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Sample records for calcium transport systems

  1. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ((Ca{sup 2+})) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic (Ca{sup 2+}) is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}) and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic (Ca{sup 2+}). The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  3. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells: Progress report, January 1986--June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal are to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells. Several different energy-dependent Ca transport systems have been identified and characterized from oat root tissue (a monocot tissue) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot tissue). They are described in more detail below. I also have included in this progress report our continuing studies to understand the mode of action of the Helminthosporium maydis T toxin. This study was initially supported by a preceding DOE grant. The time needed to complete the study overlapped partly with the present grant period.

  4. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells. Progress report, May 1986--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1991-12-31

    The ability to change cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]) by cells has made this cation a key regulator of many biological processes. Cytoplasmic [Ca{sup 2+}] is determined by the coordination of passive Ca{sup 2+} fluxes which increase cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}] and active Ca{sup 2+} transport systems that lower cytosolic [Ca{sup 2+}]. The mechanisms by which plant cells achieve this is poorly understood. We have initially used isolated vesicles from the plasma membrane or organellar membranes to study Ca{sup 2+} transport systems in oat roots (a monocot) and carrot suspension cells (a dicot). The objectives of the proposal were to identify and characterize active (energy-dependent) and passive calcium transport systems that work together to regulate calcium levels in the cytoplasm of plant cells.

  5. Calcium transporters: From fields to the table

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium transporters regulate calcium fluxes within cells. Plants, like all organisms, contain channels, pumps, and exchangers to carefully modulate intracellular calcium levels. This review presents a summary of the recent advances in cloning and characterizing of these transporters and highlight...

  6. Relaxation in ferret ventricular myocytes: unusual interplay among calcium transport systems.

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, R A; Bassani, J W; Bers, D M

    1994-01-01

    Transport systems responsible for removing Ca2+ from the myoplasm during relaxation in isolated ferret ventricular myocytes were studied using caffeine-induced contractures. Internal calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured with the fluorescent calcium indicator indo-1, and the results were compared with our recent detailed characterizations in rabbit and rat myocytes. Relaxation and [Ca2+]i decline during a twitch in ferret myocytes were fast and similar to that in rat myocytes (i.e. half-time, t 1/2 approximately 100-160 ms). During a caffeine-induced contracture (SR Ca2+ accumulation prevented), relaxation was still relatively fast (t 1/2 = 0.57 s) and similar to relaxation in rabbit supported mainly by a strong Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange. When both the SR Ca2+ uptake and Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange are blocked (by caffeine and 0 Na+, 0 Ca2+ solution) relaxation in the ferret myocyte is remarkably fast (approximately 5-fold) compared with rabbit and rat myocytes. The decline of the Cai2+ transient was also fast under these conditions. These values were similar to those in rat under conditions where relaxation is due primarily to Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange. Additional inhibition of either the sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-ATPase or mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake caused only modest slowing of the relaxation of caffeine-induced contracture in 0 Na+, 0 Ca2+ (t 1/2 increased to approximately 3 s). In rabbit myocytes the relaxation t 1/2 is slowed to 20-30 s by these procedures. Even when the systems responsible for slow relaxation in rabbit ventricular myocytes are inhibited (i.e. sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-ATPase and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake) along with the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange, relaxation and [Ca2+]i decline in ferret myocytes remain rapid compared with rabbit myocytes. Ca2+ taken up by mitochondria in rabbit myocytes during a caffeine contracture in 0 Na+, 0 Ca2+ solution gradually returns to the SR after caffeine removal, but this component appears to be much smaller in ferret

  7. Expression of epithelial calcium transport system in rat cochlea and vestibular labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The low luminal Ca2+ concentration of mammalian endolymph in the inner ear is required for normal hearing and balance. We recently reported the expression of mRNA for a Ca2+-absorptive transport system in primary cultures of semicircular canal duct (SCCD) epithelium. Results We now identify this system in native vestibular and cochlear tissues by qRT-PCR, immunoblots and confocal immunolocalization. Transcripts were found and quantified for several isoforms of epithelial calcium channels (TRPV5, TRPV6), calcium buffer proteins (calbindin-D9K, calbindin-D28K), sodium-calcium exchangers (NCX1, NCX2, NCX3) and plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA1, PMCA2, PMCA3, and PMCA4) in native SCCD, cochlear lateral wall (LW) and stria vascularis (SV) of adult rat as well as Ca2+ channels in neonatal SCCD. All components were expressed except TRPV6 in SV and PMCA2 in SCCD. 1,25-(OH)2vitamin D3 (VitD) significantly up-regulated transcripts of TRPV5 in SCCD, calbindin-D9K in SCCD and LW, NCX2 in LW, while PMCA4 in SCCD and PMCA3 in LW were down-regulated. The expression of TRPV5 relative to TRPV6 was in the sequence SV > Neonatal SCCD > Adult SCCD > LW > primary culture SCCD. Expression of TRPV5 protein from primary culture of SCCD did not increase significantly when cells were incubated with VitD (1.2 times control; P > 0.05). Immunolocalization showed the distribution of TRPV5 and TRPV6. TRPV5 was found near the apical membrane of strial marginal cells and both TRPV5 and TRPV6 in outer and inner sulcus cells of the cochlea and in the SCCD of the vestibular system. Conclusions These findings demonstrate for the first time the expression of a complete Ca2+ absorptive system in native cochlear and vestibular tissues. Regulation by vitamin D remains equivocal since the results support the regulation of this system at the transcript level but evidence for control of the TRPV5 channel protein was lacking. PMID:20113508

  8. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  9. Transport of Calcium Ions into Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaolong; Zhang, Dayong; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    To uptake calcium ions of mitochondria is of significant functional connotation for cells, because calcium ions in mitochondria are involved in energy production, regulatory signals transfer, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and even programmed cell death of apoptosis, further playing more roles in plant productivity and quality. Cytoplasmic calcium ions access into outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) from voltage dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) and were absorbed into inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), rapid mitochondrial calcium uptake (RaM) or mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR). Although both mitochondria and the mechanisms of calcium transport have been extensively studied, but there are still long-standing or even new challenges. Here we review the history and recent discoveries of the mitochondria calcium ions channel complex involved calcium assimilation, and discuss the role of calcium ions into mitochondria. PMID:27252588

  10. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  11. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  12. Active and passive calcium transport systems in plant cells: Progress report, January 1986-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1986-10-01

    Two types of ATP-dependent Ca transport systems have been identified in isolated membrane vesicles from oat roots. The properties of the Ca pumps have been partially characterized and the membrane identity has been established. One pump predominantly on the ER is a Ca-pumping ATPase, and the other is a Ca/H antiport system dependent on the electrochemical gradient from the tonoplast-type H-ATPase. Though the two systems differe in several respects, they may both be important for regulating cytoplasmic (Ca) by removing Ca from the cytoplasm. We have also examined how a fungal toxin (Helminthosporium maydis T) might alter membrane functions. The HmT toxin decreased active Ca transport into mitochondria from susceptible corn by increasing membrane permeability to Ca and H/sup +/. We found that the toxin alone increased conductance of planar bilayer membranes to cations. The dependence of Ca fluxes on the pH gradient and membrane potential or both, stresses the need to understand the mode of toxin action on membrane functions in general. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Control of calcium transport in the myocardium by the cyclic AMP-Protein kinase system.

    PubMed

    Katz, A M; Tada, M; Kirchberger, M A

    1975-01-01

    At least three mechanical changes characterize the response of cardiac muscle to agents that enhance cyclic AMP production. In common with other inotropic interventions, tension is augmented and the rate of tension rise is increased. The third response, acceleration of the rate of relaxation, is characteristic of the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. These mechanical effects can be attributed to changes in (1) the amount of Ca2+ released during systole, (2) the rate of Ca2+ release at the onset of systole, and (3) the rate at which Ca2+ is reaccumulated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum at the end of systole. The ability of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases to phosphorylate the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in vitro parallels stimulation of both Ca2+ transport and Ca2+-activated ATPase. The phosphoprotein formed in the presence of cyclic AMP and protein kinase has the chemical characteristics of a phosphoester, contains mostly phosphoserine, and has an electrophoretic mobility in SDS polyacrylamide gels that corresponds to a protein of 22,000 daltons. This 22,000-dalton protein, tentatively named phospholamban, thus differs from the acyl phosphooprotein formed by the Ca2+-transport ATPase, which as an apparent molecular weight of 90,000 to 100,000 daltons. Phospholamban has not been found in fast skeletal muscle, nor is Ca2+ transport accelerated by cyclic AMP and protein kinase in sarcoplasmic reticulum from these muslces which do not respond to beta-adrenergic agonists with accelerated relaxation. It thus appears likely that phosphorylation of phospholamban correlates both with an increased rate of Ca2+ transport by cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in vitro and accelerated relaxation in the intact myocardium. Preliminary findings are consistent with the view that phosphorylation of phospholamban may be related to other actions on Ca2+ fluxes brought about by agents which activate adenylate cyclase in the myocardium, but these interpretations must remain

  14. Is the calcium transporter a potential candidate for heme transport?

    PubMed

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O

    2016-06-01

    Heme is of significant importance in iron nutrition and in systemic iron metabolism. The crux of the matter is that while much is known about non-heme metabolism, the vectorial import of exogenous porphyrin macromolecules into the enterocyte and possibly into blood circulation is still speculative. The inhibitory effect of calcium on heme iron absorption has been previously reported in the literature. This paper postulates that the gastrointestinal Ca transporter, TRPV6, might be a putative transporter of heme and might account for reduced heme absorption in the presence of Ca. The hypothesis needs to be investigated in vitro and in vivo with targeted TRPV6 deletion models to explore the nature of the competitive inhibition of heme uptake by Ca. Studies are required to characterize fully this function in the gut and in systemic metabolism. If the hypothesis is proven, modulators of TRPV6 expression could have clinical implications in the management of heme-induced disorders. PMID:27142151

  15. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  16. EFFECTS OF SELECTED NEUROACTIVE CHEMICALS ON CALCIUM TRANSPORTING SYSTEMS IN RAT CEREBELLUM AND ON SURVIVAL OF CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation examined the effects of several neuroactive chemicals on Ca2+ -transporting systems and cytotoxicity in vitro. 5Ca2+ -uptake as a measure of Ca2+s -sequestration, was determined n mitochondria and microsomes, isolated from cerebella of adult male Long-Evans hoo...

  17. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  18. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    PubMed

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  19. A functional calcium-transporting ATPase encoded by chlorella viruses.

    PubMed

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Martin, Holger; Kang, Ming; Lewis, Gentry; Greiner, Timo; Giacometti, Sonia; Van Etten, James L; De Michelis, Maria Ida; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Calcium-transporting ATPases (Ca(2+) pumps) are major players in maintaining calcium homeostasis in the cell and have been detected in all cellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of two putative Ca(2+) pumps, M535L and C785L, encoded by chlorella viruses MT325 and AR158, respectively, and the functional characterization of M535L. Phylogenetic and sequence analyses place the viral proteins in group IIB of P-type ATPases even though they lack a typical feature of this class, a calmodulin-binding domain. A Ca(2+) pump gene is present in 45 of 47 viruses tested and is transcribed during virus infection. Complementation analysis of the triple yeast mutant K616 confirmed that M535L transports calcium ions and, unusually for group IIB pumps, also manganese ions. In vitro assays show basal ATPase activity. This activity is inhibited by vanadate, but, unlike that of other Ca(2+) pumps, is not significantly stimulated by either calcium or manganese. The enzyme forms a (32)P-phosphorylated intermediate, which is inhibited by vanadate and not stimulated by the transported substrate Ca(2+), thus confirming the peculiar properties of this viral pump. To our knowledge this is the first report of a functional P-type Ca(2+)-transporting ATPase encoded by a virus. PMID:20573858

  20. Calcium Transport by Corn Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marco Aurelio P.; Carnieri, Eva G. S.; Vercesi, Anibal E.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondria from some plant tissues possess the ability to take up Ca2+ by a phosphate-dependent mechanism associated with a decrease in membrane potential, H+ extrusion, and increase in the rate of respiration (AE Vercesi, L Pereira da Silva, IS Martins, CF Bernardes, EGS Carnieri, MM Fagian [1989] In G Fiskum, ed, Cell Calcium Metabolism. Plenum Press, New York, pp 103-111). The present study reexamined the nature of the phosphate requirement in this process. The main observations are: (a) Respiration-coupled Ca2+ uptake by isolated corn (Zea mays var Maya Normal) mitochondria or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-induced efflux of the cation from such mitochondria are sensitive to mersalyl and cannot be dissociated from the silmultaneous movement of phosphate in the same direction. (b) Ruthenium red-induced efflux is not affected by mersalyl and can occur in the absence of phosphate movement. (c) In Ca2+-loaded corn mitochondria, mersalyl causes net Ca2+ release unrelated to a decrease in membrane potential, probably due to an inhibition of Ca2+ cycling at the level of the influx pathway. It is concluded that corn mitochondria (and probably other plant mitochondria) do possess an electrophoretic influx pathway that appears to be a mersalyl-sensitive Ca2+/inorganic phosphate-symporter and a phosphate-independent efflux pathway possibly similar to the Na2+-independent Ca2+ efflux mechanism of vertebrate mitochondria, because it is not stimulated by Na+. PMID:16668661

  1. Nematode Sodium Calcium Exchangers: A Surprising Lack of Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; O’Halloran, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are low-affinity, high-capacity transporters that rapidly transport calcium against a gradient of Na+ ions. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are divided into three groups based upon substrate specificity: Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), Na+/Ca2+/K+ exchangers (NCKX), and Ca2+/cation exchangers (NCLX). In mammals, there are three NCX genes, five NCKX genes, and a single NCLX gene. The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains 10 Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes: three NCX, five NCLX, and two NCKX genes. In a previous study, we characterized the structural and taxonomic specializations within the family of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers across the phylum Nematoda and observed a complex picture of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger evolution across diverse nematode species. We noted multiple cases of putative gene gain and loss and, most surprisingly, did not detect members of the NCLX type of exchangers within subsets of nematode species. In this commentary, we discuss these findings and speculate on the functional outcomes and physiology of these observations. Our data highlight the importance of studying diverse systems in order to get a deeper understanding of the evolution and regulation of Ca2+ signaling critical for animal function. PMID:26848260

  2. Downregulation of taurine transport by calcium blockers in osteoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young-Sook

    2009-01-01

    Taurine is found in a high concentration in bone cells and is thought to help enhance bone tissue formation and inhibit bone loss. It is mainly transported by a sodium and chloride ion dependent taurine transporter (TauT), which is expressed in a variety of tissues, such as brain, retina, and placenta, but in bone the transporter has not yet been identified. The purpose of this study is to clarify the uptake mechanism of taurine in osteoblasts using mouse osteoblast cell lines. Mouse stromal ST2 cells and mouse osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells were used as osteoblast cell lines. Detection of TauT mRNA expression in these cells was performed by RT-PCR. The activity of the taurine transporter was assessed by measuring the uptake of [3H]taurine in cell lines in the presence and absence of inhibitors. TauT mRNA was detected in ST2 and MC3T3-E1 cells. [3H]Taurine uptake by these cells exhibited a time dependent increase that was linear for at least 10 min. [3H]Taurine uptake was dependent on the presence of extracellular sodium and chloride ions, and was inhibited by unlabeled taurine, beta-alanine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid. Moreover, uptake of [3H]taurine by these cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The uptake of [3H]taurine in ST2 cells treated with 4 mM calcium was increased 1.7-fold. The initial rate of [3H]taurine uptake was significantly inhibited by 100 microM nifedipine and 100 microM verapamil. These results suggest that in mouse osteoblast cell lines taurine transport is controlled by extracellular calcium. PMID:19239183

  3. Calcium transport in gill cells of Ucides cordatus, a mangrove crab living in variable salinity environments.

    PubMed

    Leite, V P; Zanotto, F P

    2013-10-01

    Crustaceans show discontinuous growth and have been used as a model system for studying cellular mechanisms of calcium transport, which is the main mineral found in their exoskeleton. Ucides cordatus, a mangrove crab, is naturally exposed to fluctuations in calcium and salinity. To study calcium transport in this species during isosmotic conditions, dissociated gill cells were marked with fluo-3 and intracellular Ca(2+) change was followed by adding extracellular Ca(2+) as CaCl2 (0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 5mM), together with different inhibitors. For control gill cells, Ca(2+) transport followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Vmax=0.137±0.001 ∆Ca(2+)i (μM×22.10(4)cells(-1)×180s(-1); N=4; r(2)=0.99); Km=0.989±0.027mM. The use of different inhibitors for gill cells showed that amiloride (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange inhibitor) inhibited 80% of Ca(2+) transport in gill cells (Vmax). KB-R, an inhibitor of Ca influx in vertebrates, similarly caused a decrease in Ca(2+) transport and verapamil (Ca(2+) channel inhibitor) had no effect on Ca(2+) transport, while nifedipine (another Ca(2+) channel inhibitor) caused a 20% decrease in Ca(2+) affinity compared to control values. Ouabain, on the other hand, caused no change in Ca(2+) transport, while vanadate increased the concentration of intracellular calcium through inhibition of Ca(2+) efflux probably through the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase. Results show that transport kinetics for Ca(2+) in these crabs under isosmotic conditions is lower compared to a hyper-regulator freshwater crab Dilocarcinus pagei studied earlier using fluorescent Ca(2+) probes. These kinds of studies will help understanding the comparative mechanisms underlying the evolution of Ca transport in crabs living in different environments. PMID:23867752

  4. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. PMID:26139029

  5. Calcium transport by skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum in the hypothyroid rat

    PubMed Central

    Fanburg, Barry L.

    1968-01-01

    The rate of calcium transport by isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum from rat skeletal muscle increases markedly during the first 4 wk of life and thereafter remains relatively constant. When animals are made hypothyroid during the first 3 wk of life, there is a marked inhibition of the increase in calcium transport by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Production of hypothyroidism after 4 wk of age, at which time the calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum has reached maximum levels, results in a depression in the rate of calcium transport. There is no clear alteration in ATPase activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum to account for the low calcium transport in hypothyroidism. It is proposed that the decrease in calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum may account for observed alterations in the intrinsic contractile properties of muscle in the hypothyroid animal. PMID:4237781

  6. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bizzozero, Julien Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  7. Calcium transport, thiol status, and hepatotoxicity following N-nitrosodimethylamine exposure in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Reitman, F.A.; Berger, M.L.; Minnema, D.J.; Shertzer, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    The hepatotoxicant N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is presumed to exert toxicity through reactive metabolites. NDMA is similar in this respect to numerous other hepatotoxicants, for which hepatotoxicity is also associated with a rapid depletion of soluble and/or protein thiols, and an inhibition of calcium transport systems. The authors examined the hypothesis that hepatotoxicity for NDMA is preceded by thiol depletion and/or inhibition of calcium transport in isolated liver subcellular fractions. Centrizonal liver necrosis in mice was evident at 24 but not at 12 h subsequent to intraperitoneal administration of 40 mg NDMA/kg. Hepatotoxicity was not preceded by depletion of liver protein-free sulfhydryls, nor by protein sulfhydryl depletion in liver whole homogenate, microsomal, or plasma membrane fractions. NDMA-mediated toxicity was also not preceded by inhibition of calcium uptake capability by microsomal, mitochondrial, or plasma membrane fractions. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride produced the expected rapid decrease in microsomal calcium uptake capability, followed by a centrizonal necrosis that was maximal at about 24 h. These studies suggest that the mechanism of NDMA hepatotoxicity may differ from that of a number of other hepatotoxicants (e.g., carbon tetrachloride, acetaminophen, bromobenzene) for which toxicity is also mediated through reactive metabolites.

  8. Expression of calcium transport proteins in the extraembryonic membranes of a viviparous snake, Virginia striatula.

    PubMed

    Fregoso, Santiago P; Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W

    2012-06-01

    Yolk is the primary source of calcium for embryonic growth and development for most squamates, irrespective of mode of parity. The calcified eggshell is a secondary source for embryonic calcium in all oviparous eggs, but this structure is lost in viviparous lineages. Virginia striatula is a viviparous snake in which embryos obtain calcium from both yolk and placental transport of uterine calcium secretions. The developmental pattern of embryonic calcium acquisition in V. striatula is similar to that for oviparous snakes. Calbindin-D(28K) is a marker for epithelial calcium transport activity and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) provides the energy to catalyze the final step in calcium transport. Expression of calbindin-D(28K) and PMCA was measured by immunoblotting in yolk sac splanchnopleure and chorioallantois of a developmental series of V. striatula to test the hypothesis that these proteins mediate calcium transport to embryos. In addition, we compared the expression of calbindin-D(28K) in extraembryonic membranes of V. striatula throughout development to a previously published expression pattern in an oviparous snake to test the hypothesis that the ontogeny of calcium transport function is independent of reproductive mode. Expression of calbindin-D(28K) increased in yolk sac splanchnopleure and chorioallantois coincident with calcium mobilization from yolk and uterine sources and with embryonic growth. The amount of PMCA in the chorioallantois did not change through development suggesting its expression is not rate limiting for calcium transport. The pattern of expression of calbindin-D(28K) and PMCA confirms our initial hypothesis that these proteins mediate embryonic calcium uptake. In addition, the developmental pattern of calbindin-D(28K) expression in V. striatula is similar to that of an oviparous snake, which suggests that calcium transport mechanisms and their regulation are independent of reproductive mode. PMID:22821861

  9. ALUMINUM ALTERS CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN PLASMA MEMBRANE AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM FROM RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium is actively transported into intracellular organelles and out of the cytoplasm by Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPases located in the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes. he effects of aluminum on calcium transport were examined in the adult rat brain. 5Ca-uptake was examined in micr...

  10. Localization of the calcium-regulated citrate transport process in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Hering-Smith, Kathleen S; Mao, Weibo; Schiro, Faith R; Coleman-Barnett, Joycelynn; Pajor, Ana M; Hamm, L Lee

    2014-06-01

    Urinary citrate is an important inhibitor of calcium-stone formation. Most of the citrate reabsorption in the proximal tubule is thought to occur via a dicarboxylate transporter NaDC1 located in the apical membrane. OK cells, an established opossum kidney proximal tubule cell line, transport citrate but the characteristics change with extracellular calcium such that low calcium solutions stimulate total citrate transport as well as increase the apparent affinity for transport. The present studies address several fundamental properties of this novel process: the polarity of the transport process, the location of the calcium-sensitivity and whether NaDC1 is present in OK cells. OK cells grown on permeable supports exhibited apical >basolateral citrate transport. Apical transport of both citrate and succinate was sensitive to extracellular calcium whereas basolateral transport was not. Apical calcium, rather than basolateral, was the predominant determinant of changes in transport. Also 2,3-dimethylsuccinate, previously identified as an inhibitor of basolateral dicarboxylate transport, inhibited apical citrate uptake. Although the calcium-sensitive transport process in OK cells is functionally not typical NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in OK cells by Western blot and PCR. By immunolocalization studies, NaDC1 was predominantly located in discrete apical membrane or subapical areas. However, by biotinylation, apical NaDC1 decreases in the apical membrane with lowering calcium. In sum, OK cells express a calcium-sensitive/regulated dicarboxylate process at the apical membrane which responds to variations in apical calcium. Despite the functional differences of this process compared to NaDC1, NaDC1 is present in these cells, but predominantly in subapical vesicles. PMID:24652587

  11. Calcium transport in tonoplast and endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells. [Daucus carota Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, D.R.; Sze, H.

    1986-02-01

    Two active calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/) transport systems have been identified and partially characterized in membrane vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers). Both transport systems required MgATP for activity and were enhanced by 10 millimolar oxalate. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in membrane vesicles derived from isolated vacuoles equilibrated at 1.10 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with Cl/sup -/-stimulated, NO/sub 3//sup -/-inhibited ATPase activity on sucrose density gradients. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in this system was insensitive to vanadate, but was inhibited by nitrate, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), and 4,4-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulfonic acid (DIDS). The K/sub m/ for MgATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ were 0.1 mM and 21 micromolar, respectively. The predominant Ca/sup 2 +/ transport system detectable in microsomal membrane preparations equilibrated at a density of 1.13 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker, antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport activity and the ER marker also shifted in parallel in ER shifting experiments. This transport system was inhibited by vanadate (I/sub 50/ = 12 micromolar) and was insensitive to nitrate, CCCP, DCCD, and DIDS. Transport exhibited cooperative MgATP dependent kinetics. Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent kinetics were complex with an apparent K/sub m/ ranging from 0.7 to 2 micromolar. We conclude that the vacuolar-derived system is a Ca/sup 2 +//H/sup +/ antiport located on the tonoplast and that the microsomal transport system is a Ca,Mg-ATPase enriched on the ER. These two Ca/sup 2 +/ transport systems are proposed to restore and maintain cytoplasmic Ca/sup 2 +/ homeostasis under changing cellular and environmental conditions.

  12. Phosphorus: Riverine system transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport and transformation of phosphorus (P) in riverine systems fundamentally affects the outcome of watershed mitigation strategies aimed at curbing downstream eutrophication. Phosphorus transport and transformations in streams and rivers are mediated by physical (sediment deposition and res...

  13. Yeast Gdt1 is a Golgi-localized calcium transporter required for stress-induced calcium signaling and protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Colinet, Anne-Sophie; Sengottaiyan, Palanivelu; Deschamps, Antoine; Colsoul, Marie-Lise; Thines, Louise; Demaegd, Didier; Duchêne, Marie-Clémence; Foulquier, François; Hols, Pascal; Morsomme, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signaling depends on a tightly regulated set of pumps, exchangers, and channels that are responsible for controlling calcium fluxes between the different subcellular compartments of the eukaryotic cell. We have recently reported that two members of the highly-conserved UPF0016 family, human TMEM165 and budding yeast Gdt1p, are functionally related and might form a new group of Golgi-localized cation/Ca2+ exchangers. Defects in the human protein TMEM165 are known to cause a subtype of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation. Using an assay based on the heterologous expression of GDT1 in the bacterium Lactococcus lactis, we demonstrated the calcium transport activity of Gdt1p. We observed a Ca2+ uptake activity in cells expressing GDT1, which was dependent on the external pH, indicating that Gdt1p may act as a Ca2+/H+ antiporter. In yeast, we found that Gdt1p controls cellular calcium stores and plays a major role in the calcium response induced by osmotic shock when the Golgi calcium pump, Pmr1p, is absent. Importantly, we also discovered that, in the presence of a high concentration of external calcium, Gdt1p is required for glycosylation of carboxypeptidase Y and the glucanosyltransferase Gas1p. Finally we showed that glycosylation process is restored by providing more Mn2+ to the cells. PMID:27075443

  14. Transportation System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  15. First evidence on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide in groundnut using solution culture technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, Manchala; Sudhakar, Palagiri; Nagamadhuri, Kandula Venkata; Balakrishna Reddy, Kota; Giridhara Krishna, Thimmavajjula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale materials, whose size typically falls below 100 nm, exhibit novel chemical, physical and biological properties which are different from their bulk counterparts. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (n-CaO) could transport through phloem tissue of groundnut unlike the corresponding bulk materials. n-CaO particles are prepared using sol-gel method. The size of the as prepared n-CaO measured (69.9 nm) using transmission electron microscopic technique (TEM). Results of the hydroponics experiment using solution culture technique revealed that foliar application of n-CaO at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 ppm) on groundnut plants confirmed the entry of calcium into leaves and stems through phloem compared to bulk source of calcium sprayed (CaO and CaNO3). After spraying of n-CaO, calcium content in roots, shoots and leaves significantly increased. Based on visual scoring of calcium deficiency correction and calcium content in plant parts, we may establish the fact that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (size 69.9 nm) could move through phloem tissue in groundnut. This is the first report on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide particles in plants and this result points to the use of nanoscale calcium oxide particles as calcium source to the plants through foliar application, agricultural crops in particular, as bulk calcium application through foliar nutrition is restricted due to its non-mobility in phloem.

  16. Optical imaging of neuronal activity in tissue labeled by retrograde transport of Calcium Green Dextran.

    PubMed

    McPherson, D R; McClellan, A D; O'Donovan, M J

    1997-05-01

    In many neurophysiological studies it is desirable to simultaneously record the activity of a large number of neurons. This is particularly true in the study of vertebrate motor systems that generate rhythmic behaviors, such as the pattern generator for locomotion in vertebrate spinal cord. Optical imaging of neurons labeled with appropriate fluorescent dyes, in which fluorescence is activity-dependent, provides a means to record the activity of many neurons at the same time, while also providing fine spatial resolution of the position and morphology of active neurons. Voltage-sensitive dyes have been explored for this purpose and have the advantage of rapid response to transmembrane voltage changes. However, voltage-sensitive dyes bleach readily, which results in phototoxic damage and limits the time that labeled neurons can be imaged. In addition, the signal-to-noise ratio is typically small, so that averaging of responses is usually required. As an alternative to voltage-sensitive dyes, calcium-sensitive dyes can exhibit large changes in fluorescence. Most neurons contain voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, and numerous reports indicate that neuronal activity is accompanied by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In this protocol we describe a method to use retrograde transport of the dextran conjugate of a calcium-sensitive dye (Calcium Green Dextran) to label selectively populations of brain and spinal interneurons in a primitive vertebrate (lamprey), for subsequent video-rate imaging of changes in intracellular fluorescence during neuronal activity. Although described with specific reference to lampreys, the technique has also been applied to embryonic chick spinal cord and larval zebrafish preparations and should be easily adaptable to other systems. The most significant novel feature of the protocol is the use of retrograde axonal transport to selectively fill neurons that have known axonal trajectories. Using lampreys, we have obtained activity

  17. Interaction of H2S with Calcium Permeable Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weihua; Xu, Changqing; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A growing amount of evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a gasotransmitter, is involved in intensive physiological and pathological processes. More and more research groups have found that H2S mediates diverse cellular biological functions related to regulating intracellular calcium concentration. These groups have demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between H2S and calcium ion channels and transporters, such as L-type calcium channels (LTCC), T-type calcium channels (TTCC), sodium/calcium exchangers (NCX), transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, β-adrenergic receptors, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in different cells. However, the understanding of the molecular targets and mechanisms is incomplete. Recently, some research groups demonstrated that H2S modulates the activity of calcium ion channels through protein S-sulfhydration and polysulfide reactions. In this review, we elucidate that H2S controls intracellular calcium homeostasis and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26078804

  18. Calcium transport across the isolated oral epithelium of scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, O. P.; Marshall, A. T.

    1991-07-01

    Oral epithelia were isolated from Lobophyllia temprichii and Plerogyra sinuosa and placed in Ussing chambers. Calcium flux was measured under open circuit and short circuit conditions using 45Ca. Only a small transepithelial potential of 1.5 mV was recorded under open circuit conditions and no effect on flux rates were observed when the preparation was short circuited. Unidirectional fluxes in single and paired experiments were consistently greater in the ectoderm to gastroderm direction than from gastroderm to ectoderm with net flux of Ca2+ frequently being more than 3x10-4 μEq mm-2 min-1. A small number of paired experiments showed that net flux of Ca2+ was reduced by Sr2+ and sodium azide but not by dinitrophenol. Unidirectional fluxes from ectoderm to gastroderm appeared to have maxima in the early and late parts of the day when recorded between 0900 and 2100 hrs. It is concluded that active transport of Ca2+ occurs across the isolated oral epitheia and that this may be an initial step in the process of keletal Ca2+ deposition.

  19. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is inexpensive, but is absorbed best when taken ... antacid products, such as Tums® and Rolaids®, contain calcium carbonate. Each pill or chew provides 200–400 mg ...

  20. Transport properties of the calcium ionophore ETH-129.

    PubMed

    Wang, E; Erdahl, W L; Hamidinia, S A; Chapman, C J; Taylor, R W; Pfeiffer, D R

    2001-12-01

    The transport mechanism and specificities of ionophore ETH-29 have been investigated in a highly defined phospholipid vesicle system, with the goal of facilitating the application of this compound to biological problems. ETH-129 transports Ca(2+) via an electrogenic mechanism, in contrast to A23187 and ionomycin, which function in a charge neutral manner. The rate of transport is a function of membrane potential, increasing by 3.9-fold per 59 mV over a broad range of that parameter. Rate is independent of the transmembrane pH gradient and strongly stimulated by the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone when no external potential has been applied. The effect of uncoupler reflects the collapse of an opposing potential arising during Ca(2+) transport, but also reflects the formation of a mixed complex between the uncoupler, ETH-129, and Ca(2+) that readily permeates the vesicle membrane. Oleate does not substitute for the uncoupler in either regard. ETH-129 transports polyvalent cations according to the selectivity sequence La(3+) > Ca(2+) > Zn(2+) approximately equal to Sr(2+) > Co(2+) approximately equal to Ni(2+) approximately equal to Mn(2+), with the magnitude of the selectivity coefficients reflecting the cation concentration range considered. There is little or no activity for the transport of Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+). These properties suggest that ETH-129 will be useful for investigating the consequences of a mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload in mammalian cells, which is difficult to pursue through the application of electroneutral ionophores. PMID:11720991

  1. The effect of exogenous calcium on mitochondria, respiratory metabolism enzymes and ion transport in cucumber roots under hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    He, Lizhong; Li, Bin; Lu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Lingyun; Yang, Yanjuan; Yuan, Yinghui; Du, Jing; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia induces plant stress, particularly in cucumber plants under hydroponic culture. In plants, calcium is involved in stress signal transmission and growth. The ultimate goal of this study was to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous calcium on the mitochondrial antioxidant system, the activity of respiratory metabolism enzymes, and ion transport in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jinchun No. 2) roots under hypoxic conditions. Our experiments revealed that exogenous calcium reduces the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases the activity of antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria under hypoxia. Exogenous calcium also enhances the accumulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. We utilized fluorescence and ultrastructural cytochemistry methods to observe that exogenous calcium increases the concentrations of Ca2+ and K+ in root cells by increasing the activity of plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase and tonoplast H+-ATPase and H+-PPase. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxic stress has an immediate and substantial effect on roots. Exogenous calcium improves metabolism and ion transport in cucumber roots, thereby increasing hypoxia tolerance in cucumber. PMID:26304855

  2. Payload transportation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A standard size set of shuttle payload transportation equipment was defined that will substantially reduce the cost of payload transportation and accommodate a wide range of payloads with minimum impact on payload design. The system was designed to accommodate payload shipments between the level 4 payload integration sites and the launch site during the calendar years 1979-1982. In addition to defining transportation multi-use mission support equipment (T-MMSE) the mode of travel, prime movers, and ancillary equipment required in the transportation process were also considered. Consistent with the STS goals of low cost and the use of standardized interfaces, the transportation system was designed to commercial grade standards and uses the payload flight mounting interfaces for transportation. The technical, cost, and programmatic data required to permit selection of a baseline system of MMSE for intersite movement of shuttle payloads were developed.

  3. Intracellular free calcium concentration and calcium transport in human erythrocytes of lead-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanar-Escorza, M.A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, M.T.; Navarro, L.; Maldonado, M.; Arevalo, B.; Calderon-Salinas, J.V. . E-mail: jcalder@cinvestav.mx

    2007-04-01

    Erythrocytes are the route of lead distribution to organs and tissues. The effect of lead on calcium homeostasis in human erythrocytes and other excitable cells is not known. In the present work we studied the effect of lead intoxication on the uptake and efflux (measured as (Ca{sup 2+}-Mg{sup 2+})-ATPase activity) of calcium were studied in erythrocytes obtained from lead-exposed workers. Blood samples were taken from 15 workers exposed to lead (blood lead concentration 74.4 {+-} 21.9 {mu}g/dl) and 15 non-exposed workers (9.9 {+-} 2 {mu}g/dl). In erythrocytes of lead-exposed workers, the intracellular free calcium was 79 {+-} 13 nM, a significantly higher concentration (ANOVA, P < 0.01) than the one detected in control (30 {+-} 9 nM). The enhanced intracellular free calcium was associated with a higher osmotic fragility and with important modifications in erythrocytes shape. The high intracellular free calcium in lead-exposed workers was also related to a 100% increase in calcium incorporation and to 50% reduction of (Ca{sup 2+}-Mg{sup 2+})-ATPase activity. Lipid peroxidation was 1.7-fold higher in erythrocytes of lead-exposed workers as compared with control. The alteration on calcium equilibrium in erythrocytes is discussed in light of the toxicological effects in lead-exposed workers.

  4. Developmental expression of calcium transport proteins in extraembryonic membranes of oviparous and viviparous Zootoca vivipara (Lacertilia, Lacertidae).

    PubMed

    Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W; Heulin, Benoit; Fregoso, Santiago P; Linville, Brent J

    2011-09-15

    The eggshell of oviparous lizards is a significant source of calcium for embryos, whereas the eggshell of viviparous lizards, when present, contains little calcium. In view of the potential cost to embryonic nutrition occasioned by the loss of eggshell calcium, the large number of independent origins of viviparity among lizards is surprising. Concomitant evolution of viviparity and calcium placentotrophy would ameliorate the loss of eggshell calcium, but a mechanism linking these events has yet to be discovered. Zootoca vivipara, a lizard with geographic variation in its mode of parity, is an excellent model for studying mechanisms of calcium transport to oviparous and viviparous embryos because each is highly dependent on calcium secreted by the uterus (eggshell or placenta) and ontogenetic patterns of embryonic calcium mobilization are similar. We compared developmental expression of the calcium transport protein calbindin-D(28K) in yolk splanchnopleure and chorioallantoic membranes of oviparous and viviparous embryos to test the hypothesis that the mechanism of calcium transport does not differ between modes of parity. We found that the ontogenetic pattern of protein expression is similar between reproductive modes and is correlated with calcium uptake from yolk and either eggshell or placenta. Calbindin-D(28K) is localized in the chorionic epithelium of embryos of both reproductive modes. These findings suggest that the embryonic calcium transport machinery is conserved in the transition between reproductive modes and that an adaptation of oviparous embryos for calcium uptake from eggshells functions similarly to transport calcium directly from uterine secretions. PMID:21865511

  5. Tissue-specific root ion profiling reveals essential roles of the CAX and ACA calcium transport systems in response to hypoxia in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifei; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Xiaohui; Colmer, Timothy David; Zhou, Meixue; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Waterlogging is a major abiotic stress that limits the growth of plants. The crucial role of Ca2+ as a second messenger in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli has been widely recognized in plants. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms of Ca2+ distribution within specific cell types in different root zones under hypoxia is poorly understood. In this work, whole-plant physiological and tissue-specific Ca2+ changes were studied using several ACA (Ca2+-ATPase) and CAX (Ca2+/proton exchanger) knock-out Arabidopsis mutants subjected to waterlogging treatment. In the wild-type (WT) plants, several days of hypoxia decreased the expression of ACA8, CAX4, and CAX11 by 33% and 50% compared with the control. The hypoxic treatment also resulted in an up to 11-fold tissue-dependent increase in Ca2+ accumulation in root tissues as revealed by confocal microscopy. The increase was much higher in stelar cells in the mature zone of Arabidopsis mutants with loss of function for ACA8, ACA11, CAX4, and CAX11. In addition, a significantly increased Ca2+ concentration was found in the cytosol of stelar cells in the mature zone after hypoxic treatment. Three weeks of waterlogging resulted in dramatic loss of shoot biomass in cax11 plants (67% loss in shoot dry weight), while in the WT and other transport mutants this decline was only 14–22%. These results were also consistent with a decline in leaf chlorophyll fluorescence (F v/F m). It is suggested that CAX11 plays a key role in maintaining cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis and/or signalling in root cells under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26889007

  6. Tissue-specific root ion profiling reveals essential roles of the CAX and ACA calcium transport systems in response to hypoxia in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Xiaohui; Colmer, Timothy David; Zhou, Meixue; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    Waterlogging is a major abiotic stress that limits the growth of plants. The crucial role of Ca(2+) as a second messenger in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli has been widely recognized in plants. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms of Ca(2+) distribution within specific cell types in different root zones under hypoxia is poorly understood. In this work, whole-plant physiological and tissue-specific Ca(2+) changes were studied using several ACA (Ca(2+)-ATPase) and CAX (Ca(2+)/proton exchanger) knock-out Arabidopsis mutants subjected to waterlogging treatment. In the wild-type (WT) plants, several days of hypoxia decreased the expression of ACA8, CAX4, and CAX11 by 33% and 50% compared with the control. The hypoxic treatment also resulted in an up to 11-fold tissue-dependent increase in Ca(2+) accumulation in root tissues as revealed by confocal microscopy. The increase was much higher in stelar cells in the mature zone of Arabidopsis mutants with loss of function for ACA8, ACA11, CAX4, and CAX11 In addition, a significantly increased Ca(2+) concentration was found in the cytosol of stelar cells in the mature zone after hypoxic treatment. Three weeks of waterlogging resulted in dramatic loss of shoot biomass in cax11 plants (67% loss in shoot dry weight), while in the WT and other transport mutants this decline was only 14-22%. These results were also consistent with a decline in leaf chlorophyll fluorescence (F v/F m). It is suggested that CAX11 plays a key role in maintaining cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis and/or signalling in root cells under hypoxic conditions. PMID:26889007

  7. Space Transportation systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    Planning for the operations phase of the Space Transportation system is reviewed. Attention is given to mission profile (typical), applications, manifesting rationale, the Operational Flight Test manifest, the operations manifest, pricing policy, and potential applications of the STS.

  8. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them ... in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with soft bones that you eat, such as canned sardines and ...

  9. Smart vehicular transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.Q.; Wilson, C.W.

    1997-05-01

    This work builds upon established Sandia intelligent systems technology to develop a unique approach for the integration of intelligent system control into the US Highway and urban transportation systems. The Sandia developed concept of the COPILOT controller integrates a human driver with computer control to increase human performance while reducing reliance on detailed driver attention. This research extends Sandia expertise in sensor based, real-time control of robotics systems to high speed transportation systems. Knowledge in the form of maps and performance characteristics of vehicles provides the automatic decision making intelligence needed to plan optimum routes, maintain safe driving speeds and distances, avoid collisions, and conserve fuel.

  10. Characterization of transport of calcium by microsomal membranes from roots maize

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates calcium transport by membranes of roots of maize isolated by differential centrifugation. The preparation was determined to be enriched in plasma membrane using market enzyme and electron microscopy. Using the /sup 45/Ca filtration technique and liquid scintillation counting, vesicular calcium uptake was shown to be stimulated by added calmodulin and specific for and dependent on ATP. Conditions for maximal calcium accumulation were found to be 30 min incubation in the presence of 5 mM ATP, 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..M CaCl/sub 2/, at 23/sup 0/C, and at pH 6.5. Calcium uptake was inhibited by the ionophores A23187, X-537A, and ionomycin. Sodium fluoride, ruthenium red, and p-chloromercuribenzoate completely inhibited transport: diamide and vanadate produced slight inhibition; caffeine, caffeic acid, oligomycin, and ouabain produced little or no inhibition. Chlorpromazine, W7, trifluoperazine, and R 24 571 inhibit calcium uptake irrespective of added calmodulin, while W5 showed little effect on uptake. Verapamil, nifedipine, cinnarizine, flunarizine, lidoflazine, and diltiazem decreased calcium uptake by 17%-50%. Electron microscopic localization of calcium by pyroantimonate showed vesicles incubated with calmodulin and ATP showed the greatest amount of precipitate. These results suggest that these vesicles accumulate calcium in an ATP-dependent, calmodulin-stimulated manner.

  11. Gastrointestinal transport of calcium and glucose in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Stefanie; Schröder, Bernd; Gemmer, Anja; Reimers, Julia; Breves, Gerhard; Herrmann, Jens; Wilkens, Mirja R

    2016-06-01

    During lactation, mineral and nutrient requirements increase dramatically, particularly those for Ca and glucose. In contrast to monogastric species, in ruminants, it is rather unclear to which extend this physiological change due to increased demand for milk production is accompanied by functional adaptations of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Therefore, we investigated potential modulations of Ca and glucose transport mechanisms in the GIT of lactating and dried-off sheep. Ussing-chamber technique was applied to determine the ruminal and jejunal Ca flux rates. In the jejunum, electrophysiological properties in response to glucose were recorded. Jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) served to characterize glucose uptake via sodium-linked glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), and RNA and protein expression levels of Ca and glucose transporting systems were determined. Ruminal Ca flux rate data showed a trend for higher absorption in lactating sheep. In the jejunum, small Ca absorption could only be observed in lactating ewes. From the results, it may be assumed that lactating ewes compensate for the Ca loss by increasing bone mobilization rather than by increasing supply through absorption from the GIT Presence of SGLT1 in the jejunum of both groups was shown by RNA and protein identification, but glucose uptake into BBMV could only be detected in lactating sheep. This, however, could not be attributed to electrogenic glucose absorption in lactating sheep under Ussing-chamber conditions, providing evidence that changes in jejunal glucose uptake may include additional factors, that is, posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation. PMID:27273883

  12. Inhibition of polar calcium movement and gravitropism in roots treated with auxin-transport inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) exhibit strong positive gravitropism. In both species, gravistimulation induces polar movement of calcium across the root tip from the upper side to the lower side. Roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) are not responsive to gravity and gravistimulation induces little or no polar movement of calcium across the root tip. Treatment of maize or pea roots with inhibitors of auxin transport (morphactin, naphthylphthalamic acid, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid) prevents both gravitropism and gravity-induced polar movement of calcium across the root tip. The results indicate that calcium movement and auxin movement are closely linked in roots and that gravity-induced redistribution of calcium across the root cap may play an important role in the development of gravitropic curvature.

  13. Inhibition of polar calcium movement and gravitropism in roots treated with auxin-transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Mulkey, T J; Evans, M L

    1984-01-01

    Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) exhibit strong positive gravitropism. In both species, gravistimulation induces polar movement of calcium across the root tip from the upper side to the lower side. Roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) are not responsive to gravity and gravistimulation induces little or no polar movement of calcium across the root tip. Treatment of maize or pea roots with inhibitors of auxin transport (morphactin, naphthylphthalamic acid, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid) prevents both gravitropism and gravity-induced polar movement of calcium across the root tip. The results indicate that calcium movement and auxin movement are closely linked in roots and that gravity-induced redistribution of calcium across the root cap may play an important role in the development of gravitropic curvature. PMID:11540830

  14. Nutritional impact of elevated calcium transport activity in carrots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition recommendations worldwide emphasize ingestion of plant-based diets rather than diets that rely primarily on animal products. However, this plant-based diet could limit the intake of essential nutrients such as calcium. Osteoporosis is one of the world's most prevalent nutritional disorders...

