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Sample records for calcium-and-magnesium ion-dependent adenosine

  1. Plasma Calcium and Magnesium in Newborn Babies

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, D. R.; Cooper, Lesley V.; Stevens, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    Normal values for plasma calcium and magnesium levels during the first week of life, in breast- and bottle-fed babies, have been determined. It has been shown on the sixth day that plasma levels of calcium, magnesium, and protein are all significantly lower in bottle-fed babies than in breast-fed babies, while the reverse is true of the plasma inorganic phosphorus. The normal babies have been compared with 30 babies who had convulsions, beginning towards the end of the first week of life. In only six of the babies was the plasma calcium outside our normal range and only four had abnormally low magnesium levels. As so many of these babies had calcium and magnesium levels within the normal range it must seriously be questioned whether hypocalcaemia or hypomagnesaemia could have been the sole cause of the convulsions. PMID:5535935

  2. Effects of calcium and magnesium on strontium distribution coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.; Hemming, C.H.; Welhan, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of calcium and magnesium on the distribution of strontium between a surficial sediment and simulated wastewater solutions were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium transport properties of surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine strontium linear sorption isotherms and distribution coefficients (K(d)'s) using simulated wastewater solutions prepared at pH 8.0??0.1 with variable concentrations of calcium and magnesium. Strontium linear sorption isotherm K(d)'s ranged from 12??1 to 85??3 ml/g, increasing as the concentration of calcium and magnesium decreased. The concentration of sorbed strontium and the percentage of strontium retained by the sediment were correlated to aqueous concentrations of strontium, calcium, and magnesium. The effect of these cation concentrations on strontium sorption was quantified using multivariate least-squares regression techniques. Analysis of data from these experiments indicates that increased concentrations of calcium and magnesium in wastewater discharged to waste disposal ponds at the INEL increases the availability of strontium for transport beneath the ponds by decreasing strontium sorption to the surficial sediment.

  3. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  4. Potassium, calcium, and magnesium in the tropics and subtropics

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The potential for increased food production in the world is undoubtedly greater than even the most optimistic surveys predict. Proper use of adequate amounts of potassium, calcium, and magnesium in fertilizers, soil amendments, crop residues and other byproducts, and minerals will be necessary if crop production potentials are to be realized. Use of these three plant nutrients with others will be an increasingly important part of the exploitation of natural resources as new lands of the tropics and subtropics are brought into production. Most of the increase in food production will come from more intensive use of lands already in production, however, and the soils of these lands will need larger amounts of all plant nutrients if high yields are to be reached and maintained. This report is intended to point out some of the complexities of the soil and fertilizer problems involving potassium, calcium, and magnesium. It is hoped that the information it contains will be helpful in the research, education, and development that will be required to point the way to increased food and crop production on soils of the tropics and subtropics throughout the world.

  5. Effects of thyroid status on renal calcium and magnesium handling.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, C; Quamme, G A

    1984-01-01

    Renal calcium and magnesium handling was studied in rats with chronic thyroid hormone deficiency or excess, hyperthyroidism. Mean kidney weight of the thyroid deficient rats was 42% of age matched, euthyroid and hyperthyroid animals and glomerular filtration rate was 71% of normal. Fractional sodium excretion was consistently elevated in thyroid deficient rats (0.26%) as compared to euthyroid (0.07%) and hyperthyroid animals (0.07%). Urinary calcium excretion (0.39%) was also elevated and parallel to sodium excretion in thyroid deficiency. Despite this renal leak of sodium and calcium, thyroid deficient animals conserved magnesium much more efficiently than either euthyroid or hyperthyroid rats (5.7% vs 17.4% respectively). Plasma magnesium concentration was elevated by acute MgCl2 infusions to determine the reabsorptive capacity of magnesium. Thyroid deficient rats reabsorbed 15-30% more of the filtered magnesium at any given plasma concentration. Although these effects on electrolyte reabsorption are modest compared to the hemodynamic alterations, the data suggest that thyroid hormone has a direct effect on the tubule which if chronically absent results in subtle sodium and calcium wasting and renal retention of magnesium. Administration of thyroid hormone to euthyroid or thyroid deficient rats twenty-four hours prior to experimentation had no effect on calcium and magnesium handling. PMID:6713257

  6. The magnesium ion-dependent adenosine triphosphatase of myosin. Two-step processes of adenosine triphosphate association and adenosine diphosphate dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Clive R.; Eccleston, John F.; Eckstein, Fritz; Goody, Roger S.; Gutfreund, Herbert; Trentham, David R.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of protein-fluorescence change when rabbit skeletal myosin subfragment 1 is mixed with ATP or adenosine 5?-(3-thiotriphosphate) in the presence of Mg2+ are incompatible with a simple bimolecular association process. A substrate-induced conformation change with ?G0

  7. A field method for the determination of calcium and magnesium in limestone and dolomite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Leonard; Brannock, Walter Wallace

    1957-01-01

    The method is an adaptation of a procedure described by Betz and Noll1 in 1950. Calcium and magnesium are determined by visual titration using Versene (disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate) with Murexide (ammonium purpurate) as the indicator for calcium and Eriochrome Black T as the indicator for magnesium.

  8. Stability and broad-sense heritability of mineral content in potato: calcium and magnesium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium and magnesium are two minerals with prominent roles in animal and plant metabolism. Advanced potato breeding lines were found to contain between 266 and 944 µg per gram fresh weight of calcium and between 705 1089 µg per gram fresh weight of magnesium. All trials had significant genotype b...

  9. Impact of Testosterone, Zinc, Calcium and Magnesium Concentrations on Sperm Parameters in Subfertile Men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Birsen; Kiziler, Ali Riza; Onaran, Ilhan; Alici, Bülent; Özkara, Hamdi; Akyolcu, Mehmet Can

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the impact of testosterone, zinc, calcium and magnesium concentrations in serum and seminal plasma on sperm parameters. There were significant decrease in sperm parameters, serum and seminal plasma zinc levels in subfertile males. It indicates zinc has a essential role in male infertility; the determination the level of zinc during infertility investigation is recommended.

  10. Effects of dietary vitamin D on calcium and magnesium levels in mice with abnormal calcium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Spurlock, B.G.; West, W.L.; Knight, E.M. )

    1991-03-11

    In previous studies vitamin D has been used to induce cardiac calcium overload in laboratory animals. Interrelationships between calcium and magnesium metabolism are also documented. The authors have investigated the effect of varying vitamin D in the diet on calcium and magnesium levels in plasma, kidney and heart of DBA mice which exhibit genetic abnormalities in cardiac calcium metabolism. Weanling DBA mice were maintained for 28 days on an AIN-76 diet containing either 1,000 I.U. of vitamin D{sub 3} per kg of diet (control); 4,000 I.U. of vitamin D{sub 3} per kg of diet; or no vitamin D. When compared to controls, supplemented animals showed significantly higher plasma magnesium, kidney calcium and kidney magnesium levels; animals receiving the vitamin D-deficient diet exhibited increases in cardiac calcium levels. The authors results support previous findings that vitamin D deficiency increases cardiac calcium uptake and suggest a possible role of vitamin D in magnesium metabolism.

  11. [Simultaneous determination of calcium and magnesium in urines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Bai, Yan; Chen, Mei-Luan

    2004-08-01

    The contents of calcium and magnesium in urines were simultaneously determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimized working conditions were ascertained. For the determination of calcium, the used wavelength was 422.8 nm, and the current of HCL(Hollow Cathode Lamp) was 3 mA; for the determination of magnesium, the used wavelength was 285.2 nm, and the current of HCL (Hollow Cathode Lamp) was 4 mA. The height of burner and the air-acetylene ratio were 8 mm and 6:1, respectively, for the determination of both calcium and magnesium. In order to remove the disturbance of phosphate, sulphate and silicate on the determination of calcium, a releasing reagent can be used. Lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) was tested as a better releasing reagent than strontium chloride (SrCl2). The disturbance of urinary substrate could be avoided after the urines were diluted to 1:100 with distilled water. The concentrations of Ca and Mg in 15 urines were determined under the optimized conditions. The obtained results were consistent with the archived data. The recovery was 96%-104%, the relative standard deviation for a sample was 1.8% with P < 0.05. PMID:15766134

  12. Continental weathering following a Cryogenian glaciation: Evidence from calcium and magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Prave, Anthony R.; Fallick, Anthony E.; Elliott, Tim; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz

    2014-06-01

    A marked ocean acidification event and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations following the extreme environmental conditions of the younger Cryogenian glaciation have been inferred from boron isotope measurements. Calcium and magnesium isotope analyses offer additional insights into the processes occurring during this time. Data from Neoproterozoic sections in Namibia indicate that following the end of glaciation the continental weathering flux transitioned from being of mixed carbonate and silicate character to a silicate-dominated one. Combined with the effects of primary dolomite formation in the cap dolostones, this caused the ocean to depart from a state of acidification and return to higher pH after climatic amelioration. Differences in the magnitude of stratigraphic isotopic changes across the continental margin of the southern Congo craton shelf point to local influences modifying and amplifying the global signal, which need to be considered in order to avoid overestimation of the worldwide chemical weathering flux.

  13. Calcium and magnesium cations enhance the adhesion of motile and nonmotile pseudomonas aeruginosa on alginate films.

    PubMed

    Kerchove, Alexis J de; Elimelech, Menachem

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the impact of calcium and magnesium ions on the deposition kinetics of flagellated and nonflagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa onto an alginate conditioning film in a radial stagnation point flow system. The bacterial deposition/adhesion behavior was related to structural changes of the alginate film in the presence of the divalent cations. Our results showed that adhesion of nonmotile bacteria was governed by cation bridging interactions between high-affinity sites at the bacterial surface and either clean or alginate-conditioned substrate surfaces. For motile bacteria, the adhesion onto clean quartz was governed by electrostatic interactions while adhesion onto alginate-conditioned quartz was dependent on the structure and viscoelastic properties of the alginate film in the presence of calcium or magnesium. We demonstrate that bacterial adhesion behavior is governed both by the effects of divalent cations on the surface properties of the bacteria and the substrate and by the type of specific interactions occurring between these two surfaces. PMID:18302437

  14. STUDYING THE EFFECTS OF CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM ON SIZE-DISTRIBUTED NITRATE AND AMMONIUM WITH EQUISOLV II. (R823186)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A chemical equilibrium code was improved and used to show that calcium and magnesium have a large yet different effect on the aerosol size distribution in different regions of Los Angeles. In the code, a new technique of solving individual equilibrium equation...

  15. Chronic dietary fiber supplementation with wheat dextrin does not inhibit calcium and magnesium absorption in premenopausal and postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover clinical study examined the effect of chronic wheat dextrin intake on calcium and magnesium absorption. Forty premenopausal and post menopausal women (mean +/- SD age 49.9 +/- 9.8 years)consumed wheat dextrin or placebo (15 g/day) for 2 weeks prior to 4...

  16. Revised Model of Calcium and Magnesium Binding to the Bacterial Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Kieth J.; Rice, Charles V.

    2014-01-01

    Metals bind to the bacterial cell wall yet the binding mechanisms and affinity constants are not fully understood. The cell wall of gram positive bacteria is characterized by a thick layer of peptidoglycan and anionic teichoic acids anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane (lipoteichoic acid) or covalently bound to the cell wall (wall teichoic acid). The polyphosphate groups of teichoic acid provide one-half of the metal binding sites for calcium and magnesium, contradicting previous reports that calcium binding is 100% dependent on teichoic acid. The remaining binding sites are formed with the carboxyl units of peptidoglycan. In this work we report equilibrium association constants and total metal binding capacities for the interaction of calcium and magnesium ions with the bacterial cell wall. Metal binding is much stronger and previously reported. Curvature of Scatchard plots from the binding data and the resulting two regions of binding affinity suggest the presence of negative cooperative binding, meaning that the binding affinity decreases as more ions become bound to the sample. For Ca2+, Region I has a KA = (1.0 0.2) 106 M?1 and Region II has a KA = (0.075 0.058) 106 M?1. For Mg2+, KA1 = (1.5 0.1) 106 and KA2 = (0.17 0.10) 106. A binding capacity (?) is reported for both regions. However, since binding is still occurring in Region II, the total binding capacity is denoted by ?2, which are 0.70 0.04 mol/mg and 0.67 0.03 mol/mg for Ca2+ and Mg2+ respectively. These data contradict the current paradigm of there being a single metal affinity value that is constant over a range of concentrations. We also find that measurement of equilibrium binding constants is highly sample dependent, suggesting a role for diffusion of metals through heterogeneous cell wall fragments. As a result, we are able to reconcile many contradictory theories that describe binding affinity and the binding mode of divalent metal cations. PMID:25315444

  17. Calcium and magnesium levels in isolated mitochondria from human cardiac biopsies.

    PubMed

    Saetersdal, T; Engedal, H; Rli, J; Myklebust, R

    1980-01-01

    A non-enzymatic method is presented for isolating mitochondria from small-sized human cardiac samples, including ventricular needle biopsies of 15-25 mg of wet weight. Electron microscopy demonstrates that these fractions are rich in structurally well preserved mitochondria. Calcium and magnesium levels of fractions are determined by atomic absorption flame spectroscopy. Comparative analyses are made in similar fractions of the mouse ventricle. Calcium concentrations of mitocondria isolated in the presence of ruthenium red do not differ significantly between the human auricle and ventricle, averaging 61 nmol Ca/mg protein and 68 nmol Ca/mg protein, respectively. Mitochondrial calcium level is lower in the mouse ventricular fractions, averaging 7 nmol Ca/mg protein. Mitochondrial magnesium amounts to slightly less than 60% of the calcium levels in the human heart, while it exceeds the calcium level by more than 100 per cent in the mouse heart. There is no significant difference of mitochondrial calcium between normal auricles, and, auricles of patients with increased right atrial mean pressure and/or volume overload. PMID:7410123

  18. Effect of cold-setting calcium- and magnesium phosphate matrices on protein expression in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Andrea; Helmschrott, Kerstin; Knebl, Georg; Mehrban, Nazia; Grover, Liam M; Gbureck, Uwe

    2011-02-01

    Bone loss due to accidents or tissue diseases requires replacement of the structure by either autografts, allografts, or artificial materials. Reactive cements, which are based on calcium phosphate chemistry, are commonly used in nonload bearing areas such as the craniofacial region. Some of these materials are resorbed by the host under physiological conditions and replaced by bone. The aim of this study was to test different calcium and magnesium cement composites in vitro for their use as bone substitution material. Phase composition of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (Ca(9) (PO(4) )(5) HPO(4) OH), brushite (CaHPO(4) ·2H(2) O), and struvite (MgNH(4) PO(4) ·6H(2) O) specimens has been determined by means of X-ray diffraction, and compressive strength was measured. Cell growth and activity of osteoblastic cells (MG 63) on the different surfaces was determined, and the expression of bone marker proteins was analyzed by western blotting. Cell activity normalized to cell number revealed higher activity of the osteoblasts on brushite and struvite when compared to hydroxyapatite and also the expression of osteoblastic marker proteins was highest on brushite scaffolds. While brushite sets under acidic conditions, formation of struvite occurs under physiological pH, similar to hydroxyapatite cements, providing the possibility of additional modifications with proteins or other active components. PMID:21210513

  19. In vivo degradation of low temperature calcium and magnesium phosphate ceramics in a heterotopic model.

    PubMed

    Klammert, Uwe; Ignatius, Anita; Wolfram, Uwe; Reuther, Tobias; Gbureck, Uwe

    2011-09-01

    Bone replacement using synthetic and degradable materials is desirable in various clinical conditions. Most applied commercial materials are based on hydroxyapatite, which is not chemically degradable under physiological conditions. Here we report the effect of a long-term intramuscular implantation regime on the dissolution of various low temperature calcium and magnesium phosphate ceramics in vivo. The specimens were analysed by consecutive radiographs, micro-computed tomography scans, compressive strength testing, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. After 15months in vivo, the investigated materials brushite (CaHPO(4)·2H(2)O), newberyite (MgHPO(4)·3H(2)O), struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) and hydroxyapatite (Ca(9)(PO(4))(5)HPO(4)OH) showed significant differences regarding changes of their characteristics. Struvite presented the highest loss of mechanical performance (95%), followed by newberyite (67%) and brushite (41%). This was accompanied by both a distinct extent of cement dissolution as well as changes of the phase composition of the retrieved cement implants. While the secondary phosphate phases (brushite, newberyite, struvite) completely dissolved, re-precipitates of whitlockite and octacalcium phosphate were formed in either particulate or whisker-like morphology. Furthermore, for the first time the possibility of a macropore-free volume degradation mechanism of bioceramics was demonstrated. PMID:21658480

  20. Dietary calcium and magnesium in the development of hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Weaver, C.M.; Harrington, D.D.; Babbs, C.F.

    1986-03-01

    The role of dietary calcium and magnesium in attenuation of hypertension was studied in 9 groups of 9 spontaneously hypertensive rats ages 8 to 31 weeks. The animals were fed AIN 76 semipurified diets altered in calcium (0.075%, 0.5%, and 2.5%) and magnesium (0.01%, 0.05%, and 0.75%) using a 3 x 3 factorial design. An inverse relationship between dietary calcium and systolic blood pressure as determined by the photoelectric tail cuff method became significant (p<0.05) after 12 weeks. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that dietary magnesium had no effect on systolic blood pressure; no calcium x magnesium interaction was observed. Total and ultrafiltrable serum calcium had a significant inverse correlation with blood pressure (-0.4642, p = .001 and -0.5568, p = .001 respectively). Total and ultrafiltrable serum magnesium reflected dietary magnesium concentration. Magnesium deficiency signs, deposition of calcium in kidneys, and histological lesions were observed in high calcium fed groups receiving normal and low levels of magnesium. Thus, a lowering of blood pressure by calcium supplementation without concomitant magnesium supplementation was accompanied by biochemical and histologic abnormalities in this animal model.

  1. Structures and stability of calcium and magnesium carbonates at mantle pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) and density functional theory methods are used to predict structures of calcium and magnesium carbonate (CaCO3 and MgCO3) at high pressures. We find a previously unknown CaCO3 structure which is more stable than the aragonite and "post aragonite" phases in the range 32-48 GPa. At pressures from 76 GPa to well over 100 GPa the most stable phase is a previously unknown CaCO3 structure of the pyroxene type with fourfold coordinated carbon atoms. We also predict a stable structure of MgCO3 in the range 85-101 GPa. Our results lead to a revision of the phase diagram of CaCO3 over more than half the pressure range encountered within the Earth's mantle, and smaller changes to the phase diagram of MgCO3. We predict CaCO3 to be more stable than MgCO3 in the Earth's mantle above 100 GPa, and that CO2 is not a thermodynamically stable compound under deep mantle conditions. Our results have significant implications for understanding the Earth's deep carbon cycle.

  2. Fully automated spectrophotometric procedure for simultaneous determination of calcium and magnesium in biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Shishov, Andrey Y; Nikolaeva, Larisa S; Moskvin, Leonid N; Bulatov, Andrey V

    2015-04-01

    An easily performed stepwise injection (SWIA) procedure based on on-line dilution of biodiesel samples and the formation of color-forming calcium (II) and magnesium (II) complexes with Eriochrome Black T (EBT) in an organic medium followed by spectrophotometric determination is presented. A sample of biodiesel was placed at the bottom of a mixing chamber connected to an automatic SWIA manifold. Isopropyl alcohol was used as the diluent under bubbling. The solution was submitted for on-line spectrophotometric simultaneous determination of calcium and magnesium based on the classic least-square method. The linear ranges were from 2 to 20 ?g g(-1) and from 1.2 to 12 ?g g(-1), and the detection limits, calculated as 3 s for a blank test (n=5), were found to be 0.6 ?g g(-1) for calcium and 0.4 ?g g(-1) for magnesium. The sample throughput was 30 h(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of biodiesel samples. PMID:25640136

  3. Dietary calcium and magnesium intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes: the Shanghai Women's Health Study123

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Raquel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Dai, Qi; Yang, Gong; Cai, Hui; Li, Honglan; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2009-01-01

    Background: Diet plays a key role in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but little is known about the contributions of specific nutrients in populations in which dietary patterns differ from Western populations. Objective: We examined associations between calcium and magnesium intakes and the risk of T2D in a Chinese population. Design: We used data from a population-based, prospective study of 64,191 women who were free of T2D or other chronic diseases at study recruitment and were living in urban Shanghai, China. Dietary intake, physical activity, and anthropometric measurements were assessed through in-person interviews. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association of the exposures under study with the risk of T2D. Results: An inverse association between calcium and magnesium intakes and T2D risk was observed. The relative risks for the lowest to the highest quintiles of calcium intake were 1.00, 0.82, 0.73, 0.67, and 0.74 (P for trend < 0.001), and for magnesium they were 1.00, 0.84, 0.84, 0.79, and 0.86 (P for trend < 0.001). Milk intake was also inversely associated with the risk of T2D. Conclusion: Our data suggest that calcium and magnesium intakes may protect against the development of T2D in this population. PMID:19225116

  4. Synthesis and Structural Studies of Calcium and Magnesium Phosphinate and Phosphonate Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampoh, Victoria Naa Kwale

    The work presented herein describes synthetic methodologies leading to the design of a wide array of magnesium and calcium based phosphinate and phosphonates with possible applications as bone scaffolding materials or additives to bone cements. The challenge to the chemistry of the alkaline earth phosphonate target compounds includes poor solubility of compounds, and poorly understood details on the control of the metal's coordination environment. Hence, less is known on phosphonate based alkaline earth metal organic frameworks as compared to transition metal phosphonates. Factors governing the challenges in obtaining crystalline, well-defined magnesium and calcium solids lie in the large metal diameters, the absence of energetically available d-orbitals to direct metal geometry, as well as the overall weakness of the metal-ligand bonds. A significant part of this project was concerned with the development of suitable reaction conditions to obtain X-ray quality crystals of the reaction products to allow for structural elucidation of the novel compounds. Various methodologies to aid in crystal growth including hydrothermal methods and gel crystallization were employed. We have used phosphinate and phosphonate ligands with different number of phosphorus oxygen atoms as well as diphosphonates with different linker lengths to determine their effects on the overall structural features. An interesting correlation is observed between the dimensionality of products and the increasing number of donor oxygen atoms in the ligands as we progress from phosphinic acid to the phosphorous acids. As an example, monophosphinate ligand only yielded one-dimensional compounds, whereas the phosphonates crystallize as one and two-dimensional compounds, and the di- and triphosphonate based compounds display two or three-dimensional geometries. This thesis provides a selection of calcium and magnesium compounds with one-dimensional geometry, as represented in a calcium phosphinate to novel two-dimensional sheets of magnesium and pillared calcium phosphonates. The preparation of these novel compounds has led to the establishment of synthetic protocols that allow for the direct preparation of compounds with defined structural features.

  5. Calcium and magnesium in exocrine secretion--an X-ray microanalytical study

    SciTech Connect

    Roomans, G.M.; Barnard, T.

    1982-01-01

    Calcium and magnesium distribution in mammalian exocrine glands under resting, stimulated and pathological conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of thick and ultrathin cryosections. Ultrathin sections were cut from tissue frozen in the presence of a polymer cryoprotectant, dextran. The effect of this treatment on isolated rabbit pancreas. Dextran caused a disturbance in water and ion transport, partly due to an osmotic effect and the impermeability of the pancreatic epithelium to dextran; this does, however, not necessarily invalidate intracellular measurements on frozen-dried sections. Cholinergic stimulation of the rat pancreas caused a change of Ca distribution from the basal to the apical part of the cell; this may be a component of the secretory Ca flux. Kinetic considerations make a significant Ca movement via the ER-Golgi endomembrane space less likely. The mitochondrial Ca concentration is low, and not significantly changed by cholinergic stimulation. X-ray microanalysis was carried out on submandibular glands of rats after chronic treatment with reserpin and/or isoproterenol (an animal model for cystic fibrosis, CF). The acinar cells had elevated Mg and Ca and lowered K concentrations. Analysis of ultrathin cryosections showed high levels of Ca and Mg in secretory granules, mucus globules and the ER. Ca and Mg in the ER may be transported intracellularly with secretory proteins to secretion granules or mucus globules. The decrease in cell K may be due to efflux of K caused by elevated cytoplasmic Ca levels. A similar decrease in cell K was caused by incubation of rat salivary glands with diluted serum from CF patients, a treatment which has been reported to mimic the effect of a rise in cytoplasmic Ca.

  6. Levels of Serum Calcium and Magnesium in Pre-eclamptic and Normal Pregnancy: A Study from Coastal India

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Aparna; Rao, Kavyarashmi; Devi, Ullal Harshini; Shetty, Harish; Kumari, Sucheta; Shetty, Prasanna Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pre-eclampsia is one of the major causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Though the aetiology is obscure, recent studies indicate that serum levels of calcium and magnesium may have a role in pre-eclampsia. Aim: The aim of this study was to find out the relationship of serum levels of calcium and magnesium in pre-eclamptic pregnancies compared to normal pregnancies in women from southern coastal India. Settings and Design: This study was done in a medical college hospital in southern coastal India. Materials and Methods: The blood samples from 60 pre-eclamptic women and an equal number of controls were analysed for calcium and magnesium levels. Data on Body Mass Index, maternal and gestational ages, serum calcium and magnesium were compared between the two groups. Outcome of pregnancy was analysed in both the groups and compared. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as Mean Standard Deviation. Data analysis was done by SPSS version 20. Comparison of serum levels of the elements between the two groups was performed by Independent t-test and Chi-square test and P-value of < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The serum calcium concentration was significantly lower in the pre-eclamptic group compared to normotensives (7.84 0.87 mg/dl Vs 8.97 0.69 mg/dl, p<0.001) whereas the levels of serum magnesium showed a marginal difference in both the groups. (1.43 0.55 mg/dl Vs, 1.57 0.72 mg/dl P 0.257) The study also showed that pre-eclamptic women were older, their BMI was higher and birth weight of babies lower compared to normotensives. Conclusion: According to the results of our research, intake of supplements, mainly calcium may help in the reduction of incidence of pre-eclampsia especially in a population of a developing country like ours where the nutrition is poor. Not many studies have been done in developing countries to assess the role of these elements in pre-eclampsia. The actual role of magnesium and calcium supplements needs further investigation. PMID:25177604

  7. Nationwide data on municipal drinking water and hip fracture: could calcium and magnesium be protective? A NOREPOS study.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Cecilie; Sgaard, Anne Johanne; Tell, Grethe S; Flaten, Trond Peder; Hongve, Dag; Omsland, Tone Kristin; Holvik, Kristin; Meyer, Haakon E; Aamodt, Geir

    2013-11-01

    Norway has a high incidence of hip fractures, and the incidence varies by degree of urbanization. This variation may reflect a difference in underlying environmental factors, perhaps variations in the concentration of calcium and magnesium in municipal drinking water. A trace metal survey (1986-1991) in 556 waterworks (supplying 64% of the Norwegian population) was linked geographically to hip fractures from hospitals throughout the country (1994-2000). In all, 5472 men and 13,604 women aged 50-85years suffered a hip fracture. Poisson regression models were fitted, adjusting for age, urbanization degree, region of residence, type of water source, and pH. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium in drinking water were generally low. An inverse association was found between concentration of magnesium and risk of hip fracture in both genders (IRR men highest vs. lowest tertile=0.80, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.87; IRR women highest vs. lowest tertile=0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.95), but no consistent association between calcium and hip fracture risk was observed. The highest tertile of urbanization degree (city), compared to the lowest (rural), was related to a 23 and 24% increase in hip fracture risk in men and women, respectively. The association between magnesium and hip fracture did not explain the variation in hip fracture risk between city and rural areas. Magnesium in drinking water may have a protective role against hip fractures; however this association should be further investigated. PMID:23831379

  8. Chelatometric determination of calcium and magnesium in iron ores, slags, anorthosite, limestone, copper-nickel-lead-zinc ores and divers materials.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, A; Zechanowitsch, G

    1980-03-01

    Chelatometric methods for the determination of calcium and magnesium in iron ores, slags, anorthosite, copper-nickel-lead-zinc ores and various other materials are described. Potential interfering elements are masked with triethanolamine and potassium cyanide. In one aliquot calcium is titrated at pH > 12, with calcein and thymolphthalein mixed indicator and in another aliquot calcium and magnesium are titrated in ammonia buffer, with o-cresolphthalein complexone screened with Naphthol Green B as indicator. The results compare favourably with certified values for reference materials of diverse nature. PMID:18962661

  9. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  10. Changes in Sodium, Calcium, and Magnesium Ion Concentrations That Inhibit Geobacillus Biofilms Have No Effect on Anoxybacillus flavithermus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Somerton, B.; Lindsay, D.; Palmer, J.; Brooks, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of varied sodium, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in specialty milk formulations on biofilm formation by Geobacillus spp. and Anoxybacillus flavithermus. The numbers of attached viable cells (log CFU per square centimeter) after 6 to 18 h of biofilm formation by three dairy-derived strains of Geobacillus and three dairy-derived strains of A. flavithermus were compared in two commercial milk formulations. Milk formulation B had relatively high sodium and low calcium and magnesium concentrations compared with those of milk formulation A, but the two formulations had comparable fat, protein, and lactose concentrations. Biofilm formation by the three Geobacillus isolates was up to 4 log CFU cm−2 lower in milk formulation B than in milk formulation A after 6 to 18 h, and the difference was often significant (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) were found when biofilm formations by the three A. flavithermus isolates were compared in milk formulations A and B. Supplementation of milk formulation A with 100 mM NaCl significantly decreased (P ≤ 0.05) Geobacillus biofilm formation after 6 to 10 h. Furthermore, supplementation of milk formulation B with 2 mM CaCl2 or 2 mM MgCl2 significantly increased (P ≤ 0.05) Geobacillus biofilm formation after 10 to 18 h. It was concluded that relatively high free Na+ and low free Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations in milk formulations are collectively required to inhibit biofilm formation by Geobacillus spp., whereas biofilm formation by A. flavithermus is not impacted by typical cation concentration differences of milk formulations. PMID:26002898

  11. Influence of increasing the calcium and magnesium content of the drinking water on performance and bone and plasma minerals of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Atteh, J O; Leeson, S

    1983-05-01

    Calcium and magnesium contents of drinking water for broiler chicks were adjusted by additions of calcium and magnesium to provide levels of 0, 25, 50, 75, or 100 ppm Mg and 0, 50, or 100 ppm Ca, arranged in a factorial design. During a 3-week trial, increasing the water magnesium concentration significantly (P less than .05) improved feed efficiency and significantly (P less than .05) increased the incidence of swollen hocks and shortened tibia but had no effect on other measures of performance. Bone ash and bone mineral content were not significantly affected by the calcium treatment. However, increasing magnesium level to 100 ppm significantly (P less than .05) increased bone magnesium and phosphorus levels. Plasma minerals were not affected by these same water treatments. PMID:6878125

  12. The role of calcium and magnesium ions in uptake of beta-amyloid peptides by microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Choucair, N; Laporte, V; Levy, R; Tranchant, C; Gies, J-P; Poindron, P; Lombard, Y

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid peptides 1-40 and 1-42 (Abeta 1-40 and Abeta 1-42) are major components of diffuse and neuritic senile plaques present in the brain of patients with Alzheimers disease. Their interaction with microglial cells was studied using a system partly mimicking these plaques, which consisted in heat-killed yeast particles coated with either Abeta 1-40 or Abeta 1-42. Using these particles, it has been shown in our laboratory that LRP is involved mainly in the elimination of Abeta 1-42-coated heat-killed yeast particles and partly in that of Abeta 1-40-coated heat-killed yeast particles by microglial cells in culture. We show here that in the presence of calcium and magnesium ions extracellular chelators, namely EDTA (for both ions) and EGTA (for calcium ions), the internalization of coated heat-killed particles was impaired. In the presence of BAPTA-AM, an intracellular chelator of calcium ions and thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, no effect was observed on the phagocytosis of Abeta 1-40-coated heat-killed yeast particles, whereas that of Abeta 1-42-coated heat-killed yeast particles was affected. These results suggest that different signaling mechanisms are involved after the internalization of Abeta 1-40 and Abeta 1-42. PMID:17026853

  13. Effect of calcium and magnesium on the antimicrobial action of enterocin LR/6 produced by Enterococcus faecium LR/6.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Srivastava, Sheela

    2011-06-01

    Enterococci are well-known producers of antimicrobial peptides (enterocins) that possess potential as biopreservatives in food. In this study, divalent cations and release of intracellular potassium were used to assess the mechanism of interaction and killing of enterocin LR/6 produced by Enterococcus faecium LR/6 on three target Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, namely Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus sp. strain LR/3 and Escherichia coli K-12. Whilst treatment with enterocin LR/6 in all cases led to a significant loss of viability, suggesting a bactericidal mode of action, E. coli K-12 showed better tolerance than the other two strains. Bacteriocins have generally been reported to create pores in the membrane of sensitive cells and this function is diminished by divalent cations. In this study it was shown that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) markedly improved the viability of enterocin LR/6-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. K(+) release as a sign of membrane leakiness was higher in M. luteus compared with the other two test strains. In agreement with the viability response, pre-exposure to Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) substantially reduced the amount of K(+) leakage by M. luteus and Enterococcus sp.; in the case of E. coli K-12, no leakage of K(+) was recorded. These results suggest that enterocin LR/6, which possesses good antibacterial potential, may not be very effective as a preservative in foods containing high concentrations of calcium and magnesium. PMID:21411293

  14. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    PubMed

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  15. The Influence of Two Tree Species and the Synoptic Meteorological Setting on the Dry Deposition of Calcium and Magnesium to a Mixed Eastern Kansas Deciduous Canopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Mark James

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to investigate what factors influenced the dry deposition of calcium and magnesium to selected deciduous trees. As part of the overall research plan, data necessary to address (a) the depositional rate similarity between two tree species and (b) the influence of synoptic meteorology on the overall depositional process were collected and analyzed. This research represents the findings for data collected during the 1988 and 1989 growing seasons. Two tree species (red oak, Quercus rubra; shagbark hickory, Carya ovata) were selected for sampling during periods absent of precipitation. Leaves were collected from three individual canopies at similar geometric locations for each species at approximately three day intervals. Leaves were then washed using distilled, deionized water and the leaf areas were measured. Concentrations of calcium and magnesium were determined using atomic absorption; a mass per unit leaf area were subsequently calculated. The rate of dry deposition was calculated by dividing the mass per unit area difference between two sequential dry segment collections by the time difference. During all dry segments, the synoptic meteorological setting was determined. This was accomplished using on -site meteorological and upper air measurements. Each dry segment was subsequently analyzed using both numerical and subjective classification schemes. Rate data collected for the oak and hickory were compared and found to show significant differences in rate magnitude. The temporal and spatial trend of deposition was similar. Depositional rates were also compared with the synoptic meteorological setting using correlation matrices and multiple linear regression. Two synoptic variables, absolute humidity and relative humidity, typically showed the highest association with calcium and magnesium depositional rates. These variables in addition to other standard synoptic variables were used to generate a series of depositional models. In general these models predicted deposition in both trend and magnitude reasonably well.

  16. [An analysis of the mechanism of the effect of intragastric calcium and magnesium on the release of gastrin and insulin in dogs].

    PubMed

    Popovych, I L; Ivasivka, S V; Butusova, I A

    1992-01-01

    The experiments have been carried out on four intact awake dogs to study the influence of intragastric introduction of deionized water, 5 mmol/l of calcium and magnesium chloride solutions in a dose of 3 ml/kg on release of gastrin and insulin into blood. It is stated that during the first 4 min after infusion of deionized water the release of gastrin decreases by 89 +/- 32 conventional units (c.u.), CaCl2 exerts a more pronounced inhibitory effect (168 +/- 36 c.u.), while MgCl2, on the contrary, increases the gastrin release by 398 +/- 92 c.u. Atropin (0.03 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection, 10 min before infusion) absolutely takes away the gastrin-stimulating effect of magnesium, but it has almost no influence on the gastrin-inhibitory effect of calcium. The latter can be taken away by 62% by ornid (5 mg/kg subcutaneously, 20 min before infusion). Preliminary anaesthesia of the stomach mucosa by trymecain or novocain absolutely remove the effect of both calcium and magnesium. Insulin release remained significantly unchanged in any series of experiments. PMID:1286691

  17. Short term spatio-temporal variability of soil water-extractable calcium and magnesium after a low severity grassland fire in Lithuania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Martin, David

    2014-05-01

    Fire has important impacts on soil nutrient spatio-temporal distribution (Outeiro et al., 2008). This impact depends on fire severity, topography of the burned area, type of soil and vegetation affected, and the meteorological conditions post-fire. Fire produces a complex mosaic of impacts in soil that can be extremely variable at small plot scale in the space and time. In order to assess and map such a heterogeneous distribution, the test of interpolation methods is fundamental to identify the best estimator and to have a better understanding of soil nutrients spatial distribution. The objective of this work is to identify the short-term spatial variability of water-extractable calcium and magnesium after a low severity grassland fire. The studied area is located near Vilnius (Lithuania) at 54° 42' N, 25° 08 E, 158 masl. Four days after the fire, it was designed in a burned area a plot with 400 m2 (20 x 20 m with 5 m space between sampling points). Twenty five samples from top soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately after the fire (IAF), 2, 5, 7 and 9 months after the fire (a total of 125 in all sampling dates). The original data of water-extractable calcium and magnesium did not respected the Gaussian distribution, thus a neperian logarithm (ln) was applied in order to normalize data. Significant differences of water-extractable calcium and magnesium among sampling dates were carried out with the Anova One-way test using the ln data. In order to assess the spatial variability of water-extractable calcium and magnesium, we tested several interpolation methods as Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance to a Weight (IDW) with the power of 1, 2, 3 and 4, Radial Basis Functions (RBF) - Inverse Multiquadratic (IMT), Multilog (MTG), Multiquadratic (MTQ) Natural Cubic Spline (NCS) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) - and Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2. Interpolation tests were carried out with Ln data. The best interpolation method was assessed using the cross validation method. Cross-validation was obtained by taking each observation in turn out of the sample pool and estimating from the remaining ones. The errors produced (observed-predicted) are used to evaluate the performance of each method. With these data, the mean error (ME) and root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated. The best method was the one which had the lower RMSE (Pereira et al. in press). The results shown significant differences among sampling dates in the water-extractable calcium (F= 138.78, p< 0.001) and extractable magnesium (F= 160.66; p< 0.001). Water-extractable calcium and magnesium was high IAF decreasing until 7 months after the fire, rising in the last sampling date. Among the tested methods, the most accurate to interpolate the water-extractable calcium were: IAF-IDW1; 2 Months-IDW1; 5 months-OK; 7 Months-IDW4 and 9 Months-IDW3. In relation to water-extractable magnesium the best interpolation techniques were: IAF-IDW2; 2 Months-IDW1; 5 months- IDW3; 7 Months-TPS and 9 Months-IDW1. These results suggested that the spatial variability of these water-extractable is variable with the time. The causes of this variability will be discussed during the presentation. References Outeiro, L., Aspero, F., Ubeda, X. (2008) Geostatistical methods to study spatial variability of soil cation after a prescribed fire and rainfall. Catena, 74: 310-320. Pereira, P., Cerdà, A., Úbeda, X., Mataix-Solera, J. Arcenegui, V., Zavala, L. Modelling the impacts of wildfire on ash thickness in a short-term period, Land Degradation and Development, (In Press), DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2195

  18. The Levels of Calcium and Magnesium, and of Selected Trace Elements, in Whole Blood and Scalp Hair of Children with Growth Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Habibe; Akarsu, Saadet; Polat, Fatih; Cukurovali, Alaaddin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Metals such as copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe) are essential for human beings. Chronic metabolic disturbances may result from an excess or deficiency of these metals. Ca and Mg are also nutrient elements and play an important role in biological systems. Thus, it is very important to check regularly trace elements concentration in the body. The purpose of this study was to measure the content of Fe, Cu, Zn, Ca and Mg in whole blood and hair of children with growth retardation compared to that of controls. Methods A quantitative elemental analysis of whole blood and scalp hair of children with constitutional growth retardation (n = 27) and matched controls (n = 21) was used to find out correlation and possible changes, between growth retardation and healthy controls. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS) analysis of quantitative method was used to determine iron, zinc, copper, calcium and magnesium levels of whole blood and scalp hair. Findings The whole blood levels of Fe and Zn were significantly lower in children with growth retardation (P<0.05), but there were no differences in Cu, Ca and Mg concentrations in whole blood between children with growth retardation and healthy controls. The hair levels of Fe, Zn, Ca and Mg were significantly lower in children with growth retardation when compared to that of controls (P<0.05). The Cu concentrations in the hair of children with growth retardation and healthy controls showed no significant differences (P>0.05). Conclusion The usefulness and significance of these elements in growth retardation should be discussed more detailed in the light of the most recent data. PMID:23724170

  19. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (?), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given ?, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern ? and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  20. Effects of glucagon, dibutyryl cyclic 3?,5?-adenosine monophosphate, and theophylline on calcitonin secretion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Norman H.

    1970-01-01

    The secretion of calcitonin by slices of porcine thyroid glands has been investigated. Calcitonin in the incubation medium was determined by radioimmunoassay. Secretion of calcitonin was diminished when calcium or magnesium was omitted and was increased stepwise as the concentration of calcium or magnesium in the incubation medium was increased. Calcitonin secretion was augmented substantially when either the quantity of thyroid tissue or volume of incubation medium was increased. Secretion of calcitonin was stimulated by glucagon, theophylline, and dibutyryl cyclic 3?,5?-adenosine monophosphate. It is concluded that calcitonin secretion is regulated by the concentration of calcium and magnesium, that secretion may be inhibited by calcitonin or a precursor and that secretion can be stimulated by increasing the concentration of cyclic 3?,5?-adenosine monophosphate in the parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. PMID:4317383

  1. Abnormalities of serum calcium and magnesium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal hypocalcemia is defined as a total serum calcium concentration of <7 mg/dL or an ionized calcium concentration of <4 mg/dL (1mmol/L). In very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, ionized calcium values of 0.8 to 1 mmol/L are common and not usually associated with clinical symptoms. In larger in...

  2. The influence of calcium and magnesium in drinking water and diet on cardiovascular risk factors in individuals living in hard and soft water areas with differences in cardiovascular mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nerbrand, Christina; Agrus, Lars; Lenner, Ragnhild Arvidsson; Nyberg, Per; Svrdsudd, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Background The role of water hardness as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease has been widely investigated and evaluated as regards regional differences in cardiovascular disease. This study was performed to evaluate the relation between calcium and magnesium in drinking water and diet and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in individuals living in hard and soft water areas with considerable differences in cardiovascular mortality. Methods A random sample of 207 individuals living in two municipalities characterised by differences in cardiovascular mortality and water hardness was invited for an examination including a questionnaire about health, social and living conditions and diet. Intake of magnesium and calcium was calculated from the diet questionnaire with special consideration to the use of local water. Household water samples were delivered by each individual and were analysed for magnesium and calcium. Results In the total sample, there were positive correlations between the calcium content in household water and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and negative correlations with s-cholesterol and s-LDL-cholesterol. No correlation was seen with magnesium content in household water to any of the risk factors. Calcium content in diet showed no correlation to cardiovascular risk factors. Magnesium in diet was positively correlated to diastolic blood pressure (DBP). In regression analyses controlled for age and sex 18.5% of the variation in SBP was explained by the variation in BMI, HbA1c and calcium content in water. Some 27.9% of the variation in s-cholesterol could be explained by the variation in s-triglycerides (TG), and calcium content in water. Conclusions This study of individuals living in soft and hard water areas showed significant correlations between the content of calcium in water and major cardiovascular risk factors. This was not found for magnesium in water or calcium or magnesium in diet. Regression analyses indicated that calcium content in water could be a factor in the complexity of relationships and importance of cardiovascular risk factors. From these results it is not possible to conclude any definite causal relation and further research is needed. PMID:12814520

  3. Adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular levels of the brain’s endogenous anticonvulsant and neuroprotectant adenosine largely depend on an astrocyte-based adenosine cycle, comprised of ATP release, rapid degradation of ATP into adenosine, and metabolic reuptake of adenosine through equilibrative nucleoside transporters and phosphorylation by adenosine kinase (ADK). Changes in ADK expression and activity therefore rapidly translate into changes of extracellular adenosine, which exerts its potent anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects by activation of pre- and postsynaptic adenosine A1 receptors. Increases in ADK increase neuronal excitability, whereas decreases in ADK render the brain resistant to seizures and injury. Importantly, ADK was found to be overexpressed and associated with astrogliosis and spontaneous seizures in rodent models of epilepsy, as well as in human specimen resected from patients with hippocampal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy. Several lines of evidence indicate that overexpression of astroglial ADK and adenosine deficiency are pathological hallmarks of the epileptic brain. Consequently, adenosine augmentation therapies constitute a powerful approach for seizure prevention, which is effective in models of epilepsy that are resistant to conventional antiepileptic drugs. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis suggests that adenosine dysfunction in epilepsy undergoes a biphasic response: An acute surge of adenosine that can be triggered by any type of injury might contribute to the development of astrogliosis via adenosine receptor –dependent and –independent mechanisms. Astrogliosis in turn is associated with overexpression of ADK, which was shown to be sufficient to trigger spontaneous recurrent electrographic seizures. Thus, ADK emerges as a promising target for the prediction and prevention of epilepsy. PMID:22700220

  4. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25175959

  5. Adenosine and sleep

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, G.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Behavioral and biochemical approaches have been used to determine the relative contribution of endogenous adenosine and adenosine receptors to the sleep-wake cycle in the rat. Adenosine concentrations in specific areas of the rat brain were not affected by 24 hours of total sleep deprivation, or by 24 or 48 hours of REM sleep deprivation. In order to assess the effect of REM sleep deprivation on adenosine A/sub 1/ receptors, /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding was measured. The Bmax values for /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding to membrane preparations of the cortices and corpus striata from 48 hour REM sleep-deprived animals were increased 14.8% and 23%, respectively. These increases were not maintained following the cessation of sleep deprivation and recovered within 2 hours. The results of a 96 hour REM deprivation experiment were similar to those of the 48 hour REM sleep deprivation experiment. However, these increases were not evident in similar structures taken from stress control animals, and conclusively demonstrated that the changes in /sup 3/H-L-PIA binding resulted from REM sleep deprivation and not from stress.

  6. Adenosine and the Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M; Housley, Gary D; Thorne, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is a signalling molecule that modulates cellular activity in the central nervous system and peripheral organs via four G protein-coupled receptors designated A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. This review surveys the literature on the role of adenosine in auditory function, particularly cochlear function and its protection from oxidative stress. The specific tissue distribution of adenosine receptors in the mammalian cochlea implicates adenosine signalling in sensory transduction and auditory neurotransmission although functional studies have demonstrated that adenosine stimulates cochlear blood flow, but does not alter the resting and sound-evoked auditory potentials. An interest in a potential otoprotective role for adenosine has recently evolved, fuelled by the capacity of A1 adenosine receptors to prevent cochlear injury caused by acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. The balance between A1 and A2A receptors is conceived as critical for cochlear response to oxidative stress, which is an underlying mechanism of the most common inner ear pathologies (e.g. noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, drug ototoxicity). Enzymes involved in adenosine metabolism, adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase, are also emerging as attractive targets for controlling oxidative stress in the cochlea. Other possible targets include ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine from extracellular ATP, and nucleoside transporters, which regulate adenosine concentrations on both sides of the plasma membrane. Developments of selective adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists that can cross the blood-cochlea barrier are bolstering efforts to develop therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating cochlear injury. Manipulations of the adenosine signalling system thus hold significant promise in the therapeutic management of oxidative stress in the cochlea. PMID:20190966

  7. Metal Ion Dependence of Cooperative Collapse Transitions in RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam, Sarvin; Caliskan, Gokhan; Chauhan, Seema; Hyeon, Changbong; Briber, R.M.; Thirumalai, D.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2010-10-12

    Positively charged counterions drive RNA molecules into compact configurations that lead to their biologically active structures. To understand how the valence and size of the cations influences the collapse transition in RNA, small-angle X-ray scattering was used to follow the decrease in the radius of gyration (R{sub g}) of the Azoarcus and Tetrahymena ribozymes in different cations. Small, multivalent cations induced the collapse of both ribozymes more efficiently than did monovalent ions. Thus, the cooperativity of the collapse transition depends on the counterion charge density. Singular value decomposition of the scattering curves showed that folding of the smaller and more thermostable Azoarcus ribozyme is well described by two components, whereas collapse of the larger Tetrahymena ribozyme involves at least one intermediate. The ion-dependent persistence length, extracted from the distance distribution of the scattering vectors, shows that the Azoarcus ribozyme is less flexible at the midpoint of transition in low-charge-density ions than in high-charge-density ions. We conclude that the formation of sequence-specific tertiary interactions in the Azoarcus ribozyme overlaps with neutralization of the phosphate charge, while tertiary folding of the Tetrahymena ribozyme requires additional counterions. Thus, the stability of the RNA structure determines its sensitivity to the valence and size of the counterions.

  8. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis…

  9. Health Significance of Calcium and Magnesium: Examples from Human Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is clear that many people do not consume recommended intakes of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), yet biochemical and/or functional changes indicative of deficiencies in these nutrients have been rare. This prompted two series of studies: one addressing an apparent Ca-deficiency rickets in child...

  10. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis

  11. Biogeochemistry cycling of calcium and magnesium by Ceanothus and chamise

    SciTech Connect

    Quideau, S.A.; Graham, R.C.; Chadwick, O.A.; Wood, H.B.

    1999-12-01

    Vegetation has long been recognized as a fundamental factor in soil formation, but vegetation and soils commonly covary in response to other environmental factors, confounding the specific effects of vegetation on soil properties. The lysimeter installation at the San Dimas Experimental Forest in southern California offers a rarely found opportunity for quantifying cation-cycling processes in a setting where all factors except vegetation are kept constant. The lysimeters were filled in 1937 with homogenized, fine sandy loam and planted in 1946 with chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum Hook, and Arn.) and ceanothus (Ceanothus crassifolius Torr.). Comparison of the chamise and ceanothus lysimeters was best achieved by using the Ca/Mg ration of the different cation pools and fluxes as an index. In 1987, the ceanothus exchangeable soil pool contained proportionally more Ca than Mg compared with chamise; that is, the Ca/Mg ratio in the ceanothus exchangeable soil pool was higher than that in chamise. Strong evidence supports vegetation influence on intra-system fluxes (weathering and biocycling) as the basis for these differences. First, more Ca than Mg was released by weathering under ceanothus than under chamise. Second, the ceanothus aboveground biomass exhibited a higher Ca/Mg ration that the chamise. Third, differences between vegetation types widened with time since construction of the lysimeter installation in both the aboveground biomass and exchangeable soil pools. Differences in cation storage measured for the lysimeter chamise and ceanothus stands appear representative of natural chaparral communities throughout California, and may result in distinct Ca and Mg biogeochemical processes in associated ecosystems.

  12. Adenosine Receptors and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, P.; Bar-Yehuda, S.; Synowitz, M.; Powell, J.D.; Klotz, K.N.; Gessi, S.; Borea, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    The A1, A2A, A2B and A3 G-protein-coupled cell surface adenosine receptors (ARs) are found to be upregulated in various tumor cells. Activation of the receptors by specific ligands, agonists or antagonists, modulates tumor growth via a range of signaling pathways. The A1AR was found to play a role in preventing the development of glioblastomas. This antitumor effect of the A1AR is mediated via tumor-associated microglial cells. Activation of the A2AAR results in inhibition of the immune response to tumors via suppression of T regulatory cell function and inhibition of natural killer cell cytotoxicity and tumor-specific CD4+/CD8+ activity. Therefore, it is suggested that pharmacological inhibition by specific antagonists may enhance immunotherapeutics in cancer therapy. Activation of the A2BAR plays a role in the development of tumors via upregulation of the expression levels of angiogenic factors in microvascular endothelial cells. In contrast, it was evident that activation of A2BAR results in inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and MAP kinase activity, which are involved in tumor cell growth signals. Finally, A3AR was found to be highly expressed in tumor cells and tissues while low expression levels were noted in normal cells or adjacent tissue. Receptor expression in the tumor tissues was directly correlated to disease severity. The high receptor expression in the tumors was attributed to overexpression of NF-κB, known to act as an A3AR transcription factor. Interestingly, high A3AR expression levels were found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from tumor-bearing animals and cancer patients, reflecting receptor status in the tumors. A3AR agonists were found to induce tumor growth inhibition, both in vitro and in vivo, via modulation of the Wnt and the NF-κB signaling pathways. Taken together, A3ARs that are abundantly expressed in tumor cells may be targeted by specific A3AR agonists, leading to tumor growth inhibition. The unique characteristics of these A3AR agonists make them attractive as drug candidates. PMID:19639290

  13. Adenosine and Autism: A Spectrum of Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Masino, Susan A.; Kawamura, Masahito; Cote, Jessica L.; Williams, Rebecca B.; Ruskin, David N.

    2012-01-01

    In rodents, insufficient adenosine produces behavioral and physiological symptoms consistent with several comorbidities of autism. In rodents and humans, stimuli postulated to increase adenosine can ameliorate these comorbidities. Because adenosine is a broad homeostatic regulator of cell function and nervous system activity, increasing adenosine’s influence might be a new therapeutic target for autism with multiple beneficial effects. PMID:22940000

  14. Adenosine induced coronary spasm A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Arora, P.; Bhatia, V.; Arora, M.; Kaul, U.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is commonly used as a pharmacological agent in myocardial perfusion imaging, as an antiarrhythmic agent, and in Cath Lab. during PCI for treating no reflow phenomenon. Coronary spasm has been reported following adenosine injection during stress imaging. We report a rare complication with ST segment elevation, following adenosine injection, given for treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. PMID:24581102

  15. Adenosine-induced apoptosis in chick embryonic sympathetic neurons: a new physiological role for adenosine.

    PubMed Central

    Wakade, T D; Palmer, K C; McCauley, R; Przywara, D A; Wakade, A R

    1995-01-01

    1. A newly found action of adenosine in neurons, which may have an important physiological function in the growth and development of the sympathetic nervous system, is described. Adenosine (1-100 microM) inhibited neurite outgrowth within the first 24 h and killed about 80% of sympathetic neurons supported by nerve growth factor over the next 2 days in culture. Neurons supported by excess KCl, forskolin or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate were equally susceptible to the toxic actions of adenosine. Inosine, guanosine or hypoxanthine (all 100-300 microM) were without effect on neuronal growth and survival. 2. Specific agonists of adenosine A1 and A2 receptors were not neurotoxic, and toxic effects of adenosine were not antagonized by aminophylline. These results rule out involvement of adenosine receptors and the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP signalling system in neurotoxic actions of adenosine. 3. Adenosine toxicity was prevented by inhibitors of the adenosine membrane transporter, suggesting an intracellular site of action of adenosine. 4. Inhibitors of adenosine deaminase dramatically facilitated the toxic action so that physiologically relevant concentrations of adenosine were neurotoxic. 5. Adenosine kinase activity of sympathetic neurons was dose-dependently inhibited by 5'-iodotubercidin (3-100 nM). 5'-Iodotubercidin (100 nM) completely protected neurons against toxicity of adenosine plus adenosine deaminase inhibitors. These results provide convincing evidence that phosphorylation of the nucleoside is an essential requirement for initiation of adenosine toxicity. 6. Sympathetic neurons were successfully rescued from the lethal effects of adenosine deaminase inhibitor plus adenosine by uridine or 2-deoxycytidine, but not by nicotinamide or 2-deoxyguanosine, suggesting that depletion of pyrimidine nucleotides by phosphorylated adenosine compounds and consequent inhibition of DNA synthesis produces neuronal death. 7. DNA fragmentation, assessed by the fluorescent dye bisbenzimide and by the TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labelling) method, indicated that neuronal death induced by adenosine was apoptotic. 8. We conclude that adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase play an important role in the metabolism of intracellular concentrations of adenosine and thereby regulate the growth and development of sympathetic neurons. Our study highlights, for the first time, the importance of adenosine as a mediator of programmed cell death of neurons supported by nerve growth factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8568648

  16. Guanosine regulates adenosine levels in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Edwin K.; Cheng, Dongmei; Mi, Zaichuan; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In cell culture, extracellular guanosine increases extracellular adenosine by attenuating the disposition of extracellular adenosine (American Journal of Physiology Cell Physiology 304: C406C421, 2013). The goal of this investigation was to determine whether this guanosineadenosine mechanism is operative in an intact organ. Twenty?seven isolated, perfused mouse kidneys were subjected to metabolic poisons (iodoacetate plus 2,4?dinitrophenol) to cause energy depletion and thereby stimulate renal adenosine production. Adenosine levels in the renal venous perfusate increased from a baseline of 36 8 to 499 96, 258 50, and 71 13 nmol/L at 15, 30, and 60 min, respectively, after administering metabolic poisons (% of basal; 1366 229, 715 128, and 206 33, respectively). Changes in renal venous levels of guanosine closely mirrored the time course of changes in adenosine: baseline of 15 2 to 157 13, 121 8, and 50 5 nmol/L at 15, 30, and 60 min, respectively (% of basal; 1132 104, 871 59, and 400 51, respectively). Freeze?clamp experiments in 12 kidneys confirmed that metabolic poisons increased kidney tissue levels of adenosine and guanosine. In eight additional kidneys, we examined the ability of guanosine to reduce the renal clearance of exogenous adenosine; and these experiments revealed that guanosine significantly decreased the renal extraction of adenosine. Because guanosine is metabolized by purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), in another set of 16 kidneys we examined the effects of 8?aminoguanine (PNPase inhibitor) on renal venous levels of adenosine and inosine (adenosine metabolite). Kidneys treated with 8?aminoguanine showed a more robust increase in both adenosine and inosine in response to metabolic poisons. We conclude that in the intact kidney, guanosine regulates adenosine levels. PMID:24872359

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... understanding adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency? asymptomatic ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; deficiency ; enzyme ; gene ; inherited ; joint ; muscle cells ; mutation ; myalgia ; nucleotide ; population ; ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Adenosine deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... providers. American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Baby's First Test: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Gene Review: Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry: Severe ...

