium influx and often induces antiapoptotic genes favouring cell survival. Previously, we reported that S-[6]-gingerol is an efficacious agonist of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) in neurones. In this study, we tested the effect of S-[6]-gingerol on HuH-7 cells using the Fluo-4 calcium assay, RT-qPCR, transient cell transfection, and luciferase measurements. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i in HuH-7 cells. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by S-[6]-gingerol was abolished by preincubation with EGTA and was also inhibited by the TRPV1 channel antagonist capsazepine. Expression of TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells was confirmed by mRNA analysis as well as a test for increase of [Ca2+]i by TRPV1 agonist capsaicin and its inhibition by capsazepine. We found that S-[6]-gingerol induced rapid NFκB activation through TRPV1 in HuH-7 cells. Furthermore, S-[6]-gingerol-induced NFκB activation was dependent on the calcium gradient and TRPV1. The rapid NFκB activation by S-[6]-gingerol was associated with an increase in mRNA levels of NFκB-target genes: cIAP-2, XIAP, and Bcl-2 that encode antiapoptotic proteins. PMID:23956783

  2. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms. PMID:24291103

  3. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  4. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J.; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  5. Transient nucleation in condensed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Greer, A. L.; Thompson, C. V.

    1983-01-01

    Using classical nucleation theory we consider transient nucleation occurring in a one-component, condensed system under isothermal conditions. We obtain an exact closed-form expression for the time dependent cluster populations. In addition, a more versatile approach is developed: a numerical simulation technique which models directly the reactions by which clusters are produced. This simulation demonstrates the evolution of cluster populations and nucleation rate in the transient regime. Results from the simulation are verified by comparison with exact analytical solutions for the steady state. Experimental methods for measuring transient nucleation are assessed, and it is demonstrated that the observed behavior depends on the method used. The effect of preexisting cluster distributions is studied. Previous analytical and numerical treatments of transient nucleation are compared to the solutions obtained from the simulation. The simple expressions of Kashchiev are shown to give good descriptions of the nucleation behavior.

  6. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food–rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout) between the two response alternatives in an experiment with three phases: In Phase 1, the delay on one alternative was 0 s, and the other was varied between 0 and 8 s; in Phase 2, both delays were equal and were varied from 0 to 4 s; in Phase 3, the two delays summed to 8 s, and each was varied from 1 to 7 s. The results showed that increasing delay affected local choice, measured by a pulse in preference, in the same way as decreasing magnitude, but we found also that increasing the delay at the other alternative increased local preference. This result casts doubt on the traditional view that a reinforcer strengthens a response depending only on the reinforcer's value discounted by any response–reinforcer delay. The results suggest that food guides, rather than strengthens, behavior. PMID:17465314

  7. Attosecond Delays in Molecular Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Martin; Jordan, Inga; Baykusheva, Denitsa; von Conta, Aaron; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2016-08-26

    We report measurements of energy-dependent photoionization delays between the two outermost valence shells of N_{2}O and H_{2}O. The combination of single-shot signal referencing with the use of different metal foils to filter the attosecond pulse train enables us to extract delays from congested spectra. Remarkably large delays up to 160 as are observed in N_{2}O, whereas the delays in H_{2}O are all smaller than 50 as in the photon-energy range of 20-40 eV. These results are interpreted by developing a theory of molecular photoionization delays. The long delays measured in N_{2}O are shown to reflect the population of molecular shape resonances that trap the photoelectron for a duration of up to ∼110 as. The unstructured continua of H_{2}O result in much smaller delays at the same photon energies. Our experimental and theoretical methods make the study of molecular attosecond photoionization dynamics accessible. PMID:27610849

  8. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  9. Catalina/Palomar Optical Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshalingam, M.; Griffith, C. V.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.