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  16. Kinetics of calcium dissociation from its high-affinity transport sites on sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, S; Champeil, P

    1991-01-15

    We investigated the kinetics of calcium dissociation from its high-affinity transport sites on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase by combining fast filtration with stopped-flow fluorescence measurements. At pH 6 and 20 degrees C, in the absence of potassium and in the presence of 20 mM MgCl2, isotopic exchange of bound calcium exhibited biphasic kinetics, with two phases of equal amplitude, regardless of the initial extent of binding site saturation. The rapidly exchangeable site, whose occupancy by calcium controlled the rate constant of the slow phase, had an apparent affinity for calcium of about 3-6 microM. A similar high affinity was also deduced from measurements of the calcium dependence of the rate constant for ATPase fluorescence changes. This affinity was higher than the overall affinity for calcium deduced from the equilibrium binding measurements (dissociation constant of 15-20 microM); this was consistent with the occurrence of cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 1.6-1.8). The drop in intrinsic fluorescence observed upon chelation of calcium was always slightly faster than the dissociation of calcium itself, although the rates for both this drop in fluorescence and calcium dissociation varied slightly from one preparation to the other. This fluorescence drop was therefore mainly due to dissociation of the bound ions, not to slow transconformation of the ATPase. Dissociation of the two bound calcium ions in a medium containing EGTA exhibited monophasic kinetics in the presence of a calcium ionophore, with a rate constant about half that of the fast phase of isotopic exchange. This particular pattern was observed over a wide range of experimental conditions, including the presence of KCl, dimethyl sulfoxide, 4-nonylphenol, or a nucleotide analogue, at pH 6 or 7, and at various temperatures. The kinetics of calcium dissociation under the above various conditions were not correlated with the ATPase affinity for calcium deduced from equilibrium

  17. Potential role of cytoplasmic calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport in renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Frindt, G; Lee, C O; Yang, J M; Windhager, E E

    1988-01-01

    Experimental maneuvers that increase intracellular calcium ion levels inhibit sodium transport by renal tubules. In the isolated perfused renal tubule, intracellular calcium ion activity (aiCa) changes in response to alterations in the magnitude of the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the basolateral cell membrane. However, a potassium-induced depolarization of this cell boundary does not cause a rise but rather a fall in intracellular calcium ion levels. Ionomycin raises aiCa without causing intracellular acidification. This observation does not support the view that high cytosolic calcium produces intracellular acidification. At least in the case of ionomycin, the inhibition of sodium transport appears to be due to ionophore-induced increases in aiCa. The changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration found in the different experimental conditions studied were consistent with the notion that cytosolic calcium ions may mediate a feedback mechanism that links the luminal entry to the peritubular extrusion of sodium ions. The mechanisms by which cytosolic calcium alters entry is not yet clear but recent experiments suggest an indirect effect on sodium channel activity. PMID:3279295

  18. A rice tonoplastic calcium exchanger, OsCCX2 mediates Ca2+/cation transport in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Akhilesh K.; Shankar, Alka; Jha, Saroj K.; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    In plant cell, cations gradient in cellular compartments is maintained by synergistic action of various exchangers, pumps and channels. The Arabidopsis exchanger family members (AtCCX3 and AtCCX5) were previously studied and belong to CaCA (calcium cation exchangers) superfamily while none of the rice CCXs has been functionally characterized for their cation transport activities till date. Rice genome encode four CCXs and only OsCCX2 transcript showed differential expression under abiotic stresses and Ca2+ starvation conditions. The OsCCX2 localized to tonoplast and suppresses the Ca2+ sensitivity of K667 (low affinity Ca2+ uptake deficient) yeast mutant under excess CaCl2 conditions. In contrast to AtCCXs, OsCCX2 expressing K667 yeast cells show tolerance towards excess Na+, Li+, Fe2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ and suggest its ability to transport both mono as well as divalent cations in yeast. Additionally, in contrast to previously characterized AtCCXs, OsCCX2 is unable to complement yeast trk1trk2 double mutant suggesting inability to transport K+ in yeast system. These finding suggest that OsCCX2 having distinct metal transport properties than previously characterized plant CCXs. OsCCX2 can be used as potential candidate for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance in plants as well as for phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26607171

  19. The role of calcium in the regulation of hormone transport in gravistimulated roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael L.; Young, Linda M.; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Prior research has shown that gravistimulation induces preferential movement of calcium toward the lower side of the tips of maize roots and that roots depleted of calcium show impaired gravitropism. To further investigate the role of calcium in root gravitropism, we examined the effects of calcium on auxin movement in both vertical and gravistimulated roots of maize. Longitudinal movement of auxin was basipetally polar in intact roots but acropetally polar in decapped roots. Treatment of the root tip with calcium increased basipetal auxin movement in both intact and decapped roots. Gravistimulation induced asymmetric auxin movement toward the lower side of the root tip. Both asymmetric auxin movement and gravicurvature were inhibited by treatment of the root tip with auxin transport inhibitors or with EGTA. The results indicate that there is a close correlation between curvature and gravity-induced asymmetric auxin movement across the root cap. Since gravistimulation causes calcium movement toward the lower side of the root tip, our observation that calcium promotes basipetal auxin movement supports the idea that gravity-induced calcium asymmetry is a key step linking gravistimulation to the establishment of auxin asymmetry during root gravitropism.

  20. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca(2+) uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  1. Regulation of Intestinal Epithelial Calcium Transport Proteins by Stanniocalcin-1 in Caco2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jinmei; Guo, Rui; Wan, Chunyun; Wu, Liming; Yang, Shijin; Guo, Dingzong

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is a calcium and phosphate regulatory hormone. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying how STC1 affects Ca2+ uptake remain unclear. Here, the expression levels of the calcium transport proteins involved in transcellular transport in Caco2 cells were examined following over-expression or inhibition of STC1. These proteins include the transient receptor potential vanilloid members (TRPV) 5 and 6, the plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Both gene and protein expressions of TRPV5 and TRPV6 were attenuated in response to over-expression of STC1, and the opposite trend was observed in cells treated with siRNASTC1. To further investigate the ability of STC1 to influence TRPV6 expression, cells were treated with 100 ng/mL of recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) for 4 h following pre-transfection with siRNASTC1 for 48 h. Intriguingly, the increase in the expression of TRPV6 resulting from siRNASTC1 was reversed by rhSTC1. No significant effect of STC1 on the expression of PMCA1b, NCX1 or VDR was observed in this study. In conclusion, the effect of STC1 on calcium transport in intestinal epithelia is due to, at least in part, its negative regulation of the epithelial channels TRPV5/6 that mediate calcium influx. PMID:27409607

  2. Deregulated Renal Calcium and Phosphate Transport during Experimental Kidney Failure

    PubMed Central

    van Loon, Ellen P.; van de Sluis, Bart; Vervloet, Mark G.; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Bindels, René J.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mineral homeostasis and inflammation are hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the underlying mechanisms of electrolyte regulation during CKD are still unclear. Here, we applied two different murine models, partial nephrectomy and adenine-enriched dietary intervention, to induce kidney failure and to investigate the subsequent impact on systemic and local renal factors involved in Ca2+ and Pi regulation. Our results demonstrated that both experimental models induce features of CKD, as reflected by uremia, and elevated renal neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) expression. In our model kidney failure was associated with polyuria, hypercalcemia and elevated urinary Ca2+ excretion. In accordance, CKD augmented systemic PTH and affected the FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D axis by elevating circulatory FGF23 levels and reducing renal αklotho expression. Interestingly, renal FGF23 expression was also induced by inflammatory stimuli directly. Renal expression of Cyp27b1, but not Cyp24a1, and blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 were significantly elevated in both models. Furthermore, kidney failure was characterized by enhanced renal expression of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 5 (TRPV5), calbindin-D28k, and sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2b (NaPi2b), whereas the renal expression of sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2a (NaPi2a) and type 3 (PIT2) were reduced. Together, our data indicates two different models of experimental kidney failure comparably associate with disturbed FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D signalling and a deregulated electrolyte homeostasis. Moreover, this study identifies local tubular, possibly inflammation- or PTH- and/or FGF23-associated, adaptive mechanisms, impacting on Ca2+/Pi homeostasis, hence enabling new opportunities to target electrolyte disturbances that emerge as a consequence of CKD development. PMID:26566277

  3. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at the level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account

  4. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at themore » level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not

  5. A lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Due to large amounts of oxygen required for space travel, a method of mining, transporting, and storing this oxygen in space would facilitate further space exploration. The following project deals specifically with the methods for transporting liquid oxygen from the lunar surface to the Lunar Orbit (LO) space station, and then to the Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) space station. Two vehicles were designed for operation between the LEO and LO space stations. The first of these vehicles is an aerobraked design vehicle. The Aerobrake Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is capable of transporting 5000 lbm of payload to LO while returning to LEO with 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen, and thus meet mission requirements. The second vehicle can deliver 18,000 lbm of payload to LO and is capable of bringing 60,000 lbm of liquid oxygen back to LEO. A lunar landing vehicle was also designed for operation between LO and the established moon base. The use of an electromagnetic railgun as a method for launching the lunar lander was also investigated. The feasibility of the railgun is doubtful at this time. A system of spheres was also designed for proper storing and transporting of the liquid oxygen. The system assumes a safe means for transferring the liquid oxygen from tank to tank is operational. A sophisticated life support system was developed for both the OTV and the lunar lander. This system focuses on such factors as the vehicle environment, waste management, water requirements, food requirements, and oxygen requirements.

  6. Lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The University Space Research Association (USRA) requested the University of Minnesota Spacecraft Design Team to design a lunar transportation infrastructure. This task was a year long design effort culminating in a complete conceptual design and presentation at Johnson Space Center. The mission objective of the design group was to design a system of vehicles to bring a habitation module, cargo, and crew to the lunar surface from LEO and return either or both crew and cargo safely to LEO while emphasizing component commonality, reusability, and cost effectiveness. During the course of the design, the lunar transportation system (LTS) has taken on many forms. The final design of the system is composed of two vehicles, a lunar transfer vehicle (LTV) and a lunar excursion vehicle (LEV). The LTV serves as an efficient orbital transfer vehicle between the earth and the moon while the LEV carries crew and cargo to the lunar surface. Presented in the report are the mission analysis, systems layout, orbital mechanics, propulsion systems, structural and thermal analysis, and crew systems, avionics, and power systems for this lunar transportation concept.

  7. Neurotensin effect on dopamine release and calcium transport in rat striatum: interactions with diphenylalkylamine calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Battaini, F; Govoni, S; Di Giovine, S; Trabucchi, M

    1986-03-01

    The release of dopamine was investigated in rat striatal slices exposed in vitro to neurotensin. This peptide increased basal and K+-evoked dopamine release. Moreover neurotensin antagonized the flunarizine-induced inhibition of K+-stimulated dopamine release. The K+-evoked 45Ca2+ accumulation was also inhibited by flunarizine. This effect was antagonized by neurotensin. The results suggest that dopamine release in rat striatum is regulated by different molecular events also of peptidergic nature having as possible mechanism of action an influence on calcium ion movements. PMID:3713871

  8. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  9. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Bill L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acting as a pneumatic spring for the system.

  10. Effect of renal insufficiency on the active transport of calcium by the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Baerg, Richard D.; Kimberg, Daniel V.; Gershon, Elaine

    1970-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium is often depressed in patients with chronic renal insufficiency. Furthermore, the malabsorption of calcium and the osteodystrophy which occur in association with chronic renal disease are often “resistant” to vitamin D; the basis for this resistance remains uncertain however. Recent studies by others have emphasized the role of an abnormality in the metabolism of vitamin D in accounting for the alterations in the calcium absorption and the apparent vitamin D-resistance which accompany the uremic syndrome. The present studies with an experimentally uremic animal model demonstrate a defect in the active transport of calcium by duodenal gut sacs in vitro. This abnormality is not due to the semistarvation associated with renal insufficiency and cannot be corrected by the administration of physiologic amounts of vitamin D3: it is reversed by massive doses of the vitamin. Neither the metabolism of vitamin D3 nor the levels of calcium binding protein activity in the duodenal mucosa are affected by renal insufficiency under the conditions employed in the present studies. The results of the present studies strongly suggest that in addition to the recently proposed mechanism involving an interference with the metabolism of vitamin D renal insufficiency also affects the cellular mechanisms for calcium transport in a manner which, while opposite in direction to that of vitamin D, is independent of a direct interaction with the vitamin or its metabolites. PMID:5422027

  11. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor and the Reproductive System

    PubMed Central

    Ellinger, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Active placental transport of maternal serum calcium (Ca2+) to the offspring is pivotal for proper development of the fetal skeleton as well as various organ systems. Moreover, extracellular Ca2+ levels impact on distinct processes in mammalian reproduction. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) translates changes in extracellular Ca2+-concentrations into cellular reactions. This review summarizes current knowledge on the expression of CaSR and its putative functions in reproductive organs. CaSR was detected in placental cells mediating materno-fetal Ca2+-transport such as the murine intraplacental yolk sac (IPYS) and the human syncytiotrophoblast. As shown in casr knock-out mice, ablation of CaSR downregulates transplacental Ca2+-transport. Receptor expression was reported in human and rat ovarian surface epithelial (ROSE) cells, where CaSR activation stimulates cell proliferation. In follicles of various species a role of CaSR activation in oocyte maturation was suggested. Based on studies in avian follicles, the activation of CaSR expressed in granulosa cells may support the survival of follicles after their selection. CaSR in rat and equine sperms was functionally linked to sperm motility and sperm capacitation. Implantation involves complex interactions between the blastocyst and the uterine epithelium. During early pregnancy, CaSR expression at the implantation site as well as in decidual cells indicates that CaSR is important for blastocyst implantation and decidualization in the rat uterus. Localization of CaSR in human extravillous cytotrophoblasts suggests a role of CaSR in placentation. Overall, evidence for functional involvement of CaSR in physiologic mammalian reproductive processes exists. Moreover, several studies reported altered expression of CaSR in cells of reproductive tissues under pathologic conditions. However, in many tissues we still lack knowledge on physiological ligands activating CaSR, CaSR-linked G-proteins, activated intracellular

  12. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor and the Reproductive System.

    PubMed

    Ellinger, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Active placental transport of maternal serum calcium (Ca(2+)) to the offspring is pivotal for proper development of the fetal skeleton as well as various organ systems. Moreover, extracellular Ca(2+) levels impact on distinct processes in mammalian reproduction. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) translates changes in extracellular Ca(2+)-concentrations into cellular reactions. This review summarizes current knowledge on the expression of CaSR and its putative functions in reproductive organs. CaSR was detected in placental cells mediating materno-fetal Ca(2+)-transport such as the murine intraplacental yolk sac (IPYS) and the human syncytiotrophoblast. As shown in casr knock-out mice, ablation of CaSR downregulates transplacental Ca(2+)-transport. Receptor expression was reported in human and rat ovarian surface epithelial (ROSE) cells, where CaSR activation stimulates cell proliferation. In follicles of various species a role of CaSR activation in oocyte maturation was suggested. Based on studies in avian follicles, the activation of CaSR expressed in granulosa cells may support the survival of follicles after their selection. CaSR in rat and equine sperms was functionally linked to sperm motility and sperm capacitation. Implantation involves complex interactions between the blastocyst and the uterine epithelium. During early pregnancy, CaSR expression at the implantation site as well as in decidual cells indicates that CaSR is important for blastocyst implantation and decidualization in the rat uterus. Localization of CaSR in human extravillous cytotrophoblasts suggests a role of CaSR in placentation. Overall, evidence for functional involvement of CaSR in physiologic mammalian reproductive processes exists. Moreover, several studies reported altered expression of CaSR in cells of reproductive tissues under pathologic conditions. However, in many tissues we still lack knowledge on physiological ligands activating CaSR, CaSR-linked G-proteins, activated

  13. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-12-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  14. Mars Equipment Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrells, Cindy; Geiger, Michelle; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Brogan, Nick

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical Engineering Senior Design Project 1 (ME4182) is a part of the NASA/University Advanced Design Program. Under this program, NASA allocates money and resources to students to be used in design work for a specified topic. The current topic is the exploration and colonization of Mars. The specific area in which we are to work is the transportation of the modules in which astronauts will live while on Mars. NASA is concerned about the weight of the module transferring system, as the shipping cost to Mars is quite expensive. NASA has specified that the weight of the system is to be minimized in order to reduce the shipping costs.

  15. Calcium and sodium transport and vitamin D metabolism in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, H P; Miller, D L; Pape, J M; Horst, R L; Wilson, H D

    1984-01-01

    Serum ionized calcium levels are lower and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone levels are higher in the spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rat than in the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKy) control. We postulated that there is either a defect in the regulation of vitamin D metabolism by parathyroid hormone or that the gut target organ for vitamin D in the SH rat is unresponsive. To test these hypotheses we measured serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites and intestinal transport of calcium and sodium. Compared with that of WKy controls, in vitro calcium transport by duodenal sacs of the SH rat was decreased (P less than 0.001) at 5 wk, before the development of hypertension, and at 12 wk, after hypertension was well established. When measured in vivo in the most proximal 20 cm of small intestine, maximum velocity (Vmax) for calcium transport was decreased (P less than 0.05) and net absorption of sodium and water was increased (P less than 0.05) in SH rats as compared with WKy rats. Vmax for calcium transport was also decreased (P less than 0.05) in the most distal 20 cm of small intestine of SH rats, but net sodium and water transport were the same in SH and WKy rats. At 12 wk, serum concentration of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25-(OH)2D3] was the same in both SH and WKy groups, but its precursor, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, was increased (P less than 0.05) in the SH rat. We conclude that in the SH rat: (a) the concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 is inappropriately low in relation to the elevated immunoreactive parathyroid hormone and the depressed calcium absorption, suggesting a defect in the regulation of vitamin D metabolism; and (b) the depressed calcium absorption, in the setting of normal concentrations of [1,25-(OH)2D3], demonstrates unresponsiveness of the gut to vitamin D and may explain in part the low serum ionized calcium found in earlier studies. The presence of these abnormalities before we found a significant difference in blood pressure suggests that

  16. Space Transportation Systems Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Jay H.

    2001-01-01

    This document is the final report by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) on contracted support provided to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Contract NAS8-99060, 'Space Transportation Systems Technologies'. This contract, initiated by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on February 8, 1999, was focused on space systems technologies that directly support NASA's space flight goals. It was awarded as a Cost-Plus-Incentive-Fee (CPIF) contract to SAIC, following a competitive procurement via NASA Research Announcement, NRA 8-21. This NRA was specifically focused on tasks related to Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs). Through Task Area 3 (TA-3), "Other Related Technology" of this NRA contract, SAIC extensively supported the Space Transportation Directorate of MSFC in effectively directing, integrating, and setting its mission, operations, and safety priorities for future RLV-focused space flight. Following an initially contracted Base Year (February 8, 1999 through September 30, 1999), two option years were added to the contract. These were Option Year 1 (October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2000) and Option Year 2 (October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001). This report overviews SAIC's accomplishments for the Base Year, Option Year 1, and Option Year 2, and summarizes the support provided by SAIC to the Space Transportation Directorate, NASA/MSFC.

  17. Magnetically Coupled Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, S.A.

    1999-01-26

    Throughout the DOE complex, materials are routinely transported within glovebox processing lines. Cylindrical product cans, crucibles, sample containers, tools, and waste products are all examples of items that are moved between equipment stations during glovebox operations. Traditional transport methods have included manual handling using tongs, chain and belt conveyors, carts with pull wires, and overhead hoists on monorails. These methods rely on hands-on operations and/or utilize high maintenance equipment located inside the gloveboxes, which can lead to high radiation exposure to personnel and can generate large amounts of radioactive waste. One innovative approach incorporates linear induction motors (LIMs) so that high maintenance items are located outside the gloveboxes, but LIMs produce heat, do not move smoothly over a wide range of velocities, and are not locked in position at zero velocity. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) engineers have developed and demonstrated a concept for a magnetically coupled transport system to transfer material within process lines and from line to line. This automated system significantly reduces hands-on operations. Linear actuators and lead screws provide smooth horizontal and vertical movement. Rare earth magnetic coupling technology allows the majority of the equipment to be located outside the glovebox, simplifying maintenance and minimizing radioactive waste.

  18. Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William; Vano, Andrew; Rutherford, Dave

    1992-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Advanced Space Design Program has developed a sample Mars exploration scenario. The purpose of the design project is to enhance NASA and university interaction, to provide fresh ideas to NASA, and to provide real world design problems to engineering students. The Mars Transportation System in this paper is designed to transport a crew of six astronauts to the Martian surface and return them to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) starting in the year 2016. The proposed vehicle features such advanced technologies as nuclear propulsion, nuclear power generation, and aerobraking. Three missions are planned. Orbital trajectories are of the conjunction class with an inbound Venus swingby providing a 60-day surface stay at Mars and an average total trip time of 520 days.

  19. Transport properties of silver-calcium doped lanthanum manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, B.; Rahmouni, H.; Smari, M.; Dhahri, E.; Moutia, N.; Khirouni, K.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of silver-calcium doped lanthanum manganite (La0.5Ca0.5-xAgxMnO3 with 0.0

  20. Cytosolic calcium homeostasis in fungi: Roles of plasma membrane transport and intracellular sequestration of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.J.; Vogg, G.; Sanders, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Cytosolic free calcium ((Ca{sup 2+}){sub c}) has been measured in the mycelial fungus Neurospora crassa with Ca{sup 2+} - selective microelectrodes. The mean value of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub c} is 92 {plus minus} 15 nM and it is insensitive to external pH values between 5.8 and 8.4. Simultaneous measurement of membrane potential enables the electrochemical potential difference for Ca{sup 2+} across the plasma membrane to be estimated as about {minus}60 kJmol{sup {minus}1} - a value that cannot be sustained either by a simple Ca{sup 2+} - ATPase, or, in alkaline conditions, by straightforward H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange with a stoichiometric ratio of {lt}5 H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}. The authors propose that the most likely alternative mechanism of Ca{sup 2+} efflux is ATP-driven H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange, with a stoichiometric ratio of at least 2 H{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}. The increase in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub c} in the presence of CN{sup {minus}} at pH 8.4 is compared with {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} influx under the same conditions. The proportion of entering Ca{sup 2+} remaining free in the cytosol is only 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, and since the concentration of available chelation sites on Ca{sup 2+} binding proteins is unlikely to exceed 100 {mu}M, a major role for the fungal vacuole in short-term Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis is indicated. This notion is supported by the observation that cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis is disrupted by a protonophore, which rapidly abolishes the driving force for Ca{sup 2+} uptake into fungal vacuoles.

  1. Calcium transport from the intestine and into bone in a rat model simulating weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Globus, R. K.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a defect in transport of calcium in the duodenum was related to decreased bone formation in the suspended rat. Rats were suspended by the tail at a 40 deg angle for up to 15 days. Ca-45 was injected into the ligated duodenum in situ 15 minutes prior to sacrific. Blood, tibia, vertebra and humerus were obtained for total calcium and Ca-45 analyses. Intestinal calcium transport did not appear to be significantly altered by suspension. However, by 5 days of suspension a significant decrease in accumulation of Ca-45 into tibia and vertebra was observed. A trend of decreasing bone mineral and mass was established in tibia and vertebra by the fifth day of suspension. The humerus failed to demonstrate a significant weight decrease or change in Ca-45 accumulation after 15 days of suspension. Results from this simulated weightlessness model suggest that transport of calcium from intestine into bone is decreased within 5 days of suspension. This deficiency appears to be associated with a progressive decrease in total mass of non-weightbearing bones.

  2. ATP-driven calcium transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus sanguis. [Streptococcus sanguis; Streptococcus faecalis; Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Houng, H.; Lynn, A.R.; Rosen, B.P.

    1986-11-01

    Calcium transport was investigated in membrane vesicles prepared from the oral bacterium Streptococcus sanguis. Procedures were devised for the preparation of membrane vesicles capable of accumulation /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake was ATP dependent and did not require a proton motive force. Calcium transport in these vesicles was compared with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ accumulation in membrane vesicles from Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The data support the existence of an ATP-driven calcium pump in S. sanguis similar to that in S. faecalis. This pump, which catalyzes uptake into membrane vesicles, would be responsible for extrusion of calcium from intact cells.

  3. Ni++ as a competitive inhibitor of calcium transport in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bragadin, M; Viola, E R

    1997-06-01

    The kinetics of Ca++ uptake in rat liver mitochondria have been studied using the potassium diffusion potential. The advantage of this approach is that in this condition, the mitochondrial respiratory rate is not the limiting step, and therefore the effects of Ni++ on the Ca++ carrier can be studied. Our results suggest that Ni++ is a competitive inhibitor of the Ca++ carrier, but it is not transported into the mitochondria. PMID:9161009

  4. Mars transportation system synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Archie C.; Mulqueen, John A.; Emrich, William J.

    Performance and requirements synthesized to support the manned Mars mission of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the Mars transportation system (MTS), which uses nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion technology associated with accomplishing the manned Mars mission. Data are also presented for a propulsion system options comparison of chemical/aerobrake and nuclear electric propulsion systems. Vehicle- and weight-scaling are used to determine the MTS mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission durations. The split sprint, opposition, and conjunction class mission modes are employed to determine the MTS requirements envelope. MTS sensitivity to Mars surface payload, crew size, Mars orbit payload, NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, and NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio are synthesized. A suggested NTR technology level to accomplish both cargo and piloted Mars missions is discussed.

  5. Alternate transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zertuche, Tony; Mckinnie, James

    1988-01-01

    Three missions have been identified by NASA for a Space Shuttle-supplementing Alternate Transportation System (ATS) encompassing combinations of booster vehicles, crew modules, and service modules: (1) to achieve manned access to orbit for Space Station crew rotation every 90 days, (2) the lofting of a logistics module resupplying the Space Station every 180 days, and (3) the simultaneous launch of both crews and logistics to the Space Station. A reentry glider is considered, in conjunction with the Space Shuttle's unmanned cargo version and the Apollo manned capsule, as an important ATS element. The Titan IV/NUS is used as a booster.

  6. Pneumatic Pellet-Transporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George; Pugsley, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Pneumatic system transports food pellets to confined animals. Flow of air into venturi assembly entrains round pellets, drawing them from reservoir into venturi for transport by airflow. Pneumatic pellet-transporting system includes venturi assembly, which creates flow of air that draws pellets into system.

  7. Influence of calcium on phosphate transport in cultured kidney epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Caverzasio, J.; Bonjour, J.P. )

    1988-02-01

    Renal epithelia cultured from opossum kidney (OK) cell line were exposed to high- and low-Ca media (H{sub Ca}M and L{sub Ca}M, respectively). Changing the extracellular Ca concentration from 2.0 mM to 0.02 mM stimulated sodium-dependent P{sub i} transport (Na{sub P{sub i}}T) of OK epithelia. The effect was detectable after 1 h of L{sub Ca}M exposure and reached a maximal value at 4 h, this difference remaining constant up to 16 h. The Na-dependent transport of both alanine and methyl-{alpha}-D-glucopyranoside, a glucose analogue, were not affect by L{sub Ca}M. Kinetic analysis of Na{sub P{sub i}}T revealed an increase in V{sub max} with no change in the apparent K{sub m}. The cellular adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate production was not affected by L{sub Ca}M. In OK epithelia pretreated with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D the L{sub Ca}M stimulatory effect was completely abolished. In the presence of 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}7} M bovine parathyroid hormone (1-34), the effect of L{sub Ca}M on Na{sub P{sub i}}T was markedly blunted. In conclusion, this study in cultured kidney epithelia demonstrates that the renal Na{sub P}{sub i}T can be directly and selectively stimulated by lowering the extracellular Ca concentration. This effect required the de novo synthesis of proteins. The results also indicate that parathyroid hormone antagonizes the stimulatory effect of extracellular Ca on the renal transport of P{sub i}.

  8. Calcium transport mechanism in molting crayfish revealed by microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuhira, V.; Ueno, M.

    1983-01-01

    Crayfish provide a good model in which to study the transport mechanism of Ca ions. During the molting stage, decalcified Ca ions are transferred into the blood and accumulate in the gastrolith epithelium, after which a gastrolith is formed on the surface of the epithelium. The gastrolith is dissolved in the stomach after molting, and the Ca is reabsorbed and redistributed throughout the newly formed exoskeleton. We studied the mechanism of Ca transport by cytochemical precipitation of Ca ions and by electron microanalysis, including X-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), with a computer. In EDX analysis, the fine precipitates of K-antimonate in the gastrolith mitochondria clearly defined Ca with antimony; we also observed a large amount of Ca-oxalate in the mitochondria, and Ca-K X-ray pulses were clearly defined. Ca-K X-rays were also detected from fresh freeze-substituted mitochondria. Finally, we succeeded in taking a Ca-L EELS image from the mitochondria of fresh freeze-substituted thin sections. Only a very small amount of Ca was detected from the cell membrane and other organelles. Ca-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and Mg-ATPase activity was also very clearly demonstrated in the mitochondria. These enzymes may play an important role in Ca metabolism.

  9. Calcium elicited asymmetric auxin transport in gravity influenced root segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Auxin is a prime candidate for regulating and modulating the differential growth response of primary corn roots to gravity. Auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), both promotes and inhibits root elongation rapidly within a narrow concentration range. Thus growth regulation would require only small changes in the short lag period for initiation of gravitropism. Since auxin is transported to/through the zone of elongation toward the meristem, it may serve as a direct communication link between the zone of elongation, site of gravitropic response, and the root cap (RC), site of gravity perception. When auxin transport is inhibited, gravitropism is also inhibited. Napthylpthalamic acid (NPA) is one such inhibitor. It inhibits gravitropism only when applied to the apical growing and dividing region of the root. Application at the basal end of the root does not influence gravitropic NPA causes upward curvature when applied to the upper surface of horizontal, two day-old, intact corn roots. This effect is countered by application of IAA to the opposite side.

  10. Effects of tetrandrine on calcium transport, protein fluorescences and membrane fluidity of sarcoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lan-Ying; Chen, Xi; Tian, Xiao-Li; Yu, Xiao-Hong

    2000-01-01

    To understand whether the molecular mechanism of Tetrandrine (Tet)'s pharmacological effects is concerned with sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport so as to be involved in myocardial contractility, we observed the effects of Tet on calcium transport and membrane structure of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (SR) and rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (CSR).Calcium uptake was monitored with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. Protein conformation and fluorescence polarization were measured by fluospectrophotometric method and membrane lipids labelled with fluorescence probes for SR, respectively.128 μmol l−1 Tet reduced the initial rate of calcium uptake to 59% of control 6 min after reaction. Tet un-competitively inhibited SR Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activity, causing the stoichiometric ratio of SR Ca2+/ATP to decrease to 1.43 from 2.0 of control.Inhibitory rates on SR Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase by Tet were reduced from 60% in the absence of phosphate to 50% in the presence of phosphate and reduced from 92% in 1 mmol l−1 ATP to 60% in 5 mmol l−1 ATP.Tet markedly reduced SR intrinsic protein fluorescence, while it slightly decreased the thiol(SH)-modified protein fluorescence of SR labelled with N-(3-pyrene)-maleimide.Tet slightly increased fluorescence polarization in the middle and deep layers of SR membrane lipids labelled with 7- or 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acid (AS) probes, whereas it did not change that of SR labelled with 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatrine (DPH).These results revealed that prevention of SR calcium uptake by Tet was due to inhibition of the SR calcium pump Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase, changes in spatial conformation of the pumps protein molecules and a decrease in the extent of motion of membrane lipid molecules, thus altering the regulation of [Ca2+]i and myocardial contractility. PMID:11015304

  11. 21 CFR 862.1145 - Calcium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium test system. 862.1145 Section 862.1145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1145 - Calcium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium test system. 862.1145 Section 862.1145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1145 - Calcium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium test system. 862.1145 Section 862.1145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1145 - Calcium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium test system. 862.1145 Section 862.1145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1145 - Calcium test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium test system. 862.1145 Section 862.1145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  16. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. PMID:26162812

  17. Effects of ethanol on calcium transport across the liver cell plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J.; Santacana, G.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of ethanol on calcium transport by the liver cell was studied by using a rat liver slice preparation. Ethanol was shown to decrease by about 30% the rate constant for /sup 45/Ca efflux from the intracellular compartment. This inhibitory effect of ethanol was not observed in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/ or Na/sup +/ from the incubation medium. Ethanol was also shown to greatly increase non-insulin calcium uptake by liver slices. This effect of ethanol appeared to be dose dependent and was not observed in the absence of Na/sup +/ from the incubation medium. The ability of ethanol to increase calcium uptake by the hepatocyte was completely blocked by 1 mM Amiloride. Amiloride, however, did not affect the increased entry of either Na/sup +/ or Ca/sup 2 +/ produced by 10 mM Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the sodium pump. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/), a well known hepatotoxin, also increased calcium uptake by the hepatocyte. Amiloride, however, was not able to block the CCl/sub 4/-induced calcium uptake. These results suggest that ethanol activates a Na/sup +/ entry pathway, probably represented by a Na/sup +//H/sup +/ exchanger, which in turn stimulates an entry of Ca/sup 2 +/ through a Na/sup +//Ca/sup 2 +/ exchange mechanism located in the plasma membrane of the hepatocyte.

  18. Absorption and transport of milk calcium by infant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, H.H.; Henning, S.J. )

    1988-01-01

    All previous studies of Ca absorption in the developing animal have used simple salts of Ca. The aims of the current study are (1) to determine the predominant form of Ca in rat milk and (2) to compare the absorption of milk Ca and CaCl{sub 2}. In vivo-labeled rat milk was obtained by injecting lactating dams with {sup 45}CaCl{sub 2}. Distribution of {sup 45}Ca in the cream, whey, and casein fractions was determined by differential centrifugation, the values being 0.3, 5, and 95%, respectively. To study Ca absorption, rats aged 14 and 28 days received either {sup 45}Ca-milk or {sup 45}CaCl{sub 2} by intragastric intubation. At 14 days, transport of milk Ca into the carcass was significantly slower than that of CaCl{sub 2}, although by 6 h postintubation both had plateaued at {approximately}92% of dose. At 28 days, the time course of transport was the same for the two forms of Ca, and the plateau was not significantly different from that at 14 days. In the younger animals, more Ca from milk than from CaCl{sub 2} was retained in gastrointestinal tissue. Quantitation of {sup 45}Ca in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract showed that the greater retention of milk Ca occurred in the stomach, the duodenum, and the distal jejunum. The authors conclude that milk Ca is efficiently absorbed by the suckling rat, possibly in a protein-bound form. The mechanism of the absorptive process awaits further investigation.

  19. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level

  20. Calcium transport and homeostasis in gill cells of a freshwater crab Dilocarcinus pagei.

    PubMed

    Granado e Sá, Marina; Baptista, B B; Farah, L S; Leite, V P; Zanotto, F P

    2010-03-01

    Crustaceans present a very interesting model system to study the process of calcification and calcium (Ca(2+)) transport because of molting-related events and the deposition of CaCO(3) in the new exoskeleton. Dilocarcinus pagei, a freshwater crab endemic to Brazil, was studied to understand Ca(2+) transport in whole gill cells using a fluorescent probe. Cells were dissociated, all of the gill cell types were loaded with fluo-3 and intracellular Ca(2+) change was monitored by adding Ca as CaCl(2) (0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0 and 5 mM), with a series of different inhibitors. For control gill cells, Ca(2+) transport followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with K(m) = 0.42 +/- 0.04 mM and V(max) = 0.50 +/- 0.02 microM (Ca(2+) change x initial intracellular Ca(-1) x 180 s(-1); N = 14, r (2) = 0.99). Verapamil (a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor) and amiloride (a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger [NCX] inhibitor) completely reduced intracellular Ca(2+) transport, while nifedipine, another Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, did not. Vanadate, a plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor (PMCA), increased intracellular Ca(2+) in gill cells through a decrease in the efflux of Ca(2+). Ouabain increased intracellular Ca(2+), similar to the effect of KB-R, a specific NCX inhibitor for Ca(2+) in the influx mode. Alterations in extracellular [Na] in the saline did not affect intracellular Ca(2+) transport. Caffeine, responsible for inducing Ca release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in vertebrate muscle, increased intracellular Ca(2+) compared to control, suggesting an effect of this inhibitor in gill epithelial cells of Dilocarcinus pagei, probably through release of intracellular stores. We also demonstrate here that intracellular Ca(2+) in gill cells of Dilocarcinus pagei was kept relatively constant in face of an extracellular Ca concentration of 50-fold, suggesting that crustaceans are able to display Ca(2+) homeostasis through various Ca(2+) intracellular sequestration mechanisms and/or plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx

  1. Interaction of calcium with the human divalent metal-ion transporter-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shawki, Ali; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2010-03-12

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency worldwide. Whereas dietary calcium is known to reduce the bioavailability of iron, the molecular basis of this interaction is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1)-the principal or only mechanism by which nonheme iron is taken up at the intestinal brush border-is shared also by calcium. We expressed human DMT1 in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes and examined its activity using radiotracer assays and the voltage clamp. DMT1 did not mediate {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Instead, we found that Ca{sup 2+} blocked the Fe{sup 2+}-evoked currents and inhibited {sup 55}Fe{sup 2+} uptake in a noncompetitive manner (K{sub i} {approx} 20 mM). The mechanism of inhibition was independent of voltage and did not involve intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. The alkaline-earth metal ions Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+} also inhibited DMT1-mediated iron-transport activity. We conclude that Ca{sup 2+} is a low-affinity noncompetitive inhibitor-but not a transported substrate-of DMT1, explaining in part the effect of high dietary calcium on iron bioavailability.

  2. GABA transport and calcium dynamics in horizontal cells from the skate retina.

    PubMed Central

    Haugh-Scheidt, L; Malchow, R P; Ripps, H

    1995-01-01

    1. Changes in intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in response to extracellularly applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were studied in isolated horizontal cells from the all-rod skate retina. 2. Calcium measurements were made using fura-2 AM, both with and without whole-cell voltage clamp. Superfusion with GABA, in the absence of voltage clamp, resulted in an increase in [Ca2+]i; the threshold for detection was approximately 50 microM GABA, and a maximal response was elicited by 500 microM GABA. 3. The rise in [Ca2+]i was not mimicked by baclofen nor was it blocked by phaclofen, picrotoxin or bicuculline. However, the GABA-induced [Ca2+]i increase was completely abolished when extracellular sodium was replaced with N-methyl-D-glucamine. 4. With the horizontal cell voltage clamped at -70 mV, GABA evoked a large inward current, but there was no concomitant change in [Ca2+]i. Nifedipine, which blocks L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, suppressed the GABA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These findings suggest that the calcium response was initiated by GABA activation of sodium dependent electrogenic transport, and that the resultant depolarization led to the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and a rise in [Ca2+]i. 5. The GABA-induced influx of calcium appears not to have been the sole source of the calcium increase. The GABA-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was reduced by dantrolene, indicating that internal Ca2+ stores contributed to the GABA-mediated Ca2+ response. 6. These observations demonstrate that activation of the GABA transporter induces changes in [Ca2+]i which may have important implications for the functional properties of horizontal cells. PMID:8576848

  3. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  4. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxin; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Spycher, Nicolas; Hubbard, Susan S; Zhang, Guoxiang; Williams, Kenneth H; Taylor, Joanna; Fujita, Yoshiko; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  5. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup

  6. Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling of Ureolytically-Driven Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Yuxin Wu; Jonathan B. Ajo-Franklin; Nicolas Spycher; Susan S. Hubbard; Guoxiang Zhang; Kenneth H. Williams; Joanna Taylor; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2011-09-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  7. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH4

  8. Calcium influx affects intracellular transport and membrane repair following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary Lee; Roth, Caleb C.; Dalzell, Danielle R.; Kuipers, Marjorie; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-05-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsPEF, ion permeable nanopores (<2 nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores (>2 nm) created by longer micro- and millisecond duration pulses. Nanoporation of the plasma membrane by nsPEF has been shown to cause a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration within milliseconds after exposure. Our research objective is to determine the impact of nsPEF on calcium-dependent structural and repair systems in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were exposed in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm, and pore size was determined using propidium iodide and calcium green. Membrane organization was observed with morphological changes and increases in FM1-43 fluorescence. Migration of lysosomes, implicated in membrane repair, was followed using confocal microscopy of red fluorescent protein-tagged LAMP1. Microtubule structure was imaged using mEmerald-tubulin. We found that at high 600-ns PEF dosage, calcium-induced membrane restructuring and microtubule depolymerization coincide with interruption of membrane repair via lysosomal exocytosis.

  9. Polyamines as Possible Modulators of Gravity-induced Calcium Transport in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galston, A. W.; Slocum, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Data from various laboratories indicate a probable relationship between calcium movement and some aspects of graviperception and tropistic bending responses. The movement of calcium in response to gravistimulation appears to be rapid, polar and opposite in direction to polar auxin transport. What might be the cause of such rapid Ca(2+) movement? Data from studies on polyamine (PA) metabolism may furnish a clue. A transient increase in the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and titers of various PAs occurs within 60 seconds after hormonal stimulation of animal cells, followed by Ca(2+) transport out of the cells. Through the use of specific inhibitors, it was shown that the enhanced PA synthesis from ODC was essential not only for Ca(2+) transport, but also for Ca(2+) transport-dependent endocytosis and the movement of hexoses and amino acids across the plasmalemma. In plants, rapid changes in arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity occur in response to various plant stresses. Physical stresses associated with gravisensor displacement and reorientation of a plant in the gravitational field could similarly activate ADC and that resultant increases in PA levels might initiate transient perturbations in Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  10. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C J; Hetherington, Alistair M; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  11. Evolution of the Calcium-Based Intracellular Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Marchadier, Elodie; Oates, Matt E.; Fang, Hai; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    To progress our understanding of molecular evolution from a collection of well-studied genes toward the level of the cell, we must consider whole systems. Here, we reveal the evolution of an important intracellular signaling system. The calcium-signaling toolkit is made up of different multidomain proteins that have undergone duplication, recombination, sequence divergence, and selection. The picture of evolution, considering the repertoire of proteins in the toolkit of both extant organisms and ancestors, is radically different from that of other systems. In eukaryotes, the repertoire increased in both abundance and diversity at a far greater rate than general genomic expansion. We describe how calcium-based intracellular signaling evolution differs not only in rate but in nature, and how this correlates with the disparity of plants and animals. PMID:27358427

  12. Biomimetic hydrogels gate transport of calcium ions across cell culture inserts.

    PubMed

    Kotanen, Christian N; Wilson, A Nolan; Wilson, Ann M; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    Control of the in vitro spatiotemporal availability of calcium ions is one means by which the microenvironments of hematopoietic stem cells grown in culture may be reproduced. The effects of cross-linking density on the diffusivity of calcium ions through cell culture compatible poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [poly(HEMA)]-based bioactive hydrogels possessing 1.0 mol% 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), 5 mol% N,N-(dimethylamino)ethylmethacrylate (DMAEMA) and ca. 17 mol% n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) have been investigated to determine if varying cross-link density is a viable approach to controlling transport of calcium across hydrogel membranes. Cross-linking density was varied by changing the composition of cross-linker, tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate (TEGDA). The hydrogel membranes were formed by sandwich casting onto the external surface of track-etched polycarbonate membranes (T = 10 μm, φ = 0.4 μm pores) of cell culture inserts, polymerized in place by UV light irradiation and immersed in buffered (0.025 HEPES, pH 7.4) 0.10 M calcium chloride solution. The transport of calcium ions across the hydrogel membrane was monitored using a calcium ion selective electrode set within the insert. Degree of hydration (21.6 ± 1.0%) and void fraction were found to be constant across all cross-linking densities. Diffusion coefficients, determined using time-lag analysis, were shown to be strongly dependent on and to exponentially decrease with increasing cross-linking density. Compared to that found in buffer (2.0-2.5 × 10⁻⁶ cm²/s), diffusion coefficients ranged from 1.40 × 10⁻⁶ cm²/s to 1.80 × 10⁻⁷ cm²/s and tortuosity values ranged from 1.7 to 10.0 for the 1 and 12 mol% TEGDA cross-linked hydrogels respectively. Changes in tortuosity arising from variations in cross-link density were found to be the primary modality for controlling diffusivity through novel n-BA containing poly(HEMA)-based bioactive hydrogels. PMID

  13. Structural characterization of gel-derived calcium silicate systems.

    PubMed

    Meiszterics, Anikó; Rosta, László; Peterlik, Herwig; Rohonczy, János; Kubuki, Shiro; Henits, Péter; Sinkó, Katalin

    2010-09-30

    The main aim of this study is to synthesize calcium silicate ceramics that exhibit suitable properties to be used for biomedical applications. In the present work, attention was paid to the understanding of processing-structure relationships. A particular effort was made to clarify the identification of Ca-O-Si bonds by means of spectroscopy. The calcium silicate systems were prepared via a sol-gel route, varying the chemical compositions, the catalyst concentration, and the temperature and time of aging and heat treatment. The processes and the phases evolved during the sol-gel procedure were determined. The bond systems were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and (29)Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and the aggregate structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. PMID:20828114

  14. pH control in biological systems using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; van Turnhout, A G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-05-01

    Due to its abundance, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has high potentials as a source of alkalinity for biotechnological applications. The application of CaCO3 in biological systems as neutralizing agent is, however, limited due to potential difficulties in controlling the pH. The objective of the present study was to determine the dominant processes that control the pH in an acid-forming microbial process in the presence of CaCO3. To achieve that, a mathematical model was made with a minimum set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions that was able to reproduce the experimental data of a batch fermentation experiment using finely powdered CaCO3. In the model, thermodynamic equilibrium was assumed for all speciation, complexation and precipitation reactions whereas, rate limited reactions were included for the biological fatty acid production, the mass transfer of CO2 from the liquid phase to the gas phase and the convective transport of CO2 out of the gas phase. The estimated pH-pattern strongly resembled the measured pH, suggesting that the chosen set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions were establishing the experimental pH. A detailed analysis of the reaction system with the aid of the model revealed that the pH establishment was most sensitive to four factors: the mass transfer rate of CO2 to the gas phase, the biological acid production rate, the partial pressure of CO2 and the Ca(+2) concentration in the solution. Individual influences of these factors on the pH were investigated by extrapolating the model to a continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) case. This case study indicates how the pH of a commonly used continuous biotechnological process could be manipulated and adjusted by altering these four factors. Achieving a better insight of the processes controlling the pH of a biological system using CaCO3 as its neutralizing agent can result in broader applications of CaCO3 in biotechnological industries. PMID:25425281

  15. Augmented behavioral response and enhanced synaptosomal calcium transport induced by repeated cocaine administration are decreased by calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K.; Ansah, T.A.; Ali, S.F.; Mukherjee, S.; Shockley, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that calcium influx via L-type calcium channels is necessary for psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization. In addition, chronic amphetamine upregulates subtype Cav1.2-containing L-type calcium channels. In the present studies, we assessed the effect of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) on cocaine-induced behavioral sentitization and determined whether the functional activity of L-type calcium channels is altered after repeated cocaine administration. Rats were administered daily intraperitoneal injections of either flunarizine (40 mg/kg), diltiazem (40 mg/kg) or cocaine (20 mg/kg) and the combination of the CCB’s and cocaine for 30 days. Motor activities were monitored on Day 1, and every 6th day during the 30-day treatment period. Daily cocaine administration produced increased locomotor activity. Maximal augmentation of behavioral response to repeated cocaine administration was observed on Day 18. Flunarizine pretreatment abolished the augmented behavioral response to repeated cocaine administration while diltiazem was less effective. Measurement of tissue monoamine levels on Day 18 revealed cocaine-induced increases in DA and 5-HT in the nucleus accumbens. By contrast to behavioral response, diltiazem was more effective in attenuating increases in monoamine levels than flunarizine. Cocaine administration for 18 days produced increases in calcium-uptake in synaptosomes prepared from the nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex. Increases in calcium-uptake were abolished by flunarizine- and diltiazem-pretreatment. Taken together, the augmented cocaine-induced behavioral response on Day 18 may be due to increased calcium uptake in the nucleus accumbens leading to increased dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) release. Flunarizine and diltiazem attenuated the behavioral response by decreasing calcium uptake and decreasing neurochemical release. PMID:17689567

  16. Regulation of calcium transporters: The role of a nuclear-localized CAX-interacting protein, CXIP4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulation of calcium transporters is essential for modulating the Ca(2+) signaling and/or Ca(2+) homeostasis that are involved in the growth and adaptation of all organisms. The Arabidopsis H(+) /Ca(2+) antiporters, CAX1 and CAX1-like transporters, are autoinhibited and unable to suppress the hype...