  19. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  20. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  1. Adenosine receptors and fibrosis: a translational review.

    PubMed

    Cronstein, Bruce N

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine-a purine nucleoside generated extracellularly from adenine nucleotides released by cells as a result of direct stimulation, hypoxia, trauma, or metabolic stress-is a well-known physiologic and pharmacologic agent. Recent studies demonstrate that adenosine, acting at its receptors, promotes wound healing by stimulating both angiogenesis and matrix production. Subsequently, adenosine and its receptors have also been found to promote fibrosis (excess matrix production) in the skin, lungs, and liver, but to diminish cardiac fibrosis. A commonly ingested adenosine receptor antagonist, caffeine, blocks the development of hepatic fibrosis, an effect that likely explains the epidemiologic finding that coffee drinking, in a dose-dependent fashion, reduces the likelihood of death from liver disease. Accordingly, adenosine may be a good target for therapies that prevent fibrosis of the lungs, liver, and skin. PMID:22003368

  2. Adenosine postsynaptically modulates supraoptic neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Todd A; Hatton, Glenn I

    2005-01-01

    Effects of adenosine on the excitability of supraoptic nucleus neurons were investigated in whole cell patch-clamp experiments conducted in horizontal slices of rat hypothalamus. Adenosine (10-100 muM) inhibited all neurons tested by reducing or abolishing spontaneous or evoked discharge. Large hyperpolarizations were seen, averaging -6.08 +/- 0.83 mV below resting membrane potential, and action potential durations were significantly reduced by 134 +/- 41 mus in the presence of 100 muM adenosine. The A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 1 muM) blocked these effects, whereas the A(1) agonists N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) mimicked the actions of adenosine. A(2) receptor contributions to excitability were assessed by application of an A(2) agonist, carboxamidoadenosine (CPCA). This resulted in membrane depolarizations (3.56 +/- 0.65 mV) and maintenance of firing. The presence of endogenous adenosine in the slice was revealed by both the application of the adenosine uptake inhibitor dilazep (1-100 muM), which resulted in a strong inhibition of firing activity, and the application of DPCPX, which induced firing in cells silenced by negative current injection. We tested for postsynaptic actions of adenosine by blocking G protein activation via GDP-beta-S infusion into recorded neurons. Under these conditions, the adenosinergic inhibition of firing and reduction of spike duration were blocked, suggesting the effects were mediated by postsynaptic adenosine receptors. That the effects on excitability could be due to direct activation of adenosine A(1) receptors on supraoptic neurons was further explored immunocytochemically via the co-labeling of magnocellular neurons with polyclonal antibodies raised against the A(1) receptors. It is concluded that adenosine, acting at postsynaptic A(1) receptors, exhibits a powerful inhibitory influence on supraoptic magnocellular activity and is an important endogenous regulator of magnocellular neuroendocrine function. PMID:15356187

  3. Halobacterial adenosine triphosphatases and the adenosine triphosphatase from Halobacterium saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristjansson, Hordur; Sadler, Martha H.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1986-01-01

    Membranes prepared from various members of the genus Halobacterium contained a Triton X-l00 activated adenosine triphosphatase. The enzyme from Halobacterium saccharovorum was unstable in solutions of low ionic strength and maximally active in the presence of 3.5 M NaCl. A variety of nucleotide triphosphates was hydrolyzed. MgADP, the product of ATP hydrolysis, was not hydrolyzed and was a competitive inhibitor with respect to MgATP. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum was composed of at least 2 and possibly 4 subunits. The 83-kDa and 60-kDa subunits represented about 90 percent of total protein. The 60-kDa subunit reacted with dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide when inhibition was carried out in an acidic medium. The enzyme from H. saccharovorum, possesses properties of an F(1)F(0) as well as an E(1)E(2) ATPase.

  4. Homeostatic Control of Synaptic Activity by Endogenous Adenosine is Mediated by Adenosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatář, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G.; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders. PMID:22997174

  5. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate, calcium, acetylcholine and the current induced by adenosine in the Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Stinnakre, J; Van Renterghem, C

    1986-01-01

    The K+ current response to bath-applied adenosine has been studied on follicle-enclosed full grown oocytes from Xenopus laevis, using the two electrodes voltage-clamp technique. The response to adenosine was mimicked by forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Forskolin applied at low concentration potentiated the response to adenosine. At low concentration, isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic agonist known to induce a potassium current via a rise of adenosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic AMP) into the oocyte, potentiated the response to adenosine. Progesterone (10(-5) M) reversibly induced a slight decrease (-24%) of the response to adenosine. The calcium ionophore A23187 applied in normal external medium reduced the response to adenosine (about -70%). Intracellular injection of EGTA induced an increase (+64%) of the peak response to adenosine. Acetylcholine (0.5-10 microM) inhibited the response to 3-10 microM adenosine by 44-91%. This inhibition was suppressed by atropine and was seen even on cells which did not show any current in response to acetylcholine application. The inhibition by ACh of the sensitivity to adenosine was long lasting (more than 1 h after the wash-out of ACh). A long term inhibition (-28 to -90%) also occurred when ACh was applied alone and washed before adenosine application. It is concluded that in Xenopus oocyte: increased cyclic AMP synthesis mediates the potassium response to adenosine; intracellular calcium ion concentration modulates this response; muscarinic stimulation induces a long-lasting inhibition of the sensitivity to adenosine. PMID:2427707

  6. Adenosine Kinase: Exploitation for Therapeutic Gain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine kinase (ADK; EC 2.7.1.20) is an evolutionarily conserved phosphotransferase that converts the purine ribonucleoside adenosine into 5′-adenosine-monophosphate. This enzymatic reaction plays a fundamental role in determining the tone of adenosine, which fulfills essential functions as a homeostatic and metabolic regulator in all living systems. Adenosine not only activates specific signaling pathways by activation of four types of adenosine receptors but it is also a primordial metabolite and regulator of biochemical enzyme reactions that couple to bioenergetic and epigenetic functions. By regulating adenosine, ADK can thus be identified as an upstream regulator of complex homeostatic and metabolic networks. Not surprisingly, ADK dysfunction is involved in several pathologies, including diabetes, epilepsy, and cancer. Consequently, ADK emerges as a rational therapeutic target, and adenosine-regulating drugs have been tested extensively. In recent attempts to improve specificity of treatment, localized therapies have been developed to augment adenosine signaling at sites of injury or pathology; those approaches include transplantation of stem cells with deletions of ADK or the use of gene therapy vectors to downregulate ADK expression. More recently, the first human mutations in ADK have been described, and novel findings suggest an unexpected role of ADK in a wider range of pathologies. ADK-regulating strategies thus represent innovative therapeutic opportunities to reconstruct network homeostasis in a multitude of conditions. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the genetics, biochemistry, and pharmacology of ADK and will then focus on pathologies and therapeutic interventions. Challenges to translate ADK-based therapies into clinical use will be discussed critically. PMID:23592612

  7. Comparison of adenosine uptake and endogenous adenosine-containing cells in mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Blazynski, C; Mosinger, J L; Cohen, A I

    1989-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to label [3H]-adenosine and [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine accumulating cells in rabbit, mouse, and ground squirrel retinas. Immunohistochemical methods revealed the distribution of cells that stained for endogenous adenosine. Comparisons of these two markers revealed for all three species that the distribution of specific subpopulations of retinal cells that store or accumulate the purine nucleoside, adenosine, is similar. For all three species, cells localized in the ganglion cell layer accumulated adenosine and exhibited adenosine-like immunoreactivity (ALIR). A smaller proportion of cells localized in the inner nuclear layer were labeled for ALIR, while a larger proportion of cells in this layer accumulated adenosine. Subtle differences between species are presented. However, the general similarities of the distribution of these two putative purinergic markers supports the evidence that a discrete adenosinergic neurotransmitter/modulatory system is present in the retina. PMID:2487641

  8. Adenosine receptors as drug targets what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors either directly or indirectly have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  9. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Prez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondn-Mercado, Roco

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies. PMID:26710546

  10. Myocardial infarction during adenosine stress test.

    PubMed

    Polad, J E; Wilson, L M

    2002-02-01

    A 65 year old woman with history of ischaemic heart disease underwent standard adenosine stress test for myocardial perfusion imaging. She sustained inferior myocardial infarction during the final stages of the stress test. She was admitted to the coronary care unit and received thrombolytic treatment. The patient made an uneventful recovery. Adenosine is widely used for myocardial stress imaging tests and has a good safety profile. So far there has been only one other reported myocardial infarction during adenosine stress test, which was under special circumstances because three days before the test the patient had undergone percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty when a severe circumferential dissection was noted. The present patient's case highlights the need to be aware of rare but potentially serious complications of adenosine, even though it generally has an excellent safety record for use in myocardial stress testing. PMID:11796565

  11. Myocardial infarction during adenosine stress test

    PubMed Central

    Polad, J E; Wilson, L M

    2002-01-01

    A 65 year old woman with history of ischaemic heart disease underwent standard adenosine stress test for myocardial perfusion imaging. She sustained inferior myocardial infarction during the final stages of the stress test. She was admitted to the coronary care unit and received thrombolytic treatment. The patient made an uneventful recovery. Adenosine is widely used for myocardial stress imaging tests and has a good safety profile. So far there has been only one other reported myocardial infarction during adenosine stress test, which was under special circumstances because three days before the test the patient had undergone percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty when a severe circumferential dissection was noted. The present patient's case highlights the need to be aware of rare but potentially serious complications of adenosine, even though it generally has an excellent safety record for use in myocardial stress testing. PMID:11796565

  12. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  13. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  14. Electrocardiographic profile of adenosine pharmacological stress testing

    PubMed Central

    SUN, HAO; TIAN, YUEQIN; ZHENG, LIHUI; PAN, QINGRONG; XIE, BOQIA

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine stress testing in conjunction with radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has become a common approach for the detection of coronary artery diseases in patients who are unable to perform adequate levels of exercise. However, specific electrocardiographic alterations during the test have been rarely described. Using a Chinese population, the aim of the present study was to provide a detailed electrocardiographic profile of adenosine stress testing. The study population included 1,168 consecutive outpatients who had undergone adenosine-induced stress myocardial perfusion imaging. Electrocardiographic data during and immediately following the adenosine infusion were collected, and the corresponding myocardial perfusion images were assessed. During adenosine infusion, 174 transient and 47 persistent arrhythmic events occurred in 110 patients (9.42%). Furthermore, frequent premature atrial contractions occurred in 65 individuals and frequent premature ventricular contractions were observed in 73 individuals. Atrioventricular block (AVB) occurred in 75 patients [first degree (I) AVB, 16; second degree (II) AVB, 58; third degree AVB, 1), while sinoatrial block occurred in eight patients. ST depression emerged in 69 patients. Patients with a baseline I AVB had an increased risk of a II AVB, and patients exhibiting baseline ST depression were more likely to have a further depressed ST segment during the stress test (odds ratio, 28.68 and 5.01, respectively; both P<0.001). Following adenosine infusion, 10 patients (0.86%) exhibited newly occurred arrhythmic events. However, no patient presented with acute myocardial infarction or sudden mortality. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that adenosine infusion was a safe method, despite the relatively high incidence of arrhythmic events. The majority of arrhythmias that occurred during infusion were transient, were reversible with the termination of infusion and did not indicate abnormal perfusion results. PMID:25780406

  15. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2008-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TIM proteins. The structure of phosphatidylserine bound to the Ig domain showed that the hydrophilic head penetrates into the MILIBS and coordinates with the metal ion, while the aromatic residues on the tip of the FG loop interacted with the fatty acid chains and could insert into the lipid bilayer. Our results also revealed a significant role of the MILIBS in trafficking of TIM-1 to the cell surface. PMID:18083575

  16. CD73-generated adenosine promotes osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takedachi, Masahide; Oohara, Hiroyuki; Smith, Brenda J.; Iyama, Mitsuyoshi; Kobashi, Mariko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Long, Courtney L.; Humphrey, Mary B.; Stoecker, Barbara J.; Toyosawa, Satoru; Thompson, Linda F.; Murakami, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    CD73 is a GPI-anchored cell surface protein with ecto-5′-nucleotidase enzyme activity that plays a crucial role in adenosine production. While the roles of adenosine receptors (AR) on osteoblasts and osteoclasts have been unveiled to some extent, the roles of CD73 and CD73-generated adenosine in bone tissue are largely unknown. To address this issue, we first analyzed the bone phenotype of CD73-deficient (cd73−/−) mice. The mutant male mice showed osteopenia, with significant decreases of osteoblastic markers. Levels of osteoclastic markers were, however, comparable to those of wild type mice. A series of in vitro studies revealed that CD73 deficiency resulted in impairment in osteoblast differentiation but not in the number of osteoblast progenitors. In addition, over expression of CD73 on MC3T3-E1 cells resulted in enhanced osteoblastic differentiation. Moreover, MC3T3-E1 cells expressed adenosine A2A receptors (A2AAR) and A2B receptors (A2BAR) and expression of these receptors increased with osteoblastic differentiation. Enhanced expression of osteocalcin (OC) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) observed in MC3T3-E1 cells over expressing CD73 were suppressed by treatment with an A2BAR antagonist but not with an A2AAR antagonist. Collectively, our results indicate that CD73 generated adenosine positively regulates osteoblast differentiation via A2BAR signaling. PMID:21882189

  17. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Current therapies for epilepsy are largely symptomatic and do not affect the underlying mechanisms of disease progression, i.e. epileptogenesis. Given the large percentage of pharmacoresistant chronic epilepsies, novel approaches are needed to understand and modify the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. Although different types of brain injury (e.g. status epilepticus, traumatic brain injury, stroke) can trigger epileptogenesis, astrogliosis appears to be a homotypic response and hallmark of epilepsy. Indeed, recent findings indicate that epilepsy might be a disease of astrocyte dysfunction. This review focuses on the inhibitory neuromodulator and endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, which is largely regulated by astrocytes and its key metabolic enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Recent findings support the ADK hypothesis of epileptogenesis: (i) Mouse models of epileptogenesis suggest a sequence of events leading from initial downregulation of ADK and elevation of ambient adenosine as an acute protective response, to changes in astrocytic adenosine receptor expression, to astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy (i.e. astrogliosis), to consequential overexpression of ADK, reduced adenosine and finally to spontaneous focal seizure activity restricted to regions of astrogliotic overexpression of ADK. (ii) Transgenic mice overexpressing ADK display increased sensitivity to brain injury and seizures. (iii) Inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. (iv) Intrahippocampal implants of stem cells engineered to lack ADK prevent epileptogenesis. Thus, ADK emerges both as a diagnostic marker to predict, as well as a prime therapeutic target to prevent, epileptogenesis. PMID:18249058

  18. The role of adenosine receptors and endogenous adenosine in citalopram-induced cardiovascular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Oransay, Kubilay; Hocaoglu, Nil; Buyukdeligoz, Mujgan; Tuncok, Yesim; Kalkan, Sule

    2014-01-01

    Aim: We investigated the role of adenosine in citalopram-induced cardiotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Protocol 1: Rats were randomized into four groups. Sodium cromoglycate was administered to rats. Citalopram was infused after the 5% dextrose, 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A1 receptor antagonist), 8-(-3-chlorostyryl)-caffeine (CSC; A2a receptor antagonist), or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) administrations. Protocol 2: First group received 5% dextrose intraperitoneally 1 hour prior to citalopram. Other rats were pretreated with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA; inhibitor of adenosine deaminase) and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI; inhibitor of facilitated adenosine transport). After pretreatment, group 2 received 5% dextrose and group 3 received citalopram. Adenosine concentrations, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), QRS duration and QT interval were evaluated. Results: In the dextrose group, citalopram infusion caused a significant decrease in MAP and HR and caused a significant prolongation in QRS and QT. DPCPX infusion significantly prevented the prolongation of the QT interval when compared to control. In the second protocol, citalopram infusion did not cause a significant change in plasma adenosine concentrations, but a significant increase observed in EHNA/NBTI groups. In EHNA/NBTI groups, citalopram-induced MAP and HR reductions, QRS and QT prolongations were more significant than the dextrose group. Conclusions: Citalopram may lead to QT prolongation by stimulating adenosine A1 receptors without affecting the release of adenosine. PMID:25097274

  19. Pain-relieving prospects for adenosine receptors and ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have potent antinociceptive effects in diverse preclinical models of chronic pain. In contrast, the efficacy of adenosine or adenosine receptor agonists at treating pain in humans is unclear. Two ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive neurons were recently identified. When injected spinally, these enzymes have long-lasting adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-dependent antinociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that spinal adenosine A2A receptor activation can enduringly inhibit neuropathic pain symptoms. Collectively, these studies suggest the possibility of treating chronic pain in humans by targeting specific adenosine receptor subtypes in anatomically defined regions with agonists or with ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine. PMID:21236731

  20. Emerging adenosine receptor agonistsan update

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs), the major targets of caffeine and theophylline, comprise four receptor subtypes designated as A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Over a dozen AR agonists are currently in clinical trials for various conditions, including cardiac arrhythmias, neuropathic pain, myocardial perfusion imaging, cardiac ischemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Adenosine (non-selective), regadenoson (A2A) and dipyridamole (act indirectly via ARs) have received regulatory approval for clinical use. The present editorial will give a brief update on the current status of AR agonists in clinical trials. PMID:22148938

  1. INTERACTIONS OF FLAVONES AND OTHER PHYTOCHEMICALS WITH ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adenosine receptors are involved in the homeostasis of the immune, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems, and adenosine agonists/ antagonists exert many similar effects. The affinity of flavonoids to adenosine receptors suggests that a wide range of natural substances in the diet may potentia...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Adenosine triphosphate release assay. (a) Identification. An adenosine triphosphate release assay is...

  3. Coronary spasm after completion of adenosine pharmacologic stress test.

    PubMed

    Han, Ping-Ping; Tian, Yue-Qin; Wei, Hong-Xing; Wang, Qi; He, Zuo-Xiang

    2011-10-01

    Adenosine is a frequently used pharmacologic stress agent in myocardial perfusion imaging. Its safety profile is well established, and most of its side effects are mild and transient. Coronary vasospasm occurs occasionally during or after adenosine stress test in rare cases, which may lead to seriously adverse outcomes. This study reported 3 such cases after completion of adenosine pharmacologic stress test. PMID:21573869

  4. A model for adenosine transport and metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Centelles, J J; Cascante, M; Canela, E I; Franco, R

    1992-01-01

    1. A model is presented for adenosine transport and metabolism in different steady states. The model considers steady-state equations for metabolic enzymes based on information from the literature on their kinetic behaviour. 2. Assuming that extracellular adenosine and inosine are translocated by three transporters, we have devised rate equations for these nucleoside transporters which are valid when both nucleosides are present. Since the Na(+)-independent transporter can either incorporate nucleosides into the cell or release them, various conditions have been simulated in which inosine was either incorporated or released. 3. Control analyses are reported which show that the fluxes towards intracellular adenine nucleosides are controlled by ecto-5'-nucleotidase in some circumstances and by the nucleoside transporters in others. The nucleoside transporter is responsible for five fluxes (two Na+ dependent adenosine transport mechanisms, a Na(+)-dependent inosine transport, a Na(+)-independent adenosine transport and a Na(+)-independent inosine influx or efflux) but the control is not always positive for all these fluxes. The control patterns of these five fluxes indicate that, in the presence of extracellular adenosine and inosine, the intracellular metabolism of adenine derivatives would be highly dependent on the extracellular and intracellular concentrations of both nucleosides, on the ectoenzymes (5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase) and on the transporter. 4. Predictions of the model were examined. The results indicate that a change in one independent variable (extracellular AMP concentration) makes the system evolve towards a new steady state which is far from the initial one and has a different control pattern. In contrast, simulation of inhibition of the carriers produces only slight modification of the fluxes since the concentrations of the metabolites change to counteract the effect. Thus, for instance, a 50% inhibition of the three carriers does not affect the flux towards intracellular adenine nucleotides. Finally, our model has confirmed that the evolution of the concentration of extracellular adenosine, when an increase in extracellular AMP is produced, agrees with the behaviour expected for a neurohormone. PMID:1445204

  5. Adenosine Triphosphate and Synchronous Mitosis in Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Chin, B.; Bernstein, I. A.

    1968-01-01

    Synchronous mitoses occur in Physarum polycephalum in the absence of cell division. Nucleoside and nucleotide profiles were prepared from synchronously growing P. polycephalum at intervals throughout the growth cycle. Comparison of these profiles demonstrates that the pool of adenosine triphosphate decreases from a high level at prophase to a minimum through mitosis and increases again in the postmitotic period. These events appear to coincide with changes in the pools of adenosine diphosphate and adenosine but not with that of adenosine monophosphate. This observed decrease in the pool of adenosine triphosphate during mitosis was confirmed by direct enzymatic assay. These results presumably reflect the energy demands of the cell during mitosis. PMID:5691835

  6. A corpora allata farnesyl diphosphate synthase in mosquitoes displaying a metal ion dependent substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Nyati, Pratik; Noriega, Fernando G

    2015-09-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, it catalyzes the head-to-tail condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) with two molecules of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to generate farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a precursor of juvenile hormone (JH). In this study, we functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti FPPS (AaFPPS) expressed in the corpora allata. AaFPPS is the only FPPS gene present in the genome of the yellow fever mosquito, it encodes a 49.6kDa protein exhibiting all the characteristic conserved sequence domains on prenyltransferases. AaFPPS displays its activity in the presence of metal cofactors; and the product condensation is dependent of the divalent cation. Mg(2+) ions lead to the production of FPP, while the presence of Co(2+) ions lead to geranyl diphosphate (GPP) production. In the presence of Mg(2+) the AaFPPS affinity for allylic substrates is GPP>DMAPP>IPP. These results suggest that AaFPPS displays "catalytic promiscuity", changing the type and ratio of products released (GPP or FPP) depending on allylic substrate concentrations and the presence of different metal cofactors. This metal ion-dependent regulatory mechanism allows a single enzyme to selectively control the metabolites it produces, thus potentially altering the flow of carbon into separate metabolic pathways. PMID:26188328

  7. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-12-01

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion-nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices.

  8. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  9. Effects of adenosine infusion into renal interstitium on renal hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowska, D.; Granger, J.P.; Knox, F.G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the hemodynamic effects of exogenous adenosine in the interstitium of the rat kidney. Adenosine or its analogues were infused into the renal interstitium by means of chronically implanted capsules. In fusion of adenosine decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from 0.81 +/- 0.06 to 0.37 +/- 0.06 ml/min while having no effect on renal blood flow (RBF). The metabolically stable analogue, 2-chloradenosine (2-ClAdo), decreased GFR from 0.73 +/- 0.07 to 021 +/- 0.06 ml/min. Interstitial infusion of theophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, completely abolished the effects of adenosine and 2-ClAdo on GFR. The distribution of adenosine, when infused into the renal interstitium, was determined using radiolabeled 5'-(N-ethyl)-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a metabolically stable adenosine agonist. After continuous infusion, (/sup 3/H)NECA was distributed throughout the kidney. The effects of NECA to reduce GFR were similar to those of adenosine and 2-ClAdo. They conclude that increased levels of adenosine in the renal interstitium markedly decrease GFR without affecting RBF in steady-state conditions. The marked effects of adenosine agonists during their infusion into the renal interstitium and the complete blockade of these effects by theophylline suggest an extracellular action of adenosine.

  10. Adenosine Phosphate Hydrolases in Cell Fractions of Vitreoscilla

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, J. C.; Hageage, G. J.

    1967-01-01

    Bound, soluble, and whole-cell fractions of two strains of the gliding bacterium Vitreoscilla were found to contain two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing adenosine phosphates: a Mg++-activated adenosine triphosphatase with a temperature optimum of 37 C, and a Mg++-activated adenosine diphosphatase with a temperature optimum of 55 C. Both enzymes had an optimal pH response between 8.5 and 9.5. Maximal activation was achieved at an ionic strength of 0.2 for the adenosine triphosphatase and at 0.3 to 0.4 for the adenosine diphosphatase. Preliminary studies indicated a molecular weight of approximately 50,000 for the adenosine diphosphatase and a molecular weight greater than 60,000 for the adenosine triphosphatase. Comparisons are made with previously reported characteristics of these enzymes in other bacteria, and a hypothesis is offered as to the role these enzymes have in the gliding mechanism. PMID:4289806

  11. Characterization of adenosine receptors in isolated cerebral arteries of cat.

    PubMed Central

    Edvinsson, L.; Fredholm, B. B.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of some adenosine analogues and xanthine derivatives were studied on isolated cerebral arteries from cats. The adenosine analogues caused an almost complete relaxation of cerebral arteries contracted by prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha, 30 microM). The order of potency was: 5-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine greater than L-N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (L-PIA). The analogue D-PIA was very weak and its maximum effect was small. NECA and L-PIA enhanced [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation in [3H]-adenine labelled feline pial vessels with similar absolute and relative potency to their relaxant effects. The relaxant effects of adenosine and of NECA were competitively antagonized by 8-phenyl-theophylline (pA2 = 6.5). The effect of theophylline and enprofylline could not be tested in higher concentrations than 30 or 10 microM because they affected the vessels directly. At these concentrations they were essentially inactive as adenosine antagonists. The non-xanthine phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram (0.1 and 100 microM) caused a slight but non-significant potentiation of the relaxant effect of adenosine. The results are compatible with the opinion that adenosine relaxes cerebral vessels by an action on adenosine A2-receptors. The effect may be linked to adenylate cyclase and can be antagonized by 8-phenyl-theophylline. PMID:6100842

  12. Extracellular Adenosine-Mediated Modulation of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Akio; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine-dependent suppression and redirection of pro-inflammatory activities are mediated by the signaling through adenosine receptors on the surface of most immune cells. The immunosuppression by endogenously-produced adenosine is pathophysiologically significant since inactivation of A2A/A2B adenosine receptor (A2AR/A2BR) and adenosine-producing ecto-enzymes CD39/CD73 results in the higher intensity of immune response and exaggeration of inflammatory damage. Regulatory T cells (Treg) can generate extracellular adenosine, which is implicated in the immunoregulatory activity of Tregs. Interestingly, adenosine has been shown to increase the numbers of Tregs and further promotes their immunoregulatory activity. A2AR-deficiency in Tregs reduces their immunosuppressive efficacy in vivo. Thus, adenosine is not only directly and instantly inhibiting to the immune response through interaction with A2AR/A2BR on the effector cells, but also adenosine signaling can recruit other immunoregulatory mechanisms, including Tregs. Such interaction between adenosine and Tregs suggests the presence of a positive feedback mechanism, which further promotes negative regulation of immune system through the establishment of immunosuppressive microenvironment. PMID:25071765

  13. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sandeep; Brito, Rafael; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined. PMID:24477263

  14. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  15. Effect of adenosine and adenosine analogs on ( sup 14 C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, S.; Hiraishi, H.; Terano, A.; Mutoh, H.; Kurachi, Y.; Shimada, T.; Ivey, K.J.; Sugimoto, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Adenosine receptors that modulate adenylate cyclase activity have been identified recently in a number of tissues. Adenosine A2 receptor is stimulatory to adenylate cyclase, whereas adenosine A1 receptor is inhibitory to adenylate cyclase. We investigated the effect of adenosine and its analogs on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation by rabbit parietal cells. Rabbit gastric mucosal cells were isolated by enzyme digestion. Parietal cells were enriched by nonlinear percoll gradients. (14C)Aminopyrine accumulation was used as an indicator of acid secretion. The effect of 2-chloroadenosine on histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation was studied. The effects of N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, stable analogs of adenosine, and adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation were assessed. Cyclic AMP content of parietal cells was determined by radioimmunoassay. Histamine and carbachol, known secretagogues, stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine did not suppress histamine-stimulated (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine dose dependently increased (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. The order of potency was N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine greater than 2-chloroadenosine greater than adenosine. 8-Phenyltheophylline and theophylline, adenosine-receptor antagonists, or cimetidine did not have significant effects on the increase of AP uptake induced by 2-chloroadenosine. Coadministration of dipyridamole, and adenosine uptake inhibitor, augmented the effect of adenosine on (14C)aminopyrine accumulation. 2-Chloroadenosine, N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine, and adenosine each induced a significant increase in cellular cyclic AMP. We conclude that there may be adenosine A2 receptors on rabbit parietal cells which modulate gastric acid secretion.

  16. The Molecular Mechanism of Ion-Dependent Gating in Secondary Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2013-01-01

    LeuT-like fold Na-dependent secondary active transporters form a large family of integral membrane proteins that transport various substrates against their concentration gradient across lipid membranes, using the free energy stored in the downhill concentration gradient of sodium ions. These transporters play an active role in synaptic transmission, the delivery of key nutrients, and the maintenance of osmotic pressure inside the cell. It is generally believed that binding of an ion and/or a substrate drives the conformational dynamics of the transporter. However, the exact mechanism for converting ion binding into useful work has yet to be established. Using a multi-dimensional path sampling (string-method) followed by all-atom free energy simulations, we established the principal thermodynamic and kinetic components governing the ion-dependent conformational dynamics of a LeuT-like fold transporter, the sodium/benzyl-hydantoin symporter Mhp1, for an entire conformational cycle. We found that inward-facing and outward-facing states of Mhp1 display nearly the same free energies with an ion absent from the Na2 site conserved across the LeuT-like fold transporters. The barrier separating an apo-state from inward-facing or outward-facing states of the transporter is very low, suggesting stochastic gating in the absence of ion/substrate bound. In contrast, the binding of a Na2 ion shifts the free energy stabilizing the outward-facing state and promoting substrate binding. Our results indicate that ion binding to the Na2 site may also play a key role in the intracellular thin gate dynamics modulation by altering its interactions with the transmembrane helix 5 (TM5). The Potential of Mean Force (PMF) computations for a substrate entrance displays two energy minima that correspond to the locations of the main binding site S1 and proposed allosteric S2 binding site. However, it was found that substrate's binds to the site S1 ?5 kcal/mol more favorable than that to the site S2 for all studied bound combinations of ions and a substrate. PMID:24204233

  17. Voltage and ion dependences of the slow currents which mediate bursting in Aplysia neurone R15.

    PubMed

    Adams, W B; Levitan, I B

    1985-03-01

    The previous paper described a slow depolarizing tail current, ID, and a slow hyperpolarizing tail current, IH, that are activated by action potentials and by brief depolarizing pulses in Aplysia neurone R15. ID and IH are necessary for the generation of bursting pace-maker activity in this cell. In this paper, the voltage and ion dependence of ID and IH are studied in an effort to determine the charge carriers for the two currents. When the slow currents are activated by brief depolarizing pulses delivered under voltage clamp in normal medium, an increase in the size of the pulse of 5-10 mV is usually sufficient to bring about full activation of ID. The apparent threshold in normal medium is approximately -20 mV. In medium in which K+ channels are blocked, full activation of an inward tail current that resembles ID requires increasing the pulse amplitude by only 1-2 mV. In contrast, IH is activated in a graded fashion over a 40 mV range of pulse amplitudes. After activating the currents with action potentials or with supramaximal pulses, ID remains an inward current and IH an outward current over a range of membrane potentials spanning -20 to -120 mV. In normal medium, ID is dependent on both extracellular Na+ concentration ( [Na+]o) and extracellular Ca2+ concentration ( [Ca2+]o). When K+ channels are blocked, ID can be supported by either [Na+]o or [Ca2+]o. IH depends only on [Ca2+]o as long as [Na+]o is at least 50 mM. Neither ID nor IH is decreased by decreasing the K+ gradient or by application of K+ channel blockers. These treatments increase somewhat the apparent amplitude of ID, probably by unmasking it from the large K+ tail current that follows the depolarizing pulse. A direct comparison in the same cell of the tetraethylammonium sensitivity of IH and of the Ca2+-activated K+ current demonstrates that these two currents flow through separate and distinct populations of channels. We conclude that in R15, ID arises in response to the triggering of an axonal action potential which in turn, through an as yet unknown mechanism, causes an increased influx of Na+ and/or Ca2+. We conclude that the apparent outward current IH, which is responsible for the interburst hyperpolarization in a normally bursting R15, in fact arises from a decrease in a resting inward Ca2+ current, possibly as the result of Ca2+-induced inactivation of Ca2+ channels. PMID:2580972

  18. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  19. Rhodium Complex and Enzyme Couple Mediated Electrochemical Detection of Adenosine.

    PubMed

    Han, Dawoon; Kim, Hyeong-Mook; Chand, Rohit; Kim, Gyumin; Shin, Ik-Soo; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2015-10-01

    Adenosine is one of the nucleoside which plays an important role in signal transduction and neuromodulation. This work proposes a simple electrochemical assay, comprising two enzymes and rhodium complex based electron transfer mediator, for the detection of adenosine. Sequential reaction of adenosine deaminase and L-glutamic dehydrogenase and the supporting cycle between ?-NADH and mediator enable quantitative analysis of adenosine. Role of electron transfer mediator is the conveyance of proton from electrode to ?-NAD(+) for regeneration of ?-NADH. The electrochemical characteristics of electron transfer mediator were also studied. Real-time adenosine detection was carried out using this multiple enzyme based chronoamperometric assay. The analysis results show a low limit of detection (140 ?M) and good correspondence between current signal and the adenosine concentration (R (2)?=?0.997). PMID:26293408

  20. Adenosine-tri-phosphate treatment for supraventricular tachycardia in infants.

    PubMed

    De Wolf, D; Rondia, G; Verhaaren, H; Matthys, D

    1994-11-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous nucleoside acting on coronary perfusion and myocardial conduction. Although the anti-arrhythmic effects of adenosine have been known for decades, interest in the use of adenosine or adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) (a precursor of adenosine) in termination of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) has been renewed. We studied the use of striadyne (ATP and a mixture of other nucleosides including adenosine) in 22 infants younger than 6 months in order to evaluate efficiency and safety of the drug in this particular age group. Striadyne stopped SVT in 17 cases and was diagnostic in another 4 cases. Ten out of 17 successfully converted infants showed one or more reinitiations of SVT, which were easily controlled. The results support the efficiency of ATP for the termination of re-entry types of tachycardia, as well as its diagnostic value and its lack of serious side-effects. PMID:7843191

  1. Intermittent ST-segment depressions during adenosine stress test.

    PubMed

    van der Hiel, Bernies; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Stokkel, Marcel P M

    2007-12-01

    ST-segment depression during adenosine stress testing is usually a 1-time event during or after the test and is often related to ischemia due to severe 3-vessel disease. In this case report we describe a patient with severe 3-vessel disease who had intermittent ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram during a myocardial perfusion stress test with adenosine. These intermittent ST depressions could be explained by possible adenosine-induced coronary spasm. PMID:18030042

  2. Decadal changes in potassium, calcium, and magnesium in a deciduous forest soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Johnson, Dale W.; Todd Jr, Donald E; Trettin, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Decadal changes in soil exchangeable K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mg{sup 2+} concentrations and contents from 1972 to 2004 in eight intensively monitored plots on Walker Branch Watershed were compared with estimates of increments or decrements in vegetation and detritus. The results from these eight plots compared favorably with those from a more extensive set from 24 soil sampling plots sampled in 1972 and 2004. Increases in exchangeable K{sup +} were noted between 1972 and 1982, but few changes were noted between 1982 and 2004 despite significant increments in vegetation and detritus and significant potential losses by leaching. Total K contents of soils in the 0- to 60-cm sampling depth were very large and a slight amount of weathering could have replenished the K{sup +} lost from exchanges sites. With one notable exception, exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} concentrations and contents decreased continuously during the sampling period. Decreases in exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} could be attributed mostly to increments in biomass and detritus, whereas decreases in exchangeable Mg{sup 2+} could not and were attributed to leaching. The major exception to these patterns was in the case of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}, where significant increases were noted in one plot and attributed to Ca release from the decomposition of Ca-rich coarse woody debris from oak (Quercus spp.) mortality. With minor exceptions, soils and changes in soils among the eight intensively sampled core plots were similar to those in a more extensive set of plots distributed across the watershed. This study shows that averaging among plots can mask significant and important spatial patterns in soil change that must be taken into account in assessing long-term trends.

  3. Effects of ion pairing with calcium and magnesium on selenate availability to higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.R.; Tice, K.R.; Thomason, D.N.

    1997-03-01

    The effects of solution speciation on the bioavailability of trace metals are well documented, but the role of speciation in the bioavailability of oxyanionic trace elements that may form significant ion pairs with Ca and Mg in saline media has not been investigated. The authors assessed the effects of such ion pairing on the availability of selenate to representative monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous higher plants. Formation constants for the CaSO{sub 4}{sup 0} formation was confirmed, but the value of 10{sup 2.7} for CaSeO{sub 4}{sup 0} was found to be in error; a value of 10{sup 2.0} is proposed here as the correct formation constant. Five solution culture experiments were conducted using alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) or tall wheatgrass (Elytrigia pontica [Podp.] Holub) with treatments consisting of NaSeO{sub 4} levels in combination with various levels of MgCl{sub 2} or CaCl{sub 2}. Both shoot Se concentrations and whole-plant Se contents were highly correlated with the free SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} activity but were poorly correlated with the sum of the free ion plus Ca and Mg ion pair species. Thus, the authors have shown, for the first time, that the free ion model of trace metal bioavailability is also valid for oxyanions that form complexes with Ca and Mg in saline media but that this conclusion hinges critically on the accuracy of the pertinent formation constants.

  4. Calcium and Magnesium Self-Diffusion in Natural Diopside Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Ganguly, J.; Ito, M.; Hervig, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    Clinopyroxenes in slowly cooled igneous rocks in both planetary and terrestrial environments (e.g. lunar basalts, layered igneous intrusives) commonly show exsolution lamellae of augite and pigeonite (which may be inverted to orthopyroxene) normal to the c-axis. The Ca-Mg-Fe zoning and thickness of these lamellae depend on the cooling rate of the host rock. This can be retrieved if the self-diffusion data for these cations are available. We have, thus, been engaged in systematic experimental studies to determine self-diffusion coefficients of divalent cations and report recent results on Ca and Mg. Gem quality diopside single crystals were oriented in a four-circle X ray diffractometer and cut as thin slabs normal to the c, b and a* axial directions. The cut pieces were polished, then the polished slabs were pre- annealed for 1-2 days at or close to experimental temperature and oxygen fugacity conditions. The source materials for Mg and Ca diffusion, which were ^{26}MgO or 44CaO powders, respectively, were deposited on the polished surfaces by thermal evaporation in an evacuated chamber. The diffusion experiments were conducted at 1 bar pressure at 950-1100 °C in a vertical tube-furnace. The oxygen fugacity was imposed by a computer controlled flowing mixture of CO and CO2, with a mixing ratio corresponding to the f (O2) of the wustite-iron buffer. The induced diffusion profiles were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and modeled by either thin film source or constant surface solutions for one-dimensional diffusion. The choice of the appropriate model was dictated by the criteria of better fit to the experimental data. Our results show that diffusion in diopside is anisotropic with the fastest diffusion parallel to c- and slowest diffusion parallel to a*-axis, with D(//c) ~ 2D(//a*). D(Mg) is slightly faster than D(Ca) but are ~ an order magnitude faster than the D(Ca) determined by Dimanov (1996). The activation energy for diffusion of Ca parallel to the c-axis is ~ 350 kJ/mol. These results will be updated with additional experimental data and applied to the modeling of exsolution processes in natural clinopyroxenes.

  5. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernndez-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodrguez, E.; Nez-Delgado, A.; Fernndez-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-07-01

    We used soil columns to study nutrients release from two compressed NPK fertilizers. The columns were filled with soil material from the surface horizon of a granitic soil. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil, and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K, Ca and Mg. These nutrients were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first percolates, reaching a steady state when 1426 mm water have percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in the geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K, Ca and Mg were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with composition 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident.

  6. Effect of iron deficiency on the digestive utilization of iron, phosphorus, calcium and magnesium in rats.

    PubMed

    Pallarés, I; Lisbona, F; Aliaga, I L; Barrionuevo, M; Alférez, M J; Campos, M S

    1993-09-01

    The influence of the source of dietary Fe (ferric citrate alone or mixed with bovine blood at a proportion of 1:1 (v/v)) on the digestive utilization of Fe, P, Ca and Mg, and on haemoglobin regeneration efficiency (HRE) was investigated in control and Fe-deficient rats. Diet A contained (by analysis) 43.5 mg Fe/kg diet (as ferric citrate), and diet B contained 44.3 mg Fe/kg diet (ferric citrate-bovine blood). In Fe-deficient rats fed on diet A or B the apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of Fe increased by 42.3 and 45.7% respectively. The ADC of Ca and Mg decreased significantly in Fe-deficient rats regardless of the source of dietary Fe. The HRE increased by 72.9% in Fe-deficient rats fed on diet A, and by 91.1% in Fe-deficient animals fed on diet B. In Fe-deficient rats fed on Fe for 10 d the values of haematological variables approached normality. However, serum Fe remained low, indicating that Fe reserves were still depleted. A deficient dietary supply of Fe for 30 d did not significantly modify the numbers of circulating leucocytes. PMID:8260485

  7. Dietary calcium and magnesium supplements in spontaneously hypertensive rats and isolated arterial reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Mkynen, H.; Khnen, M.; Arvola, P.; Wuorela, H.; Vapaatalo, H.; Prsti, I.

    1995-01-01

    1. High calcium diet attenuates the development of hypertension but an associated undesirable effect is that Mg2+ loss to the urine is enhanced. Therefore, we studied the effects of high calcium diet alone and in combination with increased magnesium intake on blood pressure and arterial function. 2. Forty-eight young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were allocated into four groups, the dietary contents of Ca2+ and Mg2+ being: 1.1%, 0.2% (SHR); 2.5%, 0.2% (Ca-SHR); 2.5%, 0.8% (CaMg-SHR); and 1.1%, 0.8% (Mg-SHR), respectively. Development of hypertension was followed for 13 weeks, whereafter electrolyte balance, lymphocyte intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i), and mesenteric arterial responses in vitro were examined. Forty normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were investigated in a similar manner. 3. Calcium supplementation comparably attenuated the development of Lypertension during normal and high magnesium intake in SHR, with an associated reduced lymphocyte [Ca2+]i and increased Mg2+ loss to the urine. 4. Endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation to acetylcholine was augmented in Ca-SHR and CaMg-SHR, while the relaxations to isoprenaline and the nitric oxide donor SIN-1 were similar in all SHR groups. Relaxation responses induced by the return of K+ to the organ bath upon precontractions in K(+)-free solution were used to evaluate the function of arterial Na+, K(+)-ATPase. The rate of potassium relaxation was similar in Ca-SHR and CaMg-SHR and faster than in untreated SHR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564205

  8. Nitrogen and phosphorus leaching as affected by gypsum amendment and exchangeable calcium and magnesium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The movement of N and P from the soil by leaching contributes to losses from agricultural land and represents an important environmental and human health concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of gypsum amendment and the resultant impact of different levels of exchangeable C...

  9. Effect of lactulose on calcium and magnesium absorption: a study using stable isotopes in adult men.

    PubMed

    Seki, Nobuo; Hamano, Hirokazu; Iiyama, Yuriko; Asano, Yuzo; Kokubo, Sadayuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Kudou, Hideki

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of lactulose on calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) absorption, we performed a clinical trial with a double-blind, randomized, crossover design in 24 healthy adult male volunteers. The absorptions of Ca and Mg were evaluated by a single-labeling method using stable isotopes. The test foods, containing lactulose at a dose of 0 g (placebo), 2 g (low-dose), or 4 g (high-dose) together with 300 mg of Ca containing 20 mg of 44Ca, and 150 mg of Mg containing 28 mg of 25Mg, were administered orally. Urine samples were collected for 8 h after the ingestion of the test food. The ratios of stable isotopes in urine (44Ca/40Ca and 25Mg/24Mg) were measured by ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry). The urinary stable-isotopes ratios (44Ca/40Ca and 25Mg/24Mg) increased with lactulose dosage. Significant differences were observed in the Ca ratio between placebo and high-dose lactulose (p<0.01), and in the Mg ratio between placebo and low-dose lactulose and between placebo and high-dose lactulose (p<0.01). Lactulose ingestion did not change the levels of bone-resorption markers (type I collagen cross-linked N-telopeptide and deoxypyridinoline) in urine. The test foods did not cause any side effects. This study demonstrates that lactulose enhances the absorptions of Ca and Mg in adult men. PMID:17484373

  10. Factors affecting ex-situ aqueous mineral carbonation using calcium and magnesium silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonation of magnesium- and calcium-silicate minerals to form their respective carbonates is one method to sequester carbon dioxide. Process development studies have identified reactor design as a key component affecting both the capital and operating costs of ex-situ mineral sequestration. Results from mineral carbonation studies conducted in a batch autoclave were utilized to design and construct a unique continuous pipe reactor with 100% recycle (flow-loop reactor). Results from the flow-loop reactor are consistent with batch autoclave tests, and are being used to derive engineering data necessary to design a bench-scale continuous pipeline reactor.

  11. Passive and active in vitro resorption of calcium and magnesium phosphate cements by osteoclastic cells.

    PubMed

    Grossardt, Christian; Ewald, Andrea; Grover, Liam M; Barralet, Jake E; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-12-01

    Biocements are clinically applied materials for bone replacement in non-load-bearing defects. Depending on their final composition, cements can be either resorbed or remain stable at the implantation site. Degradation can occur by two different mechanisms, by simple dissolution (passive) or after osteoclastic bone remodeling (active). This study investigated both the passive and active in vitro resorption behavior of brushite (CaHPO₄ · 2H₂O), monetite (CaHPO₄), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA; Ca₉(PO₄)₅HPO₄OH), and struvite (MgNH₄PO₄ · 6H₂O) cements. Passive resorption was measured by incubating the cement samples in a cell culture medium, whereas active resorption was determined during the surface culture of multinuclear osteoclastic cells derived from RAW 264.7 macrophages. Osteoclast formation was confirmed by showing tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity on CDHA, brushite, and monetite surfaces, as well as by measuring calcitonin receptor (CT-R) expression as an osteoclast-specific protein by Western blot analysis for struvite ceramics. An absence of passive degradation and only marginally active degradation of <0.01% were found for CDHA matrices. For the secondary calcium phosphates brushite and monetite, active degradation was predominant with a cumulative Ca²+ release of 2.02 (1.20) μmol during 13 days, whereas passive degradation released only 0.788 (0.04) μmol calcium ions into the medium. The struvite cement was the most degradable with a passive (active) release of 9.26 (2.92) Mg²+ ions and a total weight loss of 4.7% over 13 days of the study. PMID:20673025

  12. Bioadsorption Behavior of Rhodococcus Opacus on the Surface of Calcium and Magnesium Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongxu; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Chao; Yang, Xie; Li, An; Zhang, Lifeng

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of minerals can be influenced and changed by microbial activities when microorganisms adhere to the mineral surface. The change of mineral surface properties and thus mineral floatability can be used to separate gangues from valuable minerals. This study investigated the Rhodococcus opacus ( R. opacus) adsorption behavior on the surfaces of calcite, serpentine, and dolomite by bioadhesive test, contact angle measurements, Zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that R. opacus could be absorbed well onto the surfaces of calcite, serpentine, and dolomite in a few minutes, with adsorption rate up to 96%. The cell adsorption was dependent on the pH value and the most suitable pH is 7.2, whereas no significant influence of temperature on adsorption was found. Increasing pulp density could provide more adsorption sites to R. opacus cells and increase the adsorption rate consequently. The contact angle of three minerals decreased after R. opacus attached, which indicated that the dispersibility of the mineral surface was improved and in favor of being separated. Zeta potential measurements showed that the cell with the charge was opposite to that of minerals on a broad of pH value. The SEM images showed that R. opacus attached very tightly onto the mineral surface, with a large number of small mineral particles gathered around the cell. FTIR spectra showed the presence of polymer groups on the cell wall that could have given a net charge on the mineral surface.

  13. Effects of boron supplements on bones from rats fed calcium and magnesium deficient diets

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, H.; Irwin, A.; Kenney, M.A.; Williams, L. )

    1991-03-15

    Sixty female, weanling rats were fed, for 6 wks, diets providing: casein, 20; CHO, 40; fat, 40. Vitamins and minerals, except Ca and Mg, were fed according to AIN'76 recommendations. Gp A (control) was fed 100% AIN Ca, Mg and P with no boron (B) added. Gps CD and CD+B were fed 30% AIN Ca and 100% AIN Mg and P; Gps MD and MD+B were fed 20% AIN Mg and 100% AIN Ca and P; Gps CMD and CMD+B were fed 20% AIN Mg, 30% AIN Ca and 100% AIN P. The +B groups were supplemented with B at 12 mcg/g diet. Femurs (F) and 2 vertebrae (V) were scraped clean, weighed, sealed in saline-wet gauze, and refrigerated overnight. Bones were equilibrated at {sup {approximately}}25C. F lengths and diameters at the breakpoint were measured before a 3-point flexure test. V were subjected to a compression test. Maximum force (kg) at breakpoint was recorded. Data for right and left F and for 2 V were pooled. Although DIET' (CD, MD, CMD) affected numerous characteristics of F and V, B supplementation of diets affected only % moisture in F, Ca concentration in dry F and in F ash for CD and CMD diets. Interactions between B and diet affected F Mg concentrations in bone and in ash. Group CMD+B had higher Mg/g F than CMD. B increased Mg/g ash for CMD, decreased it for CD and did not affect it for MD.