    2008-07-01

    Inspection of a CCD spectrum (range 330-1000 nm), obtained on July 7 UT with the 3-m Shane reflector (+ Kast spectrograph) at Lick Observatory, shows that the transient reported in ATel 1604 has a very blue, featureless continuum. This could be a very young Type II supernova (though at this time no clear hydrogen Balmer features are present), or some kind of Galactic transient. Further observations are encouraged.

  10. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactobionate. 172.720 Section 172.720 Food... Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.720 Calcium lactobionate. The food additive calcium lactobionate... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by...

  11. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium hydroxide. 184.1205 Section 184.1205 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1305-62-0) is also known as slaked lime or calcium hydrate. It is produced by the hydration...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005-35-0) is the calcium salt of alginic acid, a natural polyuronide constituent of certain brown...

  14. 21 CFR 172.715 - Calcium lignosulfonate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lignosulfonate. 172.715 Section 172.715... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.715 Calcium lignosulfonate. Calcium lignosulfonate may be safely used in or on food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Calcium lignosulfonate...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1199 - Calcium gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... acid with lime or calcium carbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium gluconate. 184.1199 Section 184.1199 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1199 Calcium gluconate. (a) Calcium gluconate ( 2Ca, CAS Reg....

  16. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  17. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  18. Transient Alerts in LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, J.

    During LSST observing, transient events will be detected and alerts generated at the LSST Archive Center at NCSA in Champaign-Illinois. As a very high rate of alerts is expected, approaching ˜ 10 million per night, we plan for VOEvent-compliant Distributor/Brokers (http://voevent.org) to be the primary end-points of the full LSST alert streams. End users will then use these Distributor/Brokers to classify and filter events on the stream for those fitting their science goals. These Distributor/Brokers are envisioned to be operated as a community service by third parties who will have signed MOUs with LSST. The exact identification of Distributor/Brokers to receive alerts will be determined as LSST approaches full operations and may change over time, but it is in our interest to identify and coordinate with them as early as possible. LSST will also operate a limited Distributor/Broker with a filtering capability at the Archive Center, to allow alerts to be sent directly to a limited number of entities that for some reason need to have a more direct connection to LSST. This might include, for example, observatories with significant follow-up capabilities whose observing may temporarily be more directly tied to LSST observing. It will let astronomers create simple filters that limit what alerts are ultimately forwarded to them. These user defined filters will be possible to specify using an SQL-like declarative language, or short snippets of (likely Python) code. We emphasize that this LSST-provided capability will be limited, and is not intended to satisfy the wide variety of use cases that a full-fledged public Event Distributor/Broker could. End users will not be able to subscribe to full, unfiltered, alert streams coming directly from LSST. In this session, we will discuss anticipated LSST data rates, and capabilities for alert processing and distribution/brokering. We will clarify what the LSST Observatory will provide versus what we anticipate will be a

  19. Temporal discrimination and delayed reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Buriticá, Jonathan; Vilchez, Zirahuén; Santos, Cristiano Valerio Dos

    2016-09-01

    We attempted to determine the effect of reinforcement delay on time discrimination in an interval bisection task. Three groups of rats were exposed to immediate, delayed reinforcement and longer signals with immediate reinforcement in acquisition and test. Results show differences in the amount of training necessary to reach the acquisition criteria, the Weber fraction and the range or overall stimulus control. The results suggest an increased difficulty to discriminate the difference among durations rather than an increase in estimated time as main effect of delayed reinforcement. PMID:27431922

  20. Time delay in molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Frumker, E.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    Time-delays in the photoionization of molecules are investigated. As compared to atomic ionization, the time-delays expected from molecular ionization present a much richer phenomenon, with a strong spatial dependence due to the anisotropic nature of the molecular scattering potential. We investigate this from a scattering theory perspective, and make use of molecular photoionization calculations to examine this effect in representative homonuclear and hetronuclear diatomic molecules, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. We present energy and angle-resolved maps of the Wigner delay time for single-photon valence ionization, and discuss the possibilities for experimental measurements.