  17. Droplet transport system and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. Paul (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments of droplet transport systems and methods are disclosed for levitating and transporting single or encapsulated droplets using thermocapillary convection. One method embodiment, among others comprises providing a droplet of a first liquid; and applying thermocapillary convection to the droplet to levitate and move the droplet.

  18. Effect of cadmium on calcium transport in a human fetal hepatic cell line (WRL-68 cells).

    PubMed

    Souza, V; Bucio, L; Jay, D; Chávez, E; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M C

    1996-08-16

    Toxic metals appear to use the transport pathways that exist for biologically essential metals. Calcium uptake in cells occurs through specific membrane channels. Since cadmium inhibits calcium uptake, this study was carried on to elucidate the mechanism of Cd interference with calcium transport using the fetal hepatic cell line WRL-68 as an in vitro model. Ca accumulation by WRL-68 cells presented an initial rapid phase, followed by a sustained phase of slower accumulation over a 60 min period. A concentration of 50 microM CdCl2 produced 39% inhibition of the uptake of CaCl2 (100 microM), while 100 microM nifedipine or verapamil decreased Ca accumulation by 35 and 63%, respectively. All Cd concentrations tested produced significant decrease in Ca uptake in a concentration-dependent manner at 1 min and thereafter, although with 10 microM CdCl2 no significant difference was found after 30 min of incubation. From the Lineweaver-Burk plot, we found that Cd exerted a competitive inhibition on Ca uptake, since there was no significant effect on the Vmax but an increased K(m). A second order rate constant of Cd inactivation of 0.061 mM-1.s-1 was determined from the course of Ca uptake during Cd inhibition. SH groups seemed to play an essential role in Ca inhibition uptake by Cd because the inhibition of Ca accumulation by 50 microM Cd was practically reversed after the addition of dithiothreitol. PMID:8814339

  19. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  20. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  1. Calcium transport in sealed vesicles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L. ) storage tissue. II. Characterization of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, J.L.; Ruiz-Cristin, J.; Briskin, D.P.

    1987-12-01

    Calcium uptake was examined in sealed plasma membrane vesicles isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue using /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. Uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by the vesicles was ATP-dependent and radiotracer accumulated by the vesicles could be released by the addition of the calcium ionophore A23187. The uptake was stimulated by gramicidin D but slightly inhibited by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although the latter result might suggest some degree of indirect coupling of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake to ATP utilization via ..delta mu..H/sup +/, no evidence for a secondary H/sup +//Ca/sup 2 +/ antiport in this vesicle system could be found. Following the imposition of an acid-interior pH gradient, proton efflux from the vesicle was not enhanced by the addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ and an imposed pH gradient could not drive /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Optimal uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ occurred broadly between pH 7.0 and 7.5 and the transport was inhibited by orthovanadate, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and diethylstilbestrol but insensitive to nitrate and azide. The dependence of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake on both calcium and Mg:ATP concentration demonstrated saturation kinetics with K/sub m/ values of 6 micromolar and 0.37 millimolar, respectively. While ATP was the preferred substrate for driving /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, GTP could drive transport at about 50% of the level observed for ATP. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of a unique primary calcium transport system associated with the plasma membrane which could drive calcium efflux from the plant cell.

  2. Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program employs a heavily instrumented, B 737-100 as its Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TRSV). The TRSV has been used during the demonstration trials of the Time Reference Scanning Beam Microwave Landing System (TRSB MLS), the '4D flight-management' concept, ATC data links, and airborne windshear sensors. The credibility obtainable from successful flight test experiments is often a critical factor in the granting of substantial commitments for commercial implementation by the FAA and industry. In the case of the TRSB MLS, flight test demonstrations were decisive to its selection as the standard landing system by the ICAO.

  3. Tether Transportation System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, M. E.; Lorenzini, E.; Vestal, L.

    1998-01-01

    The projected traffic to geostationary earth orbit (GEO) is expected to increase over the next few decades. At the same time, the cost of delivering payloads from the Earth's surface to low earth orbit (LEO) is projected to decrease, thanks in part to the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). A comparable reduction in the cost of delivering payloads from LEO to GEO is sought. The use of in-space tethers, eliminating the requirement for traditional chemical upper stages and thereby reducing the launch mass, has been identified as such an alternative. Spinning tethers are excellent kinetic energy storage devices for providing the large delta vee's required for LEO to GEO transfer. A single-stage system for transferring payloads from LEO to GEO was proposed some years ago. The study results presented here contain the first detailed analyses of this proposal, its extension to a two-stage system, and the likely implementation of the operational system.

  4. Structural transition in Bcl-xL and its potential association with mitochondrial calcium ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Choi, Minjoo; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Ye, Hong; Liu, Wei; Toh, Hui Ting; Kang, CongBao; Kamariah, Neelagandan; Li, Chi; Huang, Huiya; White, Carl; Baek, Kwanghee; Grüber, Gerhard; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2015-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators for cellular homeostasis in response to apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-xL, an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, undergoes conformational transitions, which leads to two conformational states: the cytoplasmic and membrane-bound. Here we present the crystal and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structures of Bcl-xL treated with the mild detergent n-Octyl β-D-Maltoside (OM). The detergent-treated Bcl-xL forms a dimer through three-dimensional domain swapping (3DDS) by swapping helices α6-α8 between two monomers. Unlike Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, Bcl-xL is not converted to 3DDS homodimer upon binding BH3 peptides and ABT-737, a BH3 mimetic drug. We also designed Bcl-xL mutants which cannot dimerize and show that these mutants reduced mitochondrial calcium uptake in MEF cells. This illustrates the structural plasticity in Bcl-xL providing hints toward the probable molecular mechanism for Bcl-xL to play a regulatory role in mitochondrial calcium ion transport. PMID:26023881

  5. Transport Systems in Halophilic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Plemenitaš, Ana; Konte, Tilen; Gostinčar, Cene; Cimerman, Nina Gunde

    2016-01-01

    Fungi that tolerate very high environmental NaCl concentrations are good model systems to study mechanisms that enable them to endure osmotic and salinity stress. The whole genome sequences of six such fungal species have been analysed: Hortaea werneckii, Wallemia ichthyophaga and four Aureobasidium spp.: A. pullulans, A. subglaciale, A. melanogenum and A. namibiae. These fungi show different levels of halotolerance, with the presence of numerous membrane transport systems uncovered here that are believed to maintain physiological intracellular concentrations of alkali metal cations. Despite some differences, the intracellular cation contents of H. werneckii, A. pullulans and W. ichthyophaga remain low even under extreme extracellular salinities, which suggests that these species have efficient cation transport systems. We speculate that cation transporters prevent intracellular accumulation of Na(+), and thus avoid the toxic effects that such Na(+) accumulation would have, while also maintaining the high K(+)/Na(+) ratio that is required for the full functioning of the cell - another crucial task in high-Na(+) environments. This chapter primarily summarises the cation transport systems of these selected fungi, and it also describes other membrane transporters that might be involved in their mechanisms of halotolerance. PMID:26721280

  6. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment. PMID:23910337

  7. Regulation of glomerulotubular balance. III. Implication of cytosolic calcium in flow-dependent proximal tubule transport.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaopeng; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Tong

    2015-04-15

    In the proximal tubule, axial flow (drag on brush-border microvilli) stimulates Na(+) and HCO3 (-) reabsorption by modulating both Na/H exchanger 3 (NHE3) and H-ATPase activity, a process critical to glomerulotubular balance. We have also demonstrated that blocking the angiotensin II receptor decreases baseline transport, but preserves the flow effect; dopamine leaves baseline fluxes intact, but abrogates the flow effect. In the current work, we provide evidence implicating cytosolic calcium in flow-dependent transport. Mouse proximal tubules were microperfused in vitro at perfusion rates of 5 and 20 nl/min, and reabsorption of fluid (Jv) and HCO3 (-) (JHCO3) were measured. We examined the effect of high luminal Ca(2+) (5 mM), 0 mM Ca(2+), the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), and the Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. In control tubules, increasing perfusion rate from 5 to 20 nl/min increased Jv by 62% and JHCO3 by 104%. With respect to Na(+) reabsorption, high luminal Ca(2+) decreased transport at low flow, but preserved the flow-induced increase; low luminal Ca(2+) had little impact; both BAPTA and 2-APB had no effect on baseline flux, but abrogated the flow effect; thapsigargin decreased baseline flow, leaving the flow effect intact. With respect to HCO3 (-) reabsorption, high luminal Ca(2+) decreased transport at low flow and mildly diminished the flow-induced increase; low luminal Ca(2+) had little impact; both BAPTA and 2-APB had no effect on baseline flux, but abrogated the flow effect. These data implicate IP3 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling as a critical step in transduction of microvillous drag to modulate Na(+) and HCO3 (-) transport. PMID:25651568

  8. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  9. Surveillance systems for intermodal transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Sergej; Voznak, Miroslav; Andziulis, Arunas

    2015-05-01

    Intermodal container monitoring is considered a major security issue in many major logistic companies and countries worldwide. Current representation of the problem, we face today, originated in 2002, right after the 9/11 attacks. Then, a new worldwide Container Security Initiative (CSI, 2002) was considered that shaped the perception of the transportation operations. Now more than 80 larger ports all over the world contribute to its further development and integration into everyday transportation operations and improve the regulations for the developing regions. Although, these new improvements allow us to feel safer and secure, constant management of transportation operations has become a very difficult problem for conventional data analysis methods and information systems. The paper deals with a proposal of a whole new concept for the improvement of the Containers Security Initiative (CSI) by virtually connecting safety, security processes and systems. A conceptual middleware approach with deployable intelligent agent modules is proposed to be used with possible scenarios and a testbed is used to test the solution. Middleware examples are visually programmed using National Instruments LabView software packages and Wireless sensor network hardware modules. An experimental software is used to evaluate he solution. This research is a contribution to the intermodal transportation and is intended to be used as a means or the development of intelligent transport systems.

  10. Optical and spectroscopic investigation on Calcium Borotellurite glass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, E. C.; Lodi, T. A.; Gomes, B. R. A.; Melo, G. H. A.; Pedrochi, F.; Steimacher, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the glass formation in Calcium Borotellurite (CBTx) system and their optical properties were studied. Six glass samples were prepared by melt-quenching technique and the samples obtained are transparent, lightly yellowish, without any visible crystallites. The results showed that TeO2 addition increases the density, the electronic polarizability and, consequently, the refractive index. The increase of electronic polarizability and optical basicity suggest that TeO2 addition increases the non-bridging oxygen (NBO) concentration. The increase of TeO2 shifts the band edge to longer wavelength owing to increase in non-bridging oxygen ions, resulting in a linear decrease of optical energy gap. The addition of TeO2 increases the temperature coefficient of the optical path length (dS/dT) in room temperature, which are comparable to phosphate and lower than Low Silica Calcium Alumino Silicate (LSCAS) glasses. The values of dS/dT present an increase as a function of temperature for all the samples measured. The results suggest that CBTx is a good candidate for rare-earth doping and several optical applications.

  11. Optimal concentrations in transport systems

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N. Michele; Bush, John W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt∼2αμ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow. PMID:23594815

  12. Transportation Cluster Volume 7 [Transportation Systems].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is one of seven volumes of instructional materials developed around a cluster of Transportation Industries. Primarily technical in focus, they are designed to be used in a cluster-concept program and to integrate with a regular General Education Development (G.E.D.) program so that students may attain an employable skill level and a…

  13. Lunar articulated remote transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey; Conley, Gerald; Diaz, Claudine; Dimella, Timothy; Dodson, Pete; Hykin, Jeff; Richards, Byron; Richardson, Kroy; Shetzer, Christie; Vandyke, Melissa

    1990-01-01

    A first generation lunar transportation vehicle was designed for use on the surface of the Moon between the years 2010 and 2020. Attention is focussed on specific design details on all components of the Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS). The Lunar ARTS will be a three cart, six-wheeled articulated vehicle. It's purpose will be for the transportation of astronauts and/or materials for excavation purposes at a short distance from the base (37.5 kilometers). The power system includes fuel cells for both the primary system and the back-up system. The vehicle has the option of being operated in a manned or unmanned mode. The unmanned mode includes stereo imaging with signal processing for navigation. For manned missions the display console is a digital readout displayed on the inside of the asronaut's helmet. A microprocessor is also on board the vehicle. Other components of the vehicle include: a double wishbone/flexible hemispherical wheel suspension; chassis; a steering system; motors; seat restraints, heat rejection systems; solar flare protection; dust protection; and meteoroid protection. A one-quarter scale dynamic model was built to study the dynamic behavior of the vehicle. The dynamic model closely captures the mechanical and electrical details of the total design.

  14. Lunar articulated remote transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The students of the Florida A&M/Florida State University College of Engineering continued their design from 1988 to 1989 on a first generation lunar transportation vehicle for use on the surface of the Moon between the years 2010 and 2020. Attention is focused on specific design details on all components of the Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS). The Lunar ARTS will be a three-cart, six-wheeled articulated vehicle. Its purpose will be the transportation of astronauts and/or materials for excavation purposes at a short distance from the base (37.5 km). The power system includes fuel cells for both the primary system and the back-up system. The vehicle has the option of being operated in a manned or unmanned mode. The unmanned mode includes stereo imaging with signal processing for navigation. For manned missions the display console is a digital readout displayed on the inside of the astronaut's helmet. A microprocessor is also on board the vehicle. Other components of the vehicle include a double wishbone/flexible hemispherical wheel suspension; chassis; a steering system; motors; seat retraints; heat rejection systems; solar flare protection; dust protection; and meteoroid protection. A one-quarter scale dynamic model has been built to study the dynamic behavior of the vehicle. The dynamic model closely captures the mechanical and electrical details of the total design.

  15. Integrated Intermodal Passenger Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klock, Ryan; Owens, David; Schwartz, Henry; Plencner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Modern transportation consists of many unique modes of travel. Each of these modes and their respective industries has evolved independently over time, forming a largely incoherent and inefficient overall transportation system. Travelers today are forced to spend unnecessary time and efforts planning a trip through varying modes of travel each with their own scheduling, pricing, and services; causing many travelers to simply rely on their relatively inefficient and expensive personal automobile. This paper presents a demonstration program system to not only collect and format many different sources of trip planning information, but also combine these independent modes of travel in order to form optimal routes and itineraries of travel. The results of this system show a mean decrease in inter-city travel time of 10 percent and a 25 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions over personal automobiles. Additionally, a 55 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions is observed for intra-city travel. A conclusion is that current resources are available, if somewhat hidden, to drastically improve point to point transportation in terms of time spent traveling, the cost of travel, and the ecological impact of a trip. Finally, future concepts are considered which could dramatically improve the interoperability and efficiency of the transportation infrastructure.

  16. Sugar alcohols enhance calcium transport from rat small and large intestine epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Hitoshi; Hara, Hiroshi; Tomita, Fusao

    2002-06-01

    We compared the effect of a variety of sugar alcohols on calcium absorption from the rat small and large intestine in vitro. An Ussing chamber technique was used to determine the net transport of Ca across the epithelium isolated from the jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of rats. The concentration of Ca in the serosal and mucosal Tris buffer solution was 1.25 mM and 10 mM, respectively. The Ca concentration in the serosal medium was determined after incubation for 30 min and the net Ca absorption was evaluated. The addition of 0.1-200 mM erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, maltitol, palatinit, or lactitol to the mucosal medium affected net Ca absorption in the intestinal preparations. Differences in Ca transport were observed between portions of the intestine, but not between sugar alcohols tested. We concluded that sugar alcohols directly affect the epithelial tissue and promote Ca absorption from the small and large intestine in vitro. PMID:12064809

  17. Calcium homeostasis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires multiple transporters and modulates swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    Guragain, Manita; Lenaburg, Dirk L.; Moore, Frank S.; Reutlinger, Ian; Patrauchan, Marianna A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen causing severe acute and chronic infections. Earlier we have shown that calcium (Ca2+) induces P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and production of virulence factors. To enable further studies of the regulatory role of Ca2+, we characterized Ca2+ homeostasis in P. aeruginosa PAO1 cells. By using Ca2+-binding photoprotein aequorin, we determined that the concentration of free intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]in) is 0.14±0.05 μM. In response to external Ca2+, the [Ca2+]in quickly increased at least 13 fold followed by a multi-phase decline by up to 73%. Growth at elevated Ca2+ modulated this response. Treatment with inhibitors known to affect Ca2+ channels, monovalent cations gradient, or P-type and F-type ATPases impaired [Ca2+]in response, suggesting the importance of the corresponding mechanisms in Ca2+ homeostasis. To identify Ca2+ transporters maintaining this homeostasis, bioinformatic and LC-MS/MS-based membrane proteomic analyses were used. [Ca2+]in homeostasis was monitored for seven Ca2+-affected and eleven bioinformatically predicted transporters by using transposon insertion mutants. Disruption of P-type ATPases PA2435, PA3920, and ion exchanger PA2092 significantly impaired Ca2+ homeostasis. The lack of PA3920 and vanadate treatment abolished Ca2+- induced swarming, suggesting the role of the P-type ATPase in regulating P. aeruginosa response to Ca2+. PMID:24074964

  18. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from a calcium acetate and ammonium carbamate batch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prah, J.; Maček, J.; Dražič, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for preparing precipitated calcium carbonate using solutions of ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate as the sources of calcium and carbon dioxide, respectively. Two different concentrations of the starting solutions at three different temperatures (15, 25 and 50 °C) were used for the reaction. The influence of temperature and concentration on the polymorphism and the resulting morphology of calcium carbonate are discussed. The most important parameter for controlling a particular crystal structure and precipitate morphology were the concentrations of the initial solutions. When initial solutions with lower concentrations were used, the crystal form of the precipitate changed with time. Regardless the different polymorphism at different temperatures, after one day only the calcite form was detected in all samples, regardless of at which temperature the samples were prepared. At higher concentrations, pure vaterite or a mixture of vaterite and calcite were present at the beginning of the experiment. After one day, pure vaterite was found in the samples that were prepared at 15 and 25 °C. If calcium carbonate precipitated at 50 °C, the XRD results showed a mixture of calcite and vaterite regardless of the time at which the sample was taken. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles prepared at various conditions changed from calcite cubes to spherical particles of vaterite and aragonite needles. When a low starting concentration was used, the morphology at the initial stage was strongly affected by the temperature at which the experiments were conducted. However, after one day only, cubes were present in all cases at low initial concentrations. In contrast, at high concentrations spherical particles precipitated at all three temperatures at the beginning of the reaction. Spherical particles were made up from smaller particles. Over time, the size of the particles was diminishing due to their disintegration into

  19. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K(+) uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K(+) transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K(+)-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K(+) transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K(+) transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K(+) transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K(+) uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K(+)-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around -120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K(+), reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  20. Calcium sensor kinase activates potassium uptake systems in gland cells of Venus flytraps

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Sönke; Böhm, Jennifer; Krol, Elzbieta; Shabala, Lana; Kreuzer, Ines; Larisch, Christina; Bemm, Felix; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Shabala, Sergey; Rennenberg, Heinz; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K+ uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K+ transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K+-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K+ transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K+ transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K+ transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K+ uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K+-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around −120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K+, reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels. PMID:25997445

  1. Soil calcium and pH monitoring sensor system.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Sherlan G; Nogueira, Ana Rita A; Torre-Neto, André; Parra, Aleix; Alonso, Julian

    2007-06-13

    An agrarian sensorial system based on temperature, moisture, and all solid-state ion-selective potentiometric sensors was developed with the objective of monitoring the behavior of H+ and Ca2+ ions in soil and in real conditions, contributing with a new tool that tries to complement the current precision agriculture technology. The evaluation of the sensorial system to pH monitoring presented a good correlation between the results obtained by the system and the standard methodology, allowing us to notice the soil buffer capacity at different soil depths. With regard to calcium, the sensor system also presented an agreement between its results and those obtained by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, using a calibration model based on multiple linear regressions that allows the correct determination of Ca2+ concentrations in soil depths where the relative moisture is different. In this way, using well-known potentiometric sensors in a complex, discontinued, and heterogeneous matrix, such as soil, the sensorial system proved to be a useful task for agrochemical field applications. PMID:17500528

  2. Effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on colonic calcium transport in vitamin D-deficient and normal rats.

    PubMed

    Favus, M J; Langman, C B

    1984-03-01

    To determine whether prior vitamin D intake influences the intestinal calcium absorptive action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], we measured in vitro the two unidirectional transepithelial fluxes of calcium across descending colon segments from rats fed either a vitamin D-deficient or normal diet and injected with either 10, 25, or 75 ng of 1,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle alone. Vitamin D deficiency abolished net calcium absorption [J net, -2 +/- 2 vs. 12 +/- 2 (SE) nmol X cm-2 X h-1, P less than 0.001], and 10 ng of 1,25(OH)2D3 raised J net to levels found in normal rats. Larger doses (25 and 75 ng) increased J net above levels in normal rats given the same dose. In normal rats only 75 ng of 1,25(OH)2D3 increased calcium J net above vehicle control values (12 +/- 2 vs. 38 +/- 4 nmol X cm-2 X h-1, P less than 0.001). Circulating 1,25(OH)2D3 measured by radioreceptor assay was well correlated with calcium transport. For each dose of 1,25(OH)2D3 higher serum 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were reached in vitamin D-deficient rats. Only the 75-ng dose increased circulating 1,25(OH)2D3 and colonic calcium transport in normal rats. Intravenous [3H]-1,25(OH)2D3 disappeared more rapidly from the circulation of normal rats, suggesting that accelerated metabolic degradative processes for 1,25(OH)2D3 may be present in normal but not in vitamin D-deficient rats and may account for the lack of a biological response to 1,25(OH)2D3 in normal animals. PMID:6546644

  3. Transportable Collective Protection System (TCPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tekesky, R.

    1990-08-15

    Human System Division (HSD/YAGD), Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-6503 requested assistance from the Air Force Packaging Evaluation Activity (AFPEA) to conduct vibration, shock and environmental testing on three Rowley containers with contents. The contents consist of a Transportable Collective Protective System (TCPS). The TCPS, manufactured by IIC/Dover Inc., is a chemical warfare tent. Personnel can enter the tent, remove protective clothing and perform duties in an uncontaminated environment. The purpose of this project was to determine if the Rowley containers would be able to contain and protect the TCPS during world-wide shipment, storage, and handling.

  4. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system.

    PubMed

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-28

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current. PMID:27131554

  5. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current.

  6. Calcium glycerophosphate preserves transepithelial integrity in the Caco-2 model of intestinal transport

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Palika; Weis, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the direct effects of ischemia on intestinal epithelial integrity. Furthermore, clinical efforts at mitigating the effect of hypoperfusion on gut permeability have focused on restoring gut vascular function. METHODS: We report that, in the Caco-2 cell model of transepithelial transport, calcium glycerophosphate (CGP), an inhibitor of intestinal alkaline phosphatase F3, has a significant effect to preserve transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and to attenuate increases in mannitol flux rates during hypoxia or cytokine stimulation. RESULTS: The effect was observable even at concentrations as low as 1 μmol/L. As celiac disease is also marked by a loss of gut epithelial integrity, the effect of CGP to attenuate the effect of the α-gliadin peptide 31-55 was also examined. In this instance, CGP exerted little effect of preservation of TEER, but significantly attenuated peptide induced increase in mannitol flux. CONCLUSION: It appears that CGP treatment might synergize with other therapies to preserve gut epithelial integrity. PMID:26290632

  7. Effect of Early Overfeeding on Palatable Food Preference and Brain Dopaminergic Reward System at Adulthood: Role of Calcium Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Conceição, E P S; Carvalho, J C; Manhães, A C; Guarda, D S; Figueiredo, M S; Quitete, F T; Oliveira, E; Moura, E G; Lisboa, P C

    2016-05-01

    Rats raised in small litters (SL) are obese and hyperphagic. In the present study, we evaluated whether obesity is associated with changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic reward system in these animals at adulthood. We also assessed the anti-obesity effects of dietary calcium supplementation. To induce early overfeeding, litters were adjusted to three pups on postnatal day (PN)3 (SL group). Control litters were kept with 10 pups each until weaning (NL group). On PN120, SL animals were subdivided into two groups: SL (standard diet) and SL-Ca [SL with calcium supplementation (10 g calcium carbonate/kg rat chow) for 60 days]. On PN175, animals were subjected to a food challenge: animals could choose between a high-fat (HFD) or a high-sugar diet (HSD). Food intake was recorded after 30 min and 12 h. Euthanasia occurred on PN180. SL rats had higher food intake, body mass and central adiposity. Sixty days of dietary calcium supplementation (SL-Ca) prevented these changes. Only SL animals preferred the HFD at 12 h. Both SL groups had lower tyrosine hydroxylase content in the ventral tegmental area, lower dopaminergic transporter content in the nucleus accumbens, and higher type 2 dopamine receptor (D2R) content in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). They also had higher neuropeptide Y (NPY) and lower pro-opiomelanocortin contents in the ARC. Calcium treatment normalised only D2R and NPY contents. Precocious obesity induces long-term effects in the brain dopaminergic system, which can be associated with an increased preference for fat at adulthood. Calcium treatment prevents this last alteration, partially through its actions on ARC D2R and NPY proteins. PMID:26929129

  8. Modulation of intestinal calcium and phosphate transport in young goats fed a nitrogen- and/or calcium-reduced diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2015-12-28

    Feeding ruminants a reduced N diet is a common approach to reduce N output based on rumino-hepatic circulation. However, a reduction in N intake caused massive changes in Ca and inorganic phosphate (Pi) homoeostasis in goats. Although a single dietary Ca reduction stimulated intestinal Ca absorption in a calcitriol-dependent manner, a concomitant reduction of Ca and N supply led to a decrease in calcitriol, and therefore a modulation of intestinal Ca and Pi absorption. The aim of this study was to examine the potential effects of dietary N or Ca reduction separately on intestinal Ca and Pi transport in young goats. Animals were allocated to a control, N-reduced, Ca-reduced or combined N- and Ca-reduced diet for about 6-8 weeks, whereby N content was reduced by 25 % compared with recommendations. In Ussing chamber experiments, intestinal Ca flux rates significantly decreased in goats fed a reduced N diet, whereas Pi flux rates were unaffected. In contrast, a dietary Ca reduction stimulated Ca flux rates and decreased Pi flux rates. The combined dietary N and Ca reduction withdrew the stimulating effect of dietary Ca reduction on Ca flux rates. The expression of Ca-transporting proteins decreased with a reduced N diet too, whereas Pi-transporting proteins were unaffected. In conclusion, a dietary N reduction decreased intestinal Ca transport by diminishing Ca-transporting proteins, which became clear during simultaneous N and Ca reduction. Therefore, N supply in young ruminant nutrition is of special concern for intestinal Ca transport. PMID:26443238

  9. Research on advanced transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Ryouhei; Nosaka, Masataka; Koyari, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshio; Noda, Keiichirou; Shinohara, Suetsugu; Itou, Tetsuichi; Etou, Takao; Kaneko, Yutaka

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the researches on advanced space transportation systems is presented. Conceptual study is conducted on fly back boosters with expendable upper stage rocket systems assuming a launch capacity of 30 tons and returning to the launch site by the boosters, and prospect of their feasibility is obtained. Reviews are conducted on subjects as follows: (1) trial production of 10 tons sub scale engines for the purpose of acquiring hardware data and picking up technical problems for full scale 100 tons thrust engines using hydrocarbon fuels; (2) development techniques for advanced liquid propulsion systems from the aspects of development schedule, cost; (3) review of conventional technologies, and common use of component; (4) oxidant switching propulsion systems focusing on feasibility of Liquefied Air Cycle Engine (LACE) and Compressed Air Cycle Engine (CACE); (5) present status of slosh hydrogen manufacturing, storage, and handling; (6) construction of small high speed dynamometer for promoting research on mini pump development; (7) hybrid solid boosters under research all over the world as low-cost and clean propulsion systems; and (8) high performance solid propellant for upper stage and lower stage propulsion systems.

  10. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  11. Presenilins and calcium signaling – systems biology to the rescue

    PubMed Central

    Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in presenilins result in familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD). Presenilins encode a catalytic subunit of γ-secretase complex, and FAD mutations in presenilins alter γ-secretase activity. Many FAD mutations in presenilins also affect intracellular calcium signaling. To explain these results it was proposed that presenilins encode endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium leak channels, and that this function is disrupted by FAD mutations. This hypothesis has been controversial. Two recent reports provide new evidence for the calcium leak channel hypothesis. One group reported the presence of putative ion-conduction pore in the high resolution crystal structure of bacterial presenilin homologue PSH1. Another group identified an essential role of presenilins in mediating ER calcium leak in unbiased cell-based screen for calcium homeostasis modulators. These results should enable the field to move forward and to focus on exploring connections between FAD mutations in presenilins, changes in γ-secretase and ER Ca2+ leak functions and development of the disease. PMID:23838181

  12. Urban Transportation Planning Short Course: Evaluation of Alternative Transportation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This urban transportation pamphlet delves into the roles of policy groups and technical staffs in evaluating alternative transportation plans, evaluation criteria, systems to evaluate, and evaluation procedures. The introduction admits the importance of subjective, but informed, judgment as an effective tool in weighing alternative transportation…

  13. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transport trailer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ard, Kevin E.; King, David A.; Leigh, Harley; Satoh, Juli A.

    1995-01-01

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System (System 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware.

  14. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transport trailer system

    SciTech Connect

    Ard, K.E.; King, D.A.; Leigh, H.; Satoh, J.A.

    1995-01-20

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System (System 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations}, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  15. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  16. Evidence of charge exchange pumping in calcium-xenon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Charge exchange between xenon ions and calcium atoms may produce an inversion between the 5s or 4d and 4p energy levels of the calcium ions. A low power flowing xenon plasma seeded with calcium was utilized to determine if charge exchange or electron collisions populate the 5s and 4d levels Ca(+). Line intensity ratios proportional to the density ratios n5s/n4p and n4d/n4p were measured. From the dependence of these intensity ratios on power input to the xenon plasma it was concluded that charge exchange pumping of the 5s and 4d levels predominates over electron collisional pumping of these levels. Also, by comparing intensity ratios obtained using argon and krypton in place of xenon with those obtained in xenon the same conclusion was made.

  17. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  18. Ways of calcium reabsorption in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Moor, Matthias B; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The role of the kidney in calcium homeostasis has been reshaped from a classic view in which the kidney was regulated by systemic calcitropic hormones such as vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone to an organ actively taking part in the regulation of calcium handling. With the identification of the intrinsic renal calcium-sensing receptor feedback system, the regulation of paracellular calcium transport involving claudins, and new paracrine regulators such as klotho, the kidney has emerged as a crucial modulator not only of calciuria but also of calcium homeostasis. This review summarizes recent molecular and endocrine contributors to renal calcium handling and highlights the tight link between calcium and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. PMID:27009338

  19. Classical transport in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  20. Calcium is involved in both positive and negative modulation of the secretory system for ANP.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F; Thibault, G

    1994-05-01

    The calcium dependence of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretory system is controversial. Some studies clearly support a stimulatory role, whereas others favor an inhibitory role for calcium in this endocrine system. We demonstrate that calcium is involved in both a positive modulatory role and a negative modulatory role, thereby providing some explanation for the seemingly irreconcilable findings previously published. The negative modulatory role performed by calcium is evident during basal secretion, whereas the positive modulatory role is especially evident in the sustained phase of the secretory response to stimulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the calcium dependence of processing of the prohormone to the mature circulating form in a cell culture system. This supports the concept that processing is a function of the atrial myocyte rather than of the mesenchymal cells of the atrium. We have demonstrated previously that calcium is important for packaging of the prohormone into secretory granules. Together these findings support a multifaceted role for calcium in the regulation of the secretory apparatus for ANP. PMID:8203584

  1. Manned transportation system study - Evaluation of candidate transportation architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nicholas; Klemer, R.; Sooter, C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall evaluation process, the tool developed to perform the evaluation, and the evaluation results in determining the right approach to meet the nation's mannned transportation needs are presented. To address the various considerations, architecture sets consisting of the candidate transportation systems are constructed. As this methodology results in multiple architectures to examine, an architecture evaluation tool was developed to facilitate the evaluation of the architecture attribute values from the system values of the attributes.

  2. Controlled environment life support system: Calcium-related leaf injuries on plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium related injuries to plants grown in controlled environments under conditions which maximize plant growth rates are described. Procedures to encourage movement of calcium into developing leaves of lettuce plants were investigated. The time course and pattern of calcium accumulation was determined to develop effective control procedures for this injury, termed tipburn. Procedures investigated were: (1) increasing the relative humidity to saturation during the dark period and altering root temperatures, (2) maximizing water stress during light and minimizing water stress during dark periods, (3) shortening the light-dark cycle lengths in combination with elevated moisture levels during the dark cycles, (4) reducing nutrient concentrations and (5) vibrating the plants. Saturated humidities at night increased the rate of growth and the large fluctuation in plant water potential encouraged calcium movement to the young leaves and delayed tipburn. Root temperature regulation between 15 and 26 C was not effective in preventing tipburn. Attempts to modulate water stress produced little variation, but no difference in tipburn development. Variations in light-dark cycle lengths also had no effect on calcium concentrations within developing leaves and no variation in tipburn development. Low concentrations of nutrient solution delayed tipburn, presumably because of greater calcium transport in the low concentration plants. Shaking of the plants did not prevent tipburn, but did delay it slightly.

  3. A Calcium-Relay Mechanism in Vertebrate Phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-signaling in cells requires a fine-tuned system of calcium-transport proteins involving ion channels, exchangers, and ion-pumps but also calcium-sensor proteins and their targets. Thus, control of physiological responses very often depends on incremental changes of the cytoplasmic calcium concentration, which are sensed by calcium-binding proteins and are further transmitted to specific target proteins. This Review will focus on calcium-signaling in vertebrate photoreceptor cells, where recent physiological and biochemical data indicate that a subset of neuronal calcium sensor proteins named guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) operate in a calcium-relay system, namely, to make gradual responses to small changes in calcium. We will further integrate this mechanism in an existing computational model of phototransduction showing that it is consistent and compatible with the dynamics that are characteristic for the precise operation of the phototransduction pathways. PMID:23472635

  4. Apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2)/Sec31 interactions regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport: a potential effector pathway for luminal calcium.

    PubMed

    Helm, Jared R; Bentley, Marvin; Thorsen, Kevin D; Wang, Ting; Foltz, Lauren; Oorschot, Viola; Klumperman, Judith; Hay, Jesse C

    2014-08-22

    Luminal calcium released from secretory organelles has been suggested to play a regulatory role in vesicle transport at several steps in the secretory pathway; however, its functional roles and effector pathways have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate for the first time that specific luminal calcium depletion leads to a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport rates in intact cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that luminal calcium depletion is accompanied by increased accumulation of intermediate compartment proteins in COPII buds and clusters of unfused COPII vesicles at ER exit sites. Furthermore, we present several lines of evidence suggesting that luminal calcium affected transport at least in part through calcium-dependent interactions between apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2) and the Sec31A proline-rich region: 1) targeted disruption of ALG-2/Sec31A interactions caused severe defects in ER-to-Golgi transport in intact cells; 2) effects of luminal calcium and ALG-2/Sec31A interactions on transport mutually required each other; and 3) Sec31A function in transport required luminal calcium. Morphological phenotypes of disrupted ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were characterized. We found that ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were not required for the localization of Sec31A to ER exit sites per se but appeared to acutely regulate the stability and trafficking of the cargo receptor p24 and the distribution of the vesicle tether protein p115. These results represent the first outline of a mechanism that connects luminal calcium to specific protein interactions regulating vesicle trafficking machinery. PMID:25006245

  5. Controlled environment life support system: Calcium-related leaf injuries on plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    A calcium related injury in lettuce termed tipburn was the focus of this study. It affects the young developing leaves as they become enclosed during head formation. It is a good model system to study because the injury can be induced with good predictability and lettuce is one of the crops chosen by the CELSS program for concentrated study. Investigations were undertaken to study a number of different procedures, that would have the potential for encouraging movement of calcium into the young developing leaves and to study the time course and pattern of calcium accumulation in developing leaves to provide a basis for developing effective control procedures for this injury.

  6. Effects of DDT on the calcium transport and thymidine uptake of bovine lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, M.; Yin-Foo, D.

    1986-10-01

    It is known that organochlorine compounds in the environment present risks which may be related to an interference with calcium metabolism. The evidence in favor of a role for intracellular calcium levels as signals for the initiation of cell division is summarized by Metcalfe et al., and forms the basis for a calcium hypothesis for the control of cell growth. Lymphocytes undergoing transformation provide evidence for an involvement of calcium in the steps preceding mitogenic activation which occur within 20 hours of exposure to a mitogen. It has been suspected for some time that the incidence of lymphomas and leukemias may be higher in farming populations with significant past exposure to several organochlorine insecticides. It is also known that immune suppression can provoke an increase in the incidence of certain cancers, although whether this is an example of (lack of) immune surveillance for potential cancer cells or of some less direct mechanism such as a reduced resistance to a viral infection, is still unclear. For these reasons it is important to know whether DDT and other chemically related organochlorine compounds modulate calcium levels within lymphocytes, and if so whether this modulation relates to the observed effects of these compounds on lymphocyte mitogenesis. Such studies may also be of some value in providing a clue as to the relationship between chemically induced leukemias and DDT exposure.

  7. A National MagLev Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The case for a national high-speed magnetic-levitation (MagLev) transportation system is presented. Focus is on current issues facing the country, such as national security, the economy, transportation, technology, and the environment. NASA s research into MagLev technology for launch assist is also highlighted. Further, current socio-cultural norms regarding motor-vehicle-based transportation systems are questioned in light of the problems currently facing the U.S. The multidisciplinary benefits of a long-distance MagLev system support the idea that such a system would be an important element of a truly multimodal U.S. transportation infrastructure.

  8. Proton-coupled calcium transport by intact cells of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E M

    1980-08-01

    Addition of ionophores to resting aerobic cultures of Azotobacter vinelandii OP resulted in 45Ca2+ uptake (Km = 60 microM Ca2+; Vmax 1.1 nmol/min per mg of cell protein) which was inhibited by cations (La3+ greater than Mn2+ greater than Sr2+ greater Ba2+). The rate of Ca2+ entry correlated with the magnitude of a transmembrane proton gradient (inside acid) which developed in the respective order: valinomycin less than tetrachlorosalicylanilide less than nigericin less than gramicidin D less than tetrachlorosalicylanilide plus valinomycin. A process of calcium-proton exchange (antiport) is responsible for calcium accumulation under these conditions. PMID:6162836

  9. Genipin stimulates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes via an IRS-1 and calcium-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chan-Juan; Nie, Ai-Fang; Zhang, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Du, Li; Li, Xiao-Ying; Ning, Guang

    2013-03-01

    Genipin, a compound derived from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruits, has been used over the years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes. However, the molecular basis for its antidiabetic effect has not been fully revealed. In this study, we investigated the effects of genipin on glucose uptake and signaling pathways in C(2)C(12) myotubes. Our study demonstrates that genipin stimulated glucose uptake in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The maximal effect was achieved at 2 h with a concentration of 10 μM. In myotubes, genipin promoted glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the cell surface, which was observed by analyzing their distribution in subcellular membrane fraction, and increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), AKT, and GSK3β. Meanwhile, genipin increased ATP levels, closed K(ATP) channels, and then increased the concentration of calcium in the cytoplasm in C(2)C(12) myotubes. Genipin-stimulated glucose uptake could be blocked by both the PI3-K inhibitor wortmannin and calcium chelator EGTA. Moreover, genipin increases the level of reactive oxygen species and ATP in C(2)C(12) myotubes. These results suggest that genipin activates IRS-1, PI3-K, and downstream signaling pathway and increases concentrations of calcium, resulting in GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake increase in C(2)C(12) myotubes. PMID:23257267

  10. Mechanism and evolution of calcium transport across the plant plasma membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient, thus the influx of Ca(2+) into plant cells is a critical process. In addition, the efflux of Ca(2+) out of a cell is important to prevent toxicity resulting from Ca(2+) excess, and to modulate levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) required for signaling functions. Bioc...

  11. Preparation and properties of calcium phosphate cements incorporated gelatin microspheres and calcium sulfate dihydrate as controlled local drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shu; Zhai, Yujia; Xu, Guohua; Lu, Shanshan; Zhou, Wei; Ye, Xiaojian

    2011-11-01

    To develop high macroporous and degradable bone cements which can be used as the substitute of bone repairing and drug carriers, cross-linked gelatin microspheres (GMs) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD) powder were incorporated into calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) to induce macropores, adjust drug release and control setting time of α-TCP-liquid mixtures after degradation of GMs and dissolution of CSD. In this study, CSD was introduced into CPC/10GMs composites to offset the prolonged setting time caused by the incorporation of GMs, and gentamicin sulphate (GS) was chosen as the model drug entrapped within the GMs. The effects of CSD amount on the cement properties, drug release ability and final macroporosity after GMs degradation were studied in comparison with CPC/GMs cements. The resulting cements presented reduced setting time and increased compressive strength as the content of CSD below 5 wt%. Sustained release of GS was obtained on at least 21 days, and release rates were found to be chiefly controlled by the GMs degradation rate. After 4 weeks of degradation study, the resulting composite cements appeared macroporous, degradable and suitable compressive strength, suggesting that they have potential as controlled local drug delivery system and for cancellous bone applications. PMID:21894539

  12. Transportation Planning with Immune System Derived Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Kenji; Yaji, Yasuhito; Ootsuki, John Takuya; Fujimoto, Yasutaka; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    This paper presents an immune system derived approach for planning transportation of materials between manufacturing processes in the factory. Transportation operations are modeled by Petri Net, and divided into submodels. Transportation orders are derived from the firing sequences of those submodels through convergence calculation by the immune system derived excitation and suppression operations. Basic evaluation of this approach is conducted by simulation-based investigation.

  13. Polar transport of auxin across gravistimulated roots of maize and its enhancement by calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Evans, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Ca on the polar movement of [3H]indoleacetic acid ([3H]IAA) in gravistimulated roots was examined using 3-day-old seedlings of maize (Zea mays L.). Transport of label was measured by placing an agar donor block containing [3H]IAA on one side of the elongation zone and measuring movement of label across the root into an agar receiver block on the opposite side. In vertically oriented roots, movement of label across the elongation zone into the receiver was slight and was not enhanced by incorporating 10 millimolar CaCl2 into the receiver block. In horizontally oriented roots, movement of label across the root was readily detectable and movement to a receiver on the bottom was about 3-fold greater than movement in the opposite direction. This polarity was abolished in roots from which the caps were removed prior to gravistimulation. When CaCl2 was incorporated into the receivers, movement of label across horizontally oriented intact roots was increased about 3-fold in both the downward and upward direction. The ability of Ca to enhance the movement of label from [3H]IAA increased with increasing Ca concentration in the receiver up to 5 to 10 millimolar CaCl2. With the inclusion of CaCl2 in the receiver blocks, gravity-induced polar movement of label into receiver blocks from applied [3H]IAA was detectable within 30 minutes, and asymmetric distribution of label within the tissue was detectable within 20 minutes. The results indicate that gravistimulation induces a physiological asymmetry in the auxin transport system of maize roots and that Ca increases the total transport of auxin across the root.

  14. Carbon dioxide transport in molten calcium carbonate occurs through an oxo-Grotthuss mechanism via a pyrocarbonate anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, Dario; Coudert, François-Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity, speciation and solvation structure of CO2 in carbonate melts are relevant for both the fate of carbon in deep geological formations and for its electroreduction to CO (to be used as fuel) when solvated in a molten carbonate electrolyte. In particular, the high solubility of CO2 in carbonate melts has been tentatively attributed to the formation of the pyrocarbonate anion, C2O52–. Here we study, by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, the behaviour of CO2 in molten calcium carbonate. We find that pyrocarbonate forms spontaneously and the identity of the CO2 molecule is quickly lost through O2– exchange. The transport of CO2 in this molten carbonate thus occurs in a fashion similar to the Grotthuss mechanism in water, and is three times faster than molecular diffusion. This shows that Grotthuss-like transport is more general than previously thought.