  14. Intramolecular hydroamination of aminoalkenes by calcium and magnesium complexes: a synthetic and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Crimmin, Mark R; Arrowsmith, Merle; Barrett, Anthony G M; Casely, Ian J; Hill, Michael S; Procopiou, Panayiotis A

    2009-07-22

    The beta-diketiminate-stabilized calcium amide complex [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Ca{N(SiMe(3))(2)}(THF)] (Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) and magnesium methyl complex [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Mg(Me)(THF)] are reported as efficient precatalysts for hydroamination/cyclization of aminoalkenes. The reactions proceeded under mild conditions, allowing the synthesis of five-, six-, and seven-membered heterocyclic compounds. Qualitative assessment of these reactions revealed that the ease of catalytic turnover increases (i) for smaller ring sizes (5 > 6 > 7), (ii) substrates that benefit from favorable Thorpe-Ingold effects, and (iii) substrates that do not possess additional substitution on the alkene entity. Prochiral substrates may undergo diastereoselective hydroamination/cyclization depending upon the position of the existing stereocenter. Furthermore, a number of minor byproducts of these reactions, arising from competitive alkene isomerization reactions, were identified. A series of stoichiometric reactions between the precatalysts and primary amines provided an important model for catalyst initiation and suggested that these reactions are facile at room temperature, with the reaction of the calcium precatalyst with benzylamine proceeding with DeltaG(o)(298 K) = -2.7 kcal mol(-1). Both external amine/amide exchange and coordinated amine/amide exchange were observed in model complexes, and the data suggest that these processes occur via low-activation-energy pathways. As a result of the formation of potentially reactive byproducts such as hexamethyldisilazane, calcium-catalyst initiation is reversible, whereas for the magnesium precatalyst, this process is nonreversible. Further stoichiometric reactions of the two precatalysts with 1-amino-2,2-diphenyl-4-pentene demonstrated that the alkene insertion step proceeds via a highly reactive transient alkylmetal intermediate that readily reacts with N-H sigma bonds under catalytically relevant conditions. The results of deuterium-labeling studies are consistent with the formation of a single transient alkyl complex for both the magnesium and calcium precatalysts. Kinetic analysis of the nonreversible magnesium system revealed that the reaction rate depends directly upon catalyst concentration and inversely upon substrate concentration, suggesting that substrate-inhibited alkene insertion is rate-determining. PMID:19552442

  15. Effect of Calcium and Magnesium on Phosphatidylserine Membranes: Experiments and All-Atomic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Rodríguez-Beas, César; Faraudo, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    It is known that phosphatidylserine (PS−) lipids have a very similar affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations, as revealed by electrokinetic and stability experiments. However, despite this similar affinity, experimental evidence shows that the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ induces very different aggregation behavior for PS− liposomes as characterized by their fractal dimensions. Also, turbidity measurements confirm substantial differences in aggregation behavior depending on the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ cations. These puzzling results suggest that although these two cations have a similar affinity for PS− lipids, they induce substantial structural differences in lipid bilayers containing each of these cations. In other words, these cations have strong ion-specific effects on the structure of PS− membranes. This interpretation is supported by all-atomic molecular-dynamics simulations showing that Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations have different binding sites and induce different membrane hydration. We show that although both ions are incorporated deep into the hydrophilic region of the membrane, they have different positions and configurations at the membrane. Absorbed Ca2+ cations present a peak at a distance ∼2 nm from the center of the lipid bilayer, and their most probable binding configuration involves two oxygen atoms from each of the charged moieties of the PS molecule (phosphate and carboxyl groups). In contrast, the distribution of absorbed Mg2+ cations has two different peaks, located a few angstroms before and after the Ca2+ peak. The most probable configurations (corresponding to these two peaks) involve binding to two oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups (the most superficial binding peak) or two oxygen atoms from phosphate groups (the most internal peak). Moreover, simulations also show differences in the hydration structure of the membrane: we obtained a hydration of 7.5 and 9 water molecules per lipid in simulations with Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. PMID:22824273

  16. Synthesis, structure and enhanced photoluminescence properties of two robust, water stable calcium and magnesium coordination networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Wang, Hao; Teat, Simon J; Liu, Wei; Xia, Qibin; Li, Zhong; Li, Jing

    2015-12-21

    Two new 3D coordination networks Ca(cca)H2O (1) and Mg(cca)2H2O (2) (H2cca = 4-carboxycinnamic acid) are synthesized by solvothermal reactions and characterized by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, optical diffuse reflection, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and internal quantum yield measurements. Crystal structure analysis reveals that compound 1 is built from edge-sharing chains of seven-coordinated calcium polyhedra, which are connected by the cca ligand to form a 2D layered structure. Compound 2 contains isolated magnesium polyhedra layers. These layers are linked by cca ligands to complete the 3D connectivity. Both compounds 1 and 2 have high thermal stability and remain intact in aqueous solutions of a broad range of pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Both compounds also show significantly enhanced luminescence with respect to the free ligand, giving rise to an increase in quantum yield by as much as 4-fold. PMID:26541284

  17. Dietary calcium and magnesium supplements in spontaneously hypertensive rats and isolated arterial reactivity.

    PubMed

    Mkynen, H; Khnen, M; Arvola, P; Wuorela, H; Vapaatalo, H; Prsti, I

    1995-08-01

    1. High calcium diet attenuates the development of hypertension but an associated undesirable effect is that Mg2+ loss to the urine is enhanced. Therefore, we studied the effects of high calcium diet alone and in combination with increased magnesium intake on blood pressure and arterial function. 2. Forty-eight young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were allocated into four groups, the dietary contents of Ca2+ and Mg2+ being: 1.1%, 0.2% (SHR); 2.5%, 0.2% (Ca-SHR); 2.5%, 0.8% (CaMg-SHR); and 1.1%, 0.8% (Mg-SHR), respectively. Development of hypertension was followed for 13 weeks, whereafter electrolyte balance, lymphocyte intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i), and mesenteric arterial responses in vitro were examined. Forty normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were investigated in a similar manner. 3. Calcium supplementation comparably attenuated the development of Lypertension during normal and high magnesium intake in SHR, with an associated reduced lymphocyte [Ca2+]i and increased Mg2+ loss to the urine. 4. Endothelium-dependent arterial relaxation to acetylcholine was augmented in Ca-SHR and CaMg-SHR, while the relaxations to isoprenaline and the nitric oxide donor SIN-1 were similar in all SHR groups. Relaxation responses induced by the return of K+ to the organ bath upon precontractions in K(+)-free solution were used to evaluate the function of arterial Na+, K(+)-ATPase. The rate of potassium relaxation was similar in Ca-SHR and CaMg-SHR and faster than in untreated SHR. 5. Contractile responses to high concentrations of potassium and noradrenaline, and the ability of vascular smooth muscle to sequester Ca2+, which was evaluated by eliciting responses to caffeine or noradrenaline after loading periods in different Ca2+ concentrations, were comparable in all SHR groups. In SHR with increased magnesium intake, and in WKY rats with calcium or magnesium supplementation, no detectable effects on blood pressure and arterial function were observed.6. In conclusion, high calcium diet attenuated the development of hypertension in SHR, with an associated augmented endothelium-dependent relaxation, promoted recovery rate of ionic gradients across the cell membrane via Na+, K+-ATPase, and reduced basal [Ca2+ ]i. Dietary magnesium supplementation, whether combined with normal or high calcium intake, had no beneficial effects on blood pressure or arterial function. PMID:8564205

  18. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutrients release from two compressed nitrogen-potassium-phosphorous (NPK) fertilizers. In the Lourizán Forest Center, tablet-type controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) were prepared by compressing various mixtures of fertilizers without covers or binders. We used soil columns (50 cm long and 7.3 cm inner diameter) that were filled with soil from the surface layer (0-20 cm) of an A horizon corresponding to a Cambic Umbrisol. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil (within the first 3 cm), and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime for 80 days. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These elements were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first leachates and reached a steady state when 1426 mm of water had been percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in this geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with a composition of 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident, with a significant increase of pH, available Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, P and effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) in the fertilized columns, as well as a significant decrease in exchangeable Al3+, reaching values < 0.08 cmol (+) kg-1.

  19. Allosterically Coupled Calcium and Magnesium Binding Sites are Unmasked by Ryanodine Receptor Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Andrew A.; Allen, Paul D.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Perez, Claudio F.

    2009-01-01

    We studied cation regulation of wild type ryanodine receptor type 1 (WTRyR1), type 3 (WTRyR3) and RyR3/RyR1 chimeras (Ch) expressed in 1B5 dyspedic myotubes. Using [3H]ryanodine binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes, Ca2+ titrations with WTRyR3 and three chimeras show biphasic activation that is allosterically coupled to attenuated inhibition relative to WTRyR1. Chimeras show biphasic Mg2+ inhibition profiles at 3 and 10?M Ca2+, no observable inhibition at 20?M Ca2+ and monophasic inhibition at 100?M Ca2+. Ca2+ imaging of intact myotubes expressing Ch-4 exhibit caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients with inhibition kinetics that are significantly slower than those expressing WTRyR1 or WTRyR3. Four new aspects of RyR regulation are evident: 1) high affinity (H) activation and low affinity (L) inhibition sites are allosterically coupled, 2) Ca2+ facilitates removal of the inherent Mg2+ block, 3) WTRyR3 exhibits reduced cooperativity between H activation sites when compared to WTRyR1, and 4) uncoupling of these sites in Ch-4 results in decreased rates of inactivation of caffeine-induced Ca transients. PMID:18096513

  20. Calcium and magnesium transport by in situ mitochondria: electron probe analysis of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, R.; Somlyo, A.P.

    1987-10-01

    The extent, time course, and reversibility of mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake secondary to cellular Ca/sup 2 +/ influx stimulated by massive Na+ efflux were evaluated by electron probe microanalysis of rabbit portal vein smooth muscle. Strips of portal vein were Na+ loaded for 3 hours at 37/sup 0/C in a K+-free 1 mM ouabain solution, after which rapid Na+ efflux was induced by washing with a Na+-free K+-Li+ solution (1 mM ouabain). Li+ washing Na+-loaded portal vein produced a large transient contraction accompanied by an increase (over 100-fold) in mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ and also significant (p less than 0.05) increases in phosphorus and Mg/sup 2 +/. The Ca/sup 2 +/ loading of the mitochondria was reversed during prolonged Li+ wash, and by 2 hours, mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and phosphorus had returned to control levels. The maximal contractile response to stimulation remained normal, demonstrating that pathologic Ca/sup 2 +/ loading of mitochondria is reversible in situ and compatible with normal maximal force developed by the smooth muscle. Mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphorus uptake were reduced but still significant when the Li+ wash contained 0.2 mM Ca/sup 2 +/ or when ouabain was omitted. The fact that mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/ loading accompanied submaximal contractions during 0.2 mM Ca/sup 2 +/-Li wash suggests supranormal affinity of mitochondria for Ca/sup 2 +/ and may be due, in part, to reverse operation of the mitochondrial Na+-Ca/sup 2 +/ exchanger. Mitochondrial Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and phosphorus uptake were eliminated when the Li+ wash was performed at 2/sup 0/C or when the wash contained no Ca/sup 2 +/.

  1. Renal calcium and magnesium excretion during vasopressin administration into sheep with acid or alkaline urine.

    PubMed Central

    Beal, A M

    1979-01-01

    1. The proposition that changes in renal calcium excretion during vasopressin administration are positively correlated with concurrent changes in urine hydrogen ion concentration was tested by administration of vasopressin into twelve conscious diuresing sheep receiving either alkalinizing or acidifying infusions. 2. Vasopressin-induced antidiuresis in sheep with alkaline urine was associated with significant increases in urinary pH and decreases in the rate of calcium excretion whereas antidiuresis in sheep with acid urine was associated with significant decreases in urinary pH and no consistent effect on calcium excretion. 3. Magnesium excretion increased during vasopressin administration in most experiments regardless of urinary pH changes. 4. Vasopressin administration did not significantly alter the rate of excretion of sodium, potassium, chloride and phosphate or the rates of sodium, potassium, chloride, inulin, para-aminohippurate and osmolal clearance in sheep with either acid or alkaline urine. Potassium excretion and clearance in sheep with alkaline ruine was higher than that of sheep with acid urine during vasopressin infusion. 5. The results support the hypothesis that changes in renal tubular hydrogen ion concentration or bicarbonate concentration caused by water reabsorption from the collecting duct and possibly the late distal tubule could be part of the explanation for changes in renal calcium excretion which occur during vasopressin-induced antidiuresis. PMID:41939

  2. Relationship of Cotton Fiber Calcium and Magnesium Contents on Dye Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton from a single bale was processed into knit fabrics and prepared for dyeing. Following scouring, fabrics were soaked in either a metal sequestering solution or a water solution, bleached and dyed using 5 dye shades from both reatice and direct dye classes. Results indicate that removal of re...

  3. Adenosine receptor ligands: differences with acute versus chronic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; von Lubitz, Dag K. J. E.; Daly, John W.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors have been the target of intense research with respect to potential use of selective ligands in a variety of therapeutic areas. Caffeine and theophylline are adenosine receptor antagonists, and over the past three decades a wide range of selective agonists and antagonists for adenosine receptor subtypes have been developed. A complication to the therapeutic use of adenosine receptor ligands is the observation that the effects of acute administration of a particular ligand can be diametrically opposite to the chronic effects of the same ligand. This effect inversion is discussed here by Ken Jecobson and colleagues, and has been observed for effects on cognitive processes, seizures and ischaemic damage. PMID:8936347

  4. Adenosine analogs inhibit fighting in isolated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Palmour, R.M.; Lipowski, C.J.; Simon, C.K.; Ervin, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The potent adenosine analogs N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) and phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA) inhibit fighting and associated agonistic behaviors in isolated male mice. These effects are reversed by methylxanthines; moderate doses of NECA which inhibit fighting have minimal effects on spontaneous locomotor activity. At very low doses, both NECA and PIA increase fighting in parallel with previously reported increases of motor activity. Brain levels of (/sup 3/H)-NECA and (/sup 3/H)-PIA achieved at behaviorally effective doses suggest an involvement of adenosine receptors. The biochemical mechanism of adenosine receptor action with respect to fighting is unknown, but may include neuromodulatory effects on the release of other, more classical neurotransmitters.

  5. An Essential Role for Adenosine Signaling in Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Christina L.; Adams, Chelsea; Knight, Emily J.; Nam, Hyung Wook; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine plays an important role in regulating neuronal activity and modulates signaling by other neurotransmitters, including GABA, glutamate, and dopamine. Adenosine suppresses neurotransmitter release, reduces neuronal excitability, and regulates ion channel function through activation of four classes of G protein-coupled receptors, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Central adenosine levels are largely controlled by nucleoside transporters, which regulate adenosine levels across the plasma membrane. Adenosine has been shown to modulate cortical glutamate signaling and ventral-tegmental dopaminergic signaling, which are involved in several aspects of alcohol use disorders. Acute ethanol elevates extracellular adenosine levels by selectively inhibiting the type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter, ENT1. Raised adenosine levels mediate the ataxic and sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol through activation of A1 receptors in the cerebellum, striatum, and cerebral cortex. Recently, we have shown that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of ENT1 reduces the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), the primary regulator of extracellular glutamate, in astrocytes. These lines of evidence support a central role for adenosine-mediated glutamate signaling and the involvement of astrocytes in regulating ethanol intoxication and preference. In this paper, we discuss recent findings on the implication of adenosine signaling in alcohol use disorders. PMID:21054262

  6. Introduction to Adenosine Receptors as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine acts as a cytoprotective modulator in response to stress to an organ or tissue. Although short-lived in the circulation, it can activate four sub-types of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. The alkylxanthines caffeine and theophylline are the prototypical antagonists of ARs, and their stimulant actions occur primarily through this mechanism. For each of the four AR subtypes, selective agonists and antagonists have been introduced and used to develop new therapeutic drug concepts. ARs are notable among the GPCR family in the number and variety of agonist therapeutic candidates that have been proposed. The selective and potent synthetic AR agonists, which are typically much longer lasting in the body than adenosine, have potential therapeutic applications based on their anti-inflammatory (A2A and A3), cardioprotective (preconditioning by A1 and A3 and postconditioning by A2B), cerebroprotective (A1 and A3), and antinociceptive (A1) properties. Potent and selective AR antagonists display therapeutic potential as kidney protective (A1), antifibrotic (A2A), neuroprotective (A2A), and antiglaucoma (A3) agents. AR agonists for cardiac imaging and positron-emitting AR antagonists are in development for diagnostic applications. Allosteric modulators of A1 and A3 ARs have been described. In addition to the use of selective agonists/antagonists as pharmacological tools, mouse strains in which an AR has been genetically deleted have aided in developing novel drug concepts based on the modulation of ARs. PMID:19639277

  7. Adenosine: Tipping the balance towards hepatic steatosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Simon C.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the histochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5?-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:20395005

  8. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  9. Adenosine signaling promotes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lili; Tamplin, Owen J.; Chen, Michael J.; Deng, Qing; Patterson, Shenia; Kim, Peter G.; Durand, Ellen M.; McNeil, Ashley; Green, Julie M.; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ablain, Julien; Brandt, Margot K.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Daley, George Q.; Ravid, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from aortic endothelium via the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms that initiate and regulate EHT remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adenosine signaling regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development in zebrafish embryos. The adenosine receptor A2b is expressed in the vascular endothelium before HSPC emergence. Elevated adenosine levels increased runx1+/cmyb+ HSPCs in the dorsal aorta, whereas blocking the adenosine pathway decreased HSPCs. Knockdown of A2b adenosine receptor disrupted scl+ hemogenic vascular endothelium and the subsequent EHT process. A2b adenosine receptor activation induced CXCL8 via cAMPprotein kinase A (PKA) and mediated hematopoiesis. We further show that adenosine increased multipotent progenitors in a mouse embryonic stem cell colony-forming assay and in embryonic day 10.5 aorta-gonad-mesonephros explants. Our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling plays an evolutionary conserved role in the first steps of HSPC formation in vertebrates. PMID:25870200

  10. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  11. Effect of theophylline on adenosine production in the canine myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J.E.; Steffen, R.P.; Haddy, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is thought to participate in local regulation of coronary blood flow. However, competitive antagonists of adenosine fail to block myocardial active hyperemia. The authors examined the effect of locally administered theophylline on active hyperemia and myocardial adenosine production during intracoronary isoproterenol infusion in the dog heart. Isoproterenol decreased coronary resistance and increased myocardial adenosine production. Infusion of theophylline at a rate that attenuated the vasodilator response to exogenously administered adenosine failed to attenuate the increase in coronary blood flow produced by isoproterenol. However, theophylline plus isoproterenol production greater increases in myocardial adensine production than isoproterenol alone. The curves relating resistance and adenosine in the presence of theophylline fell to the right of those in the absence of theophylline. These findings suggest that the failure of theophylline to attenuate isoproterenol hyperemia in the dog heart results at least in part from an increase in adenosine concentration at the arteriole to a level beyond that blocked by this competitive antagonist and that adenosine may in fact play a role in isoproterenol-induced active hyperemia.

  12. Adenosine receptors and asthma in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C N

    2008-10-01

    According to an executive summary of the GINA dissemination committee report, it is now estimated that approximately 300 million people (5% of the global population or 1 in 20 persons) have asthma. Despite the scientific progress made over the past several decades toward improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, there is still a great need for improved therapies, particularly oral therapies that enhance patient compliance and that target new mechanisms of action. Adenosine is an important signalling molecule in human asthma. By acting on extracellular G-protein-coupled ARs on a number of different cell types important in the pathophysiology of human asthma, adenosine affects bronchial reactivity, inflammation and airway remodelling. Four AR subtypes (A(1), A(2a), A(2b) and A(3)) have been cloned in humans, are expressed in the lung, and are all targets for drug development for human asthma. This review summarizes what is known about these AR subtypes and their function in human asthma as well as the pros and cons of therapeutic approaches to these AR targets. A number of molecules with high affinity and high selectivity for the human AR subtypes have entered clinical trials or are poised to enter clinical trials as anti-asthma treatments. With the availability of these molecules for testing in humans, the function of ARs in human asthma, as well as the safety and efficacy of approaches to the different AR targets, can now be determined. PMID:18852693

  13. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    SciTech Connect

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  14. Adenosine reduces postbypass transfusion requirements in humans after heart surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Mentzer, R M; Rahko, P S; Canver, C C; Chopra, P S; Love, R B; Cook, T D; Hegge, M O; Lasley, R D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of adenosine blood cardioplegia on blood component usage after heart surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The most common cause of nonsurgical postcardiopulmonary bypass bleeding is platelet dysfunction. For this reason, pharmacologic agents are under investigation in an effort to reduce the need for transfusion in this setting. METHODS: A posthoc analysis of blood product usage was performed in data obtained from a Phase I, single center, open label, randomized study performed in 63 patients. The trial was designed to test the safety and tolerance of adenosine when added to blood cardioplegia in increasing doses to enhance myocardial protection. The database provided information regarding the effect of adenosine cardioplegia on venous plasma adenosine concentrations, the amount of platelets, fresh frozen plasma and packed erythrocytes used, and the association between the adenosine dose and postoperative thoracic drainage. RESULTS: The postoperative thoracic drainage at 6 hours, 24 hours, and at the time of chest tube removal in the high-dose adenosine cardioplegia group was 68%, 76%, and 75% of the placebo and low-dose adenosine cardioplegia group (p < 0.05). The highest dose of adenosine studied increased baseline adenosine venous plasma levels 360-fold, from 0.17 +/- 0.09 mumol/L to 42.30 +/- 11.20 mumol/L (p < 0.05). This marked increase was associated with a 68%, 56%, and 58% reduction in platelet, fresh frozen plasma, and packed erythrocyte usage, respectively (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to enhancing the heart's tolerance to ischemia, adenosine-supplemented cardioplegic solution also may reduce bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:8857856

  15. Chaperoning of the A1-Adenosine Receptor by Endogenous AdenosineAn Extension of the Retaliatory Metabolite Concept*

    PubMed Central

    Kusek, Justyna; Yang, Qiong; Witek, Martin; Gruber, Christian W.; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cell-permeable orthosteric ligands can assist folding of G proteincoupled receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); this pharmacochaperoning translates into increased cell surface levels of receptors. Here we used a folding-defective mutant of human A1-adenosine receptor as a sensor to explore whether endogenously produced adenosine can exert a chaperoning effect. This A1-receptor-Y288 A was retained in the ER of stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells but rapidly reached the plasma membrane in cells incubated with an A1 antagonist. This was phenocopied by raising intracellular adenosine levels with a combination of inhibitors of adenosine kinase, adenosine deaminase, and the equilibrative nucleoside transporter: mature receptors with complex glycosylation accumulated at the cell surface and bound to an A1-selective antagonist with an affinity indistinguishable from the wild-type A1 receptor. The effect of the inhibitor combination was specific, because it did not result in enhanced surface levels of two folding-defective human V2-vasopressin receptor mutants, which were susceptible to pharmacochaperoning by their cognate antagonist. Raising cellular adenosine levels by subjecting cells to hypoxia (5% O2) reproduced chaperoning by the inhibitor combination and enhanced surface expression of A1-receptor-Y288 A within 1 hour. These findings were recapitulated for the wild-type A1 receptor. Taken together, our observations document that endogenously formed adenosine can chaperone its cognate A1 receptor. This results in a positive feedback loop that has implications for the retaliatory metabolite concept of adenosine action: if chaperoning by intracellular adenosine results in elevated cell surface levels of A1 receptors, these cells will be more susceptible to extracellular adenosine and thus more likely to cope with metabolic distress. PMID:25354767

  16. Identification of possible adenosine receptors in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine is a vasodilator and has been implicated in increased blood flow in tissues that undergo energy deficiency. During conditions such as hypoxia and ischemia, adenosine is produced and is said to increase blood flow by relaxing the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) lining the resistance vessels. The goal of this research was to identify receptors that might be responsible for adenosine-mediated VSM relaxation. When an insoluble fraction from calf aortic VSM was incubated with /sup 32/P-ATP, two components were phosphorylated. One was identified as myosin light chain by MW, pl, and immunoprecipitation. The other product was identified as phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) by tic. Both phosphorylations were inhibited by adenosine and by 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (Cl-Ado). DPI production was much more sensitive to the nucleosides than was myosin phosphorylation. Neither inhibition involved change in cAMP production. Phosphatidylinositol (Pl) kinase in the VSM membranes required magnesium, was activated and solubilized by Triton X-100, and phosphorylated both endogenous and exogenous Pl. Cl-Ado inhibited Pl kinase in a manner competitive with respect to ATP and noncompetitive with respect to Pl. Adenosine and adenosine analogs modified in the ribose ring were inhibitors with potencies comparable to that of Cl-Ado. Adenine nucleotides and purine-modified adenosine analogs were weaker inhibitors than Cl-Ado.

  17. New 2,N6-disubstituted adenosines: potent and selective A1 adenosine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Sally A; Baker, Stephen P; Scammells, Peter J

    2002-04-01

    A number of adenosine analogues substituted in the 2- and N6-positions were synthesized and evaluated for affinity, functional potency and intrinsic activity at the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors (AR). Three classes of N6-substituents were tested; norbornen-2-yl (series 1), norborn-2-yl (series 2) and 5,6-epoxynorborn-2-yl (series 3). The halogens; fluoro, bromo, and iodo were evaluated as C-2 substituents. All compounds showed relatively high affinity (nanomolar) for the A1AR and high potency for inhibiting (-)isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in hamster smooth muscle DDT1 MF-2 cells with the 2-fluoro derivatives from each series having the highest affinity. All of the derivatives showed the same intrinsic activity as CPA. At the A2AAR, all of the derivatives showed relatively low affinity and potency (micromolar) for stimulating cAMP accumulation in rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells. The intrinsic activity of the derivatives compared to CGS 21680 was dependent upon the halogen substituent in the C-2 position with most showing partial agonist activity. Of particular interest is 2-iodo-N6-(2S-endo-norborn-2-yl)adenosine (5e), which is over 100-fold selective for the A1AR, is a full agonist at this receptor subtype and has no detectable agonist activity at the A2AAR. PMID:11836122

  18. Immunosuppression via adenosine receptor activation by adenosine monophosphate released from apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Urade, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is coupled with recruitment of macrophages for engulfment of dead cells, and with compensatory proliferation of neighboring cells. Yet, this death process is silent, and it does not cause inflammation. The molecular mechanisms underlying anti-inflammatory nature of the apoptotic process remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that the culture supernatant of apoptotic cells activated the macrophages to express anti-inflammatory genes such as Nr4a and Thbs1. A high level of AMP accumulated in the apoptotic cell supernatant in a Pannexin1-dependent manner. A nucleotidase inhibitor and A2a adenosine receptor antagonist inhibited the apoptotic supernatant-induced gene expression, suggesting AMP was metabolized to adenosine by an ecto-5-nucleotidase expressed on macrophages, to activate the macrophage A2a adenosine receptor. Intraperitoneal injection of zymosan into Adora2a- or Panx1-deficient mice produced high, sustained levels of inflammatory mediators in the peritoneal lavage. These results indicated that AMP from apoptotic cells suppresses inflammation as a calm down signal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02172.001 PMID:24668173

  19. Increased Cortical Extracellular Adenosine Correlates with Seizure Termination

    PubMed Central

    Van Gompel, Jamie J.; Bower, Mark R.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Stead, Matt; Chang, Su-Youne; Goerss, Stephan J.; Kim, Inyong; Bennet, Kevin E.; Meyer, Fredric B.; Marsh, W. Richard; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Seizures are currently defined by their electrographic features. However, neuronal networks are intrinsically dependent upon neurotransmitters of which little is known regarding their peri-ictal dynamics. Evidence supports adenosine as having a prominent role in seizure termination, as its administration can terminate and reduce seizures in animal models. Further, microdialysis studies in humans suggest adenosine is elevated peri-ictally, but the relationship to the seizure is obscured by its temporal measurement limitations. Because electrochemical techniques can provide vastly superior temporal resolution, we test the hypothesis that extracellular adenosine concentrations rise during seizure termination in an animal model and humans using electrochemistry. Methods White farm swine (n=45) were used in an acute cortical model of epilepsy and 10 human epilepsy patients were studied during intraoperative electrocorticography (Ecog). Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) based fast scan cyclic voltametry (FSCV) and fixed potential amperometry were obtained utilizing an adenosine specific triangular waveform or biosensors respectively. Results Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemistry demonstrated an average adenosine rise of 260% compared to baseline at 7.5 ± 16.9 seconds with amperometry (n=75 events) and 2.6 ± 11.2 seconds with FSCV (n=15 events) prior to electrographic seizure termination. In agreement with these animal data, adenosine elevation prior to seizure termination in a human patient utilizing FSCV was also seen. Significance Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemical recording supports the hypothesis that adenosine rises prior to seizure termination, suggesting that adenosine itself may be responsible for seizure termination. Future work using intraoperative WINCS based FSCV recording may help to elucidate the precise relationship between adenosine and seizure termination. PMID:24483230

  20. Adenosine reversal of in vivo hepatic responsiveness to insulin.

    PubMed

    McLane, M P; Black, P R; Law, W R; Raymond, R M

    1990-01-01

    Modulation by adenosine of hepatic responsiveness to insulin was investigated in vivo in 10 healthy mongrel dogs of both sexes by determining net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) in response to insulin during the presence or absence of exogenous adenosine infusion. In addition, two separate series of experiments were performed to study the effect of adenosine (n = 7) or glucagon (n = 5) on NHGO. Basal NHGO, quantitated via the Fick principle, was significantly decreased by insulin infusion (4 U/min; 4.8 +/- 0.6 vs. -1.7 +/- 2.6 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.05). The addition of an intrahepatic arterial infusion of adenosine (10 mumol/min) during insulin infusion caused glucose output to return to basal levels (insulin, -1.7 +/- 2.6 mg.kg-1.min-1; insulin + adenosine, 3.8 +/- 1.6 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.05). The addition of intrahepatic arterial saline (control) during insulin infusion had no effect on insulin's action (insulin, -1.0 +/- 1.9 mg.kg-1.min-1; insulin + saline, -1.2 +/- 1.6 mg.kg-1.min-1, P greater than 0.05). Hepatic glucose, lactate, and oxygen deliveries were not affected during either insulin or insulin plus adenosine infusion. Intrahepatic arterial infusion of adenosine alone had no effect on NHGO, whereas intrahepatic arterial infusion of glucagon alone stimulated glucose output approximately fivefold (basal, 2.7 +/- 0.4 mg.kg-1.min-1; glucagon, 15.5 +/- 1.2 mg.kg-1.min-1, P less than 0.01). These results show that adenosine completely reversed the inhibition by insulin of NHGO. These data suggest that adenosine may act as a modulator of insulin action on the liver. PMID:2210062

  1. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Gabriel S; Darmody, Patrick T; Walsh, John P; Moon, Morgan L; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Bray, Julie K; McCusker, Robert H; Freund, Gregory G

    2014-10-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by 2-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  2. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Darmody, Patrick T.; Walsh, John P.; Moon, Morgan L.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; McCusker, Robert H.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by two-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  3. Structures of adenosine kinase from Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Jennifer; Gonzlez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Wilson, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a single-cellular parasite of the genus Kinetoplastida and is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness in humans. Adenosine kinase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway, phosphorylating adenosine to AMP, and also activates cytotoxic analogues such as cordycepin and Ara-A by their phosphorylation. The structures of T. brucei brucei adenosine kinase (TbAK) in its unliganded open conformation and complexed with adenosine and ADP in the closed conformation are both reported to 2.6? resolution. The structures give insight into the binding mode of the substrates and the conformational change induced upon substrate binding. This information can be used to guide the improvement of cytotoxic substrate analogues as potential antitrypanosomal drugs. PMID:24419613

  4. Extracellular adenosine mediates a systemic metabolic switch during immune response.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-04-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the "selfish" immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  5. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the selfish immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  6. Purification and characterization of a chloride ion-dependent ?-glucosidase from the midgut gland of Japanese scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yasushi; Okuyama, Masayuki; Iizuka, Takahisa; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Saburi, Wataru; Fukukawa, Taro; Maneesan, Janjira; Tagami, Takayoshi; Naraoka, Tetsushi; Mori, Haruhide; Kimura, Atsuo

    2016-03-01

    Marine glycoside hydrolases hold enormous potential due to their habitat-related characteristics such as salt tolerance, barophilicity, and cold tolerance. We purified an ?-glucosidase (PYG) from the midgut gland of the Japanese scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis) and found that this enzyme has unique characteristics. The use of acarbose affinity chromatography during the purification was particularly effective, increasing the specific activity 570-fold. PYG is an interesting chloride ion-dependent enzyme. Chloride ion causes distinctive changes in its enzymatic properties, increasing its hydrolysis rate, changing the pH profile of its enzyme activity, shifting the range of its pH stability to the alkaline region, and raising its optimal temperature from 37 to 55C. Furthermore, chloride ion altered PYG's substrate specificity. PYG exhibited the highest Vmax/Km value toward maltooctaose in the absence of chloride ion and toward maltotriose in the presence of chloride ion. PMID:26645800

  7. Mucosal adenosine deaminase activity and gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Namiot, Z; Marcinkiewicz, M; Jaroszewicz, W; Stasiewicz, J; Gorski, J

    1993-10-26

    Adenosine deaminase activity was studied in gastric corpus mucosa close to an ulcer crater. It was found that 6 weeks of therapy with ranitidine was accompanied by a decrease in enzyme activity in the mucosa around healed ulcers and an increase around those which failed to heal. The different activities of adenosine deaminase in the vicinity of healed and unhealed ulcers may indicate its possible role in peptic ulcer healing. PMID:8276083

  8. Low-dose adenosine stress echocardiography: Detection of myocardial viability

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Ostojic, Miodrag; Beleslin, Branko; Nedeljkovic, Ivana; Stepanovic, Jelena; Stojkovic, Sinisa; Petrasinovic, Zorica; Nedeljkovic, Milan; Saponjski, Jovica; Giga, Vojislav

    2003-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of low-dose adenosine stress echocardiography in detection of myocardial viability. Background Vasodilation through low dose dipyridamole infusion may recruit contractile reserve by increasing coronary flow or by increasing levels of endogenous adenosine. Methods Forty-three patients with resting dyssynergy, due to previous myocardial infarction, underwent low-dose adenosine (80, 100, 110 mcg/kg/min in 3 minutes intervals) echocardiography test. Gold standard for myocardial viability was improvement in systolic thickening of dyssinergic segments of ? 1 grade at follow-up. Coronary angiography was done in 41 pts. Twenty-seven patients were revascularized and 16 were medically treated. Echocardiographic follow up data (12 2 months) were available in 24 revascularized patients. Results Wall motion score index improved from rest 1.55 0.30 to 1.33 0.26 at low-dose adenosine (p < 0.001). Of the 257 segments with baseline dyssynergy, adenosine echocardiography identified 122 segments as positive for viability, and 135 as necrotic since no improvement of systolic thickening was observed. Follow-up wall motion score index was 1.31 0.30 (p < 0.001 vs. rest). The sensitivity of adenosine echo test for identification of viable segments was 87%, while specificity was 95%, and diagnostic accuracy 90%. Positive and negative predictive values were 97% and 80%, respectively. Conclusion Low-dose adenosine stress echocardiography test has high diagnostic potential for detection of myocardial viability in the group of patients with left ventricle dysfunction due to previous myocardial infarction. Low dose adenosine stress echocardiography may be adequate alternative to low-dose dobutamine test for evaluation of myocardial viability. PMID:12812523

  9. Adenosine analogues decrease myocardial. beta. -adrenergic receptor affinity for isoproterenol

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, F.D.; Fenton, R.A.; Dobson, J.G. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    Adenosine and its analogues have been shown to attenuate catecholamine-induced activation of adenylate cyclase in rat myocardial membranes via adenosine R/sub i/ (inhibitory) receptors. The effects of adenosine analogues on binding characteristics of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors (BAR) in rat heart ventricular membranes were examined in the present study. Neither phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA, 1..mu..M) nor 2-chloroadenosine (CADO, 10..mu..M) significantly influenced /sup 125/I-cyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to membranes as assessed by BAR affinity (Kd, 20 pM) or concentration (B/sub max/, 35 fmol/mg protein). However, in isoproterenol (ISO)-ICYP competition experiments, PIA, an R/sub i/ agonist, significantly shifted the ISO competition curve to the right 3.6 fold. The IC/sub 50/s of control and PIA treated membranes were 5.04 x 10/sup -8/M, and 1.81 X 10/sup -7/M respectively. The slope of the control curve (-0.58) was also increased in the PIA treated membranes (-0.94). CADO, a less specific adenosine R/sub i/ receptor agonist, shifted the curve to the right only 2 fold and increased the slope from -0.5 to -0.75. 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, an adenosine P-site agonist, had no significant effect on ISO binding. These data suggest that adenosine R/sub i/ agonists may attenuate catecholamine-induced activation of adenylate cyclase by decreasing the affinity of BAR for agonists.

  10. QTc interval prolongation during infusion with dipyridamole or adenosine.

    PubMed

    Guideri, F; Ferber, D; Galgano, G; Isidori, S; Blardi, P; Pasini, F L; Di Perri, T

    1995-01-27

    The aim of our study was to discover whether there was a relationship between the QTc interval prolongation on the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and provoked myocardial ischemia. Since the increase of adenosine plasma levels, obtained either with adenosine or dipyridamole (an adenosine reuptake inhibitor) infusion, has been used to test the coronary artery reserve in patients affected by coronary artery disease, the QTc interval modifications during dipyridamole or adenosine echocardiographic stress test were evaluated. Twenty-five patients admitted to our Institute for evaluation of chest pain of suspected myocardial origin underwent an echocardiographic dipyridamole stress test (0.84 mg/kg over 10 min) after discontinuation of antianginal treatment. Of these patients, 10 underwent an echocardiographic adenosine stress test (scalar doses of 50, 75, 100, 140 micrograms/kg/min) after 48-72 h. The Bazett formula was used to evaluate the QTc interval. After dipyridamole and adenosine administration, a significant prolongation of the QTc interval was observed only in those patients who had positive test results. Our data suggested that QTc interval prolongation during pharmacological stress tests might be considered a marker of myocardial ischemia. PMID:7744540

  11. Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate are synthesized by yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, A; Günther Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1994-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.1) catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (P4A) and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate (P3 or P4), with relative velocities of 7:1, respectively. Of 12 nucleotides tested as potential donors of nucleotidyl moiety, only ATP, adenosine-5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate], and acetyl-AMP were substrates, with relative velocities of 100, 62, and 80, respectively. The Km values for ATP, P3, and acetyl-AMP were 0.16, 4.7, and 1.8 mM, respectively. The synthesis of p4A could proceed in the absence of exogenous acetate but was stimulated twofold by acetate, with an apparent Km value of 0.065 mM. CoA did not participate in the synthesis of p4A (p5A) and inhibited the reaction (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.015 mM). At pH 6.3, which was optimum for formation of p4A (p5A), the rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis (1.84 mumol mg-1 min-1) was 245 times faster than the rate of synthesis of p4A measured in the presence of acetate. The known formation of p4A (p5A) in yeast sporulation and the role of acetate may therefore be related to acetyl-CoA synthetase. Images PMID:7910605

  12. Interstitial adenosine concentration is increased by dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, M.W.; Wangler, R.D.; DeWitt, D.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Sparks, H.V.

    1986-03-01

    The authors used the multiple indicator dilution technique to observe the capillary transport of adenosine (ADO) in isolated guinea pig hearts. Radiolabelled albumin, sucrose and ADO were injected on the arterial side and measured in venous samples collected during the following 20 seconds. Transport parameters calculated from these data include permeability-surface area products (PS) for transendothelial diffusion, endothelial cell (EC) uptake at the lumenal and ablumenal membranes, and EC metabolism. With simultaneous measurements of arterial and venous ADO concentrations and flow, the authors calculated the steady-state interstitial fluid (ISF) ADO concentration. Under control conditions the venous ADO concentration was 7.1 +/- 2.8 nM. The calculated ISF concentration depends on whether they assume the venous ADO comes from the ISF, or directly from ECs. These ISF concentrations are 25 +/- 12 nM and 9.8 +/- 4.0 nM, respectively. During dipyridamole infusion (10 uM) the EC transport parameters became nearly zero. Venous and ISF ADO concentrations increased to 33 +/- 8.9 nM and 169 +/- 42 nM, respectively. The authors conclude that the ISF ADO concentration is 1.5-4 fold higher than the venous concentration at rest, and the ISF concentration increases greatly with dipyridamole.

  13. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yukio; Ariga, Tadashi; Ohtsu, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    A four year-old boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA-) deficient severe combined immunodeficiency(SCID) receiving PEG-ADA was treated under a gene therapy protocol targeting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in 1995. After eleven infusions of autologous PBLs transduced with retroviral vector LASN encoding ADAcDNA, he exhibited increased levels of the CD8+ T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulin, specific antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests. Follow-up studies also provided evidence of long-term persistence and function of transduced PBLs with improvement in the immune function. However, the therapeutic effect of this gene therapy has been difficult to assess because of the concomitant treatment of PEG-ADA. Two ADA-SCID patients have been currently treated with autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells engineered with a retroviral vector GCsapM-ADA after discontinuation of PEG-ADA. The restoration of intracellular ADA enzymatic activity in lymphocytes and granulocytes resulted in correction of the systemic toxicity and liver function in the absence of PEG-ADA treatment. Both patients are at home where they are clinically well, and they do not experience adversed effect, with follow up being 12 months after CD34+ cells gene therapy. PMID:15773344

  14. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Y

    1996-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Based on the first clinical trial of two young girls with ADA-deficient SCID by recombinant retrovirus-mediated gene transfer at the National Institute of Health of USA, we prepared to treat a four-year-old boy with ADA-deficient SCID who had been treated with PEG-ADA for 3 years. Approval to perform the clinical trial of gene therapy by using his peripheral blood T lymphocytes as the target and recombinant retroviral vector (LASN) as the vector for ADA gene transfer was obtained from both of the Ministry of Health and Welfare and the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture on 13 February, 1995. The first clinical trial of gene therapy for the patient was initiated on 1 August 1995. He received 8 x 10(8) LASN-transduced lymphocytes in an injection administered intravenously on 8 August and 2.5 x 10(9) transduced lymphocytes on 4 September without any side reactions. The procedure, safety and efficacy of clinical trial of gene therapy were discussed. PMID:8727372

  15. An adenosine nucleoside inhibitor of dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zheng; Chen, Yen-Liang; Schul, Wouter; Wang, Qing-Yin; Gu, Feng; Duraiswamy, Jeyaraj; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Niyomrattanakit, Pornwaratt; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Goh, Anne; Xu, Hao Ying; Liu, Wei; Liu, Boping; Lim, Joanne Y. H.; Ng, Chuan Young; Qing, Min; Lim, Chin Chin; Yip, Andy; Wang, Gang; Chan, Wai Ling; Tan, Hui Pen; Lin, Kai; Zhang, Bo; Zou, Gang; Bernard, Kristen A.; Garrett, Christine; Beltz, Karen; Dong, Min; Weaver, Margaret; He, Handan; Pichota, Arkadius; Dartois, Veronique; Keller, Thomas H.; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2009-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a major public health threat. The virus poses risk to 2.5 billion people worldwide and causes 50 to 100 million human infections each year. Neither a vaccine nor an antiviral therapy is currently available for prevention and treatment of DENV infection. Here, we report a previously undescribed adenosine analog, NITD008, that potently inhibits DENV both in vitro and in vivo. In addition to the 4 serotypes of DENV, NITD008 inhibits other flaviviruses, including West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, and Powassan virus. The compound also suppresses hepatitis C virus, but it does not inhibit nonflaviviruses, such as Western equine encephalitis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. A triphosphate form of NITD008 directly inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity of DENV, indicating that the compound functions as a chain terminator during viral RNA synthesis. NITD008 has good in vivo pharmacokinetic properties and is biologically available through oral administration. Treatment of DENV-infected mice with NITD008 suppressed peak viremia, reduced cytokine elevation, and completely prevented the infected mice from death. No observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was achieved when rats were orally dosed with NITD008 at 50 mg/kg daily for 1 week. However, NOAEL could not be accomplished when rats and dogs were dosed daily for 2 weeks. Nevertheless, our results have proved the concept that a nucleoside inhibitor could be developed for potential treatment of flavivirus infections. PMID:19918064

  16. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s? at 30 C. Since adenine is deaminated ?10 slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-?-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common ?/? barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism. PMID:21511036

  17. Increased adenosine contributes to penile fibrosis, a dangerous feature of priapism, via A2B adenosine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Jiang, Xianzhen; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Tang, Yuxin; Sun, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Phatarpekar, Prasad V; Kellems, Rodney E; Blackburn, Michael R; Xia, Yang

    2010-03-01

    Priapism is a condition of persistent penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation. Of men with sickle cell disease (SCD), 40% display priapism. The disorder is a dangerous and urgent condition, given its association with penile fibrosis and eventual erectile dysfunction. Current strategies to prevent its progression are poor because of a lack of fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms for penile fibrosis in priapism. Here we demonstrate that increased adenosine is a novel causative factor contributing to penile fibrosis in two independent animal models of priapism, adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice and SCD transgenic mice. An important finding is that chronic reduction of adenosine by ADA enzyme therapy successfully attenuated penile fibrosis in both mouse models, indicating an essential role of increased adenosine in penile fibrosis and a novel therapeutic possibility for this serious complication. Subsequently, we identified that both mice models share a similar fibrotic gene expression profile in penile tissue (including procollagen I, TGF-beta(1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA), suggesting that they share similar signaling pathways for progression to penile fibrosis. Thus, in an effort to decipher specific cell types and underlying mechanism responsible for adenosine-mediated penile fibrosis, we purified corpus cavernosal fibroblast cells (CCFCs), the major cell type involved in this process, from wild-type mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the major receptor expressed in these cells is the adenosine receptor A(2B)R. Based on this fact, we further purified CCFCs from A(2B)R-deficient mice and demonstrated that A(2B)R is essential for excess adenosine-mediated penile fibrosis. Finally, we revealed that TGF-beta functions downstream of the A(2B)R to increase CCFC collagen secretion and proliferation. Overall, our studies identify an essential role of increased adenosine in the pathogenesis of penile fibrosis via A(2B)R signaling and offer a potential target for prevention and treatment of penile fibrosis, a dangerous complication seen in priapism.-Wen, J., Jiang, X., Dai, Y., Zhang, Y., Tang, Y., Sun, H., Mi, T., Phatarpekar, P. V., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Xia, Y. Increased adenosine contributes to penile fibrosis, a dangerous feature of priapism, via A(2B) adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:19858092

  18. Effect of adenosine on the growth of human T-lymphocyte leukemia cell line MOLT-4.

    PubMed

    Streitová, Denisa; Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Horváth, Viktor; Kozubík, Alois; Znojil, Vladimír

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine has been observed to suppress the growth of MOLT-4 human leukemia cells in vitro. Changes in the cell cycle, especially increased percentage of cells in S phase, prolonged generation time, and induction of apoptosis at higher adenosine concentrations have been found to be responsible for the growth suppression. Dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, reversed partially but significantly the adenosine-induced growth suppression. It follows from these results that the action of adenosine on the MOLT-4 cells comprises its cellular uptake and intracellular operation. These findings present new data on anticancer efficacy of adenosine. PMID:17882653

  19. Adenosine-induced tachycardia acceleration: an unusual proarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vini; Salehi, Negar; Thakur, Ranjan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an effective agent for termination of most re-entrant supraventricular arrhythmias involving the atrioventricular node and often also used as a diagnostic agent for wide QRS tachycardias. Adenosine terminates 90-99% of re-entrant supraventricular tachycardias but it may rarely accelerate tachycardias. Adenosine-induced tachycardia acceleration is a rare phenomenon, as only a handful of cases have been described in the literature. We present a case of a 36-year-old man with a narrow complex, short RP tachycardia at a rate of 165?bpm and an initial blood pressure of 110/78?mm?Hg. A bolus of 12?mg of adenosine resulted in slowing of the tachycardia to 150?bpm for 2-3?s, followed by acceleration of the tachycardia to 185?bpm that lasted for approximately 20?s and returned to baseline at 165?bpm. The main mechanism of adenosine-induced acceleration may be the secondary sympathetic stimulation, which may be preceded by transient bradycardia and/or hypotension. PMID:25628324

  20. Enhancement by benzodiazepines of the inhibitory effect of adenosine on skeletal neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, L. C.; Ling, J. Y.; Chang, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. Interactions of benzodiazepines with adenosine on the neuromuscular transmission were studied in mouse diaphragm preparations. 2. In tubocurarine (0.6-0.8 microM)-partially paralyzed preparations, diazepam (35 microM) and Ro 5-4864 (3-30 microM), a peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor agonist, potentiated the inhibitory effect of adenosine on indirect twitch responses. 3. The central type receptor agonist, clonazepam did not affect the inhibitory effect of adenosine. 4. The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, PK11195 (1-10 microM) attenuated the adenosine inhibition and antagonized the potentiation by Ro 5-4864. 5. Ro 5-4864 failed to enhance further the inhibitory effect of adenosine in the presence of dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake inhibitor that also potentiated adenosine inhibition. 6. Neither Ro 5-4864 nor PK 11195 affected the inhibition produced by a stable adenosine analogue, 2-chloroadenosine, which is not a substrate for the adenosine uptake system. 7. Ro 5-4864 did not affect endplate potentials (e.p.ps) in the absence of adenosine, but reduced the amplitude of e.p.ps in the presence of adenosine without affecting miniature e.p.ps. 8. It is suggested that benzodiazepines potentiate the adenosine-effected presynaptic inhibition of neuromuscular transmission by an inhibition of adenosine uptake through activation of peripheral type benzodiazepine receptors. PMID:8528572

  1. METABOLIC REGULATION OF ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE SULFURYLASE IN YEAST

    PubMed Central

    de Vito, Peter C.; Dreyfuss, Jacques

    1964-01-01

    de Vito, Peter C. (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), and Jacques Dreyfuss. Metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 88:13411348. 1964.The metabolic regulation of adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase (ATP-sulfurylase) from baker's yeast was studied. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by low concentrations of adenosine-5?-phosphosulfate, 3?-phosphoadenosine-5?-phosphosulfate, and sulfide. Sulfide ion was a competitive inhibitor of ATP-sulfurylase. Cysteine, methionine, sulfite, and thiosulfate were not inhibitors of the enzyme. ATP-sulfurylase was repressed when yeast was grown in the presence of methionine, and derepressed when yeast was grown in the presence of cysteine. In contrast to these results, the enzyme sulfite reductase was repressed in cysteine-grown cells. Thus, the sulfate-reducing pathway in yeast appears to be regulated at its first step both by feedback inhibition (by sulfide) and by repression (by methionine). Other known controls in the cysteine biosynthetic pathway are discussed. PMID:14234791

  2. Mucosal adenosine deaminase activity and stump ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Namiot, Z; Namiot, A; Stasiewicz, J; Marcinkiewicz, M; Jaroszewicz, W; Górski, J

    1995-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase activity was studied in endoscopically taken slices from gastric mucosa in patient after partial gastric resection performed due to complicated duodenal ulcer, and currently with peptic ulcer in the stump. The samples of gastric mucosa were taken before and after 6 weeks of treatment with ranitidine, 150 mg twice daily, at a distance within 2 cm and greater than 2 cm from the ulcer crater. Adenosine deaminase activity was measured in mucosa homogenates by determination of ammonia liberated from substrate. It was found that therapy with ranitidine was accompanied by an increase in enzyme activity in the mucosa surrounding unhealed stump ulcers, while no changes were noted in mucosa around healed stump ulcers. A possible role of mucosal adenosine deaminase activity in stump ulcer healing is postulated. PMID:7670131

  3. Surface expression of adenosine deaminase in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, M; Centelles, J J; Huguet, J; Echevarne, F; Colomer, D; Vives-Corrons, J L; Franco, R

    1993-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression on the surface of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes was studied by flow cytometry. The gate for lymphocytes was located by cell size (forward scatter), cytoplasmic complexity (side scatter) and by expression of the markers CD2, CD4, CD8 and CD19. After mitogenic proliferation two populations appeared, one corresponding to non-stimulated cells, and the other consisting of larger cells which showed relatively high expression of adenosine deaminase on their surface. The increase was similar to that observed for CD71 expression, and paralleled the increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation. There was a correlation between ADA and CD71 expression (r = 0.92 for phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and 0.97 for pokeweed mitogen (PWM)). These results suggest a role for ecto-adenosine deaminase in lymphocyte proliferation and/or triggering. PMID:8348757

  4. Actions of Adenosine on Cullin Neddylation: Implications for Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Valerie F.; Ehrentraut, Stefan F.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    There is intense interest in understanding how the purine nucleoside adenosine functions in health and during disease. In this review, we outline some of the evidence that implicates adenosine signaling as an important metabolic signature to promote inflammatory resolution. Studies derived from cultured cell systems, animal models and human patients have revealed that nucleotide metabolism is significant component of the overall inflammatory microenvironment. These studies have revealed a prominent role for the transcription factors NF-?B and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and that these molecules are post-translationally regulated through similar components, namely the neddylation of cullins within the E3 ligase that are controlled through adenosine receptor signaling. Studies defining differences and similarities between these responses have taught us a number of important lessons about the complexity of the inflammatory response. A clearer definition of these pathways has provided new insight into disease pathogenesis and importantly, the potential for new therapeutic targets. PMID:25973141

  5. Grafts of adenosine-releasing cells suppress seizures in kindling epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Alexander; Padrun, Vivianne; Dglon, Nicole; Aebischer, Patrick; Mhler, Hanns; Boison, Detlev

    2001-01-01

    Adenosine is an inhibitor of neuronal activity in the brain. The local release of adenosine from grafted cells was evaluated as an ex vivo gene therapy approach to suppress synchronous discharges and epileptic seizures. Fibroblasts were engineered to release adenosine by inactivating the adenosine-metabolizing enzymes adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase. After encapsulation into semipermeable polymers, the cells were grafted into the brain ventricles of electrically kindled rats, a model of partial epilepsy. Grafted rats provided a nearly complete protection from behavioral seizures and a near-complete suppression of afterdischarges in electroencephalogram recordings, whereas the full tonicclonic convulsions in control rats remained unaltered. Thus, the local release of adenosine resulting in adenosine concentrations <25 nM at the site of action is sufficient to suppress seizure activity and, therefore, provides a potential therapeutic principle for the treatment of drug-resistant partial epilepsies. PMID:11404469

  6. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  7. Graphene oxide based fluorescent aptasensor for adenosine deaminase detection using adenosine as the substrate.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Xue-Guo; Yue-He; Luo, Qing-Ying; Tang, Hong-Wu; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel fluorescent aptasensor for simple and accurate detection of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity and inhibition on the basis of graphene oxide (GO) using adenosine (AD) as the substrate. This aptasensor consists of a dye-labeled single-stranded AD specific aptamer, GO and AD. The fluorescence intensity of the dye-labeled AD specific aptamer is quenched very efficiently by GO as a result of strong ?-? stacking interaction and excellent electronic transference of GO. In the presence of AD, the fluorescence of the GO-based probe is recovered since the competitive binding of AD and GO with the dye-labeled aptamer prevents the adsorption of dye-labeled aptamer on GO. When ADA was introduced to this GO-based probe solution, the fluorescence of the probe was quenched owing to ADA can convert AD into inosine which has no affinity to the dye-labeled aptamer, thus allowing quantitative investigation of ADA activity. The as-proposed sensor is highly selective and sensitive for the assay of ADA activity with a detection limit of 0.0129U/mL in clean buffer, which is more than one order of magnitude lower than the previous reports. Meanwhile, a good linear relationship with the correlation coefficient of R=0.9922 was obtained by testing 5% human serum containing a series of concentrations of ADA. Additionally, the inhibition effect of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine on ADA activity was investigated in this design. The GO-based fluorescence aptasensor not only provides a simple, cost-effective and sensitive platform for the detection of ADA and its inhibitor but also shows great potential in the diagnosis of ADA-relevant diseases and drug development. PMID:22613226

  8. Adenosine-mediated cardioprotection in ischemic-reperfused mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Peart, Jason; Flood, Amanda; Linden, Joel; Matherne, G Paul; Headrick, John P

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the roles of A1, A2A, or A3 receptors and purine salvage in cardioprotection with exogenous adenosine, and tested whether A2A -mediated reductions in perfusion pressure modify post-ischemic recovery. Treatment with 10(-5) or 5 x 10(-5) M adenosine improved contractile recovery from 20 min ischemia 45 min reperfusion in isolated mouse hearts. Protection was attenuated by adenosine kinase inhibition (10(-5) M iodotubercidin) and receptor antagonism (5 x 10(-5) M 8-rho-sulfophenyltheophylline, 8-SPT). Enzyme efflux mirrored contractile recoveries. A 3 agonism with 10(-7) M 2-chloro- N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (Cl-IB-MECA) improved ischemic tolerance whereas A1 agonism with 5 x 10(-8) M N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and A2A agonism with 10(-9) M 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl) phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) or 2 x 10(-8) M methyl-4-(3-[9-[4S,5S,2R,3R)-5-(N-ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxyoxolan-2-yl]-6-aminopurin-2-yl)]prop-2-ynyl) cyclohexane-carboxylate (ATL-146e) were ineffective. Protection via A1 receptor overexpression was enhanced by adenosine, but unaltered by A1 or A2A agonists. Finally, post-ischemic dysfunction in hearts perfused at constant flow was dependent on coronary pressure, with A2A AR-mediated reductions in pressure reducing diastolic contracture, and elevated perfusion pressure worsening contracture. Data indicate that cardioprotection with exogenous adenosine in asanguinous hearts involves purine salvage and activation of A3 but not A1 or A2A receptors. PMID:11743234

  9. Retraction Note: Adenosine triphosphate treatment for supraventricular tachycardia in infants.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Retraction Note to: Eur J Pediatr (1994) 153:668-671 DOI 10.1007/BF02190689. This article, "Adenosine triphosphate treatment for supraventricular tachycardia in infants", published in the European Journal of Pediatrics (1994) 153/9: 668-671, Springer-Verlag 1994, has been retracted at the request of the Publisher as it is a duplicate of the paper "Adenosine-tri-phosphate treatment for supraventricular tachycardia in infants", that has been published with further corrections in Vol. 153/11: 793-796, of the same journal. PMID:26814330

  10. The Guanosine-Adenosine Interaction Exists In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zaichuan

    2014-01-01

    In cultured renal cells and isolated perfused kidneys, extracellular guanosine augments extracellular adenosine and inosine (the major renal metabolite of adenosine) levels by altering the extracellular disposition of these purines. The present study addressed whether this guanosine-adenosine mechanism exists in vivo. In rats (n = 15), intravenous infusions of adenosine (1 mol/kg per minute) decreased mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) from 114 4 to 83 5 mm Hg, heart rate (HR) from 368 11 to 323 9 beats/min), and renal blood flow (RBF) from 6.2 0.5 to 5.3 0.6 ml/min). In rats (n = 15) pretreated with intravenous guanosine (10 mol/kg per minute), intravenous adenosine (1 mol/kg per minute) decreased MABP (from 109 4 to 58 5 mm Hg), HR (from 401 10 to 264 20 beats/min), and RBF (from 6.2 0.7 to 1.7 0.3). Two-factor analysis of variance (2F-ANOVA) revealed a significant interaction (P < 0.0001) between guanosine and adenosine for MABP, HR, and RBF. In control rats, the urinary excretion rate of endogenous inosine was 211 103 ng/30 minutes (n = 9); however, in rats treated with intravenous guanosine (10 mol/kg per minute), the excretion rate of inosine was 1995 300 ng/30 minutes (n = 12; P < 0.0001 versus controls). Because adenosine inhibits inflammatory cytokine production, we also examined the effects of intravenous guanosine on endotoxemia-induced increases in tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?). In control rats (n = 7), lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Escherichia coli 026:B6 endotoxin; 30 mg/kg) increased plasma TNF-? from 164 56 to 4082 730 pg/ml, whereas in rats pretreated with intravenous guanosine (10 mol/kg per minute; n = 6), LPS increased plasma TNF-? from 121 45 to 1821 413 pg/ml (2F-ANOVA interaction effect, P = 0.0022). We conclude that the guanosine-adenosine mechanism exists in vivo and that guanosine may be a useful therapeutic for reducing inflammation. PMID:25002416

  11. Development of Coronary Vasospasm during Adenosine-Stress Myocardial Perfusion CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jeong Gu; Kang, Byeong Seong; Bang, Min Seo; Kwon, Woon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a short-acting coronary vasodilator, and it is widely used during pharmacological stress myocardial perfusion imaging. It has a well-established safety profile, and most of its side effects are known to be mild and transient. Until now, coronary vasospasm has been rarely reported as a side effect of adenosine during or after adenosine stress test. This study reports a case of coronary vasospasm which was documented on stress myocardial perfusion CT imaging during adenosine stress test. PMID:25995700

  12. Development of Coronary Vasospasm during Adenosine-Stress Myocardial Perfusion CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeong Gu; Choi, Seong Hoon; Kang, Byeong Seong; Bang, Min Seo; Kwon, Woon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a short-acting coronary vasodilator, and it is widely used during pharmacological stress myocardial perfusion imaging. It has a well-established safety profile, and most of its side effects are known to be mild and transient. Until now, coronary vasospasm has been rarely reported as a side effect of adenosine during or after adenosine stress test. This study reports a case of coronary vasospasm which was documented on stress myocardial perfusion CT imaging during adenosine stress test. PMID:25995700

  13. Anticancer effect of adenosine on gastric cancer via diverse signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Ayako; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-10-21

    Extracellular adenosine induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In the former pathway, adenosine uptake into cells triggers apoptosis, and in the latter pathway, adenosine receptors mediate apoptosis. Extracellular adenosine also induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine is transported into cells through an adenosine transporter and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. In turn, AMP activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is the factor responsible for caspase-independent apoptosis of GT3-TKB gastric cancer cells. Extracellular adenosine, on the other hand, induces caspase-dependent apoptosis of MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cells by two mechanisms. Firstly, AMP, converted from intracellularly transported adenosine, initiates apoptosis, regardless of AMPK. Secondly, the A3 adenosine receptor, linked to Gi/Gq proteins, mediates apoptosis by activating the Gq protein effector, phospholipase C?, to produce inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which activate protein kinase C. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis vary, depending upon gastric cancer cell types. Understand the contribution of each downstream target molecule of adenosine to apoptosis induction may aid the establishment of tailor-made chemotherapy for gastric cancer. PMID:26494951

  14. Neuronal transporter and astrocytic ATP exocytosis underlie activity-dependent adenosine release in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes within the mammalian CNS. However, the precise mechanisms of how the concentration of extracellular adenosine increases following neural activity remain contentious. Here we have used microelectrode biosensors to directly measure adenosine release induced by focal stimulation in stratum radiatum of area CA1 in mouse hippocampal slices. Adenosine release was both action potential and Ca2+ dependent and could be evoked with low stimulation frequencies and small numbers of stimuli. Adenosine release required the activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and could be evoked by local application of glutamate receptor agonists. Approximately 40% of stimulated-adenosine release occurred by translocation of adenosine via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). This component of release persisted in the presence of the gliotoxin fluoroacetate and thus results from the direct release of adenosine from neurons. A reduction of adenosine release in the presence of NTPDase blockers, in slices from CD73?/? and dn-SNARE mice, provides evidence that a component of adenosine release arises from the extracellular metabolism of ATP released from astrocytes. This component of release appeared to have slower kinetics than the direct ENT-mediated release of adenosine. These data suggest that activity-dependent adenosine release is surprisingly complex and, in the hippocampus, arises from at least two distinct mechanisms with different cellular sources. PMID:23713028

  15. Acetate supplementation modulates brain adenosine metabolizing enzymes and adenosine A2A receptor levels in rats subjected to neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetate supplementation reduces neuroglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in rat models of neuroinflammation and Lyme neuroborreliosis. Because single-dose glyceryl triacetate (GTA) treatment increases brain phosphocreatine and reduces brain AMP levels, we postulate that GTA modulates adenosine metabolizing enzymes and receptors, which may be a possible mechanism to reduce neuroinflammation. Methods To test this hypothesis, we quantified the ability of GTA to alter brain levels of ecto-5-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine kinase (AK), and adenosine A2A receptor using western blot analysis and CD73 activity by measuring the rate of AMP hydrolysis. Neuroinflammation was induced by continuous bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion in the fourth ventricle of the brain for 14 and 28days. Three treatment strategies were employed, one and two where rats received prophylactic GTA through oral gavage with LPS infusion for 14 or 28days. In the third treatment regimen, an interventional strategy was used where rats were subjected to 28days of neuroinflammation, and GTA treatment was started on day 14 following the start of the LPS infusion. Results We found that rats subjected to neuroinflammation for 28days had a 28% reduction in CD73 levels and a 43% increase in AK levels that was reversed with prophylactic acetate supplementation. CD73 activity in these rats was increased by 46% with the 28-day GTA treatment compared to the water-treated rats. Rats subjected to neuroinflammation for 14days showed a 50% increase in levels of the adenosine A2A receptor, which was prevented with prophylactic acetate supplementation. Interventional GTA therapy, beginning on day 14 following the induction of neuroinflammation, resulted in a 67% increase in CD73 levels and a 155% increase in adenosine A2A receptor levels. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that acetate supplementation can modulate brain CD73, AK and adenosine A2A receptor levels, and possibly influence purinergic signaling. PMID:24898794

  16. ATP-Sensitive K+ Channels Regulate the Concentrative Adenosine Transporter CNT2 following Activation by A1 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duflot, Sylvie; Riera, Brbara; Fernndez-Veledo, Sonia; Casad, Vicent; Norman, Robert I.; Casado, F. Javier; Llus, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Pastor-Anglada, Maral

    2004-01-01

    This study describes a novel mechanism of regulation of the high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter (CNT2) via the activation of A1 adenosine receptors (A1R). This regulation is mediated by the activation of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. The high-affinity Na+-dependent adenosine transporter CNT2 and A1R are coexpressed in the basolateral domain of the rat hepatocyte plasma membrane and are colocalized in the rat hepatoma cell line FAO. The transient increase in CNT2-mediated transport activity triggered by (?)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine is fully inhibited by KATP channel blockers and mimicked by a KATP channel opener. A1R agonist activation of CNT2 occurs in both hepatocytes and FAO cells, which express Kir6.1, Kir6.2, SUR1, SUR2A, and SUR2B mRNA channel subunits. With the available antibodies against Kir6.X, SUR2A, and SUR2B, it is shown that all of these proteins colocalize with CNT2 and A1R in defined plasma membrane domains of FAO cells. The extent of the purinergic modulation of CNT2 is affected by the glucose concentration, a finding which indicates that glycemia and glucose metabolism may affect this cross-regulation among A1R, CNT2, and KATP channels. These results also suggest that the activation of KATP channels under metabolic stress can be mediated by the activation of A1R. Cell protection under these circumstances may be achieved by potentiation of the uptake of adenosine and its further metabolization to ATP. Mediation of purinergic responses and a connection between the intracellular energy status and the need for an exogenous adenosine supply are novel roles for KATP channels. PMID:15024061

  17. Metal Ion-dependent Heavy Chain Transfer Activity of TSG-6 Mediates Assembly of the Cumulus-Oocyte Matrix*

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, David C.; Birchenough, Holly L.; Ali, Tariq; Rugg, Marilyn S.; Waltho, Jon P.; Ievoli, Elena; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Richter, Ralf P.; Salustri, Antonietta; Milner, Caroline M.; Day, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    The matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) has a critical role in the expansion of the cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC), a process that is necessary for ovulation and fertilization in most mammals. Hyaluronan is organized into a cross-linked network by the cooperative action of three proteins, inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), pentraxin-3, and TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), driving the expansion of the COC and providing the cumulus matrix with its required viscoelastic properties. Although it is known that matrix stabilization involves the TSG-6-mediated transfer of IαI heavy chains (HCs) onto hyaluronan (to form covalent HC·HA complexes that are cross-linked by pentraxin-3) and that this occurs via the formation of covalent HC·TSG-6 intermediates, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have determined the tertiary structure of the CUB module from human TSG-6, identifying a calcium ion-binding site and chelating glutamic acid residue that mediate the formation of HC·TSG-6. This occurs via an initial metal ion-dependent, non-covalent, interaction between TSG-6 and HCs that also requires the presence of an HC-associated magnesium ion. In addition, we have found that the well characterized hyaluronan-binding site in the TSG-6 Link module is not used for recognition during transfer of HCs onto HA. Analysis of TSG-6 mutants (with impaired transferase and/or hyaluronan-binding functions) revealed that although the TSG-6-mediated formation of HC·HA complexes is essential for the expansion of mouse COCs in vitro, the hyaluronan-binding function of TSG-6 does not play a major role in the stabilization of the murine cumulus matrix. PMID:26468290

  18. Metal Ion-dependent Heavy Chain Transfer Activity of TSG-6 Mediates Assembly of the Cumulus-Oocyte Matrix.

    PubMed

    Briggs, David C; Birchenough, Holly L; Ali, Tariq; Rugg, Marilyn S; Waltho, Jon P; Ievoli, Elena; Jowitt, Thomas A; Enghild, Jan J; Richter, Ralf P; Salustri, Antonietta; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J

    2015-11-27

    The matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) has a critical role in the expansion of the cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC), a process that is necessary for ovulation and fertilization in most mammals. Hyaluronan is organized into a cross-linked network by the cooperative action of three proteins, inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), pentraxin-3, and TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), driving the expansion of the COC and providing the cumulus matrix with its required viscoelastic properties. Although it is known that matrix stabilization involves the TSG-6-mediated transfer of IαI heavy chains (HCs) onto hyaluronan (to form covalent HC·HA complexes that are cross-linked by pentraxin-3) and that this occurs via the formation of covalent HC·TSG-6 intermediates, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have determined the tertiary structure of the CUB module from human TSG-6, identifying a calcium ion-binding site and chelating glutamic acid residue that mediate the formation of HC·TSG-6. This occurs via an initial metal ion-dependent, non-covalent, interaction between TSG-6 and HCs that also requires the presence of an HC-associated magnesium ion. In addition, we have found that the well characterized hyaluronan-binding site in the TSG-6 Link module is not used for recognition during transfer of HCs onto HA. Analysis of TSG-6 mutants (with impaired transferase and/or hyaluronan-binding functions) revealed that although the TSG-6-mediated formation of HC·HA complexes is essential for the expansion of mouse COCs in vitro, the hyaluronan-binding function of TSG-6 does not play a major role in the stabilization of the murine cumulus matrix. PMID:26468290

  19. Purification and properties of adenylyl sulphate:ammonia adenylyltransferase from Chlorella catalysing the formation of adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate from adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate and ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Fankhauser, Heinz; Schiff, Jerome A.; Garber, Leonard J.

    1981-01-01

    Extracts of Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris, spinach, barley, Dictyostelium discoideum and Escherichia coli form an unknown compound enzymically from adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate in the presence of ammonia. This unknown compound shares the following properties with adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate: molar proportions of constituent parts (1 adenine:1 ribose:1 phosphate:1 ammonia released at low pH), co-electrophoresis in all buffers tested including borate, formation of AMP at low pH through release of ammonia, mass and i.r. spectra and conversion into 5?-AMP by phosphodiesterase. This unknown compound therefore appears to be identical with adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate. The enzyme that catalyses the formation of adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate from ammonia and adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate was purified 1800-fold (to homogeneity) from Chlorella by using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex and Reactive Blue 2agarose chromatography. The purified enzyme shows one band of protein, coincident with activity, at a position corresponding to 6000065000 molecular weight, on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, and yields three subunits on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of 26000, 21000 and 17000 molecular weight, consistent with a molecular weight of 64000 for the native enzyme. Isoelectrofocusing yields one band of pI4.2. The pH optimum of the enzyme-catalysed reaction is 8.8. ATP, ADP or adenosine 3?-phosphate 5?-phosphosulphate will not replace adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate, and the apparent Km for the last-mentioned compound is 0.82mm. The apparent Km for ammonia (assuming NH3 to be the active species) is about 10mm. A large variety of primary, secondary and tertiary amines or amides will not replace ammonia. One mol.prop. of adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate reacts with 1 mol.prop. of ammonia to yield 1 mol.prop. each of adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate and sulphate; no AMP is found. The highly purified enzyme does not catalyse any of the known reactions of adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate, including those catalysed by ATP sulphurylase, adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate kinase, adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate sulphotransferase or ADP sulphurylase. Adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate is found in old samples of the ammonium salt of adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate and can be formed non-enzymically if adenosine 5?-phosphosulphate and ammonia are boiled. In the non-enzymic reaction both adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate and AMP are formed. Thus the enzyme forms adenosine 5?-phosphoramidate by selectively speeding up an already favoured reaction. ImagesFig. 4. PMID:6274307

  20. CD39/Adenosine Pathway Is Involved in AIDS Progression

    PubMed Central

    Limou, Sophie; Younas, Mehwish; Kk, Ayrin; Hu, Sophie; Seddiki, Nabila; Hulin, Anne; Delaneau, Olivier; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Herbeck, Joshua T.; Mullins, James I.; Muhtarova, Maria; Bensussan, Armand; Zagury, Jean-Franois; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Lvy, Yves

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by a chronic activation of the immune system and suppressed function of T lymphocytes. Regulatory CD4+ CD25high FoxP3+CD127low T cells (Treg) play a key role in both conditions. Here, we show that HIV-1 positive patients have a significant increase of Treg-associated expression of CD39/ENTPD1, an ectoenzyme which in concert with CD73 generates adenosine. We show in vitro that the CD39/adenosine axis is involved in Treg suppression in HIV infection. Treg inhibitory effects are relieved by CD39 down modulation and are reproduced by an adenosine-agonist in accordance with a higher expression of the adenosine A2A receptor on patients' T cells. Notably, the expansion of the Treg CD39+ correlates with the level of immune activation and lower CD4+ counts in HIV-1 infected patients. Finally, in a genetic association study performed in three different cohorts, we identified a CD39 gene polymorphism that was associated with down-modulated CD39 expression and a slower progression to AIDS. PMID:21750674

  1. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages ...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages ...

  3. Pharmacological blockade of adenosine A2A receptors diminishes scarring

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Aso, Miguel; Chiriboga, Luis; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation promotes wound healing and is required for the development of fibrosis in murine models of scleroderma and cirrhosis. Nonetheless, the role of A2AR in the formation of scars following skin trauma has not been explored. Here, we examined the effect of pharmacological blockade of A2AR, with the selective adenosine A2AR-antagonist ZM241385 (2.5 mg/ml), in a murine model of scarring that mimics human scarring. We found that application of the selective adenosine A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased scar size and enhanced the tensile strength of the scar. Within the scar itself, collagen alignment and composition (marked reduction in collagen 3), but not periostin, biglycan, or fibronectin accumulation, was improved by application of ZM241385. Moreover, A2AR blockade reduced the number of myofibroblasts and angiogenesis but not macrophage infiltration in the scar. Taken together, our work strongly suggests that pharmacological A2AR blockade can be used to diminish scarring while improving the collagen composition and tensile strength of the healed wound.Perez-Aso, M., Chiriboga, L., Cronstein, B. N. Pharmacological blockade of adenosine A2A receptors diminishes scarring. PMID:22767233

  4. Adenosine receptor modulation of seizure susceptibility in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Szot, P.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is considered to be a neuromodulator or cotransmitter in the periphery and CNS. This neuromodulatory action of adenosine may be observed as an anticonvulsant effect. Dose-response curves for R-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), cycohexyladenosine (CHA), 2-chloroadenosine (2-ClAdo), N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and S-PIA were generated against PTZ seizure thresholds in the rat. The rank order of potency for adenosine agonists to elevate PTZ seizure threshold was R-PIA > 2-ClAdo > NECA > CHA > S-PIA. R-PIA was approximately 80-fold more potent than S-PIA. This 80-fold difference in potency between the diasteriomers of PIA was consistent with an A{sub 1} adenoise receptor-mediated response. The anticonvulsant action of 2-ClAdo was reversed by pretreatment with theoplylline. Chronic administration of theophylline significantly increased the specific binding of {sup 3}H-cyclohexyladenosine in membranes of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the rat. Chronic exposure to theophylline produced a significant increase in the densities of both the high- and low-affinity forms of A{sub 1} adenosine receptors in the cerebral cortex.

  5. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages ...

  6. Adenosine deaminase: functional implications and different classes of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, G; Costanzi, S; Lambertucci, C; Lupidi, G; Vittori, S; Volpini, R; Camaioni, E

    2001-03-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an enzyme of the purine metabolism which catalyzes the irreversible deamination of adenosine and deoxyadenosine to inosine and deoxyinosine, respectively. This ubiquitous enzyme has been found in a wide variety of microorganisms, plants, and invertebrates. In addition, it is present in all mammalian cells that play a central role in the differentiation and maturation of the lymphoid system. However, despite a number of studies performed to date, the physiological role played by ADA in the different tissues is not clear. Inherited ADA deficiency causes severe combined immunodeficiency disease (ADA-SCID), in which both B-cell and T-cell development is impaired. ADA-SCID has been the first disorder to be treated by gene therapy, using polyethylene glycol-modified bovine ADA (PEG-ADA). Conversely, there are several diseases in which the level of ADA is above normal. A number of ADA inhibitors have been designed and synthesized, classified as ground-state and transition-state inhibitors. They may be used to mimic the genetic deficiency of the enzyme, in lymphoproliferative disorders or immunosuppressive therapy (i.e., in graft rejection), to potentiate the effect of antileukemic or antiviral nucleosides, and, together with adenosine kinase, to reduce breakdown of adenosine in inflammation, hypertension, and ischemic injury. PMID:11223861

  7. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  8. Multi-objective evolutionary design of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Eelke; Marqus-Gallego, Patricia; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; van Veldhoven, Jacobus; Kruisselbrink, Johannes; Aleman, Alexander; Emmerich, Michael T M; Brussee, Johannes; Bender, Andreas; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2012-07-23

    A novel multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) for de novo design was developed and applied to the discovery of new adenosine receptor antagonists. This method consists of several iterative cycles of structure generation, evaluation, and selection. We applied an evolutionary algorithm (the so-called Molecule Commander) to generate candidate A1 adenosine receptor antagonists, which were evaluated against multiple criteria and objectives consisting of high (predicted) affinity and selectivity for the receptor, together with good ADMET properties. A pharmacophore model for the human A1 adenosine receptor (hA1AR) was created to serve as an objective function for evolution. In addition, three support vector machine models based on molecular fingerprints were developed for the other adenosine receptor subtypes (hA2A, hA2B, and hA3) and applied as negative objective functions, to aim for selectivity. Structures with a higher evolutionary fitness with respect to ADMET and pharmacophore matching scores were selected as input for the next generation and thus developed toward overall fitter ("better") compounds. We finally obtained a collection of 3946 unique compounds from which we derived chemical scaffolds. As a proof-of-principle, six of these templates were selected for actual synthesis and subsequently tested for activity toward all adenosine receptors subtypes. Interestingly, scaffolds 2 and 3 displayed low micromolar affinity for many of the adenosine receptor subtypes. To further investigate our evolutionary design method, we performed systematic modifications on scaffold 3. These modifications were guided by the substitution patterns as observed in the set of generated compounds that contained scaffold 3. We found that an increased affinity with appreciable selectivity for hA1AR over the other adenosine receptor subtypes was achieved through substitution of the scaffold; compound 3a had a Ki value of 280 nM with approximately 10-fold selectivity with respect to hA2AR, while 3g had a 1.6 ?M affinity for hA1AR with negligible affinity for the hA2A, hA2B, and hA3 receptor subtypes. PMID:22647079

  9. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) invivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1 receptor heteromers is postulated. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 897. PMID:26526685

  10. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhes-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Ftima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the purinome may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5?-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5?-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5?-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  11. Adenosine inhibits excitatory transmission to substantia gelatinosa neurons of the adult rat spinal cord through the activation of presynaptic A(1) adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lao, L J; Kumamoto, E; Luo, C; Furue, H; Yoshimura, M

    2001-12-01

    Although intrathecal administration of adenosine analogues or A(1) adenosine receptor agonists is known to result in antinociception, this has not been examined yet at the cellular level. In the present study, we examined in pharmacology an action of adenosine on glutamatergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of an adult rat spinal cord slice; this was done under the condition where a postsynaptic action of adenosine was blocked. In 65% of the neurons examined (n=72), adenosine at a concentration of 100 microM depressed the frequency of mEPSC in a reversible manner; the remaining neurons exhibited an inhibition followed by potentiation of the frequency. When examined quantitatively in extent in some cells (n=25), the inhibition was 40+/-3% (n=25) while the potentiation was 42+/-8% (n=6). These actions were not accompanied by a change in mEPSC amplitude. The inhibitory action on mEPSC frequency was dose-dependent in a range of 10-500 microM with an EC(50) value of 277 microM. The inhibitory action of adenosine was mimicked by a selective A(1) adenosine receptor agonist, CPA (1 microM; depression: 54+/-9%, n=4); this action of adenosine (100 microM) was not observed in the presence of a specific A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) (1 microM; 94+/-4% of control, n=3). The facilitatory action of adenosine (100 microM) was unaffected by an A(2a) antagonist, ZM 241385 (0.1 microM, n=3); an A(2a) agonist, CGS 21680 (0.1-10 microM; n=6), was without actions on mEPSC frequency. It is concluded that adenosine inhibits excitatory transmission to SG neurons through the activation of presynaptic A(1) adenosine receptor and that some of the inhibition is followed by a potentiation of the transmission. It remains to be examined which subtypes of adenosine receptors except for the A(1)- and A(2a)-subtypes are involved in the potentiating action. Considering that adenosine-like immunoreactivity and adenosine receptors are expressed at a high density in the SG, which is thought to play an important role in modulating nociceptive transmission from the periphery to the central nervous system, this inhibitory action of adenosine could contribute to a negative modulation of pain transmission. PMID:11731068

  12. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  13. Metabolic changes of cultured DRG neurons induced by adenosine using confocal microscopy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple effects on pain transmission in the peripheral nervous system. This study was performed to use confocal microscopy to evaluate whether adenosine could affect dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro and test which adenosine receptor mediates the effect of adenosine on DRG neurons. After adding adenosine with different concentration, we compared the metabolic changes by the real time imaging of calcium and mitochondria membrane potential using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the effect of 500 ?M adenosine on the metabolic changes of DRG neurons was more significant than others. Furthermore, four different adenosine receptor antagonists were used to study which receptor mediated the influences of adenosine on the cultured DRG neurons. All adenosine receptor antagonists especially A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX) had effect on the Ca2+ and mitochondria membrane potential dynamics of DRG neurons. The above studies demonstrated that the effect of adenosine which may be involved in the signal transmission on the sensory neurons was dose-dependent, and all the four adenosine receptors especially the A1R may mediate the transmission.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of adenosine and cordycepin, a bioactive constituent of Cordyceps sinensis in rat.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yung-Jen; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2010-04-28

    Cordycepin is a bioactive constituent of Cordyceps sinensis that has been shown to regulate homeostatic function. As an adenosine analogue, it is possible cordycepin goes through a similar metabolic pathway to that of adenosine. To investigate this hypothesis, a sensitive liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detector (HPLC-PDA) coupled to a microdialysis sampling system was developed to monitor cordycepin and adenosine in rat blood and liver. Other endogenous nucleosides were simultaneously measured to further understand the downstream metabolic pathway. The experiments were divided into six parallel groups for drug administration: (1) normal saline vehicle, (2) adenosine, (3) cordycepin, (4) normal saline + erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA; a potent adenosine deaminase inhibitor), (5) adenosine + EHNA, and (6) cordycepin + EHNA. The pharmacokinetic results suggest that the levels of both adenosine and cordycepin decreased rapidly in blood around 30 min after drug administration. When adenosine was given, the concentrations of adenosine metabolites, hypoxanthinosine and hypoxanthine, increased in rat blood. This phenomenon was inhibited by EHNA pretreatment. An unidentified peak was observed in the blood and liver samples after cordycepin administration. The decline of this unidentified peak paralleled the decreased of the concentration of cordycepin, and it was not observed in the presence of the adenosine deaminase inhibitor. It is concluded that adenosine and cordycepin had short elimination half-lives and high rates of clearance and their biotransformation was suppressed by EHNA. PMID:20302371

  15. Modulation of bladder function by luminal adenosine turnover and A1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, H. Sandeep; Herrington, Heather; Roppolo, James R.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    The bladder uroepithelium transmits information to the underlying nervous and musculature systems, is under constant cyclical strain, expresses all four adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3), and is a site of adenosine production. Although adenosine has a well-described protective effect in several organs, there is a lack of information about adenosine turnover in the uroepithelium or whether altering luminal adenosine concentrations impacts bladder function or overactivity. We observed that the concentration of extracellular adenosine at the mucosal surface of the uroepithelium was regulated by ecto-adenosine deaminase and by equilibrative nucleoside transporters, whereas adenosine kinase and equilibrative nucleoside transporters modulated serosal levels. We further observed that enriching endogenous adenosine by blocking its routes of metabolism or direct activation of mucosal A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), a selective agonist, stimulated bladder activity by lowering the threshold pressure for voiding. Finally, CCPA did not quell bladder hyperactivity in animals with acute cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis but instead exacerbated their irritated bladder phenotype. In conclusion, we find that adenosine levels at both surfaces of the uroepithelium are modulated by turnover, that blocking these pathways or stimulating A1 receptors directly at the luminal surface promotes bladder contractions, and that adenosine further stimulates voiding in animals with cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. PMID:22552934

  16. Adenosine signalling at immature parallel fibrePurkinje cell synapses in rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Atterbury, Alison; Wall, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    The purine adenosine is an extracellular signalling molecule involved in a large number of physiological and pathological conditions throughout the mammalian brain. However little is known about how adenosine release and its subsequent clearance change during brain development. We have combined electrophysiology and microelectrode biosensor measurements to investigate the properties of adenosine signalling at early stages of cerebellar development, when parallel fibrePurkinje cell synapses have recently been formed (postnatal days 912). At this stage of development, we could detect little or no inhibitory A1 receptor tone in basal conditions and during trains of stimuli. Addition of pharmacological agents, to inhibit adenosine clearance, had only minor effects on synaptic transmission suggesting that under basal conditions, the concentration of adenosine moving in and out of the extracellular space is small. Active adenosine release was stimulated with hypoxia and trains of electrical stimuli. Although hypoxia released significant concentrations of adenosine, the release was delayed and slow. No adenosine release could be detected following electrical stimulation in the molecular layer. In conclusion, at this stage of development, although adenosine receptors and the mechanisms of adenosine clearance are present there is very little adenosine release. PMID:19651764

  17. The relationship between the neuromodulator adenosine and behavioral symptoms of autism

    PubMed Central

    Masino, Susan A.; Kawamura, Masahito; Plotkin, Louisa M.; Svedova, Julia; DiMario, Francis J.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine is an endogenous sleep promoter, neuroprotector and anticonvulsant, and people with autism often suffer from sleep disruption and/or seizures. We hypothesized that increasing adenosine can decrease behavioral symptoms of autism, and, based on published research, specific physiological stimuli are expected to increase brain adenosine. To test the relationship between adenosine and autism, we developed a customized parent-based questionnaire to assess child participation in activities expected to influence adenosine and quantify behavioral changes following these experiences. Parents were naive to study hypotheses and all conditions were pre-assigned. Results demonstrate significantly better behavior associated with events pre-established as predicted to increase rather than decrease or have no influence on adenosine. Understanding the physiological relationship between adenosine and autism could open new therapeutic strategies - potentially preventing seizures, improving sleep, and reducing social and behavioral dysfunction. PMID:21693172

  18. Regional haemodynamic responses to adenosine receptor activation vary across time following lipopolysaccharide treatment in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, L; March, J E; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T; Gardiner, S M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies using adenosine receptor antagonists have shown that adenosine-mediated vasodilatations play an important role in the maintenance of regional perfusion during sepsis, but it is unclear whether vascular sensitivity to adenosine is affected. Here, we assessed regional haemodynamic responses to adenosine agonists and antagonists in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated rats to investigate a possible role for adenosine in the haemodynamic sequelae. Experimental approach: Male SpragueDawley rats were chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes to measure regional haemodynamic responses to adenosine-receptor agonists (adenosine, 2-choloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA)) and antagonists (8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)), at selected time points in control and LPS-treated rats. Key results: The responses to 8-PT were consistent with endogenous adenosine causing bradycardia, and renal and hindquarters vasodilatation in control rats, whereas in LPS-treated rats, there was evidence for endogenous adenosine causing renal (at 1.5?h) and hindquarters (at 6?h) vasoconstriction. In control animals, exogenous adenosine caused hypotension, tachycardia and widespread vasodilatation, whereas in LPS-treated rats, the adenosine-induced renal (at 1.5?h) and hindquarters (at 6?h) vasodilatations were abolished. As enhanced A1 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction could explain the results in LPS-treated rats, vascular responsiveness to a selective A1-receptor agonist (CCPA) or antagonist (DPCPX) was assessed. There was no evidence for enhanced vasoconstrictor responsiveness to CCPA in LPS-treated rats, but DPCPX caused renal vasodilatation, consistent with endogenous adenosine mediating renal vasoconstriction under these conditions. Conclusions and implications: The results show changes in adenosine receptor-mediated cardiovascular effects in endotoxaemia that may have implications for the use of adenosine-based therapies in sepsis. PMID:18500354

  19. Effects of adenosine metabolism in astrocytes on central nervous system oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu-Liang, Chen; Ya-Nan, Zhang; Zhong-Zhuang, Wang; Wei-Gang, Xu; Run-Ping, Li; Jun-Dong, Zhang

    2016-03-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is widely used in military operations, especially underwater missions. However, prolonged and continuous inhalation of HBO can cause central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which greatly limits HBO׳s application. The regulation of astrocytes to the metabolism of adenosine is involved in epilepsy. In our study, we aimed to observe the effects of HBO exposure on the metabolism of adenosine in the brain. Furthermore, we aimed to confirm the possible mechanism underlying adenosine׳s mediation of the CNS-OT. Firstly, anesthetized rats exposed to 5atm absolute HBO for 80min. The concentrations of extracellular adenosine, ATP, ADP, and AMP were detected. Secondly, free-moving rats were exposed to HBO at the same pressure for 20min, and the activities of 5'-nucleotidase and ADK in brain tissues were measured. For the mechanism studies, we observed the effects of a series of different doses of drugs related to adenosine metabolism on the latency of CNS-OT. Results showed HBO exposure could increase adenosine content by inhibiting ADK activity and improving 5'-nucleotidase activity. And adenosine metabolism during HBO exposure may be a protective response against HBO-induced CNS-OT. Moreover, the improvement of adenosine concentration, activation of adenosine A1R, or suppression of ADK and adenosine A2AR, which are involved in the prevention of HBO-induced CNS-OT. This is the first study to demonstrate HBO exposure regulated adenosine metabolism in the brain. Adenosine metabolism and adenosine receptors are related to HBO-induced CNS-OT development. These results will provide new potential targets for the termination or the attenuation of CNS-OT. PMID:26806404

  20. Extracellular adenosine levels are associated with the progression and exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fayong; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Mills, Tingting; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Molina, Jose G; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Liu, Hong; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating lung disease with limited treatment options. The signaling molecule adenosine is produced in response to injury and serves a protective role in early stages of injury and is detrimental during chronic stages of disease such as seen in lung conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis. Understanding the association of extracellular adenosine levels and the progression of pulmonary fibrosis is critical for designing adenosine based approaches to treat pulmonary fibrosis. The goal of this study was to use various models of experimental lung fibrosis to understand when adenosine levels are elevated during pulmonary fibrosis and whether these elevations were associated with disease progression and severity. To accomplish this, extracellular adenosine levels, defined as adenosine levels found in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, were determined in mouse models of resolvable and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. We found that relative bronchioalveolar lavage fluid adenosine levels are progressively elevated in association with pulmonary fibrosis and that adenosine levels diminish in association with the resolution of lung fibrosis. In addition, treatment of these models with dipyridamole, an inhibitor of nucleoside transporters that potentiates extracellular adenosine levels, demonstrated that the resolution of lung fibrosis is blocked by the failure of adenosine levels to subside. Furthermore, exacerbating adenosine levels led to worse fibrosis in a progressive fibrosis model. Increased adenosine levels were associated with elevation of IL-6 and IL-17, which are important inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary fibrosis. These results demonstrate that extracellular adenosine levels are closely associated with the progression of experimental pulmonary fibrosis and that this signaling pathway may mediate fibrosis by regulating IL-6 and IL-17 production.-Luo, F., Le, N.-B., Mills, T., Chen, N.-Y., Karmouty-Quintana, H., Molina, J. G., Davies, J., Philip, K., Volcik, K. A., Liu, H., Xia, Y., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R. Extracellular adenosine levels are associated with the progression and exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26527068

  1. Adenosine protected against pulmonary edema through transporter- and receptor A2-mediated endothelial barrier enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Harrington, Elizabeth O.; Newton, Julie; Casserly, Brian; Radin, Gregory; Warburton, Rod; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that adenosine plus homocysteine enhanced endothelial basal barrier function and protected against agonist-induced barrier dysfunction in vitro through attenuation of RhoA activation by inhibition of isoprenylcysteine-O-carboxyl methyltransferase. In the current study, we tested the effect of elevated adenosine on pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro and in vivo. We noted that adenosine alone dose dependently enhanced endothelial barrier function. While adenosine receptor A1 or A3 antagonists were ineffective, an adenosine transporter inhibitor, NBTI, or a combination of DPMX and MRS1754, antagonists for adenosine receptors A2A and A2B, respectively, partially attenuated the barrier-enhancing effect of adenosine. Similarly, inhibition of both A2A and A2B receptors with siRNA also blunted the effect of adenosine on barrier function. Interestingly, inhibition of both transporters and A2A/A2B receptors completely abolished adenosine-induced endothelial barrier enhancement. The adenosine receptor A2A and A2B agonist, NECA, also significantly enhanced endothelial barrier function. These data suggest that both adenosine transporters and A2A and A2B receptors are necessary for exerting maximal effect of adenosine on barrier enhancement. We also found that adenosine enhanced Rac1 GTPase activity and overexpression of dominant negative Rac1 attenuated adenosine-induced increases in focal adhesion complexes. We further demonstrated that elevation of cellular adenosine by inhibition of adenosine deaminase with Pentostatin significantly enhanced endothelial basal barrier function, an effect that was also associated with enhanced Rac1 GTPase activity and with increased focal adhesion complexes and adherens junctions. Finally, using a non-inflammatory acute lung injury (ALI) model induced by ?-naphthylthiourea, we found that administration of Pentostatin, which elevated lung adenosine level by 10-fold, not only attenuated the development of edema before ALI but also partially reversed edema after ALI. The data suggest that adenosine deaminase inhibition may be useful in treatment of pulmonary edema in settings of ALI. PMID:20228181

  2. Kinetic mechanism of Toxoplasma gondii adenosine kinase and the highly efficient utilization of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Fardos N M; Rais, Reem H; Al Safarjalani, Omar N; el Kouni, Mahmoud H

    2015-10-01

    Initial velocity and product inhibition studies of Toxoplasma gondii adenosine kinase (TgAK, EC 2.7.1.20) demonstrated that the basic mechanism of this enzyme is a hybrid random bi-uni ping-pong uni-bi. Initial velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern, consistent with substrate-enzyme-co-substrate complex formation and a binding pattern indicating that binding of the substrate interferes with the binding of the co-substrate and vice versa. Estimated kinetic parameters were KAdo=0.0020.0002 mM, KATP=0.050.008 mM, and Vmax=92035 ?mol/min/mg protein. Ado exhibited substrate inhibition suggesting the presence of more than one binding site for Ado on the enzyme. ATP relieved substrate inhibition by Ado. Thus, Ado also binds to the ATP binding site. AMP was competitive with ATP, inferring that AMP binds to the same site as ATP. AMP, ADP and ATP were non-competitive with Ado, therefore, none of these nucleotides binds to the Ado binding site. Combining ATP with ADP was additive. Therefore, the binding of either ATP or ADP does not interfere with the binding of the other. It is concluded that for every ATP consumed, TgAK generates three new AMPs. These findings along with the fact that a wide range of nucleoside 5'-mono, di, and triphosphates could substitute for ATP as phosphate donors in this reaction may explain the efficient and central role played by TgAK in the utilization of Ado as the major source from which all other purines can be synthesized in T. gondii. PMID:26112826

  3. Evaluation of calcium and magnesium in scalp hair samples of population consuming different drinking water: risk of kidney stone.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Shaikh, Haffeezur Rehman; Arain, Salma Aslam; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Brahman, Kapil Dev

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in underground water (UGW), bottled mineral water (BMW), and domestic treated water (DTW) with related to risk of kidney stones. The water samples were collected from different areas of Sindh, Pakistan. The scalp hair samples of both genders, age ranged 30-60 years, consuming different types of water, have or have not kidney disorders, were selected. The Ca and Mg concentrations were determined in scalp hair of study subjects and water by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The Ca and Mg contents in different types of drinking water, UGW, DTW, and BMW, were found in the range of 79.1-466, 23.7-140, and 45-270 mg/L and 4.43-125, 5.23-39.6, and 7.16-51.3 mg/L, respectively. It was observed that Ca concentration in the scalp hair samples of kidney stone patients consuming different types of drinking water was found to be higher (2,895-4721 ?g/g) while Mg level (84.3-101 ?g/g) was lower as compare to referents subjects (2,490-2,730 ?g/g for Ca, 107-128 ?g/g for Mg) in both genders. The positive correlation was found between Ca and Mg levels in water with related to kidney stone formations in population, especially who consumed underground water. A relative risk and odd ratio were calculated; the relative risk had a strong positive association with incidence of kidney stone which depends on types of drinking water. PMID:24218227

  4. Intravenous Calcium and Magnesium for Oxaliplatin-Induced Sensory Neurotoxicity in Adjuvant Colon Cancer: NCCTG N04C7

    PubMed Central

    Grothey, Axel; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Kugler, John W.; Silberstein, Peter T.; Dentchev, Todor; Wender, Donald B.; Novotny, Paul J.; Chitaley, Umesh; Alberts, Steven R.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cumulative sensory neurotoxicity (sNT) is the dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin, which commonly leads to early discontinuation of oxaliplatin-based therapy in the palliative and adjuvant settings. In a nonrandomized, retrospective study, intravenous (IV) calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) was associated with reduced oxaliplatin-induced sNT. Methods Patients with colon cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy with infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) were randomly assigned to Ca/Mg (1g calcium gluconate plus 1g magnesium sulfate pre- and post-oxaliplatin) or placebo, in a double-blinded manner. The primary end point was the percentage of patients with grade 2 or greater sNT at any time during or after oxaliplatin-based therapy by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI CTCAE; version 3) criteria. An oxaliplatin-specific sNT scale and patient questionnaires were also used to assess sNT. After 104 of 300 planned patients were enrolled, the study was closed. This was due to preliminary reports from another trial that suggested that Ca/Mg decreased treatment efficacy; these data were subsequently found to be incorrect. Results Overall, 102 patients were available for analysis. Ca/Mg decreased the incidence of chronic, cumulative, grade 2 or greater sNT, as measured by NCI CTCAE (P = .038) and also by the oxaliplatin-specific sNT scale (P = .018). In addition, acute muscle spasms associated with oxaliplatin were significantly reduced (P = .01) No effect on acute, cold-induced sNT was found. No substantial differences in adverse effects were noted between Ca/Mg and placebo. Conclusion Despite early termination and decreased statistical power, this study supports IV Ca/Mg as an effective neuroprotectant against oxaliplatin-induced cumulative sNT in adjuvant colon cancer. PMID:21189381

  5. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of <150 micron fines from ten sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform (RN) and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). One was drilled from the Windjana (WJ) site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation. Four were drilled from sites Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP) and Buckskin (BK) of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp. Two were drilled from sandstones of the Stimson formation targeting relatively unaltered (Big Sky, BY) and then altered (Greenhorn, GH) material associated with a light colored fracture zone. CheMin analyses provided quantitative sample mineralogy. SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases. This contribution will focus on evolved SO2. All samples evolved SO2 above 500 C. The shapes of the SO2 evolution traces with temperature vary between samples but most have at least two "peaks' within the wide high temperature evolution, from approx. 500-700 and approx. 700-860 C (Fig. 1). In many cases, the only sulfur minerals detected with CheMin were Ca sulfates (e.g., RN and GH), which should thermally decompose at temperatures above those obtainable by SAM (>860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose at temperatures outside the SAM temperature range (e.g., Ca and Mg sulfates). Here we discuss the results of SAM-like laboratory analyses targeted at understanding this last possibility, focused on understanding if reactions of HCl or an HCl evolving phase (oxychlorine phases, chlorides, etc.) and Ca and Mg sulfates can result in SO2 evolution in the SAM temperature range.

  6. Structural basis for calcium and magnesium regulation of a large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel with ?1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Wen; Hou, Pan-Pan; Guo, Xi-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Wen; Hu, Bin; Li, Xia; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Sheng

    2014-06-13

    Large conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels, composed of pore-forming ? subunits and auxiliary ? subunits, play important roles in diverse physiological activities. The ?1 is predominately expressed in smooth muscle cells, where it greatly enhances the Ca(2+) sensitivity of BK channels for proper regulation of smooth muscle tone. However, the structural basis underlying dynamic interaction between BK mSlo1 ? and ?1 remains elusive. Using macroscopic ionic current recordings in various Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) concentrations, we identified two binding sites on the cytosolic N terminus of ?1, namely the electrostatic enhancing site (mSlo1(K392,R393)-?1(E13,T14)), increasing the calcium sensitivity of BK channels, and the hydrophobic site (mSlo1(L906,L908)-?1(L5,V6,M7)), passing the physical force from the Ca(2+) bowl onto the enhancing site and S6 C-linker. Dynamic binding of these sites affects the interaction between the cytosolic domain and voltage-sensing domain, leading to the reduction of Mg(2+) sensitivity. A comprehensive structural model of the BK(mSlo1 ?-?1) complex was reconstructed based on these functional studies, which provides structural and mechanistic insights for understanding BK gating. PMID:24764303

  7. Acidic fermentation in the caecum increases absorption of calcium and magnesium in the large intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    Younes, H; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    1996-02-01

    The effect of fermentation on colonic absorption of Ca and Mg was investigated in 8-week-old rats adapted to diets containing either digestible wheat starch (DS diets) or including resistant starch, i.e. 350 g raw potato starch/kg (RS diets). The dietary Ca level of the DS and RS diets was 2.5 or 7.5 g/kg. RS diets resulted in enlargements of the caecum together with hypertrophy of the caecal wall. Acidification of the caecal contents by microbial fermentation of RS was influenced by the dietary Ca level. Very acidic pH conditions and relatively low concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, in the presence of lactic acid fermentation, were observed with the 2.5 g Ca/kg level. Rats fed on RS diets had a higher percentage of soluble Ca (and inorganic phosphate) in the caecum, particularly of rats adapted to the high Ca level. As a result of the hypertrophy of the caecal wall and of an elevated concentration of soluble Ca, the caecal absorption of Ca was 5-6-fold higher in the RS groups than in the DS groups. The difference between dietary intake and faecal excretion (DI-FE) of Ca was higher in rats fed on RS diets than in those fed on DS diets, when the dietary Ca level was 2.5 g/kg. With the higher Ca intake the elevated rate of Ca absorption from the caecum in RS-fed rats was not paralleled by an enhanced DI-EE difference: this suggests a shift of the Ca absorption towards the large intestine. Feeding RS diets also enhanced Mg caecal absorption, resulting in a substantially higher DI-FE difference for Mg, especially with the 2.5 g Ca/kg diets, because a high Ca intake tends to inhibit Mg absorption. The present findings support the view that the large intestine may represent a major site of Ca (and Mg) absorption when acidic fermentations take place. This process could improve the digestive Ca balance when the dietary Ca supply is low; when the Ca supply is affluent, it rather shifts Ca absorption towards a more distal site of the digestive tract. PMID:8785206

  8. Influence of oral co-administration of a preparation containing calcium and magnesium and food on enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Zi?kowski, Hubert; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J; Ma?lanka, Tomasz; Grabowski, Tomasz; Katolik, Kinga; Paw?ska, Justyna; Siemianowska, Ma?gorzata; Jasiecka, Agnieszka; Markiewicz, W?odzimierz; Spodniewska, Anna

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to determine the influence of food and ions on the pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin (ENRO) in turkeys, administered per os at a dose of 10?mg/kg of body weight (b.w.). Co-administration of ENRO with ions or with food significantly retarded its absorption, and the interaction was more pronounced when the drug was given together with food. The bioavailability of ENRO was 65.78??7.81% and 47.99??9.48% with ions and food, respectively. The maximum concentration (Cmax) in plasma of animals exposed to ions reached 0.87??0.26??g/ml in a tmax of 2.07??0.76?h; in animals which were fed while medicated, the analogous parameters were 0.36??0.13??g/ml and 8.06??3.08?h. The PK/PD analysis demonstrated that a decrease in the concentration of ENRO in turkeys' blood due to the interaction with ions or food might impair the drug's clinical efficacy toward some pathogenic microorganisms in turkeys if a routine dose of 10?mg ENRO/kg b.w. is administered. PMID:24875062

  9. Removal of hardness agents, calcium and magnesium, by natural and alkaline modified pumice stones in single and binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Zarrabi, Mansur; Kazemian, Hossein; Amrane, Abdeltif; Yaghmaian, Kamiar; Ghaffari, Hamid Reza

    2013-06-01

    Natural and alkaline modified pumice stones were used for the adsorption of water hardening cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+. The adsorbents were characterized using XRF, XRD, SEM and FTIR instrumental techniques. At equilibrium time and for 150 mg/L of a given cation, removal efficiencies were 83% and 94% for calcium and 48% and 73% for magnesium for raw and modified pumices, respectively. The optimal pH for raw and modified pumices were found to be 6.0, leading to the removal of 79 and 96% of calcium and 51 and 93% of magnesium by 10 g/L of raw and modified pumice adsorbents, respectively. Maximum adsorption capacities were 57.27 and 62.34 mg/g for Ca2+ and 44.53 and 56.11 mg/g for Mg2+ on the raw and modified pumices, respectively. Ca2+ and Mg2+ adsorption capacities of the pumice adsorbents decreased in the presence of competing cations. Less than 300 min were needed to achieve 99 and 92% desorption of the adsorbed Ca2+ and 100 and 89% of the adsorbed Mg2+ from the natural and modified pumices, respectively. After treating synthetic water solution simulating an actual water stream with the alkali-modified pumice, total hardness of the treated sample met the required standard for drinking water, namely below 300 mg/L of CaCO3 (297.5 mg/L). The studied pumice adsorbents, and especially the treated pumice, can be therefore considered as promising low cost adsorbents, suitable for the removal of hardness ions from drinking water.

  10. Effect of water-soluble silicon supplementation on bone status and balance of calcium and magnesium in male mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Jung, Ji-Youn; Choi, Mi-Kyeong

    2014-05-01

    Silicon (Si) is important for the growth and development of bone and connective tissues. Several studies have reported that Si supplementation improved bone mineral density (BMD) in female ovarectomized rats. However, few studies have investigated the effects of Si supplementation on bone status and bone metabolism in male animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Si supplementation on BMD and balance of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in adult male mice. Si was administrated orally through demineralized water containing different contents of Si as a form of sodium metasilicate (0 %, control; 0.025 %, Si50; 0.050 %, Si100; and 0.075 %, Si150) to 9-week-old male mice for 4 weeks. Si supplementation did not alter weight gain or BMD of femur and tibia in male mice. However, a high level of Si (0.05 and 0.075 %) supplementation significantly decreased Mg retention without changing Ca retention. Serum alkaline phosphatase of Si-supplemented groups significantly decreased compared with that of the control. According to these results, short-term Si supplementation did not affect BMD but showed a possible effect on increasing the need for Mg in adult male mice. PMID:24664270

  11. Evaluation of the content and bioaccessibility of iron, zinc, calcium and magnesium from groats, rice, leguminous grains and nuts.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, Joanna; Krejpcio, Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the content and the bioaccessibility of minerals (Fe, Zn, Ca and Mg) in commonly consumed food products, such as cereal groats, rice, leguminous grains and nuts purchased from the local market. The contents of Fe, Zn, Ca and Mg in foods were assayed after dry ashing of samples, while the bioaccessibility of these minerals after enzymatic in vitro digestion, was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A relatively high content of Fe was found in cashew nuts and green lentils, while cashew nuts and buckwheat groats had the highest concentration of Zn. It was found that the highest amount of macro-elements was generally in nuts, in particular: brazil nuts (Ca and Mg), cashews (Mg) and hazelnuts (Ca and Mg). Concerning the mineral bioaccessibility, the highest values for Fe were obtained in cashew nuts and green lentils (2.8 and 1.7 mg/100 g), for Zn in green lentils (2.1 mg/100 g), for Ca in brazil nuts and shelled pea (32.6 and 29.1 mg/100 g), while for Mg in shelled peas and green lentils (43.4 and 33.9 mg/100 g). Generally, the best sources of bioaccessible minerals seem to be leguminous grains and nuts. PMID:24587537

  12. Effects of oligofructose-enriched inulin on intestinal absorption of calcium and magnesium and bone turnover markers in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deficiency of oestrogen at menopause decreases intestinal Ca absorption, contributing to a negative Ca balance and bone loss. Mg deficiency has also been associated with bone loss. The purpose of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that treatment with a spray-dried mixture of chicor...

  13. Dietary intake of chromium, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, calcium and magnesium: Duplicate plate technique - Measured and derived

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Bryden, N.A.; Polansky, M.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Duplicate plate technique is currently the most reliable method to measure dietary intake of nutrients. However, there is no control for alterations in the diet, conscious or subconscious, due to the collection process. Duplicate diet samples were collected by 19 adult subjects, 11 females (F) and 8 males (M), while consuming freely-chosen diets. Subjects were then placed on a controlled diet to determine actual caloric requirement. Most subjects consumed fewer calories during the freely-chosen diet collection day than their actual caloric requirement. The ratio of the determined caloric intake to the calories measured in the duplicate plate sample varied from 0.90 to 2.2. The data demonstrate that derived nutrient intake may be a better measurement of actual intake than duplicate technique alone.

  14. Evaluation of postmortem serum calcium and magnesium levels in relation to the causes of death in forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Li; Ishikawa, Takaki; Quan, Li; Li, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Dong; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2005-12-01

    There appears to be very poor investigation of postmortem serum calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) for diagnostic evidence to determine the cause of death. The aim of the present study was a comprehensive analysis of the serum levels in relation to the causes of death in routine casework. Autopsy cases (total, n=360; 5-48 h postmortem), including blunt injury (n=76), sharp injury (n=29), asphyxiation (n=42), drownings (n=28: freshwater, n=11; saltwater, n=17), fire fatalities (n=79), methamphetamine (MA) poisoning (n=8), delayed death from traumas (n=37), and acute myocardial infarction/ischemia (AMI, n=61), were examined. In total cases, there was no significant postmortem time-dependent rise in serum Ca and Mg. Both Ca and Mg levels in the heart and peripheral blood were significantly higher in saltwater drowning compared with those of the other groups. In addition, a significant elevation in the Ca level was observed in freshwater drowning and fire fatalities, and in the Mg level in fatal MA intoxication and asphyxiation. Topographic analyses suggested a rise in serum Ca and Mg due to aspirated saltwater in drowning, that in serum Ca in freshwater drowning and fire fatalities of peripheral skeletal muscle origin and that in serum Mg in MA fatality and asphyxiation of myocardial and/or peripheral origin. These markers may be useful especially for diagnosis and differentiation of salt- and freshwater drownings and may be also helpful to determine the causes of death involving skeletal muscle damage, including burns and MA intoxication. PMID:16216707

  15. Effects of calcium and magnesium hardness on the fertilization and hatching success of channel X blue hybrid catfish eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aquifer used for hybrid catfish hatcheries is less than 10 mg/L of calcium hardness and 1- 25 mg/L of magnesium hardness. Embryonic development is deemed to be the most sensitive stage in the life cycle of a teleost. As egg development takes outside the fish’s body, water hardness is one abioti...

  16. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca2+ and Mg2+, two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca2+ nor Mg2+ lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones. PMID:26865182

  17. Seasonal patterns of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium in the leaves of the Massachusetts cranberry. [Vaccinium macrocarpon

    SciTech Connect

    DeMoranville, C.J.; Deubert, K.H.

    1986-01-01

    Leaf samples from cranberry plants in Wareham, MA, were collected during the 1980-82 growing seasons and analyzed for N, P, K, Ca and Mg. The seasonal patterns which emerged allowed the proposal of normal ranges for the elements and optimum times for sampling. The foliar nutrient levels obtained were compared to those for cranberries grown in other areas as well as to those for crops which are grown under similar conditions.