  15. Carbon dioxide transport in molten calcium carbonate occurs through an oxo-Grotthuss mechanism via a pyrocarbonate anion.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Dario; Coudert, François-Xavier; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity, speciation and solvation structure of CO2 in carbonate melts are relevant for both the fate of carbon in deep geological formations and for its electroreduction to CO (to be used as fuel) when solvated in a molten carbonate electrolyte. In particular, the high solubility of CO2 in carbonate melts has been tentatively attributed to the formation of the pyrocarbonate anion, C2O5(2-). Here we study, by first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, the behaviour of CO2 in molten calcium carbonate. We find that pyrocarbonate forms spontaneously and the identity of the CO2 molecule is quickly lost through O(2-) exchange. The transport of CO2 in this molten carbonate thus occurs in a fashion similar to the Grotthuss mechanism in water, and is three times faster than molecular diffusion. This shows that Grotthuss-like transport is more general than previously thought. PMID:27102679

  16. Modification of cesium toxicity by calcium in mammalian system.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Ghosh, A K; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1991-11-01

    The interaction between cesium chloride CsCl and calcium chloride CaCl2 was observed in bone marrow chromosomes of mice. The two salts were administered orally to laboratory bred Swiss albino mice in vivo singly or one followed by the other, or both simultaneously. CsCl induced chromosomal aberrations in frequencies directly proportional to the dose administered. The frequency of aberrations was reduced significantly when the two chemicals were administered simultaneously or when CaCl2 was given 2 h before CsCl. Thus, CaCl2 is able to protect against the cytotoxicity of CsCl. PMID:9438035

  17. STARS: The Space Transportation Architecture Risk System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Joel S.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the need to perform comparisons between transportation systems that are likely to have significantly different levels of risk, both because of differing degrees of freedom in achieving desired performance levels and their different states of development and utilization, an approach has been developed for performing early comparisons of transportation architectures explicitly taking into account quantitative measures of uncertainty and resulting risk. The approach considers the uncertainty associated with the achievement of technology goals, the effect that the achieved level of technology will have on transportation system performance and the relationship between transportation system performance/capability and the ability to accommodate variations in payload mass. The consequences of system performance are developed in terms of expected values and associated standard deviations of nonrecurring, recurring and the present value of transportation system life cycle cost. Typical results are presented to illustrate the application of the methodology.

  18. Functional Characterization of an Aspergillus fumigatus Calcium Transporter (PmcA) that Is Essential for Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Almeida, Ricardo S.; Brown, Neil Andrew; dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Savoldi, Marcela; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a primary and opportunistic pathogen, as well as a major allergen, of mammals. The Ca+2-calcineurin pathway affects virulence, morphogenesis and antifungal drug action in A. fumigatus. Here, we investigated three components of the A. fumigatus Ca+2-calcineurin pathway, pmcA,-B, and -C, which encode calcium transporters. We demonstrated that CrzA can directly control the mRNA accumulation of the pmcA-C genes by binding to their promoter regions. CrzA-binding experiments suggested that the 5′-CACAGCCAC-3′ and 5′-CCCTGCCCC-3′ sequences upstream of pmcA and pmcC genes, respectively, are possible calcineurin-dependent response elements (CDREs)-like consensus motifs. Null mutants were constructed for pmcA and -B and a conditional mutant for pmcC demonstrating pmcC is an essential gene. The ΔpmcA and ΔpmcB mutants were more sensitive to calcium and resistant to manganese and cyclosporin was able to modulate the sensitivity or resistance of these mutants to these salts, supporting the interaction between calcineurin and the function of these transporters. The pmcA-C genes have decreased mRNA abundance into the alveoli in the ΔcalA and ΔcrzA mutant strains. However, only the A. fumigatus ΔpmcA was avirulent in the murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:22649543

  19. Studies of in-situ calcium-based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; O'Donnell, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in gasification systems and to evaluate or develop kinetic models applicable to the commercial design of such systems. Both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed combustion systems (partial gasification) will be investigated, as well as subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced. More specifically, the objectives are to: Develop data on kinetics of in-situ desulfurization reactions; study the effect of calcium on the kinetics of carbon conversion rate; study kinetics of oxidation of CaS to CaSO[sup 4]; Develop and identify viable techniques to stabilize CaS; and, carry out further development work on most promising method and determine its commercial economics.

  20. Studies of in-situ calcium-based sorbents in advanced pressurized coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Katta, S.; Shires, P.J.; O`Donnell, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The overall objective of the project is to obtain experimental data on the reactions of calcium-based sorbents in gasification systems and to evaluate or develop kinetic models applicable to the commercial design of such systems. Both air-blown coal gasification systems and second generation fluid bed combustion systems (partial gasification) will be investigated, as well as subsequent stabilization of the solid wastes (calcium sulfide/ash) produced. More specifically, the objectives are to: Develop data on kinetics of in-situ desulfurization reactions; study the effect of calcium on the kinetics of carbon conversion rate; study kinetics of oxidation of CaS to CaSO{sup 4}; Develop and identify viable techniques to stabilize CaS; and, carry out further development work on most promising method and determine its commercial economics.

  1. The transportation operations system: A description

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L.; Dixon, L.D.; Peterson, R.W. ); Pope, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the system for transporting radioactive waste that may be deployed to accomplish the assigned system mission, which includes accepting spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from waste generator sites and transporting them to the FWMS destination facilities. The system description presented here contains, in part, irradiated fuel and waste casks, ancillary equipments, truck, rail, and barge transporters, cask and vehicle traffic management organizations, maintenance facilities, and other operations elements. The description is for a fully implemented system, which is not expected to be achieved, however, until several years after initial operations. 6 figs.

  2. Renal transport of bisphosphonates: accumulation by renal cortical slices enhanced by calcium phosphate ions

    SciTech Connect

    Troehler, U.; Bonjour, J.P.; Fleisch, H.

    1985-07-01

    Bisphosphonates have been recognized as useful therapeutic agents in metabolic bone disease. Earlier studies showed a net renal secretion of 1-hydroxy-ethylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP). They suggested a renal cellular uptake of this compound. The authors further studied this concept by investigating the uptake in vitro of /sup 14/C-HEBP by rat renal cortex slices. HEBP was accumulated against a concentration gradient, a process that was dependent on time, temperature, and substrate concentration. Unlike that of /sup 3/H-p-aminohippurate, the uptake was not affected by change in medium Na+ or glucose and acetate concentration, or by anoxia and various metabolic inhibitors. It was, however, markedly increased by raising the medium calcium and inorganic phosphate concentration. Equilibrium dialysis with renal cortex homogenates suggests that HEBP binds to a cytosolic macromolecule through a process that exhibits saturability and calcium dependency. In conclusion, the results suggest that the bisphosphonate HEBP can penetrate kidney cells by a process that does not appear to be energy dependent, but is markedly influenced by the extracellular calcium-phosphate concentration.

  3. Systems Studies of DDT Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, H. L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Major consequences of present and additional environmental quantities of DDT pesticide are predictable by mathematical models of transport, accumulation and concentration mechanisms in the Wisconsin regional ecosystem. High solubility and stability produce increased DDT concentrations at high organism trophic levels within world biosphere…

  4. Free calcium concentration in brain nerve endings of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, S.N.; Pokudin, N.I.; Kravstov, G.M.; Postnov, Yu.V.; Okun', I.M.; Shukanova, N.A.; Rakovich, A.A.; Aksentsev, S.L.; Konev, S.V.

    1987-10-01

    The frequency of neurotransmitter release from the synaptic vesicles of nerve endings by exocytosis depends primarily on the free calcium concentration in the cytoplasm which is controlled by calcium transporting and calcium binding systems. In this paper, in an attempt to determine the state of these systems in primary hypertension and the effects of neurotransmitter release on the increased resistance in the peripheral circulatory system, the authors study the exchange, uptake, and concentration of calcium 45 cations by synaptosomes.

  5. A slow release calcium delivery system for the study of reparative dentine formation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A R; Kirk, E E; Robinson, D H; Kardos, T B

    1998-06-01

    Several liquid, semi-solid and solid delivery systems were formulated and tested to devise a method of reproducibly administering accurate micro-doses of calcium into a 700 microns diameter cavity in a rat maxillary incisor tooth, in the absence of hydroxyl ions. Development of this delivery system was necessary to facilitate studies of the mechanisms of pulpal repair and odontoblast differentiation. The principal requirements for the delivery system were that it should be easily administered into a small pulp exposure in the rat incisor and that a greater than 1000-fold range in calcium ion concentrations could be incorporated and delivered for a period of 2-3 days, preferably in an acidic environment to minimize the effect of non-specific nucleation under alkaline conditions. Poly- (ethylene) glycol microspheres were found to be an ideal vehicle. Under the in vitro dissolution conditions used, complete release of all calcium salts occurred within 12-15 hours, except for the very water-insoluble calcium stearate. It was anticipated that the release of calcium ions would be significantly more prolonged in vivo because of the physical constraints of the prepared cavity as well as the restricted access to fluid flow. PMID:9863419

  6. Calcium channel blockers ameliorate iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis by altering iron transport and stellate cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xin; Chang, Yanzhong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chu, Xi; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Wang, Na; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2016-06-15

    Liver fibrosis is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with iron overload. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) can antagonize divalent cation entry into renal and myocardial cells and inhibit fibrogenic gene expression. We investigated the potential of CCBs to resolve iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis. Kunming mice were assigned to nine groups (n=8 per group): control, iron overload, deferoxamine, high and low dose verapamil, high and low dose nimodipine, and high and low dose diltiazem. Iron deposition and hepatic fibrosis were measured in mouse livers. Expression levels of molecules associated with transmembrane iron transport were determined by molecular biology approaches. In vitro HSC-T6 cells were randomized into nine groups (the same groups as the mice). Changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and metalloproteinase expression in cells were detected to assess the anti-fibrotic effects of CCBs during iron overload conditions. We found that CCBs reduced hepatic iron content, intracellular iron deposition, the number of hepatic fibrotic areas, collagen expression levels, and hydroxyproline content. CCBs rescued abnormal expression of α1C protein in L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (LVDCC) and down-regulated divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) expression in mouse livers. In iron-overloaded HSC-T6 cells, CCBs reduced iron deposition, inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). CCBs are potential therapeutic agents that can be used to address hepatic fibrosis during iron overload. They resolve hepatic fibrosis probably correlated with regulating transmembrane iron transport and inhibiting HSC growth. PMID:27095094

  7. Transportation Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chastain, Gary K.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-semester or 1-year course in transportation provides activities that show and explain many of the occupations, devices, and systems that are related to transportation on land, water, air, and space. The guide contains competencies (task lists), student competency records, and management sheets. Management sheets,…

  8. Structural interaction with transportation and handling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Problems involved in the handling and transportation of finished space vehicles from the factory to the launch site are presented, in addition to recommendations for properly accounting for in space vehicle structural design, adverse interactions during transportation. Emphasis is given to the protection of vehicle structures against those environments and loads encountered during transportation (including temporary storage) which would exceed the levels that the vehicle can safely withstand. Current practices for verifying vehicle safety are appraised, and some of the capabilities and limitations of transportation and handling systems are summarized.

  9. Modulation of venous endothelial activity and transcellular calcium transport by defibrotide: the adenosine hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pasini, F L; Frigerio, C; Capecchi, P L; Ceccatelli, L; Messa, G L; Franchi, M; Di Perri, T

    1996-01-01

    Defibrotide is a polydeoxyribonucleotide that possesses profibrinolytic and cytoprotective activities. These properties have been associated with its capacity to induce the release of prostacyclin and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) from endothelial cells. In the present study, the bolus administration of defibrotide in humans was able to induce (100-800 mg) a dose-dependent decrease in plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) (from 19.4 +/- 7.11 to 7.20 +/- 6.41 AU/mL) and an increase in t-PA (from 3.70 +/- 0.96 to 4.50 +/- 1.20 IU/mL) and in the stable prostacyclin derivative 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (from 18.83 +/- 3.83 to 26.75 +/- 8.48 pg/0.1 mL) in the venous blood. In a second part of the study, defibrotide has been shown to inhibit dose-dependently (10-100 microns) neutrophil activation in vitro: it decreased lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion and chemiluminescence production induced by the oligopeptide fMLP and the ionophores A23187 and ionomycin. The increase in extracellular calcium concentration from 0.5 to 2 mm antagonized the inhibitory effect of the drug. Defibrotide was able to reduce the cytosolic free calcium increase induced by specific stimuli by blunting calcium entry. Such an inhibitory activity of defibrotide was antagonized by theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist. The study confirms some pharmacological activities of defibrotide (release of t-PA and prostacyclin in vivo), and it also suggests that the compound blocks Ca2+ entry into the cells, possibly by interfering with the adenosine receptors. PMID:8807723

  10. Regulatory effect of chrysin on expression of lenticular calcium transporters, calpains, and apoptotic-cascade components in selenite-induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Thomas, Philip A.; Teresa, P. Archana; Anbukkarasi, Muniyandi

    2016-01-01

    selenite-challenged and simultaneously chrysin-treated (Group IIIa) lenses showed no opacification (Grade 0) after 24 h incubation, while the remaining single lens exhibited only a slight degree of opacification (Grade +). In the Group IIIa lenses, the reduced glutathione, protein sulfhydryl, and malondialdehyde concentrations appeared to have been maintained at near-normal levels. The mean lenticular concentration of calcium was significantly lower in the Group IIIa lenses than that in the Group II lenses and approximated the values observed in the normal control (Group I) lenses. The Group IIIa lenses also exhibited significantly (p<0.05) higher mean lenticular activity of calpain, significantly higher mean mRNA transcript levels of genes that encode m-calpain and lenticular preferred calpain (Lp82), and significantly higher mean levels of the m-calpain and Lp82 proteins than the corresponding values in the Group II lenses. Casein zymography results suggested that chrysin prevented calpain activation and autolysis. Significantly (p<0.05) lower mean levels of mRNA transcripts of the genes that encode calcium transporter proteins (plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase-1 and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase-2) and lenticular apoptotic-cascade proteins (early growth response protein-1, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9) and significantly (p<0.05) lower mean concentrations of the proteins themselves were seen in the Group IIIa rat lenses in comparison to the values noted in the Group II rat lenses. Conclusions Chrysin appears to prevent selenite-induced cataractogenesis in vitro by maintaining the redox system components at near-normal levels and by preventing the abnormal expression of several lenticular calcium transporters and apoptotic-cascade proteins, thus preventing accumulation of calcium and subsequent calpain activation and lenticular cell death in cultured Wistar rat lenses. PMID:27168717

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Calcium-sensing Receptor-mediated Calcium Signaling in the Modulation of Epithelial Ion Transport and Bicarbonate Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Rui; Dong, Xiao; Wong, Chase; Vallon, Volker; Tang, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yang, Shiming; Dong, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ion transport is mainly under the control of intracellular cAMP and Ca2+ signaling. Although the molecular mechanisms of cAMP-induced epithelial ion secretion are well defined, those induced by Ca2+ signaling remain poorly understood. Because calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) activation results in an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) but a decrease in cAMP levels, it is a suitable receptor for elucidating the mechanisms of [Ca2+]cyt-mediated epithelial ion transport and duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS). CaSR proteins have been detected in mouse duodenal mucosae and human intestinal epithelial cells. Spermine and Gd3+, two CaSR activators, markedly stimulated DBS without altering duodenal short circuit currents in wild-type mice but did not affect DBS and duodenal short circuit currents in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) knockout mice. Clotrimazole, a selective blocker of intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels but not chromanol 293B, a selective blocker of cAMP-activated K+ channels (KCNQ1), significantly inhibited CaSR activator-induced DBS, which was similar in wild-type and KCNQ1 knockout mice. HCO3− fluxes across epithelial cells were activated by a CFTR activator, but blocked by a CFTR inhibitor. CaSR activators induced HCO3− fluxes, which were inhibited by a receptor-operated channel (ROC) blocker. Moreover, CaSR activators dose-dependently raised cellular [Ca2+]cyt, which was abolished in Ca2+-free solutions and inhibited markedly by selective CaSR antagonist calhex 231, and ROC blocker in both animal and human intestinal epithelial cells. Taken together, CaSR activation triggers Ca2+-dependent DBS, likely through the ROC, intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, and CFTR channels. This study not only reveals that [Ca2+]cyt signaling is critical to modulate DBS but also provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of CaSR-mediated Ca2+-induced DBS. PMID:25331955

  12. Propulsion system for research VTOL transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsma, L. W.; Zigan, S.

    1973-01-01

    In anticipation of an eventual VTOL requirement for civil aviation, NASA has been conducting studies directed toward determining and developing the technology required for a commercial VTOL transport. In this paper, the commercial transport configurations are briefly reviewed; the propulsion system specifications and components developed by the engine study contractor are presented and described; and methods for using the lift-propulsion system for aircraft attitude control are discussed.

  13. Electromagnetic effects on transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.E.; Dinallo, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Electronic and electrical system protection design can be used to eliminate deleterious effects from lightning, electromagnetic interference, and electrostatic discharges. Evaluation of conventional lightning protection systems using advanced computational modeling in conjunction with rocket-triggered lightning tests suggests that currently used lightning protection system design rules are inadequate and that significant improvements in best practices used for electronic and electrical system protection designs are possible. A case study of lightning induced upset and failure of a railway signal and control system is sketched.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha in optic axons moves with slow axonal transport and undergoes posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    2001-12-21

    In neurons, the mRNA for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CKIIalpha) is known to be targeted to dendrites-where the enzyme is synthesized and supports postsynaptic functions. We are interested in knowing how neuronal proteins enter axons from the nerve cell body, and the mechanism for protein transport to terminals. Because CKIIalpha immunofluorescence can be demonstrated in over 80% of retinal ganglion cells, we asked whether this regulatory protein is being transported into optic axons. Using Sprague-Dawley rats, [(35)S] methionine was injected into the vitreous humor of the eye. Four days later, the optic nerves, tracts, lateral geniculate ganglia, and superior colliculi were removed and processed for 2D-PAGE and Western blotting. Radiolabeled CKIIalpha appears to move with slow component b (SCb) of axonal transport, as is the case in rodent sciatic motor neurons. In addition, the radiolabeled CKIIalpha isoform that enters the optic nerve is found to be 4 kDa heavier (in SDS-PAGE molecular mass) than the isoform in the optic tract, superior colliculus, and lateral geniculate nucleus. This reduction is likely the result of dephosphorylation, which is a mechanism used to regulate the enzyme's activity. PMID:11741313

  15. Systemic Analysis Approaches for Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Air transportation system designers have had only limited success using traditional operations research and parametric modeling approaches in their analyses of innovations. They need a systemic methodology for modeling of safety-critical infrastructure that is comprehensive, objective, and sufficiently concrete, yet simple enough to be used with reasonable investment. The methodology must also be amenable to quantitative analysis so issues of system safety and stability can be rigorously addressed. However, air transportation has proven itself an extensive, complex system whose behavior is difficult to describe, no less predict. There is a wide range of system analysis techniques available, but some are more appropriate for certain applications than others. Specifically in the area of complex system analysis, the literature suggests that both agent-based models and network analysis techniques may be useful. This paper discusses the theoretical basis for each approach in these applications, and explores their historic and potential further use for air transportation analysis.

  16. The WIPP transportation system: Dedicated to safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, T.; McFadden, M.

    1993-12-01

    When developing a transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely-dispersed generator sites, the Department of Energy (DOE) recognized and addressed many challenges. Shipments of waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were to cover a twenty-five year period and utilize routes covering over twelve thousand miles in twenty-three states. Enhancing public safety by maximizing the payload, thus reducing the number of shipments, was the primary objective. To preclude the requirement for overweight permits, the DOE started with a total shipment weight limit of 80,000 pounds and developed an integrated transportation system consisting of a Type ``B`` package to transport the material, a lightweight tractor and trailer, stringent driver requirements, and a shipment tracking system referred to as ``TRANSCOM``.

  17. Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets in rats: potential application in a bioregenerative life-support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickel, K. P.; Nielsen, S. S.; Smart, D. J.; Mitchell, C. A.; Belury, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets containing various proportions of candidate crops for a controlled ecological life-support system (CELSS) was determined by femur 45Ca uptake. Three vegetarian diets and a control diet were labeled extrinsically with 45Ca and fed to 5-wk old male rats. A fifth group of rats fed an unlabeled control diet received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 45Ca. There was no significant difference in mean calcium absorption of vegetarian diets (90.80 +/- 5.23%) and control diet (87.85 +/- 5.25%) when calculated as the percent of an IP dose. The amounts of phytate, oxalate, and dietary fiber in the diets did not affect calcium absorption.

  18. Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets in rats: potential application in a bioregenerative life-support system.

    PubMed

    Nickel, K P; Nielsen, S S; Smart, D J; Mitchell, C A; Belury, M A

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability of vegetarian diets containing various proportions of candidate crops for a controlled ecological life-support system (CELSS) was determined by femur 45Ca uptake. Three vegetarian diets and a control diet were labeled extrinsically with 45Ca and fed to 5-wk old male rats. A fifth group of rats fed an unlabeled control diet received an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 45Ca. There was no significant difference in mean calcium absorption of vegetarian diets (90.80 +/- 5.23%) and control diet (87.85 +/- 5.25%) when calculated as the percent of an IP dose. The amounts of phytate, oxalate, and dietary fiber in the diets did not affect calcium absorption. PMID:11540533

  19. Ca K-Edge XAS as a Probe of Calcium Centers in Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Herein, Ca K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is developed as a means to characterize the local environment of calcium centers. The spectra for six, seven, and eight coordinate inorganic and molecular calcium complexes were analyzed and determined to be primarily influenced by the coordination environment and site symmetry at the calcium center. The experimental results are closely correlated to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations of the XAS spectra. The applicability of this methodology to complex systems was investigated using structural mimics of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. It was found that Ca K-edge XAS is a sensitive probe for structural changes occurring in the cubane heterometallic cluster due to Mn oxidation. Future applications to the OEC are discussed. PMID:25492398

  20. TRANSIMS: Transportation analysis and simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Baggerly, K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

  1. TRANSIMS: TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Anson, D.; Nagel, K.; Williams, M.

    1995-08-01

    This paper summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

  2. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  3. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a)...

  4. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  5. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a)...

  6. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a)...

  7. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport transportation systems. 37.33 Section 37.33 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.33 Airport transportation systems. (a)...

  8. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  9. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  10. 49 CFR 37.25 - University transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false University transportation systems. 37.25 Section 37.25 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.25 University transportation systems....

  11. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaravelu, A.; Goddard, H.; Gold, R.; Greenwell, S.; Lander, J.; Nordell, B.; Stepp, K.; Styer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a good transportation infrastructure is a major requirement for the establishment of a permanent lunar base. Transportation is characterized by the technology available in a specific time frame and the need to transport personnel and cargo between Earth and Moon, and between lunar bases. In our study, attention was first focused on developing a transportation system for the first generation lunar base. As a first step, a tracked-type multipurpose lunar transportation vehicle was considered as a possible mode of transportation and a detailed study was conducted on the various aspects of the vehicle. Since the vehicle is composed of many moving parts, exposing it to the environment of the Moon, where fine dust particles are prevalent, can cause problems associated with lubrication and friction. The vehicle also posed problems concerning weight and power. Hence, several modifications were made to the above design ideas conceptually, and a Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS) is proposed as a more effective alternative with the following objectives: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from Earth or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light-weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetic levitation using superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e., high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, lower gravity, etc. To achieve the above objectives of designing transportation systems from concept to operation, the project was planned in three phases: (1) conceptual design; (2) detailed analysis and synthesis; and (3) construction, testing, evaluation, and operation. In this project, both phases 1 and 2 have been carried out and work on phase 3 is in progress. In this paper, the details of the Lunar ARTS are discussed and the future work on the vehicle are

  12. Calcium transport in vesicles from carrot cells: Stimulation by calmodulin and phosphatidylserine. [Daucus carota cv. Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Wenling Hsieh; Sze, Heven )

    1991-05-01

    The transport properties of Ca-pumping ATPases from carrot (Daucus carota cv. Danvers) tissue culture cells were studied. ATP dependent Ca transport in vesicles that comigrated with an ER marker, was stimulated 3-4 fold by calmodulin. Cyclopiazonic acid (a specific inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase) partially inhibited oxalate-stimulated Ca transport activity; however, it had little or not effect on calmodulin-stimulated Ca uptake. The results suggested the presence of two types of Ca ATPases, and ER- and a plasma membrane-type. Incubation of membranes with (gamma{sup 32}P)ATP resulted in the formation of a single acyl ({sup 32}P) phosphoprotein of 120 kDa. Formation of this phosphoprotein was dependent on Ca, and enhanced by La {sup 3+}, characteristic of the plasma membrane CaATPase. Acidic phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, stimulated Ca transport, similar to their effect on the erythrocyte plasma membrane CaATPase. These results would indicate that the calmodulin-stimulated Ca transport originated in large part from a plasma membrane-type Ca pump of 120 kDa.

  13. Hyperspectral imaging utility for transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgelall, Raj; Rafert, J. Bruce; Tolliver, Denver

    2015-03-01

    The global transportation system is massive, open, and dynamic. Existing performance and condition assessments of the complex interacting networks of roadways, bridges, railroads, pipelines, waterways, airways, and intermodal ports are expensive. Hyperspectral imaging is an emerging remote sensing technique for the non-destructive evaluation of multimodal transportation infrastructure. Unlike panchromatic, color, and infrared imaging, each layer of a hyperspectral image pixel records reflectance intensity from one of dozens or hundreds of relatively narrow wavelength bands that span a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Hence, every pixel of a hyperspectral scene provides a unique spectral signature that offers new opportunities for informed decision-making in transportation systems development, operations, and maintenance. Spaceborne systems capture images of vast areas in a short period but provide lower spatial resolution than airborne systems. Practitioners use manned aircraft to achieve higher spatial and spectral resolution, but at the price of custom missions and narrow focus. The rapid size and cost reduction of unmanned aircraft systems promise a third alternative that offers hybrid benefits at affordable prices by conducting multiple parallel missions. This research formulates a theoretical framework for a pushbroom type of hyperspectral imaging system on each type of data acquisition platform. The study then applies the framework to assess the relative potential utility of hyperspectral imaging for previously proposed remote sensing applications in transportation. The authors also introduce and suggest new potential applications of hyperspectral imaging in transportation asset management, network performance evaluation, and risk assessments to enable effective and objective decision- and policy-making.

  14. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Finnveden, Göran Åkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  15. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  16. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-10-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Human Transportation System (HTS) study: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-10-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Human Transportation System (HTS) study: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    Work completed under the Human Transportation System Study is summarized. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems as well as proposed systems to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are the following: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  19. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation System launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1990-01-01

    An account is given of NASA's Advanced Space Transportation System plans, with a view to the support systems that must be evolved in order to implement such long-term mission requirements; these encompass space-based infrastructure for orbital transfer operations between LEO and GEO, and for operations from LEO to lunar orbit and to Mars. These mission requirements are addressed by the NASA Civil Needs Data Base in order to promote multiple applications. The requisite near-term lift capacity to LEO could be achieved through the development of the Shuttle-derived, unmanned Shuttle-C cargo launch system. Longer-term transportation studies are concerned with the Next Manned Transportation System and Space Transfer Vehicles.

  20. Transportable Vitrification System Demonstration on Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Whitehouse, J.C.; Wilson, C.N.; Van Ryn, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary results from the first demonstration of the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) on actual mixed waste. The TVS is a fully integrated, transportable system for the treatment of mixed and low-level radioactive wastes. The demonstration was conducted at Oak Ridge`s East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), formerly known as the K-25 site. The purpose of the demonstration was to show that mixed wastes could be vitrified safely on a `field` scale using joule-heated melter technology and obtain information on system performance, waste form durability, air emissions, and costs.

  1. Advanced secondary power system for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. C.; Hansen, I. G.; Beach, R. F.; Plencner, R. M.; Dengler, R. P.; Jefferies, K. S.; Frye, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A concept for an advanced aircraft power system was identified that uses 20-kHz, 440-V, sin-wave power distribution. This system was integrated with an electrically powered flight control system and with other aircraft systems requiring secondary power. The resulting all-electric secondary power configuration reduced the empty weight of a modern 200-passenger, twin-engine transport by 10 percent and the mission fuel by 9 percent.

  2. Monte Carlo Nucleon Meson Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-11-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAERI97 is an upgraded version of the code system NMTC/JAERI, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAERI97 simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nucleon-meson transport processes.

  3. Alternative battery systems for transportation uses

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Thackeray

    2013-06-05

    Argonne Distinguished Fellow Michael Thackeray highlights the need for alternative battery systems for transportation uses. Such systems will not only need to be smaller, lighter and more energy dense, but also able to make electric vehicles more competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles.

  4. Alternative battery systems for transportation uses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Thackeray

    2012-07-25

    Argonne Distinguished Fellow Michael Thackeray highlights the need for alternative battery systems for transportation uses. Such systems will not only need to be smaller, lighter and more energy dense, but also able to make electric vehicles more competitive with internal combustion engine vehicles.

  5. Hemocytes participate in calcium carbonate crystal formation, transportation and shell regeneration in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Yangjia; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2016-04-01

    In this study, light microscope, scanning and transmission electron microscope, hematoxylin-eosin and fluorescent staining, and mass spectrometry methods were employed to observe the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystal formation, hemocyte release and transportation, and hemocyte distribution at the shell regeneration area and to analyse the proteome of hemocytes in the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The results indicated that intracellular CaCO3 crystals were observed in circulating hemocytes in P. fucata, implying that there was a suitable microenvironment for crystal formation in the hemocytes. This conclusion was further supported by the proteome analysis, in which various biomineralization-related proteins were detected. The crystal-bearing hemocytes, mainly granulocytes, may be released to extrapallial fluid (EPF) by the secretory cavities distributed on the outer surface of the mantle centre. These granulocytes in the EPF and between the regenerated shells were abundant and free. In the regenerated prismatic layer, the granulocytes were fused into each column and fragmented with the duration of shell maturation, suggesting the direct involvement of hemocytes in shell regeneration. Overall, this study provided evidence that hemocytes participated in CaCO3 crystal formation, transportation and shell regeneration in the pearl oyster. These results are helpful to further understand the exact mechanism of hemocyte-mediated biomineralization in shelled molluscs. PMID:26923245

  6. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  7. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P < 0.05). Decreases in parathyroid hormone did not reach significance. Calcitonin showed modest decreases postflight (P < 0.02). Overall, effects of spaceflight on the calcium endocrine system were similar to the effects of chairing on the ground, but were more pronounced. Reduced intestinal calcium absorption, losses in body weight, increases in cortisol, and higher postflight blood urea nitrogen were the changes in flight monkeys that distinguished them from the flight simulation study animals.

  8. Aluminum effects upon calbindin D9k-linked duodenal calcium transport in diabetic male rats.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, D; Favre, C; Monti, J A; Carnovale, C E; Carrillo, M C

    1999-02-22

    In order to elucidate if the inhibition mechanisms of Aluminum (Al) on intestinal calcium flux involve some possible action on calbindin-D9k, a series of in vivo and in vitro experiments were carried out in normal and in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male rats. The dose-response curves obtained from the in vitro studies indicate that, in the diabetic group (which has a lower content of calbindin-D9k), the effect of Al on JCa(ms) has a small dependence on rising Al concentration (0-10 microM). The parameters obtained from those curves: Emax (maximum reduction percentage of JCa(ms)) and ED50 (Al concentration that produces half of the highest inhibition) were significantly diminished in this group compared to control. Both s.c. injections of calcitriol (D3) at doses of 0.08 and 0.40 microg/kg body wt. per day and insulin (10 IU/kg body wt. per day), increase the inhibitory effect of Al to levels that did not differ from controls. In vivo gavage of 60 mg/kg body wt. per day of aluminum chloride for 1 week reveals that the degree of reduction of intestinal CaBP9k by Al is directly correlated to duodenal content of this protein (r2 = 0.683, P = 0.022). PMID:10079056

  9. Ethanol induces calcium influx via the Cch1-Mid1 transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Courchesne, William E; Vlasek, Christopher; Klukovich, Rachel; Coffee, Sara

    2011-05-01

    Yeast suffers from a variety of environmental stresses, such as osmotic pressure and ethanol produced during fermentation. Since calcium ions are protective for high concentrations of ethanol, we investigated whether Ca(2+) flux occurs in response to ethanol stress. We find that exposure of yeast to ethanol induces a rise in the cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+). The response is enhanced in cells shifted to high-osmotic media containing proline, galactose, sorbitol, or mannitol. Suspension of cells in proline and galactose-containing media increases the Ca(2+) levels in the cytoplasm independent of ethanol exposure. The enhanced ability for ethanol to induce Ca(2+) flux after the hypertonic shift is transient, decreasing rapidly over a period of seconds to minutes. There is partial recovery of the response after zymolyase treatment, suggesting that cell wall integrity affects the ethanol-induced Ca(2+) flux. Acetate inhibits the Ca(2+) accumulation elicited by the ethanol/osmotic stress. The Ca(2+) flux is primarily via the Cch1 Ca(2+) influx channel because strains carrying deletions of the cch1 and mid1 genes show greater than 90% reduction in Ca(2+) flux. Furthermore, a functional Cch1 channel reduced growth inhibition by ethanol. PMID:21259000

  10. The Integrated Air Transportation System Evaluation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, Earl R., III; Hees, Jing; Villani, James A.; Yackovetsky, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout U.S. history, our nation has generally enjoyed exceptional economic growth, driven in part by transportation advancements. Looking forward 25 years, when the national highway and skyway systems are saturated, the nation faces new challenges in creating transportation-driven economic growth and wealth. To meet the national requirement for an improved air traffic management system, NASA developed the goal of tripling throughput over the next 20 years, in all weather conditions while maintaining safety. Analysis of the throughput goal has primarily focused on major airline operations, primarily through the hub and spoke system.However, many suggested concepts to increase throughput may operate outside the hub and spoke system. Examples of such concepts include the Small Aircraft Transportation System, civil tiltrotor, and improved rotorcraft. Proper assessment of the potential contribution of these technologies to the domestic air transportation system requires a modeling capability that includes the country's numerous smaller airports, acting as a fundamental component of the National Air space System, and the demand for such concepts and technologies. Under this task for NASA, the Logistics Management Institute developed higher fidelity demand models that capture the interdependence of short-haul air travel with other transportation modes and explicitly consider the costs of commercial air and other transport modes. To accomplish this work, we generated forecasts of the distribution of general aviation based aircraft and GA itinerant operations at each of nearly 3.000 airport based on changes in economic conditions and demographic trends. We also built modules that estimate the demand for travel by different modes, particularly auto, commercial air, and GA. We examined GA demand from two perspectives: top-down and bottom-up, described in detail.

  11. A Robust Scalable Transportation System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew; DeLaurentis, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the 2005 Revolutionary System Concept for Aeronautics (RSCA) study entitled "A Robust, Scalable Transportation System Concept". The objective of the study was to generate, at a high-level of abstraction, characteristics of a new concept for the National Airspace System, or the new NAS, under which transportation goals such as increased throughput, delay reduction, and improved robustness could be realized. Since such an objective can be overwhelmingly complex if pursued at the lowest levels of detail, instead a System-of-Systems (SoS) approach was adopted to model alternative air transportation architectures at a high level. The SoS approach allows the consideration of not only the technical aspects of the NAS", but also incorporates policy, socio-economic, and alternative transportation system considerations into one architecture. While the representations of the individual systems are basic, the higher level approach allows for ways to optimize the SoS at the network level, determining the best topology (i.e. configuration of nodes and links). The final product (concept) is a set of rules of behavior and network structure that not only satisfies national transportation goals, but represents the high impact rules that accomplish those goals by getting the agents to "do the right thing" naturally. The novel combination of Agent Based Modeling and Network Theory provides the core analysis methodology in the System-of-Systems approach. Our method of approach is non-deterministic which means, fundamentally, it asks and answers different questions than deterministic models. The nondeterministic method is necessary primarily due to our marriage of human systems with technological ones in a partially unknown set of future worlds. Our goal is to understand and simulate how the SoS, human and technological components combined, evolve.

  12. Targeted Deletion of Vesicular GABA Transporter from Retinal Horizontal Cells Eliminates Feedback Modulation of Photoreceptor Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arlene A; Liu, Xue; Boulter, Jim; Grove, James; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying feedback signaling from horizontal cells to photoreceptors, which are important for the formation of receptive field surrounds of early visual neurons, remain unsettled. Mammalian horizontal cells express a complement of synaptic proteins that are necessary and sufficient for calcium-dependent exocytosis of inhibitory neurotransmitters at their contacts with photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that they are capable of releasing GABA via vesicular release. To test whether horizontal cell vesicular release is involved in feedback signaling, we perturbed inhibitory neurotransmission in these cells by targeted deletion of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), the protein responsible for the uptake of inhibitory transmitter by synaptic vesicles. To manipulate horizontal cells selectively, an iCre mouse line with Cre recombinase expression controlled by connexin57 (Cx57) regulatory elements was generated. In Cx57-iCre mouse retina, only horizontal cells expressed Cre protein, and its expression occurred in all retinal regions. After crossing with a VGAT(flox/flox) mouse line, VGAT was selectively eliminated from horizontal cells, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. Voltage-gated ion channel currents in horizontal cells of Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice were the same as Cx57-VGAT(+/+) controls, as were the cell responses to the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist kainate, but the response to the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol in Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice was larger. In contrast, the feedback inhibition of photoreceptor calcium channels, which in control animals is induced by horizontal cell depolarization, was completely absent in Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice. The results suggest that vesicular release of GABA from horizontal cells is required for feedback inhibition of photoreceptors. PMID:27022629

  13. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr1 in the Proximal and Distal Tubule Identifies Distinct Roles in Phosphate and Calcium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaobin; Yang, Jiancheng; Li, Linqiang; Huang, Jinsong; King, Gwendalyn; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2016-01-01

    A postnatal role of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) in the kidney is suggested by its binding to α-Klotho to form an obligate receptor for the hormone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). FGFR1 is expressed in both the proximal and distal renal tubular segments, but its tubular specific functions are unclear. In this study, we crossed Fgfr1flox/flox mice with either gamma-glutamyltransferase-Cre (γGT-Cre) or kidney specific-Cre (Ksp-Cre) mice to selectively create proximal tubule (PT) and distal tubule (DT) Fgfr1 conditional knockout mice (designated Fgfr1PT-cKO and Fgfr1DT-cKO, respectively). Fgfr1PT-cKO mice exhibited an increase in sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter expression, hyperphosphatemia, and refractoriness to the phosphaturic actions of FGF-23, consistent with a direct role of FGFR1 in mediating the proximal tubular phosphate responses to FGF-23. In contrast, Fgfr1DT-cKO mice unexpectedly developed hypercalciuria, secondary elevations of parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypophosphatemia and enhanced urinary phosphate excretion. Fgfr1PT-cKO mice also developed a curly tail/spina bifida-like skeletal phenotype, whereas Fgfr1DT-cKO mice developed renal tubular micro-calcifications and reductions in cortical bone thickness. Thus, FGFR1 has dual functions to directly regulate proximal and distal tubule phosphate and calcium reabsorption, indicating a physiological role of FGFR1 signaling in both phosphate and calcium homeostasis. PMID:26839958

  14. Targeted Deletion of Vesicular GABA Transporter from Retinal Horizontal Cells Eliminates Feedback Modulation of Photoreceptor Calcium Channels123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Boulter, Jim; Grove, James; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cellular mechanisms underlying feedback signaling from horizontal cells to photoreceptors, which are important for the formation of receptive field surrounds of early visual neurons, remain unsettled. Mammalian horizontal cells express a complement of synaptic proteins that are necessary and sufficient for calcium-dependent exocytosis of inhibitory neurotransmitters at their contacts with photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that they are capable of releasing GABA via vesicular release. To test whether horizontal cell vesicular release is involved in feedback signaling, we perturbed inhibitory neurotransmission in these cells by targeted deletion of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), the protein responsible for the uptake of inhibitory transmitter by synaptic vesicles. To manipulate horizontal cells selectively, an iCre mouse line with Cre recombinase expression controlled by connexin57 (Cx57) regulatory elements was generated. In Cx57-iCre mouse retina, only horizontal cells expressed Cre protein, and its expression occurred in all retinal regions. After crossing with a VGATflox/flox mouse line, VGAT was selectively eliminated from horizontal cells, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. Voltage-gated ion channel currents in horizontal cells of Cx57-VGAT−/− mice were the same as Cx57-VGAT+/+ controls, as were the cell responses to the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist kainate, but the response to the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol in Cx57-VGAT−/− mice was larger. In contrast, the feedback inhibition of photoreceptor calcium channels, which in control animals is induced by horizontal cell depolarization, was completely absent in Cx57-VGAT−/− mice. The results suggest that vesicular release of GABA from horizontal cells is required for feedback inhibition of photoreceptors. PMID:27022629

  15. Calcium transport by ionophorous peptides in dog and human lymphocytes detected by quin-2 fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Deber, C M; Hsu, L C

    1986-01-29

    Synthetic peptides of structure cyclo(Glu(OBz)-Sar-Gly-(N-R)Gly)2 (I), electrogenic Ca2+-selective carriers in phospholipid vesicle membranes, are shown to mediate the uptake of Ca2+ ions into the cytoplasm of dog and human lymphocytes. Ca2+ transport by DECYL-2E (I, R = n-decyl) - monitored by measurements of the fluorescence of an intracellular dye, quin-2 - occurred at a rate comparable to that produced by electroneutral Ca2+ ionophores ionomycin and Br-A23187. Fluorescence quenching experiments using Mn2+ suggested a greater selectivity by DECYL-2E for Ca2+/Mn2+ vs. the other two ionophores. The result that Ca2+ ions can traverse biological membranes bound in a neutral cavity consisting exclusively of peptide carbonyl ligands may imply the functional significance of binding sites of similar structures in membrane transport proteins. PMID:3947349

  16. Structure-Based Engineering of Lithium-Transport Capacity in an Archaeal Sodium-Calcium Exchanger.

    PubMed

    Refaeli, Bosmat; Giladi, Moshe; Hiller, Reuben; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-03-29

    Members of the Ca(2+)/cation exchanger superfamily (Ca(2+)/CA) share structural similarities (including highly conserved ion-coordinating residues) while exhibiting differential selectivity for Ca(2+), Na(+), H(+), K(+), and Li(+). The archaeal Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX_Mj) and its mammalian orthologs are highly selective for Na(+), whereas the mitochondrial ortholog (NCLX) can transport either Li(+) or Na(+) in exchange with Ca(2+). Here, structure-based replacement of ion-coordinating residues in NCX_Mj resulted in a capacity for transporting either Na(+) or Li(+), similar to the case for NCLX. This engineered protein may serve as a model for elucidating the mechanisms underlying ion selectivity and ion-coupled alternating access in NCX and similar proteins. PMID:26958982

  17. Mars transportation system - Architecture trade study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Lewis A.; Malloy, John D.

    1992-07-01

    An advanced Mars base resupply transportation system utilizing nuclear thermal rockets, a split/sprint architecture, and conjunction class trajectories for the manned flight segments was studied to determine the impact of engine characteristics other than specific impulse. High engine thrust-to-weight ratios were found to offer significant performance improvements and engine clustering and shielding strategies were found to interrelate to the engine thrust-to-weight ratio in a complex manner. Performance tradeoffs of alternate abort mode and engine disposal strategies were assessed. The significant benefits of the use of indigenous Martian materials to support the transportation system were quantified.

  18. Acoustic system for material transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An object within a chamber is acoustically moved by applying wavelengths of different modes to the chamber to move the object between pressure wells formed by the modes. In one system, the object is placed in one end of the chamber while a resonant mode, applied along the length of the chamber, produces a pressure well at the location. The frequency is then switched to a second mode that produces a pressure well at the center of the chamber, to draw the object. When the object reaches the second pressure well and is still traveling towards the second end of the chamber, the acoustic frequency is again shifted to a third mode (which may equal the first model) that has a pressure well in the second end portion of the chamber, to draw the object. A heat source may be located near the second end of the chamber to heat the sample, and after the sample is heated it can be cooled by moving it in a corresponding manner back to the first end of the chamber. The transducers for levitating and moving the object may be all located at the cool first end of the chamber.

  19. The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.W.; Hassberger, J.A.; Smith, C.; Carelli, M.; Greenspan, E.; Peddicord, K.L.; Stroh, K.; Wade, D.C.; Hill, R.N.

    1999-05-27

    The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR) system is a development architecture for implementing a small nuclear power system, specifically aimed at meeting the growing energy needs of much of the developing world. It simultaneously provides very high standards for safety, proliferation resistance, ease and economy of installation, operation, and ultimate disposition. The STAR system accomplishes these objectives through a combination of modular design, factory manufacture, long lifetime without refueling, autonomous control, and high reliability.

  20. A Mars/phobos Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A transportation system will be necessary to support construction and operation of bases on Phobos and Mars beginning in the year 2020 or later. An approach to defining a network of vehicles and the types of vehicles which may be used in the system are presented. The network will provide a convenient, integrated means for transporting robotically constructed bases to Phobos and Mars. All the technology needed for the current plan is expected to be available for use at the projected date of cargo departure from the Earth system. The modular design of the transportation system provides easily implemented contingency plans, so that difficulties with any one vehicle will have a minimal effect on the progress of the total mission. The transportation network proposed consists of orbital vehicles and atmospheric entry vehicles. Initially, only orbital vehicles will participate in the robotic construction phase of the Phobos base. The Interplanetary Transfer Vehicle (ITV) will carry the base and construction equipment to Phobos where the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicles (OMV's) will participate in the initial construction of the base. When the Mars base is ready to be sent, one or more ITV's will be used to transport the atmospheric entry vehicles from Earth. These atmospheric vehicles are the One Way Landers (OWL's) and the Ascent/Descent Vehicles (ADV's). They will be used to carry the base components and/or construction equipment. The OMV's and the Orbital Transfer Vehicles (OTV's) will assist in carrying the atmospheric entry vehicles to low Martian orbit where the OWL's or ADV's will descent to the planet surface. The ADV's were proposed to accommodate expansion of the system. Additionally, a smaller version of the ADV class is capable of transporting personnel between Mars and Phobos.

  1. Transportation systems analyses. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The principal objective is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform crew delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery and return, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include: the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationship between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. Conceptual studies of transportation elements contribute to the systems approach by identifying elements (such as ETO node and transfer/excursion vehicles) needed in current and planned transportation systems. These studies are also a mechanism to integrate the results of relevant parallel studies.

  2. CORROSION AND CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION INDEX IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion in water distribution systems was studied to gain a better understanding of the processes and to develop control strategies. Equations and calculation methods for determining the pH(sub s) were developed using a chemical model with and without ionic speciation. Several ...