  18. Calcium and Magnesium Ions Are Membrane-Active against Stationary-Phase Staphylococcus aureus with High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuntao; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is notorious for its ability to acquire antibiotic-resistance, and antibiotic-resistant S. aureus has become a wide-spread cause of high mortality rate. Novel antimicrobials capable of eradicating S. aureus cells including antibiotic-resistant ones are thus highly desired. Membrane-active bactericides and species-specific antimicrobials are two promising sources of novel anti-infective agents for fighting against bacterial antibiotic-resistance. We herein show that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), two alkaline-earth-metal ions physiologically essential for diverse living organisms, both disrupt model S. aureus membranes and kill stationary-phase S. aureus cells, indicative of membrane-activity. In contrast to S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis exhibit unaffected survival after similar treatment with these two cations, indicative of species-specific activity against S. aureus. Moreover, neither Ca(2+) nor Mg(2+) lyses mouse red blood cells, indicative of hemo-compatibility. This works suggests that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) may have implications in targeted eradication of S. aureus pathogen including the antibiotic-resistant ones. PMID:26865182

  19. A novel mouse model for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP): role of impaired adenosine clearance

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hai-Ying; Li, Tianfu; Boison, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    Summary Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a significant cause of mortality in people with epilepsy. Two postulated causes for SUDEP, cardiac and respiratory depression, can both be explained by over-stimulation of adenosine receptors. We hypothesized that SUDEP is a consequence of a surge in adenosine as a result of prolonged seizures combined with deficient adenosine clearance; consequently, blockade of adenosine receptors should prevent SUDEP. Here we induced impaired adenosine clearance in adult mice by pharmacological inhibition of the adenosine removing enzymes, adenosine kinase and deaminase. Combination of impaired adenosine clearance with kainic acid-induced seizures triggered sudden death in all animals. Most importantly, the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine when given after seizure onset increased survival from 23.75 1.35 min to 54.86 6.59 min (p<0.01). Our data indicate that SUDEP is due to over-activation of adenosine receptors and that caffeine treatment after seizure onset might be beneficial. PMID:19674057

  20. Adenosine-mediated modulation of ventral horn interneurons and spinal motoneurons in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Witts, Emily C.; Nascimento, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation allows neural networks to adapt to varying environmental and biomechanical demands. Purinergic signaling is known to be an important modulatory system in many parts of the CNS, including motor control circuitry. We have recently shown that adenosine modulates the output of mammalian spinal locomotor control circuitry (Witts EC, Panetta KM, Miles GB. J Neurophysiol 107: 1925–1934, 2012). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying this adenosine-mediated modulation. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on ventral horn interneurons and motoneurons within in vitro mouse spinal cord slice preparations. We found that adenosine hyperpolarized interneurons and reduced the frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to interneurons. Both effects were blocked by the A1-type adenosine receptor antagonist DPCPX. Analysis of miniature postsynaptic currents recorded from interneurons revealed that adenosine reduced their frequency but not amplitude, suggesting that adenosine acts on presynaptic receptors to modulate synaptic transmission. In contrast to interneurons, recordings from motoneurons revealed an adenosine-mediated depolarization. The frequency and amplitude of synaptic inputs to motoneurons were again reduced by adenosine, but we saw no effect on miniature postsynaptic currents. Again these effects on motoneurons were blocked by DPCPX. Taken together, these results demonstrate differential effects of adenosine, acting via A1 receptors, in the mouse spinal cord. Adenosine has a general inhibitory action on ventral horn interneurons while potentially maintaining motoneuron excitability. This may allow for adaptation of the locomotor pattern generated by interneuronal networks while helping to ensure the maintenance of overall motor output. PMID:26311185

  1. Activity-Dependent Release of Adenosine: A Critical Re-Evaluation of Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Mark; Dale, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is perhaps the most important and universal modulator in the brain. The current consensus is that it is primarily produced in the extracellular space from the breakdown of previously released ATP. It is also accepted that it can be released directly, as adenosine, during pathological events primarily by equilibrative transport. Nevertheless, there is a growing realization that adenosine can be rapidly released from the nervous system in a manner that is dependent upon the activity of neurons. We consider three competing classes of mechanism that could explain neuronal activity dependent adenosine release (exocytosis of ATP followed by extracellular conversion to adenosine; exocytotic release of an unspecified transmitter followed by direct non-exocytotic adenosine release from an interposed cell; and direct exocytotic release of adenosine) and outline discriminatory experimental tests to decide between them. We review several examples of activity dependent adenosine release and explore their underlying mechanisms where these are known. We discuss the limits of current experimental techniques in definitively discriminating between the competing models of release, and identify key areas where technologies need to advance to enable definitive discriminatory tests. Nevertheless, within the current limits, we conclude that there is evidence for a mechanism that strongly resembles direct exocytosis of adenosine underlying at least some examples of neuronal activity dependent adenosine release. PMID:19587854

  2. Antiepileptic effects of silk-polymer based adenosine release in kindled rats

    PubMed Central

    Szybala, Cory; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Li, Tianfu; Wilz, Andrew; Kaplan, David L.; Boison, Detlev

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy for epilepsy is limited by high incidence of pharmacoresistance and failure to prevent development and progression of epilepsy. Using the rat hippocampal kindling model, we report on the therapeutic potential of novel silk-based polymers engineered to release the anticonvulsant adenosine. Polymers were designed to release 1000 ng adenosine per day during a time span of ten days. In the first experiment rats were kindled by hippocampal electrical stimulation until all animals reacted with stage 5 seizures. Adenosine-releasing or control polymers were then implanted into the infrahippocampal fissure ipsilateral to the site of stimulation. Subsequently, only recipients of adenosine-releasing implants were completely protected from generalized seizures over a period of ten days corresponding to the duration of sustained adenosine release. To monitor seizure-development in the presence of adenosine, adenosine-releasing or control polymers were implanted prior to kindling. After 30 stimulations delivered from days 48 after implantation control animals had developed convulsive stage 5 seizures, whereas recipients of adenosine-releasing implants were still protected from convulsive seizures. Kindling was resumed after nine days to allow expiration of adenosine-release. During additional 30 stimulations, recipients of adenosine-releasing implants gradually resumed kindling development at seizure stages corresponding to those when kindling was initially suspended, while control rats resumed kindling development at convulsive seizure stages. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors did not exacerbate seizures in protected animals. We conclude that silk-based adenosine-delivery exerts potent anti-ictogenic effects, but might also have at least partial anti-epileptogenic effects. Thus, silk-based adenosine augmentation holds promise for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19460372

  3. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Khalaf F; Thomas, Mark R; Judge, Heather M; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7%4.4 vs. control 22.6%2.4; p<0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10(-8)M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.66.6 vs. 28.06.6; p=0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  4. Ticagrelor potentiates adenosine-induced stimulation of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Khalaf F.; Thomas, Mark R.; Judge, Heather M.; Khan, Haroon; Prince, Lynne R.; Sabroe, Ian; Ridger, Victoria C.; Storey, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    In the PLATO study, ticagrelor was associated with fewer pulmonary infections and subsequent deaths than clopidogrel. Neutrophils are a first-line defence against bacterial lung infection; ticagrelor inhibits cellular uptake of adenosine, a known regulator of neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. We assessed whether the inhibition of adenosine uptake by ticagrelor influences neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Neutrophils and erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers. Concentration-dependent effects of adenosine on IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were investigated and the involved receptors identified using adenosine receptor antagonists. The modulatory effects of ticagrelor on adenosine-mediated changes in neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae were determined in the presence of erythrocytes to replicate physiological conditions of cellular adenosine uptake. Low-concentration adenosine (10?8M) significantly increased IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (% neutrophil chemotaxis: adenosine 28.7%4.4 vs. control 22.6%2.4; p<0.01) by acting on the high-affinity A1 receptor. Erythrocytes attenuated the effect of adenosine, although this was preserved by ticagrelor and dipyridamole (another inhibitor of adenosine uptake) but not by control or by cangrelor. Similarly, in the presence of erythrocytes, a low concentration of adenosine (10?8M) significantly increased neutrophil phagocytic index compared to control when ticagrelor was present (37.66.6 vs. 28.06.6; p=0.028) but had no effect in the absence of ticagrelor. We therefore conclude that the inhibition of cellular adenosine reuptake by ticagrelor potentiates the effects of a nanomolar concentration of adenosine on neutrophil chemotaxis and phagocytosis. This represents a potential mechanism by which ticagrelor could influence host defence against bacterial lung infection. PMID:25869515

  5. Pharmacology of the Adenosine A3 Receptor in the Vasculature and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Low, Leanne M.; Rose’Meyer, Roselyn B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Essential hypertension is considered to be a multifactorial disorder and its aetiology has yet to be clearly identified. As the adenosine receptors have a significant role in mediating vasodilation, alterations in their structures or signalling pathways may be involved in the development of hypertension. This study aimed to measure the expression of adenosine A3 receptors in a range of cardiovascular tissues and determine whether they could be altered with essential hypertension, and to functionally test responses to adenosine A3 receptor agonists in coronary blood vessels using the isolated perfused heart preparation. Methods mRNA samples from cardiovascular tissues and a range of blood vessels were collected from 10 week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats and age-gender matched Wistar rats (n = 8). The Langendorff heart perfusion preparation was used to characterise adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in the rat heart. Results Adenosine A3 receptor agonists induced coronary vasodilation. The expression of adenosine A3 receptors in cardiovascular tissues was altered in a tissue-specific pattern. Specifically, down-regulation of adenosine A3 receptor expression occurred in hypertensive hearts, which might be associated with attenuated vasodilator responses observed in coronary vessels to adenosine A3 receptor agonists. Conclusions This study demonstrated alterations in the expression of adenosine A3 receptors occurred in a tissue specific mode, and reduced adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats. Our findings with regard to changes in the adenosine A3 receptor in hypertensive hearts suggest that adenosine A3 receptor might play a role in the physiopathology of essential hypertension and potentially open the way to pharmacologic manipulation of vasomotor activity by the use of adenosine A3 receptor agonists. PMID:26907173

  6. Adenosine: an endogenous mediator in the pathogenesis of psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Festugato, Moira

    2015-01-01

    It is known that inflammatory and immune responses protect us from the invasion of micro-organisms and eliminate "wastes" from the injured sites, but they may also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Adenosine, as a purine nucleoside, which is produced in inflamed or injured sites, fulfills its role in limiting tissue damage. Although, it may have a pleiotropic effect, which signals it with a proinflammatory state in certain situations, it can be considered a potent anti-inflammatory mediator. The effects of adenosine, which acts through its receptors on T cell, on mast cell and macrophages, on endothelial cells, on neutrophils and dendritic cells, as they indicate TNF-alpha and cytokines, show that this mediator has a central role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The way it acts in psoriasis will be reviewed in this study. PMID:26734868

  7. Adenosine gates synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Kimberly A.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Schmitz, Dietmar

    2003-11-01

    The release properties of synapses in the central nervous system vary greatly, not only across anatomically distinct types of synapses but also among the same class of synapse. This variation manifests itself in large part by differences in the probability of transmitter release, which affects such activity-dependent presynaptic forms of plasticity as paired-pulse facilitation and frequency facilitation. This heterogeneity in presynaptic function reflects differences in the intrinsic properties of the synaptic terminal and the activation of presynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Here we show that the unique presynaptic properties of the hippocampal mossy fiber synapse are largely imparted onto the synapse by the continuous local action of extracellular adenosine at presynaptic A1 adenosine receptors, which maintains a low basal probability of transmitter release.

  8. Abiotic regioselective phosphorylation of adenosine with borate in formamide.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Hutter, Daniel; Benner, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Nearly 40 years ago, Schoffstall and his coworkers used formamide as a solvent to permit the phosphorylation of nucleosides by inorganic phosphate to give nucleoside phosphates, which (due to their thermodynamic instability with respect to hydrolysis) cannot be easily created in water by an analogous phosphorylation (the "water problem" in prebiotic chemistry). More recently, we showed that borate could stabilize certain carbohydrates against degradation (the "asphalt problem"). Here, we combine the two concepts to show that borate can work in formamide to guide the reactivity of nucleosides under conditions where they are phosphorylated. Specifically, reaction of adenosine in formamide with inorganic phosphate and pyrophosphate in the presence of borate gives adenosine-5'-phosphate as the only detectable phosphorylated product, with formylation (as opposed to hydrolysis) being the competing reaction. PMID:25826074

  9. StructureActivity Relationships of 9-Alkyladenine and Ribose-Modified Adenosine Derivatives at Rat A3 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Siddiqi, Suhaib M.; Olah, Mark E.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Bellamkonda, Kamala; Meshulam, Yakov; Stiles, Gary L.; Kim, Hea O.

    2012-01-01

    9-Alkyladenine derivatives and ribose-modified N6-benzyladenosine derivatives were synthesized in an effort to identify selective ligands for the rat A3 adenosine receptor and leads for the development of antagonists. The derivatives contained structural features previously determined to be important for A3 selectivity in adenosine derivatives, such as an N6-(3-iodobenzyl) moiety, and were further substituted at the 2-position with halo, amino, or thio groups. Affinity was determined in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A3 receptors stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5?-(N-methyluronamide)), and at rat brain A1 and A2a receptors using [3H]-N6-PIA ((R)-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine) and [3H]CGS 21680 (2-[[[4-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenyl]ethyl]amino]-5?-(N-ethylcarbamoyl)adenosine), respectively. A series of N6-(3-iodobenzyl) 2-amino derivatives indicated that a small 2-alkylamino group, e.g., methylamino, was favored at A3 receptors. N6-(3-Iodobenzyl)-9-methyl-2-(methylthio)adenine was 61-fold more potent than the corresponding 2-methoxy ether at A3 receptors and of comparable affinity at A1 and A2a receptors, resulting in a 36-fold selectivity for A3 receptors. A pair of chiral N6-(3-iodobenzyl) 9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl) derivatives showed stereoselectivity, with the R-enantiomer favored at A3 receptors by 5.7-fold. 2-Chloro-9-(?-d-erythrofuranosyl)-N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenine had a Ki value at A3 receptors of 0.28 M. 2-Chloro-9-[2-amino-2,3-dideoxy-?-d-5-(methylcarbamoyl)-arabinofuranosyl]-N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenine was moderately selective for A1 and A3 vs A2a receptors. A 3?-deoxy analogue of a highly A3-selective adenosine derivative retained selectivity in binding and was a full agonist in the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase mediated via cloned rat A3 receptors expressed in CHO cells. The 3?-OH and 4?-CH2OH groups of adenosine are not required for activation at A3 receptors. A number of 2?,3?-dideoxyadenosines and 9-acyclic-substituted adenines appear to inhibit adenylyl cyclase at the allosteric P site. PMID:7752196

  10. Role of central and peripheral adenosine receptors in the cardiovascular responses to intraperitoneal injections of adenosine A1 and A2A subtype receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W; Karcz-Kubicha, Marzena; Thorndike, Eric B; Mller, Christa E; Tella, Srihari R; Ferr, Sergi; Goldberg, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5?-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680) were investigated in rats implanted with telemetry transmitters for the measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA led to dose-dependent decreases in both blood pressure and heart rate. These effects of 0.3?mg?kg?1 CPA were antagonized by i.p. injections of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethyl-xanthine (CPT), but not by i.p. injections of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthine phosphate disodium salt (MSX-3). Injections (i.p.) of the peripherally acting nonselective adenosine antagonist 8-sulfophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) and the purported nonselective adenosine antagonist caffeine also antagonized the cardiovascular effects of CPA. The adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 given i.p. produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. These effects of 0.5?mg?kg?1 CGS 21680 were antagonized by i.p. injections of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, but not by i.p. injections of the antagonists CPT, 8-SPT or caffeine. Central administration (intracerebral ventricular) of CGS 21680 produced an increase in heart rate, but no change in blood pressure. MSX-3 given i.p. antagonized the effects of the central injection of CGS 21680. These results suggest that adenosine A1 receptor agonists produce decreases in blood pressure and heart rate that are mediated by A1 receptors in the periphery, with little or no contribution of central adenosine A1 receptors to those effects. The heart rate increasing effect of adenosine A2A agonists appears to be mediated by adenosine A2A receptors in the central nervous system. The blood pressure decreasing effect of adenosine A2A agonists is most probably mediated in the periphery. PMID:15678095

  11. Adenosine and ATP: traffic regulators in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kriz, Wilhelm

    2004-01-01

    Glomerular filtration in the kidney is a continuous process that acts in concert with tubular reabsorption to prevent derangements of body fluid composition. Filtration is regulated by systemic factors, but it is also controlled by an intrinsic mechanism based on the anatomical connection between the distal nephron and the glomerular arterioles. Facing the threat of urinary salt loss, this mechanism causes vasoconstriction and reduces filtration by generating adenosine through the hydrolysis of nucleotide precursors such as 5?-AMP and possibly ATP . PMID:15343376

  12. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N.; Kemp, N.; Adeyemo, O.; Buchanan, P.; Stone, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  13. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Madery, Brandon D.; Pike, Tasha L.; Eisenach, John H.; Dietz, Niki M.; Joyner, Michael J.; Wilkins, Brad W.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (?-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in mlmin?1100 mmHg?1) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (?FVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 29 and 314 34 mlmin?1100 mmHg?1 (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect ?FVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 29 mlmin?1100 mmHg?1, P = 0.4) or 20% (287 48 mlmin?1100 mmHg?1, P = 0.3). In protocol 2, ?FVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 30 and 453 41 mlmin?1100 mmHg?1 (10% and 20% respectively). ?FVC was similar at 10% (352 39 mlmin?1100 mmHg?1, P = 0.8) and 20% (528 45 mlmin?1100 mmHg?1, P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, ?FVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans. PMID:19661449

  14. Adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Bruner, Robert C; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders and other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Numerous studies have indicated a role for A1 receptors (A1R) in acute ethanol-induced motor incoordination, while A2A receptors (A2AR) mainly regulate the rewarding effect of ethanol in mice. Recent findings have demonstrated that dampened A2AR-mediated signaling in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) promotes ethanol-seeking behaviors. Moreover, decreased A2AR function is associated with decreased CREB activity in the DMS, which enhances goal-oriented behaviors and contributes to excessive ethanol drinking in mice. Interestingly, caffeine, the most commonly used psychoactive substance, is known to inhibit both the A1R and A2AR. This dampened adenosine receptor function may mask some of the acute intoxicating effects of ethanol. Furthermore, based on the fact that A2AR activity plays a role in goal-directed behavior, caffeine may also promote ethanol-seeking behavior. The A2AR is enriched in the striatum and exclusively expressed in striatopallidal neurons, which may be responsible for the regulation of inhibitory behavioral control over drug rewarding processes through the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuit. Furthermore, the antagonistic interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptors in the striatum also play an integral role in alcoholism and addiction-related disorders. This review focuses on regulation of adenosine signaling in striatal circuits and the possible implication of caffeine in goal-directed behaviors and addiction. PMID:23912595

  15. Identification of widespread adenosine nucleotide binding in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Ortega, Corrie; Payne, Samuel H.; Haft, Daniel H.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Lewis, Michael P.; Ollodart, Anja R.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shukla, Anil K.; Fortuin, Suereta; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Grundner, Christoph; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-01-24

    The annotation of protein function is almost completely performed by in silico approaches. However, computational prediction of protein function is frequently incomplete and error prone. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), ~25% of all genes have no predicted function and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. This lack of functional information severely limits our understanding of Mtb pathogenicity. Current tools for experimental functional annotation are limited and often do not scale to entire protein families. Here, we report a generally applicable chemical biology platform to functionally annotate bacterial proteins by combining activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) and quantitative LC-MS-based proteomics. As an example of this approach for high-throughput protein functional validation and discovery, we experimentally annotate the families of ATP-binding proteins in Mtb. Our data experimentally validate prior in silico predictions of >250 ATPases and adenosine nucleotide-binding proteins, and reveal 73 hypothetical proteins as novel ATP-binding proteins. We identify adenosine cofactor interactions with many hypothetical proteins containing a diversity of unrelated sequences, providing a new and expanded view of adenosine nucleotide binding in Mtb. Furthermore, many of these hypothetical proteins are both unique to Mycobacteria and essential for infection, suggesting specialized functions in mycobacterial physiology and pathogenicity. Thus, we provide a generally applicable approach for high throughput protein function discovery and validation, and highlight several ways in which application of activity-based proteomics data can improve the quality of functional annotations to facilitate novel biological insights.

  16. Optimization of Adenosine 5?-Carboxamide Derivatives as Adenosine Receptor Agonists Using Structure-Based Ligand Design and Fragment Screening

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Dilip K.; Phan, Khai; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Gakh, Andrei A.; Xu, Fei; Deflorian, Francesca; Abagyan, Ruben; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Katritch, Vsevolod

    2012-01-01

    Structures of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have a proven utility in the discovery of new antagonists and inverse agonists modulating signaling of this important family of clinical targets. Applicability of active-state GPCR structures to virtual screening and rational optimization of agonists, however, remains to be assessed. In this study of adenosine 5? derivatives, we evaluated the performance of an agonist-bound A2A adenosine receptor (AR) structure in retrieval of known agonists and then employed the structure to screen for new fragments optimally fitting the corresponding subpocket. Biochemical and functional assays demonstrate high affinity of new derivatives that include polar heterocycles. The binding models also explain modest selectivity gain for some substituents toward the closely related A1AR subtype and the modified agonist efficacy of some of these ligands. The study suggests further applicability of in silico fragment screening to rational lead optimization in GPCRs. PMID:22486652

  17. Adenosine levels in serum and adenosine deaminase activity in blood cells of dogs infected by Rangelia vitalii.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Frana, Raqueli T; Costa, Marcio M; Paim, Francine C; Pimentel, Victor C; Schmatz, Roberta; Jaques, Jeandre A; Schetinger, Maria R C; Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Tonin, Alexandre A; Monteiro, Silvia G; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2013-12-01

    Ecto-adenosinedeaminase (E-ADA) plays an important role in the production and differentiation of blood cells as well as in the control of extracellular adenosine levels. Infectious diseases can influence the synthesis of new cells or cause cell destruction, as occurs in canine rangeliosis, which results in anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, and/or leukopenia. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate E-ADA activity in sera, erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and adenosine levels in sera samples of dogs infected by Rangelia vitalii. Twelve animals were divided into 2 groups: noninfected (n = 5) and infected by R. vitalii (n = 7). Animals were infected with 2 ml of blood containing the parasite, and parasitemia was estimated daily for 20 days by microscopic examination of peripheral blood smears. Blood collection was performed on days 0, 10, and 20 post-infection (PI) in order to evaluate the evolution of the disease. The blood collected was used to assess the activity of E-ADA. We observed an increase of E-ADA activity in sera (day 20 PI) and erythrocytes (days 10 and 20 PI) in the infected group (P < 0.05). E-ADA activity in lymphocytes was decreased on day 10, when the parasitemia was high, and increased after 20 days, when the number of circulating parasites was low. HPLC measured adenosine levels in the serum and found a reduction on days 10 and 20 PI. In conclusion, our results showed that E-ADA activity was altered in sera, lymphocytes, and erythrocytes of dogs experimentally infected by R. vitalii as well as the serum concentration of adenosine. These alterations may contribute to the pathogenesis of anemia and immune response in infected dogs. PMID:23777319

  18. The rate of the AMP/adenosine substrate cycle in concanavalin-A-stimulated rat lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Szondy, Z; Newsholme, E A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of adenosine on the metabolism of prelabelled adenine nucleotides was investigated in concanavalin-A-stimulated rat lymphocytes. Adenosine in the presence of the adenosine deaminase inhibitor, deoxycoformycin, caused a 2-fold increase in the ATP concentration. This effect was, in part, countereacted by an increased rate of adenine nucleotide catabolism, which could be explained by a stimulation of AMP deaminase (EC 3.5.4.6). At the same time a continuous rate of labelled adenosine production was found, which was not affected by the increased ATP concentration and which could only be detected by the trapping effect of a high concentration of added unlabelled adenosine. It is concluded that the rate of the substrate cycle between AMP and adenosine is low (1.9 +/- 0.2 nmol/h per 10(7) cells) in comparison to the rate of AMP deamination. PMID:2552990

  19. Anthranilic acid release in adenosine-inhibited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its inhibition by thiamin.

    PubMed

    Iwashima, A; Kawasaki, Y; Kimura, Y; Hasegawa, T

    1992-10-01

    Adenosine, at 1 mM concentrations or above, was found to have a fungistatic effect on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A substance with amethyst fluorescence was detected in the medium of adenosine-inhibited cultures of S. cerevisiae. This compound was isolated and physicochemically identified as anthranilic acid. Both the inhibition of growth and release of anthranilic acid induced by adenosine were abrogated by thiamin or by the pyrimidine portion of thiamin, 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hdroxymethyl-pyrimidine (hydroxymethyl-pyrimidine); the latter was found to restore intracellular thiamin content that had been reduced by adenosine. It was demonstrated that effects of thiamin and hydroxymethylpyrimidine on S. cerevisiae cultured with adenosine resulted from their inhibition of adenosine uptake by growing yeast cells. PMID:1426996

  20. [Effects of dopamine and adenosine on regulation of water-electrolyte exchange in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine and adenosine both regulate transport of sodium chloride in the renal tubules in mammals. We have studied the effect of dopamine and adenosine on spontaneous activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteous. Both substances stimulated contractile vacuole. The effect of dopamine was suppressed by D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, but not by D1 antagonist, SCH 39166. Adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2.5-dideoxyadenosine, suppressed the effect of dopamine, but not of adenosine. Inhibitor of protein kinase C, staurosporine, in contrast, blocked the effect of adenosine, but not dopamine. Notably, dopamine opposed effect of adenosine and vice versa. These results suggest that similar effects of dopamine and adenosine could be mediated by different intracellulare mechanisms. PMID:25509166

  1. Dissecting striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions. New clues from rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferr, Sergi; Sebastio, Ana Maria

    2016-03-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Chiodi etal. () showing that the effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation in the striatum are significantly reduced in rats with neuronal over-expression of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). Two hypotheses are derived from that study. Hypothesis A: two subpopulations of pre-synaptic CB1R in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals exist, one forming and another not forming heteromers with A2AR. Hypothesis B: CB1R are predominantly forming heteromers with A2AR. In the case of hypothesis A, the A2AR might be required for CB1R-A2AR heteromeric signaling, whereas non-heteromeric CB1R activity is inhibited by A2ARs. In the case of hypothesis B, up-regulation of A2ARs may perturb heteromeric stoichiometry, thus reducing CB1R functioning. In any case, pre-synaptic striatal A2AR-CB1R heteromers emerge as important targets of the effects of cannabinoids demonstrated at the neuronal and behavioral level. Read the highlighted article 'Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors' on page 907. PMID:26806455

  2. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  3. Adenosine-mediated inhibition of casein production by mouse mammary glands in culture.

    PubMed

    Hom, Y K; Bandyopadhyay, G K; Levay-Young, B K; Nandi, S

    1996-08-01

    The present study was carried out to examine whether activation of adenosine receptors by adenosine analogues will affect casein production by mouse mammary epithelial cells. The morphogenesis and functions of epithelial tissue in the mammary gland are influenced by their surrounding adipocytes. Adipocytes are known to release adenosine into the extracellular fluid which can modulate cyclic-AMP levels in surrounding cells through binding to their adenosine receptors. To examine a possible paracrine effect of adenosine, the modulation of casein production in mammary explant culture and mammary epithelial cell (MEC) culture by adenosine receptor agonists has been investigated. We have observed that activation of the A1-adenosine receptor subtype in mammary tissue by an adenosine analogue (-)N6-(R-phenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine (PIA) raised cAMP levels. PIA and another adenosine receptor agonist, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), inhibited casein accumulation both in explants and in MEC cultures in the presence of lactogenic hormones, which suggests that PIA or adenosine can act directly on the epithelial cells. This inhibition does not appear to be caused by elevation of cAMP levels or phosphodiesterase activity. The inhibition of intracellular casein accumulation by PIA and IBMX in explant cultures can be reversed via treatment of pertussis toxin which is known to ADP-ribosylate GTP-binding G alpha i-proteins, indicating that a Gi-protein-dependent pathway may be involved in this inhibition. The results also suggest that local accumulation of adenosine in the extracellular fluids of mammary glands is likely to inhibit the lactogenic response of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:8707867

  4. Contraction-induced secretion of VEGF from skeletal muscle cells is mediated by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Hier, Birgitte; Olsen, Karina; Nyberg, Michael; Bangsbo, Jens; Hellsten, Ylva

    2010-09-01

    The role of adenosine and contraction for secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in skeletal muscle was investigated in human subjects and rat primary skeletal muscle cells. Microdialysis probes were inserted in the thigh muscle of seven male subjects, and dialysate was collected at rest, during infusion of adenosine, and during knee extensor exercise. The dialysate was analyzed for content of VEGF protein and adenosine. The mechanism of VEGF secretion from muscle cells in culture was examined in resting and electrostimulated cells and in response to the adenosine analog NECA and the adenosine A(2A) receptor specific analog CGS-21680. Adenosine receptors A(1), A(2A), and A(2B) were blocked with DPCPX, ZM-241385, and enprofylline, respectively. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were inhibited by H-89 and PD-98509, respectively. The human experiment showed that adenosine infusion enhanced (P < 0.05) the interstitial concentration of VEGF protein approximately fourfold above baseline. Exercise increased (P < 0.05) the interstitial VEGF concentration approximately sixfold above rest in parallel with an approximately threefold increase in adenosine concentration. In accordance, in cultured muscle cells, NECA and contraction caused secretion of VEGF (P < 0.05). The contraction-induced secretion of VEGF was abolished by the A(2B) antagonist enprofylline and by inhibition of PKA or MAPK. The results demonstrate that adenosine causes secretion of VEGF from human skeletal muscle cells and that the contraction-induced secretion of VEGF protein is partially mediated via adenosine acting on A(2B) adenosine receptors. Moreover, the contraction-induced secretion of VEGF protein from muscle is dependent on both PKA and MAPK activation, but only the MAPK pathway appears to be adenosine dependent, revealing involvement of additional pathways in VEGF secretion. PMID:20543089

  5. Coronary spasm after an adenosine stress test: an adverse effect of a vasodilator.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Thierry; Perdrisot, Remy

    2008-06-01

    The occurrence of a coronary spasm after an adenosine stress test is an exceptional event. We report a vasospasm in a patient with normal coronary angiography. The spasm occurred shortly after termination of adenosine infusion on abrupt withdrawal of vasodilation. Ischaemia induced ventricular arrhythmia (bursts of polymorphous tachycardia) that responded well to antispastic therapy. The main identified predisposing factor for coronary spasm was vasospastic angina and adenosine acted as a revealing factor of this unsuspected diagnosis. PMID:18664034

  6. The hydrogen bonding and hydration of 2'-OH in adenosine and adenosine 3'-ethyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Parag; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti

    2002-03-22

    The 2'-OH group has major structural implications in the recognition, processing, and catalytic properties of RNA. We report here intra- and intermolecular H-bonding of 2'-OH in adenosine 3'-ethyl phosphate (1), 3'-deoxyadenosine (2), and adenosine (3) by both temperature- and concentration-dependent NMR studies, as well as by detailed endo ((3)J(H,H)) and exocyclic ((3)J(H,OH)) coupling constant analyses. We have also examined the nature of hydration and exchange processes of 2'-OH with water by a combination of NOESY and ROESY experiments in DMSO-d(6) containing 2 mol % HOD. The NMR-constrained molecular modeling (by molecular mechanics as well as by ab initio methods both in the gas and solution phase) has been used to characterize the energy minima among the four alternative dihedrals possible from the solution of the Karplus equation for (3)J(H2',OH) and (3)J(H3',OH) to delineate the preferred orientation of 2'-O-H proton in 1 and 2 as well as for 2'/3'-O-H protons in 3. The NMR line shape analysis of 2'-OH gave the DeltaG(H-bond)(298K) of 7.5 kJ mol(-1) for 1 and 8.4 kJ mol(-1) for 3; similar analyses of the methylene protons of 3'-ethyl phosphate moiety in 1 also gave comparable DeltaG(H-bond)(298K) of 7.3 kJ mol(-1). The donor nature of the 2'-OH in the intramolecular H-bonding in 3 is evident from its relatively reduced flexibility [-TDeltaS++](2'-OH) = -17.9(+/-0.5) kJ mol(-1)] because of the loss of conformational freedom owing to the intramolecular 2'O-H...O3' H-bonding, compared to the acceptor 3'-OH in 3 [-TDeltaS++](3'-OH) = -19.8 (+/- 0.6) kJ mol(-1)] at 298 K. The presence of intramolecular 2'-OH...O3' H-bonding in 3 is also corroborated by the existence of weak long-range (4)J(H2',OH3') in 3 (i.e., W conformation of H2'-C2'-C3'-O3'-H) as well as by (3)J(H,OH) dependent orientation of the 2'- and 3'-OH groups. The ROESY spectra for 1 and 3 at 308 K, in DMSO-d(6), show a clear positive ROE contact of both 2'- and 3'-OH with water. The presence of a hydrophilic 3'-phosphate group in 1 causes a much higher water activity in the vicinity of its 2'-OH, which in turn causes the 2'-OH to exchange faster, culminating in a shorter exchange lifetime (tau) for 2'-OH proton with HOD in 1 (tau2'-OH: 489 ms) compared to that in 3 (tau2'-OH: 6897 ms). The activation energy (E(a)) of the exchange with the bound-water for 2'- and 3'-OH in 3 (48.3 and 45.0 kJ mol(-1), respectively) is higher compared to that of 2'-OH in 1 (31.9 kJ mol(-1)), thereby showing that the kinetic availability of hydrated 2'-OH in 1 for any inter- and intramolecular interactions, in general, is owing to the vicinal 3'-phosphate residue. It also suggests that 2'-OH in native RNA can mediate other inter- or intramolecular interactions only in competition with the bound-water, depending upon the specific chemical nature and spatial orientation of other functions with potential for hydrogen bonding in the neighborhood. This availability of the bound water around 2'-OH in RNA would, however, be dictated by whether the vicinal phosphate is exposed to the bulk water or not. This implies that relatively poor hydration around a specific 2'-OH across a polyribonucleotide chain, owing to some hydrophobic microenvironmental pocket around that hydroxyl, may make it more accessible to interact with other donor or acceptor functions for H-bonding interactions, which might then cause the RNA to fold in a specific manner generating a new motif leading to specific recognition and function. Alternatively, a differential hydration of a specific 2'-OH may modulate its nucleophilicity to undergo stereospecific transesterification reaction as encountered in ubiquitous splicing of pre-mRNA to processed RNA or RNA catalysis, in general. PMID:11895403

  7. A rapid enzymatic assay for high-throughput screening of adenosine-producing strains

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huina; Zu, Xin; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major local regulator of tissue function and industrially useful as precursor for the production of medicinal nucleoside substances. High-throughput screening of adenosine overproducers is important for industrial microorganism breeding. An enzymatic assay of adenosine was developed by combined adenosine deaminase (ADA) with indophenol method. The ADA catalyzes the cleavage of adenosine to inosine and NH3, the latter can be accurately determined by indophenol method. The assay system was optimized to deliver a good performance and could tolerate the addition of inorganic salts and many nutrition components to the assay mixtures. Adenosine could be accurately determined by this assay using 96-well microplates. Spike and recovery tests showed that this assay can accurately and reproducibly determine increases in adenosine in fermentation broth without any pretreatment to remove proteins and potentially interfering low-molecular-weight molecules. This assay was also applied to high-throughput screening for high adenosine-producing strains. The high selectivity and accuracy of the ADA assay provides rapid and high-throughput analysis of adenosine in large numbers of samples. PMID:25580842

  8. Adenosine and inosine release during hypoxia in the isolated spinal cord of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Otsuguro, K; Ohta, T; Ito, S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adenosine and inosine accumulate extracellularly during hypoxia/ischaemia in the brain and may act as neuroprotectants. In spinal cord, there is pharmacological evidence for increases in extracellular adenosine during hypoxia, but no direct measurements of purine release. Furthermore, the efflux pathways and origin of extracellular purines are not defined. To characterize hypoxia-evoked purine accumulation, we examined the effect of acute hypoxia on the extracellular levels of adenosine and inosine in isolated spinal cords from rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Extracellular adenosine and inosine concentrations were assayed in an in vitro preparation of the isolated spinal cord of the neonatal rat by HPLC. KEY RESULTS The extracellular level of inosine was about 10-fold higher than that of adenosine. Acute hypoxia (10 min) caused a temperature-dependent increase in these two purines, which were inhibited by an increase in external Ca2+, but not by several inhibitors of efflux pathways or metabolic enzymes of adenine nucleotides. Inhibitors of adenosine deaminase or the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) abolished the hypoxia-evoked increase in inosine but not adenosine. The inhibition of glial metabolism abolished the increase of both purines evoked by hypoxia but not by oxygen-glucose deprivation, hypercapnia or an adenosine kinase inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data suggest that hypoxia releases adenosine itself from intracellular sources. Inosine formed intracellularly may be released through ENTs. During hypoxia, astrocytes appear to play a key role in purine release from neonatal rat spinal cord. PMID:20735412

  9. Molecular Vibration-Activity Relationship in the Agonism of Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Hyun Keun

    2013-01-01

    The molecular vibration-activity relationship in the receptor-ligand interaction of adenosine receptors was investigated by structure similarity, molecular vibration, and hierarchical clustering in a dataset of 46 ligands of adenosine receptors. The resulting dendrogram was compared with those of another kind of fingerprint or descriptor. The dendrogram result produced by corralled intensity of molecular vibrational frequency outperformed four other analyses in the current study of adenosine receptor agonism and antagonism. The tree that was produced by clustering analysis of molecular vibration patterns showed its potential for the functional classification of adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:24465242

  10. Impaired inhibitory function of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Arribas, Silvia Magdalena; Fresco, Paula; Gonzlez, Maria Carmen; Gonalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension, vascular reactivity alterations have been attributed to numerous factors, including higher sympathetic innervation/adenosine. This study examined the modulation of adenosine receptors on vascular sympathetic nerves and their putative contribution to higher noradrenaline spillover in hypertension. We assessed adenosine receptors distribution in the adventitia through confocal microscopy, histomorphometry, and their regulatory function on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow, using selective agonists/antagonists. We found that: i) A1-adenosine receptor agonist (CPA: 100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow to a lower extent in SHR (25% 3%, n = 14) compared to WKY (38% 3%, n = 14) mesenteric arteries; ii) A2A-adenosine receptor agonist (CGS 21680: 100 nM) induced a slight increase of tritium overflow that was similar in SHR (22% 8%, n = 8) and WKY (24% 5%, n = 8) mesenteric arteries; iii) A2B- and A3-adenosine receptors did not alter tritium overflow in either strain; iv) all adenosine receptors were present on mesenteric artery sympathetic nerves and/or some adventitial cells of both strains; and v) A1-adenosine receptor staining fractional area was lower in SHR than in WKY mesenteric arteries. We conclude that there is an impaired inhibitory function of vascular presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR, likely related to a reduced presence of these receptors on sympathetic innervation, which might lead to higher levels of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and contribute to hypertension in this strain. PMID:23782593

  11. Adenosine-induced coronary vasospasm following drug-eluting stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi; Kasama, Shu

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of coronary vasospasm during adenosine stress in a patient with a prior drug-eluting stent implantation. The patient had a stent implantation in the left anterior descending coronary artery 3?years ago. Recently, he developed a chest pain and underwent adenosine stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission CT (SPECT). During the adenosine stress, he felt severe chest pain and ST elevation on electrocardiogram. An invasive coronary angiography showed no in-stent restenosis. This phenomenon deemed to be adenosine-induced coronary vasospasm after stent implantation. PMID:24518394

  12. Mechanical stimulation evokes rapid increases in extracellular adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ashley E.; Nguyen, Michael D.; Privman, Eve; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical perturbations can release ATP, which is broken down to adenosine. In this work, we used carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure mechanically-stimulated adenosine in the brain by lowering the electrode 50 ?m. Mechanical stimulation evoked adenosine in vivo (average: 3.3 0.6 ?M) and in brain slices (average: 0.8 0.1 ?M) in the prefrontal cortex. The release was transient, lasting 18 2 s. Lowering a 15 ?m diameter glass pipette near the carbon-fiber microelectrode produced similar results as lowering the actual microelectrode. However, applying a small puff of artificial cerebral spinal fluid was not sufficient to evoke adenosine. Multiple stimulations within a 50 ?m region of a slice did not significantly change over time or damage cells. Chelating calcium with EDTA or blocking sodium channels with tetrodotoxin (TTX) significantly decreased mechanically evoked adenosine, signifying that the release is activity-dependent. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), did not affect mechanically-stimulated adenosine; however, the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1,2 and 3 (NTDPase) inhibitor POM-1 significantly reduced adenosine so a portion of adenosine is dependent on extracellular ATP metabolism. Thus, mechanical perturbations from inserting a probe in the brain cause rapid, transient adenosine signaling which might be neuroprotective. PMID:24606335

  13. Effects of adenosine and adenosine A2A receptor agonist on motor nerve conduction velocity and nerve blood flow in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sokindra; Arun, K H S; Kaul, Chaman L; Sharma, Shyam S

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of chronic administration of adenosine and CGS 21680 hydrochloride (adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist) on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), nerve blood flow (NBF) and histology of sciatic nerve in animal model of diabetic neuropathy. Adenosinergic agents were administered for 2 weeks after 6 weeks of streptozotocin-induced (50 mg/kg i.p.) diabetes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Significant reduction in sciatic MNCV and NBF were observed after 8 weeks in diabetic animals in comparison with control (non diabetic) rats. Adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved sciatic MNCV and NBF in diabetic rats. The protective effect of adenosine on MNCV and NBF was completely reversed by theophylline (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, suggesting that the adenosine effect was mediated via adenosinergic receptors. CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved NBF; however, MNCV was not significantly improved in diabetic rats. At a dose of 1 mg/kg, neither MNCV nor NBF was improved by CGS 21680 in diabetic rats. ZM 241385 (adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of CGS 21680 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Histological changes observed in sciatic nerve were partially improved by the adenosinergic agents in diabetic rats. Results of the present study, suggest the potential of adenosinergic agents in the therapy of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15829161

  14. Activity-Dependent Adenosine Release May Be Linked to Activation of Na+-K+ ATPase: An In Vitro Rat Study

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Robert Edward; Dale, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In the brain, extracellular adenosine increases as a result of neuronal activity. The mechanisms by which this occurs are only incompletely understood. Here we investigate the hypothesis that the Na+ influxes associated with neuronal signalling activate the Na+-K+ ATPase which, by consuming ATP, generates intracellular adenosine that is then released via transporters. By measuring adenosine release directly with microelectrode biosensors, we have demonstrated that AMPA-receptor evoked adenosine release in basal forebrain and cortex depends on extracellular Na+. We have simultaneously imaged intracellular Na+ and measured adenosine release. The accumulation of intracellular Na+ during AMPA receptor activation preceded adenosine release by some 90 s. By removing extracellular Ca2+, and thus preventing indiscriminate neuronal activation, we used ouabain to test the role of the Na+-K+ ATPase in the release of adenosine. Under conditions which caused a Na+ influx, brief applications of ouabain increased the accumulation of intracellular Na+ but conversely rapidly reduced extracellular adenosine levels. In addition, ouabain greatly reduced the amount of adenosine released during application of AMPA. Our data therefore suggest that activity of the Na+-K+ ATPase is directly linked to the efflux of adenosine and could provide a universal mechanism that couples adenosine release to neuronal activity. The Na+-K+ ATPase-dependent adenosine efflux is likely to provide adenosine-mediated activity-dependent negative feedback that will be important in many diverse functional contexts including the regulation of sleep. PMID:24489921

  15. Adenosine signaling contributes to ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongsheng; Borea, Pier Andrea; Wilder, Tuere; Yee, Herman; Chiriboga, Luis; Blackburn, Michael R.; Azzena, Gianfranco; Resta, Giuseppe; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2009-01-01

    Fatty liver is commonly associated with alcohol ingestion and abuse. While the molecular pathogenesis of these fatty changes is well understood, the biochemical and pharmacological mechanisms by which ethanol stimulates these molecular changes remain unknown. During ethanol metabolism, adenosine is generated by the enzyme ecto-5?-nucleotidase, and adenosine production and adenosine receptor activation are known to play critical roles in the development of hepatic fibrosis. We therefore investigated whether adenosine and its receptors play a role in the development of alcohol-induced fatty liver. WT mice fed ethanol on the Lieber-DeCarli diet developed hepatic steatosis, including increased hepatic triglyceride content, while mice lacking ecto-5?-nucleotidase or adenosine A1 or A2B receptors were protected from developing fatty liver. Similar protection was also seen in WT mice treated with either an adenosine A1 or A2B receptor antagonist. Steatotic livers demonstrated increased expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A1 receptors, and decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, which was prevented by blockade of adenosine A2B receptors. In vitro studies supported roles for adenosine A1 receptors in promoting fatty acid synthesis and for A2B receptors in decreasing fatty acid metabolism. These results indicate that adenosine generated by ethanol metabolism plays an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis via both A1 and A2B receptors and suggest that targeting adenosine receptors may be effective in the prevention of alcohol-induced fatty liver. PMID:19221436

  16. Adenosine Release Evoked by Short Electrical Stimulations in Striatal Brain Slices Is Primarily Activity Dependent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine is an important neuromodulator in the brain. Traditionally, adenosine is thought to arise in the extracellular space by either an extracellular mechanism, where it is formed outside the cell by the breakdown of released ATP, or an intracellular mechanism, where adenosine made inside the cell is transported out. Recently, a third mechanism of activity dependent adenosine release has also been proposed. Here, we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to compare the time course and mechanism of adenosine formation evoked by either low- or high-frequency stimulations in striatal rat brain slices. Low-frequency stimulations (5 pulses at 10 Hz) resulted in an average adenosine efflux of 0.22 ± 0.02 μM, while high-frequency stimulations (5 pulses, 60 Hz) evoked 0.36 ± 0.04 μM. Blocking intracellular formation by inhibiting adenosine transporters with S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI) or propentofylline did not decrease release for either frequency, indicating that the release was not due to the intracellular mechanism. Blocking extracellular formation with ARL-67156 reduced low-frequency release about 60%, but did not affect high-frequency release. Both low- and high-frequency stimulated release were almost completely blocked by the removal of calcium, indicating activity dependence. Reducing dopamine efflux did not affect adenosine release but inhibiting ionotropic glutamate receptors did, indicating that adenosine release is dependent on downstream effects of glutamate. Therefore, adenosine release after short, high-frequency physiological stimulations is independent of transporter activity or ATP metabolism and may be due to the direct release of adenosine after glutamate receptor activation. PMID:21218131

  17. Adenosine formation in contracting primary rat skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Y; Frandsen, U

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study examined the capacity for adenosine formation, uptake and metabolism in contracting primary rat muscle cells and in microvascular endothelial cells in culture. 2. Strong and moderate electrical simulation of skeletal muscle cells led to a significantly greater increase in the extracellular adenosine concentration (421 +/- 91 and 235 +/- 30 nmol (g protein)-1, respectively; P < 0.05) compared with non-stimulated muscle cells (161 +/- 20 nmol (g protein)-1). The ATP concentration was lower (18%; P < 0.05) in the intensely contracted, but not in the moderately contracted muscle cells. 3. Addition of microvascular endothelial cells to the cultured skeletal muscle cells enhanced the contraction-induced accumulation of extracellular adenosine (P < 0.05), whereas endothelial cells in culture alone did not cause extracellular accumulation of adenosine. 4. Skeletal muscle cells were found to have ecto-forms of several enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism, including ATPases capable of converting extracellular ATP to ADP and AMP. 5. Adenosine added to the cell medium was taken up by muscle cells and incorporated into the adenine nucleotide pool so that after 30 min of incubation, over 95% of the adenosine label was present in ATP, ADP and AMP. A similar extent of incorporation of adenosine into the nucleotide pool was evident in the endothelial cells. 6. The present data suggest that contracting muscle cells induce an elevation in the extracellular adenosine concentration. Addition of endothelial cells to muscle cells enhances the contraction-induced formation of adenosine. Adenosine taken up by muscle and endothelial cells from the extracellular space is not likely to be used for storage in intracellular pools, but may serve to regulate muscle extracellular adenosine levels. PMID:9401975

  18. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  19. Bone marrow transplantation and alternatives for adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H Bobby

    2010-05-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) comprises approximately 10% to 15% of all cases of SCID. The clinical effects of ADA deficiency are manifest most dramatically in the immune system, where it leads to severe lymphopenia. Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the mainstay of treatment for ADA-deficient SCID, 2 other treatment options are available, namely enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA and autologous hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. In this article the author reviews the available data on treatment by these different options, and offers an overview on when each of the different treatment options should be used. PMID:20493398

  20. Adenosine triphosphatases of thermophilic archaeal double-stranded DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) of double-stranded (ds) DNA archaeal viruses are structurally related to the AAA+ hexameric helicases and translocases. These ATPases have been implicated in viral life cycle functions such as DNA entry into the host, and viral genome packaging into preformed procapsids. We summarize bioinformatical analyses of a wide range of archaeal ATPases, and review the biochemical and structural properties of those archaeal ATPases that have measurable ATPase activity. We discuss their potential roles in genome delivery into the host, virus assembly and genome packaging in comparison to hexameric helicases and packaging motors from bacteriophages. PMID:25105011

  1. Adenosine conjugated lipidic nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Naidu, V G M; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Delivering chemotherapeutics by nanoparticles into tumor is impeded majorly by two factors: nonspecific targeting and inefficient penetration. Targeted delivery of anti-cancer agents solely to tumor cells introduces a smart strategy because it enhances the therapeutic index compared with untargeted drugs. The present study was performed to investigate the efficiency of adenosine (ADN) to target solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to over expressing adenosine receptor cell lines such as human breast cancer and prostate cancer (MCF-7 and DU-145 cells), respectively. SLN were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation process using docetaxel (DTX) as drug and were characterized by various techniques like dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimeter and transmission electron microscopy. DTX loaded SLNs were surface modified with ADN, an adenosine receptors ligand using carbodiimide coupling. Conjugation was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy and quantified using phenol-sulfuric acid method. Conjugated SLN were shown to have sustained drug release as compared to unconjugated nanoparticles and drug suspension. Compared with free DTX and unconjugated SLN, ADN conjugated SLN showed significantly higher cytotoxicity of loaded DTX, as evidenced by in vitro cell experiments. The IC50 was 0.41 ?g/ml for native DTX, 0.30 ?g/ml for unconjugated SLN formulation, and 0.09 ?g/ml for ADN conjugated SLN formulation in MCF-7 cell lines. Whereas, in DU-145, there was 2 fold change in IC50 of ADN-SLN as compared to DTX. IC50 was found to be 0.44 ?g/ml for free DTX, 0.39 ?g/ml for unconjugated SLN and 0.22 ?g/ml for ADN-SLN. Annexin assay and cell cycle analysis assay further substantiated the cell cytotoxicity. Fluorescent cell uptake and competitive ligand-receptor binding assay corroborated the receptor mediated endocytosis pathway indicated role of adenosine receptors in internalization of conjugated particles. Pharmacokinetic studies of lipidic formulations depicted significant improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters than marketed formulation. ADN conjugated SLN proved to be an efficient drug delivery vehicle. Hence, ADN can be used as a potential ligand to target breast and prostate cancer. PMID:25839415

  2. A conformational study of adenylyl-(3',5')-adenosine and adenylyl-(2',5')-adenosine in aqueous solution by carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schleich, T; Cross, B P; Smith, I C

    1976-01-01

    The solution conformation of adenylyl-(3',5')-adenosine and adenylyl-(2',5')-adenosine in both the stacked and unstacked states was studied by carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Large chemical shift differences between the base carbons in the dimers and those in the corresponding monomers are attributed in part to the influence of base-base interaction. Carbon-phosphorus couplings across three bonds revealed the preferred populations for certain backbone rotamers, demonstrating that significant changes in conformation about the "c(3')-O and C(5')-O bonds do not occur in the temperature or salt-induced unstacking of adenylyl-(3',5')-adenosine. However, rotations about the C(2')-O and C(5')-O bonds occur in the temperature-mediated unstacking of adenylyl-(2',5')-adenosine. PMID:1257051

  3. Spreading depolarization-induced adenosine accumulation reflects metabolic status in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Britta E; Shuttleworth, C William

    2014-11-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD), a pathologic feature of migraine, stroke and traumatic brain injury, is a propagating depolarization of neurons and glia causing profound metabolic demand. Adenosine, the low-energy metabolite of ATP, has been shown to be elevated after SD in brain slices and under conditions likely to trigger SD in vivo. The relationship between metabolic status and adenosine accumulation after SD was tested here, in brain slices and in vivo. In brain slices, metabolic impairment (assessed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) autofluorescence and O2 availability) was associated with prolonged extracellular direct current (DC) shifts indicating delayed repolarization, and increased adenosine accumulation. In vivo, adenosine accumulation was observed after SD even in otherwise healthy mice. As in brain slices, in vivo adenosine accumulation correlated with DC shift duration and increased when DC shifts were prolonged by metabolic impairment (i.e., hypoglycemia or middle cerebral artery occlusion). A striking pattern of adenosine dynamics was observed during focal ischemic stroke, with nearly all the observed adenosine signals in the periinfarct region occurring in association with SDs. These findings suggest that adenosine accumulation could serve as a biomarker of SD incidence and severity, in a range of clinical conditions. PMID:25160669

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to adenosine receptor by an auto-anti-idiotypic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Hsing-Hsu.

    1988-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with adenosine 6-aminocaproyl-BSA. Hybridoma cell lines that secreted anti-idiotypic antibodies were identified by their binding to rabbit anti-adenosine antibodies, but not to normal rabbit immunoglobulins. Two such monoclonal antibodies, AA18 and AA21, also inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)adenosine to the rabbit anti-adenosine antibodies. Therefore, both appeared to recognize idiotypic determinants on the rabbit anti-adenosine antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies AA18 and AA21 were established as being directed at adenosine receptors by the following criteria: (1) they bound to both rat and bovine brain membranes, and binding could be inhibited by CHA, an adenosine receptor agonist, (2) they inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)R-PIA, an adenosine receptor agonist, to rat brain membranes; and (3) they inhibited the adenylate cyclase of rat brain membranes. The monoclonal antibodies were used to screen cDNA libraries in lambda gt11.

  5. A method of the rapid preparation of adenosine 5'-gamma-[32P] triphosphate by chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kozio?kiewicz, W; Pankowski, J; Janecka, A

    1978-01-01

    A new chemical method for the synthesis of adenosine 5'-gamma-[32P] triphosphate has been developed based on the reaction of adenosine 5'-diphosphate with ethyl chloroformate. The resulting active mixed anhydride was able to react with [32P]-triethylammonium orthophosphate to give gamma-[32P]ATP. PMID:219425

  6. Adenosine as a non-opioid analgesic in the perioperative setting.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tong J; Habib, Ashraf S

    2007-08-01

    Adenosine, a ubiquitous metabolic intermediate in the body, is involved in nearly every aspect of cell function, including neuromodulation and neurotransmission. Adenosine A(1) and A(2) receptors are widely distributed in the brain and spinal cord, and are a novel, non-opiate target for pain management. The potential of adenosine as a non-narcotic analgesic in anesthetized patients has been explored in clinical trials, including double-blind studies versus placebo and remifentanil infusion. These studies suggest that, compared to placebo or remifentanil, an intraoperative adenosine infusion stabilizes core hemodynamics and reduces the requirement for anesthesia during surgery. Further, adenosine improves postoperative recovery, as indicated by lower pain scores and less opioid consumption. The safety profile of adenosine has been well characterized based on use of currently approved adenosine products. The most common adverse events associated with its use include flushing, chest discomfort, dyspnea, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and lightheadedness. These effects are generally well tolerated and transient. Further studies are warranted to investigate the full potential of adenosine as a non-opioid analgesic in the perioperative setting. PMID:17646510

  7. Photomodulation of G Protein-Coupled Adenosine Receptors by a Novel Light-Switchable Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N6 substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:25248077

  8. On-Pump Inhibition of the es-ENT1 Nucleoside Transporter and Adenosine Deaminase during Aortic Cross-Clamping Entraps Intracellular Adenosine and Protects against Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elfattah, Anwar Saad; Ding, Mai; Jessen, Michael E.; Wechsler, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Inhibition of adenosine deaminase, with EHNA (erythro-9 (2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine), and the es-ENT1 transporter, with NBMPR (p-nitro- benzylthioinosine), entraps myocardial intracellular adenosine during on pump warm cross clamping (ACC) leading to a complete recovery of cardiac function and ATP during reperfusion. The differential role of entrapped intracellular and circulating adenosine in EHNA/NBMPR-mediated protection is unknown. Selective, DPCPX [8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl-xanthine], or non-selective, [8-(p-sulfophenyltheophyline], A1-receptor antagonists were used to block adenosine A1-receptor contribution in EHNA/NBMPR-mediated cardiac recovery. Methods Anesthetized dogs (n= 45), instrumented to measure heart performance using sonomicrometry, were subjected to 30 minutes of warm ACC and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Three boluses of the vehicle (Series A) or 100?M EHNA and 25?M NBMPR (Series B) were infused into the pump at baseline, before ischemia and before reperfusion. DPCPX (10 ?M) or 8-SPT (100?M) was intra-aortically infused immediately after ACC distal to the clamp in Series (A) and Series (B). ATP pool and NAD+ was determined using HPLC. Results Ischemia depleted ATP in all groups by 50%. The ratios between adenosine to inosine were >10 fold higher in Series (B) than in Series (A) (p<0.001). ATP and function recovered in the EHNA/NBMPR-treated group (p<0.05 vs. control group). DPCPX or 8-SPT partially reduced cardiac function in Series (A) and (B) to the same degree but did not abolish EHNA/NBMPR-mediated protection in Series (B). Conclusion In addition to cardioprotection mediated by activation of adenosine receptors by extracellular adenosine, EHNA/NBMPR-entrapment of intracellular adenosine provides a significant component of myocardial protection despite of A1-R blockade. PMID:22325325

  9. Adenosine mediates relaxation of human small resistance-like coronary arteries via A2B receptors.

    PubMed

    Kemp, B K; Cocks, T M

    1999-04-01

    1. The receptor subtype and mechanisms underlying relaxation to adenosine were examined in human isolated small coronary arteries contracted with the thromboxane A2 mimetic, 1,5,5-hydroxy-11alpha, 9alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5Z, 13E-dienoic acid (U46619) to approximately 50% of their maximum contraction to K+ (125 mM) depolarization (Fmax). Relaxations were normalized as percentages of the 50% Fmax contraction. 2. Adenosine caused concentration-dependent relaxations (pEC50, 5.95+/-0.20; maximum relaxation (Rmax), 96.7+/-1.4%) that were unaffected by either combined treatment with the nitric oxide inhibitors, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 100 microM) and oxyhaemoglobin (HbO; 20 microM) or the ATP-dependent K+ channel (KATP) inhibitor, glibenclamide (10 microM). The pEC50 but not Rmax to adenosine was significantly reduced by high extracellular K+ (30 mM). Relaxations to the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, however, were unaffected by high K+ (30 mM). 3. Adenosine and a range of adenosine analogues, adenosine, 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA), S(+)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (S-PIA), N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-beta- D-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA), 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine hydrochloride (CGS 21680), relaxed arteries with a rank order of potency of NECA= 2-CADO >adenosine= IB-MECA = R-PIA= CPA > S-PIA)> CGS 21680. 4. Sensitivity but not Rmax to adenosine was significantly reduced approximately 80 and 20 fold by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT) and the A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX). By contrast, the A1-selective antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) had no effect on pEC50 or Rmax to adenosine. 5. These results suggest that A2B receptors mediate relaxation to adenosine in human small coronary arteries which is independent of NO but dependent in part on a K+-sensitive mechanism. PMID:10372822

  10. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing and human disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional modification that converts adenosines to inosines in both coding and noncoding RNA transcripts. It is catalyzed by ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, which exist throughout the body but are most prevalent in the central nervous system. Inosines exhibit properties that are most similar to those of guanosines. As a result, ADAR-mediated editing can post-transcriptionally alter codons, introduce or remove splice sites, or affect the base pairing of the RNA molecule with itself or with other RNAs. A-to-I editing is a mechanism that regulates and diversifies the transcriptome, but the full biological significance of ADARs is not understood. ADARs are highly conserved across vertebrates and are essential for normal development in mammals. Aberrant ADAR activity has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, including cancer, neurological disorders, metabolic diseases, viral infections and autoimmune disorders. ADARs have been shown to contribute to disease pathologies by editing of glutamate receptors, editing of serotonin receptors, mutations in ADAR genes, and by other mechanisms, including recently identified regulatory roles in microRNA processing. Advances in research into many of these diseases may depend on an improved understanding of the biological functions of ADARs. Here, we review recent studies investigating connections between ADAR-mediated RNA editing and human diseases. PMID:24289319

  11. Inhibitors of membranous adenylyl cyclases with affinity for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Kachler, Sonja

    2016-03-01

    Membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases constitute an interesting therapeutic target for various diseases that affect a large number of patients including asthma or congestive heart failure. Many inhibitors of adenylyl cyclases are competitive inhibitors at the ATP binding site and may, therefore, also interact with one or several of numerous ATP-binding proteins other than adenylyl cyclases. Several such inhibitors also show structural similarity to adenosine receptor ligands, providing a risk for side effects mediated by an unwanted interaction with these receptors. We have investigated a potential specific binding of four representative adenylyl cyclase inhibitors and found binding with pharmacologically relevant affinity to A1 and A2A receptors for NKY80 (2-amino-7-(2-furanyl)-7,8-dihydro-5(6H)-quinazolinone) and SQ22,536 (9-(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-9H-purin-6-amine). These results underscore the importance to consider potential side effects mediated via adenosine receptors in the development of potent and specific inhibitors of adenylyl cyclases. PMID:26660072

  12. Adenosine Signaling and the Energetic Costs of Induced Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Life history theory predicts that trait evolution should be constrained by competing physiological demands on an organism. Immune defense provides a classic example in which immune responses are presumed to be costly and therefore come at the expense of other traits related to fitness. One strategy for mitigating the costs of expensive traits is to render them inducible, such that the cost is paid only when the trait is utilized. In the current issue of PLOS Biology, Bajgar and colleagues elegantly demonstrate the energetic and life history cost of the immune response that Drosophila melanogaster larvae induce after infection by the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. These authors show that infection-induced proliferation of defensive blood cells commands a diversion of dietary carbon away from somatic growth and development, with simple sugars instead being shunted to the hematopoetic organ for rapid conversion into the raw energy required for cell proliferation. This metabolic shift results in a 15% delay in the development of the infected larva and is mediated by adenosine signaling between the hematopoietic organ and the central metabolic control organ of the host fly. The adenosine signal thus allows D. melanogaster to rapidly marshal the energy needed for effective defense and to pay the cost of immunity only when infected. PMID:25915419

  13. Adenosine amine congener mitigates noise-induced cochlear injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu-Hyun; Wong, Ann Chi Yan; Guo, Cindy X.; Gupta, Rita; Housley, Gary D.; Thorne, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss from noise exposure is a leading occupational disease, with up to 5% of the population at risk world-wide. Here, we present a novel purine-based pharmacological intervention that can ameliorate noise-induced cochlear injury. Wistar rats were exposed to narrow-band noise (8–12 kHz, 110 dB SPL, 2–24 h) to induce cochlear damage and permanent hearing loss. The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, adenosine amine congener (ADAC), was administered intraperitoneally (100 µg/kg/day) at time intervals after noise exposure. Hearing thresholds were assessed using auditory brainstem responses and the hair cell loss was evaluated by quantitative histology. Free radical damage in the organ of Corti was assessed using nitrotyrosine immunohistochemistry. The treatment with ADAC after noise exposure led to a significantly greater recovery of hearing thresholds compared with controls. These results were upheld by increased survival of sensory hair cells and reduced nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in ADAC-treated cochlea. We propose that ADAC could be a valuable treatment for noise-induced cochlear injury in instances of both acute and extended noise exposures. PMID:20806018

  14. Adenosine Amine Congener as a Cochlear Rescue Agent

    PubMed Central

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M.; Chang, Hao; Paek, Song Yee; Chi, Howard H.-T.; Sreebhavan, Sreevalsan; Telang, Ravindra S.; Tingle, Malcolm; Housley, Gary D.; Thorne, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that adenosine amine congener (ADAC), a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, can ameliorate noise- and cisplatin-induced cochlear injury. Here we demonstrate the dose-dependent rescue effects of ADAC on noise-induced cochlear injury in a rat model and establish the time window for treatment. Methods. ADAC (25–300 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to Wistar rats (8–10 weeks old) at intervals (6–72 hours) after exposure to traumatic noise (8–16 kHz, 110 dB sound pressure level, 2 hours). Hearing sensitivity was assessed using auditory brainstem responses (ABR) before and 12 days after noise exposure. Pharmacokinetic studies investigated ADAC concentrations in plasma after systemic (intravenous) administration. Results. ADAC was most effective in the first 24 hours after noise exposure at doses >50 μg/kg, providing up to 21 dB protection (averaged across 8–28 kHz). Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a short (5 min) half-life of ADAC in plasma after intravenous administration without detection of degradation products. Conclusion. Our data show that ADAC mitigates noise-induced hearing loss in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but further studies are required to establish its translation as a clinical otological treatment. PMID:25243188

  15. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated depression of corticostriatal and thalamostriatal glutamatergic synaptic potentials in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flagmeyer, I; Haas, H L; Stevens, D R

    1997-12-01

    Electrophysiological recordings in rat brain slices have been used to study the actions of adenosine on striatal neurons and striatal excitatory amino acid neurotransmission originating in the cortex or the thalamus. Adenosine had no effects on membrane properties of striatal neurons. Adenosine and the A1 agonist N6-Cyclopentyl adenosine reduced EPSPs of both cortical and thalamic origin by more than 50%. Depression of EPSPs was associated with an increase in paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a presynaptic locus of action. EPSP depression was blocked by the A1 antagonist, 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl xanthine. The A2 agonist 5'-(N-cyclopropyl)-carboxamidoadenosine had no effect on excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. The A1 antagonist alone enhanced the synaptic component of the evoked field potential (23 +/- 12%). These results indicate that endogenous adenosine, acting via A1 receptors, limits striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission, serving a modulatory and neuroprotective role. PMID:9462890

  16. [Adenosine and homeostatic control of sleep. Actions in target structures of the sleep-wake circuits].

    PubMed

    Cars-Cadavieco, Marta; de Andrs, Isabel

    2012-10-01

    Sleep homeostasis occurs during prolonged wakefulness. Drowsiness and sleep pressure are its behavioral manifestations and, when sleep is allowed, there is a sleep rebound of sufficient duration and intensity to compensate for the previous deprivation. Adenosine is one of the molecules involved in sleep homeostasic regulation. Caffeine and theophylline, stimulants widely consumed by the humans, are antagonists. It is an endogenous factor, resulting from ATP metabolism in neurons and glia. Adenosine accumulates in the extracellular space, where it can exert regulatory actions on the sleep-wakefulness cycle circuits. Adenosine acts through the purinergic receptors A1 and A2. This paper reviews: 1) the metabolic pathways of cerebral adenosine, and the mechanisms of its release by neurons and glia to the extracellular space; 2) the actions of adenosine and its antagonists in regions of the central nervous system related to wakefulness, non-REM sleep, and REM sleep, and 3) the synaptic mechanisms involved in these actions. PMID:23011860

  17. Human Placental Adenosine Receptor Expression is Elevated in Preeclampsia and Hypoxia Increases Expression of the A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    von Versen-Hynck, F.; Rajakumar, A.; Bainbridge, S.A.; Gallaher, M.J.; Roberts, J.M.; Powers, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Placental hypoxia as a result of impaired trophoblast invasion is suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Hypoxia is a potent stimulus for the release of adenosine, and the actions of adenosine are mediated through four adenosine receptors, A1, A2A, A2B and A3. We investigated the presence, distribution and expression of adenosine receptor subtypes in the human placenta, the expression of the adenosine receptors in placentas from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, small for gestational age (SGA) infants and uncomplicated pregnancies, and the effect of hypoxia on placental adenosine receptor expression. Immunofluorescent microscopy localized A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors to the syncytiotrophoblast, endothelial cells and myo-/fibroblasts within the human placenta. Adenosine receptor protein and message expression levels were significantly higher in placentas from preeclamptic pregnancies with or without SGA infants, but not different in pregnancies with SGA infants alone. In vitro exposure of placental villous explants to hypoxia (2% oxygen) increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor 50%. These data indicate that all four known adenosine receptors are expressed in the human placenta and adenosine receptor expression is significantly higher in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in placental adenosine receptors may contribute to alterations in placental function in preeclampsia. PMID:19303140

  18. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and metabolism of squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles in mice using dual radio-labeling and radio-HPLC analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Alice; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Mougin, Julie; Parrod, Martine; Pieters, Grégory; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Loreau, Olivier; Goncalves, Jordan; Chacun, Hélène; Courbebaisse, Yann; Clayette, Pascal; Desmaële, Didier; Rousseau, Bernard; Andrieux, Karine; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic endogenous nucleoside with potential neuroprotective pharmacological activity. However, clinical use of adenosine is hampered by its extremely fast metabolization. To overcome this limitation, we recently developed a new squalenoyl nanomedicine of adenosine [Squalenoyl-Adenosine (SQAd)] by covalent linkage of this nucleoside to the squalene, a natural lipid. The resulting nanoassemblies (NAs) displayed a dramatic pharmacological activity both in cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury pre-clinical models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma profile and tissue distribution of SQAd NAs using both Squalenoyl-[3H]-Adenosine NAs and [14C]-Squalenoyl-Adenosine NAs as respective tracers of adenosine and squalene moieties of the SQAd bioconjugate. This study was completed by radio-HPLC analysis allowing to determine the metabolization profile of SQAd. We report here that SQAd NAs allowed a sustained circulation of adenosine under its prodrug form (SQAd) for at least 1 h after intravenous administration, when free adenosine was metabolized within seconds after injection. Moreover, the squalenoylation of adenosine and its formulation as NAs also significantly modified biodistribution, as SQAd NAs were mainly captured by the liver and spleen, allowing a significant release of adenosine in the liver parenchyma. Altogether, these results suggest that SQAd NAs provided a reservoir of adenosine into the bloodstream which may explain the previously observed neuroprotective efficacy of SQAd NAs against cerebral ischemia and spinal cord injury. PMID:26087468

  19. Interactions between adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampal slice

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Ali; Stone, Trevor W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined excitatory postsynaptic potentials and paired-pulse interactions in rat hippocampal slices to obtain more information about the site and mechanism of interactions between metabotropic glutamate receptors and adenosine receptors. The results show that the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is explained by a selectively reduced responsiveness to A1 receptor stimulation, and does not involve any facilitation of A2A adenosine receptors, since it can be obtained in the absence of endogenous adenosine and is not prevented by the A2A receptor blocker ZM241385. The glutamate receptors involved are of the group I class since the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is produced by ACPD and the group I selective compound DHPG. Furthermore, the effects of DHPG could be prevented by LY367385, a selective antagonist at the mGlu1a subtype of group I receptors. The selective antagonist at mGlu5 receptors, SIB1893, did not prevent the suppression of adenosine sensitivity by DHPG. Blockade of the DHPG/adenosine interaction was also obtained by superfusion with the protein kinasae C inhibitor chelerythrine. Since the suppression of adenosine responses by metabotropic receptor agonists was seen in the paired-pulse paradigm, we conclude that the observed interactions occur at the level of the presynaptic terminals. The interaction with adenosine receptors is not specific, but applies also to a suppression of responses mediated by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. We conclude that activation of the mGlu1a subtype of receptor can suppress responses mediated via adenosine A1 receptors, probably by activating protein kinase C. Since the changes induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists last for at least 60 min, the data also imply that these interactions could play an important role in changes of synaptic function long after even transient increases of glutamate release in the CNS. PMID:12684261

  20. Overexpression, purification and crystallographic analysis of a unique adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimin; Long, Mary C.; Ranganathan, Senthil; Escuyer, Vincent; Parker, William B.; Li, Rongbao

    2005-06-01

    Adenosine kinase from M. tuberculosis has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of adenosine. Structure determination using molecular replacement with diffraction data collected at 2.2 Å reveals a dimeric structure. Adenosine kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the only prokaryotic adenosine kinase that has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to adenosine monophosphate and is involved in the activation of 2-methyladenosine, a compound that has demonstrated selective activity against M. tuberculosis. The mechanism of action of 2-methyladenosine is likely to be different from those of current tuberculosis treatments and this compound (or other adenosine analogs) may prove to be a novel therapeutic intervention for this disease. The M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme was purified with activity comparable to that reported previously. The protein was crystallized in the presence of adenosine using the vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted X-rays to high resolution and a complete data set was collected to 2.2 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.2, c = 111.6 Å, and contained a single protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. An initial structural model of the protein was obtained by the molecular-replacement method, which revealed a dimeric structure. The monomers of the dimer were related by twofold crystallographic symmetry. An understanding of how the M. tuberculosis adenosine kinase differs from the human homolog should aid in the design of more potent and selective antimycobacterial agents that are selectively activated by this enzyme.

  1. Adenosine regulates the proinflammatory signaling function of thrombin in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; Dinarvand, Peyman; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma level of the regulatory metabolite adenosine increases during the activation of coagulation and inflammation. Here we investigated the effect of adenosine on modulation of thrombin-mediated proinflammatory responses in HUVECs. We found that adenosine inhibits the barrier-disruptive effect of thrombin in HUVECs by a concentration-dependent manner. Analysis of cell surface expression of adenosine receptors revealed that A2A and A2B are expressed at the highest level among the four receptor subtypes (A2B>A2A>A1>A3) on HUVECs. The barrier-protective effect of adenosine in response to thrombin was recapitulated by the A2A specific agonist, CGS 21680, and abrogated both by the siRNA knockdown of the A2A receptor and by the A2A-specific antagonists, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261. The thrombin-induced RhoA activation and its membrane translocation were both inhibited by adenosine in a cAMP-dependent manner, providing a molecular mechanism through which adenosine exerts a barrier-protective function. Adenosine also inhibited thrombin-mediated activation of NF-?B and decreased adhesion of monocytic THP-1 cells to stimulated HUVECs via down-regulation of expression of cell surface adhesion molecules, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin. Moreover, adenosine inhibited thrombin-induced elevated expression of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and HMGB-1; and chemokines, MCP-1, CXCL-1 and CXCL-3. Taken together, these results suggest that adenosine may inhibit thrombin-mediated proinflammatory signaling responses, thereby protecting the endothelium from injury during activation of coagulation and inflammation. PMID:24477600

  2. Effect of adenosine and adenosine receptor antagonist on Mller cell potassium channel in Rat chronic ocular hypertension models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zijian; Huang, Ping; Liu, Xiaohong; Huang, Shouyue; Deng, Lianfu; Jin, Zhe; Xu, Shuo; Shen, Xi; Luo, Xunda; Zhong, Yisheng

    2015-01-01

    Mller cells are principal glial cells in rat retina and have attracted much attention in glaucoma studies. However, it is not clear whether adenosine and adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists play any roles in the regulation of potassium channels in Mller cells and subsequently in the promotion of glutamine synthetase (GS) and L-Glutamate/L-Aspartate Transporter (GLAST) functions. We found that chronic ocular hypertension (COH) in rat down-regulated Mller cells Kir2.1, Kir4.1, TASK-1, GS and GLAST expressions and attenuated the peak of inward potassium current. Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) count was lower in the COH rats than that in the sham operation animals. Intravitreal injection of selective A2A AR antagonist SCH442416 up-regulated Mller cell Kir4.1, TASK-1, GS and GLAST expressions and enhanced inward potassium currents compared with those in the COH rats with vehicle control. Meanwhile, the RGC count was higher following intravitreal injection of SCH442416 in the COH rats than that after vehicle injection. The fact that PKA inhibitor H-89 blocked these SCH442416 effects suggested that the PKA signaling pathway was involved in the observed ocular responses following the intravitreal SCH442416 injection. PMID:26063641

  3. Role of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase in adenosine-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Marina; Osswald, Hartmut; Kloor, Doris

    2007-01-15

    Adenosine has been shown to initiate apoptosis through different mechanisms: (i) activation of adenosine receptors, (ii) intracellular conversion to AMP and stimulation of AMP-activated kinase, (iii) conversion to S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy), which is an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferases. Since the pathways involved are still not completely understood, we further investigated the role of AdoHcy hydrolase in adenosine-induced apoptosis. In HepG2 cells, adenosine induced caspase-like activity and DNA fragmentation, a marker of apoptosis. These effects were potentiated by co-incubation with homocysteine or adenosine deaminase inhibitor, pentostatin, and were mimicked by inhibition of AdoHcy hydrolase by adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde (Adox). Adenosine-induced effects were significantly inhibited by dipyridamole, an inhibitor of adenosine transporter, whereas inhibitors of adenosine kinase did not affect adenosine-induced changes. Various adenosine receptor agonists and AICAR, an activator of AMP-activated kinase, did not mimic the effect of adenosine. Thus, adenosine-induced apoptosis is likely due to intracellular action of AdoHcy and independent of AMP-activated kinase and adenosine receptors. Because elevated AdoHcy levels are associated with reduced mRNA methylation, we studied mRNA expression in Adox-treated cells by microarray analysis. Since several p53-target genes and other apoptosis-related genes were up-regulated by Adox, we conclude that AdoHcy is involved in adenosine-induced apoptosis by altering gene expression. PMID:17097637

  4. Control of adenosine deaminase levels in human lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Daddona, P E; Kelley, W N

    1982-01-01

    High levels of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity have been associated with normal T cell differentiation and T cell disease, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia; however, possible mechanisms controlling the level of this enzyme have not been explored. In this study, the properties and rate of turnover of ADA are compared in cultured human T and B lymphoblast cell lines. (1) Relative to B lymphoblasts, the level of ADA activity in extracts of T lymphoblast cell lines (MOLT-4, RPMI-8402, CCRF-CEM and CCRF-HSB-2) is elevated 7- to 14-fold and differs by 2-fold among the T-cell lines. (2) In T and B lymphoblast extracts, the enzyme is apparently identical based on Km for adenosine and deoxyadenosine, Ki for inosine, Vmax for adenosine, S20w, isoelectric pH, and heat stability. Further, by radioimmunoassay the quantity of ADA immunoreactive protein is proportional to the level of enzyme activity in all cell lines studied. (3) Using a purification and selective immunoprecipitation technique, the enzyme turnover could be assessed in cell lines labeled with [35S]methionine. The apparent rate of ADA synthesis, relative to total protein, is 2-fold faster in both T cell lines (RPMI-8402 and CCRF-CEM) than in the B cell lines (MGL-8 and GM-130). The apparent half-life (t1/2) for the enzyme degradation is 19 and 39 hr, respectively, for CCRF-CEM and RPMI-8402, while the t1/2 for both B cell lines is 7-9 hr. From the net rate of synthesis and degradation, the T cell lines exhibit a 6- and 12-fold difference in ADA turnover relative to B cells, consistent with the observed differences in enzyme activity. (4) The level of ADA (activity and/or protein) in cultured T or B lymphoblasts is not influenced by either substrates or products of the ADA reaction or an ADA inhibitor or a selected group of immunosuppressive drugs added to these cells in culture. These studies indicate that while ADA is apparently identical in all T and B lymphoblasts, alterations in both the rate of ADA synthesis and degradation lead to its accumulation and high steady-state level in T cells. PMID:6981287

  5. Fluorometric determination of adenosine nucleotide derivatives as measures of the microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial biomass and physiological status

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. M.; White, D.C.

    1980-09-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophophate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N/sup 6/-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with flourescence detection. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciderase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge.

  6. Role of adenosine signalling and metabolism in β-cell regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Olov

    2014-02-01

    Glucose homeostasis, which is controlled by the endocrine cells of the pancreas, is disrupted in both type I and type II diabetes. Deficiency in the number of insulin-producing β cells – a primary cause of type I diabetes and a secondary contributor of type II diabetes – leads to hyperglycemia and hence an increase in the need for insulin. Although diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections, a curative approach is needed. A potential approach to curing diabetes involves regenerating the β-cell mass, e.g. by increasing β-cell proliferation, survival, neogenesis or transdifferentiation. The nucleoside adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP have long been known to affect insulin secretion, but have more recently been shown to increase β-cell proliferation during homeostatic control and regeneration of the β-cell mass. Adenosine is also known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and agonism of adenosine receptors can promote the survival of β-cells in an inflammatory microenvironment. In this review, both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of adenosine and ATP are discussed in terms of their established and putative effects on β-cell regeneration. - Highlights: • A potential way to cure diabetes is to regenerate the β-cell mass by promoting cell survival, proliferation or neogenesis. • Adenosine may promote β-cell regeneration through several cellular mechanisms. • Adenosine and its cognate nucleotide ATP can each promote β-cell proliferation. • Do adenosine and ATP interact in promoting β-cell proliferation?.

  7. Extracellular adenosine generation in the regulation of pro-inflammatory responses and pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Samiul; Costales, Matthew G; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Williams, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine, an immunomodulatory biomolecule, is produced by the ecto-enzymes CD39 (nucleoside triphosphate dephosphorylase) and CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) by dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73 is expressed by many cell types during injury, infection and during steady-state conditions. Besides host cells, many bacteria also have CD39-CD73-like machinery, which helps the pathogen subvert the host inflammatory response. The major function for adenosine is anti-inflammatory, and most recent research has focused on adenosine's control of inflammatory mechanisms underlying various autoimmune diseases (e.g., colitis, arthritis). Although adenosine generated through CD73 provides a feedback to control tissue damage mediated by a host immune response, it can also contribute to immunosuppression. Thus, inflammation can be a double-edged sword: it may harm the host but eventually helps by killing the invading pathogen. The role of adenosine in dampening inflammation has been an area of active research, but the relevance of the CD39/CD73-axis and adenosine receptor signaling in host defense against infection has received less attention. Here, we review our recent knowledge regarding CD73 expression during murine Salmonellosis and Helicobacter-induced gastric infection and its role in disease pathogenesis and bacterial persistence. We also explored a possible role for the CD73/adenosine pathway in regulating innate host defense function during infection. PMID:25950510

  8. Activation of nicotinic ACh receptors with ?4 subunits induces adenosine release at the rat carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Slvia V; Monteiro, Emlia C

    2006-01-01

    The effect of ACh on the release of adenosine was studied in rat whole carotid bodies, and the nicotinic ACh receptors involved in the stimulation of this release were characterized. ACh and nicotinic ACh receptor agonists, cytisine, DMPP and nicotine, caused a concentration-dependent increase in adenosine production during normoxia, with nicotine being more potent and efficient in stimulating adenosine release from rat CB than cytisine and DMPP. D-Tubocurarine, mecamylamine, DH?E and ?-bungarotoxin, nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists, caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the release of adenosine evoked by hypoxia. The rank order of potency for nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists that inhibit adenosine release was DH?E>mecamylamine>D-tubocurarine>?-bungarotoxin. The effect of the endogenous agonist, ACh, which was mimicked by nicotine, was antagonized by DH?E, a selective nicotinic receptor antagonist. The ecto-5?-nucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP produces a 72% inhibition in the release of adenosine from CB evoked by nicotine. Taken together, these data indicate that ACh induced the production of adenosine, mainly from extracellular ATP catabolism at the CB through a mechanism that involves the activation of nicotinic receptors with ?4 and ?2 receptor subunits. PMID:16444287

  9. Latest QSAR study of adenosine A[Formula: see text] receptor affinity of xanthines and deazaxanthines.

    PubMed

    Prez-Garrido, Alfonso; Rivero-Buceta, Virginia; Cano, Gaspar; Kumar, Sanjay; Prez-Snchez, Horacio; Bautista, Marta Teijeira

    2015-11-01

    Adenosine, a widespread and endogenous nucleoside that acts as a powerful neuromodulator in the nervous system, is a promising therapeutic target in a wide range of conditions. The structural similarity between xanthine derivatives and neurotransmitter adenosine has led to the derivatives of the heterocyclic ring being among the most abundant chemical classes of ligand antagonists of adenosine receptor subtypes. Small changes in the xanthine scaffold have resulted in a wide array of adenosine receptor antagonists. In this work, we developed a QSAR model for the [Formula: see text] subtype, which is, as yet, not well characterized, with two purposes in mind: to predict adenosine [Formula: see text] antagonist activity and to offer a substructural interpretation of this group of xanthines. The QSAR model provided good classifications of both the test and external sets. In addition, most of the contributions to adenosine [Formula: see text] receptor affinity derived by subfragmentation of the molecules in the training set agree with the relationships observed in the literature. These two factors mean that this QSAR ensemble could be used as a model to predict future adenosine [Formula: see text] antagonist candidates. PMID:26160364

  10. The Role of Adenosine in Pulmonary Vein Isolation: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Dallaglio, Paolo D.; Betts, Timothy R.; Ginks, Matthew; Bashir, Yaver; Anguera, Ignasi; Rajappan, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), which can be achieved in more than 95% of patients at the end of the procedure. However, AF recurrence rates remain high and are related to recovery of PV conduction. Adenosine testing is used to unmask dormant pulmonary vein conduction (DC). The aim of this study is to review the available literature addressing the role of adenosine testing and determine the impact of ablation at sites of PV reconnection on freedom from AF. Adenosine infusion, by restoring the excitability threshold, unmasks reversible injury that could lead to recovery of PV conduction. The studies included in this review suggest that adenosine is useful to unmask nontransmural lesions at risk of reconnection and that further ablation at sites of DC is associated with improvement in freedom from AF. Nevertheless it has been demonstrated that adenosine is not able to predict all veins at risk of later reconnection, which means that veins without DC are not necessarily at low risk. The role of the waiting period in the setting of adenosine testing has also been analyzed, suggesting that in the acute phase adenosine use should be accompanied by enough waiting time.

  11. Adenosine, Ketogenic Diet and Epilepsy: The Emerging Therapeutic Relationship Between Metabolism and Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Masino, S.A; Kawamura, M; Wasser, C.D.; Pomeroy, L.T; Ruskin, D.N

    2009-01-01

    For many years the neuromodulator adenosine has been recognized as an endogenous anticonvulsant molecule and termed a “retaliatory metabolite.” As the core molecule of ATP, adenosine forms a unique link between cell energy and neuronal excitability. In parallel, a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carbohydrate) diet is a metabolic therapy that influences neuronal activity significantly, and ketogenic diets have been used successfully to treat medically-refractory epilepsy, particularly in children, for decades. To date the key neural mechanisms underlying the success of dietary therapy are unclear, hindering development of analogous pharmacological solutions. Similarly, adenosine receptor–based therapies for epilepsy and myriad other disorders remain elusive. In this review we explore the physiological regulation of adenosine as an anticonvulsant strategy and suggest a critical role for adenosine in the success of ketogenic diet therapy for epilepsy. While the current focus is on the regulation of adenosine, ketogenic metabolism and epilepsy, the therapeutic implications extend to acute and chronic neurological disorders as diverse as brain injury, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, autism and hyperdopaminergic disorders. Emerging evidence for broad clinical relevance of the metabolic regulation of adenosine will be discussed. PMID:20190967

  12. Development and structural analysis of adenosine site binding tankyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Waaler, Jo; Ignatev, Alexander; Nkizinkiko, Yves; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Obaji, Ezeogo; Krauss, Stefan; Lehtiö, Lari

    2016-01-15

    Tankyrases 1 and 2, the specialized members of the ARTD protein family, are druggable biotargets whose inhibition may have therapeutic potential against cancer, metabolic disease, fibrotic disease, fibrotic wound healing and HSV viral infections. We have previously identified a novel tankyrase inhibitor scaffold, JW55, and showed that it reduces mouse colon adenoma formation in vivo. Here we expanded the scaffold and profiled the selectivity of the compounds against a panel of human ARTDs. The scaffold also enables a fine modulation of selectivity towards either tankyrase 1 or tankyrase 2. In order to get insight about the binding mode of the inhibitors, we solved crystal structures of the compounds in complex with tankyrase 2. The compounds bind to the adenosine pocket of the catalytic domain and cause changes in the protein structure that are modulated by the chemical modifications of the compounds. The structural analysis allows further rational development of this compound class as a potent and selective tankyrase inhibitor. PMID:26706174

  13. A2B adenosine receptors in immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hask, Gyrgy; Cska, Balzs; Nmeth, Zoltn H.; Vizi, E. Sylvester; Pacher, Pl

    2009-01-01

    A2B adenosine receptors are increasingly recognized as important orchestrators of inflammation. A2B receptor activation promotes the inflammatory response of mast cells, epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, thereby contributing to the pathophysiology of asthma and colitis. A2B receptor stimulation limits endothelial cell inflammatory responses and permeability and suppresses macrophage activation thereby preventing tissue injury after episodes of hypoxia and ischemia. A2B receptor stimulation also promotes the production of angiogenic cytokines by endothelial cells, mast cells and dendritic cells, aiding granuloma tissue formation and inflammatory resolution, but can also contribute to tumor growth. A2B receptors are, thus, potentially important pharmacological targets in treating immune system dysfunction and inflammation. PMID:19427267

  14. Role of adenosine A2B receptors in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feoktistov, Igor; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the unique role of A2B receptors in the regulation of inflammation, immunity and tissue repair was considerably facilitated with the introduction of new pharmacological and genetic tools. However, it also led to seemingly conflicting conclusions on the role of A2B adenosine receptors in inflammation with some publications indicating pro-inflammatory effects and others suggesting the opposite. This chapter reviews the functions of A2B receptors in various cell types related to inflammation and integrated effects of A2B receptor modulation in several animal models of inflammation. It is argued that translation of current findings into novel therapies would require a better understanding of A2B receptors functions in diverse types of inflammatory responses in various tissues and at different points of their progression. PMID:21586358

  15. Extraction and analysis of adenosine triphosphate from aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Shultz, David J.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) extraction procedures have been investigated for their applicability to samples from aquatic environments. The cold sulfuric-oxalic acid procedure was best suited to samples consisting of water, periphyton, and sediments. Due to cation and fulvic acid interferences, a spike with a known quantity of ATP was necessary to estimate losses when sediments were extracted. Variable colonization densities for periphyton required that several replicates be extracted to characterize accurately the periphyton community. Extracted samples were stable at room temperature for one to five hours, depending on the ATP concentration, if the pH was below 2. Neutralized samples which were quick frozen and stored at -30C were stable for months. (USGS)

  16. N6-Adenosine Methylation in MiRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Berulava, Tea; Rahmann, Sven; Rademacher, Katrin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludgar; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A) has been observed in many different classes of RNA, but its prevalence in microRNAs (miRNAs) has not yet been studied. Here we show that a knockdown of the m6A demethylase FTO affects the steady-state levels of several miRNAs. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation with an anti-m6A-antibody followed by RNA-seq revealed that a significant fraction of miRNAs contains m6A. By motif searches we have discovered consensus sequences discriminating between methylated and unmethylated miRNAs. The epigenetic modification of an epigenetic modifier as described here adds a new layer to the complexity of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. PMID:25723394

  17. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  18. Elevation by ethanol and its metabolites of liver adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lindros, K O; Kivikataja, R L; Suokas, A

    1986-01-01

    Acute ethanol administration significantly increased the concentration of adenosine monophosphate (5'-AMP) in the intact freeze-clamped rat liver regardless of the ethanol dose administered. The increase was abolished by the alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole, but was also seen after direct infusion of acetaldehyde into the portal vein. Administration of acetate to give hepatic levels similar to those seen during ethanol oxidation failed, however, to cause an increase in AMP. After ethanol administration there was a highly significant positive correlation between individual AMP levels and 3-OH-butyrate/acetoacetate ratios. The results suggest that the increase in liver AMP reflects activation of ethanol-derived acetate by acetothiokinase in the mitochondrial matrix. Ethanol, but not acetate inhibits the citric acid cycle, as reflected by the shift in the mitochondrial redox state. This could inhibit production of GTP needed for AMP phosphorylation by GTP-AMP phosphotransferase, thus explaining the accumulation of AMP by ethanol. PMID:3964439

  19. Adenosine modulates light responses of rat retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors througha cAMP-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2014-10-01

    Adenosine is an established neuromodulator in the mammalian retina, with A1 adenosine receptors being especially prevalent in the innermost ganglion cell layer. Activation of A1 receptors causes inhibition of adenylate cyclase, decreases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). In this work, our aim was to characterize the effects of adenosine on the light responses of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and to determine whether these photoreceptors are subject to neuromodulation through intracellular cAMP-related signalling pathways. Using multielectrode array recordings from postnatal and adult rat retinas, we demonstrated that adenosine significantly shortened the duration of ipRGC photoresponses and reduced the number of light-evoked spikes fired by these neurons. The effects were A1 adenosine receptor-mediated, and the expression of this receptor on melanopsin-containing ipRGCs was confirmed by calcium imaging experiments on isolated cells in purified cultures. While inhibition of the cAMP/PKA pathway by adenosine shortened ipRGC light responses, stimulation of this pathway with compounds such as forskolin had the opposite effect and lengthened the duration of ipRGC spiking. Our findings reveal that the modification of ipRGC photoresponses through a cAMP/PKA pathway is a general feature of rat ganglion cell photoreceptors, and this pathway can be inhibited through activation of A1 receptors by adenosine. As adenosine levels in the retina rise at night, adenosinergic modulation of ipRGCs may serve as an internal regulatory mechanism to limit transmission of nocturnal photic signals by ipRGCs to the brain. Targeting retinal A1 adenosine receptors for ipRGC inhibition represents a potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and migraine-associated photophobia. PMID:25038240

  20. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S.

    2014-01-01

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (28 ?g/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  1. Adenosine modulates light responses of rat retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors througha cAMP-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is an established neuromodulator in the mammalian retina, with A1 adenosine receptors being especially prevalent in the innermost ganglion cell layer. Activation of A1 receptors causes inhibition of adenylate cyclase, decreases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). In this work, our aim was to characterize the effects of adenosine on the light responses of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and to determine whether these photoreceptors are subject to neuromodulation through intracellular cAMP-related signalling pathways. Using multielectrode array recordings from postnatal and adult rat retinas, we demonstrated that adenosine significantly shortened the duration of ipRGC photoresponses and reduced the number of light-evoked spikes fired by these neurons. The effects were A1 adenosine receptor-mediated, and the expression of this receptor on melanopsin-containing ipRGCs was confirmed by calcium imaging experiments on isolated cells in purified cultures. While inhibition of the cAMP/PKA pathway by adenosine shortened ipRGC light responses, stimulation of this pathway with compounds such as forskolin had the opposite effect and lengthened the duration of ipRGC spiking. Our findings reveal that the modification of ipRGC photoresponses through a cAMP/PKA pathway is a general feature of rat ganglion cell photoreceptors, and this pathway can be inhibited through activation of A1 receptors by adenosine. As adenosine levels in the retina rise at night, adenosinergic modulation of ipRGCs may serve as an internal regulatory mechanism to limit transmission of nocturnal photic signals by ipRGCs to the brain. Targeting retinal A1 adenosine receptors for ipRGC inhibition represents a potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and migraine-associated photophobia. PMID:25038240

  2. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1? secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1? secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  3. Smoke Extract Impairs Adenosine Wound Healing. Implications of Smoke-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Zhang, Hui; Castellanos, Glenda; OMalley, Jennifer K.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Horacio; Kharbanda, Kusum; Sisson, Joseph H.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine concentrations are elevated in the lungs of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where it balances between tissue repair and excessive airway remodeling. We previously demonstrated that the activation of the adenosine A2A receptor promotes epithelial wound closure. However, the mechanism by which adenosine-mediated wound healing occurs after cigarette smoke exposure has not been investigated. The present study investigates whether cigarette smoke exposure alters adenosine-mediated reparative properties via its ability to induce a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Using an in vitro wounding model, bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract, were wounded, and were then stimulated with either 10 ?M adenosine or the specific A2A receptor agonist, 5?-(N-cyclopropyl)carboxamidoadenosine (CPCA; 10 ?M), and assessed for wound closure. In a subset of experiments, bronchial epithelial cells were infected with adenovirus vectors encoding human superoxide dismutase and/or catalase or control vector. In the presence of 5% smoke extract, significant delay was evident in both adenosine-mediated and CPCA-mediated wound closure. However, cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a nonspecific antioxidant, reversed smoke extractmediated inhibition. We found that cells overexpressing mitochondrial catalase repealed the smoke extract inhibition of CPCA-stimulated wound closure, whereas superoxide dismutase overexpression exerted no effect. Kinase experiments revealed that smoke extract significantly reduced the A2A-mediated activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphatedependent protein kinase. However, pretreatment with NAC reversed this effect. In conclusion, our data suggest that cigarette smoke exposure impairs A2A-stimulated wound repair via a reactive oxygen speciesdependent mechanism, thereby providing a better understanding of adenosine signaling that may direct the development of pharmacological tools for the treatment of chronic inflammatory lung disorders. PMID:23371060

  4. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1? secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1? secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of coronary flow regulation by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S J

    1980-06-18

    There is strong evidence in favor of a major role for adenosine in the metabolic regulation of blood flow to the heart. The exact nature of the molecular and cellular events leading to the vasodilatation by adenosine are poorly understood. In the present report we have provided experimental evidence that; (i) hypoxia of cardiac cells resulted in the production of adenosine (and its degradative products) which can be responsible for the hypoxic dilation observed by several workers; (ii) the release of metabolites such as potassium and inorganic phosphate was unchanged due to a 30-minute hypoxia of cardiac cells; (iii) the release of prostaglandin E but not F was enhanced due to hypoxia of cardiac cells which may be due to the storage pools in the cells; (iv) prostaglandin E1, E2 and F2 alpha inhibited the uptake of adenosine at pharmacological concentrations but not at physiological concentrations; (v) prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (aspirin and indomethacin) nonspecifically inhibited the uptake of adenosine in the cardiac cells; (vi) lowering of pH resulted in inhibition in the uptake of adenosine and its incorporation into adenine nucleotides in cardiac cells; (vii) lowering the pH of the perfusion medium resulted in the increased release of perfusate adenosine (and its degradative products) with a simultaneous increase in coronary blood flow; (ix) specific adenosine receptor sites were found in cardiac muscle, coronary arteries, and carotid arteries of the dog and rabbit aorta, which satisfy the basic characteristic of receptor binding; and (x) these receptor binding sites were different from the adenosine uptake protein and were competitively blocked by theophylline or aminophylline. It is concluded that adensine plays a major role in blood flow regulation to the heart and acts through specific receptors to produce vasodilatation. PMID:6774229

  6. Lack of Endogenous Adenosine Tonus on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Mesenteric Artery

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; S, Carlos; Ferreirinha, Ftima; Correia-de-S, Paulo; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased sympathetic activity has been implicated in hypertension. Adenosine has been shown to play a role in blood flow regulation. In the present study, the endogenous adenosine neuromodulatory role, in mesenteric arteries from normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats, was investigated. Methods and Results The role of endogenous adenosine in sympathetic neurotransmission was studied using electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release experiments. Purine content was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Localization of adenosine A1 or A2A receptors in adventitia of mesenteric arteries was investigated by Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy. Results indicate a higher electrically-evoked noradrenaline release from hypertensive mesenteric arteries. The tonic inhibitory modulation of noradrenaline release is mediated by adenosine A1 receptors and is lacking in arteries from hypertensive animals, despite their purine levels being higher comparatively to those determined in normotensive ones. Tonic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptor-mediated effects were absent in arteries from both strains. Immunohistochemistry revealed an adenosine A1 receptors redistribution from sympathetic fibers to Schwann cells, in adventitia of hypertensive mesenteric arteries which can explain, at least in part, the absence of effects observed for these receptors. Conclusion Data highlight the role of purines in hypertension revealing that an increase in sympathetic activity in hypertensive arteries is occurring due to a higher noradrenaline/ATP release from sympathetic nerves and the loss of endogenous adenosine inhibitory tonus. The observed nerve-to-glial redistribution of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors in hypertensive arteries may explain the latter effect. PMID:25158061

  7. Airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine induced by lipopolysaccharide in Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Tigani, B; Hannon, J P; Rondeau, C; Mazzoni, L; Fozard, J R

    2002-01-01

    We have explored the effects of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) on the response of the airways of Brown Norway (BN) rats to adenosine. Comparisons have been drawn with the effects on responses to methacholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine.In vehicle-challenged animals, adenosine, given i.v. was only a weak bronchoconstrictor. In contrast, 1?h following intratracheal administration of LPS, 0.3?mg?kg?1, bronchoconstrictor responses to adenosine were markedly and selectively enhanced. At this time point, there were no significant changes in leukocyte numbers, eosinophil peroxidase and myeloperoxidase activities or protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Twenty-four hours after challenge, the sensitivity of the airways to both adenosine and methacholine was reduced relative to the earlier time point and there were substantial increases in each marker of inflammation in BAL fluid.The bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine was blocked selectively by methysergide, disodium cromoglycate and the broad-spectrum adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-SPT, but not by DPCPX or ZM?243185, selective antagonists for the A1 and A2A receptors, respectively.Thus, the response to adenosine augmented following LPS is mast cell mediated and involves a receptor which can be blocked by 8-SPT but not by selective A1 or A2A receptor antagonists. It thus bears similarity to the augmented response to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized BN rats. Exposure to LPS could be a factor along with allergen in determining the increased sensitivity of the airways of asthmatics to adenosine. PMID:11976275

  8. Effects of adenosine agonists on consumptive behaviour and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Coupar, Ian M; Tran, Binh L T

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of the A1-receptor selective agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), and the A2-selective agonist, 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-hydrochloride (CGS-21680) on consumptive behaviour and body temperature in rats in relation to the non-selective A1/A2 adenosine agonist, N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), and to morphine. It was shown that two subcutaneous injections of 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) CPA caused a similar decrease in food consumption to NECA (2 x 0.03 mg kg(-1)) and morphine (2 x 10 mg kg(-1)). However, two doses of 0.03 mg kg(-1) CPA and 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1)CGS-21680 enhanced feeding. These effects were not directly correlated to faecal output at all doses of the selective agonists, as NECA and morphine induced constipation. The doses of CPA and 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) of CGS-21680 enhanced water consumption, as did NECA, but not morphine. The stimulation of drinking by CPA was not absolutely associated with diuresis. Instead, urine output was reduced by 0.03 and 0.1 mg kg(-1) and increased by 0.3 mg kg(-1). CGS-21680 at 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) and NECA also induced diuresis, which was opposite to the effect of morphine. CPA and CGS-21680 both caused significant dose-dependent decreases in body temperature after the two-injection treatment, but their effects were significantly less after 36 h when four doses had been administered. The study indicates that highly selective A1 and A2A adenosine agonists might have the ability to interfere with consumptive behaviour, induce constipation, affect renal function and to lower body temperature. PMID:11858214

  9. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  10. Cardiovascular selectivity of adenosine receptor agonists in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gerencer, R. Z.; Finegan, B. A.; Clanachan, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to determine the relevance of adenosine (Ado) receptor classification obtained from in vitro methods to the cardiovascular actions of Ado agonists in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA, 400 fold A1-selective), 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA, A1 approximately A2) and 2-phenylaminoadenosine (PAA, 5 fold A2-selective) were compared in open-chest, fentanyl-pentobarbitone anaesthetized dogs. 2. Graded doses of CHA (10 to 1000 micrograms kg-1), NECA (0.5 to 100 micrograms kg-1) or PAA (0.1 to 20 micrograms kg-1) were administered intravenously and changes in haemodynamics and myocardial contractility were assessed 10 min following each dose. The effects of graded infusions of AMP (200 to 1000 micrograms kg-1 min-1) were also evaluated. 3. AMP and each of the Ado analogues (NECA > PAA > CHA) increased the systemic vascular conductance index (SVCI) in a dose-dependent manner and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). At doses causing similar increases in SVCI, these agonists caused (i) similar reflex increases in heart rate (HR) and cardiac index (CI) and decreases in AV conduction interval (AVi) and (ii) similar increases in coronary vascular conductance (CVC). 4. After cardiac autonomic blockade with atropine (0.2 mg kg-1) and propranolol (1 mg kg-1), AMP, CHA and PAA still increased SVCI and CVC and decreased MAP. CHA and PAA had no marked effects on HR, CI or AVi. As in the absence of cardiac autonomic blockade, equieffective vasodilator doses of CHA and PAA had identical effects on CVC, CI and AVi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467827

  11. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA, RNA Editing, and Interferon Action

    PubMed Central

    George, Cyril X.; Gan, Zhenji; Liu, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine (A) to inosine (I) editing of RNA that possesses double-stranded (ds) structure. A-to-I RNA editing results in nucleotide substitution, because I is recognized as G instead of A both by ribosomes and by RNA polymerases. A-to-I substitution can also cause dsRNA destabilization, as I:U mismatch base pairs are less stable than A:U base pairs. Three mammalian ADAR genes are known, of which two encode active deaminases (ADAR1 and ADAR2). Alternative promoters together with alternative splicing give rise to two protein size forms of ADAR1: an interferon-inducible ADAR1-p150 deaminase that binds dsRNA and Z-DNA, and a constitutively expressed ADAR1-p110 deaminase. ADAR2, like ADAR1-p110, is constitutively expressed and binds dsRNA. A-to-I editing occurs with both viral and cellular RNAs, and affects a broad range of biological processes. These include virus growth and persistence, apoptosis and embryogenesis, neurotransmitter receptor and ion channel function, pancreatic cell function, and post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs. Biochemical processes that provide a framework for understanding the physiologic changes following ADAR-catalyzed A-to-I (?=?G) editing events include mRNA translation by changing codons and hence the amino acid sequence of proteins; pre-mRNA splicing by altering splice site recognition sequences; RNA stability by changing sequences involved in nuclease recognition; genetic stability in the case of RNA virus genomes by changing sequences during viral RNA replication; and RNA-structure-dependent activities such as microRNA production or targeting or proteinRNA interactions. PMID:21182352

  12. The resurgence of A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Carol M.; Kewley, Emily M.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery as a low-affinity adenosine receptor (AR), the A2B receptor (A2BAR), has proven enigmatic in its function. The previous discovery of the A2AAR, which shares many similarities with the A2BAR but demonstrates significantly greater affinity for its endogenous ligand, led to the original perception that the A2BAR was not of substantial physiologic relevance. In addition, lack of specific pharmacological agents targeting the A2BAR made its initial characterization challenging. However, the importance of this receptor was reconsidered when it was observed that the A2BAR is highly transcriptionally regulated by factors implicated in inflammatory hypoxia. Moreover, the notion that during ischemia or inflammation extracellular adenosine is dramatically elevated to levels sufficient for A2BAR activation, indicated that A2BAR signaling may be important to dampen inflammation particularly during tissue hypoxia. In addition, the recent advent of techniques for murine genetic manipulation along with development of pharmacological agents with enhanced A2BAR specificity has provided invaluable tools for focused studies on the explicit role of A2BAR signaling in different disease models. Currently, studies performed with combined genetic and pharmacological approaches have demonstrated that A2BAR signaling plays a tissue protective role in many models of acute diseases e.g. myocardial ischemia, or acute lung injury. These studies indicate that the A2BAR is expressed on a wide variety of cell types and exerts tissue/cell specific effects. This is an important consideration for future studies where tissue or cell type specific targeting of the A2BAR may be used as therapeutic approach. PMID:20546702

  13. Acute pulmonary embolism decreases adenosine plasma levels in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Kerbaul, Franois; By, Youlet; Gariboldi, Vlad; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Fesler, Pierre; Collart, Frdric; Brimioulle, Serge; Jammes, Yves; Ruf, Jean; Guieu, Rgis

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine plays a role in pulmonary arterial (PA) resistance due to its vasodilator properties. However, the behavior of adenosine plasma levels (APLs) during pulmonary embolism remains unknown. We investigated the effects of gradual pulmonary embolism on right ventricular (RV) contractility and PA coupling and on APLs in an piglet experimental model of RV failure. PA distal resistance by pressure-flow relationships and pulmonary vascular impedance were measured. RV contractility was determined by the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship (Ees), PA effective elastance by the end-diastolic to end-systolic relationship (Ea), and RV-PA coupling efficiency by the Ees/Ea ratio. APLs were measured before and during gradual pulmonary embolization. PA embolism increased PA resistance and elastance, increased Ea from 1.08 0.15 to 5.62 0.32?mmHg/mL, decreased Ees from 1.82 0.10 to 1.20 0.23?mmHg/mL, and decreased Ees/Ea from 1.69 0.15 to 0.21 0.07. APLs decreased from 2.7 0.26 to 1.3 0.12??M in the systemic bed and from 4.03 0.63 to 2.51 0.58??M in the pulmonary bed during embolism procedure. Pulmonary embolism worsens PA hemodynamics and RV-PA coupling. APLs were reduced, both in the systemic and in the pulmonary bed, leading then to pulmonary vasoconstriction. PMID:22347654

  14. Development of a luminescent G-quadruplex-selective iridium(III) complex for the label-free detection of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six luminescent iridium(III) complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to act as G-quadruplex-selective probes. The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was found to be highly selective for G-quadruplex DNA, and was employed for the construction of a label-free G-quadruplex-based adenosine detection assay in aqueous solution. Two different detection strategies were investigated for adenosine detection, and the results showed that initial addition of adenosine to the adenosine aptamer gave superior results. The assay exhibited a linear response for adenosine in the concentration range of 5 to 120??M (R(2)?=?0.992), and the limit of detection for adenosine was 5??M. Moreover, this assay was highly selective for adenosine over other nucleosides, and exhibited potential use for biological sample analysis. PMID:26778273

  15. Development of a luminescent G-quadruplex-selective iridium(III) complex for the label-free detection of adenosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six luminescent iridium(III) complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to act as G-quadruplex-selective probes. The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was found to be highly selective for G-quadruplex DNA, and was employed for the construction of a label-free G-quadruplex-based adenosine detection assay in aqueous solution. Two different detection strategies were investigated for adenosine detection, and the results showed that initial addition of adenosine to the adenosine aptamer gave superior results. The assay exhibited a linear response for adenosine in the concentration range of 5 to 120 μM (R2 = 0.992), and the limit of detection for adenosine was 5 μM. Moreover, this assay was highly selective for adenosine over other nucleosides, and exhibited potential use for biological sample analysis.

  16. Development of a luminescent G-quadruplex-selective iridium(III) complex for the label-free detection of adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; He, Bingyong; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-01-01

    A panel of six luminescent iridium(III) complexes were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to act as G-quadruplex-selective probes. The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was found to be highly selective for G-quadruplex DNA, and was employed for the construction of a label-free G-quadruplex-based adenosine detection assay in aqueous solution. Two different detection strategies were investigated for adenosine detection, and the results showed that initial addition of adenosine to the adenosine aptamer gave superior results. The assay exhibited a linear response for adenosine in the concentration range of 5 to 120 μM (R2 = 0.992), and the limit of detection for adenosine was 5 μM. Moreover, this assay was highly selective for adenosine over other nucleosides, and exhibited potential use for biological sample analysis. PMID:26778273

  17. Adenosine A2A receptors in Parkinsons disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cie?lak, Marek; Wojtczak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Latest results on the action of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists indicate their potential therapeutic usefulness in the treatment of Parkinsons disease. Basal ganglia possess high levels of adenosine A2A receptors, mainly on the external surfaces of neurons located at the indirect tracts between the striatum, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Experiments with animal models of Parkinsons disease indicate that adenosine A2A receptors are strongly involved in the regulation of the central nervous system. Co-localization of adenosine A2A and dopaminergic D2 receptors in striatum creates a milieu for antagonistic interaction between adenosine and dopamine. The experimental data prove that the best improvement of mobility in patients with Parkinsons disease could be achieved with simultaneous activation of dopaminergic D2 receptors and inhibition of adenosine A2A receptors. In animal models of Parkinsons disease, the use of selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors, such as istradefylline, led to the reversibility of movement dysfunction. These compounds might improve mobility during both monotherapy and co-administration with L-DOPA and dopamine receptor agonists. The use of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists in combination therapy enables the reduction of the L-DOPA doses, as well as a reduction of side effects. In combination therapy, the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists might be used in both moderate and advanced stages of Parkinsons disease. The long-lasting administration of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists does not decrease the patient response and does not cause side effects typical of L-DOPA therapy. It was demonstrated in various animal models that inhibition of adenosine A2A receptors not only decreases the movement disturbance, but also reveals a neuroprotective activity, which might impede or stop the progression of the disease. Recently, clinical trials were completed on the use of istradefylline (KW-6002), an inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptors, as an anti-Parkinson drug. PMID:18438720

  18. Activation of adenosine A1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens impairs inhibitory avoidance memory.