  3. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  4. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  5. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  6. Crew Transportation System Design Reference Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Contains summaries of potential design reference mission goals for systems to transport humans to andfrom low Earth orbit (LEO) for the Commercial Crew Program. The purpose of this document is to describe Design Reference Missions (DRMs) representative of the end-to-end Crew Transportation System (CTS) framework envisioned to successfully execute commercial crew transportation to orbital destinations. The initial CTS architecture will likely be optimized to support NASA crew and NASA-sponsored crew rotation missions to the ISS, but consideration may be given in this design phase to allow for modifications in order to accomplish other commercial missions in the future. With the exception of NASA’s mission to the ISS, the remaining commercial DRMs are notional. Any decision to design or scar the CTS for these additional non-NASA missions is completely up to the Commercial Provider. As NASA’s mission needs evolve over time, this document will be periodically updated to reflect those needs.

  7. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L−1 on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L−1 resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  8. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L(-1) on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L(-1) resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  9. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  10. Recent developments in intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2009-02-01

    Calcium absorption proceeds by transcellular and paracellular flux, with the latter accounting for most absorbed calcium when calcium intake is adequate. Vitamin D helps regulate transcellular calcium transport by increasing calcium uptake via a luminal calcium channel and by inducing the cytosolic calcium transporting protein, calbindinD(9k). Recent studies utilizing knockout mice have challenged the functional importance of the channel and calbindin. To integrate the new findings with many previous studies, the function of the two molecules must be evaluated in the calcium transport and economy of mice. When calcium intake is high, transcellular calcium transport contributes little to total calcium absorption. Therefore, increasing calcium intake seems the most effective nutritional approach to ensure adequate absorption and prevent bone loss. PMID:19178653

  11. Direct measurement of calcium transport across chloroplast inner-envelope vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, M.H.; Shingles, R.; Cleveland, M.J.; McCarty, R.E.

    1998-12-01

    The initial rate of Ca{sup 2+} movement across the inner-envelope membrane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) chloroplasts was directly measured by stopped-flow spectrofluorometry using membrane vesicles loaded with the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive fluorophore fura-2. Calibration of fura-2 fluorescence was achieved by combining a ratiometric method with Ca{sup 2+}-selective minielectrodes to determine pCa values. The initial rate of Ca{sup 2+} influx in predominantly right-side-out inner-envelope membrane vesicles was greater than that in largely inside-out vesicles. Ca{sup 2+} movement was stimulated by an inwardly directed electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane vesicles, an effect that was diminished by the addition of valinomycin in the presence of K{sup +}. In addition, Ca{sup 2+} was shown to move across the membrane vesicles in the presence of K{sup +} diffusion potential gradient. The potential-stimulated rate of Ca{sup 2+} transport was slightly inhibited by diltiazem and greatly inhibited by ruthenium red. Other pharmacological agents such as LaCl{sub 3}, verapamil, and nifedipine had little or no effect. These results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} transport across the chloroplast inner envelope can occur by a potential-stimulated uniport mechanism.

  12. Self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) of rosuvastatin calcium: design, formulation, bioavailability and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; selvan, Natarajan Tamil; prasad, Ranganathan Hari; Abdu, Siyad

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve solubility and bioavailability of Rosuvastatin calcium using self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS). Self emulsifying property of various oils including essential oils was evaluated with suitable surfactants and co-surfactants. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed based on Rosuvastatin calcium solubility analysis for optimizing the system. The prepared formulations were evaluated for self emulsifying time, robustness to dilution, droplet size determination and zeta potential analysis. The system was found to be robust in different pH media and dilution volume. The globule size of the optimized system was less than 200nm which could be an acceptable nanoemulsion size range. The zeta potential of the selected CN 7 SNEDDS formulation (cinnamon oil 30%; labrasol 60%; Capmul MCM C8 10%) was -29.5±0.63 with an average particle size distribution of 122nm. In vitro drug release studies showed remarkable increase in dissolution of CN7 SNEDDS compared to marketed formulation. In house developed HPLC method for determination of Rosuvastatin calcium in rat plasma was used in the bioavailability and pharmacokinetic evaluation. The relative bioavailability of self nanoemulsified formulation showed an enhanced bioavailability of 2.45 times greater than that of drug in suspension. The obtained plasma drug concentration data was processed with PKSolver 2.0 and it was best fit into the one compartment model. PMID:24012665

  13. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  14. PARTS: (Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aherne, Michael; Davis, Phil; England, Matt; Gustavsson, Jake; Pankow, Steve; Sampaio, Chere; Savella, Phil

    2002-01-01

    The Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System (PARTS) is an unmanned cargo shuttle intended to ferry large payloads to and from Martian orbit using a highly efficient VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). The design of PARTS focuses on balancing cost and minimizing transit time for a chosen payload consisting of vehicles, satellites, and other components provided by interested parties.

  15. Tomorrows' Air Transportation System Breakout Series Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss tomorrow's air transportation system. Section of this presentation includes: chair comments; other general comments; surface congestion alleviation; runway productivity; enhanced arrival/departure tools; integrated airspace decision support tools; national traffic flow management, runway independent operations; ATM TFM weather; and terminal weather.

  16. Transportation systems analyses: Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform man delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationships between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. This executive summary of the transportation systems analyses (TSM) semi-annual report addresses the SSF logistics resupply. Our analysis parallels the ongoing NASA SSF redesign effort. Therefore, there could be no SSF design to drive our logistics analysis. Consequently, the analysis attempted to bound the reasonable SSF design possibilities (and the subsequent transportation implications). No other strategy really exists until after a final decision is rendered on the SSF configuration.

  17. Dietary calcium and bone mineral density in premenopausal women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chong, H C; Chee, S S; Goh, E M L; Chow, S K; Yeap, S S

    2007-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the relationship between dietary calcium intake and bone mineral density (BMD) in premenopausal women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) on corticosteroids (CS). The secondary aim was to identify other risk factors for osteoporosis in these patients. A cross-sectional sample of patients attending the SLE Clinic at a teaching hospital was recruited. BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Daily dietary calcium intake was assessed using a structured validated food frequency questionnaire, in which patients were asked to estimate their food intake based on their recent 2-month dietary habits. Sixty subjects were recruited with a mean age of 33.70+/-8.46 years. The median duration of CS use was 5.5 years (range 0.08-24). The median cumulative dose of steroids was 17.21 g (range 0.16-91.37). The median daily dietary calcium intake was 483 mg (range 78-2101). There was no significant correlation between calcium intake and BMD, even after correcting for CS use. There were also no correlations between BMD and the duration of SLE, cumulative CS use, duration of CS use, smoking, alcohol intake, and SLE disease activity index score. Twenty-eight (46.7%) patients had normal BMD, 28 (46.7%) had osteopenia, and four (6.6%) had osteoporosis. Duration of SLE significantly correlated with cumulative CS dosage. In conclusion, 6.7% of these Asian premenopausal SLE women had osteoporosis and only 46.7% had normal BMD. Daily dietary calcium intake did not correlate with BMD. PMID:16565892

  18. Future space transportation systems analysis study. Phase 1 extension: Transportation systems reference data, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Transportation mass requirements are developed for various mission and transportation modes based on vehicle systems sized to fit the exact needs of each mission. The parametric data used to derive the mass requirements for each mission and transportation mode are presented to enable accommodation of possible changes in mode options or payload definitions. The vehicle sizing and functional requirements used to derive the parametric data are described.

  19. DTS: the NOAO Data Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Michael J.

    2010-07-01

    The Data Transport System (DTS) provides automated, reliable, high-throughput data transfer between the telescopes, archives and pipeline processing systems used by the NOAO centers in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. DTS is implemented using an XML-RPC1 architecture to eliminate the need for persistent network connections between the sites, allowing each site to provide or consume services within the network only as needed. This architecture also permits remote control and monitoring of each site, and for language-independent client applications (e.g. a web interface to display transfer status or a compiled task to queue data for transport which is more tightly coupled with the acquisition system being used). The resulting system is a highly multi-threaded distributed application able to span a wide range of network environments and operational uses.

  20. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Greg M; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2016-01-15

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization. PMID:26538444

  1. Structural Features of Ion Transport and Allosteric Regulation in Sodium-Calcium Exchanger (NCX) Proteins.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Tal, Inbal; Khananshvili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) proteins extrude Ca(2+) from the cell to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since NCX proteins contribute to numerous physiological and pathophysiological events, their pharmacological targeting has been desired for a long time. This intervention remains challenging owing to our poor understanding of the underlying structure-dynamic mechanisms. Recent structural studies have shed light on the structure-function relationships underlying the ion-transport and allosteric regulation of NCX. The crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj) along with molecular dynamics simulations and ion flux analyses, have assigned the ion binding sites for 3Na(+) and 1Ca(2+), which are being transported in separate steps. In contrast with NCX_Mj, eukaryotic NCXs contain the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding domains, CBD1 and CBD2, which affect the membrane embedded ion-transport domains over a distance of ~80 Å. The Ca(2+)-dependent regulation is ortholog, isoform, and splice-variant dependent to meet physiological requirements, exhibiting either a positive, negative, or no response to regulatory Ca(2+). The crystal structures of the two-domain (CBD12) tandem have revealed a common mechanism involving a Ca(2+)-driven tethering of CBDs in diverse NCX variants. However, dissociation kinetics of occluded Ca(2+) (entrapped at the two-domain interface) depends on the alternative-splicing segment (at CBD2), thereby representing splicing-dependent dynamic coupling of CBDs. The HDX-MS, SAXS, NMR, FRET, equilibrium (45)Ca(2+) binding and stopped-flow techniques provided insights into the dynamic mechanisms of CBDs. Ca(2+) binding to CBD1 results in a population shift, where more constraint conformational states become highly populated without global conformational changes in the alignment of CBDs. This mechanism is common among NCXs. Recent HDX-MS studies have demonstrated that the apo CBD1 and CBD2 are stabilized by interacting with each other, while Ca(2+) binding to CBD1

  2. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fire worthiness of air transport interiors was evaluated. The effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in an uncontrolled transport aircraft fire is addressed. Modification of aircraft interior subsystem components which provide improvements in aircraft fire safety are examined. Three specific subsystem components, interior panels, seats and windows, offer the most immediate and highest payoff by modifying interior materials of existing aircrafts. It is shown that the new materials modifications reduce the fire hazards because of significant reduction in their characteristic flame spread, heat release, and smoke and toxic gas emissions.

  3. Space transportation systems for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the potential requirements, proposed configurations, inherent development problems, and technologies to be considered for future space transportation systems is presented. Such systems will include the improved Space Shuttle, new and derivative cargo launch vehicles, new propulsion systems, orbital transfer and maneuvering vehicles, and a second-generation Space Shuttle. It is concluded that more efficient and capable systems can be developed by placing strong emphasis on high reliability, safety, and improved ground and flight operations. These improvements can result from the introduction of advanced technologies and vehicles designed for operations and maintainability with the flexibility to adapt to mission needs.

  4. The Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, P.

    1996-10-01

    The present paper describes, for purposes of the Department of Energy (DoE) Hydrogen Program Review, Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period January through June 1996. This period represents the first six months of the three year project. The estimated cost over three years is $3.9M, $1.859M of which is funded by the DoE ($600 k for fiscal year 1996). The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project will demonstrate the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as vehicle power plants. This transportation system will be developed in the City of Palm Desert in southern California and will include a fleet of 8 fuel cell powered vehicles, solar and wind powered hydrogen generating facilities, a consumer-ready refueling station, and a service infrastructure. The system holds the promise of a clean environment and an energy supply that is predictable, domestic, safe, and abundant. During, the first part of 1996 SERC has nearly completed building a fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle, which features an upgraded safety and computer system; they have designed and built a test bench that is able to mimic golf cart loads and test fuel cell system auxiliary components; they have begun the design of the solar hydrogen generating station; they have worked with Sandia National Laboratory on an advanced metal hydride storage system; they have increased the power density of the SERC fuel cell by as much as 50%; and they have reached out to the rest of the world with a new fact sheet, world wide web pages, a press release, video footage for a television program. and instruction within the community.

  5. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  6. Thermal protection systems for hypersonic transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, G.; Hinger, J.; Huchler, M.

    1990-07-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic transport vehicles are described and evaluated. During the flight through the atmosphere moderate to high aerodynamic heating rates with corresponding high surface temperatures are generated. Therefore, a reliable light-weight but effective TPS is required, that limits the heat transfer into the central fuselage with the liquid hydrogen tank and that prevents the penetration of the temperature peak during stage separation to the load carrying structure. The heat transfer modes in the insulation are solid conduction, gas convection and radiation. Thermal protection systems based on different phenomena to reduce the heat transfer, like vacuum shingles, inert gas filled shingles, microporous insulations and multiwall structures, are described. It is demonstrated that microporous and multiwall insulations are efficient, light weight and reliable TPSs for future hypersonic transportation systems.

  7. DTS: The NOAO Data Transport System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Semple, T.

    2014-05-01

    The NOAO Data Transport System (DTS) provides high-throughput, reliable, data transfer between telescopes, pipelines and archive centers located in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. It is a distributed application using XML-RPC for command and control, and either parallel-TCP or UDT protocols for bulk data transport. The system is data-agnostic, allowing arbitrary files or directories to be moved using the same infrastructure. Data paths are configurable in the system by connecting nodes as the source or destination of data in a queue. Each leg of a data path may be configured independently based on the network environment between the sites. A queueing model is currently implemented to manage the automatic movement of data, a streaming model is planned to support arbitrarily large transfers (e.g. as in a disk recovery scenario) or to provide a 'pass-thru' interface to minize overheads. A web-based monitor allows anyone to get a graphical overview of the DTS system as it runs, operators will be able to control individual nodes in the system. Through careful tuning of the network paths DTS is able to achieve in excess of 80-percent of the nominal wire speed using only commodity networks, making it ideal for long-haul transport of large volumes of data.

  8. 360 degree vision system: opportunities in transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon

    2007-09-01

    Panoramic technologies are experiencing new and exciting opportunities in the transportation industries. The advantages of panoramic imagers are numerous: increased areas coverage with fewer cameras, imaging of multiple target simultaneously, instantaneous full horizon detection, easier integration of various applications on the same imager and others. This paper reports our work on panomorph optics and potential usage in transportation applications. The novel panomorph lens is a new type of high resolution panoramic imager perfectly suitable for the transportation industries. The panomorph lens uses optimization techniques to improve the performance of a customized optical system for specific applications. By adding a custom angle to pixel relation at the optical design stage, the optical system provides an ideal image coverage which is designed to reduce and optimize the processing. The optics can be customized for the visible, near infra-red (NIR) or infra-red (IR) wavebands. The panomorph lens is designed to optimize the cost per pixel which is particularly important in the IR. We discuss the use of the 360 vision system which can enhance on board collision avoidance systems, intelligent cruise controls and parking assistance. 360 panoramic vision systems might enable safer highways and significant reduction in casualties.

  9. Automatic braking system modification for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Transportation Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coogan, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications were designed for the B-737-100 Research Aircraft autobrake system hardware of the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Program at Langley Research Center. These modifications will allow the on-board flight control computer to control the aircraft deceleration after landing to a continuously variable level for the purpose of executing automatic high speed turn-offs from the runway. A bread board version of the proposed modifications was built and tested in simulated stopping conditions. Test results, for various aircraft weights, turnoff speed, winds, and runway conditions show that the turnoff speeds are achieved generally with errors less than 1 ft/sec.

  10. Calcium and Mitosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  11. Calcium effect on the metabolic pathway of phosphorus accumulating organisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ling; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Fang, Wei; Wang, Yong-Peng; Fang, Cai-Yun; Shao, Li-Min; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) have been found to act as glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) under certain conditions, thus, the deterioration in the performance of enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems is not always attributed to the proliferation of GAOs. In this work, the effects of calcium on the metabolic pathway of PAOs were explored. It was found that when the influent Ca(2+) concentration was elevated, the tendency and extent of extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation increased, and the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate was synthesized, while the microbial population remained almost unchanged. The changes in the ratios of phosphorus released/acetate uptaken, the glycogen degraded/acetate uptaken and the poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates synthesized/acetate uptaken during the anaerobic period confirm that, as the influent Ca(2+) concentration was increased, the polyphosphate-accumulating metabolism was partially shifted to the glycogen-accumulating metabolism. At an influent Ca(2+) around 50 mg/L, in addition to the extracellular calcium phosphate precipitation, the intracellular inert Ca-bound polyphosphate synthesis might also be involved in the metabolic change of PAOs. The results of the present work would be beneficial to better understand the biochemical metabolism of PAOs in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. PMID:26233656

  12. Small Aircraft Transportation System Concept and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Durham, Michael H.; Tarry, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes both the vision and the early public-private collaborative research for the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). The paper outlines an operational definition of SATS, describes how SATS conceptually differs from current air transportation capabilities, introduces four SATS operating capabilities, and explains the relation between the SATS operating capabilities and the potential for expanded air mobility. The SATS technology roadmap encompasses on-demand, widely distributed, point-to-point air mobility, through hired-pilot modes in the nearer-term, and through self-operated user modes in the farther-term. The nearer-term concept is based on aircraft and airspace technologies being developed to make the use of smaller, more widely distributed community reliever and general aviation airports and their runways more useful in more weather conditions, in commercial hired-pilot service modes. The farther-term vision is based on technical concepts that could be developed to simplify or automate many of the operational functions in the aircraft and the airspace for meeting future public transportation needs, in personally operated modes. NASA technology strategies form a roadmap between the nearer-term concept and the farther-term vision. This paper outlines a roadmap for scalable, on-demand, distributed air mobility technologies for vehicle and airspace systems. The audiences for the paper include General Aviation manufacturers, small aircraft transportation service providers, the flight training industry, airport and transportation authorities at the Federal, state and local levels, and organizations involved in planning for future National Airspace System advancements.

  13. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  14. Calcium transport in canine renal basolateral membrane vesicles. Effects of parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Scoble, J E; Mills, S; Hruska, K A

    1985-01-01

    The effects of parathyroid hormone were studied on Ca2+ fluxes in canine renal proximal tubular basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV). Efflux of Ca2+ from preloaded BLMV was found to be stimulated by an external Na+ gradient, and this was inhibited by the Na+ ionophore, monensin, and enhanced by intravesicular negative electrical potentials, which indicated electrogenic Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity. There was a Na+ gradient independent Ca2+ flux, but membrane binding of Ca2+ was excluded from contributing to the Na+ gradient-dependent efflux. The Na+ gradient-dependent flux of Ca2+ was very rapid, and even 2- and 5-s points may not fully represent absolute initial rates. It was saturable with respect to the interaction of Ca2+ and Na+ with an apparent (5 s) Km for Na+-dependent Ca2+ uptake of 10 microM, and an apparent (5 s) Vmax of 0.33 nmol/mg protein per 5 s. The Na+ concentration that yielded half maximal Ca2+ efflux (2 s) was 11 mM, and the Hill coefficient was two or greater. Both Na+ gradient dependent and independent Ca2+ efflux were decreased in BLMV prepared from kidneys of thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) dogs, and both were stimulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH) infusion to TPTX dogs. BLMV from TPTX dogs exhibited significantly reduced maximal stimulation of Na+ gradient-dependent Ca2+ uptake with an apparent (5 s) Vmax of 0.23 nmol/mg protein per 5 s, but the apparent Km was 8 microM, which was unchanged from normal. The Na+ gradient independent Ca2+ uptake was also reduced in BLMV from TPTX dogs compared with normal. Thus, PTH stimulated both Na+/Ca2+ exchange activity and Na+ independent Ca2+ flux. In vivo, the latter could result in an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ by PTH, and this might contribute to the observed decrease in solute transport in the proximal tubule. Images PMID:3988932

  15. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  16. Apatite coating of electrospun PLGA fibers using a PVA vehicle system carrying calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Ae; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    A novel method to coat electrospun poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) fiber surfaces evenly and efficiently with low-crystalline carbonate apatite crystals using a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) vehicle system carrying calcium ions was presented. A non-woven PLGA fabric was prepared by electrospinning: a 10 wt% PLGA solution was prepared using 1,1,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol as a solvent and electrospun under a electrical field of 1 kV/cm using a syringe pump with a flowing rate of 3 ml/h. The non-woven PLGA fabric, 12 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness, was cut and then coated with a PVA solution containing calcium chloride dihydrate (specimen PPC). As controls, pure non-woven PLGA fabric (specimen P) and fabric coated with a calcium chloride dihydrate solution without PVA (specimen PC) were also prepared. Three specimens were exposed to simulated body fluid for 1 week and this exposure led to form uniform and complete apatite coating layer on the fiber surfaces of specimen PPC. However, no apatite had formed to the fiber surfaces of specimen P and only inhomogeneous coating occurred on the fiber surfaces of specimen PC. These results were explained in terms of the calcium chelating and adhesive properties of PVA vehicle system. The practical implication of the results is that this method provides a simple but efficient technique for coating the fiber surface of an initially non-bioactive material with low-crystalline carbonate apatite. PMID:20507712

  17. Human Transportation System (HTS) study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Geyer, M. S.; Gaunce, M. T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes work completed under the Human Transportation System Study. This study was conducted by the New Initiatives Office at JSC with the technical support of Boeing, General Dynamics, Lockheed, McDonnell-Douglas, Martin Marietta, and Rockwell. The study was designed to generate information on determining the appropriate path to follow for new system development to meet the Nation's space transportation needs. The study evaluates 18 transportation architecture options using a parametric set of mission requirements. These options include use of current systems (e.g., Shuttle, Titan, etc. ) as well as proposed systems (e.g., PLS, Single-Stage-to-Orbit, etc.) to assess the impact of various considerations, such as the cost of alternate access, or the benefit of separating people and cargo. The architecture options are compared to each other with six measurable evaluation criteria or attributes. They are: funding profile, human safety, probability of mission success, architecture cost risk, launch schedule confidence, and environmental impact. Values for these attributes are presented for the architecture options, with pertinent conclusions and recommendations.

  18. 77 FR 24559 - Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... System National Advisory Council (MTSNAC) will hold a meeting to discuss recommendations to the Secretary on the integration of marine highways into the national transportation system and the development of... Maritime Administration Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council ACTION: National...

  19. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  20. Controlled ecological life support system: Transportation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustan, E.; Vinopal, T.

    1982-01-01

    This report discusses a study utilizing a systems analysis approach to determine which NASA missions would benefit from controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) technology. The study focuses on manned missions selected from NASA planning forecasts covering the next half century. Comparison of various life support scenarios for the selected missions and characteristics of projected transportation systems provided data for cost evaluations. This approach identified missions that derived benefits from a CELSS, showed the magnitude of the potential cost savings, and indicated which system or combination of systems would apply. This report outlines the analytical approach used in the evaluation, describes the missions and systems considered, and sets forth the benefits derived from CELSS when applicable.

  1. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  2. Cargo transportation by airships: A systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Dalton, C.

    1976-01-01

    A systems engineering study of a lighter than air airship transportation system was conducted. The feasibility of the use of airships in hauling cargo was demonstrated. Social, legal, environmental and political factors were considered as well as the technical factors necessary to design an effective airship transportation system. In order to accomplish an effective airship transportation program two phases of implementation were recommended. Phase I would involve a fleet of rigid airships of 3.5 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying 25 tons of cargo internal to the helium-filled gas bag. The Phase I fleet would demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of modern-day airships while providing a training capability for the construction and operation of larger airships. The Phase II portion would be a fleet of rigid airships of 12 million cubic feet displacement capable of carrying a cargo of 100 tons a distance of 2,000 miles at a cruising speed of 60 mph. An economic analysis is given for a variety of missions for both Phase I and Phase II airships.

  3. The Palm Desert renewable [hydrogen] transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlin, C.E.; Lehman, P.

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period June 1997 through May 1998. The project began in March 1996. The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project demonstrates the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a vehicle power system. The project includes designing and building 4 fuel cell powered vehicles, a solar hydrogen generating and refueling station, and a fuel cell vehicle diagnostic center. Over this last year, SERC has built a fuel cell powered neighborhood electric vehicle and delivered it to the City of Palm Desert. The design of the hydrogen refueling station is near completion and it is anticipated that construction will be complete in the fall of 1998. The vehicles are currently being refueled at a temporary refueling station. The diagnostic center is being designed and maintenance procedures as well as computer diagnostic programs for the fuel cell vehicles are being developed. City employees are driving the vehicles daily and monitoring data are being collected. The drivers are pleased with the performance of the vehicles.

  4. Comparative Study of Calcium Silicate Bulk Systems Produced by Different Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkó, K.; Meiszterics, A.; Rosta, L.

    The aim of this study is to prepare bulk calcium silicate system that exhibits suitable properties to be used for biomedical applications. Glass-ceramics of composition CaO ṡ SiO2 were produced by sol-gel technique starting from tetraethoxysilane and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and by melt-quenching technique using a mixture of CaCO3 and SiO2. The traditional power technology requires 1 500 °C temperature to produce ceramic bulks; contrarily the sol-gel technique 700 °C. Their structures were compared by means of thermoanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and small angle X-ray scattering. In the melt-quenched samples, the crystalline feature is dominated; the gel-derived samples are rather amorphous. The mechanical property of the calcium silicate materials obtained by different preparation routes were characterized by Brinell hardness test. The melt-quenching technology provides the glass-ceramics product with high mechanical strength at 1 500 °C; the gel derived products achieve this mechanical strength already after a heat treatment at 700 °C. The gel derived product prepared with ammonia catalyst proved to be the hardest, most compact matter.

  5. Calcium chloride effects on the glass transition of condensed systems of potato starch.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Lillian; Panyoyai, Naksit; Katopo, Lita; Shanks, Robert; Kasapis, Stefan

    2016-05-15

    The effect of calcium chloride on the structural properties of condensed potato starch undergoing a thermally induced glass transition has been studied using dynamic mechanical analysis and modulated differential scanning calorimetry. Extensive starch gelatinisation was obtained by hot pressing at 120°C for 7 min producing materials that covered a range of moisture contents from 3.7% w/w (11% relative humidity) to 18.8% w/w (75% relative humidity). FTIR, ESEM and WAXD were also performed in order to elucidate the manner by which salt addition affects the molecular interactions and morphology of condensed starch. Experimental protocol ensured the development of amorphous matrices that exhibited thermally reversible glassy consistency. Both moisture content and addition of calcium chloride affected the mechanical strength and glass transition temperature of polymeric systems. Highly reactive calcium ions form a direct interaction with starch to alter considerably its structural properties via an anti-plasticizing effect, as compared to the polymer-water matrix. PMID:26776036

  6. Next generation: In-space transportation system(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Fredrick; Redus, Jerry; Kelley, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the next generation In-Space Transportation System presents a unique challenge to the design of a propulsion system for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Never before have the requirements for long-life, multiple mission use, space basing, high reliability, man-rating, and minimum maintenance come together with performance in one system that must protect the lives of space travelers, support the mission logistics needs, and do so at an acceptable cost. The challenge that is presented is to quantify the bounds of these requirements. The issue is one of degree. The length of acceptable life in space, the time it takes for reuse to pay off, and the degree to which space basing is practical (full, partial, or expended) are the issues that determine the reusable bounds of a design and include dependability, contingency capabilities, resilency, and minimum dependence on a maintenance node in preparation for and during a mission. Missions to planet earth, other non-NASA missions, and planetary missions will provide important but less demanding requirements for the transportation systems of the future. The mission proposed for the SEI require a family of transportation vehicles to meet the requirements for establishing a permanent human presence on the Moon and eventually on Mars. Specialized vehicles are needed to accomplish the different phases of each mission. These large scale missions require assembly in space and will provide the greatest usage of the planned integrated transportation system. The current approach to defining the In-Space Transportation System for the SEI Moon missions with later Mars mission applications is presented. Several system development options, propulsion concepts, current/proposed activities are reviewed, and key propulsion design criteria, issues, and technology challenges for the next generation In-Space Transportation System(s) are outlined.

  7. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  8. High Energy Particle Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-12-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAM is an upgraded version of the code CCC-694/NMTC-JAERI97, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAM simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nuclear meson transport processes. The applicable energy range of NMTC/JAM was extended in principle up to 200 GeV for nucleons and mesons by introducing the high energy nuclear reaction code Jet-Aa Microscopic (JAM) for the intra-nuclear cascade part. For the evaporation andmore » fission process, a new model, GEM, can be used to describe the light nucleus production from the excited residual nucleus. According to the extension of the applicable energy, the nucleon-nucleus non-elastic, elastic and differential elastic cross section data were upgraded. In addition, the particle transport in a magnetic field was implemented for beam transport calculations. Some new tally functions were added, and the format of input and output of data is more user friendly. These new calculation functions and utilities provide a tool to carry out reliable neutronics study of a large scale target system with complex geometry more accurately and easily than with the previous model. It implements an intranuclear cascade model taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects and the preequilibrium calculation model based on the exciton one. For treating the nucleon transport process, the nucleon-nucleus cross sections are revised to those derived by the systematics of Pearlstein. Moreover, the level density parameter derived by Ignatyuk is included as a new option for particle evaporation calculation. A geometry package based on the Combinatorial Geometry with multi-array system and the importance sampling technique is implemented in the code. Tally function is also employed for obtaining such physical quantities as neutron energy spectra, heat deposition and nuclide yield without editing a history file. The code can simulate both the primary spallation reaction and the

  9. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  10. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  11. Corridor guided transport system utilizing permanent magnet levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, J.J.; Poland, A.P.; Lombardi, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    The invention relates to a corridor guided transport system including a guided goods conveyance container utilizing permanent magnet levitation. The transport system of the invention eliminates the need for the wheel and track arrangement presently required by known and utilized conventional train systems and also required by some conventional magnetic levitation transport systems and, as a result, is safer to operate and maintain than either of these known transportation systems.

  12. Hyperspectral range imaging for transportation systems evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgelall, Raj; Rafert, J. B.; Atwood, Don; Tolliver, Denver D.

    2016-04-01

    Transportation agencies expend significant resources to inspect critical infrastructure such as roadways, railways, and pipelines. Regular inspections identify important defects and generate data to forecast maintenance needs. However, cost and practical limitations prevent the scaling of current inspection methods beyond relatively small portions of the network. Consequently, existing approaches fail to discover many high-risk defect formations. Remote sensing techniques offer the potential for more rapid and extensive non-destructive evaluations of the multimodal transportation infrastructure. However, optical occlusions and limitations in the spatial resolution of typical airborne and space-borne platforms limit their applicability. This research proposes hyperspectral image classification to isolate transportation infrastructure targets for high-resolution photogrammetric analysis. A plenoptic swarm of unmanned aircraft systems will capture images with centimeter-scale spatial resolution, large swaths, and polarization diversity. The light field solution will incorporate structure-from-motion techniques to reconstruct three-dimensional details of the isolated targets from sequences of two-dimensional images. A comparative analysis of existing low-power wireless communications standards suggests an application dependent tradeoff in selecting the best-suited link to coordinate swarming operations. This study further produced a taxonomy of specific roadway and railway defects, distress symptoms, and other anomalies that the proposed plenoptic swarm sensing system would identify and characterize to estimate risk levels.

  13. An overview of European space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    With the completion of the launch rocket series Ariane 1 to 4, Europe will have reached the same capacity to transport commercial payloads as the USA has with the Space Shuttle and the kick stages which are presently operative. The near term development of these capacities would require Europe to develop a larger launch rocket, Araine 5. Further motivations for this rocket are access to manned spaceflight, the development of an European space station, and the demand for shuttle technology. Shuttle technology is the subject of research being done in France on the winged re-entry vehicle Hermes. Operation of the European space station Columbus will require development of an interorbital transport system to facilitate traffic between the various segments of the space station. All European space transportation systems will have to match their quality to that of the other countries involve in space flight. All areas of development are marked not only by possible cooperation but also by increased competition because of increasing commercialization of space flight.

  14. National Space Transportation System (NSTS) technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, David L.; Ulrich, Kimberly K.

    1990-01-01

    The National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is one of the Nation's most valuable resources, providing manned transportation to and from space in support of payloads and scientific research. The NSTS program is currently faced with the problem of hardware obsolescence, which could result in unacceptable schedule and cost impacts to the flight program. Obsolescence problems occur because certain components are no longer being manufactured or repair turnaround time is excessive. In order to achieve a long-term, reliable transportation system that can support manned access to space through 2010 and beyond, NASA must develop a strategic plan for a phased implementation of enhancements which will satisfy this long-term goal. The NSTS program has initiated the Assured Shuttle Availability (ASA) project with the following objectives: eliminate hardware obsolescence in critical areas, increase reliability and safety of the vehicle, decrease operational costs and turnaround time, and improve operational capability. The strategy for ASA will be to first meet the mandatory needs - keep the Shuttle flying. Non-mandatory changes that will improve operational capability and enhance performance will then be considered if funding is adequate. Upgrade packages should be developed to install within designated inspection periods, grouped in a systematic approach to reduce cost and schedule impacts, and allow the capability to provide a Block 2 Shuttle (Phase 3).

  15. Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlying mechanism of calcium oscillations through the power of mathematical modeling. We also summarize recent findings on the role of calcium entry through store-operated channels in sustaining calcium oscillations and in the mechanism by which calcium oscillations couple to downstream effectors. PMID:21421924

  16. Effects of age on calcium transport activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum in fast- and slow-twitch rat muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, L; Salviati, G

    1989-01-01

    1. The calcium transport activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was measured in chemically skinned single fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres from young (3 months) and old (23-24 months) rats. Contractile properties, the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition and enzyme histochemical features were studied in relation to the SR characteristics. 2. In fast-twitch single motor units, the contraction time of the isometric twitch increased (P less than 0.001) from 13 +/- 1 ms in young animals to 18 +/- 2 ms in old ones. In the slow-twitch soleus, the contraction (P less than 0.001) and half-relaxation (P less than 0.05) times increased from 30 +/- 5 and 45 +/- 10 ms, respectively, in the young animals to 43 +/- 3 and 55 +/- 4 ms in the old ones. The proportion of slow-twitch (type I) fibres increased (P less than 0.05) with age in the soleus from 92 +/- 6 to 98 +/- 2% and the proportion of fast-twitch fibres (type IIA) decreased (P less than 0.01) from 6 +/- 5 to 0 +/- 0%. 3. The Ca2+ accumulation capacity (an index of SR volume), the rate of Ca2+ uptake and the fractional rate of SR filling (an estimate of the specific activity of the Ca2+ pump) were decreased by 18 (P less than 0.05), 32 (P less than 0.01) and 32% (P less than 0.001), respectively, in the old fast-twitch muscle fibres. In the slow-twitch muscle fibres, on the other hand, no significant age-related changes were observed in the Ca2+ transport activity of the SR. Thus, ageing exerts a differential influence on SR volume and function in fast- and slow-twitch fibres. 4. It is concluded that an age-related impairment of intrinsic SR function and a decrease in SR volume are probable factors underlying the decreased speed of contraction of fast-twitch muscle fibres in old age. In the slow-twitch soleus, on the other hand, one or more other mechanisms are responsible for the age-related decrease in the speed of contraction. The loss of fast-twitch muscle fibres in old soleus is one mechanism, but not the

  17. Technological Support for Logistics Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, Andrzej; Śliwa, Zdzisław; Gębczyńska, Alicja

    The modern world is changing introducing robots, remotely controlled vehicles and other crewless means of transportation to reduce people's mistakes, as the main cause of incidents and crashes during traffic. New technologies are supporting operators and drivers, and according to some studies they can even replace them. Such programs as: AHS, UAH, IVBSS or MTVR are under development to improve traffic flow and its safety, to reduce traffic hazards and crashes. It is necessary to analyze such concepts and implement them boldly, including Polish logistics' companies, new programs, highways' system etc., as they will be applied in the future, so it is necessary to prepare logistics infrastructure ahead of time in order to capitalize on these improvements. The problem is quite urgent as transportation in the country must not be outdated to meet clients' expectations and to keep pace with competing foreign companies.

  18. Design of Large Momentum Acceptance Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Douglas

    2005-05-01

    The use of energy recovery to enable high power linac operation often gives rise to an attendant challenge--the transport of high power beams subtending large phase space volumes. In particular applications--such as FEL driver accelerators--this manifests itself as a requirement for beam transport systems with large momentum acceptance. We will discuss the design, implementation, and operation of such systems. Though at times counterintuitive in behavior (perturbative descriptions may, for example, be misleading), large acceptance systems have been successfully utilized for generations as spectrometers and accelerator recirculators [1]. Such systems are in fact often readily designed using appropriate geometric descriptions of beam behavior; insight provided using such a perspective may in addition reveal inherent symmetries that simplify construction and improve operability. Our discussion will focus on two examples: the Bates-clone recirculator used in the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR U pgrade FEL (which has an observed acceptance of 10% or more) and a compaction-managed mirror-bend achromat concept with an acceptance ranging from 50 to 150 MeV.

  19. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory hormones.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, A; Brown, J M; Williams, J S

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence of a clinically relevant interplay between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and calcium-regulatory systems. Classically, the former is considered a key regulator of sodium and volume homeostasis, while the latter is most often associated with skeletal health. However, emerging evidence suggests an overlap in regulatory control. Hyperaldosteronism and hyperparathyroidism represent pathophysiologic conditions that may contribute to or perpetuate each other; aldosterone regulates parathyroid hormone and associates with adverse skeletal complications, and parathyroid hormone regulates aldosterone and associates with adverse cardiovascular complications. As dysregulation in both systems is linked to poor cardiovascular and skeletal health, it is increasingly important to fully characterize how they interact to more precisely understand their impact on human health and potential therapies to modulate these interactions. This review describes the known clinical interactions between these two systems including observational and interventional studies. Specifically, we review studies describing the inhibition of renin activity by calcium and vitamin D, and a potentially bidirectional and stimulatory relationship between aldosterone and parathyroid hormone. Deciphering these relationships might clarify variability in outcomes research, inform the design of future intervention studies and provide insight into the results of prior and ongoing intervention studies. However, before these opportunities can be addressed, more effort must be placed on shifting observational data to the proof of concept phase. This will require reallocation of resources to conduct interventional studies and secure the necessary talent. PMID:25631218

  20. Calcium phosphate-PEG-insulin-casein (CAPIC) particles as oral delivery systems for insulin.

    PubMed

    Morçöl, T; Nagappan, P; Nerenbaum, L; Mitchell, A; Bell, S J D

    2004-06-11

    An oral delivery system for insulin was developed and functional activity was tested in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. Calcium phosphate particles containing insulin was synthesized in the presence of PEG-3350 and modified by aggregating the particles with caseins to obtain the calcium phosphate-PEG-insulin-casein (CAPIC) oral insulin delivery system. Single doses of CAPIC formulation were tested in NOD mice under fasting or fed conditions to evaluate the glycemic activity. The blood glucose levels were monitored every 1-2h for 12h following the treatments using an ACCU CHECK blood glucose monitoring system. Orally administered and subcutaneously injected free insulin solution served as controls in the study. Based on the results obtained we propose that: (1). the biological activity of insulin is preserved in CAPIC formulation; (2). insulin in CAPIC formulations, but not the free insulin, displays a prolonged hypoglycemic effect after oral administration to diabetic mice; (3). CAPIC formulation protects insulin from degradation while passing through the acidic environment of the GI track until it is released in the less acidic environment of the intestines where it can be absorbed in its biologically active form; (4). CAPIC formulation represents a new and unique oral delivery system for insulin and other macromolecules. PMID:15158972

  1. Chemically generated convective transport in microfluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Das, Sambeeta; Altemose, Alicia; Shum, Henry; Balazs, Anna; Sen, Ayusman

    High precision manipulation of small volumes of fluid, containing suspended micron sized objects like cells, viruses, and large molecules, is one of the main goals in designing modern lab-on-a-chip devices which can find a variety of chemical and biological applications. To transport the cargo toward sensing elements, typical microfluidic devices often use pressure driven flows. Here, we propose to use enzymatic chemical reactions which decompose reagent into less dense products and generate flows that can transport particles. Density variations that lead to flow in the assigned direction are created between the place where reagent is fed into the solution and the location where it is decomposed by enzymes attached to the surface of the microchannel. When the reagent is depleted, the fluid motion stops and particles sediment to the bottom. We demonstrate how the choice of chemicals, leading to specific reaction rates, can affect the transport properties. In particular, we show that the intensity of the fluid flow, the final location of cargo, and the time for cargo delivery are controlled by the amount and type of reagent in the system.

  2. Anomalous transport in ergodic lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar Lev, Yevgeny; Reichman, David R.

    Many-body localization transition is a peculiar dynamical transition between ergodic and non-ergodic phases, which may occur at any temperature and in any dimension. For temperatures below the transition the system is nonergodic and localized, such that conductivity strictly vanishes at the thermodynamic limit, while for temperatures above the transition the system is thermal and conductive. In this talk I will present a comprehensive study of the dynamical properties of the ergodic phase in one and two dimensional generic disordered and interacting systems, conducted using a combination of nonequilibrium diagrammatic techniques and numerically exact methods. I will show that the ergodic phase, which was expected to be diffusive, exhibits anomalous transport regime for nontrivial times and explain how our findings settle with phenomenological theoretical models. NSF-CHE-1644802.

  3. Saenger space transportation system - Progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, Dietrich E.; Kuczera, Heribert

    1992-10-01

    The first part of the Saenger System Definition Study within the German National Hypersonics Technology Program (1988 to 1992) was completed by mid-1990. This paper summarizes the progress made and the status of the project as of that milestone which was formally completed by the System Study Presentation in July 1990. For the second phase of the study (mid-1990 to end 1992) the original philosophy of different upper stages for manned space operations and for unmanned cargo/payloads transportation is being maintained, however, a winged unmanned Horus-C version has been found to be a better solution than the originally conceived expendable ballistic stage Cargus. The advantage of this twin-Horus Concept is the greater commonality of both upper stages as well as the new return capability of payloads up to 7 Mg. The maximum payload capability of the expendable stage was of course higher, but it is assumed that for larger payloads a complementary launch vehicle (i.e. Ariane 5) will be further available. The paper also presents new data about the Horus return flight trajectories as well as on the aerothermodynamic studies and experimental work. Finally, aspects of mission operations and economics are discussed which are of special importance for such an advanced reusable space transportation system.

  4. Space transportation system biomedical operations support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    The shift of the Space Transportation System (STS) flight tests of the orbiter vehicle to the preparation and flight of the payloads is discussed. Part of this change is the transition of the medical and life sciences aspects of the STS flight operations to reflect the new state. The medical operations, the life sciences flight experiments support requirements and the intramural research program expected to be at KSC during the operational flight period of the STS and a future space station are analyzed. The adequacy of available facilities, plans, and resources against these future needs are compared; revisions and/or alternatives where appropriate are proposed.

  5. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The STS 41-C National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the eleventh Shuttle flight and fifth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Also summarized are the significant problems that occurred during STS 41-C, and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight. The major objectives of flight STS 41-C were to successfully deploy the LDEF (long duration exposure facility) and retrieve, repair and redeploy the SMM (Solar Maximum Mission) spacecraft, and perform functions of IMAX and Cinema 360 cameras.

  6. Operating systems in the air transportation environment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Consideration of the problems facing air transport at present, and to be expected in the future. In the Northeast Corridor these problems involve community acceptance, airway and airport congestion and delays, passenger acceptance, noise reduction, and improvements in low-density short-haul economics. In the development of a superior short-haul operating system, terminal-configured vs cruise-configured vehicles are evaluated. CTOL, STOL, and VTOL aircraft of various types are discussed. In the field of noise abatement, it is shown that flight procedural techniques are capable of supplementing ?quiet engine' technology.

  7. Conceptual design of a Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and several major aerospace corporations the University of Minnesota has developed a scenario to place humans on Mars by the year 2016. The project took the form of a year-long design course in the senior design curricula at the University's Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department. Students worked with the instructor, teaching assistants and engineers in industry to develop a vehicle and the associated mission profile to fulfill the requirements of the Mars Transportation System. This report is a summary of the final design and the process though which the final product was developed.

  8. Future Intelligent Transportation Systems and Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Akio

    A road vehicle traffic contributes to the social improvement greatly, but it has big problems such as safety, congestion, environment, energy, elder people driving and adaptation to information society. ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) is expected as a direction solving these. The intellectual function about a road vehicle traffic depended on most of human beings. ITS helps intellectual functions such as information sensing, situation recognition, judgment, planning and operation. A sensor detecting information is an important key in ITS. I describe expectation to a sensor in ITS.

  9. Progress toward an integrated advanced transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1989-01-01

    Long term mission and payload mass requirements have been inventoried in NASA's Civil Needs Data Base, thereby establishing a framework for the analysis of launch vehicle requirements as well as time-frame requirements for the availability of specific launch vehicle and orbit-transfer vehicle capabilities. The Next Manned Transportation System studies conducted within this framework focus on the definition of options for manned flight operations beyond current Space Shuttle capabilities. Also under way are Assured Crew Return Capability studies for the Space Station Freedom, and Space Transfer Vehicle studies for a space-based aerobraking spacecraft.

  10. Mars integrated transportation system multistage Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the objective of the Mars Integrated Transport System (MITS) program, the Multistage Mars Mission (MSMM) design team developed a profile for a manned mission to Mars. The purpose of the multistage mission is to send a crew of five astronauts to the martian surface by the year 2019. The mission continues man's eternal quest for exploration of new frontiers. This mission has a scheduled duration of 426 days that includes experimentation en route as well as surface exploration and experimentation. The MSMM is also designed as a foundation for a continuing program leading to the colonization of the planet Mars.

  11. A space transportation system operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a description of a computer program which permits assessment of the operational support requirements of space transportation systems functioning in both a ground- and space-based environment. The scenario depicted provides for the delivery of payloads from Earth to a space station and beyond using upper stages based at the station. Model results are scenario dependent and rely on the input definitions of delivery requirements, task times, and available resources. Output is in terms of flight rate capabilities, resource requirements, and facility utilization. A general program description, program listing, input requirements, and sample output are included.

  12. The Interaction of Calcium and Auxin in the Gravitropic Response of Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The role of calcium redistribution in the responding region of the root is examined, however, the potential connection between calcium and auxin redistribution in the elongation zone is not found. The following items are examined: (1) the effect of gravity on calcium movement across the elongation zone; (2) the effect of gravity on auxin movement across the elongation zone; and (3) the effect of calcium on auxin movement across the elongation zone. It is indicated that gravistimulation induces a physiological asymmetry in the auxin transport system of maize roots and that calcium increases the total transport of auxin across the root. Gravistimulation is apparently necessary for the enhancing effect of calcium on lateral auxin movement, and it is possible that the preferential downward movement of calcium across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots plays a role in establishing the auxin asymmetry proposed to cause positive gravitropic curvature.

  13. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... systems operated by public airport operators, which provide designated public transportation and connect.... Public airports which operate fixed route transportation systems are subject to the requirements of this... part. (b) Fixed-route transportation systems operated by public airport operators between the...

  14. Third-order TRANSPORT: A computer program for designing charged particle beam transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.; Brown, K.L.; Rothacker, F.

    1995-05-01

    TRANSPORT has been in existence in various evolutionary versions since 1963. The present version of TRANSPORT is a first-, second-, and third-order matrix multiplication computer program intended for the design of static-magnetic beam transport systems. This report discusses the following topics on TRANSPORT: Mathematical formulation of TRANSPORT; input format for TRANSPORT; summaries of TRANSPORT elements; preliminary specifications; description of the beam; physical elements; other transformations; assembling beam lines; operations; variation of parameters for fitting; and available constraints -- the FIT command.

  15. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  16. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  17. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soils, ground water and surface waters. This document describes the requirements for such a laboratory.

  18. Transport systems research vehicle color display system operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, Wesley C.; Johnson, Larry E.

    1989-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle operated by the Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office at the NASA Langley Research Center has resulted in an all-glass panel in the research flight deck. Eight ARINC-D size CRT color displays make up the panel. A major goal of the display upgrade effort was ease of operation and maintenance of the hardware while maintaining versatility needed for flight research. Software is the key to this required versatility and will be the area demanding the most detailed technical design expertise. This document is is intended to serve as a single source of quick reference information needed for routine operation and system level maintenance. Detailed maintenance and modification of the display system will require specific design documentation and must be accomplished by individuals with specialized knowledge and experience.

  19. Sensor system for fuel transport vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; West, David L.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary sensor system for a fuel transport vehicle can comprise a fuel marker sensor positioned between a fuel storage chamber of the vehicle and an access valve for the fuel storage chamber of the vehicle. The fuel marker sensor can be configured to measure one or more characteristics of one or more fuel markers present in the fuel adjacent the sensor, such as when the marked fuel is unloaded at a retail station. The one or more characteristics can comprise concentration and/or identity of the one or more fuel markers in the fuel. Based on the measured characteristics of the one or more fuel markers, the sensor system can identify the fuel and/or can determine whether the fuel has been adulterated after the marked fuel was last measured, such as when the marked fuel was loaded into the vehicle.

  20. A study of characteristics of intercity transportation systems. Phase 1: Definition of transportation comparison methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. M.; Smith, J. L.; Lifson, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine a unified methodological framework for the comparison of intercity passenger and freight transportation systems; (2) to review the attributes of existing and future transportation systems for the purpose of establishing measures of comparison. These objectives were made more specific to include: (1) development of a methodology for comparing long term transportation trends arising from implementation of various R&D programs; (2) definition of value functions and attribute weightings needed for further transportation goals.

  1. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  2. Biodegradable calcium phosphate nanoparticle with lipid coating for systemic siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Chen, Yun-Ching; Tseng, Yu-Cheng; Mozumdar, Subho; Huang, Leaf

    2010-03-19

    A lipid coated calcium phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle (NP) formulation was developed for efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to a xenograft tumor model by intravenous administration. Based on the previous formulation, liposome-polycation-DNA (LPD), which was a DNA-protamine complex wrapped by cationic liposome followed by post-insertion of PEG, LCP was similar to LPD NP except that the core was replaced by a biodegradable nano-sized calcium phosphate precipitate prepared by using water-in-oil micro-emulsions in which siRNA was entrapped. We hypothesized that after entering the cells, LCP would de-assemble at low pH in the endosome, which would cause endosome swelling and bursting to release the entrapped siRNA. Such a mechanism was demonstrated by the increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration as shown by using a calcium specific dye Fura-2. The LCP NP was further modified by post-insertion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) with or without anisamide, a sigma-1 receptor ligand for systemic administration. Luciferase siRNA was used to evaluate the gene silencing effect in H-460 cells which were stably transduced with a luciferase gene. The anisamide modified LCP NP silenced about 70% and 50% of luciferase activity for the tumor cells in culture and those grown in a xenograft model, respectively. The untargeted NP showed a very low silencing effect. The new formulation improved the in vitro silencing effect 3-4 folds compared to the previous LPD formulation, but had a negligible immunotoxicity. PMID:19919845

  3. Dissolved Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates Promote Arsenate Release From Ferrihydrite in Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfield, S. L.; Bostick, B. C.

    2007-12-01

    Field data from water systems around the world have shown that arsenic can reach toxic concentrations in dynamic groundwater systems. This is generally in contrast to analogous static systems at circumneutral pH, where arsenic is strongly retained by sorption to iron (hydr)oxides. Our research examines the effect of calcium and magnesium carbonates on As(V) mobility. In both dynamic flow and static experiments, arsenate was pre- sorbed to poorly crystalline iron hydroxides (1-10% sorption capacity), with varying aqueous compositions including calcium, magnesium, carbonate, sulfate, lactate, and other common groundwater species (pH 7.5-8). Thus we investigated how the dissolution of common carbonate minerals, specifically CaCO3 and MgCO3, affect arsenic behavior in the context of groundwater solutions. Under static (batch) conditions, no measurable arsenic (<10 μg/L) is released into solutions containing alkaline earth metals (AEMs) and carbonates. When elevated concentrations of AEMs and carbonate are introduced by dynamic flow, however, arsenic is mobilized at up to 500 μg/L, releasing significant proportions the total arsenic present. This is only the case when both of these species are present; with other common ion pairs, little to no arsenic is released. These results indicate that arsenate adsorption is kinetically controlled under flow conditions, resulting in very different mobility relative to otherwise equivalent static systems. Furthermore, the combination of alkaline earth metals and carbonates promotes As(V) mobility in column-based systems. We propose that these phenomena indicate a combination of physical and chemical effects by which diffusion limitation becomes dominant in limiting arsenic sorption in flow systems. Many carbonate-buffered aquifers, as well as those undergoing rapid mineralization of organic matter, could be affected by these processes of AEM-carbonate-limited sorption and increased arsenic mobility.

  4. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  5. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  6. A study of characteristics of intercity transportation systems. Phase 1: Definition of transportation comparison methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. M.; Smith, J. L.; Lifson, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    Decision making in early transportation planning must be responsive to complex value systems representing various policies and objectives. The assessment of alternative transportation concepts during the early initial phases of the system life cycle, when supportive research and technology development activities are defined, requires estimates of transportation, environmental, and socio-economic impacts throughout the system life cycle, which is a period of some 40 or 50 years. A unified methodological framework for comparing intercity passenger and freight transportation systems is described and is extended to include the comparison of long term transportation trends arising from implementation of the various R & D programs. The attributes of existing and future transportation systems are reviewed in order to establish measures for comparison, define value functions, and attribute weightings needed for comparing alternative policy actions for furthering transportation goals. Comparison criteria definitions and an illustrative example are included.

  7. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... best treatment for the most common type of kidney stone , which is made of calcium. This type of ... the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production ...

  8. Simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01

    A simulation framework has been developed for a large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed for running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems, but can run on standalone workstations for smaller simulations. The simulator currently models instrumented smart vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factors studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver personality and behavior, and vehicle type. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of the approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  9. NASA's advanced space transportation system launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1991-01-01

    Some insight is provided into the advanced transportation planning and systems that will evolve to support long term mission requirements. The general requirements include: launch and lift capacity to low earth orbit (LEO); space based transfer systems for orbital operations between LEO and geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), the Moon, and Mars; and Transfer vehicle systems for long duration deep space probes. These mission requirements are incorporated in the NASA Civil Needs Data Base. To accomplish these mission goals, adequate lift capacity to LEO must be available: to support science and application missions; to provide for construction of the Space Station Freedom; and to support resupply of personnel and supplies for its operations. Growth in lift capacity must be time phased to support an expanding mission model that includes Freedom Station, the Mission to Planet Earth, and an expanded robotic planetary program. The near term increase in cargo lift capacity associated with development of the Shuttle-C is addressed. The joint DOD/NASA Advanced Launch System studies are focused on a longer term new cargo capability that will significantly reduce costs of placing payloads in space.

  10. Code System To Analyze Radiological Impact From Radwaste Transportation.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1988-05-01

    Version 00 RADSHIP-2 is a computer code system used to analyze the environmental impact of radwaste transportation in Taiwan. The specific transport scheme including the land transport by truck and sea transport by ship or barge were considered in the analysis for normal transport and transport accident conditions. The code combines meteorological, population, health physics, transportation, packaging and material factors and has the capability to obtain the results of the expected annual population radiation exposure,more » the expected number of annual latent cancer fatalities and the annual probability of a given number of early fatalities.« less

  11. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  12. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  13. Safety awareness continuity in transportation and space systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macidull, John C.

    The paper discusses safety awareness in transportation and space systems, the roles of definitions, statistics and accident investigation in relation to transportation safety using examples of naval and commercial aircraft historical data, and the Space Shuttle Challenger investigation.

  14. The mammalian transferrin-independent iron transport system may involve a surface ferrireductase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, I; Kaplan, J

    1994-01-01

    Mammalian cells accumulate iron from ferric citrate or ferric nitrilotriacetate through the activity of a transferrin-independent iron transport system [Sturrock, Alexander, Lamb, Craven and Kaplan (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 3139-3145]. The uptake system might recognize and transport ferric-anion complexes, or cells may reduce ferric iron at the surface and then transport ferrous iron. To distinguish between these possibilities we exposed cells to either [59Fe]ferric citrate or ferric [14C]citrate and determined whether accumulation of iron was accompanied by the obligatory accumulation of citrate. In HeLa cells and human skin fibroblasts the rate of accumulation of iron was three to five times greater than that of citrate. Incubation of fibroblasts with ferric citrate or ferric ammonium citrate resulted in an enhanced accumulation of iron and citrate; the molar ratio of accumulation approaching unity. A similar rate of citrate accumulation, however, was observed when ferric citrate-incubated cells were exposed to [14C]citrate alone. Further studies demonstrated the independence of iron and citrate accumulation: addition of unlabelled citrate to cells decreased the uptake of labelled citrate without affecting the accumulation of 59Fe; iron uptake was decreased by the addition of ferrous chelators whereas the uptake of citrate was unaffected; reduction of ferric iron by ascorbate increased the uptake of iron but had no effect on the uptake of citrate. When HeLa cells were depleted of calcium, iron uptake decreased, but there was little effect on citrate uptake. These results indicate that transport of iron does not require the obligatory transport of citrate and vice versa. The mammalian transferrin-independent iron transport system appears functionally similar to iron transport systems in both the bacterial and plant kingdoms which require the activities of both a surface reductase and a ferrous metal transporter. PMID:7945215

  15. Fireworthiness of transport aircraft interior systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The key materials question is addressed concerning the effect of interior systems on the survival of passengers and crew in the case of an uncontrolled transport aircraft fire. Technical opportunities are examined which are available through the modification of aircraft interior subsystem components, modifications that may reasonably be expected to provide improvements in aircraft fire safety. Subsystem components discussed are interior panels, seats, and windows. By virtue of their role in real fire situations and as indicated by the results of large scale simulation tests, these components appear to offer the most immediate and highest payoff possible by modifying interior materials of existing aircraft. These modifications have the potential of reducing the rate of fire growth, with a consequent reduction of heat, toxic gas, and smoke emission throughout the habitable interior of an aircraft, whatever the initial source of the fire.

  16. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-09-28

    A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

  17. Fuel cell system for transportation applications

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Krumpelt, Michael; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

  18. The air transportation/energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The changing pattern of transportation is discussed, and the energy intensiveness of various modes of transportation is also analyzed. Sociopsychological data affecting why people travel by air are presented, along with governmental regulation and air transportation economics. The aviation user tax structure is shown in tabular form.

  19. Calcium Intake and Ion Transporter Genetic Polymorphisms Interact in Human Colorectal Neoplasia Risk in a 2-Phase Study123

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiangzhu; Liang, Ji; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Ness, Reid M.; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Chen, Zhi; Li, Guoliang; Wiese, Dawn; Zhang, Bing; Smalley, Walter E.; Edwards, Todd L.; Giovannucci, Edward; Zheng, Wei; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The kidney-specific sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) protein encoded by solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) is the direct downstream effector of the inward-rectifier potassium channel (ROMK) encoded by potassium inwardly-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 1 (KCNJ1), both of which are critical for calcium reabsorption in the kidney. Objective: We hypothesized that polymorphisms in KCNJ1, SLC12A1, and 7 other genes may modify the association between calcium intake and colorectal neoplasia risk. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase study in 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. Results: In phase I, we identified 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly interacted with calcium intake in adenoma risk. In phase II, rs2855798 in KCNJ1 was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, the P values for interactions between calcium intake and rs2855798 were 1 × 10−4 for all adenoma and 5 × 10−3 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with no variant allele but was significantly associated with a 41% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried at least 1 variant allele in KCNJ1. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 52% among those with at least 1 variant allele. The P values for interactions between calcium intake and combined SNPs from the KCNJ1 and SLC12A1 genes were 7.5 × 10−5 for adenoma and 9.9 × 10−5 for multiple/advanced adenoma. The highest calcium intake was not associated with risk among those with nonvariant alleles in 2 genes but was significantly associated with a 34% reduced adenoma risk among those who carried a variant allele in 1 of the genes. The corresponding reduction in risk of multiple or advanced adenomas was 64% among those with variant alleles in both genes. Conclusion: These findings, if confirmed, will be critical for the development of personalized

  20. Argonne simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Canfield, T.; Brown-VanHoozer, A.; Tentner, A.

    1996-04-01

    A simulation framework has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed to run on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems; however, a version for a stand alone workstation is also available. The ITS simulator includes an Expert Driver Model (EDM) of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units. The EDM is capable of performing optimal route planning and communicating with Traffic Management Centers (TMC). A dynamic road map data base is sued for optimum route planning, where the data is updated periodically to reflect any changes in road or weather conditions. The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces that includes human-factors studies to support safety and operational research. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factor studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver`s personality and behavior and vehicle type. The simulator has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers, but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of the developed simulator is that vehicles will be represented by autonomous computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. Vehicle processes interact with each other and with ITS components by exchanging messages. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  1. A flow-system comparison of the reactivities of calcium superoxide and potassium superoxide with carbon dioxide and water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, P. C.; Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    A single pass flow system was used to test the reactivity of calcium superoxide with respiratory gases and the performance was compared to that of potassium superoxide. The KO2 system is used by coal miners as a self-contained unit in rescue operations. Particular attention was given to the reactivity with carbon dioxide and water vapor at different temperatures and partial pressures of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. The calcium superoxide beds were found to absorb CO2 and H2O vapor, releasing O2. The KO2 bed, however, released O2 at twice the rate of CO2 absorption at 37 C. It is concluded that the calcium superoxide material is not a suitable replacement for the KO2 bed, although Ca(O2)2 may be added to the KO2 bed to enhance the CO2 absorption.

  2. Distribution of calcium ions at the interface between resin bonding materials and tooth dentin. Use of commercially available adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Hanaizumi, Y; Maeda, T; Takano, Y

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that calcium ions play a key role in chemical (chelate) binding between the adhesive resin and dentin surface. However, no data is available concerning how calcium ions are distributed at the binding sites. The aim of this study is to demonstrate calcium ions at the resin-dentin interface by means of X-ray microanalysis and calcium ion-sensitive histochemical staining. The dentin surface in human teeth was ground by use of 240 grit silicon carbide abrasive paper under running water and treated with the dentin-primer and adhesive resin in Clearfil Liner Bond System or IMPERVA Bond System according to the manufacturer's instructions. After removing dentin matrix and isolating adhesive resin by the KOH-digestion method, one half of the samples were processed for scanning electron microscopy. The rest were embedded in Epon 812 and processed either for glyoxal bis (2-hydroxyanil) (GBHA) staining or transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed Ca-phosphate deposits at the bottom of the resin-impregnated layer. The adhesive resin above the resin-impregnated layer was amorphous and showed no precipitates of Ca-phosphate. GBHA displayed intense calcium reactions throughout the resin-impregnated layer and also moderate ones in the 10 microns (Clearfil Liner Bond System) or 30 microns (IMPERVA Bonding System) thick boundary zone of the adhesive resin as well as in the resin tags. These data are the first to offer a distinct localization of calcium ions within the adhesive resin at the dentin-resin interface. PMID:9800373

  3. Systematic Development of Intelligent Systems for Public Road Transport

    PubMed Central

    García, Carmelo R.; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Cristóbal, Teresa; Padrón, Gabino; Alayón, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture model for the development of intelligent systems for public passenger transport by road. The main objective of our proposal is to provide a framework for the systematic development and deployment of telematics systems to improve various aspects of this type of transport, such as efficiency, accessibility and safety. The architecture model presented herein is based on international standards on intelligent transport system architectures, ubiquitous computing and service-oriented architecture for distributed systems. To illustrate the utility of the model, we also present a use case of a monitoring system for stops on a public passenger road transport network. PMID:27438836

  4. Systematic Development of Intelligent Systems for Public Road Transport.

    PubMed

    García, Carmelo R; Quesada-Arencibia, Alexis; Cristóbal, Teresa; Padrón, Gabino; Alayón, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture model for the development of intelligent systems for public passenger transport by road. The main objective of our proposal is to provide a framework for the systematic development and deployment of telematics systems to improve various aspects of this type of transport, such as efficiency, accessibility and safety. The architecture model presented herein is based on international standards on intelligent transport system architectures, ubiquitous computing and service-oriented architecture for distributed systems. To illustrate the utility of the model, we also present a use case of a monitoring system for stops on a public passenger road transport network. PMID:27438836

  5. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles-based systems for siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochun; Li, Zehao; Zhao, Xueqin; Keen, Lawrence; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-09-01

    Despite the enormous therapeutic potential of siRNA as a treatment strategy, the delivery is still a problem due to unfavorable biodistribution profiles and poor intracellular bioavailability. Calcium phosphate (CaP) co-precipitate has been used for nearly 40 years for in vitro transfection due to its non-toxic nature and simplicity of preparation. The surface charge of CaP will be tuned into positive by surface modification, which is important for siRNA loading and crossing cell membrane without enzymatic degradation. The new siRNA carrier system will also promote the siRNA escape from lysosome to achieve siRNA sustained delivery and high-efficiency silence. In this review, we focus on the current research activity in the development of CaP nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. These nanoparticles are mainly classified into lipid coated, polymer coated and various other types for discussion. PMID:27252888

  6. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles-based systems for siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaochun; Li, Zehao; Zhao, Xueqin; Keen, Lawrence; Kong, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous therapeutic potential of siRNA as a treatment strategy, the delivery is still a problem due to unfavorable biodistribution profiles and poor intracellular bioavailability. Calcium phosphate (CaP) co-precipitate has been used for nearly 40 years for in vitro transfection due to its non-toxic nature and simplicity of preparation. The surface charge of CaP will be tuned into positive by surface modification, which is important for siRNA loading and crossing cell membrane without enzymatic degradation. The new siRNA carrier system will also promote the siRNA escape from lysosome to achieve siRNA sustained delivery and high-efficiency silence. In this review, we focus on the current research activity in the development of CaP nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. These nanoparticles are mainly classified into lipid coated, polymer coated and various other types for discussion. PMID:27252888

  7. Calcium-dependent electroactive biofilm structure and electricity generation in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Cai, Xixi; Ding, Guochun; Rao, Liqun; Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-10-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays an important role in guaranteeing the formation and structure of microbial biofilm. However, little is known regarding its influence on the structure and electron transfer properties of electroactive biofilms (EABs). In this study, advanced investigative techniques such as microscopy and electrochemistry are employed to characterize biofilm structure and electron transfer properties following growth at different Ca2+ concentrations in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). As revealed by electrochemical measurements, a lower current is obtained from the EABs formed in the presence of higher Ca2+ concentrations. The decline of the current is due to the dominance of non-active cells and non-exoelectrogens in the biofilms formed at high Ca2+ concentrations. The results of this study provide a better understanding of the effect of Ca2+ on EABs structure and thus electricity generation in BESs.

  8. National Space Transportation Systems Program mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, M. A., Jr.; Aldrich, A. D.; Lunney, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The 515-41B National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report contains a summary of the major activities and accomplishments of the sixth operational Shuttle flight and fourth flight of the OV-099 vehicle, Challenger. Since this flight was the first to land at Kennedy Space Center, the vehicle was towed directly to the OPF (Orbiter Processing Facility) where preparations for flight STS-41C, scheduled for early April 1984, began immediately. The significant problems that occurred during STS-41B are summarized and a problem tracking list that is a complete list of all problems that occurred during the flight is given. None of the problems will affect the STS 41C flight. The major objectives of flight STS-41B were to successfully deploy the Westar satellite and the Indonesian Communications Satellite-B2 (PALAPA-B2); to evaluate the MMU (Manned Maneuvering Unit) support for EVA (Extravehicular Activities); to exercise the MFR (Manipulator Foot Restraint); to demonstrate a closed loop rendezvous; and to operate the M.R (Monodisperse Latex Reactor), the ACES (Acoustic Containerless Experiment System) and the IEF (Isoelectric Focusing) in cabin experiments; and to obtain photographs with the Cinema 360 Cameras.

  9. Advanced space transportation systems, BARGOUZIN booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prampolini, Marco; Louaas, Eric; Prel, Yves; Kostromin, Sergey; Panichkin, Nickolay; Sumin, Yuriy; Osin, Mikhail; Iranzo-Greus, David; Rigault, Michel; Beaurain, André; Couteau, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of Advanced Space Transportation Systems Studies sponsored by CNES in 2006, a study called "BARGOUZIN" was performed by a joint team led by ASTRIUM ST and TSNIIMASH. Beyond these leaders, the team comprised MOLNIYA, DASSAULT AVIATION and SNECMA as subcontractors. The "BARGOUZIN" concept is a liquid fuelled fly-back booster (LFBB), mounted on the ARIANE 5 central core stage in place of the current solid rocket booster. The main originality of the concept lies in the fact that the "BARGOUZIN" features a cluster of VULCAIN II engines, similar to the one mounted on the central core stage of ARIANE 5. An astute permutation strategy, between the booster engines and central core engine is expected to lead to significant cost reductions. The following aspects were addressed during the preliminary system study: engine number per booster trade-off/abort scenario analysis, aerodynamic consolidation, engine reliability, ascent controllability, ground interfaces separation sequence analysis, programmatics. These topics will be briefly presented and synthesized in this paper, giving an overview of the credibility of the concept.

  10. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  11. Road transportable analytical laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Remediation of DOE contaminated areas requires extensive sampling and analysis. Reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site a full range of analyses meeting high levels of quality assurance and control, would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of cleanup and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping, and manpower associated with sample shipments. Goals of RTAL are to meet the needs of DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. The system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or together, to meet specific site needs: radioanalytical lab, organic chemical analysis lab, inorganic chemical analysis lab, aquatic biomonitoring lab, field analytical lab, robotics base station, decontamination/sample screening module, and operations control center. Goal of this integrated system is a sample throughput of 20 samples/day, providing a full range of accurate analyses on each sample within 16 h (after sample preparation), compared with the 45- day turnaround time in commercial laboratories. A prototype RTAL consisting of 5 modules was built and demonstrated at Fernald(FEMP)`s OU-1 Waste Pits, during the 1st-3rd quarters of FY96 (including the `96 Blizzard). All performance and operational goals were met or exceeded: as many as 50 sample analyses/day were achieved, depending on the procedure, sample turnaround times were 50-67% less than FEMP`s best times, and RTAL costs were projected to be 30% less than FEMP costs for large volume analyses in fixed laboratories.

  12. The SIMPSONS project: An integrated Mars transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Matthew; Carlson, Eric; Bradfute, Sherie; Allen, Kent; Duvergne, Francois; Hernandez, Bert; Le, David; Nguyen, Quan; Thornhill, Brett

    1992-01-01

    In response to the Request for Proposal (RFP) for an integrated transportation system network for an advanced Martian base, Frontier Transportation Systems (FTS) presents the results of the SIMPSONS project (Systems Integration for Mars Planetary Surface Operations Networks). The following topics are included: the project background, vehicle design, future work, conclusions, management status, and cost breakdown. The project focuses solely on the surface-to-surface transportation at an advanced Martian base.

  13. The SIMPSONS project: An integrated Mars transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Matthew; Carlson, Eric; Bradfute, Sherie; Allen, Kent; Duvergne, Francois; Hernandez, Bert; Le, David; Nguyen, Quan; Thornhill, Brett

    In response to the Request for Proposal (RFP) for an integrated transportation system network for an advanced Martian base, Frontier Transportation Systems (FTS) presents the results of the SIMPSONS project (Systems Integration for Mars Planetary Surface Operations Networks). The following topics are included: the project background, vehicle design, future work, conclusions, management status, and cost breakdown. The project focuses solely on the surface-to-surface transportation at an advanced Martian base.

  14. Integrated mass transportation system study/definition/implementation program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, R. K.; Deptula, D. A.; Yorke, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Specific actions needed to plan and effect transportation system improvements are identified within the constraints of limited financial, energy and land use resources, and diverse community requirements. A specific program is described which would develop the necessary generalized methodology for devising improved transportation systems and evaluate them against specific criteria for intermodal and intramodal optimization. A consistent, generalized method is provided for study and evaluation of transportation system improvements.

  15. Concept of Integrated Information Systems of Rail Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siergiejczyk, Mirosław; Gago, Stanisław

    This paper will present a need to create integrated information systems of the rail transport and their links with other means of public transportation. IT standards will be discussed that are expected to create the integrated information systems of the rail transport. Also the main tasks will be presented of centralized information systems, the concept of their architecture, business processes and their implementation as well as the proposed measures to secure data. A method shall be proposed to implement a system to inform participants of rail transport in Polish conditions.

  16. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  17. Transportation system requirements document. Revision 1 DCN01. Supplement

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The original Transportation System Requirements Document described the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of that document was to define the system-level requirements. These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presented an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. This revision of the document contains only the pages that have been modified.

  18. Contexts for dopamine specification by calcium spike activity in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Ulloa, Norma A.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.; Dulcis, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent electrical activity plays a significant role in neurotransmitter specification at early stages of development. To test the hypothesis that activity-dependent differentiation depends on molecular context we investigated the development of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system of larval Xenopus laevis. We find that different dopaminergic nuclei respond to manipulation of this early electrical activity by ion channel misexpression with different increases and decreases in numbers of dopaminergic neurons. Focusing on the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus and the spinal cord in order to gain insight into these differences, we identify distinct subpopulations of neurons that express characteristic combinations of GABA and NPY as co-transmitters and Lim1,2 and Nurr1 transcription factors. We demonstrate that the developmental state of neurons identified by their spatial location and expression of these molecular markers is correlated with characteristic spontaneous calcium spike activity. Different subpopulations of dopaminergic neurons respond differently to manipulation of this early electrical activity. Moreover, retinohypothalamic circuit activation of the ventral suprachiasmatic nucleus recruits expression of dopamine selectively in reserve pool neurons that already express GABA and neuropeptide Y. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that spontaneously active neurons expressing GABA are most susceptible to activity-dependent expression of dopamine both in the spinal cord and in the brain. Because loss of dopaminergic neurons plays a role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, understanding how subpopulations of neurons become dopaminergic may lead to protocols for differentiation of neurons in vitro to replace those that have been lost in vivo. PMID:21209192

  19. Calcium sulphate as a drug delivery system in a deep diabetic foot infection.

    PubMed

    Morley, Robert; Lopez, Felix; Webb, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Treating diabetic foot infection is costly, time consuming and challenging for the patient and clinician alike. It requires a multidisciplinary approach to provide a favourable outcome but all too often results in amputation. We present a patient with Type 2 diabetes who attended clinic with a limb threatening foot infection complicated by osteomyelitis and requiring emergency surgery and antibiotic administration. Our patient underwent surgery by means of an incision and drainage procedure with local antibiotic administration to augment systemic antibiotics. The wound was packed with calcium sulphate (Stimulan(®) Biocomposites Ltd.) impregnated with gentamicin and vancomycin to enable high antibiotic concentrations at the site of infection. The patient made a full recovery at four months requiring only minimal bone excision to maintain a functional foot. This case demonstrates an alternative route for antibiotic administration to overcome some of the limitations of systemic administration including penetration at the site of infection, systemic toxicity, prolonged hospital admission and cost. This route of administration is being increasingly used as an alternative to systemic antibiotics at our centre. PMID:26338082

  20. Carboxylic Acid Ionophores as Probes of the Role of Calcium in Biological Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, P. W.

    1983-01-01

    The biological effects of calcium ionophores are described, focusing on arachidonic acid oxygenation, and the formation of a number of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. These metabolites are involved in a number of bodily functions, and their production may be regulated by calcium.

  1. Highly reusable space transportation system study

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    To significantly increase demand for launch services by stimulating existing and planned markets as well as enabling new markets, the cost to orbit needs to be reduced a factor of ten below projected Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) goals. This will place the recurring operations cost around {dollar_sign}200 per payload pound to low earth orbit (LEO). Methods for reducing the cost include: increasing relative vehicle performance, increasing vehicle reusability, and decreasing recurring operations. A study was conducted for NASA in support of its Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) initiative to identify for further assessment and development, those launch strategies that hold the greatest potential with respect to meeting this goal. During this study a number of candidate strategies were evaluated associated with access to space. Both technical and cost trades were performed, and concluded that there are two airbreathing propulsion concepts utilizing launch assist that appear promising in achieving the HRST-cost goals. These concepts employ both turbine based combine cycle (TBCC) and rocket based combine cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. The launch assist selected uses electromagnetic propulsion and a guideway to provide both delta velocity and altitude. A first order investigation of system level requirements associated with HRST launch assist for a magnetically launched vehicle including guideway concept and requirements as well as magnetic levitation and propulsion concepts and requirements were also conducted. This study concluded that the HRST goals of total recurring operations cost of {dollar_sign}200 per payload pound to Low Earth Orbit based on a ten year operational period were feasible if the required technology was matured. The most promising concept to achieve these goals is based on a RBCC powered vehicle with electromagnetic launch assist. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. A Segway RMP-based robotic transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Kogut, Greg; Barua, Ripan; Burmeister, Aaron; Pezeshkian, Narek; Powell, Darren; Farrington, Nathan; Wimmer, Matt; Cicchetto, Brett; Heng, Chana; Ramirez, Velia

    2004-12-01

    In the area of logistics, there currently is a capability gap between the one-ton Army robotic Multifunction Utility/Logistics and Equipment (MULE) vehicle and a soldier"s backpack. The Unmanned Systems Branch at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR Systems Center, or SSC), San Diego, with the assistance of a group of interns from nearby High Tech High School, has demonstrated enabling technologies for a solution that fills this gap. A small robotic transport system has been developed based on the Segway Robotic Mobility Platform (RMP). We have demonstrated teleoperated control of this robotic transport system, and conducted two demonstrations of autonomous behaviors. Both demonstrations involved a robotic transporter following a human leader. In the first demonstration, the transporter used a vision system running a continuously adaptive mean-shift filter to track and follow a human. In the second demonstration, the separation between leader and follower was significantly increased using Global Positioning System (GPS) information. The track of the human leader, with a GPS unit in his backpack, was sent wirelessly to the transporter, also equipped with a GPS unit. The robotic transporter traced the path of the human leader by following these GPS breadcrumbs. We have additionally demonstrated a robotic medical patient transport capability by using the Segway RMP to power a mock-up of the Life Support for Trauma and Transport (LSTAT) patient care platform, on a standard NATO litter carrier. This paper describes the development of our demonstration robotic transport system and the various experiments conducted.

  3. Experimental study and thermodynamic modelling of the calcium oxide-silicon oxide-aluminum oxide-calcium fluoride system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Geun

    Mould flux for the continuous casting process is a major concern for the steelmaking industry. Nowadays, more than 90 % of steel is being produced by the continuous casting process, which requires mould flux as an essential additive. The development of mould flux has been achieved by the conventional trial and error approach since it was first introduced in industry in the 1960s. Recently, the interest on the properties of fluorine has increased a lot since it is reported that fluorine has important functions such as playing a critical role on the crystallization behavior, and decreasing the melting point and viscosity of slag. However, the conventional way to find a suitable mould flux is not efficient to face the increasingly stringent requirements of the continuous casting process such as thin slab casting and higher casting speed. Therefore, fundamental phase diagram study on mould flux systems is clearly necessary, and thermodynamic modeling is the most effective way to design new mould flux in terms of time and money saving. The major components of mould flux, the CaO-SiO2-Al2O 3-CaF2 system, are investigated in this study as these four constituents will mostly affect the largest numbers of properties. Unfortunately, fluorine has high volatility at high temperature and high reactivity with other materials. Therefore, the results of previous experiments on F-containing systems are characterized by large discrepancies due to composition alteration and unexpected reactions during the experiment. As literature data show inconsistent results between each other, key phase diagram experiments were performed in this study. The phase diagram experiments were conducted with the quenching method in sealed Pt capsules to prevent fluorine loss during the experiment. The analyses were performed using a FE-SEM equipped with an EDS system, and a newly developed technique which produces more precise quantitative results for the equilibrium phase composition. The CaO liquidus

  4. Calcium transport in protoplasts isolated from ml-o barley isolines resistant and susceptible to powdery mildew. [Hordeum vulgare L

    SciTech Connect

    Wrona, A.F.; Spanswick, R.M.; Aist, J.R. )

    1988-12-01

    Free cytoplasmic calcium has been postulated to play a role in preventing powdery mildew in a series of homozygous ml-o mutants of barley, Hordeum vulgare L. Protoplasts isolated from 7-day-old plants of the ml-o resistant-susceptible (R-S) barley isolines, Riso 5678/3* {times} Carlsberg II R and S, were used to test for differences in fluxes of Ca{sup 2+} across the plasmalemma. Greater influx or lesser efflux might account for a higher free cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} postulated to exist in ml-o R mutants. Uniform patterns of uptake were maintained for 3 hours from solutions of 0.2 and 2 millimolar Ca{sup 2+}. Washout curves of {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} from R and S protoplasts revealed three compartments - presumed to represent release from the vacuole, organelles, and the cytoplasm (which included bound as well as free Ca{sup 2+}). Uptake and washout did not differ between isolines. On the basis of recent determinations of submicromolar levels of free cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} and their initial rates of {sup 45}ca-labeled Ca{sup 2+} uptake, they show that measurement of the unidirectional influx of Ca{sup 2+} across the plasmalemma is not feasible because the specific activity of the pool of free cytoplasmic calcium increases almost instantaneously to a level that would result in a significant, but unknown, efflux of label. Similarly, measurement of the efflux of Ca{sup 2+} across the plasmalemma is not possible since the activity of the pool of free cytoplasmic calcium is a factor of 350 smaller than the most rapid component of the washout experiment. This pool of cytoplasmic free Ca{sup 2+} will wash out too rapidly and be too small to detect under the conditions of these experiments.

  5. [Calcium antagonism by papaverine in isolated rat gastric fundus strips in a model system].

    PubMed

    Simon, L; Sallai, J; Szontagh, M; Simon-Talpas, G; Müller, A

    1984-04-01

    Examining isolated strips of gastric fundus tissue of rats the authors observed that papaverin up to 7.8 X 10(-8) to 6.25 X 10(-7) mol/l increased the intensity of convulsions induced by constant amounts of barium chloride (9.5 X 10(-4); with further increase of the concentration the intensity of convulsions gradually sank under the initial value. An increased proneness to cramping was also observed when the calcium content of the Tyrode solution was reduced. In this case the proneness to cramping was highest between 1 and 1.3 mmol/l calcium content. When the calcium content was 1 mmol/l, papaverin increased the proneness to cramping only to a smaller degree, in agreement with the effect measured when the calcium content of the organ bath was reduced below 1 mmol/l. In model experiments, calcium antagonized the potential difference-increasing effect of papaverin at the ether/NaCl (0.1 mol/l) phase boundary. From this the authors infer an interaction (complex formation) between papaverin and calcium at the phase boundary, which is independent of the biological medium. Their findings and the papaverin -calcium antagonism first observed by Benigni [2] can be interpreted in this way. PMID:6739529

  6. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  7. Transport in small and/or random systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lax, M.

    1987-05-14

    This report discusses: transport in small systems; electron-phonon interactions in quantum wells; noise in small systems; laser propagation in the atmosphere; laser-aerosol interactions; transport properties of carriers in semiconductor quantum wells; light transmission in a particulate medium; and laser generation of shock waves in droplets. (LSP)

  8. Buffer storage of thermal energy using the reaction heat of the system calcium oxide/calcium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, B.

    1986-12-01

    The reaction heat of the system CaO/Ca(OH)2 was investigated as storage effect for thermal energy. The heat from the chemical system is used as a buffer facility for thermal energy, i.e., sensible heat is stored without thermal losses to the environment. In the forward reaction by adding water to the CaO, sensible heat is released, which can be used for heating houses or water, and for generation of steam for industrial purposes. The necessary heat to be fed to the Ca(OH)2 in order to run the reaction inversely can be supplied by solar collector, high temperature reactors, geothermal energy, or combustion of wastes. Heat at temperatures less than 450 C has to be furnished for the loading phase of the reaction. The discharging reaction delivers temperatures up to 400 C. A gas loop was designed, built, and operated to test this kind of heat storage. The quantities which determine the storage and release of energy were deduced and documented. Pressure drops and storage mass behavior are discussed.

  9. Deep space mission integration with the space transportation system. [Galileo mission using Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The Galileo mission is the first interplanetary mission scheduled to use the Space Transportation System (STS). Therefore, Galileo is the trailblazer for mission integration of a deep space mission with the STS. A short overview of the Galileo mission is presented as background for the discussion of the mission integration effort. The components of the STS and the mission integration system are defined, documentation requirements explained, the work of the Flight Design Working Group described, and several examples of the types of problems dealt with are given. The steps of mission integration are shown from introducing requirements into the system to resolving conflicts that arise between the payload project and the STS operator. Conclusions are drawn from the Galileo mission integration effort to aid future payload projects in working with the STS.

  10. Transporters, channels, or simple diffusion? Dogmas, atypical roles and complexity in transport systems.

    PubMed

    Conde, Artur; Diallinas, George; Chaumont, François; Chaves, Manuela; Gerós, Hernâni

    2010-06-01

    The recent breakthrough discoveries of transport systems assigned with atypical functions provide evidence for complexity in membrane transport biochemistry. Some channels are far from being simple pores creating hydrophilic passages for solutes and can, unexpectedly, act as enzymes, or mediate high-affinity uptake, and some transporters are surprisingly able to function as sensors, channels or even enzymes. Furthermore, numerous transport studies have demonstrated complex multiphasic uptake kinetics for organic and mineral nutrients. The biphasic kinetics of glucose uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a result of several genetically distinct uptake systems operating simultaneously, is a classical example that is a subject of continuous debate. In contrast, some transporters display biphasic kinetics, being bona fidae dual-affinity transporters, their kinetic properties often modulated by post-translational regulation. Also, aquaporins have recently been reported to exhibit diverse transport properties and can behave as highly adapted, multifunctional channels, transporting solutes such as CO(2), hydrogen peroxide, urea, ammonia, glycerol, polyols, carbamides, purines and pyrimidines, metalloids, glycine, and lactic acid, rather than being simple water pores. The present review provides an overview on some atypical functions displayed by transporter proteins and discusses how this novel knowledge on cellular uptake systems may be related to complex multiphasic uptake kinetics often seen in a wide variety of living organisms and the intriguing diffusive uptake of sugars and other solutes. PMID:20026419

  11. Regulation of Differentiation by Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Normal and Tumoral Developing Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; García, Marta; Rodríguez-Hernández, Carlos J.; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    During normal development of the nervous system (NS), neural progenitor cells (NPCs) produce specialized populations of neurons and glial cells upon cell fate restriction and terminal differentiation. These sequential processes require the dynamic regulation of thousands of genes. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is temporally and spatially regulated in both neurons and glial cells during development of the NS. In particular, CaSR expression and function have been shown to play a significant role during differentiation of NPCs toward the oligodendrocyte lineage and also in maturation of cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs). Moreover, CaSR regulates axonal and dendritic growth in both central and peripheral nervous systems (PNSs), a process necessary for proper construction of mature neuronal networks. On the other hand, several lines of evidence support a role for CaSR in promotion of cell differentiation and inhibition of proliferation in neuroblastoma, a tumor arising from precursor cells of developing PNS. Thus, among the variety of NS functions in which the CaSR participates, this mini-review focuses on its role in differentiation of normal and tumoral cells. Current knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for CaSR regulation and function in these contexts is also discussed, together with the therapeutic opportunities provided by CaSR allosteric modulators. PMID:27242543

  12. 25. VIEW FOURTH FLOOR, ELEVATOR PULLEY TRANSPORT SYSTEM, LOOKING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW FOURTH FLOOR, ELEVATOR PULLEY TRANSPORT SYSTEM, LOOKING AT TOP MAIN WOOD AND STEEL BEAM SUPPORT SYSTEM, NORTHWEST - Bates Manufacturing Company, Storehouse, Northeast corner of Chestnut Street & Hines Alley, Lewiston, Androscoggin County, ME

  13. Information Transport Systems at IBM's Corporate Technical Institutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, Ralph E.; Pryzdial, Edward F.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the facilities and major networks of IBM's Corporate Technical Institute state-of-the-art residential campus at Thornwood, New York. Explains the operations and components of its information transport system and the capabilities of its cabling system. (ML)

  14. Activation of a new proline transport system in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Ekena, K; Liao, M K; Maloy, S

    1990-06-01

    Proline uptake can be mediated by three different transport systems in wild-type Salmonella typhimurium: a high-affinity proline transport system encoded by the putP gene and two glycine-betaine transport systems with a low affinity for proline encoded by the proP and proU genes. However, only the PutP permease transports proline well enough t allow growth on proline as a sole carbon or nitrogen source. By selecting for mutations that allow a putP mutant to grow on proline as a sole nitrogen source, we isolated mutants (designated proZ) that appeared to activate a cryptic proline transport system. These mutants enhanced the transport of proline and proline analogs but did not require the function of any of the known proline transport genes. The mutations mapped between 75 and 77.5 min on the S. typhimurium linkage map. Proline transport by the proZ mutants was competitively inhibited by isoleucine and leucine, which suggests that the ProZ phenotype may be due to unusual mutations that alter the substrate specificity of the branched-chain amino acid transport system encoded by the liv genes. PMID:2160931

  15. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking too much calcium Too much production of ... Milk-alkali syndrome Proximal renal tubular acidosis Rickets Sarcoidosis Vitamin D Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated ...

  16. Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

    2010-01-01

    A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near

  17. Transport processes in biological systems: Tumoral cells and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The entropy generation approach has been developed for the analysis of complex systems, with particular regards to biological systems, in order to evaluate their stationary states. The entropy generation is related to the transport processes related to exergy flows. Moreover, cancer can be described as an open complex dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, it is used as an example useful to evaluate the different thermo-chemical quantities of the transport processes in normal and in tumoral cells systems.

  18. The effects of combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation on glycemia, insulin resistance and systemic inflammation in non-diabetic adults age 65 and older

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Altered vitamin D and calcium homeostasis may play a role in the development of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. In a 3-year randomized controlled trial, we compared the effects of combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation vs. placebo on glycemia, insulin sensitivity and systemic infla...

  19. Streptozotocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis via disruption of calcium homeostasis in mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Changhwan; An, Beum-Soo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2015-09-01

    Calcium homeostasis refers to the regulation of calcium ion concentration in the body. This concentration is tightly controlled by a stabilizing system consisting of calcium channels and calcium buffering proteins. Calcium homeostasis is crucial for cell survival. Various forms of cell death (e.g., necrosis and apoptosis) also share calcium signaling pathways and molecular effectors. Calcium acts not only as a ubiquitous second messenger involved in apoptosis along with various cell death inducers but also a regulator for the synthesis of enzymes/hormones such as insulin. We hypothesized that streptozotocin disrupts calcium homeostasis and the altered intracellular calcium levels may induce cell death. After streptozotocin administration, blood glucose level was increased while insulin levels decreased. The expression of insulin response markers also decreased relative to the vehicle group. L-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase were increased by streptozotocin. Calcium buffering protein calbindin-D9k and calmodulin family members were also increased. The expression of genes involved in transporting calcium ions to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was decrease while the expression of those affecting the removal of calcium from the ER was increased. Depletion of calcium from the ER leads to ER-stress and can induce apoptosis. In the streptozotocin-treatment group, apoptosis markers were increased. Taken together, these results imply that the disruption of calcium homeostasis by streptozotocin induces ER-stress and leads to the apoptosis of pancreatic cells. Additionally, findings from this study suggest that imbalances in calcium homeostasis could promote pancreatic beta cell death and result in type I diabetes. PMID:26003140

  20. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the human body. It helps build and protect your teeth ... absorb calcium. You can get vitamin D from sunlight exposure to your skin and from your diet. Ask your provider whether ...

  1. Intra-canal calcium hydroxide removal by two rotary systems: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Dadresanfar, Bahare; Abbas, Fateme Mashhadi; Bashbaghi, Hamide; Miri, Shima Sadat; Ghorbani, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The presence of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) in the root canal interferes with the apical root canal sealing and may result in periapical lesions in the long run. The present study was aimed to compare the efficacy of two rotary systems of Race and Mtwo in the removal of Ca (OH)2 aqueous-based from distobuccal canals of human maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 44 distobuccal root canals of human maxillary molars were randomly distributed into two groups of 20 canals each and two control groups. Specimens in each group were instrumented with similar master apical rotary (MAR) and flexible files according to the manufacture's guidelines. The Ca (OH)2 paste was placed in canals using # 20 lentulo and radiographs were taken from the two dimensions. The roots were incubated for 1 week at 37°C and 100% humidity and Ca (OH)2 was removed from canals by MAR, afterward. Then, the roots were longitudinally split in halves by diamond disk and chisel without entering the root canals. Photos were taken from the canals’ walls by a stereomicroscope with × 10 magnification. Next, according to a defined scoring system, photos were scored by four endodontists, so that scores 1 and 2 (nonvisible remnants or scattered remnants of Ca(OH)2) were considered as acceptable and scores 3 and 4 (distinct mass or densely-packed mass of Ca(OH)2) were regarded as nonacceptable. Results: The obtained findings indicated that in coronal, middle, and apical portions of the root canal, 45, 60, and 65% of Mtwo specimens and 40, 50, and 55% of specimens prepared by the Race system acquired an acceptable score (1 and 2), respectively. Moreover, the results showed no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Both Mtwo and Race rotary systems with acceptable removal efficiency (score 1 and 2) were similarly able to remove Ca(OH)2 PMID:26069416

  2. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Human behavior research and the design of sustainable transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, James J.