    PubMed

    Normile, H J; Gaston, S; Johnson, G; Barraco, R A

    1994-09-01

    Potent and highly selective adenosine A1 and A2 receptor agonists were bilaterally injected into the nucleus accumbens of mice 10 min prior to inhibitory avoidance training. Retention of the inhibitory avoidance response was assessed 24 h after training. Intra-ACB activation of A1 receptors, but not A2a receptor activation, significantly impaired the performance of mice during the subsequent retention test. Furthermore, the retention deficit produced by activation of A1 receptors was significantly attenuated by pretreating mice with a highly selective A1 receptor antagonist. These findings suggest that endogenous adenosine may modulate information processing in the ventral striatum via adenosine A1 receptors. PMID:7993306

  19. Elucidating the inosinome: global approaches to adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Bjorn-Erik; Sakurai, Masayuki; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2011-01-01

    Catalysed by members of the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes, adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing converts adenosines in RNA molecules to inosines, which are functionally equivalent to guanosines. Recently, global approaches to studying this widely conserved phenomenon have emerged. The use of bioinformatics, high-throughput sequencing and other approaches has increased the number of known editing sites by several orders of magnitude, and we now have a greater understanding of the control and the biological significance of editing. This Progress article reviews some of these recent global studies and their results. PMID:21173775

  20. Adenosine A2A Receptor Binding Profile of Two Antagonists, ST1535 and KW6002: Consideration on the Presence of Atypical Adenosine A2A Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Riccioni, Teresa; Leonardi, Fabiana; Borsini, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors seem to exist in typical (more in striatum) and atypical (more in hippocampus and cortex) subtypes. In the present study, we investigated the affinity of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, ST1535 [2 butyl -9-methyl-8-(2H-1,2,3-triazol 2-yl)-9H-purin-6-xylamine] and KW6002 [(E)-1,3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,dione] to the “typical” and “atypical” A2A binding sites. Affinity was determined by radioligand competition experiments in membranes from rat striatum and hippocampus. Displacement of the adenosine analog [3H]CGS21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethyl-amino-5’-N-ethylcarbox-amidoadenosine] was evaluated in the absence or in the presence of either CSC [8-(3-chlorostyryl)-caffeine], an adenosine A2A antagonist that pharmacologically isolates atypical binding sites, or DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that pharmacologically isolates typical binding site. ZM241385 [84-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl) [1,2,4]-triazol[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl amino]ethyl) phenol)] and SCH58261 [(5-amino-7-(β-phenylethyl)-2-(8-furyl)pyrazolo(4,3-e)-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c) pyrimidine], two other adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, which were reported to differently bind to atypical and typical A2A receptors, were used as reference compounds. ST1535, KW6002, ZM241385 and SCH58261 displaced [3H]CGS21680 with higher affinity in striatum than in hippocampus. In hippocampus, no typical adenosine A2A binding was detected, and ST1535 was the only compound that occupied atypical A2A adenosine receptors. Present data are explained in terms of heteromeric association among adenosine A2A, A2B and A1 receptors, rather than with the presence of atypical A2A receptor subtype. PMID:21423433

  1. Adenosine deaminase and adenosine kinase expression in human glioma and their correlation with glioma-associated epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JUN; HE, YUJIAO; CHEN, MINGNA; DU, JUAN; LI, GUOLIANG; LI, SHUYU; LIU, WEIPING; LONG, XIAOYAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate adenosine deaminase (ADA) and adenosine kinase (ADK) expression in human glioma and to explore its correlation with glioma-associated epilepsy. Tumor tissues (n=45) and peritumoral tissues (n=14) were obtained from glioma patients undergoing surgery. Normal control tissues (n=8) were obtained from brain trauma patients. The disease grade was determined by histological evaluation and the degree of tumor invasion was evaluated using immunofluorescence analyses. mRNA and protein expression of ADA and ADK were evaluated using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction or western blot analysis, respectively. Based on histological evaluations, four cases were classified as Grade I gliomas, 18 cases as Grade II, 17 cases as Grade III and six cases were considered Grade IV. Increased ADA and ADK expression was observed in tumor tissues. ADA was predominantly distributed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells, whereas ADK was detected in the cytoplasm as well as in the nuclei. ADA and ADK levels were upregulated in patients with Grade II and Grade III gliomas compared to those in control subjects (p<0.05). In addition, tumor invasion was detected in peritumoral tissues. The number of ADA-positive or ADK-positive cells in tumor tissues was similar between glioma patients with and without epilepsy (p>0.05). However, ADA and ADK expression was upregulated in peritumoral tissues derived from patients with epilepsy compared to that in glioma patients without epilepsy. The results of the present study suggested that ADA and ADK are involved in glioma progression, and that increased ADA and ADK levels in peritumoral tissues may be associated with epilepsy in glioma patients. PMID:26329539

  2. The binding of adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine to calf thymus histones measured by non-equilibrium dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Just, G; Holler, E

    1987-01-01

    Binding of adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine (Ap4A) to histones of calf thymus was investigated by non-equilibrium dialysis. Histone H1 interacts with the dinucleotide via two strong sites and competes with Mg2+ ions. Intrinsic dissociation constants were 1.6 +/- 0.1 microM and 11 +/- 1 microM for zero and 0.4 mm-Mg2+ concentration respectively. Binding of poly(dT) and of other nucleotides to histone H1 was measured in an [3H]Ap4A-competition assay. The tendency to form complexes among nucleotides was highest for bisnucleoside tetraphosphates and decreased in the order poly(dT) greater than or equal to Ap4A approximately Gp4G greater than Ap4 much greater than Ap3A approximately Ap5A greater than or equal to ATP, GTP and dTTP. The co-ordination complex derived from Ap4A and cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum(II) was not reactive. The other histones of calf thymus also bound Ap4A with affinities decreasing in the order H4 approximately H3 greater than H1 greater than H2b greater than H2a. Ap4A stimulated the exchange of histone H1 between nucleosomes, but this effect was referred to ionic strength. It did not bind to assembled nucleosomes. Binding of Ap4A to histone H1 was decreased by salt (NaCl). At physiological saline concentration the value of the dissociation constant is commensurable with the value of the Ap4A concentration in the nucleus and thus indicative of complex-formation in vivo. PMID:3689327

  3. [The influence of purine nucleotides and adenosine on bioelectrical activity of bat (Pipistrellus nathusii) heart].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, V S; Abramochkin, D V; Zakarian, A A; Sukhova, G S; Rozenshtraukh, L V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of work was to investigate effects of adenosine, AMP, GMP and ADP-ribose on bioelectric activity of bat heart. Purine nucleotides decreased action potential duration at level of 90% (APD90) repolarization in bat ventricular myocardium. When preparation of right ventricle was paced with frequency of 6 Hz, APD50 and APD90 were 7 +/- 2 ms and 60 +/- 5 ms, respectively. Adenosine decreased APD90 by 50 +/- 10% (n=6), AMP - by 30 +/- 10% (n=6), GMP - by 38 +/- 5% (n=6), ADP-ribose - by 24 +/- 6% (n=6) (concentration of all compounds - 10 ). Effects of purine nucleotides and nucleoside in bat ventricular myocardium exceed effects of same compounds in rat and ground squirrel ventricular myocardium. Inhibitory effects of purine nucleotides and adenosine in bat heart could be mediated by A1 adenosine receptors. PMID:18789010

  4. Adenosine deaminase and nucleoside phosphorylase activities in normal human blood mononuclear cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Macdermott, R. P.; Tritsch, G. L.; Formeister, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase and nucleoside phosphorylase activity is highest in T cells and macrophages; null cells have approximately half the amount and B cells have the least amount of both enzyme activities PMID:6781801

  5. Microthalamotomy effect during deep brain stimulation: potential involvement of adenosine and glutamate efflux.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su-Youne; Shon, Young Min; Agnesi, Filippo; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus is widely used in humans to treat essential tremor and tremor dominant Parkinson's disease. After DBS lead implantation, tremor is often reduced even without electrical stimulation. Often called "microthalamotomy" effect, the exact mechanism is unknown, although it is presumed to be due to micro lesioning. Here, we tested whether microthalamotomy effect may, in fact, be mediated via release of neurotransmitters adenosine and glutamate, using fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and amperometry, respectively. Implantation of microelectrodes into the ventrolateral (VL) thalamus of the rat resulted in transient rise in adenosine and glutamate level from mechanical stimulation. Similarly, high frequency stimulation (100 - 130 Hz) of the VL thalamus also resulted in adenosine and glutamate release. These results suggest that glutamate and adenosine release may be an important and unappreciated mechanism whereby mechanical stimulation via electrode implantation procedure may achieve the microthalamotomy effect. PMID:19964296

  6. Microthalamotomy effect during Deep Brain Stimulation: Potential Involvement of Adenosine and Glutamate Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Su-Youne; Shon, Young Min; Agnesi, Filippo; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus is widely used in humans to treat essential tremor and tremor dominant Parkinsons disease. After DBS lead implantation, tremor is often reduced even without electrical stimulation. Often called microthalamotomy effect, the exact mechanism is unknown, although it is presumed to be due to micro lesioning. Here, we tested whether microthalamotomy effect may, in fact, be mediated via release of neurotransmitters adenosine and glutamate, using fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and amperometry, respectively. Implantation of microelectrodes into the ventrolateral (VL) thalamus of the rat resulted in transient rise in adenosine and glutamate level from mechanical stimulation. Similarly, high frequency stimulation (100 130 Hz) of the VL thalamus also resulted in adenosine and glutamate release. These results suggest that glutamate and adenosine release may be an important and unappreciated mechanism whereby mechanical stimulation via electrode implantation procedure may achieve the microthalamotomy effect. PMID:19964296

  7. Laboratory procedures manual for the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Knust, E. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Vance, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A manual on the procedures and instruments developed for the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) luciferase assay is presented. Data cover, laboratory maintenance, maintenance of bacterial cultures, bacteria measurement, reagents, luciferase procedures, and determination of microbal susceptibility to antibiotics.

  8. Passive targeting of ischemic-reperfused myocardium with adenosine-loaded silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Galagudza, Michael; Korolev, Dmitry; Postnov, Viktor; Naumisheva, Elena; Grigorova, Yulia; Uskov, Ivan; Shlyakhto, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological agents suggested for infarct size limitation have serious side effects when used at cardioprotective doses which hinders their translation into clinical practice. The solution to the problem might be direct delivery of cardioprotective drugs into ischemic-reperfused myocardium. In this study, we explored the potential of silica nanoparticles for passive delivery of adenosine, a prototype cardioprotective agent, into ischemic-reperfused heart tissue. In addition, the biodegradation of silica nanoparticles was studied both in vitro and in vivo. Immobilization of adenosine on the surface of silica nanoparticles resulted in enhancement of adenosine-mediated infarct size limitation in the rat model. Furthermore, the hypotensive effect of adenosine was attenuated after its adsorption on silica nanoparticles. We conclude that silica nanoparticles are biocompatible materials that might potentially be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. PMID:22619519

  9. Analysis of normal and mutant forms of human adenosine deaminase - a review.

    PubMed

    Daddona, P E; Kelley, W N

    1980-02-01

    A deficiency of the enzyme adenosine deaminase is associated with an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency disease in man. The molecular forms of the normal human enzyme have now been well characterized in an effort to better understand the nature of the enzyme defect in affected patients. In some human tissues adenosine deaminase exists predominantly as a small molecular form while in other tissues a large form composed of adenosine deaminase (small form) and an adenosine deaminase-binding protein predominates. The small form of the enzyme purified to homogeneity by antibody affinity chromatography is a monomer of native molecular weight of 37,600. The adenosine deaminase-binding protein, purified by adenosine deaminase affinity chromatography, appears to be a dimer of native molecular weight 213,000 and contains carbohydrate. Based on direct binding measurements, chemical cross-linking studies and sedimentation equilibrium analyses, small form adenosine deaminase has been shown to combine with purified binding protein in a molar ratio of 2:1 respectively to produce the large form adenosine deaminase. Reduced, but widely ranging levels of adenosine deaminating activity, have been reported in various tissues of adenosine deaminase deficient patients. Further, the characteristics of this residual enzyme activity have been analyzed immunochemically to substantiate genetic heterogeneity in this disorder. While many types of immunodeficiency are currently recognized in man, in most cases the molecular defect is unknown. The discovery of a deficiency of the enzyme, adenosine deaminase, ADA, (EC 3.5.4.4), in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease represented an early clue to the pathogenesis of immune dysfunction at the molecular level 1-4. Affected patients with markedly reduced levels of ADA exhibit a defect of both cellular and humoral immunity characterized clinically by severe recurrent infections with a fatal outcome if untreated. Attempts to elucidate the nature of the genetic mutation(s) leading to the reduction of ADA activity in these immunodeficient patients have been complicated in part by an incomplete understanding of the nature of ADA in normal tissues. In this review we will consider the structural characteristics of the normal and mutant forms of ADA as they are currently understood. PMID:6988697

  10. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cronstein, B N; Eberle, M A; Gruber, H E; Levin, R I

    1991-01-01

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, we determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from [14C]adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts from 4 +/- 1% to 31 +/- 6% of total purine released (EC50, 1 nM) and by endothelial cells from 24 +/- 4% to 42 +/- 7%. Methotrexate-enhanced adenosine release from fibroblasts was further increased to 51 +/- 4% (EC50, 6 nM) and from endothelial cells was increased to 58 +/- 5% of total purine released by exposure to stimulated (fMet-Leu-Phe at 0.1 microM) neutrophils. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up [14C]adenine and released 14C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils (IC50, 9 nM) and stimulated neutrophils (IC50, 13 nM). Methotrexate treatment inhibited neutrophil adherence by enhancing adenosine release from fibroblasts since digestion of extracellular adenosine by added adenosine deaminase completely abrogated the effect of methotrexate on neutrophil adherence without, itself, affecting adherence. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside referred to hereafter as acadesine) has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. We found that acadesine also promotes adenosine release from and inhibits neutrophil adherence to connective tissue cells. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:2006182

  11. LDL-cholesterol reduction in patients with hypercholesterolemia by modulation of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Newton, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the profile of ETC-1002, as shown in preclinical and clinical studies, including LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering activity and beneficial effects on other cardiometabolic risk markers as they relate to the inhibition of adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Recent findings ETC-1002 is an adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase inhibitor/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator currently in Phase 2b clinical development. In seven Phase 1 and Phase 2a clinical studies, ETC-1002 dosed once daily for 212 weeks has lowered LDL-C and reduced high-sensitivity C-reactive protein by up to 40%, with neutral to positive effects on glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight. Importantly, use of ETC-1002 in statin-intolerant patients has shown statin-like lowering of LDL-C without the muscle pain and weakness responsible for discontinuation of statin use by many patients. ETC-1002 has also been shown to produce an incremental benefit, lowering LDL-C as an add-on therapy to a low-dose statin. In over 300 individuals in studies of up to 12 weeks, ETC-1002 has been well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. Summary Because adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase play central roles in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, pharmacological modulation of these two enzymes could provide an important therapeutic alternative for statin-intolerant patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24978142

  12. Human adenosine deaminase: properties and turnover in cultured T and B lymphoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Daddona, P.E.

    1981-12-10

    In this study, the properties and rate of turnover of adenosine deaminase are compared in cultured human T and B lymphoblast cell lines. 1) Relative to B lymphoblasts, the level of adenosine deaminase activity in extracts of T lymphoblast cell lines (MOLT-4, RPMI-8402, CCRF-CEM, and CCRF-HSB-2) is elevated 7-14-fold and differs by 2-fold between the C cell lines. 2) In both T and B lymphoblast extracts, the enzyme is apparently identical, based on K/sub m/ for adenosine and deoxyadenosine, K/sub i/ for inosine, V/sub max/ for adenosine, /sub S20,w/, isoelectric pH, and heat stability. Furthermore, by radioimmunoassay, the quantity of adenosine deaminase-immunocreative protein is proportional to the level of enzyme activity in all cell lines studies. 3) Using a purification and selective immunoprecipitation technique, the enzyme turnover could be assessed in cell lines labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine. The apparent rate of adenosine deaminase synthesis, relative to total protein, is 2-fold faster in both T cell lines (RPMI-8402 and CCRF-CEM) than in the B cell lines (MGL-8 and GM-130). The apparent half-life (tsub1/2) for the enzyme degradation is 19 and 39 h, respectively, in CCFR-CEM and RPMI-8402, while the tsub1/2 in both B cell lines is 7-9 h. From the net rate of synthesis and degradation, the T cell lines, respectively, exhibit approximately a 6- and 12-fold difference in adenosine deaminase turnover relative to B cells, consistent with the observed differences in enzyme activity. This study suggests that while adenosine deaminase is apparently identical in both T and B lymphoblast cell lines, alterations in both the rate of enzyme synthesis and degradation contribute to its high steady state level in T cells.

  13. Adenosine is not essential for exercise hyperaemia in the hindlimb in conscious dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, L G; Britton, S L; Metting, P J

    1990-01-01

    1. The contribution of endogenous adenosine to the increase in hindlimb blood flow that occurs during treadmill exercise was evaluated in conscious dogs. We postulated that if adenosine is essential for the hindlimb hyperaemic response, then pharmacological treatment of the animals with adenosine receptor antagonists should decrease hindlimb blood flow during treadmill exercise. 2. A total of twenty-three dogs were chronically instrumented for measurement of aortic blood pressure and hindlimb blood flow using electromagnetic or Doppler flow probes on the left external iliac artery. Measurements of arterial blood pressure, hindlimb blood flow and heart rate were made during steady-state treadmill exercise in both the presence and the absence of adenosine receptor antagonists. Four different protocols were performed using different routes of administration of two adenosine receptor antagonists. Aminophylline was used in most of the experiments, and the effects of the more potent antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline, were also evaluated. In addition, the dogs exercised at varying intensities ranging from a low level of 5.5 km h-1 at 0% gradient to a high intensity of 5.5 km h-1 at 21% gradient. 3. Aminophylline given as a single intravenous dose, or as a constant infusion either intravenously or directly into the hindlimb artery, did not decrease hindlimb blood flow at low, moderate or high intensities of exercise. Likewise, the blockade of adenosine receptors with 8-phenyltheophylline, given systemically or as a bolus injection administered directly into the hindlimb circulation during moderate exercise, did not attenuate the hindlimb blood flow response. 4. Our data demonstrate that exercise hyperaemia of the hindlimb is not reduced by antagonism of adenosine receptors. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that adenosine is not an essential mediator of hindlimb vasodilatation during exercise. PMID:2277358

  14. Sitagliptin attenuates sympathetic innervation via modulating reactive oxygen species and interstitial adenosine in infarcted rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yang, Chen-Chia; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chang, Nen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, attenuates arrhythmias through inhibiting nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in post-infarcted normoglycemic rats, focusing on adenosine and reactive oxygen species production. DPP-4 bound adenosine deaminase has been shown to catalyse extracellular adenosine to inosine. DPP-4 inhibitors increased adenosine levels by inhibiting the complex formation. Normoglycemic male Wistar rats were subjected to coronary ligation and then randomized to either saline or sitagliptin in in vivo and ex vivo studies. Post-infarction was associated with increased oxidative stress, as measured by myocardial superoxide, nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium fluorescent staining. Measurement of myocardial norepinephrine levels revealed a significant elevation in vehicle-treated infarcted rats compared with sham. Compared with vehicle, infarcted rats treated with sitagliptin significantly increased interstitial adenosine levels and attenuated oxidative stress. Sympathetic hyperinnervation was blunted after administering sitagliptin, as assessed by immunofluorescent analysis and western blotting and real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NGF. Arrhythmic scores in the sitagliptin-treated infarcted rats were significantly lower than those in vehicle. Ex vivo studies showed a similar effect of erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (an adenosine deaminase inhibitor) to sitagliptin on attenuated levels of superoxide and NGF. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of sitagliptin on superoxide anion production and NGF levels can be reversed by 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropulxanthine (adenosine A1 receptor antagonist) and exogenous hypoxanthine. Sitagliptin protects ventricular arrhythmias by attenuating sympathetic innervation via adenosine A1 receptor and xanthine oxidase-dependent pathways, which converge through the attenuated formation of superoxide in the non-diabetic infarcted rats. PMID:25388908

  15. Adenosine receptors on human airway epithelia and their relationship to chloride secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Lazarowski, E. R.; Mason, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Harden, T. K.; Boucher, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have characterized an adenosine receptor subtype present in human airway epithelial cells by measuring the changes in the intracellular levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and the rate of transepithelial Cl- secretion. 2. Primary cultures of human nasal epithelium obtained from excised surgical airway epithelial tissues and the cell lines BEAS39 and CF/T43 derived from human airway epithelium were grown on plastic dishes and labelled with [3H]-adenine for measurement of intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation. Primary cultures were loaded with the calcium indicator fura-2 to measure [Ca2+]i and studied as polarized, ion transporting epithelia on collagen matrix supports for measurement of Cl- secretion. 3. Adenosine analogues stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation with a rank order of potency characteristic of an A2-receptor: 5-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than adenosine greater than R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA), 6-N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) greater than S-PIA. NECA increased cyclic AMP accumulation in normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) primary cells as well as in the CF/T43 and BEAS39 cell lines with K0.5 values ranging from 0.3 to 3 microM. Preincubation with NECA resulted in the homologous desensitization of airway epithelial cells. The effect of NECA was specifically inhibited by the adenosine receptor antagonist, aminophylline, in a competitive manner. 4. The A1-adenosine receptor agonists CPA and R-PIA did not inhibit isoprenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in CF/T43 cells, and potentiating effects of the adenosine analogues were observed on forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. Adenosine analogues did not cause significant changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in airway epithelium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1327386

  16. Ticagrelor Does Not Inhibit Adenosine Transport at Relevant Concentrations: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rongen, G. A.; van den Broek, P. H. H.; Bilos, A.; Donders, A. R. T.; Gomes, M. E.; Riksen, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In patients with myocardial infarction, ticagrelor reduces cardiovascular and sepsis-related mortality, and can cause dyspnea. It is suggested that this is caused by adenosine receptor stimulation, because in preclinical studies, ticagrelor blocks the nucleoside transporter and increases cellular ATP release. We now investigated the effects of ticagrelor on the adenosine system in humans in vivo. Experimental Approach In a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in 14 healthy subjects, we have tested whether ticagrelor (180 mg) affects adenosine- and dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation, as surrogates of nucleoside uptake inhibition and adenosine formation, respectively. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was measured. Primary endpoint was adenosine-induced vasodilation. Key Results Ticagrelor did not affect adenosine- or dipyridamole-induced forearm vasodilation. Also, ex vivo uptake of adenosine and uridine in isolated red blood cells was not affected by ticagrelor. In vitro, ticagrelor dose-dependently inhibited nucleoside uptake, but only at supra-physiological concentrations. Conclusion and Implications In conclusion, at relevant plasma concentration, ticagrelor does not affect adenosine transport, nor adenosine formation in healthy subjects. Therefore, it is unlikely that this mechanism is a relevant pleiotropic effect of ticagrelor. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01996735 PMID:26509673

  17. Auto-inhibition of rat parallel fibrePurkinje cell synapses by activity-dependent adenosine release

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Mark J; Dale, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine is an important signalling molecule involved in a large number of physiological functions. In the brain these processes are as diverse as sleep, memory, locomotion and neuroprotection during episodes of ischaemia and hypoxia. Although the actions of adenosine, through cell surface G-protein-coupled receptors, are well characterized, in many cases the sources of adenosine and mechanisms of release have not been defined. Here we demonstrate the activity-dependent release of adenosine in the cerebellum using a combination of electrophysiology and biosensors. Short trains of electrical stimuli delivered to the molecular layer in vitro, release adenosine via a process that is both TTX and Ca2+ sensitive. As ATP release cannot be detected, adenosine must either be released directly or rapidly produced by highly localized and efficient extracellular ATP breakdown. Since adenosine release can be modulated by receptors that act on parallel fibrePurkinje cell synapses, we suggest that the parallel fibres release adenosine. This activity-dependent adenosine release exerts feedback inhibition of parallel fibrePurkinje cell transmission. Spike-mediated adenosine release from parallel fibres will thus powerfully regulate cerebellar circuit output. PMID:17347275

  18. Thallium-201 scintigraphy after intravenous infusion of adenosine compared with exercise thallium testing in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, E.P.; Belvedere, D.A.; Vande Streek, P.R.; Weiland, F.L.; Evans, R.B.; Spaccavento, L.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Adenosine is an endogenously produced compound that has significant effects as a coronary and systemic vasodilator. Previous studies suggest that intravenous infusion of adenosine, coupled with thallium-201 scintigraphy, may have specific value as a noninvasive means of evaluating coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of adenosine thallium testing with that of standard exercise thallium testing. One hundred subjects were studied with exercise thallium imaging and thallium imaging after adenosine infusion, including 47 with angiographically proved coronary artery disease and 53 control subjects. The overall sensitivity of the thallium procedures was 81% for the exercise study and 83% for the adenosine study (p = NS); the specificity was 74% for the exercise study and 75% for the adenosine study (p = NS). The diagnostic accuracy of the exercise study was 77% and that of the adenosine study was 79%. Ninety-four percent of subjects had an adverse effect due to the adenosine infusion; however, most of these effects were mild and well tolerated. All adverse effects abated within 30 to 45 s of the termination of the study, consistent with the very brief half-life of the agent. Thus, thallium-201 scintigraphy after intravenous infusion of adenosine has a diagnostic value similar to that of exercise thallium testing for evaluation of coronary artery disease. Adenosine thallium testing may be particularly useful in evaluating patients unable to perform treadmill exercise testing.

  19. Oral sucrose for heel lance enhances adenosine triphosphate use in preterm neonates with respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Asmerom, Yayesh; Boskovic, Danilo S; Slater, Laurel; Bacot-Carter, Sharon; Bahjri, Khaled; Mukasa, Joseph; Holden, Megan; Fayard, Elba

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of oral sucrose on procedural pain, and on biochemical markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization and oxidative stress in preterm neonates with mild to moderate respiratory distress. Study design: Preterm neonates with a clinically required heel lance that met study criteria (n = 49) were randomized into three groups: (1) control (n = 24), (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (n = 15) and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (n = 10). Plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, chi-square and one-way analysis of variance. Results: We found that in preterm neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2, a single dose of oral sucrose given before a heel lance significantly increased markers of adenosine triphosphate use. Conclusion: We found that oral sucrose enhanced adenosine triphosphate use in neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2. Although oral sucrose decreased pain scores, our data suggest that it also increased energy use as evidenced by increased plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization. These effects of sucrose, specifically the fructose component, on adenosine triphosphate metabolism warrant further investigation. PMID:26770807

  20. A ketogenic diet suppresses seizures in mice through adenosine A? receptors.

    PubMed

    Masino, Susan A; Li, Tianfu; Theofilas, Panos; Sandau, Ursula S; Ruskin, David N; Fredholm, Bertil B; Geiger, Jonathan D; Aronica, Eleonora; Boison, Detlev

    2011-07-01

    A ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate metabolic regimen; its effectiveness in the treatment of refractory epilepsy suggests that the mechanisms underlying its anticonvulsive effects differ from those targeted by conventional antiepileptic drugs. Recently, KD and analogous metabolic strategies have shown therapeutic promise in other neurologic disorders, such as reducing brain injury, pain, and inflammation. Here, we have shown that KD can reduce seizures in mice by increasing activation of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). When transgenic mice with spontaneous seizures caused by deficiency in adenosine metabolism or signaling were fed KD, seizures were nearly abolished if mice had intact A1Rs, were reduced if mice expressed reduced A1Rs, and were unaltered if mice lacked A1Rs. Seizures were restored by injecting either glucose (metabolic reversal) or an A1R antagonist (pharmacologic reversal). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the KD reduced adenosine kinase, the major adenosine-metabolizing enzyme. Importantly, hippocampal tissue resected from patients with medically intractable epilepsy demonstrated increased adenosine kinase. We therefore conclude that adenosine deficiency may be relevant to human epilepsy and that KD can reduce seizures by increasing A1R-mediated inhibition. PMID:21701065

  1. Intravenous adenosine (adenoscan) versus exercise in the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease by SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Mohama, R.; Slavich, I.L. 3d.; Lumia, F.J.; Cha, S.D.; Rambaran, N.; Maranhao, V. )

    1990-11-01

    Fifteen patients at a mean age of 58 underwent adenosine and maximal exercise thallium SPECT imaging. All scans were performed 1 week apart and within 4 weeks of cardiac catheterization. SPECT imaging was performed after the infusion of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine for 6 minutes. Mean heart rate increment during adenosine administration was 67 +/- 3.7 to 77 +/- 4.1. Mean blood pressure was 136 +/- 7.2 to 135 +/- 6.2 systolic and 78 +/- 1.8 to 68 +/- 2.6 diastolic. No adverse hemodynamic effects were observed. There were no changes in PR or QRS in intervals. Five stress ECGs were ischemic. No ST changes were observed with adenosine. Although 68% of the patients had symptoms of flushing, light-headedness, and dizziness during adenosine infusion, symptoms resolved within 1 minute of dosage adjustment or termination of the infusion in all but one patient, who required theophylline. Sensitivity for coronary artery detection was 77% and specificity 100%. Concordance between adenoscans and exercise thallium scintigraphy was high (13/15 = 87%). In two patients, there were minor scintigraphic differences. The authors conclude that adenosine is a sensitive, specific, and safe alternative to exercise testing in patients referred for thallium imaging and may be preferable to dipyridamole.

  2. Striatal Adenosine Signaling Regulates EAAT2 and Astrocytic AQP4 Expression and Alcohol Drinking in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moonnoh R; Ruby, Christina L; Hinton, David J; Choi, Sun; Adams, Chelsea A; Young Kang, Na; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcoholism. Among its diverse functions in the brain, adenosine regulates glutamate release and has an essential role in ethanol sensitivity and preference. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying adenosine-mediated glutamate signaling in neuroglial interaction remain elusive. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ethanol-sensitive adenosine transporter, type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1), drink more ethanol compared with wild-type mice and have elevated striatal glutamate levels. In addition, ENT1 inhibition or knockdown reduces glutamate transporter expression in cultured astrocytes. Here, we examined how adenosine signaling in astrocytes contributes to ethanol drinking. Inhibition or deletion of ENT1 reduced the expression of type 2 excitatory amino-acid transporter (EAAT2) and the astrocyte-specific water channel, aquaporin 4 (AQP4). EAAT2 and AQP4 colocalization was also reduced in the striatum of ENT1 null mice. Ceftriaxone, an antibiotic compound known to increase EAAT2 expression and function, elevated not only EAAT2 but also AQP4 expression in the striatum. Furthermore, ceftriaxone reduced ethanol drinking, suggesting that ENT1-mediated downregulation of EAAT2 and AQP4 expression contributes to excessive ethanol consumption in our mouse model. Overall, our findings indicate that adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expressions, which control ethanol drinking in mice. PMID:23032072

  3. Age-related changes in adenosine in rat coronary resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Rose'Meyer, R B; Harden, F A; Varela, J I; Harrison, G J; Willis, R J

    1999-01-01

    1. The vasodilator effects of adenosine receptor agonists, isoprenaline and histamine were examined in perfused heart preparations from young (4-6 weeks) and mature (12-20 weeks) rats. 2. Adenosine induced a biphasic concentration-dependent decrease in KCl (35 mM) raised coronary perfusion pressure in hearts from young and mature rats, suggesting the presence of both high- and low-affinity sites for adenosine receptors in the two age groups tested. In heart preparations from mature rats, vasodilator responses to adenosine were significantly reduced compared with responses observed in young rats. 3. Responses to 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680) were reduced in preparations from mature rats, whereas the vasodilator actions of N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and N6-2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyladenosine (APNEA) did not change with age. 4. The results presented in this study suggest that several adenosine receptor subtypes mediate vasodilator responses in the coronary circulation of the rat and that a reduction in response to adenosine with age may be due to changes in the high-affinity receptor site. PMID:9888251

  4. Functional proteomics of adenosine triphosphatase system in the rat striatum during aging?

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Ferrari, Federica; Gorini, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    The maximum rates of adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) systems related to energy consumption were systematically evaluated in synaptic plasma membranes isolated from the striata of male Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, because of their key role in presynaptic nerve ending homeostasis. The following enzyme activities were evaluated: sodium-potassium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+, Mg2+-ATPase); ouabain-insensitive magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+-ATPase); sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase); direct magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Mg2+-ATPase); calcium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase); and acetylcholinesterase. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase decreased at 18 and 24 months, Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase decreased from 6 months, while Mg2+-ATPase was unmodified. Therefore, ATPases vary independently during aging, suggesting that the ATPase enzyme systems are of neuropathological and pharmacological importance. This could be considered as an experimental model to study regeneration processes, because of the age-dependent modifications of specific synaptic plasma membranes. ATPases cause selective changes in some cerebral functions, especially bioenergetic systems. This could be of physiopathological significance, particularly in many central nervous system diseases, where, during regenerative processes, energy availability is essential. PMID:25806051

  5. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Fe-S Targeted Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Suzuki, Yuta; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) is an iron-sulfur enzyme that is vital for survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during dormancy and is an attractive target for the treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. The 4Fe-4S cluster is coordinated to APR by sulfur atoms of four cysteine residues, is proximal to substrate, adenosine 5′-phopsphosulfate (APS), and is essential for catalytic activity. Herein, we present an approach for the development of a new class of APR inhibitors. As an initial step, we have employed an improved solid-phase chemistry method to prepare a series of N6-substituted adenosine analogues and their 5′-phosphates as well as adenosine 5′-phosphate diesters bearing different Fe and S binding groups, such as thiols or carboxylic and hydroxamic acid moieties. Evaluation of the resulting compounds indicates a clearly defined spacing requirement between the Fe-S targeting group and adenosine scaffold and that smaller Fe-S targeting groups are better tolerated. Molecular docking analysis suggests that the S atom of the most potent inhibitor may establish a favorable interaction with an S atom in the cluster. In summary, this study showcases an improved solid-phase method that expedites the preparation of adenosine and related 5′-phosphate derivatives and presents a unique Fe-S targeting strategy for the development of APR inhibitors. PMID:25710356

  6. Extracellular Adenosine Generation in the Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Responses and Pathogen Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M. Samiul; Costales, Matthew G.; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Williams, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine, an immunomodulatory biomolecule, is produced by the ecto-enzymes CD39 (nucleoside triphosphate dephosphorylase) and CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) by dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73 is expressed by many cell types during injury, infection and during steady-state conditions. Besides host cells, many bacteria also have CD39-CD73-like machinery, which helps the pathogen subvert the host inflammatory response. The major function for adenosine is anti-inflammatory, and most recent research has focused on adenosine’s control of inflammatory mechanisms underlying various autoimmune diseases (e.g., colitis, arthritis). Although adenosine generated through CD73 provides a feedback to control tissue damage mediated by a host immune response, it can also contribute to immunosuppression. Thus, inflammation can be a double-edged sword: it may harm the host but eventually helps by killing the invading pathogen. The role of adenosine in dampening inflammation has been an area of active research, but the relevance of the CD39/CD73-axis and adenosine receptor signaling in host defense against infection has received less attention. Here, we review our recent knowledge regarding CD73 expression during murine Salmonellosis and Helicobacter-induced gastric infection and its role in disease pathogenesis and bacterial persistence. We also explored a possible role for the CD73/adenosine pathway in regulating innate host defense function during infection. PMID:25950510

  7. Metabolic Autocrine Regulation of Neurons Involves Cooperation Among Pannexin Hemichannels, Adenosine Receptors and KATP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Masahito; Ruskin, David N.; Masino, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic perturbations that decrease or limit blood glucose - such as fasting or adhering to a ketogenic diet – reduce epileptic seizures significantly. To date, the critical links between altered metabolism and decreased neuronal activity remain unknown. More generally, metabolic changes accompany numerous central nervous system disorders, and the purines ATP and its core molecule adenosine are poised to translate cell energy into altered neuronal activity. Here we show that non-pathological changes in metabolism induce a purinergic autoregulation of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron excitability. During conditions of sufficient intracellular ATP, reducing extracellular glucose induces pannexin-1 hemichannel-mediated ATP release directly from CA3 neurons. This extracellular ATP is dephosphorylated to adenosine, activates neuronal adenosine A1 receptors, and, unexpectedly, hyperpolarizes neuronal membrane potential via ATP-sensitive K+ channels. Together, these data delineate an autocrine regulation of neuronal excitability via ATP and adenosine in a seizure-prone subregion of the hippocampus, and offer new mechanistic insight into the relationship between decreased glucose and increased seizure threshold. By establishing neuronal ATP release via pannexin hemichannels, and hippocampal adenosine A1 receptors coupled to ATP-sensitive K+ channels, we reveal detailed information regarding the relationship between metabolism and neuronal activity and new strategies for adenosine-based therapies in the central nervous system. PMID:20237259

  8. Metabolic autocrine regulation of neurons involves cooperation among pannexin hemichannels, adenosine receptors, and KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Masahito; Ruskin, David N; Masino, Susan A

    2010-03-17

    Metabolic perturbations that decrease or limit blood glucose-such as fasting or adhering to a ketogenic diet-reduce epileptic seizures significantly. To date, the critical links between altered metabolism and decreased neuronal activity remain unknown. More generally, metabolic changes accompany numerous CNS disorders, and the purines ATP and its core molecule adenosine are poised to translate cell energy into altered neuronal activity. Here we show that nonpathological changes in metabolism induce a purinergic autoregulation of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron excitability. During conditions of sufficient intracellular ATP, reducing extracellular glucose induces pannexin-1 hemichannel-mediated ATP release directly from CA3 neurons. This extracellular ATP is dephosphorylated to adenosine, activates neuronal adenosine A(1) receptors, and, unexpectedly, hyperpolarizes neuronal membrane potential via ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Together, these data delineate an autocrine regulation of neuronal excitability via ATP and adenosine in a seizure-prone subregion of the hippocampus and offer new mechanistic insight into the relationship between decreased glucose and increased seizure threshold. By establishing neuronal ATP release via pannexin hemichannels, and hippocampal adenosine A(1) receptors coupled to ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, we reveal detailed information regarding the relationship between metabolism and neuronal activity and new strategies for adenosine-based therapies in the CNS. PMID:20237259

  9. Adenosine as an Adjunct Therapy in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients: Myth or Truth?

    PubMed

    Kassimis, George; Davlouros, Periklis; Patel, Niket; De Maria, Gianluigi; Kallistratos, Manolis S; Kharbanda, Rajesh K; Manolis, Athanasios J; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Banning, Adrian P

    2015-10-01

    Early reperfusion represents the key strategy in ST elevation myocardial infarction. However, reperfusion may induce myocardial damage due to the reperfusion myocardial injury, compromising the full potential of reperfusion therapy and accounting for unfavourable results in high risk patients. Adenosine seems to attenuate ischemia reperfusion injury, and thus represents a promising therapeutic option for treating such patients. However, previous randomized clinical trials have collectively failed to demonstrate whether adenosine can effectively reduce measures of myocardial injury and improve clinical outcome, despite its good basic evidence. The failure of such trials to show a real beneficial action may be in part related to specific factors other than adenosine's clinical efficacy. The purpose of this review is to explain the rationale for the use of adenosine as an adjunctive pharmacological cardio-protective agent following reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium, to address the weakness of previous trials and to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effect of adenosine administration on reperfusion myocardial injury in patients with myocardial infarction. Although some preclinical and clinical studies point towards the beneficial role of adenosine in the prevention and treatment of no-reflow phenomenon in myocardial infarction, many unanswered questions still remain, including the optimal clinical indication, mode, dosage, duration and timing of application, and the exact mechanisms leading to potential benefits. Clarifying these issues will depend on further properly designed, adequately powered and well conducted clinical trials, which will probably provide us with the definite answers. PMID:26150100

  10. KF polymerase-based fluorescence aptasensor for the label-free adenosine detection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dongli; Jiao, Huping; Wang, Bin; Lin, Quan; Yu, Cong

    2012-02-21

    We have developed a simple, inexpensive, and label-free method for the selective detection of adenosine. Klenow fragment polymerase (KF polymerase) is a commonly-used 5' to 3' DNA polymerase, it also has 3' to 5' exonuclease activity that can digest single-stranded DNA. An adenosine binding DNA aptamer was employed, the aptamer was split into two pieces of single-stranded DNA (aptamer-A1 + aptamer-A2). Without the addition of adenosine, aptamer-A1 and aptamer-A2 existed as single-stranded DNA which could be efficiently degraded by the exonuclease activity of KF polymerase. Much reduced background fluorescence was obtained when SYBR Green dye was added. However, in the presence of adenosine, aptamer-A1 and aptamer-A2 bound to adenosine, and hybridization of the complementary sequences resulted in the formation of a duplex DNA structure, which could initiate DNA polymerization. The addition of SYBR Green dye resulted in a very high fluorescence enhancement, which could be used for the quantification of adenosine. PMID:22183639

  11. Highlights on the development of A(2A) adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, Gloria; Cacciari, Barbara; Dal Ben, Diego; Lambertucci, Catia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Volpini, Rosaria

    2007-03-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the past few decades demonstrating that adenosine modulates a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes through the interaction with four subtypes of a family of cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors, clinical evaluation of some adenosine receptor ligands has been discontinued. Major problems include side effects due to the wide distribution of adenosine receptors, low brain penetration (which is important for the targeting of CNS diseases), short half-life of compounds, or a lack of effects, in some cases perhaps due to receptor desensitization or to low receptor density in the targeted tissue. Currently, three A(2A) adenosine receptor agonists have begun phase III studies. Two of them are therapeutically evaluated as pharmacologic stress agents and the third proved to be effective in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI), while avoiding the adverse effects of steroid agents. On the other hand, the great interest in the field of A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists is related to their application in neurodegenerative disorders, in particular, Parkinson's disease, and some of them are currently in various stages of evaluation. This review presents an update of medicinal chemistry and molecular recognition of A(2A) adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists, and stresses the strong need for more selective ligands at the A(2A) human subtype. PMID:17177231

  12. Ethanol-induced increase in portal blood glow: Role of adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Orrego, H.; Carmichael, F.J.; Saldivia, V.; Giles, H.G.; Sandrin, S.; Israel, Y. )

    1988-04-01

    The mechanism by which ethanol induces an increase in portal vein blood flow was studied in rats using radiolabeled microspheres. Ethanol by gavage resulted in an increase of 50-70% in portal vein blood flow. The ethanol-induced increase in portal blood flow was suppressed by the adenosine receptor blocker 8-phenyltheophylline. By itself, 8-phenyltheophylline was without effect on cardiac output or portal blood flow. Adenosine infusion resulted in a dose-dependent increase in portal blood flow. This adenosine-induced increase in portal blood flow was inhibited by 8-phenyltheophylline in a dose-dependent manner. Both alcohol and adenosine significantly reduced preportal vascular resistance by 40% and 60%, respectively. These effects were fully suppressed by 8-phenyltheophylline. It is concluded that adenosine is a likely candidate to mediate the ethanol-induced increase in portal vein blood flow. It is suggested that an increase in circulating acetate and liver hypoxia may mediate the effects of alcohol by increasing tissue and interstitial adenosine levels.

  13. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cronstein, B.N.; Eberle, M.A.; Levin, R.I. ); Gruber, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, the authors determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from ({sup 14}C)adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up ({sup 14}C)adenine and released {sup 14}C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils and stimulated neutrophils. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs.

  14. Synaptic mechanisms of adenosine A2A receptor-mediated hyperexcitability in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Diogo M; Newton, Kathryn; Nissen, Wiebke; Badurek, Sylvia; Horn, Jacqueline M; Minichiello, Liliana; Jefferys, John G R; Sebastiao, Ana M; Lamsa, Karri P

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine inhibits excitatory neurons widely in the brain through adenosine A1 receptor, but activation of adenosine A2A receptor (A2A R) has an opposite effect promoting discharge in neuronal networks. In the hippocampus A2A R expression level is low, and the receptor's effect on identified neuronal circuits is unknown. Using optogenetic afferent stimulation and whole-cell recording from identified postsynaptic neurons we show that A2A R facilitates excitatory glutamatergic Schaffer collateral synapses to CA1 pyramidal cells, but not to GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. In addition, A2A R enhances GABAergic inhibitory transmission between CA1 area interneurons leading to disinhibition of pyramidal cells. Adenosine A2A R has no direct modulatory effect on GABAergic synapses to pyramidal cells. As a result adenosine A2A R activation alters the synaptic excitation - inhibition balance in the CA1 area resulting in increased pyramidal cell discharge to glutamatergic Schaffer collateral stimulation. In line with this, we show that A2A R promotes synchronous pyramidal cell firing in hyperexcitable conditions where extracellular potassium is elevated or following high-frequency electrical stimulation. Our results revealed selective synapse- and cell type specific adenosine A2A R effects in hippocampal CA1 area. The uncovered mechanisms help our understanding of A2A R's facilitatory effect on cortical network activity. PMID:25402014

  15. Adenosine signaling in reserpine-induced depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Minor, Thomas R; Hanff, Thomas C

    2015-06-01

    A single, 6 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection of reserpine increased floating time during forced swim testing 24h after administration in rats in five experiments. Although such behavioral depression traditionally is attributed to drug-induced depletion of brain monoamines, we examined the potential contribution of adenosine signaling, which is plausibly activated by reserpine treatment and contributes to behavioral depression in other paradigms. Whereas peripheral administration of the highly selective A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (0.5, 1.0, or 5.0mg/kg i.p.) 15 min before swim testing failed to improve performance in reserpine-treated rats, swim deficits were completely reversed by 7 mg/kg of the nonselective receptor antagonist caffeine. Performance deficits were also reversed by the nonselective A2 antagonist 3,7-dimethylxanthine (0, 0.5, 1.0mg/kg i.p.), and the highly selective A2A receptor antagonist (CSC: 8-(3 chlorostyral)caffeine) (0.01, 0.1, or 1.0mg/kg i.p.) in a dose-dependent manner. The highly selective A2B antagonist alloxazine had no beneficial effect on swim performance at any dose under study (0.1, 1.0, and 5.0mg/kg i.p.). PMID:25721738

  16. Altered adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Nurit; Levanon, Erez Y.; Amariglio, Ninette; Heimberger, Amy B.; Ram, Zvi; Constantini, Shlomi; Barbash, Zohar S.; Adamsky, Konstantin; Safran, Michal; Hirschberg, Avi; Krupsky, Meir; Ben-Dov, Issachar; Cazacu, Simona; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya; Eisenberg, Eli; Rechavi, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing was recently shown to be abundant in the human transcriptome, affecting thousands of genes. Employing a bioinformatic approach, we identified significant global hypoediting of Alu repetitive elements in brain, prostate, lung, kidney, and testis tumors. Experimental validation confirmed this finding, showing significantly reduced editing in Alu sequences within MED13 transcripts in brain tissues. Looking at editing of specific recoding and noncoding sites, including in cancer-related genes, a more complex picture emerged, with a gene-specific editing pattern in tumors vs. normal tissues. Additionally, we found reduced RNA levels of all three editing mediating enzymes, ADAR, ADARB1, and ADARB2, in brain tumors. The reduction of ADARB2 correlated with the grade of malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive of brain tumors, displaying a 99% decrease in ADARB2 RNA levels. Consistently, overexpression of ADAR and ADARB1 in the U87 glioblastoma multiforme cell line resulted in decreased proliferation rate, suggesting that reduced A-to-I editing in brain tumors is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Altered epigenetic control was recently shown to play a central role in oncogenesis. We suggest that A-to-I RNA editing may serve as an additional epigenetic mechanism relevant to cancer development and progression. PMID:17908822

  17. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  18. Characterization of the adenosine receptors mediating hypothermia in the conscious mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R; Sheehan, M J; Strong, P

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of a range of adenosine receptor-selective ligands on body temperature were investigated following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in conscious mice. The compounds tested were the non-selective adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA), the adenosine A1 receptor-selective agonists cyclopentyl-adenosine (CPA), N6-(9R-phenyl-isopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA) and N-(1S,trans)-[2-hydroxyclopentyl]-adenosine (GR79236), the A2a receptor selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoaden osine (CGS-21680), the A2b receptor agonist N-[(2-methylphenyl)methyl[adenosine (metrifudil) and the A3 receptor agonist N6-(4-aminophenylethyl)adenosine (APNEA). 2. NECA (0.01-1 microgram, i.c.v.), all of the A1-selective agonists (0.01-1 microgram, i.c.v.) and APNEA (0.1-3 micrograms i.c.v.) produced profound and dose-related hypothermia and sedation. However, CGS-21680 (0.1-10 micrograms i.c.v.) and metrifudil (0.01-1 microgram i.c.v.), produced only mild hypothermia at the highest doses tested. 3. The hypothermic response to the A1 receptor-selective agonists, GR79236 and R-PIA was dose-dependently antagonized by peripheral administration of either the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, approximately 40 and 30 fold rightward shifts of the dose-response curves respectively at 10 mg kg-1, i.p.), or the adenosine A1 receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, approximately 20 fold shift of the GR79236 dose-response curve at 1 mg kg-1, i.p.). The hypothermic response to APNEA was similarly dose-dependently antagonized by the A1 receptor-selective antagonist, DPCPX (5 fold shift at 0.1 mg kg-1, i.p.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889296

  19. Efficacy of Adenosine in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qijun; Yang, Bo; Guo, Yi; Zheng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Whether adenosine offers cardioprotective effects when used as an adjunctive therapy for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains controversial. To evaluate, via meta-analysis, the efficacy of adenosine in patients with AMI undergoing PCI. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. RCTs of patients with AMI undergoing primary PCI, comparing adenosine treatment and placebo groups and reporting mortality, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow grade, myocardial blush grade (MBG), re-infarction, left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), ST-segment elevation resolution (STR), recurrent angina, or heart failure (HF). Risk of bias was assessed by the Cochrane guidelines and publication bias by Egger's test. For studies reported in multiple publications, the most complete publication was used. Arms using different dosing schedules were merged. Mean differences (MDs) or risk ratios (RRs) were determined. Data were extracted from 15 RCTs involving 1736 patients. Compared with placebo, adenosine therapy was associated with fewer occurrences of heart failure (RR: 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43-0.97, P?=?0.03) and no-reflow (TIMI flow grade <3, RR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.45-0.85, P?=?0.003; MBG?=?0-1, RR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67-0.98, P?=?0.03), more occurrences of STR (RR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.07-1.31, P?Adenosine improved LVEF in the intravenous subgroup and the regular-dose intracoronary (IC) subgroup (0.24-2.25?mg) compared with placebo (MD: 2.68, 95% CI: 0.66-4.70, P?=?0.009). Adenosine was associated with a poorer LVEF in the high-dose (4-6?mg) IC subgroup (MD: ?2.40; 95% CI: ?4.72 to ?0.09, P?=?0.04). There was no significant evidence that adenosine reduced rates of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality or re-infarction after PCI. Adenosine dosage and administration routes, baseline profiles, and endpoints differed among included RCTs. Performance, publication, and reporting biases remain possible. Adenosine therapy appears to improve several outcomes in patients with AMI after PCI, but there is no evidence that adenosine can reduce mortality rates. PMID:26266362

  20. Comonitoring of adenosine and dopamine using the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System: proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Young-Min; Chang, Su-Youne; Tye, Susannah J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Object The authors of previous studies have demonstrated that local adenosine efflux may contribute to the therapeutic mechanism of action of thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) for essential tremor. Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of DBS-targeted regions may thus advance functional neurosurgical procedures by identifying candidate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators involved in the physiological effects of DBS. This would in turn permit the development of a method of chemically guided placement of DBS electrodes in vivo. Designed in compliance with FDA-recognized standards for medical electrical device safety, the authors report on the utility of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for real-time comonitoring of electrical stimulationevoked adenosine and dopamine efflux in vivo, utilizing fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a polyacrylonitrile-based (T-650) carbon fiber microelectrode (CFM). Methods The WINCS was used for FSCV, which consisted of a triangle wave scanned between ?0.4 and +1.5 V at a rate of 400 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages applied to the CFM were with respect to an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single T-650 carbon fiber (r = 2.5 ?m) into a glass capillary and pulling to a microscopic tip using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ? 50 ?m. Proof of principle tests included in vitro measurements of adenosine and dopamine, as well as in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring adenosine and dopamine efflux in the dorsomedial caudate putamen evoked by high-frequency electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Results The WINCS provided reliable, high-fidelity measurements of adenosine efflux. Peak oxidative currents appeared at +1.5 V and at +1.0 V for adenosine, separate from the peak oxidative current at +0.6 V for dopamine. The WINCS detected subsecond adenosine and dopamine efflux in the caudate putamen at an implanted CFM during high-frequency stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Both in vitro and in vivo testing demonstrated that WINCS can detect adenosine in the presence of other easily oxidizable neurochemicals such as dopamine comparable to the detection abilities of a conventional hardwired electrochemical system for FSCV. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrate that WINCS is well suited for wireless monitoring of high-frequency stimulation-evoked changes in brain extracellular concentrations of adenosine. Clinical applications of selective adenosine measurements may prove important to the future development of DBS technology. PMID:19731995

  1. Sleep-Wake Sensitive Mechanisms of Adenosine Release in the Basal Forebrain of Rodents: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Robert Edward; Wu, Houdini Ho Tin; Dale, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB) to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state. PMID:23326515

  2. Kinetic considerations for the regulation of adenosine and deoxyadenosine metabolism in mouse and human tissues based on a thymocyte model.