    2011-09-01

    Transport currently represents approximately 19% of the global energy demand and accounts for about 23% of the global carbon dioxide emissions (IEA 2009). As the demand for mobility is expected to continue to increase in the coming decades, the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will require the evolution of transport, along with power generation, building design and manufacturing. The continued development of these sectors will need to include changes in energy sources, energy delivery, materials, infrastructure and human behavior. Pathways to reducing carbon from the transport sector have unique challenges and opportunities that are inherent to the human choices and behavioral patterns that mold the transportation systems and the associated energy needs. Technology, government investment, and regulatory policies have a significant impact on the formulation of transportation infrastructure; however, the role of human behavior and public acceptance on the efficiency and effectiveness of transport systems should not be underestimated. Although developed, rapidly developing, and underdeveloped nations face different challenges in the establishment of transport infrastructure that can meet transport needs while achieving sustainable carbon dioxide emissions, the constraints that establish the domain of possibilities are closely related for all nations. These constraints include capital investment, fuel supplies, power systems, and human behavior. Throughout the world, there are considerable efforts directed at advancing and optimizing the financing of sustainable infrastructures, the production of low carbon fuels, and the production of advanced power systems, but the foundational work on methods to understand human preferences and behavior within the context of transport and the valuation of reductions in carbon dioxide emissions is greatly lagging behind. These methods and the associated understanding of human behavior and the willingness to pay for

  4. ToF-SIMS evaluation of calcium-containing silica/γ-PGA hybrid systems for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daming; Nakamura, Jin; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Jones, Julian R.; McPhail, David S.

    2014-08-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrids have great potential for the production of bioactive scaffolds which have tailored mechanical properties and degradation rates suitable for tissue engineering. For bone regeneration, calcium incorporation into hybrids at low temperatures is important due to its ability to stimulate new bone formation. As a consequence, understanding the homogeneity of the critical inorganic and organic components will be the key to the development of such hybrids. The aim of this interdisciplinary study was to use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to determine the homogeneity of these critical components. We evaluated various sol-gel silica/γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) hybrid systems produced using different routes to introduce the calcium, thereby tailoring and optimizing hybrid syntheses and processing routes. Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used to improve the inorganic/organic coupling and its influence on the homogeneity of the hybrid structures was also examined. The results revealed that the calcium salt form of γ-PGA was promising for calcium incorporation since homogeneous products could be obtained. The ToF-SIMS data also indicated that the reaction time of hybrid synthesis and the timing of the addition of DMC can affect the homogeneity of hybrids.

  5. Control of machine functions or transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, M.D.; Lee, M.J.; Jaeger, J.; King, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer code, COMFORT, has been developed at SLAC for on-line calculation of the strengths of magnetic elements in an electron storage ring or transport beam line, subject to first order fitting constraints on the ring or beam line parameters. This code can also be used off-line as an interactive lattice or beam line design tool.

  6. Partially Defective Store Operated Calcium Entry and Hem(ITAM) Signaling in Platelets of Serotonin Transporter Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Karen; Braun, Attila; Haining, Elizabeth J.; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Gotru, Sanjeev K.; Chen, Wenchun; Hermanns, Heike M.; Stoll, Guido; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Background Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamin, 5-HT) is an indolamine platelet agonist, biochemically derived from tryptophan. 5-HT is secreted from the enterochromaffin cells into the gastrointestinal tract and blood. Blood 5-HT has been proposed to regulate hemostasis by acting as a vasoconstrictor and by triggering platelet signaling through 5-HT receptor 2A (5HTR2A). Although platelets do not synthetize 5-HT, they take 5-HT up from the blood and store it in their dense granules which are secreted upon platelet activation. Objective To identify the molecular composite of the 5-HT uptake system in platelets and elucidate the role of platelet released 5-HT in thrombosis and ischemic stroke. Methods: 5-HT transporter knockout mice (5Htt-/-) were analyzed in different in vitro and in vivo assays and in a model of ischemic stroke. Results In 5Htt-/- platelets, 5-HT uptake from the blood was completely abolished and agonist-induced Ca2+ influx through store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), integrin activation, degranulation and aggregation responses to glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) were reduced. These observed in vitro defects in 5Htt-/- platelets could be normalized by the addition of exogenous 5-HT. Moreover, reduced 5-HT levels in the plasma, an increased bleeding time and the formation of unstable thrombi were observed ex vivo under flow and in vivo in the abdominal aorta and carotid artery of 5Htt-/- mice. Surprisingly, in the transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) model of ischemic stroke 5Htt-/- mice showed nearly normal infarct volume and the neurological outcome was comparable to control mice. Conclusion Although secreted platelet 5-HT does not appear to play a crucial role in the development of reperfusion injury after stroke, it is essential to amplify the second phase of platelet activation through SOCE and plays an important role in thrombus stabilization. PMID:26800051

  7. Calcium phosphate ceramic systems in growth factor and drug delivery for bone tissue engineering: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman

    2012-01-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are the most widely used bone substitutes in bone tissue engineering due to their compositional similarities to bone mineral and excellent biocompatibility. In recent years, CaPs, especially hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate, have attracted significant interest in simultaneous use as bone substitute and drug delivery vehicle, adding a new dimension to their application. CaPs are more biocompatible than many other ceramic and inorganic nanoparticles. Their biocompatibility and variable stoichiometry, thus surface charge density, functionality, and dissolution properties, make them suitable for both drug and growth factor delivery. CaP matrices and scaffolds have been reported to act as delivery vehicles for growth factors and drugs in bone tissue engineering. Local drug delivery in musculoskeletal disorder treatments can address some of the critical issues more effectively and efficiently than the systemic delivery. CaPs are used as coatings on metallic implants, CaP cements, and custom designed scaffolds to treat musculoskeletal disorders. This review highlights some of the current drug and growth factor delivery approaches and critical issues using CaP particles, coatings, cements, and scaffolds towards orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:22127225

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, and Thermal Kinetics of Mixed Gadolinium: Calcium Heptamolybdate System

    PubMed Central

    Koul, R. K.; Suri, Shivani; Singh, Vishal; Bamzai, K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of mixed gadolinium calcium heptamolybdate (GdCaHM) system in silica gel medium using single gel single tube technique has been successfully achieved. The grown crystal exhibits various morphologies, which includes spherulites, multifaceted, and square platelets. The nature of the grown material was established by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study signifies the presence of heptamolybdate (Mo7O24) and water symmetry structure, whereas energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) establishes the stoichiometric of the grown crystal as GdCaMo7O24·8H2O. The thermal behaviour was studied using the thermoanalytical techniques, which include thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results obtained on the application of TG based models, namely, Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern, and Piloyan-Novikova, suggest the contracting cylindrical model as the relevant model for the thermal decomposition of the material. The kinetic parameters, namely, the order of reaction (n), activation energy (Ea), frequency factor (Z), and entropy (ΔS∗), were also calculated using these three models.

  9. The requirement for calcium ions and the effect of other ions on axoplasmic transport in mammalian nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S Y; Ochs, S; Worth, R M

    1980-01-01

    1. Until recently it was believed that axoplasmic transport in vitro was not affected by Ca2+, transport being normal in Ca2+-free medium. This was found due to the presence of the relatively impermeable perineurial sheath around the nerve trunks. Using a desheathed cat peroneal nerve preparation, axoplasmic transport was shown to require an adequate level of Ca2+ in the external medium. In a buffered Ca2+-free medium, transport began to decline within 30 min and a complete block occurred in 2 . 6 hr. A concentration of 5 mM-Ca2+ added to a buffered isotonic sucrose of NaCl solution was able to maintain transport. With lower concentrations of Ca2+ of 1 . 5-3 . 0 mM, those usually present in the extracellular fluid or in a Ringer medium, some impairment of transport was seen but the addition of 4 mM-K+ restored the normal pattern of axoplasmic transport. With Ca2+ concentrations below 0 . 75 mM, however, 4 mM-K+ was unable to sustain transport. 2. Potassium by itself at a concentration of 4 mM when added to a buffered isotonic sucrose of NaCl medium was unable to prolong the time of transport block beyond that seen in buffered isotonic NaCl or sucrose solutions. In concentrations of K+ up to 25 mM, 1 . 5-5 mM-Ca2+ was required for normal transport. With moderately higher concentrations of K+ in the range of 50-100 mM, normal appearing transport was seen with or without Ca2+. This was seen whether or not Na+ was present in the medium. At higher levels of K+, 120-150 mM, decreased transport was seen, with or without the addition of either 15 mM-Na+ or Ca2+ in concentrations of 1 . 5-3 . 0 mM. 3. While Mg2+ could not substitute completely for Ca2+ in maintaining transport, it was able to prolong the time before block occurred. An extra 30-60 min of downflow was seen when 5 mM-Mg2+ was added to a buffered isotonic NaCl medium. Magnesium also acts synergistically with Ca2+. Concentration of Ca2+ as low as 0 . 25 mM was, with the addition of 1 . 5 mM-Mg2+, able to

  10. Membrane Transporters and Folate Homeostasis; Intestinal Absorption, Transport into Systemic Compartments and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rongbao; Matherly, Larry H.; Goldman, I. David

    2013-01-01

    Folates, the generic term for the family of B vitamins, are derived entirely from dietary sources, and are key one-carbon donors required for de novo nucleotide and methionine synthesis. These highly hydrophilic molecules utilize genetically distinct and functionally diverse transport systems to enter cells: the reduced folate carrier (RFC), the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT), and the folate receptors. Each plays a unique role in mediating folate transport across epithelia and into systemic tissues. With the recent discovery of the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption, and the clarification of the genetic basis for the autosomal recessive disorder, hereditary folate malabsorption, involving loss-of-function mutations in PCFT protein, it is now possible to piece together how these folate transporters contribute, both individually and collectively, to folate homeostasis in humans. This review focuses on the physiological roles of these major folate transporters with a brief consideration of their impact on the pharmacological activities of antifolates. PMID:19173758

  11. A 10-Gbps optical WiMAX transport system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Pyng; Lu, Hai-Han; Wu, Po-Yi; Chen, Chia-Yi; Jhang, Tai-Wei; Ruan, Sheng-Siang; Wu, Kuan-Hung

    2014-02-10

    A 10-Gbps optical worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX) transport system employing vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and spatial light modulator (SLM) with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulating signal is proposed. With the assistance of equalizer and low noise amplifier (LNA) at the receiving site, good bit error rate (BER) performance, clear constellation map, and clear eye diagram are achieved in the proposed systems. An optical WiMAX transport system, transmitting 16-QAM-OFDM signal over a 6-m free-space link, with a data rate of 10 Gbps is successfully demonstrated. Such a 10-Gbps optical WiMAX transport system would be attractive for providing services including Internet and telecommunication services. Our proposed system is suitable for the free-space lightwave transport system in visible light communication (VLC) application. PMID:24663567

  12. Modeling the Calcium Sequestration System in Isolated Guinea Pig Cardiac Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Bazil, Jason N.; Blomeyer, Christoph A.; Pradhan, Ranjan K.; Camara, Amadou K.S.; Dash, Ranjan K.

    2012-01-01

    Under high Ca2+ load conditions, Ca2+ concentrations in the extra-mitochondrial and mitochondrial compartments do not display reciprocal dynamics. This is due to a paradoxical increase in the mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering power as the Ca2+ load increases. Here we develop and characterize a mechanism of the mitochondrial Ca2+ sequestration system using an experimental data set from isolated guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. The proposed mechanism elucidates this phenomenon and others in a mathematical framework and is integrated into a previously corroborated model of oxidative phosphorylation including the Na+/Ca2+ cycle. The integrated model reproduces the Ca2+ dynamics observed in both compartments of the isolated mitochondria respiring on pyruvate after a bolus of CaCl2 followed by ruthenium red and a bolus of NaCl. The model reveals why changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration of Ca2+ loaded mitochondria appear significantly mitigated relative to the corresponding extra-mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration changes after Ca2+ efflux is initiated. The integrated model was corroborated by simulating the set-point phenomenon. The computational results support the conclusion that the Ca2+ sequestration system is composed of at least two classes of Ca2+ buffers. The first class represents prototypical Ca2+ buffering, and the second class encompasses the complex binding events associated with the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate. With the Ca2+ sequestration system in mitochondria more precisely defined, computer simulations can aid in the development of innovative therapeutics aimed at addressing the myriad of complications that arise due to mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. PMID:23180139

  13. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  14. Conceptual Design of a Mars Surface Transportation System (MSTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Chad; Gomez, Alex; Muniz, Rick; Musson, Dave

    1999-01-01

    We have proposed a design for a Mars Surface Transportation System. The design will support multi-range and multi-purpose scientific/exploratory activities for extended periods. Several assumptions were made before developing a desiun: 1. This system is to be deployed early in a series of piloted landings on the planet surface. 2. A Mars surface base has already been established. 3. A transport system to and from Mars already exists. 4. The capacity to transport this proposed system exists within the current transport design. 5. Facilities exist at this base for the supply of fuel and other consumables. 6. Medical facilities are a component of the main base. 7. The surface conditions of Mars are known and are.accurate. It was decided that the transportation system design should support a crew of two for up to four weeks away from the primary base. In order to support multiple mission requirements, the system is modular and m multi-configurable, The main structural aspects of the design are: 1. An inflatable habitat module. 2. Independently powered and remotely controllable wheel trucks to allow multiple configurations and ease of system assembly. 3. Parabolic space trusses for hi-h structural stability with low overall system mass. In addition to these design aspects, new and existing concepts for control systems, power, radiation protection, and crew safety have been incorporated into the transportation system design.

  15. Mechanisms of intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Felix

    2003-02-01

    Calcium is absorbed in the mammalian small intestine by two general mechanisms: a transcellular active transport process, located largely in the duodenum and upper jejunum; and a paracellular, passive process that functions throughout the length of the intestine. The transcellular process involves three major steps: entry across the brush border, mediated by a molecular structure termed CaT1, intracellular diffusion, mediated largely by the cytosolic calcium-binding protein (calbindinD(9k) or CaBP); and extrusion, mediated largely by the CaATPase. Chyme travels down the intestinal lumen in approximately 3 h, spending only minutes in the duodenum, but over 2 h in the distal half of the small intestine. When calcium intake is low, transcellular calcium transport accounts for a substantial fraction of the absorbed calcium. When calcium intake is high, transcellular transport accounts for only a minor portion of the absorbed calcium, because of the short sojourn time and because CaT1 and CaBP, both rate-limiting, are downregulated when calcium intake is high. Biosynthesis of CaBP is fully and CaT1 function is approximately 90% vitamin D-dependent. At high calcium intakes CaT1 and CaBP are downregulated because 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the active vitamin D metabolite, is downregulated. PMID:12520541

  16. Electrical Power Systems for NASA's Space Transportation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lollar, Louis F.; Maus, Louis C.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) lead center for space transportation systems development. These systems include earth to orbit launch vehicles, as well as vehicles for orbital transfer and deep space missions. The tasks for these systems include research, technology maturation, design, development, and integration of space transportation and propulsion systems. One of the key elements in any transportation system is the electrical power system (EPS). Every transportation system has to have some form of electrical power and the EPS for each of these systems tends to be as varied and unique as the missions they are supporting. The Preliminary Design Office (PD) at MSFC is tasked to perform feasibility analyses and preliminary design studies for new projects, particularly in the space transportation systems area. All major subsystems, including electrical power, are included in each of these studies. Three example systems being evaluated in PD at this time are the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB) system, the Human Mission to Mars (HMM) study, and a tether based flight experiment called the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS). These three systems are in various stages of definition in the study phase.

  17. Genetic interactions between Rch1 and the high-affinity calcium influx system Cch1/Mid1/Ecm7 in the regulation of calcium homeostasis, drug tolerance, hyphal development and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dayong; Cheng, Jianqing; Cao, Chunlei; Wang, Litong; Jiang, Linghuo

    2015-11-01

    The high-affinity calcium influx system (HACS) consisted of CaCch1, CaMid1 and CaEcm7 controls calcium influx into the cell in response to environmental stimuli. The plasma membrane protein CaRch1 is a negative regulator of calcium influx in Candida albicans. In this study, we show that deletion of any of the HACS components suppresses the calcium hypersensitivity of, and the elevated activation level of calcium/calcineurin signaling in, C. albicans cells lacking CaRCH1. In contrast, CaRCH1 is epistatic to the HACS system in the tolerance of antifungal drugs. In addition, cells lacking CaRCH1 are sensitive to tunicamycin, show a delay in in vitro filamentation and an altered colony surface morphology, and are attenuated in virulence in a mouse systemic model. Cells lacking CaCCH1 and CaMID1, but not CaECM7, are sensitive to tunicamycin. Deletion of CaRCH1 increases the tunicamycin sensitivity of cells lacking CaECM7 or CaMID1, but not CaCCH1. Furthermore, deletion of CaRCH1 suppresses the defect in hyphal development due to the deletion of CaCCH1 or CaECM7, and increases the virulence of cells lacking any of the HACS components. Therefore, CaRch1 genetically interacts with the HACS components in different fashions for these functions. PMID:26323599

  18. A system for measuring total body calcium in man using the 40Ca(n, alpha)37 Ar reaction.

    PubMed

    Lewellen, T K; Nelp, W B; Murano, R; Palmer, H E; Hinn, G M

    1979-01-01

    A technique to measure total body calcium using the 40Ca(n, alpha)37 Ar reaction has been developed. The technique is based on collecting 37Ar exhaled in the breath following a 10 mrad uniform total body irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons. The 37Ar in the exhaled breath is extracted by selective absorption and its radioactivity is measured inside a low-background proportional detector. The facilities developed include an activation facility providing a +/-2.7% activation uniformity, a closed circuit rebreathing and gas collection system, and a gas purification and counting system. The technique provides a precision of +/-2.4% as determined by repetitive measurements of human volunteers and has an accuracy for determination of total body calcium in grams of +/-5%. PMID:432261

  19. Natural hazard impacts on transport systems: analyzing the data base of transport accidents in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    We consider a transport accident as any accident that occurs during transportation of people and goods. It comprises of accidents involving air, road, rail, water, and pipeline transport. With over 1.2 million people killed each year, road accidents are one of the world's leading causes of death; another 20-50 million people are injured each year on the world's roads while walking, cycling, or driving. Transport accidents of other types including air, rail, and water transport accidents are not as numerous as road crashes, but the relative risk of each accident is much higher because of the higher number of people killed and injured per accident. Pipeline ruptures cause large damages to the environment. That is why safety and security are of primary concern for any transport system. The transport system of the Russian Federation (RF) is one of the most extensive in the world. It includes 1,283,000 km of public roads, more than 600,000 km of airlines, more than 200,000 km of gas, oil, and product pipelines, 115,000 km of inland waterways, and 87,000 km of railways. The transport system, especially the transport infrastructure of the country is exposed to impacts of various natural hazards and weather extremes such as heavy rains, snowfalls, snowdrifts, floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, snow avalanches, debris flows, rock falls, fog or icing roads, and other natural factors that additionally trigger many accidents. In June 2014, the Ministry of Transport of the RF has compiled a new version of the Transport Strategy of the RF up to 2030. Among of the key pillars of the Strategy are to increase the safety of the transport system and to reduce negative environmental impacts. Using the data base of technological accidents that was created by the author, the study investigates temporal variations and regional differences of the transport accidents' risk within the Russian federal regions and a contribution of natural factors to occurrences of different

  20. A low earth orbit skyhook tether transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design concept of a structure, called the Skyhook Tether Transportation System (STTS) which may be used to transport mass to higher or lower orbits or to capture objects from higher or lower orbits. An analysis is presented for the possibility of the STTS to perform the function of transporting masses suborbitally, capturing the objects, and then releasing them to a higher orbit, the GEO, the moon, or for an escape. It is shown that, although the possibility of such a system is limited by the tether strength, even a modest system can yield considerable benefits in propellant savings if it is used in combination with chemical propulsion.

  1. Heating and Cooling System Design for a Modern Transportable Container

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Jason E.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been tasked with the design of a modern transportable container (MTC) for use in high reliability transportation environments. The container is required to transport cargo capable of generating its own heat and operate under the United States’ climatic extremes. In response to these requirements, active heating and cooling is necessary to maintain a controlled environment inside the container. The following thesis project documents the design of an active heating, active cooling, and combined active heating and cooling system (now referred to as active heating and cooling systems) through computational thermal analyses, scoping of commercial system options, and mechanical integration with the container’s structure.

  2. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of ribosomes in a eukaryotic system: Is there a facilitated transport process

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna-Gupta, A.; Ware, V.C. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors have examined the kinetics of the process by which ribosomes are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm using Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected into the germinal vesicle with radiolabeled ribosomes or ribosomal subunits from X. laevis, Tetrahymena thermophila, or Escherichia coli. Microinjected eukaryotic mature ribosomes are redistributed into the oocyte cytoplasm by an apparent carrier-mediated transport process that exhibits saturation kinetics as increasing amounts of ribosomes are injected. T. thermophila ribosomes are competent to traverse the Xenopus nuclear envelope, suggesting that the basic mechanism underlying ribosome transport is evolutionarily conserved. Microinjected E. coli ribosomes are not transported in this system, indicating that prokaryotic ribosomes lack the signals required for transport. Surprisingly, coinjected small (40S) and large (60S) subunits from T. thermophila are transported significantly faster than individual subunits. These observations support a facilitated transport model for the translocation of ribosomal subunits as separate units across the nuclear envelope whereby the transport rate of 60S or 40S subunits is enhanced by the presence of the partner subunit. Although the basic features of the transport mechanism have been preserved through evolution, other aspects of the process may be mediated through species-specific interactions. They hypothesize that a species-specific nuclear 40S-60S subunit association may expedite the transport of individual subunits across the nuclear envelope.

  3. A Numbering System for MFS Transporter Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Sands, Zara A.; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest classes of secondary active transporters and is widely expressed in many domains of life. It is characterized by a common 12-transmembrane helix motif that allows the selective transport of a vast range of diverse substrates across the membrane. MFS transporters play a central role in many physiological processes and are increasingly recognized as potential drug targets. Despite intensive efforts, there are still only a handful of crystal structures and therefore homology modeling is likely to be a necessary process for providing models to interpret experiments for many years to come. However, the diversity of sequences and the multiple conformational states these proteins can exist in makes the process significantly more complicated, especially for sequences for which there is very little sequence identity to known templates. Inspired by the approach adopted many years ago for GPCRs, we have analyzed the large number of MFS sequences now available alongside the current structural information to propose a series of conserved contact points that can provide additional guidance for the homology modeling process. To enable cross-comparison across MFS models we also present a numbering scheme that can be used to provide a point of reference within each of the 12 transmembrane regions. PMID:27314000

  4. Conceptual design of an RTG Facility Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Stephen J.; Gentzlinger, Robert C.; Lujan, Richard E.

    1994-06-01

    The conceptual design of an Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Facility Transportation System which is part of the overall RTG Transportation System has been completed and is described in detail. The Facility Transportation System serves to provide locomotion, cooling, shock protection and data acquisition for the RTG package during loading and unloading sequences. The RTG Facility Transportation System consists of a Transporter Subsystem, a Package Cooling Subsystem, and a Shock Limiting Transit Device Subsystem. The Transporter Subsystem is a uniquely designed welded steel cart combined with a pneumatically-driven hand tug for locomotion. The Package Cooling Subsystem provides five kilowatts of active liquid cooling via an on-board refrigeration system. The Shock limiting Transit Device Subsystem consists of a consumable honeycomb transit frame which provides shock protection for the 3855 kg (8500 LB) RTG package. These subsystems have been combined into an integrated system which will facilitate the unloading and loading of the RTG, of the Transport Trailer as well as meet ALARA radiation Package into and out exposure guidelines.

  5. Conceptual design of an RTG Facility Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.J.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Lujan, R.E.

    1994-06-03

    The conceptual design of an Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Facility Transportation System which is part of the overall RTG Transportation System has been completed and is described in detail. The Facility Transportation System serves to provide locomotion, cooling, shock protection and data acquisition for the RTG package during loading and unloading sequences. The RTG Facility Transportation System consists of a Transporter Subsystem, a Package Cooling Subsystem, and a Shock Limiting Transit Device Subsystem. The Transporter Subsystem is a uniquely designed welded steel cart combined with a pneumatically-driven hand tug for locomotion. The Package Cooling Subsystem provides five kilowatts of active liquid cooling via an on-board refrigeration system. The Shock limiting Transit Device Subsystem consists of a consumable honeycomb transit frame which provides shock protection for the 3855 kg (8500 LB) RTG package. These subsystems have been combined into an integrated system which will facilitate the unloading and loading of the RTG , of the Transport Trailer as well as meet ALARA radiation Package into and out exposure guidelines.

  6. GROUNDWATER MASS TRANSPORT AND EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR MULTICOMPONENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass transport model, TRANQL, for a multicomponent solution system has been developed. The equilibrium interaction chemistry is posed independently of the mass transport equations which leads to a set of algebraic equations for the chemistry coupled to a set of differential equ...

  7. Systems evaluation of low density air transportation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, R. W.; Webb, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    Methods were studied for improving air transportation to low-density population regions in the U.S. through the application of new aeronautical technology. The low-density air service concepts are developed for selected regions, and critical technologies that presently limit the effective application of low-density air transportation systems are identified.

  8. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Borle, A B

    1990-01-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total cell calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca2+ compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca2+ loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of 45Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca2+ among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca2+ exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of 45Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while 45Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. Permeabilized cells have been successfully used to gauge the relative role of intracellular organelles in controlling [Ca2+]i. The measurement of the cytosolic ionized calcium ([Ca2+]i) is undoubtedly the most important and, physiologically, the most relevant method available. The choice of the appropriate calcium indicator, fluorescent, bioluminescent, metallochromic, or Ca2(+)-sensitive microelectrodes depends on the cell type and the magnitude and time constant of the event under study. Each probe has specific assets and drawbacks. The study of plasma membrane vesicles derived from baso-lateral or apical plasmalemma can also bring important information on the (Ca2(+)-Mg2+) ATPase-dependent calcium pump and on the kinetics and stoichiometry of the Na(+)-Ca2+ antiporter. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to

  9. Economic analysis of new space transportation systems: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An economic analysis of alternative space transportation systems is presented. Results indicate that the expendable systems represent modest investments, but the recurring costs of operation would remain high. The space shuttle and tug system requires a substantial investment, but would substantially reduce the recurring costs of operation. Economic benefits and costs of the different systems are also analyzed. Findings are summarized.

  10. Study of aircraft in intraurban transportation systems. Volume 4: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, E. G.; Kesling, P. H.; Matteson, H. C.; Sherwood, D. E.; Tuck, W. R., Jr.; Vaughn, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    An appendix of the supporting data leading to conclusions and recommendations for an effective intraurban transportation system from volumes 1, 2, and 3 is presented. The data are given in tables and graphs.

  11. Space transportation system payload status and reimbursement policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yardley, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    The status of the Space Transportation System (STS) is reviewed. The management structure and project planning status are discussed, including considerations of STS utilization, payloads, cost assessments, and pricing policy.

  12. Transportation System After Next & Comments on AvSTAR Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to define and identify: the role of transportation in supporting future US needs, trends, system after next, supporting research and education, priority investments, and barriers.

  13. 20-Gbps optical LiFi transport system.

    PubMed

    Ying, Cheng-Ling; Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Chun-Jen; Peng, Peng-Chun; Ho, Wen-Jeng

    2015-07-15

    A 20-Gbps optical light-based WiFi (LiFi) transport system employing vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and external light injection technique with 16-quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM)-orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulating signal is proposed. Good bit error rate (BER) performance and clear constellation map are achieved in our proposed optical LiFi transport systems. An optical LiFi transport system, delivering 16-QAM-OFDM signal over a 6-m free-space link, with a data rate of 20 Gbps, is successfully demonstrated. Such a 20-Gbps optical LiFi transport system provides the advantage of a free-space communication link for high data rates, which can accelerate the visible laser light communication (VLLC) deployment. PMID:26176448

  14. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  15. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T. )

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines.

  16. MRS (monitored retrievable storage) to transportation system interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Row, T.H.; Croff, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    In March 1987, the US Department of Energy presented to Congress the proposal to construct and operate a facility for the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portions of Oak Ridge. In discussing the MRS to Transportation System Interfaces, the authors provide a blending of the technical and institutional issues, for they do not believe the solutions to success of this enterprise lie wholly in one area. The authors cover: early chronology of the MRS; comparison of total-system life cycle cost estimates of the authorized system and improved-performance system (i.e., the system that includes a facility for MRS); transportation costs resulting from shipping, security and cask; assumptions for dedicated rail transport from MRS to repository; and significant results from the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) analysis of the improved performance system. (AT)

  17. Mechanism for defoaming by oils and calcium soap in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Miller, Clarence A; Garrett, Peter R; Raney, Kirk H

    2003-07-15

    The effect of oils, hardness, and calcium soap on foam stability of aqueous solutions of commercial surfactants was investigated. For conditions where negligible calcium soap was formed, stability of foams made with 0.1 wt% solutions of a seven-EO alcohol ethoxylate containing dispersed drops of n-hexadecane, triolein, or mixtures of these oils with small amounts of oleic acid could be understood in terms of entry, spreading, and bridging coefficients, i.e., ESB analysis. However, foams made from solutions containing 0.01 wt% of three-EO alcohol ethoxysulfate sodium salt and the same dispersed oils were frequently more stable than expected based on ESB analysis, reflecting that repulsion due to overlap of electrical double layers in the asymmetric oil-water-air film made oil entry into the air-water interface more difficult than the theory predicts. When calcium soap was formed in situ by the reaction of fatty acids in the oil with calcium, solid soap particles were observed at the surfaces of the oil drops. The combination of oil and calcium soap produced a synergistic effect facilitating the well-known bridging instability of foam films or Plateau borders and producing a substantial defoaming effect. A possible mechanism of instability involving increases in disjoining pressure at locations where small soap particles approach the air-water interface is discussed. For both surfactants with the triolein-oleic acid mixtures, calculated entry and bridging coefficients for conditions when calcium soap formed were positive shortly after foam generation but negative at equilibrium. These results are consistent with the experimental observation that most defoaming action occurred shortly after foam generation rather than at later times. PMID:12909057

  18. Future Air Transportation System Breakout Series Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This presentation discusses: AvSTAR Future System Effort Critically important; Investment in the future; Need to follow a systems engineering process; and Efforts need to be worked in worldwide context

  19. Fold assisted transport in graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Bastos, Ramon; Faria, Daiara; Jiang, Yuhang; Mao, Jinhai; Li, Guohong; Andrei, Eva Y.; Latge, Andrea; Sandler, Nancy

    Sasaki pointed out that a constant uniaxial strain applied along the zigzag direction in graphene causes localized states, akin to edge states in nanoribbons. These states are dispersionless and can carry ballistic transport. Recent experiments reported the presence of ballistic channels in graphene grown on SiC characterized with STM spectroscopy. In this work, we show that out-of plane deformations in the form of folds produce states as those predicted by Sasaki. Using tight-binding calculations and recursive Green's function methods, we obtain conductance, density of states (DOS), local density of states, and band structure (BS) for graphene nanoribbons with zigzag termination. Regions with enhanced DOS are identified in the deformed area corresponding to states in new flattened bands in the BS and new ballistic channels in the conductance. Adjusting the fold parameters, desired properties of these states can be tailored. Our results show that folds could serve as pathways for electronic transport and open the possibility of circuitry design within a simple graphene membrane. Support: DOE-FG02-99ER45742, NSF-DMR 1207108 and 1508325.

  20. Cost competitive space transportation system for geostationary payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    A geostationary satellite system designer will have a number of launch vehicles to consider in the system designs for the 1980s. The Space transportation System (the shuttle orbiter plus upper stage) offers the opportunity for lower system cost in comparison with the expendable launch vehicles. An analysis of a spin stabilized solid rocket motor stage has demonstrated the feasibility of this upper stage concept. A cost competitive Space Transportation System (STS) for geostationary payloads is made possible by achievement of the STS cost goals, multiple launch from the STS orbiter, and a user-provided spin stabilized upper stage.

  1. Chronology of the early Solar System from chondrule-bearing calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions.

    PubMed

    Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Hutcheon, Ian D; MacPherson, Glenn J

    2005-04-21

    Chondrules and Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are high-temperature components of meteorites that formed during transient heating events in the early Solar System. A major unresolved issue is the relative timing of CAI and chondrule formation. From the presence of chondrule fragments in an igneous CAI, it was concluded that some chondrules formed before CAIs (ref. 5). This conclusion is contrary to the presence of relict CAIs inside chondrules, as well as to the higher abundance of 26Al in CAIs; both observations indicate that CAIs pre-date chondrules by 1-3 million years (Myr). Here we report that relict chondrule material in the Allende meteorite, composed of olivine and low-calcium pyroxene, occurs in the outer portions of two CAIs and is 16O-poor (Delta17O approximately -1 per thousand to -5 per thousand). Spinel and diopside in the CAI cores are 16O-rich (Delta17O up to -20 per thousand), whereas diopside in their outer zones, as well as melilite and anorthite, are 16O-depleted (Delta17O = -8 per thousand to 2 per thousand). Both chondrule-bearing CAIs are 26Al-poor with initial 26Al/27Al ratios of (4.7 +/- 1.4) x 10(-6) and <1.2 x 10(-6). We conclude that these CAIs had chondrule material added to them during a re-melting episode approximately 2 Myr after formation of CAIs with the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio of 5 x 10(-5). PMID:15846340

  2. Chronology of the early Solar System from chondrule-bearing calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Hutcheon, Ian D.; MacPherson, Glenn J.

    2005-04-01

    Chondrules and Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are high-temperature components of meteorites that formed during transient heating events in the early Solar System. A major unresolved issue is the relative timing of CAI and chondrule formation. From the presence of chondrule fragments in an igneous CAI, it was concluded that some chondrules formed before CAIs (ref. 5). This conclusion is contrary to the presence of relict CAIs inside chondrules, as well as to the higher abundance of 26Al in CAIs; both observations indicate that CAIs pre-date chondrules by 1-3million years (Myr). Here we report that relict chondrule material in the Allende meteorite, composed of olivine and low-calcium pyroxene, occurs in the outer portions of two CAIs and is 16O-poor (Δ17O ~ - 1‰ to -5‰). Spinel and diopside in the CAI cores are 16O-rich (Δ17O up to -20‰), whereas diopside in their outer zones, as well as melilite and anorthite, are 16O-depleted (Δ17O = -8‰ to 2‰). Both chondrule-bearing CAIs are 26Al-poor with initial 26Al/27Al ratios of (4.7 +/- 1.4) × 10-6 and <1.2 × 10-6. We conclude that these CAIs had chondrule material added to them during a re-melting episode ~2Myr after formation of CAIs with the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio of 5 × 10-5.

  3. Flow and transport in hierarchically fractured systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that flow in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain is controlled by fractures. A current conceptual model assumes that the flow in the fracture system can be approximately by a three-dimensionally interconnected network of linear conduits. The overall flow system of rocks at Yucca Mountain is considered to consist of hierarchically structured heterogeneous fracture systems of multiple scales. A case study suggests that it is more appropriate to use the flow parameters of the large fracture system for predicting the first arrival time, rather than using the bulk average parameters of the total system.

  4. Flow and transport in hierarchically fractured systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K.

    1993-12-31

    Preliminary results indicate that flow in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain is controlled by fractures. A current conceptual model assumes that the flow in the fracture system can be approximated by a three-dimensionally interconnected network of linear conduits. The overall flow system of rocks at Yucca Mountain is considered to consist of hierarchically structured heterogeneous fracture systems of multiple scales. A case study suggests that it is more appropriate to use the flow parameters of the large fracture system for predicting the first arrival time, rather than using the bulk average parameters of the total system.

  5. Effects of 1-week head-down tilt bed rest on bone formation and the calcium endocrine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Whalen, Robert T.; Fung, Paul; Sherrard, Donald J.; Maloney, Norma

    1992-01-01

    The -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) is employed in the study of 8 subjects to determine early responses in human bone and calcium endocrines during spaceflight. The average rates of bone formation in the iliac crest are determined by means of a single-dose labeling schedule and are found to decrease in 6 of the subjects. The decrease varies directly with walking miles, and increased excretion of urinary Ca and Na are observed preceding increased levels of ionized serum calcium on a bed-rest day late in the week. Reduced phosphorous excretions are also followed by increased serum phosphorous on day six, and reductions are noted in parathyroid hormone and vitamin D by the end of the experiment. The data demonstrate the responsiveness of the skeletal system to biomechanical stimuli such as the HDT.

  6. Workshop on technology issues of superconducting Maglev transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wegrzyn, J.E. ); Shaw, D.T. )

    1991-09-27

    There exists a critical need in the United States to improve its ground transportation system. One suggested system that offers many advantages over the current transportation infrastructure is Maglev. Maglev represents the latest evolution in very high and speed ground transportation, where vehicles are magnetically levitated, guided, and propelled over elevated guideways at speeds of 300 miles per hour. Maglev is not a new concept but is, however, receiving renewed interest. The objective of this workshop was to further promote these interest by bringing together a small group of specialists in Maglev technology to discuss Maglev research needs and to identify key research issues to the development of a successful Maglev system. The workshop was organized into four sessions based on the following technical areas: Materials, Testing, and Shielding; Magnet Design and Cryogenic Systems; Propulsion and Levitation Systems; and, System Control and Integration.

  7. Security plan for the Automated Transportation Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) is an unclassified non-sensitive system consisting of hardware and software designed to facilitate the shipment of goods for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The system is secured against waste, fraud, abuse, misuse, and programming errors through a series of security measures that are discussed in detail in this document.

  8. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    PubMed Central

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methanol was unsatisfactory. Phosphate buffer (0.06 M) produced higher activity than did either U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reconstituted hard water or Tris buffer sediment diluents. Intracellular formazan crystals were dissolved within minutes when in contact with immersion oil. Greater crystal production (respiration) detected by a tetrazolium salt assay occurred at increased substrate concentrations. Test diluents containing macrophyte exudates produced greater activity than did phosphate buffer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water, or ultrapure water diluents. Both assays showed decreases in sediment or bacterial activity through time. PMID:16347067

  9. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  10. Arrow 227: Air transport system design simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bontempi, Michael; Bose, Dave; Brophy, Georgeann; Cashin, Timothy; Kanarios, Michael; Ryan, Steve; Peterson, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    The Arrow 227 is a student-designed commercial transport for use in a overnight package delivery network. The major goal of the concept was to provide the delivery service with the greatest potential return on investment. The design objectives of the Arrow 227 were based on three parameters; production cost, payload weight, and aerodynamic efficiency. Low production cost helps to reduce initial investment. Increased payload weight allows for a decrease in flight cycles and, therefore, less fuel consumption than an aircraft carrying less payload weight and requiring more flight cycles. In addition, fewer flight cycles will allow a fleet to last longer. Finally, increased aerodynamic efficiency in the form of high L/D will decrease fuel consumption.

  11. Massive excretion of calcium oxalate from late prepupal salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster demonstrates active nephridial-like anion transport.

    PubMed

    Farkaš, Robert; Pečeňová, Ludmila; Mentelová, Lucia; Beňo, Milan; Beňová-Liszeková, Denisa; Mahmoodová, Silvia; Tejnecký, Václav; Raška, Otakar; Juda, Pavel; Svidenská, Silvie; Hornáček, Matúš; Chase, Bruce A; Raška, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    The Drosophila salivary glands (SGs) were well known for the puffing patterns of their polytene chromosomes and so became a tissue of choice to study sequential gene activation by the steroid hormone ecdysone. One well-documented function of these glands is to produce a secretory glue, which is released during pupariation to fix the freshly formed puparia to the substrate. Over the past two decades SGs have been used to address specific aspects of developmentally-regulated programmed cell death (PCD) as it was thought that they are doomed for histolysis and after pupariation are just awaiting their fate. More recently, however, we have shown that for the first 3-4 h after pupariation SGs undergo tremendous endocytosis and vacuolation followed by vacuole neutralization and membrane consolidation. Furthermore, from 8 to 10 h after puparium formation (APF) SGs display massive apocrine secretion of a diverse set of cellular proteins. Here, we show that during the period from 11 to 12 h APF, the prepupal glands are very active in calcium oxalate (CaOx) extrusion that resembles renal or nephridial excretory activity. We provide genetic evidence that Prestin, a Drosophila homologue of the mammalian electrogenic anion exchange carrier SLC26A5, is responsible for the instantaneous production of CaOx by the late prepupal SGs. Its positive regulation by the protein kinases encoded by fray and wnk lead to increased production of CaOx. The formation of CaOx appears to be dependent on the cooperation between Prestin and the vATPase complex as treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A abolishes the production of detectable CaOx. These data demonstrate that prepupal SGs remain fully viable, physiologically active and engaged in various cellular activities at least until early pupal period, that is, until moments prior to the execution of PCD. PMID:27397870

  12. Advanced Vehicle system concepts. [nonpetroleum passenger transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, K. S.; Langendoen, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Various nonpetroleum vehicle system concepts for passenger vehicles in the 1990's are being considered as part of the Advanced Vehicle (AV) Assessment at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The vehicle system and subsystem performance requirements, the projected characteristics of mature subsystem candidates, and promising systems are presented. The system candidates include electric and hybrid vehicles powered by electricity with or without a nonpetroleum power source. The subsystem candidates include batteries (aqueous-mobile, flow, high-temperature, and metal-air), fuel cells (phosphoric acid, advanced acids, and solid polymer electrolyte), nonpetroleum heat engines, advanced dc and ac propulsion components, power-peaking devices, and transmissions.

  13. Transport Information System using Query Centric Cyber Physical Systems (QCPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundra, Ankit; Rathee, Geetanjali; Chawla, Meenu; Soni, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    To incorporate the computation and communication with the physical world, next generation architecture i.e. CPS is viewed as a new technology. To improve the better interaction with the physical world or to perk up the electricity delivery usage, various CPS based approaches have been introduced. Recently several GPS equipped smart phones and sensor based frameworks have been proposed which provide various services i.e. environment estimation, road safety improvement but encounter certain limitations like elevated energy consumption and high computation cost. To meet the high reliability and safety requirements, this paper introduces a novel approach based on QCPS model which provides several users services (discussed in this paper). Further, this paper proposed a Transport Information System (TIS), which provide the communication with lower cost overhead by arranging the similar sensors in the form of grids. Each grid has a coordinator which interacts with cloud to process the user query. In order to evaluate the performance of proposed approach we have implemented a test bed of 16 wireless sensor nodes and have shown the performance in terms of computation and communication cost.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION STATES OF WATER SYSTEMS (TECHNICAL NOTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emphasis is given to the fact that saturation indexes only indicate the tendency of a water to dissolve or precipitate calcium carbonate (CaCo3). The rate at which a given water attains equilibrium cannot be derived from the saturation index value.

  15. Manifold Coal-Slurry Transport System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, S. G.; Estus, J. M.; Lavin, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Feeding several slurry pipes into main pipeline reduces congestion in coal mines. System based on manifold concept: feeder pipelines from each working entry joined to main pipeline that carries coal slurry out of panel and onto surface. Manifold concept makes coal-slurry haulage much simpler than existing slurry systems.

  16. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOEpatents

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1992-07-07

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  17. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Program cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes Rockwell International's cost analysis results of manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to low earth orbit during the basic and option 1 period of performance for contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies. Vehicles analyzed include the space shuttle, personnel launch system (PLS) with advanced launch system (ALS) and national launch system (NLS) boosters, foreign launch vehicles, NLS-2 derived launch vehicles, liquid rocket booster (LRB) derived launch vehicle, and cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV).

  18. A Configurable, Object-Oriented, Transportation System Software Framework

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY,SUZANNE M.; MYRE,JOHN W.; PRICE,MARK H.; RUSSELL,ERIC D.; SCOTT,DAN W.

    2000-08-01

    The Transportation Surety Center, 6300, has been conducting continuing research into and development of information systems for the Configurable Transportation Security and Information Management System (CTSS) project, an Object-Oriented Framework approach that uses Component-Based Software Development to facilitate rapid deployment of new systems while improving software cost containment, development reliability, compatibility, and extensibility. The direction has been to develop a Fleet Management System (FMS) framework using object-oriented technology. The goal for the current development is to provide a software and hardware environment that will demonstrate and support object-oriented development commonly in the FMS Central Command Center and Vehicle domains.

  19. Safety of high speed ground transportation systems: Safety of advanced braking concepts for high speed ground transportation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.P.; Ahlbeck, D.R.; Luedeke, J.F.; Cook, S.D.; Dielman, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop qualitative and quantitative information on the various braking strategies used in high-speed ground transportation systems in support of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The approach employed in this study is composed of two steps: first, build a technical understanding of the various braking strategies, and second, perform a safety analysis for each system. The systems considered in this study include seven operating high-speed rail transportation systems and three existing magnetic levitation systems. The principal technique used in the system safety analysis is Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), an inductive approach to identifying system failure modes that depends on a thorough understanding of the system design and operation. Key elements derived from the system safety analysis are the fault-tolerant and fail-safe characteristics of the braking systems. The report concludes with recommended guidance on the structure of potential future regulations governing high-speed rail braking systems.

  20. 78 FR 16030 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program...: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory Committee (ITS PAC) will hold a... relating to the study, development, and implementation of intelligent transportation systems. Through...

  1. [Role of drug transporters in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Temesszentandrási-Ambrus, Csilla; Beéry, Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Although the presence of blood-brain barrier in the mammalian organisms was discovered in the early 1900s, its precise structure and the drug transporter proteins localized in the blood-brain barrier were identified only in the last decades. Beside the ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins responsible for the protection of the brain, the Solute Carrier transporters play also an important role in the function of the central nervous system by its feeding, energy supply and cleaning function during the metabolism. This review provides an overview on the main types of transporters located in the brain, on their localization in different cell types and the main techniques for their investigation. In the second part of this article various neurodegenerative disorders and the pathology-related transporter proteins are presented. In the light of recent experimental results new therapeutic strategies may come into the focus of research for the treatment of disorders currently without effective therapy. PMID:26920327

  2. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  3. The competitive advantage of a dual-transporter system.

    PubMed

    Levy, Sagi; Kafri, Moshe; Carmi, Miri; Barkai, Naama

    2011-12-01

    Cells use transporters of different affinities to regulate nutrient influx. When nutrients are depleted, low-affinity transporters are replaced by high-affinity ones. High-affinity transporters are helpful when concentrations of nutrients are low, but the advantage of reducing their abundance when nutrients are abundant is less clear. When we eliminated such reduced production of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-affinity transporters for phosphate and zinc, the elapsed time from the initiation of the starvation program until the lack of nutrients limited growth was shortened, and recovery from starvation was delayed. The latter phenotype was rescued by constitutive activation of the starvation program. Dual-transporter systems appear to prolong preparation for starvation and to facilitate subsequent recovery, which may optimize sensing of nutrient depletion by integrating internal and external information about nutrient availability. PMID:22158820

  4. A flexible micro fluid transport system featuring magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrooz, Majid; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a flexible magnetically-actuated micro fluid transport system utilizing an isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE). Theoretical modeling and analysis of this system is presented for a two-dimensional model. This fluid transport system can propel the fluid by applying a fluctuating magnetic field on the MRE. The magneto-fluid-structure interaction analysis is employed to determine movement of the solid domain and the velocity of the fluid under a controllable magnetic field. The effects of key material, geometric, and magnetic parameters on the behavior of this system are examined. It is demonstrated that the proposed system can propel the fluid unidirectionally, and the volume of the transported fluid is significantly affected by some of the design parameters.

  5. Antioxidant depletion, lipid peroxidation, and impairment of calcium transport induced by air-blast overpressure in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M; Tyurina, Y Y; Tyurin, V A; Menshikova, E V; Kisin, E R; Kagan, V E

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to blast overpressure, or the sudden rise in atmospheric pressure after explosive detonation, results in damage mainly of the gas-filled organs. In addition to the physical damage, in the lung, injury may proceed via a hemorrhage-dependent mechanism initiating oxidative stress and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products. Massive rupture of capillaries and red blood cells, release of hemoglobin, its oxidation to met-hemoglobin and degradation sets the stage for heme-catalyzed oxidations. The authors hypothesized that lipid hydroperoxides interact with met-hemoglobin in the lungs of exposed animals to produce ferryl-hemoglobin, an extremely potent oxidant that induces oxidative damage by depleting antioxidants and initiating peroxidation reactions. Oxidation-induced disturbance of Ca2+ homeostasis facilitates further amplification of the damage. To test this hypothesis, groups of anesthetized rats (6 rats/group) were exposed to blast at 3 peak pressures: low (61.2 kPa), medium (95.2 kPa), high (136 kPa). One group served as an unexposed control. Immediately after exposure, the rats were euthanized and the lungs were analyzed for biochemical parameters. Blast overpressure caused: (1) depletion of total and water-soluble pulmonary antioxidant reserves and individual antioxidants (ascorbate, vitamin E, GSH), (2) accumulation of lipid peroxidation products (conjugated dienes, TBARS), and (3) inhibition of ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport. The magnitude of these changes in the lungs was proportional to the peak blast overpressure. Inhibition of Ca2+ transport strongly correlated with both depletion of antioxidants and enhancement of lipid peroxidation. In model experiments, met-hemoglobin/H2O2 produced damage to Ca2+ transport in the lungs from control animals similar to that observed in the lungs from blast overpressure-exposed animals. Ascorbate, which is known to reduce ferryl-hemoglobin, protected against met-hemoglobin/H2O2-induced damage of Ca2+ transport

  6. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurance, Dennis; Kimball, Foster; Rix, Craig

    1995-01-01

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  7. Modular transportable superconducting magnetic Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lieurance, D.; Kimball, F.; Rix, C.

    1994-12-31

    Design and cost studies were performed for the magnet components of mid-size (1-5 MWh), cold supported SMES systems using alternative configurations. The configurations studied included solenoid magnets, which required onsite assembly of the magnet system, and toroid and racetrack configurations which consisted of factory assembled modules. For each configuration, design concepts and cost information were developed for the major features of the magnet system including the conductor, electrical insulation, and structure. These studies showed that for mid-size systems, the costs of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are comparable and that the specific configuration to be used for a given application should be based upon customer requirements such as limiting stray fields or minimizing risks in development or construction.

  8. Superconducting magnet for the Maglev transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi

    1994-07-01

    Magnetically levitated vehicles (Maglev) using superconducting magnets have been under development in Japan for the past 23 years. The superconducting magnets for the Maglev system are used in a special environment compared to other applications. They have to work stably subject to both mechanical and electromagnetic disturbances. The brief history of the Maglev development in Japan, the planning of new test line, the superconducting magnet's stability and the on-board refrigeration system will be presented.

  9. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The establishment of lunar bases is the next logical step in the exploration of space. Permanent lunar bases will support scientific investigation, the industrialization of space, and the development of self-sufficiency on the Moon. Scientific investigation and research and development would lead to applications utilizing lunar material resources. By utilizing these resources, the industrialization of space can become a reality. The above two factors coupled with the development of key and enabling technologies would lead to achievement of self-sufficiency of the lunar base. Attention was focused on specific design(s) to be pursued during subsequent stages in advanced courses. Some of the objectives in the project included: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from earth, or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetically levitated, or superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e. high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, zero wind forces, and lower gravity, etc.

  10. Heat-induced gelation of bovine serum albumin/low-methoxyl pectin systems and the effect of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Donato, Laurence; Garnier, Catherine; Novales, Bruno; Durand, Sylvie; Doublier, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    Influence of low-methoxyl pectin (LM pectin) and calcium ions (3 mM) on mechanical behavior and microstructure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) gels (pH 6.8, in 0.1 M NaCl) was evaluated. Protein and LM pectin concentrations were fixed at 2, 4, and 8 wt % and 0.21, 0.43, and 0.85 wt %, respectively. Rheological measurements and confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled with texture image analysis by use of the co-occurrence method were performed. Heat treatment of BSA/LM pectin mixtures induced protein gelation and a phase separation process between the two biopolymers, which was kinetically trapped. Calcium ions induced pectin gelation and modified BSA gel properties. Depending on biopolymer concentrations, a balance between pectin and/or protein gel contribution on final gel strength exists. The microstructures of the mixed systems in the presence of calcium can be interpreted as interpenetrated structures. Texture image analysis allowed one to classify more precisely the different microstructures observed in relation with mechanical properties. PMID:15638542

  11. Calcium channel ligand binding to intact, concanavalin A and cyclic AMP-treated cells of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, G V; Pinchuk, L N; Tkachenko, Y V; Rudenko, A E

    1990-12-01

    To examine whether the cells of immune system express calcium channel-forming proteins, we studied the binding of calcium channel ligands, known to detect certain types of the above channels in excitable tissues, to murine splenic and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Specific (i.e., displaceable by excess cold ligand) binding of the 3H-labelled dihydropyridine drugs PN200-110 and nitrendipine, was not detected in these cells. Specific binding of a phenylalkylamine drug, [3H]verapamil, was detected, but cannot be attributed to the existence of certain specialized receptors, since multiple [3H]verapamil binding sites (about 10(6) per cell) appeared to be occupied. [3H]Verapamil binding to murine splenic mononuclear cells was inhibited following exposure to either the polyclonal T-cell activator, concanavalin A, or a cell-permeable analogue of the second messenger, cyclic AMP, suggesting that processes of lymphocyte activation and/or intracellular signalling may down-modulate at least some of calcium channel ligand binding sites. PMID:1964929

  12. Calcium alginate nanoparticles synthesized through a novel interfacial cross-linking method as a potential protein drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Nesamony, Jerry; Singh, Priti R; Nada, Shadia E; Shah, Zahoor A; Kolling, William M

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this research work was to develop a novel technique to synthesize calcium alginate nanoparticles using pharmaceutically relevant microemulsions. Stable microemulsion-based reactors were prepared using aqueous sodium alginate, aqueous calcium chloride, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS), and isopropyl myristate. The reactor microemulsions were characterized via conductivity and dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments. The conductivity data indicated composition- and reagent-dependent variations in electrical conductivity when the aqueous phase containing reagents were present at or above a Wo (Wo = [DOSS]/[water]) value of 14. The reactor microemulsions were of approximately 6 nm sized droplets. When the reactor microemulsions were mixed and sonicated for 1 h approximately, 350-nm-sized calcium alginate nanoparticles were produced, as indicated by DLS measurements. The particles were isolated and characterized via low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy. The electron micrographs corroborate the DLS results. The nanoparticles were evaluated as a drug delivery system by incorporating bovine serum albumin (BSA) and performing in vitro release and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) studies. The BSA release profile was characterized by an initial burst release followed by a sustained-release phase. SDS-PAGE studies indicated that the incorporated protein did not suffer covalent aggregation or degradation via fragmentation. PMID:22411606

  13. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  14. Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect

    C.A Kouts

    2006-11-22

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

  15. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. ); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. ); Dixon, L.D. , Martinez, GA ); Jones, R.H. , Los Gatos, CA ); Klimas, M.J. ); Peterson, R.W

    1992-03-01

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  16. Multirate Transport of Natural Tracers in a Fractured System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.; Heath, J. E.; Gardner, P.; Robinson, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Flow and transport in fractured systems is important in both groundwater applications and low-permeability hydrocarbon systems. We apply the multirate solute transport model to the flow of single-phase natural tracers in low-permeability hydrocarbon source rocks. We explore the effects of fracture and domain geometry, reservoir boundary conditions, and initial conditions of both the flow and transport problems using analytical and semi-analytical solutions. The flow and transport solutions will be combined to optimize reservoir characterization using a Bayesian framework. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. The Small Aircraft Transportation System Project: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.

    2006-01-01

    To all peoples in all parts of the world throughout history, the ability to move about easily is a fundamental element of freedom. The American people have charged NASA to increase their freedom and that of their children knowing that their quality of life will improve as our nation s transportation systems improve. In pursuit of this safe, reliable, and affordable personalized air transportation option, in 2000 NASA established the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Project. As the name suggests personalized air transportation would be built on smaller aircraft than those used by the airlines. Of course, smaller aircraft can operate from smaller airports and 96% of the American population is within thirty miles of a high-quality, underutilized community airport as are the vast majority of their customers, family members, and favorite vacation destinations.

  18. A method for a comparison of bulk energy transport systems.

    PubMed

    Oudalov, Alexandre; Lave, Lester B; Reza, Muhamad; Bahrman, Michael P

    2009-10-15

    We model alternatives for moving bulk energy, including both private costs and accounting for environmental externalities by requiring the transport system to satisfy environment health, and safety standards. In particular, we focus on the cost and environmental trade-offs between "coal by wire," mine-mouth generation with electricity transmission, and transporting the primary energy resources with generation near the customer. Having the bulk energy transport model satisfy standards avoids the controversy associated with estimating dollar costs for constrained visibility, noise, and 50/60 Hz electromagnetic fields. A sensitivity analysis examines the implications of a range of carbon-dioxide discharge charges. PMID:19921870

  19. Study of aircraft in intraurban transportation systems, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, E. G.; Kesling, P. H.; Matteson, D. E.; Sherwood, D. E.; Tuck, W. R., Jr.; Vaughn, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of three aircraft concepts, deflected slipstream STOL, helicopter VTOL, and fixed wing STOL, is presented. An attempt was made to determine the best concept for the intraurban transportation system. Desirability of the concept was based on ease of maintenance, development timing, reliability, operating costs, and the noise produced. Indications are that the deflected slipstream STOL is best suited for intraurban transportation. Tables and graphs are included.

  20. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) sample pig transport system

    SciTech Connect

    MCCOY, J.C.

    1999-03-16

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides a technical evaluation of the Sample Pig Transport System as compared to the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1, Change 1, Chapter III. The evaluation concludes that the package is acceptable for the onsite transport of Type B, fissile excepted radioactive materials when used in accordance with this document.

  1. Conestoga 2: A low cost commercial space transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. O.

    1984-01-01

    Conestoga 2 is currently under development. It is capable of inserting 500 Kg satellites into 800 Km circular polar orbits. Conestoga 2 makes maximum use of existing (developed) technology and hardware. Its commercial objective is to fill a need for low cost low Earth orbital transport not efficiently served by Shuttle or larger space transport systems. Low Earth orbit markets, foreign participation, and launch site considerations are discussed along with technical and economic trade-offs.

  2. Designing a beam transport system for RHIC's electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We designed two electron lenses to apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC; they will be installed near IP10. The electron-beam transport system is an important subsystem of the entire electron-lens system. Electrons are transported from the electron gun to the main solenoid and further to the collector. The system must allow for changes of the electron beam size inside the superconducting magnet, and for changes of the electron position by 5 mm in the horizontal- and vertical-planes.

  3. Transformations in Air Transportation Systems For the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    Globally, our transportation systems face increasingly discomforting realities: certain of the legacy air and ground infrastructures of the 20th century will not satisfy our 21st century mobility needs. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity for those nations unable to transform from the 20th to 21st century systems. Clearly, new thinking is required regarding business models that cater to consumers value of time, airspace architectures that enable those new business models, and technology strategies for innovating at the system-of-networks level. This lecture proposes a structured way of thinking about transformation from the legacy systems of the 20th century toward new systems for the 21st century. The comparison and contrast between the legacy systems of the 20th century and the transformed systems of the 21st century provides insights into the structure of transformation of air transportation. Where the legacy systems tend to be analog (versus digital), centralized (versus distributed), and scheduled (versus on-demand) for example, transformed 21st century systems become capable of scalability through technological, business, and policy innovations. Where air mobility in our legacy systems of the 20th century brought economic opportunity and quality of life to large service markets, transformed air mobility of the 21st century becomes more equitable available to ever-thinner and widely distributed populations. Several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems create new foundations for 21st thinking about air transportation. One of the technological developments of importance arises from complexity science and modern network theory. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of robustness

  4. Space Transportation Systems Life Cycle Cost Assessment and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, John W.; Rhodes, Russell E.; Zapata, Edgar; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Donahue, Benjaamin B.; Knuth, William

    2008-01-01

    Civil and military applications of space transportation have been pursued for just over 50 years and there has been, and still is, a need for safe, dependable, affordable, and sustainable space transportation systems. Fully expendable and partially reusable space transportation systems have been developed and put in operation that have not adequately achieved this need. Access to space is technically achievable, but presently very expensive and will remain so until there is a breakthrough in the way we do business. Since 1991 the national Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) has reviewed and assessed the lessons learned from the major U.S. space programs of the past decades focusing on what has been learned from the assessment and control of Life Cycle Cost (LCC) from these systems. This paper presents the results of a selected number of studies and analyses that have been conducted by the SPST addressing the need, as well as the solutions, for improvement in LCC. The major emphasis of the SPST processes is on developing the space transportation system requirements first (up front). These requirements must include both the usual system flight performance requirements and also the system functional requirements, including the infrastructure on Earth's surface, in-space and on the Moon and Mars surfaces to determine LCC. This paper describes the development of specific innovative engineering and management approaches and processes. This includes a focus on flight hardware maturity for reliability, ground operations approaches, and business processes between contractor and government organizations. A major change in program/project cost control is being proposed by the SPST to achieve a sustainable space transportation system LCC - controlling cost as a program metric in addition to the existing practice of controlling performance and weight. Without a firm requirement and methodically structured cost control, it is unlikely that an affordable and sustainable space

  5. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the Breast

    PubMed Central

    VanHouten, Joshua N.; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Normal breast epithelial cells and breast cancer cells express the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), the master regulator of systemic calcium metabolism. During lactation, activation of the CaSR in mammary epithelial cells downregulates PTHrP levels in milk and in the circulation, and increases calcium transport into milk. In contrast, in breast cancer cells the CaSR upregulates PTHrP production. A switch in G-protein usage underlies the opposing effects of the CaSR on PTHrP expression in normal and malignant breast cells. During lactation, the CaSR in normal breast cells coordinates a feedback loop that matches the transport of calcium into milk and maternal calcium metabolism to the supply of calcium. A switch in CaSR G-protein usage during malignant transformation converts this feedback loop into a feed-forward cycle in breast cancer cells that may promote the growth of osteolytic skeletal metastases. PMID:23856268

  6. Characterization of nucleoside transport systems in cultured rat epididymal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Leung, G P; Ward, J L; Wong, P Y; Tse, C M

    2001-05-01

    The nucleoside transport systems in cultured epididymal epithelium were characterized and found to be similar between the proximal (caput and corpus) and distal (cauda) regions of the epididymis. Functional studies revealed that 70% of the total nucleoside uptake was Na(+) dependent, while 30% was Na(+) independent. The Na(+)-independent nucleoside transport was mediated by both the equilibrative nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR)-sensitive system (40%) and the NBMPR-insensitive system (60%), which was supported by a biphasic dose response to NBMPR inhibition. The Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]uridine uptake was selectively inhibited 80% by purine nucleosides, indicating that the purine nucleoside-selective N1 system is predominant. Since Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]guanosine uptake was inhibited by thymidine by 20% and Na(+)-dependent [(3)H]thymidine uptake was broadly inhibited by purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, this suggested the presence of the broadly selective N3 system accounting for 20% of Na(+)-dependent nucleoside uptake. Results of RT-PCR confirmed the presence of mRNA for equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1, ENT2, and concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) 2 and the absence of CNT1. It is suggested that the nucleoside transporters in epididymis may be important for sperm maturation by regulating the extracellular concentration of adenosine in epididymal plasma. PMID:11287319

  7. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate under diffusion controlled mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigabu Gebrehiwet; James R. Henriksen; Luanjing Guo; Don T. Fox; Hai Huang; Lee Tu; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith; George Redden

    2014-07-01

    Multi-component mineral precipitation in porous, subsurface environments is challenging to simulate or engineer when in situ reactant mixing is controlled by diffusion. In contrast to well-mixed systems, the conditions that favor mineral precipitation in porous media are distributed along chemical gradients, which evolve spatially due to concurrent mineral precipitation and modification of solute transport in the media. The resulting physical and chemical characteristics of a mixing/precipitation zone are a consequence of coupling between transport and chemical processes, and the distinctive properties of individual chemical systems. We examined the spatial distribution of precipitates formed in “double diffusion” columns for two chemical systems, calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. Polyacrylamide hydrogel was used as a low permeability, high porosity medium to maximize diffusive mixing and minimize pressure- and density-driven flow between reactant solutions. In the calcium phosphate system, multiple, visually dense and narrow bands of precipitates were observed that were reminiscent of previously reported Liesegang patterns. In the calcium carbonate system, wider precipitation zones characterized by more sparse distributions of precipitates and a more open channel structure were observed. In both cases, formation of precipitates inhibited, but did not necessarily eliminate, continued transport and mixing of the reactants. A reactive transport model with fully implicit coupling between diffusion, chemical speciation and precipitation kinetics, but where explicit details of nucleation processes were neglected, was able to qualitatively simulate properties of the precipitation zones. The results help to illustrate how changes in the physical properties of a precipitation zone depend on coupling between diffusion-controlled reactant mixing and chemistry-specific details of precipitation kinetics.

  8. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta isoform is expressed in motor neurons during axon outgrowth and is part of slow axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Lund, Linda M; McQuarrie, Irvine G

    2002-03-15

    Previously, we identified calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIbeta (CaMKIIbeta) mRNA in spinal motor neurons with 372 bp inserted in what corresponds to the "association" domain of the protein. This was interesting because known additions and deletions to CaMKIIbeta mRNA are usually less than 100 bp in size and found in the "variable" region. Changes in the association domain of CaMKIIbeta could influence substrate specificity, activity or intracellular targeting. We show that three variations of this insert are found in CNS neurons or sciatic motor neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats. We used PCR and nucleic acid sequencing to identify inserts of 114, 243, or 372 bases. We also show that addition of the 372 bases is associated with outgrowth of the axon (the standard CaMKIIbeta downregulates when axon outgrowth occurs). Radiolabeling, immunoblots, and 2D PAGE identified this larger CaMKIIbeta as part of the group of soluble proteins moving at the slowest rate of axonal transport (SCa) in sciatic motor neurons (similar1 mm/day). This group is composed mainly of structural proteins (e.g., tubulin) used to assemble the cytoskeleton of regrowing axons. PMID:11891785

  9. Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation and strontium coprecipitation in a porous media flow system.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Schultz, Logan N; Bugni, Steven; Mitchell, Andrew C; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-02-01

    Strontium-90 is a principal radionuclide contaminant in the subsurface at several Department of Energy sites in the Western U.S., causing a threat to groundwater quality in areas such as Hanford, WA. In this work, we used laboratory-scale porous media flow cells to examine a potential remediation strategy employing coprecipitation of strontium in carbonate minerals. CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation were induced via ureolysis by Sporosarcina pasteurii in two-dimensional porous media reactors. An injection strategy using pulsed injection of calcium mineralization medium was tested against a continuous injection strategy. The pulsed injection strategy involved periods of lowered calcite saturation index combined with short high fluid velocity flow periods of calcium mineralization medium followed by stagnation (no-flow) periods to promote homogeneous CaCO(3) precipitation. By alternating the addition of mineralization and growth media the pulsed strategy promoted CaCO(3) precipitation while sustaining the ureolytic culture over time. Both injection strategies achieved ureolysis with subsequent CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation. The pulsed injection strategy precipitated 71-85% of calcium and 59% of strontium, while the continuous injection was less efficient and precipitated 61% of calcium and 56% of strontium. Over the 60 day operation of the pulsed reactors, ureolysis was continually observed, suggesting that the balance between growth and precipitation phases allowed for continued cell viability. Our results support the pulsed injection strategy as a viable option for ureolysis-induced strontium coprecipitation because it may reduce the likelihood of injection well accumulation caused by localized mineral plugging while Sr coprecipitation efficiency is maintained in field-scale applications. PMID:23282003

  10. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further

  11. Evaluation of the calcium-antagonist, antidiarrhoeic and central nervous system activities of Baccharis serraefolia.

    PubMed

    Tortoriello, J; Aguilar-Santamaría, L

    1996-09-01

    Baccharis serraefolia is a widely used plant to treat diarrhoea in Mexican traditional medicine. Although the methanolic extract of this plant has shown an important dose-dependent spasmolytic activity, its underlying mechanism has not been studied. In the present work, the methanolic extract of B. serraefolia significantly delayed the onset of tonic seizures induced by strychnine and pentylenetetrazol; besides, it diminished the death rate and number of animals that exhibited convulsions. It produced potentiation of the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital. Oral administration produced an inhibition of gastrointestinal transit in mice as effective as that produced by loperamide. As to the effect on smooth muscles, the active extract produced an inhibition of contraction induced electrically, which could not be reversed by naloxone. The calcium concentration-contraction curve showed a rightward displacement when the extract was added to isolated guinea pig ileum depolarized with high K+ and cumulative concentrations of Ca2+. The results suggest that the methanolic extract does not interact with classical opiate receptors and its effects, at least that produced on smooth muscle, may be due to a probable interference with calcium influx and/or calcium release from an intra-cellular store. PMID:8887023

  12. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  13. Transportation routing analysis geographic information system -- TRAGIS, a multimodal transportation routing tool

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    Over 15 years ago, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed two transportation routing models: HIGHWAY, which predicts truck transportation routes, and INTERLINE, which predicts rail transportation routes. Subsequent modifications have been made to enhance each of these models. Some of these changes include population density information for routes, HM-164 routing regulations for highway route controlled quantities of radioactive materials (RAM) truck shipments, and inclusion of waterway routing into INTERLINE. The AIRPORT model, developed 2 years after the HIGHWAY and INTERLINE models, serves as an emergency response tool. This model identifies the nearest airports from a designated location. Currently, the AIRPORT model is inactive. The Transportation Management Division of the US Department of Energy held a Baseline Requirements Assessment Session on the HIGHWAY, INTERLINE, and AIRPORT models in April 1994 to bring together many users of these models and other experts in the transportation routing field to discuss these models and to decide on the capabilities that needed to be added. Of the many needs discussed, the primary one was to have the network databases within a geographic information system (GIS). As a result of the Baseline Requirements Session, the development of a new GIS model has been initiated. This paper will discuss the development of the new Transportation Routing Analysis GIS (TRAGIS) model at ORNL.

  14. Modeling Reactive Transport in Coupled Groundwater-Conduit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiessl, S. M.; Sauter, M.; Zheng, C.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modeling reactive transport in coupled groundwater-conduit systems requires consideration of two transport time scales in the flow and transport models. Consider for example a subsurface mine consisting of a network of highly conductive shafts, drifts or ventilation raises (i.e., conduits) within the considerably less permeable ore material (i.e., matrix). In the conduits, potential contaminants can travel much more rapidly than in the background aquifer (matrix). Since conduits cannot necessarily be regarded as a continuum, double continuum models are only of limited use for simulation of contaminant transport in such coupled groundwater-conduit systems. This study utilizes a "hybrid" flow and transport model in which contaminants can in essence be transported at a slower time scale in the matrix and at a faster time scale in the conduits. The hybrid flow model uses an approach developed by Clemens et al. (1996), which is based on the modelling of flow in a discrete pipe network, coupled to a continuum representing the low-permeability inter-conduit matrix blocks. Laminar or turbulent flow can be simulated in the different pipes depending on the flow conditions in the model domain. The three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater flow model MODFLOW (Harbaugh and McDonald, 1996) is used to simulate flow in the continuum. Contaminant transport within the matrix is simulated with a continuum approach using the three-dimensional multi-species solute transport model MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999), while that in the conduit system is simulated with a one-dimensional advective transport model. As a first step for reactive transport modeling in such systems, only equilibrium reactions among multiple species are considered by coupling the hybrid transport model to a geochemical speciation package. An idealized mine network developed by Viswanathan and Sauter (2001) is used as a test problem in this study. The numerical experiment is based on reference date collected from

  15. Macrophages require different nucleoside transport systems for proliferation and activation.

    PubMed

    Soler, C; García-Manteiga, J; Valdés, R; Xaus, J; Comalada, M; Casado, F J; Pastor-Anglada, M; Celada, A; Felipe, A

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms involved in macrophage proliferation and activation, we studied the regulation of the nucleoside transport systems. In murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, the nucleosides required for DNA and RNA synthesis are recruited from the extracellular medium. M-CSF induced macrophage proliferation and DNA and RNA synthesis, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) led to activation, blocked proliferation, and induced only RNA synthesis. Macrophages express at least the concentrative systems N1 and N2 (CNT2 and CNT1 genes, respectively) and the equilibrative systems es and ei (ENT1 and ENT2 genes, respectively). Incubation with M-CSF only up-regulated the equilibrative system es. Inhibition of this transport system blocked M-CSF-dependent proliferation. Treatment with IFN-gamma only induced the concentrative N1 and N2 systems. IFN-gamma also down-regulated the increased expression of the es equilibrative system induced by M-CSF. Thus, macrophage proliferation and activation require selective regulation of nucleoside transporters and may respond to specific requirements for DNA and RNA synthesis. This report also shows that the nucleoside transporters are critical for macrophage proliferation and activation. PMID:11532978

  16. GPS and GPRS Based Telemonitoring System for Emergency Patient Transportation.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Sarma, A D; Sravan, J; Malini, M; Venkateswarlu, G

    2013-01-01

    Telemonitoring during the golden hour of patient transportation helps to improve medical care. Presently there are different physiological data acquisition and transmission systems using cellular network and radio communication links. Location monitoring systems and video transmission systems are also commercially available. The emergency patient transportation systems uniquely require transmission of data pertaining to the patient, vehicle, time of the call, physiological signals (like ECG, blood pressure, a body temperature, and blood oxygen saturation), location information, a snap shot of the patient, and voice. These requirements are presently met by using separate communication systems for voice, physiological data, and location that result in a lot of inconvenience to the technicians, maintenance related issues, in addition to being expensive. This paper presents design, development, and implementation of such a telemonitoring system for emergency patient transportation employing ARM 9 processor module. This system is found to be very useful for the emergency patient transportation being undertaken by organizations like the Emergency Management Research Institute (EMRI). PMID:27019844

  17. GPS and GPRS Based Telemonitoring System for Emergency Patient Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, K.; Sarma, A. D.; Sravan, J.; Malini, M.; Venkateswarlu, G.

    2013-01-01

    Telemonitoring during the golden hour of patient transportation helps to improve medical care. Presently there are different physiological data acquisition and transmission systems using cellular network and radio communication links. Location monitoring systems and video transmission systems are also commercially available. The emergency patient transportation systems uniquely require transmission of data pertaining to the patient, vehicle, time of the call, physiological signals (like ECG, blood pressure, a body temperature, and blood oxygen saturation), location information, a snap shot of the patient, and voice. These requirements are presently met by using separate communication systems for voice, physiological data, and location that result in a lot of inconvenience to the technicians, maintenance related issues, in addition to being expensive. This paper presents design, development, and implementation of such a telemonitoring system for emergency patient transportation employing ARM 9 processor module. This system is found to be very useful for the emergency patient transportation being undertaken by organizations like the Emergency Management Research Institute (EMRI). PMID:27019844

  18. Geographic information system applications in coal transportation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Elmes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Geographic information systems (GIS) offer great potential to the coal transportation industry for capitalizing on the growing availability of spatially-referenced data. As computer-based systems for the collection, storage, retrieval and analysis of spatial data, generating information products in a variety of formats, GIS have a great capability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of coal transportation operations, planning, engineering, and facilities management. Currently GIS are used in the transportation industry at large to analyze, and display information about network infrastructure, fleet operations, property ownership, routing and scheduling, and utilities. Current coal transportation applications include consumer service inquiries, train and locomotive scheduling, and evaluation of network usage. The paper describes the significant potential uses of GIS in the coal transportation sector when integrated with optimization and decision support systems, scientific visualization, data forecasting, and strategic system planning approaches. Ultimately consumer demand and the drive for economic efficiency are likely to stimulate the integration and management of spatial information across the entire coal chain.

  19. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Wich Parameter of the Carbonate System Influences the Boron Isotopic Composition and the Boron Calcium Ratio in Foraminiferal Tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, K.; Nehrke, G.; Horn, I.; Langer, G.; Misra, S.; Bijma, J.

    2013-12-01

    We performed culture experiments with the benthic symbiont bearing foraminifer Amphistegina lessonii in order to determine which parameter of the marine carbonate system influences the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) and the boron calcium ratio (B/Ca) in the test. A. lessonii grew for two months in treatments of culture media with decoupled pH-carbonate chemistry. We measured δ11B and B/Ca simultaneously on single tests using a recently new developed mass spectrometric technique. Our results show a clear pH dependence on δ11B. The B/Ca in the shell show a positive correlation with aqueous B(OH)4-/HCO3-.

  1. Study of space transportation for space solar power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Shoji; Aoki, Hiroshi; Okawa, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Space solar power systems (SSPSs) have the potential to provide abundant quantities of electric power for use on the Earth. One of the hurdles to them is the transportation of SSPSs to the operational geostationary Earth orbit (GEO). The objectives of this study are to examine the transportation of SSPSs, and to give a reference transportation scenario. This study presumes that the SSPSs have a mass of 10,000 tons each and are constructed at a rate of one per year. Reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) are assumed for the transportation to low Earth orbit (LEO), and reusable orbit transfer vehicles (OTVs) propelled by a solar electric propulsion system for the transportation from LEO to GEO. The payload element delivered to LEO by each launch is individually transferred by each OTV transportation service to GEO, where the elements are assembled into a whole SSPS. The OTV round-trip time is assumed to be a year. With these operations and reasonable estimations for the OTV subsystems, the OTV payload ratio was obtained. This, with an SSPS element mass, gave the total mass that has to be launched by RLVs. The result indicated that about 300 times of launch are required per year.

  2. Calcium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ... the body on a full or empty stomach. Calcium carbonate is less expensive. It is absorbed better by ...

  3. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDRAE, R. W.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  4. Aqueous extract of tamarind seeds selectively increases glucose transporter-2, glucose transporter-4, and islets' intracellular calcium levels and stimulates β-cell proliferation resulting in improved glucose homeostasis in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sole, Sushant Shivdas; Srinivasan, B P

    2012-08-01

    Tamarindus indica Linn. has been in use for a long time in Asian food and traditional medicine for different diseases including diabetes and obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms of these effects have not been fully understood. In view of the multidimensional activity of tamarind seeds due to their having high levels of polyphenols and flavonoids, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of aqueous tamarind seed extract (TSE) might increase glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP) 1c messenger RNA (mRNA) in the liver. Daily oral administration of TSE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced (90 mg/kg intraperitoneally) type 2 diabetic male Wistar rats at different doses (120 and 240 mg/kg body weight) for 4 weeks showed positive correlation with intracellular calcium and insulin release in isolated islets of Langerhans. Tamarind seed extract supplementation significantly improved the GLUT-2 protein and SREBP-1c mRNA expression in the liver and GLUT-4 protein and mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. The elevated levels of serum nitric oxide (NO), glycosylated hemoglobin level (hemoglobin (A1c)) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) decreased after TSE administration. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that TSE abrogated STZ-induced apoptosis and increased β-cell neogenesis, indicating its effect on islets and β-cell mass. In conclusion, it was found that the antidiabetic effect of TSE on STZ-induced diabetes resulted from complex mechanisms of β-cell neogenesis, calcium handling, GLUT-2, GLUT-4, and SREBP-1c. These findings show the scope for formulating a new herbal drug for diabetes therapy. PMID:22935346

  5. Combined system for high-time-resolution dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and fluorescence imaging of calcium transients in single normal and diseased skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Fast photometric measurements and video-imaging of fluorescent indicators both are powerful tools in measuring the intracellular free calcium concentration of muscle and many other cells. as photometric systems yield a high temporal resolution, calcium imaging systems have high spatial but significantly reduced temporal resolution. Therefore we have developed an integrated system combining both methods and based mostly on standard components. As a common, sensitive Ca2+- indicator we used the fluorescent probe Fura-2, which is alternatingly excited for ratio measurements at 340/380 nm. We used a commercially available dual excitation photometric system (OSP-3; Olympus) for attaching a CCD-camera and a frame grabber board. To achieve the synchronization we had to design circuitries for external triggering, synchronization and accurate control of the filter changer, which we added to the system. Additionally, the software for a triggered image acquisition was developed. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode (ratio frequency 100 Hz) and the imaging mode (ratio frequency 4.17 Hz). The calcium images are correlated with the 25 times faster spot measurements and are analyzed by means of image processing. With this combined system we study release and uptake of calcium ions of normal and diseased skeletal muscle from mdx mice. Such a system will also be important for other cellular studies in which fluorescence indicators are used to monitor similar time dependent alterations as well as changes in cellular distributions of calcium.

  6. Development of an analysis capability for the National Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, D.; Nelson, R.

    1997-10-24

    The purpose of this report is to examine the Department of Transportation`s (DOT) National Transportation System (NTS) initiative, to document what has been learned, and to outline a National Transportation Network Analysis Capability (NTNAC) based on a ``TRANSIMS-like`` approach. This study was conducted over a two month period at the end of FY1997. The scope of the effort was carefully defined to accommodate the short time horizon and to provide focus to a very large analytical problem. The objectives were to: (1) define the NTS and the NTS problem; (2) identify problem characteristics; (3) describe an analytical solution based on the TRANSIMS approach; (4) identify data requirements and availability; (5) develop criteria for a scenario to be used in a prototype demonstration; and (6) select a scenario for the prototype demonstration.

  7. Perception and Expectation of Iran Neonatal Transport Expert Regard to Developing Neonatal Transport System in Iran: A Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad-Bager; Jannati, Ali; Gholipour, Kamal; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Iezadi, Shabnam; Mojahed, Farokh; Vahidi, Reza Gholi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study was aimed to reach expert's expectations of neonatal transport system for developing neonatal transport system in Iran. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative study conducted by using focus group discussion (FGD) to present expert's perspectives and expectancy about neonatal transport system. Participants was selected from all experts and specialist about neonatal transport in Iran countryside. Finally 48 experts, participate in this study. To data collection 4 FGD were conducted, data were analyzed by content analyses. All subthemes were categorized in main themes according to conceptual relationship as an expert panels opinions. In order to comply with the ethical issues involved in the study was voluntary, also permission for the recording session were taken and confidentiality was also ensured. Result: According to FGD results, 11 themes and 90 subthemes were founded related to neonatal transport system, the main identified themes included: Aims, necessity and models of neonatal transport system, organizing the transport system, management and quality of instruments in the transport system, Neonatal transport system staff, Human resource management and issue related to human resources, conditions and requirements of neonatal transport system, facilitating factors in neonatal transport system, information management and communication system and weakness of neonatal transport system. Conclusion: Neonatal transport systems in different countries must adapted according to situation and component of each country have different strength and weakness and in implementing a system must attend to geographical conditions, financial ability and access to professionals, health system structure, facilities related to neonatal health care, antenatal services in regain, health care related, health care program about neonates and pregnant women and epidemiological status and mortality and morbidity in deferent locals and regains in countryside

  8. Evidence for a possible calcium flux dependent cardiomyopathy in hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, J.L.; Wicker, P.; Manley, W.; Brendel, A.J.; Lefort, G.; San Galli, F.; Commenges-Ducos, M.; Latapie, J.L.; Riviere, J.; Ducassou, D.

    1985-05-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the impaired functional cardiac reserve to exercise in hyperthyroidism is related to alterations in the regulation of calcium transport. In 2l hyperthyroid patients, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured using equilibrium gated radionuclide angiocardiography at rest and during supine dynamic exercise. After a recovery period, the patients performed a second exercise study after random administration of Verapamil, a calcium entry blocker (11 pts), or propanolol, a beta adrenergic antagonist (10 pts) for comparison. The results showed i) normal resting LVEF with no significant change during exercise before any medication, ii) resting LVEF significantly decreased after Propanolol, and no significantly changed after Verapamil, iii) during exercise, significant increase of LVEF after Verapamil, and no significant change after Propanolol. These results are consistent with previous studies showing that abnormal change in LVEF during exercise in hyperthyroidism seems independent of beta adrenergic activation, and suggest a reversible functional cardiomyopathy dependent of calcium transporting systems.

  9. The subcellular location, maturation and response to increased plasma glucagon of Ruthenium Red-insensitive calcium-ion transport in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, Fyfe L.; Tranter, Charmaine J.

    1978-01-01

    1. The subcellular distribution and maturation of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport activity were determined in livers of rats ranging in age from 3 days pre-term to 10 weeks of adult life and compared with those of glucose 6-phosphatase, 5′-nucleotidase and Ruthenium Red-sensitive Ca2+ transport. Initial rates of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport were highest in those fractions enriched in glucose 6-phosphatase, i.e. the microsomal fraction; this fraction was devoid of Ruthenium Red-sensitive Ca2+ transport activity. Although the heaviest fraction (nuclear) contained significant amounts of 5′-nucleotidase activity it was devoid of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport activity. 2. Foetal rat liver contain minimal amounts of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport activity, glucose 6-phosphatase and 5′-nucleotidase activities. These begin to be expressed concomitantly soon after birth; Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport is maximal by 3 to 4 days and remains so for up to at least 10 weeks of adult life. Glucose 6-phosphatase also reaches a peak at 3–4 days, but then rapidly decreases to approach adult values. Maximal activity of 5′-nucleotidase in the microsomal and nuclear fractions is seen about 4–6 days after birth; this enzyme activity remains increased for up to about 10 days and then falls, but not as rapidly as glucose 6-phosphatase. It is tentatively suggested that the bulk of the Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport is attributable to the system derived from the endoplasmic reticulum. 3. Administration of glucagon to adult rats enhances by 2–3-fold the initial rate of Ruthenium Red-insensitive Ca2+ transport in the intermediate but not the microsomal fraction. The hormone-induced effect is fully suppressed by co-administration of puromycin, is dose-dependent with half-maximal response at approx. 1μg of glucagon/100g body wt. and time-dependent exhibiting a half-maximal response about 1h after administration of the

  10. Systemic delivery of siRNA by hyaluronan-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chong; Wei, Wei; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Ding, Jing-Song; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hyaluronan (HA)-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs) were developed for an injectable and targetable delivery of siRNA, which were prepared by coating the alendronate-hyaluronan graft polymer (AHA) around the surface of calcium phosphate-siRNA co-precipitates. The prepared CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs had a uniform spherical core-shell morphology with an approximate size of 170 nm and zeta potential of -12 mV. The coating of hydrophilic HA improved the physical stability of nanoparticles over one month due to the strong interactions between phosphonate and calcium. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the negatively charged CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs could effectively deliver EGFR-targeted siRNA into A549 cells through CD44-mediated endocytosis and significantly down-regulate the level of EGFR expression. Also, the internalized CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs exhibited a pH-responsive release of siRNA, indicating that the acidification of lysosomes probably facilitated the disassembling of nanoparticles and the resultant ions sharply increased the inner osmotic pressure and thus expedited the release of siRNA from late lysosomes into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, in vivo tumor therapy demonstrated that high accumulation of CaP-AHA/siEGFR NPs in tumor led to a significant tumor growth inhibition with a specific EGFR gene silencing effect after intravenous administration in nude mice xenografted with A549 tumor, along with a negligible body weight loss. These results suggested that the CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs could be an effective and safe systemic siRNA delivery system for a RNAi-based tumor targeted therapy strategy.In this study, hyaluronan (HA)-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs) were developed for an injectable and targetable delivery of siRNA, which were prepared by coating the alendronate-hyaluronan graft polymer (AHA) around the surface of calcium phosphate-siRNA co-precipitates. The prepared CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs had a uniform

  11. 76 FR 22940 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research and... the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory Committee (ITS PAC). The Web conference... Transportation on all matters relating to the study, development, and implementation of...

  12. 78 FR 64048 - Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Intelligent Transportation Systems Program Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program...: Notice. The Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program Advisory Committee (ITSPAC) will hold a... Transportation on all matters relating to the study, development, and implementation of...

  13. Transportation and operations aspects of space energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1989-01-01

    A brief comparative analysis was made for three concepts of supplying large-scale electrical energy to Earth from space. The concepts were: (1) mining helium-3 on the Moon and returning it to Earth; (2) constructing solar power satellites in geosynchronous orbit from lunar materials (the energy is beamed by microwave to receivers on Earth); and (3) constructing power collection and beaming systems on the Moon itself and transmitting the energy to Earth by microwave. This analysis concerned mainly space transportation and operations, but each of the systems is briefly characterized to provide a basis for space transportation and operations analysis.

  14. Recent developments in the Los Alamos radiation transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Parsons, K.

    1997-06-01

    A brief progress report on updates to the Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) for solving criticality and fixed-source problems is provided. LARTCS integrates the Diffusion Accelerated Neutral Transport (DANT) discrete ordinates codes with the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The LARCTS code is being developed with a graphical user interface for problem setup and analysis. Progress in the DANT system for criticality applications include a two-dimensional module which can be linked to a mesh-generation code and a faster iteration scheme. Updates to MCNP Version 4A allow statistical checks of calculated Monte Carlo results.

  15. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  16. Conceptual analysis of a lunar base transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoy, Trevor D.; Johnson, Lloyd B.; Persons, Mark B.; Wright, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A systems analysis and assessment has been conducted on the transportation requirements to support a Phase II lunar base mission. It is noted that the development of such a base will require 3-4 million lbm. total weight in LEO over the course of some 20-30 launches of a 150,00 lbm leavy-lift launch vehicle. The results indicate that the optimum transportation system would be a one-stage, aerobraked, reusable vehicle with the highest engine efficiency attainable. Furthermore, the use of lunar oxygen is advised.

  17. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  18. 3D Porous Calcium-Alginate Scaffolds Cell Culture System Improved Human Osteoblast Cell Clusters for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Yun; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yen, Ko-Chung; Hsieh, Hui-Chen; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Age-related orthopedic disorders and bone defects have become a critical public health issue, and cell-based therapy is potentially a novel solution for issues surrounding bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Long-term cultures of primary bone cells exhibit phenotypic and functional degeneration; therefore, culturing cells or tissues suitable for clinical use remain a challenge. A platform consisting of human osteoblasts (hOBs), calcium-alginate (Ca-Alginate) scaffolds, and a self-made bioreactor system was established for autologous transplantation of human osteoblast cell clusters. The Ca-Alginate scaffold facilitated the growth and differentiation of human bone cell clusters, and the functionally-closed process bioreactor system supplied the soluble nutrients and osteogenic signals required to maintain the cell viability. This system preserved the proliferative ability of cells and cell viability and up-regulated bone-related gene expression and biological apatite crystals formation. The bone-like tissue generated could be extracted by removal of calcium ions via ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelation, and exhibited a size suitable for injection. The described strategy could be used in therapeutic application and opens new avenues for surgical interventions to correct skeletal defects. PMID:25825603

  19. A new system for profiling drug-induced calcium signal perturbation in human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kimberley J; Silvester, Nicole C; Barberini-Jammaers, Steven; Mason, Sammy A; Marsh, Sarah A; Lipka, Magdalena; George, Christopher H

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of human stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hSCCM)-based assays in the cardiovascular (CV) drug discovery sphere requires the development of improved systems for interrogating the rich information that these cell models have the potential to yield. We developed a new analytical framework termed SALVO (synchronization, amplitude, length, and variability of oscillation) to profile the amplitude and temporal patterning of intra- and intercellular calcium signals in hSCCM. SALVO quantified drug-induced perturbations in the calcium signaling "fingerprint" in spontaneously contractile hSCCM. Multiparametric SALVO outputs were integrated into a single index of in vitro cytotoxicity that confirmed the rank order of perturbation as astemizole > thioridazine > cisapride > flecainide > valdecoxib > sotalol > nadolol ≈ control. This rank order of drug-induced Ca(2+) signal disruption is in close agreement with the known arrhythmogenic liabilities of these compounds in humans. Validation of the system using a second set of compounds and hierarchical cluster analysis demonstrated the utility of SALVO to discriminate drugs based on their mechanisms of action. We discuss the utility of this new mechanistically agnostic system for the evaluation of in vitro drug cytotoxicity in hSCCM syncytia and the potential placement of SALVO in the early stage drug screening framework. PMID:25367900

  20. A New System for Profiling Drug-Induced Calcium Signal Perturbation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kimberley J.; Silvester, Nicole C.; Barberini-Jammaers, Steven; Mason, Sammy A.; Marsh, Sarah A.; Lipka, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of human stem cell–derived cardiomyocyte (hSCCM)–based assays in the cardiovascular (CV) drug discovery sphere requires the development of improved systems for interrogating the rich information that these cell models have the potential to yield. We developed a new analytical framework termed SALVO (synchronization, amplitude, length, and variability of oscillation) to profile the amplitude and temporal patterning of intra- and intercellular calcium signals in hSCCM. SALVO quantified drug-induced perturbations in the calcium signaling “fingerprint” in spontaneously contractile hSCCM. Multiparametric SALVO outputs were integrated into a single index of in vitro cytotoxicity that confirmed the rank order of perturbation as astemizole > thioridazine > cisapride > flecainide > valdecoxib > sotalol > nadolol ≈ control. This rank order of drug-induced Ca2+ signal disruption is in close agreement with the known arrhythmogenic liabilities of these compounds in humans. Validation of the system using a second set of compounds and hierarchical cluster analysis demonstrated the utility of SALVO to discriminate drugs based on their mechanisms of action. We discuss the utility of this new mechanistically agnostic system for the evaluation of in vitro drug cytotoxicity in hSCCM syncytia and the potential placement of SALVO in the early stage drug screening framework. PMID:25367900