    PubMed

    Snyder, F F; Lukey, T

    1982-03-29

    Metabolic regulation at a branch point may be determined primarily by relative enzyme activities and affinity for common substrate. Adenosine and deoxyadenosine are both phosphorylated and deaminated and their metabolism was studied in intact mouse thymocytes. From kinetic considerations of two activities competing for a common substrate, the deamination:phosphorylation ratio, vd/vk, at high nucleoside concentration, [S] congruent to infinity, is equal to Vd/Vk, or 34 and 1090 for adenosine and deoxyadenosine, respectively. At low substrate concentrations, [S] congruent to o, vd/vk is equal to VdKkm/VkKdm, or 0.7 and 285 for adenosine and deoxyadenosine, respectively. The analysis was extended to other mouse and human tissues by measurement of adenosine kinase, deoxyadenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase activities. All tissues were found to preferentially deaminate deoxyadenosine. Three tissue types were apparent with respect to adenosine metabolism: those which preferentially phosphorylate adenosine at all concentrations, those which switch from phosphorylation to deamination between low and high adenosine concentration and those for which deamination is quantatively important at all concentrations. Lymphoid tissues are representative of the latter category. The kinetic approach we describe offers a means of predicting nucleoside metabolism over a range of concentration which may be technically difficult to otherwise measure. The phosphorylation of adenosine and deoxyadenosine was also studied in intact thymocytes in the presence of adenosine deaminase inhibitors. The rate of deoxyadenosine phosphorylation was unaffected by coformycin or EHNA, whereas adenosine phosphorylation decreased with increasing substrate concentrations to 18% the rate in the absence of adenosine deaminase inhibitors. PMID:6978152

  3. Adenosine deaminase regulates Treg expression in autologous T cell-dendritic cell cocultures from patients infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Naval-Macabuhay, Isaac; Casanova, Vctor; Navarro, Gemma; Garca, Felipe; Len, Agathe; Miralles, Laia; Rovira, Cristina; Martinez-Navio, Jos M; Gallart, Teresa; Mallol, Josefa; Gatell, Jos M; Llus, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J; Climent, Nria

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells have an important role in immune suppression during HIV-1 infection. As regulatory T cells produce the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine, our aim here was to assess the potential of adenosine removal to revert the suppression of anti-HIV responses exerted by regulatory T cells. The experimental setup consisted of ex vivo cocultures of T and dendritic cells, to which adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, was added. In cells from healthy individuals, adenosine hydrolysis decreased CD4(+)CD25(hi) regulatory T cells. Addition of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, significantly decreased CD4(+)CD25(lo) cells, confirming a modulatory role of adenosine acting via adenosine receptors. In autologous cocultures of T cells with HIV-1-pulsed dendritic cells, addition of adenosine deaminase led to a significant decrease of HIV-1-induced CD4(+)CD25(hi) forkhead box p3(+) cells and to a significant enhancement of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+) responder T cells. An increase in the effector response was confirmed by the enhanced production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD25(-)CD45RO(+) memory cell generation and secretion of Th1 cytokines, including IFN-? and IL-15 and chemokines MIP-1?/CCL3, MIP-1?/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. These ex vivo results show, in a physiologically relevant model, that adenosine deaminase is able to enhance HIV-1 effector responses markedly. The possibility to revert regulatory T cell-mediated inhibition of immune responses by use of adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, merits attention for restoring T lymphocyte function in HIV-1 infection. PMID:26310829

  4. Stimulation of gastric acid secretion by rabbit parietal cell A2B adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Arin, Rosa Mara; Vallejo, Ana Isabel; Rueda, Yuri; Fresnedo, Olatz; Ochoa, Begoa

    2015-12-15

    Adenosine modulates different functional activities in many cells of the gastrointestinal tract; some of them are believed to be mediated by interaction with its four G protein-coupled receptors. The renewed interest in the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) subtype can be traced by studies in which the introduction of new genetic and chemical tools has widened the pharmacological and structural knowledge of this receptor as well as its potential therapeutic use in cancer and inflammation- or hypoxia-related pathologies. In the acid-secreting parietal cells of the gastric mucosa, the use of various radioligands for adenosine receptors suggested the presence of the A2 adenosine receptor subtype(s) on the cell surface. Recently, we confirmed A2BR expression in native, nontransformed parietal cells at rest by using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. In this study, we show that A2BR is functional in primary rabbit gastric parietal cells, as indicated by the fact that agonist binding to A2BR increased adenylate cyclase activity and acid production. In addition, both acid production and radioligand binding of adenosine analogs to isolated cell membranes were potently blocked by selective A2BR antagonists, whereas ligands for A1, A2A, and A3 adenosine receptors failed to abolish activation. We conclude that rabbit gastric parietal cells possess functional A2BR proteins that are coupled to Gs and stimulate HCl production upon activation. Whether adenosine- and A2BR-mediated functional responses play a role in human gastric pathophysiology is yet to be elucidated. PMID:26468208

  5. Dual Effect of Adenosine A1 Receptor Activation on Renal O2 Consumption.

    PubMed

    Babich, Victor; Vadnagara, Komal; Di Sole, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    The high requirement of O2 in the renal proximal tubule stems from a high rate of Na(+) transport. Adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) activation regulates Na(+) transport in this nephron segment. Thus, the effect of the acute activation and the mechanisms of A1R on the rate of O2 consumption were evaluated. The A1R-antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (CPX) and adenosine deaminase (ADA), which metabolize endogenous adenosine, reduced O2 consumption (40-50%). Replacing Na(+) in the buffer reversed the ADA- or CPX-mediated reduction of O2 consumption. Blocking the Na/H-exchanger activity, which decreases O2 usage per se, did not enhance the ADA- or CPX-induced inhibition of O2 consumption. These data indicate that endogenous adenosine increases O2 usage via the activation of Na(+) transport. In the presence of endogenous adenosine, A1R was further activated by the A1R-agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA); CPA inhibited O2 usage (30%) and this effect also depended on Na(+) transport. Moreover, a low concentration of CPA activated O2 usage in tissue pretreated with ADA, whereas a high concentration of CPA inhibited O2 usage; both effects depended on Na(+). Protein kinase C signaling mediated the inhibitory effect of A1R, while adenylyl cyclase mediated its stimulatory effect on O2 consumption. In summary, increasing the local concentrations of adenosine can either activate or inhibit O2 consumption via A1R, and this mechanism depends on Na(+) transport. The inhibition of O2 usage by A1R activation might restore the compromised balance between energy supply and demand under pathophysiological conditions, such as renal ischemia, which results in high adenosine production. PMID:26010290

  6. Interaction of adenosine receptors with other receptors from therapeutic perspective in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2014-01-01

    Altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in the basal ganglia is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias (LID). An attractive alternative for treating LID is to use adjunct drugs to modulate nondopaminergic neurotransmitter systems in the basal ganglia. For example, adenosine receptors have received attention over the past years for the treatment of PD and LID. Adenosine interacts closely with dopamine and plays an important role in the function of striatal GABAergic efferent neurons. Excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission is also modulated by adenosine in the striatum. Hence, based on the unique cellular and regional distribution of this system, adenosine neurotransmission could have an important implication for the development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the basal ganglia disorders. Indeed, A2A adenosine receptor antagonists were shown to improve motor deficits in PD and to reduce the severity of LID. A2A receptor subtypes are selectively found on striatopallidal neurons and can couple with receptors of interest in PD, such as D2 dopamine and metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGlu5) receptors, and form functional heteromeric complexes. This chapter will review relevant studies investigating the role and contribution of adenosine receptor subtypes in pathophysiology of PD and LID. The interactions of adenosine receptors, especially A1 and A2A receptor subtypes, with other receptors implicated in the pathophysiology of PD and LID such as dopaminergic and glutamatergic receptors will be reviewed. The implication of these interactions in the development and expression of PD symptoms and LID needs further investigation to find novel drug targets. PMID:25175965

  7. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2?-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2?-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.21.4 ). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  8. Physiological control of NKT cell-dependent hepatitis induction by extracellular adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Meenakshi; Kini, Radhika; Madasu, Manasa; Ohta, Akiko; Nowak, Michael; Exley, Mark; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ohta, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Extracellular adenosine regulates inflammatory responses via A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR). A2AR-deficiency results in much exaggerated acute hepatitis, indicating non-redundancy of adenosine-A2AR pathway in inhibitory mechanisms of immune activation. To identify a critical target of immunoregulatory effect of extracellular adenosine, we focused on NKT cells, which play an indispensable role in hepatitis. A2AR agonist abolished NKT cell-dependent induction of acute hepatitis by Con A or α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), corresponding to down-regulation of activation markers and cytokines in NKT cells and of NK cell co-activation. These results show that A2AR signaling can down-regulate NKT cell activation and suppress NKT cell-triggered inflammatory responses. Next, we hypothesized that NKT cells might be under physiological control of the adenosine-A2AR pathway. Indeed, both Con A and α-GalCer induced more severe hepatitis in A2AR−/− mice than in wild-type controls. Transfer of A2AR−/− NKT cells into A2AR-expressing recipients resulted in exaggeration of Con A-induced liver damage, suggesting that NKT cell activation is controlled by endogenous adenosine via A2AR, and this physiological regulatory mechanism of NKT cells is critical in the control of tissue-damaging inflammation. The current study suggests the possibility to manipulate NKT cell activity in inflammatory disorders through intervention to the adenosine-A2AR pathway. PMID:24448964

  9. Overexpression of adenosine kinase in cortical astrocytes generates focal neocortical epilepsy in mice: Laboratory investigation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hai-Ying; Sun, Hai; Hanthorn, Marissa M.; Zhi, Zhongwei; Lan, Jing-Quan; Poulsen, David J.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Boison, Detlev

    2013-01-01

    Object New experimental models and diagnostic methods are needed to better understand the pathophysiology of focal neocortical epilepsies in a search for improved epilepsy treatment options. We hypothesized that a focal disruption of adenosine homeostasis in the neocortex might be sufficient to trigger electrographic seizures. We further hypothesized that a focal disruption of adenosine homeostasis might affect microcirculation and thus offer a diagnostic opportunity for the detection of a seizure focus located in the neocortex. Methods Focal disruption of adenosine homeostasis was achieved by injecting an adeno-associated virus (AAV) engineered to overexpress adenosine kinase (ADK), the major metabolic clearance enzyme for the brain’s endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, into the neocortex of mice. Eight weeks following virus injection, the affected brain area was imaged via optical microangiography (OMAG) to detect changes in microcirculation. After completion of imaging, cortical electroencephalography (EEG) recordings were obtained from the imaged brain area. Results Viral expression of the Adk cDNA in astrocytes generated a focal area (~ 2 mm in diameter) of ADK overexpression within the neocortex. OMAG scanning revealed a reduction in vessel density within the affected brain area of approximately 23% and 29% compared to control animals and the contralateral hemisphere, respectively. EEG recordings revealed electrographic seizures within the focal area of ADK overexpression at a rate of 1.3 ± 0.2 seizures per hour. Conclusions Our findings suggest that focal adenosine deficiency is sufficient to generate a neocortical focus of hyperexcitability, which is also characterized by reduced vessel density. We conclude that our model constitutes a useful tool to study neocortical epilepsies and that OMAG constitutes a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the imaging of seizure foci with disrupted adenosine homeostasis. PMID:24266544

  10. An enzyme-linked immuno-mass spectrometric assay with the substrate adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Soosaipillai, Antonius; Dufresne, Jaimie; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Marshall, John G

    2015-02-01

    An enzyme-linked immuno-mass spectrometric assay (ELIMSA) with the specific detection probe streptavidin conjugated to alkaline phosphatase catalyzed the production of adenosine from the substrate adenosine monophosphate (AMP) for sensitive quantification of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by mass spectrometry. Adenosine ionized efficiently and was measured to the femtomole range by dilution and direct analysis with micro-liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization, and mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). The LC-ESI-MS assay for adenosine production was shown to be linear and accurate using internal (13)C(15)N adenosine isotope dilution, internal (13)C(15)N adenosine one-point calibration, and external adenosine standard curves with close agreement. The detection limits of LC-ESI-MS for alkaline phosphatase-streptavidin (AP-SA, ?190,000Da) was tested by injecting 0.1?l of a 1pg/ml solution, i.e., 100attograms or 526yoctomole (5.26E-22) of the alkaline-phosphatase labeled probe on column (about 315 AP-SA molecules). The ELIMSA for PSA was linear and showed strong signals across the picogram per milliliter range and could robustly detect PSA from all of the prostatectomy patients and all of the female plasma samples that ranged as low as 70pg/ml with strong signals well separated from the background and well within the limit of quantification of the AP-SA probe. The results of the ELIMSA assay for PSA are normal and homogenous when independently replicated with a fresh standard over multiple days, and intra and inter diem assay variation was less than 10% of the mean. In a blind comparison, ELIMSA showed excellent agreement with, but was more sensitive than, the present gold standard commercial fluorescent ELISA, or ECL-based detection, of PSA from normal and prostatectomy samples, respectively. PMID:25519722

  11. Inhibition of adenosine kinase attenuates inflammation and neurotoxicity in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Bhatia, Kanchan; Elsherbini, Ahmed M; Fulzele, Sadanand; Liou, Gregory I

    2014-12-15

    Traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is associated with apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. Local productions of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells have been hypothesized to underlie apoptotic processes. We previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of adenosine, through A2A receptor activation had profound protective influence against retinal injury in traumatic optic neuropathy. This protective effect is limited due to rapid cellular re-uptake of adenosine by equilibrative nucleotside transporter-1 (ENT1) or break down by adenosine kinase (AK), the key enzyme in adenosine clearance pathway. Further, the use of adenosine receptors agonists are limited by systemic side effects. Therefore, we seek to investigate the potential role of amplifying the endogenous ambient level of adenosine by pharmacological inhibition of AK. We tested our hypothesis by comparing TON-induced retinal injury in mice with and without ABT-702 treatment, a selective AK inhibitor (AKI). The retinal-protective effect of ABT-702 was demonstrated by significant reduction of Iba-1, ENT1, TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS/nNOS protein or mRNA expression in TON as revealed by western blot and real time PCR. TON-induced superoxide anion generation and nitrotyrosine expression were reduced in ABT-702 treated mice retinal sections as determined by immunoflourescence. In addition, ABT-702 attenuated p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 activation in LPS induced activated mouse microglia cells. The results of the present investigation suggested that ABT-702 had a protective role against marked TON-induced retinal inflammation and damage by augmenting the endogenous therapeutic effects of site- and event-specific accumulation of extracellular adenosine. PMID:25457840

  12. Adenosine: an endogenous inhibitor of neutrophil-mediated injury to endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cronstein, B N; Levin, R I; Belanoff, J; Weissmann, G; Hirschhorn, R

    1986-01-01

    Since adenosine and its analogue 2-chloroadenosine prevent neutrophils from generating superoxide anion in response to chemoattractants, we sought to determine whether these agents could inhibit neutrophil-mediated injury of endothelial cells. The chemoattractant N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP, 0.1 microM) enhanced the adherence of neutrophils to endothelial cells twofold (18 +/- 2% vs. 39 +/- 3% adherence, P less than 0.001) and caused substantial neutrophil-mediated injury to endothelial cells (2 +/- 2% vs. 39 +/- 4% cytotoxicity, P less than 0.001). 2-Chloroadenosine (10 microM) not only inhibited the adherence of stimulated neutrophils by 60% (24 +/- 2% adherence, P less than 0.001) but also diminished the cytotoxicity by 51% (20 +/- 4% cytotoxicity, P less than 0.002). Furthermore, depletion of endogenously released adenosine from the medium by adenosine deaminase-enhanced injury to endothelial cells by stimulated neutrophils (from 39 +/- 4% to 69 +/- 3% cytotoxicity, P less than 0.001). Indeed, in the presence of adenosine deaminase, even unstimulated neutrophils injured endothelial cells (19 +/- 4% vs. 2 +/- 2% cytotoxicity, P less than 0.001). These data indicate that engagement of adenosine receptors prevents both the adhesion of neutrophils and the injury they cause to endothelial cells. Adenosine inhibits injury provoked not only by cells that have been stimulated by chemoattractants but also by unstimulated cells. Based on this model of acute vascular damage we suggest that adenosine is not only a potent vasodilator, but plays the additional role of protecting vascular endothelium from damage by neutrophils. Images PMID:3745437

  13. Interactions between adenosine and dopamine receptor antagonists with different selectivity profiles: Effects on locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lyndsey E; Galtieri, Daniel J; Collins, Patricia; Jones, Shawnet K; Port, Russell G; Paul, Nicholas E; Hockemeyer, Jrg; Mller, Christa E; Salamone, John D

    2010-08-25

    Forebrain dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation. Adenosine A(2A) antagonists reverse many of the behavioral effects of DA antagonists, and A(2A) receptors are co-localized with D(2) receptors on striatal medium spiny neurons. The present work was undertaken to determine if the ability of an A(2A) antagonist, a non-selective adenosine antagonist, or an A(1) antagonist to reverse the locomotor effects of DA blockade in rats differed depending upon whether D(1) or D(2) family receptors were being antagonized. The adenosine antagonists MSX-3, caffeine, DPCPX and CPT were studied for their ability to reverse the locomotor suppression induced by the D(1) antagonist SCH 39166 (ecopipam) and the D(2) antagonist eticlopride. The D(1) and D(2) antagonists suppressed locomotion in all experiments. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3 (0.5-2.0 mg/kg IP) significantly reversed the suppression of locomotion induced by eticlopride. The non-selective adenosine antagonist caffeine (5.0-20.0 mg/kg IP) also reversed the effect of eticlopride, though the effect was not as robust as that seen with MSX-3. The adenosine A(1) antagonists DPCPX (0.375-1.5 mg/kg) and CPT (3.0-12.0 mg/kg IP) were unable to reverse the locomotor impairment elicited by eticlopride. Furthermore, the attenuation of locomotion induced by the D(1) antagonist could only be reversed by the highest dose of MSX-3, but not by caffeine, DPCPX or CPT. DA and adenosine receptor antagonists interact in the regulation of locomotor activation, but the nature of this interaction appears to depend upon the receptor selectivity profiles of the specific drugs being tested. PMID:20211657

  14. Fluorometric Determination of Adenosine Nucleotide Derivatives as Measures of the Microfouling, Detrital, and Sedimentary Microbial Biomass and Physiological Status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William M.; White, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Adenosine, adenine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), AMP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were recovered quantitatively from aqueous portions of lipid extracts of microfouling, detrital, and sedimentary microbial communities. These could be detected quantitatively in the picomolar range by forming their 1-N6-etheno derivatives and analyzing by high-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Lipid extraction and subsequent analysis allowed the simultaneous measurement of the microbial community structure, total microbial biomass with the quantitative recovery of the adenine-containing cellular components, which were protected from enzymatic destruction. This extraction and fluorescent derivatization method showed equivalency with the luciferin-luciferase method for bacterial ATP measurements. Quick-freezing samples in the field with dry ice-acetone preserved the ATP and energy charge (a ratio of adenosine nucleotides) for analysis at remote laboratories. The metabolic lability of ATP in estuarine detrital and microfouling communities, as well as bacterial monocultures of constant biomass, showed ATP to be a precarious measure of biomass under some conditions. Combinations of adenosine and adenine nucleotides gave better correlations with microbial biomass measured as extractable lipid phosphate in the detrital and microfouling microbial communities than did ATP alone. Stresses such as anoxia or filtration are reflected in the rapid accumulation of intracellular adenosine and the excretion of adenosine and AMP into the surrounding milieu. Increases in AMP and adenosine may prove to be more sensitive indicators of metabolic status than the energy charge. PMID:16345633

  15. Rapid adenosine release in the nucleus tractus solitarii during defence response in rats: real-time measurement in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nicholas; Gourine, Alexander V; Llaudet, Enrique; Bulmer, David; Thomas, Teresa; Spyer, K Michael

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the release of adenosine and inosine from the dorsal surface of the brainstem and from within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) during the defence response evoked by hypothalamic stimulation in the anaesthetised rat. At the surface of the brainstem, only release of inosine was detected on hypothalamic defence area stimulation. This inosine signal was greatly reduced by addition of the ecto-5?-nucleotidase inhibitor ?,?-methylene ADP (200 ?M), suggesting that the inosine arose from adenosine that was produced in the extracellular space by the prior release of ATP. By placing a microelectrode biosensor into the NTS under stereotaxic control we have recorded release of adenosine within this nucleus. By contrast to the brainstem surface, a fast increase in adenosine, accompanied only by a much smaller change in inosine levels, was seen following stimulation of the hypothalamic defence area. The release of adenosine following hypothalamic stimulation was mainly confined to a narrow region of the NTS some 500 ?m in length around the level of the obex. Interestingly the release of adenosine was depletable: when the defence reaction was evoked at short time intervals, much less adenosine was released on the second stimulus. Our novel techniques have given unprecedented real-time measurement and localisation of adenosine release in vivo and demonstrate that adenosine is released at the right time and in sufficient quantities to contribute to the cardiovascular components of the defence reaction. PMID:12356888

  16. Inhibition of Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation by Adenosine and Inosine: Studies on Their Relative Contribution and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego; Alarcn, Marcelo; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Ivn

    2014-01-01

    Background The inhibitory effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation is abrogated after the addition of adenosine-deaminase. Inosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside degraded from adenosine. Objectives The mechanisms of antiplatelet action of adenosine and inosine in vitro and in vivo, and their differential biological effects by molecular modeling were investigated. Results Adenosine (0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L) inhibited phosphatidylserine exposure from 524% in the control group to 444 (p<0.05), 292 (p<0.01) and 203% (p<0.001). P-selectin expression in the presence of adenosine 0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L was inhibited from 324 to 272 (p<0.05), 143 (p<0.01) and 93% (p<0.001), respectively. At the concentrations tested, only inosine to 4 mmol/L had effect on platelet P-selectin expression (p<0.05). Adenosine and inosine inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release stimulated by ADP and collagen. Adenosine and inosine reduced collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under flow. At the same concentrations adenosine inhibited platelet aggregation, decreased the levels of sCD40L and increased intraplatelet cAMP. In addition, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) attenuated the effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Adenosine and inosine significantly inhibited thrombosis formation in vivo (622% occlusion at 60 min [n?=?6, p<0.01] and 721.9% occlusion at 60 min, [n?=?6, p<0.05], respectively) compared with the control (982% occlusion at 60 min, n?=?6). A2A is the adenosine receptor present in platelets; it is known that inosine is not an A2A ligand. Docking of adenosine and inosine inside A2A showed that the main difference is the formation by adenosine of an additional hydrogen bond between the NH2 of the adenine group and the residues Asn253 in H6 and Glu169 in EL2 of the A2A receptor. Conclusion Therefore, adenosine and inosine may represent novel agents lowering the risk of arterial thrombosis. PMID:25393959

  17. Metabolism of Adenosine 3′,5′-Cyclic Monophosphate and Induction of Fruiting Bodies in Coprinus macrorhizus

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Isao; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    1973-01-01

    The adenyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase metabolizing adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) were detected in mycelia of strains of Coprinus macrorhizus which form fruiting bodies, but not in those of strains which do not form fruiting bodies. The adenyl cyclase synthesized cyclic AMP from adenosine triphosphate. The phosphodiesterase degr[UNK]ded cyclic AMP to adenosine-5′-monophosphate and was inhibited by adenosine-3′-monophosphate, theophylline, and caffeine. The strains which form fruiting bodies incorporated and metabolized cyclic AMP, but strains which do not form fruiting bodies did not. The possible participation of cyclic AMP in the induction of fruiting bodies is discussed. PMID:4347968

  18. The Metal Ion-Dependent Adhesion Site Motif of the Enterococcus faecalis EbpA Pilin Mediates Pilus Function in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Guiton, Pascale S.; Kline, Kimberly A.; Port, Gary C.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Neiers, Fabrice; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Caparon, Michael G.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Though the bacterial opportunist Enterococcus faecalis causes a myriad of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), including catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), little is known about the virulence mechanisms that it employs. However, the endocarditis- and biofilm-associated pilus (Ebp), a member of the sortase-assembled pilus family, was shown to play a role in a mouse model of E. faecalis ascending UTI. The Ebp pilus comprises the major EbpC shaft subunit and the EbpA and EbpB minor subunits. We investigated the biogenesis and function of Ebp pili in an experimental model of CAUTI using a panel of chromosomal pilin deletion mutants. A nonpiliated pilus knockout mutant (EbpABC− strain) was severely attenuated compared to its isogenic parent OG1RF in experimental CAUTI. In contrast, a nonpiliated ebpC deletion mutant (EbpC− strain) behaved similarly to OG1RF in vivo because it expressed EbpA and EbpB. Deletion of the minor pilin gene ebpA or ebpB perturbed pilus biogenesis and led to defects in experimental CAUTI. We discovered that the function of Ebp pili in vivo depended on a predicted metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) motif in EbpA’s von Willebrand factor A domain, a common protein domain among the tip subunits of sortase-assembled pili. Thus, this study identified the Ebp pilus as a virulence factor in E. faecalis CAUTI and also defined the molecular basis of this function, critical knowledge for the rational development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:22829678

  19. Adenosine triphosphate inhibits melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Souza-Teodoro, Luis Henrique; Dargenio-Garcia, Letícia; Petrilli-Lapa, Camila Lopes; Souza, Ewerton da Silva; Fernandes, Pedro A C M; Markus, Regina P; Ferreira, Zulma S

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is released onto the pinealocyte, along with noradrenaline, from sympathetic neurons and triggers P2Y1 receptors that enhance β-adrenergic-induced N-acetylserotonin (NAS) synthesis. Nevertheless, the biotransformation of NAS into melatonin, which occurs due to the subsequent methylation by acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT; EC 2.1.1.4), has not yet been evaluated in the presence of purinergic stimulation. We therefore evaluated the effects of purinergic signaling on melatonin synthesis induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. ATP increased NAS levels, but, surprisingly, inhibited melatonin synthesis in an inverse, concentration-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that enhanced NAS levels, which depend on phospholipase C (PLC) activity (but not the induction of gene transcription), are a post-translational effect. By contrast, melatonin reduction is related to an ASMT inhibition of expression at both the gene transcription and protein levels. These results were independent of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) translocation. Neither the P2Y1 receptor activation nor the PLC-mediated pathway was involved in the decrease in melatonin, indicating that ATP regulates pineal metabolism through different mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate that purinergic signaling differentially modulates NAS and melatonin synthesis and point to a regulatory role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the control of ASMT, the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The endogenous production of melatonin regulates defense responses; therefore, understanding the mechanisms involving ASMT regulation might provide novel insights into the development and progression of neurological disorders since melatonin presents anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects. PMID:26732366

  20. Targeting Na?/K? -translocating adenosine triphosphatase in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Durlacher, Cameron T; Chow, Kevin; Chen, Xiao-Wu; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxin; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-05-01

    The Na(+) /K(+) -translocating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) transports sodium and potassium across the plasma membrane and represents a potential target in cancer chemotherapy. Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase belongs to the P-type ATPase family (also known as E1-E2 ATPase), which is involved in transporting certain ions, metals, and lipids across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. In humans, the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase is a binary complex of an ?-subunit that has four isoforms (?1 -?4 ) and a ?-subunit that has three isoforms (?1 -?3 ). This review aims to update our knowledge on the role of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase in cancer development and metastasis, as well as on how Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibitors kill tumour cells. The Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase has been found to be associated with cancer initiation, growth, development, and metastasis. Cardiac glycosides have exhibited anticancer effects in cell-based and mouse studies via inhibition of the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase and other mechanisms. Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibitors may kill cancer cells via induction of apoptosis and autophagy, radical oxygen species production, and cell cycle arrest. They also modulate multiple signalling pathways that regulate cancer cell survival and death, which contributes to their antiproliferative activities in cancer cells. The clinical evidence supporting the use of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase inhibitors as anticancer drugs is weak. Several phase I and phase II clinical trials with digoxin, Anvirzel, and huachansu (an intravenous formulated extract of the venom of the wild toad), either alone or more often in combination with other anticancer agents, have shown acceptable safety profiles but limited efficacy in cancer patients. Well-designed randomized clinical trials with reasonable sample sizes are certainly warranted to confirm the efficacy and safety of cardiac glycosides for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25739707

  1. Cerebral adenosine A? receptors are upregulated in rodent encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Boersma, Wytske; Sijbesma, Jurgen W; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Meerlo, Peter; Doorduin, Janine; Dierckx, Rudi A; van Waarde, Aren

    2014-05-15

    Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) are implied in the modulation of neuroinflammation. Activation of cerebral A1Rs acts as a brake on the microglial response after traumatic brain injury and has neuroprotective properties in animal models of Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. Neuroinflammatory processes in turn may affect the expression of A1Rs, but the available data is limited and inconsistent. Here, we applied an animal model of encephalitis to assess how neuroinflammation affects the expression of A1Rs. Two groups of animals were studied: Infected rats (n=7) were intranasally inoculated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, 1 10(7) plaque forming units), sham-infected rats (n=6) received only phosphate-buffered saline. Six or seven days later, microPET scans (60 min with arterial blood sampling) were made using the tracer 8-dicyclopropyl-1-(11)C-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine ((11)C-MPDX). Tracer clearance from plasma and partition coefficient (K?/k? estimated from a 2-tissue compartment model fit) were not significantly altered after virus infection. PET tracer distribution volume calculated from a Logan plot was significantly increased in the hippocampus (+37%) and medulla (+27%) of virus infected rats. Tracer binding potential (k?/k? estimated from the model fit) was significantly increased in the cerebellum (+87%) and the medulla (+148%) which may indicate increased A1R expression. This was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis showing a strong increase of A1R immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of HSV-1-infected rats. Both the quantitative PET data and immunohistochemical analysis indicate that A1Rs are upregulated in brain areas where active virus is present. PMID:24513151

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  3. Adenosine 2A receptors modulate reward behaviours for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Chesworth, Rose; Brown, Robyn M; Kim, Jee Hyun; Ledent, Catherine; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to methamphetamine (METH) is a global health problem for which there are no approved pharmacotherapies. The adenosine 2A (A2 A ) receptor presents a potential therapeutic target for METH abuse due to its modulatory effects on striatal dopamine and glutamate transmission. Notably, A2 A receptor signalling has been implicated in the rewarding effects of alcohol, cocaine and opiates; yet, the role of this receptor in METH consumption and seeking is essentially unknown. Therefore, the current study used A2 A knockout (KO) mice to assess the role of A2 A in behaviours relevant to METH addiction. METH conditioned place preference was absent in A2 A KO mice compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Repeated METH treatment produced locomotor sensitization in both genotypes; however, sensitization was attenuated in A2 A KO mice in a dose-related manner. METH intravenous self-administration was intact in A2 A KO mice over a range of doses and schedules of reinforcement. However, the motivation to self-administer was reduced in A2 A KO mice. Regression analysis further supported the observation that the motivation to self-administer METH was reduced in A2 A KO mice even when self-administration was similar to WT mice. Sucrose self-administration was also reduced in A2 A KO mice but only at higher schedules of reinforcement. Collectively, these data suggest that A2 A signalling is critically required to integrate rewarding and motivational properties of both METH and natural rewards. PMID:25612195

  4. Autoimmune dysregulation and purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties. PMID:22969765

  5. AB204. Research on adenosine signal in renal fibrosis originated from unilateral ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bing; Dai, Yingbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ischemia and hypoxia are the important cause of chronic kidney disease. Adenosine is an important signaling molecule resulted from ischemia and hypoxia and may function as a main pathogenic factor to CKD. The present study detected the fluctuation of renal adenosine and its relative factor-induced fibrosis expression after the unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) procedure. To explore the role of adenosine pathway in renal fibrosis and mechanism of the pathogenesis of chronic kidney. Methods A total of 32 male SD rats were randomly enrolled into two groups: sham-operated group and UUO group. Each group was also randomly divided into 1, 2, 3,4 group in term of the week after surgery (n=4) and killed in the same time point, Prior to sacrifice blood, kidney samples taken after death. In obstructed kidney, histological changes and the deposition of renal interstitial collagen were observed by HE stain and Masson stain, adenosine was separated and using reverse-phase HPLC, blood creatinine level was measured using spectrophotometric kits in accordance with the manufacturers instructions, the mRNA of TGF-?1 and procollagen I were measured by real time PCR and its protein was examined by immunohistochemical method. The results of immunohistochemical were analyzed semi-quantitatively with the pathological image analysis system. Results (I) After the UUO procedure, Adenosine concentration in the UUO group was significantly higher compared to the Sham group (P<0.05), and reached a peak after the 1 week of the experiment (P<0.01), H&E and Masson staining exhibited renal damage, accompanied by increased (P<0.05) adenosine concentration, Nephron damage gradually increased, increasing the deposition of renal interstitial collagen; (II) we failed to observe a significantly increased creatinine in UUO groups during four time points (P>0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that in the second week after UUO, its highest expression in renal tubular epithelial cells, and then over time, the expression decreased gradually, and with the extension of UUO time, TGF-?1 in renal tubular epithelial cells from the distribution transfer to renal interstitial, and then spread to the glomeruli; (III) the PCR data and immunohistochemical analysis showed that UUO procedure significantly increased (P<0.05) TGF-?1 and procollagen I expression during four weeks. Conclusions (I) Renal interstitial fibrosis continued presence of renal tissue hypoxia and lead to elevated adenosine levels within the organization; (II) the increased adenosine profile accelerated the renal tubular injury and the occurrence and development of interstitial fibrosis; (III) the adenosine signaling pathway can mediate the development of RIF by regulating the expression of the mRNA of TGF-?1, ?1 (I) procollagen.

  6. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Guillaume; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Tate, Christopher G

    2015-06-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A(2A)R) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Comparison of A(2A)R structures bound to either CGS21680, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169(EL2), His264(EL3), Leu267(7.32), and Ile274(7.39), and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser67(2.65). Of these residues, only Ile274(7.39) is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A(2A)R bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser67(2.65) to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser67(2.65), Glu169(EL2), and His264(EL3), and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A(2A)R. PMID:25762024

  7. Tissue distribution of adenosine receptor mRNAs in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, A. K.; Gubitz, A. K.; Sirinathsinghji, D. J.; Richardson, P. J.; Freeman, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. A degree of ambiguity and uncertainty exists concerning the distribution of mRNAs encoding the four cloned adenosine receptors. In order to consolidate and extent current understanding in this area, the expression of the adenosine receptors has been examined in the rat by use of in situ hybridisation and the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). 2. In accordance with earlier studies, in situ hybridisation revealed that the adenosine A1 receptor was widely expressed in the brain, whereas A2A receptor mRNA was restricted to the striatum, nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle. In addition, A1 receptor mRNA was detected in large striatal cholinergic interneurones, 26% of these neurones were also found to express the A2A receptor gene. Central levels of mRNAs encoding adenosine A2B and A3 receptors were, however, below the detection limits of in situ hybridisation. 3. The more sensitive technique of RT-PCR was then employed to investigate the distribution of adenosine receptor mRNAs in the central nervous system (CNS) and a wide range of peripheral tissues. As a result, many novel sites of adenosine receptor gene expression were identified. A1 receptor expression has now been found in the heart, aorta, liver, kidney, eye and bladder. These observations are largely consistent with previous functional data. A2A receptor mRNA was detected in all brain regions tested, demonstrating that expression of this receptor is not restricted to the basal ganglia. In the periphery A2A receptor mRNA was also found to be more widely distributed than generally recognised. The ubiquitous distribution of the A2B receptor is shown for the first time, A2B mRNA was detected at various levels in all rat tissues studied. Expression of the gene encoding the adenosine A3 receptor was also found to be widespread in the rat, message detected throughout the CNS and in many peripheral tissues. This pattern of expression is similar to that observed in man and sheep, which had previously been perceived to possess distinct patterns of A3 receptor gene expression in comparison to the rat. 4. In summary, this work has comprehensively studied the expression of all the cloned adenosine receptors in the rat, and in so doing, resolves some of the uncertainty over where these receptors might act to control physiological processes mediated by adenosine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8832073

  8. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Patricia C.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5?-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 . Comparison of A2AR structures bound to either CGS21680, 5?-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169EL2, His264EL3, Leu2677.32, and Ile2747.39, and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser672.65. Of these residues, only Ile2747.39 is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A2AR bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser672.65 to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser672.65, Glu169EL2, and His264EL3, and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A2AR. PMID:25762024

  9. Squalenoyl adenosine nanoparticles provide neuroprotection after stroke and spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Alice; Yemisci, Müge; Eroglu, Hakan; Lepetre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Turkoglu, Omer Faruk; Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Caban, Seçil; Sargon, Mustafa Fevzi; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Pieters, Grégory; Loreau, Olivier; Rousseau, Bernard; Tagit, Oya; Hildebrandt, Niko; Le Dantec, Yannick; Mougin, Julie; Valetti, Sabrina; Chacun, Hélène; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Andrieux, Karine; Capan, Yilmaz; Dalkara, Turgay; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of severe neurological trauma, such as stroke and spinal cord injuries. However, many drugs with potential neuropharmacological activity, such as adenosine, are inefficient upon systemic administration because of their fast metabolization and rapid clearance from the bloodstream. Here, we show that conjugation of adenosine to the lipid squalene and the subsequent formation of nanoassemblies allows prolonged circulation of this nucleoside, providing neuroprotection in mouse stroke and rat spinal cord injury models. The animals receiving systemic administration of squalenoyl adenosine nanoassemblies showed a significant improvement of their neurologic deficit score in the case of cerebral ischaemia, and an early motor recovery of the hindlimbs in the case of spinal cord injury. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the nanoassemblies were able to extend adenosine circulation and its interaction with the neurovascular unit. This Article shows, for the first time, that a hydrophilic and rapidly metabolized molecule such as adenosine may become pharmacologically efficient owing to a single conjugation with the lipid squalene.

  10. Modulation of neuroimmunity by adenosine and its receptors: Metabolism to mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a pleiotropic bioactive with potent neuromodulatory properties. Due to its ability to easily cross the blood-brain barrier, it can act as a signaling molecule between the periphery and the brain. It functions through four (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) cell surface G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (AR) that are expressed in some combination on nearly all cells types within the CNS. By regulating the activity of adenylyl cyclase and changing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, adenosine can alter neuronal function and neurotransmission. A variety of illnesses related to metabolic dysregulation, such as type 1 diabetes and Alzheimers disease, are associated with an elevated serum concentration of adenosine and a pathogenesis rooted in inflammation. This review describes the accepted physiologic function of adenosine in neurological disease and explores its new potential as a peripheral to central danger signal that can activate the neuroimmune system and contribute to symptoms of sickness and psychopathologies. PMID:25308443

  11. Adenosine mediates metabolic and cardiovascular responses to hypoxia in fetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Koos, B J; Chau, A; Ogunyemi, D

    1995-01-01

    1. In seven unanaesthetized fetal sheep (> 80% term), isocapnic hypoxia (arterial partial pressure of O2, Pa,O2, approximately 15 mmHg) was induced for 1 h by lowering maternal inspired PO2. Fetal hypoxia was also produced during intra-arterial administration of the adenosine receptor antagonist 8-(p-sulphophenyl)-theophylline (8-SPT). The fetal 8-SPT infusion was begun just prior to hypoxia and was stopped when fetal Pa,O2 was returned to normal. 2. Hypoxia induced a progressive fetal acidosis, a rise in mean arterial pressure, a transient fall in heart rate and a decrease in breathing movements. 8-SPT significantly reduced the metabolic acidosis and abolished the hypertension and bradycardia without altering hypoxic inhibition of fetal breathing. Administration of the vehicle for 8-SPT during hypoxia did not significantly affect the normal fetal metabolic and cardiovascular responses to acute O2 deprivation. 3. It is concluded that adenosine mediates the fetal bradycardia and hypertension produced by hypoxia, indicating that adenosine modulates fetal autonomic responses to acute oxygen deficiency. Secondly, adenosine contributes to fetal metabolic acidaemia, suggesting that adenosine also modulates fetal glycolytic responses to hypoxia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8576865

  12. Phosphorylation potential and adenosine release during norepinephrine infusion in guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    He, Miao-Xiang; Wangler, R.D.; Dillon, P.F.; Romig, G.D.; Sparks, H.V. )

    1987-11-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that adenosine released from isolated guinea pig hearts in response to norepinephrine is related to the cellular phosphorylation potential (PP;(ATP)/(ADP)(P{sub i})), where P{sub i} is inorganic phosphate. {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the relative concentrations of P{sub i}, phosphocreatine (PCr), and ATP. After a control period, norepinephrine was infused for 20 min during which {sup 31}P-NMR spectra and samples of venous effluent were collected every minute. With norepinephrine infusion, PCr decreased rapidly to 72% of control by 8 min and then recovered to 80% of control for the remaining 12 min. ATP fell slowly to 70% of control over 20 min. P{sub i} increased to a peak at 2 min, then declined slowly to a steady state from 8 to 20 min. Adenosine release increased at 7 min and then slowly fell to a steady state from 10 to 20 min. There is hyperbolic relationship between adenosine release and PP; when the PP declines, a level is reached below which there is a rapid increase in adenosine release. These data support the hypothesis that adenosine release is regulated by the cellular PP as a closely related variable.

  13. Neurochemical Measurement of Adenosine in Discrete Brain Regions of Five Strains of Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Amar K.; Jiao, Yun; Sample, Kenneth J.; Smeyne, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO), a non-classical neurotransmitter and neuromodulator, and its metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), have been shown to play an important role in a number of biochemical processes. Although their signaling is well described, it has been difficult to directly, accurately and simultaneously quantitate these purines in tissue or fluids. Here, we describe a novel method for measuring adenosine (ADO) and its metabolites using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Using this chromatographic technique, we examined baseline levels of ADO and ATP, ADP and AMP in 6 different brain regions of the C57BL/6J mouse: stratum, cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, substantia nigra and cerebellum and compared ADO levels in 5 different strains of mice (C57BL/6J, Swiss-Webster, FVB/NJ, 129P/J, and BALB/c). These studies demonstrate that baseline levels of purines vary significantly among the brain regions as well as between different mouse strains. These dissimilarities in purine concentrations may explain the variable phenotypes among background strains described in neurological disease models. PMID:24642754

  14. Cloning of human adenosine kinase cDNA: sequence similarity to microbial ribokinases and fructokinases.

    PubMed Central

    Spychala, J; Datta, N S; Takabayashi, K; Datta, M; Fox, I H; Gribbin, T; Mitchell, B S

    1996-01-01

    Adenosine kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to AMP and hence is a potentially important regulator of extracellular adenosine concentrations. Despite extensive characterization of the kinetic properties of the enzyme, its primary structure has never been elucidated. Full-length cDNA clones encoding catalytically active adenosine kinase were obtained from lymphocyte, placental, and liver cDNA libraries. Corresponding mRNA species of 1.3 and 1.8 kb were noted on Northern blots of all tissues examined and were attributable to alternative polyadenylylation sites at the 3' end of the gene. The encoding protein consists of 345 amino acids with a calculated molecular size of 38.7 kDa and does not contain any sequence similarities to other well-characterized mammalian nucleoside kinases, setting it apart from this family of structurally and functionally related proteins. In contrast, two regions were identified with significant sequence identity to microbial ribokinase and fructokinases and a bacterial inosine/guanosine kinase. Thus, adenosine kinase is a structurally distinct mammalian nucleoside kinase that appears to be akin to sugar kinases of microbial origin. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8577746

  15. Obligatory coupling between proton entry and the synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate in Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, P C

    1977-01-01

    Proton influx was measured after imposition of an electrochemical potential difference for protons (delta muH+) across the cell membrane of the anaerobe, Streptococcus lactis. As delta muH+ was increased, there was an approximately parallel increase in proton entry, until delta muH+ attained 175 to 200 mV. At this point, a new pathway became available for proton entry, allowing an abrupt increase in both the rate and extent of H+ influx. This gated response depended upon the value of delta muH+ itself, and not upon the value of either the membrane potential or the pH gradient. For delta muH+ above 175 to 200 mV, elevated proton entry occurred only in cells having a functional membrane-bound Ca2+-stimulated, Mg2+stimulated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3). When present, elevated proton entry coincided with the appearance of net synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate catalyzed by this adenosine 5'-triphosphatase. These observations demonstrate that membrane-bound adenosine 5'-triphosphatase catalyzes an obligatory coupling between the inward movement of protons and synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:21165

  16. Functional characterization of adenosine receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius mediating hypotensive responses in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    White, P. J.; Rose'Meyer, R. B.; Hope, W.

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to characterize adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) that mediate decreases in blood pressure in the anaesthetized rat. To determine the adenosine receptor subtype involved, a range of selective agonists and antagonists were studied and their relative potencies evaluated. 2. The rank order of agonist potency in inducing decreases in diastolic blood pressure was N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) > N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) > N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (NECA) > or = 2-phenylaminoadenosine (CV1808) > 2-p-(carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5' N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680) > N6-(2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl)-adenosine (APNEA). 3. The hypotensive action of CPA following microinjection into the NTS was antagonized by i.v. infusions (50 micrograms kg-1 min-1) of adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3 dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), 8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline (8-SPT), and 1,3-dipropyl-8-N-(2-diethylamino)ethyl)-N methyl-4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo) benzenesulphonamidexanthine (PD 115199). The antagonist potency order was DPCPX > PD115199 > or = 8-PT. Intravenous infusion of 8-SPT had no effect on blood pressure responses to microinjection of CPA into the NTS. 4. The results suggest that adenosine A1 receptors in the NTS mediate hypotensive responses in the anaesthetized rat preparation. PMID:8789383

  17. Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson Andr; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosngela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andria

    2014-01-01

    In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P27 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P27 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P27 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signalingp53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavageas well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

  18. Astrocyte-derived adenosine is central to the hypnogenic effect of glucose.

    PubMed

    Scharbarg, Emeric; Daenens, Marion; Lematre, Frdric; Geoffroy, Hlne; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has been hypothesised to maintain a close relationship with metabolism. Here we focus on the brain structure that triggers slow-wave sleep, the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), to explore the cellular and molecular signalling pathways recruited by an increase in glucose concentration. We used infrared videomicroscopy on ex vivo brain slices to establish that glucose induces vasodilations specifically in the VLPO via the astrocytic release of adenosine. Real-time detection by in situ purine biosensors further revealed that the adenosine level doubles in response to glucose, and triples during the wakefulness period. Finally, patch-clamp recordings uncovered the depolarizing effect of adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, on sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. Altogether, our results provide new insights into the metabolically driven release of adenosine. We hypothesise that adenosine adjusts the local energy supply to local neuronal activity in response to glucose. This pathway could contribute to sleep-wake transition and sleep intensity. PMID:26755200

  19. Astrocyte-derived adenosine is central to the hypnogenic effect of glucose

    PubMed Central

    Scharbarg, Emeric; Daenens, Marion; Lemaître, Frédéric; Geoffroy, Hélène; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has been hypothesised to maintain a close relationship with metabolism. Here we focus on the brain structure that triggers slow-wave sleep, the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), to explore the cellular and molecular signalling pathways recruited by an increase in glucose concentration. We used infrared videomicroscopy on ex vivo brain slices to establish that glucose induces vasodilations specifically in the VLPO via the astrocytic release of adenosine. Real-time detection by in situ purine biosensors further revealed that the adenosine level doubles in response to glucose, and triples during the wakefulness period. Finally, patch-clamp recordings uncovered the depolarizing effect of adenosine and its A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, on sleep-promoting VLPO neurons. Altogether, our results provide new insights into the metabolically driven release of adenosine. We hypothesise that adenosine adjusts the local energy supply to local neuronal activity in response to glucose. This pathway could contribute to sleep-wake transition and sleep intensity. PMID:26755200

  20. Adenosine Receptors Mediated Intracellular Calcium in Cumulus Cells Involved in the Maintenance of First Meiotic Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Heekyung; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2013-01-01

    Keeping the intact germinal vesicle (GV) is essential for maintaining the capacity of mammals including human. It is maintained by very complex procedures along with folliculogenesis and is a critical step for getting competent oocyte. So far, a few mechanisms involved in folliculogenesis are known but GV arrest mechanisms are largely unrevealed. Cyclic AMP, a adenosine derived substance, have been used as inhibitor of germinal vesicle breakdown as a putative oocyte maturation inhibitor. In this study, we examined the potency of adenosine as GV maintainer and a possible signaling mediator for that. A1, A2b, and A3 were detected in cumulus cells of cumulus enclosed-oocyte (CEO). Intact of germinal vesicle was not kept like in follicle but the spontaneous maturation was inhibited by exogenous adenosine. It is inhibited with concentration dependent manners. Intracellular calcium level of cumulus was extensively increased after adenosine treatment. Based on these results it is suggested that one of the pathway for GV arrest by adenosine and its receptors is calcium mediated signaling pathway in CEO. PMID:25949130

  1. Endogenous adenosine release is involved in the control of heart rate in rats.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Yves; Joulia, Fabrice; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Ravailhe, Sylvie; Delpierre, Stéphane; Condo, Jocelyne; Guieu, Regis; Delliaux, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) injections of adenosine exert marked effects on heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (BP), but the role of an endogenous adenosine release by vagal stimulation has not been evaluated. In anaesthetized rats, we examined HR and BP changes induced by 1 min electrical vagal stimulation in the control condition, and then after i.v. injections of (i) atropine, (ii) propranolol, (iii) caffeine, (iv) 8 cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), or (v) dipyridamole to increase the plasma concentration of adenosine (APC). APC was measured by chromatography in the arterial blood before and at the end of vagal stimulation. The decrease in HR in the controls during vagal stimulation was markedly attenuated, but persisted after i.v. injections of atropine and propranolol. When first administered, DPCPX modestly but significantly reduced the HR response to vagal stimulation, but this disappeared after i.v. caffeine administration. Both the HR and BP responses were significantly accentuated after i.v. injection of dipyridamole. Vagal stimulation induced a significant increase in APC, proportional to the magnitude of HR decrease. Our data suggest that the inhibitory effects of electrical vagal stimulations on HR and BP were partly mediated through the activation of A1 and A2 receptors by an endogenous adenosine release. Our experimental data could help to understand the effects of ischemic preconditioning, which are partially mediated by adenosine. PMID:26222197

  2. Content of Adenosine Phosphates and Adenylate Energy Charge in Germinating Ponderosa Pine Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Te May; Ching, Kim K.

    1972-01-01

    An average of 540 picomoles of total adenosine phosphates was found in the embryo of mature seeds of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) and 1140 picomoles in the gametophyte. Adenylate energy charges were 0.44 and 0.26, respectively. After stratification, total adenosine phosphates increased 7-fold and 6-fold in embryo and gametophyte, respectively, and energy charges rose to 0.85 and 0.75. During germination, total adenosine phosphates increased to a 20-fold peak on the 9th day in gametophytic tissue, parallel with the peak of reserve regradation and organellar synthesis, and then decreased. In embryo and seedling, total adenosine phosphates elevated 80-fold with two distinct oscillating increases of AMP and ADP. The oscillating increases occurred before the emergence of radicle and cotyledons during which the highest mitotic index prevailed in all tissues. Energy charges fluctuated between 0.65 at the rapid cell dividing stage to 0.85 at the fully differentiated stage of the seedling, while energy charges remained around 0.75 in the gametophyte. These data indicated that the content of adenosine phosphates of germinating seeds reflects growth, organogenesis, and morphogenesis, and that a compartmentalized energy metabolism must exist in dividing and growing plant cells. PMID:16658212

  3. Coronary Vasospasm While Treating Supraventricular Tachycardia: Is Adenosine Really to Blame?

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Henry C.; Pinto Miranda, Veronica; Sequeira, Rafael F.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery spasm has been reported during adenosine stress testing. Herein, we describe a transient ST-segment elevation following adenosine therapy for supraventricular tachycardia. A 38-year-old male presented to the emergency department with palpitations. Electrocardiogram showed supraventricular tachycardia with short RP interval. Vagal maneuvers were unsuccessful. Adenosine was then administered in two successive injections of 6 and 12?mg dosages, respectively. A subsequent 12-lead electrocardiogram revealed ST-segment elevation in inferior leads with reciprocal changes. Coronary angiography disclosed nonobstructive coronary disease. A postprocedure electrocardiogram exhibited normal sinus rhythm with nonspecific T wave abnormalities. Cardiac biomarkers were elevated with a peak troponin I of 0.32. Echocardiogram depicted bicuspid aortic valve and normal systolic function. Electrophysiological study revealed a concealed left accessory pathway and successful radiofrequency ablation was performed. Given the dynamic changes in the electrocardiogram, we hypothesize that this event was most likely a coronary vasospasm. The mechanism of coronary spasm following adenosine injection remains uncertain. Potential mediators include KATP channels and adenosine-2 receptors. PMID:24826297

  4. Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tian-shen; Du, Zhong-heng; Li, Zhi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Huang, Ka-te; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhou-yang; Hu, Huan; Wang, Jun-lu; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of repeated electroacupuncture (EA) over 21 days on the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 6 animals each: sham-control, CIA-control, and CIA-EA. We determined the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood and assessed pathological changes of ankle joints. Quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA levels of ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect expression of ADA and CD73 in synovial tissue. Repeated EA treatment on CIA resulted in the persistence of high concentrations of adenosine in peripheral blood, significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α mRNA concentrations, and synovial hyperplasia. Importantly, EA treatment led to a significant increase in CD73 mRNA levels in peripheral blood but was associated with a decrease of CD73 immunostaining in synovial tissue. In addition, EA treatment resulted in a significant decrease of both ADA mRNA levels in peripheral blood and ADA immunostaining in synovial tissue. Thus, repeated EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effect on CIA by increasing the concentration of adenosine. The mechanism of EA action may involve the modulation of CD73 and ADA expression levels. PMID:26941824

  5. Repeated Electroacupuncture Persistently Elevates Adenosine and Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian-Shen; Du, Zhong-Heng; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xie, Wen-Xia; Huang, Ka-Te; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhou-Yang; Hu, Huan; Wang, Jun-Lu; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of repeated electroacupuncture (EA) over 21 days on the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 6 animals each: sham-control, CIA-control, and CIA-EA. We determined the adenosine concentration in peripheral blood and assessed pathological changes of ankle joints. Quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine mRNA levels of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect expression of ADA and CD73 in synovial tissue. Repeated EA treatment on CIA resulted in the persistence of high concentrations of adenosine in peripheral blood, significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α mRNA concentrations, and synovial hyperplasia. Importantly, EA treatment led to a significant increase in CD73 mRNA levels in peripheral blood but was associated with a decrease of CD73 immunostaining in synovial tissue. In addition, EA treatment resulted in a significant decrease of both ADA mRNA levels in peripheral blood and ADA immunostaining in synovial tissue. Thus, repeated EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effect on CIA by increasing the concentration of adenosine. The mechanism of EA action may involve the modulation of CD73 and ADA expression levels. PMID:26941824

  6. Interactions between responses mediated by activation of adenosine A2 receptors and alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the rabbit isolated aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, H. L.; Thalody, G. P.; Maayani, S.

    1993-01-01

    1. This paper describes aspects of the functional antagonism between the responses mediated by activated alpha 1-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2 receptors in the adventitia- and endothelium-denuded aorta of the rabbit. 2. Adenosine A2 receptor agonists relaxed aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine. The relaxation response was agonist concentration-dependent and saturable. The respective contractile and relaxation responses were stable, reproducible, and reversible. 3. Increasing the phenylephrine concentration caused a progressive attenuation of the action of adenosine A2 receptor agonists, consisting of a decreased maximal response and a dextral shift of the adenosine agonist concentration-response curve. This functional antagonism could be completely reversed upon removal of adenosine by either the addition of adenosine deaminase or by wash-out of the adenosine agonist from the tissue. The relaxation response to the adenosine A2 receptor partial agonists, N6-cyclohexyladenosine and R-(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, was abolished at higher phenylephrine concentrations (e.g. 30 EC50). 4. A 1000 fold increase in the adenosine concentration was required to shift the value of the EC50 of phenylephrine six fold, while a similar increase in the value of the EC50 of adenosine could be elicited by only a 32 fold increase in the phenylephrine concentration. A 30 fold increase in the phenylephrine concentration shifted the value of the EC50 of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine four fold. 5. Analysis of the functional antagonism between the responses mediated by these receptors using the Black & Leff (1983) operational model of agonism allowed for the estimation of the agonist dissociation constant, KA, and the apparent efficacy, tau, for both phenylephrine and adenosine A2 receptor agonists. Increasing the concentration of phenylephrine reduced the value of tau for adenosine agonists in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. Similarly, increasing the concentration of adenosine reduced the value of tau for phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. The phenylephrine KA value obtained by the method of functional antagonism (1.9 microM) was similar to that obtained by the receptor inactivation method (2.1 microM). 6. Partial occlusion of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor by the alkylating agent, dibenamine, demonstrated that the magnitude of the adenosine A2 receptor-mediated relaxation was inversely proportional to the number of functional alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 7. It is concluded that the magnitude of functional antagonism is proportional to the stimulus elicited through either receptor. We propose that this tissue preparation and pair of receptors is a good model to study quantitative aspects of functional antagonism between activated receptors. PMID:8395286

  7. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients. PMID:26521170

  8. Predictors and Diagnostic Significance of the Adenosine Related Side Effects on Myocardial Perfusion SPECT/CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Y?ld?r?m Poyraz, Nilfer; zdemir, Elif; Poyraz, Bar?? Mustafa; Kandemir, Zuhal; Keskin, Mutlay; Trklmez, ?eyda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient characteristics and adenosine-related side-effects during stress myocard perfusion imaging (MPI). The effect of presence of adenosine-related side-effects on the diagnostic value of MPI with integrated SPECT/CT system for coronary artery disease (CAD), was also assessed in this study. Methods: Total of 281 patients (109 M, 172 F; mean age:62.610) who underwent standard adenosine stress protocol for MPI, were included in this study. All symptoms during adenosine infusion were scored according to the severity and duration. For the estimation of diagnostic value of adenosine MPI with integrated SPECT/CT system, coronary angiography (CAG) or clinical follow-up were used as gold standard. Results: Total of 173 patients (61.6%) experienced adenosine-related side-effects (group 1); flushing, dyspnea, and chest pain were the most common. Other 108 patients completed pharmacologic stress (PS) test without any side-effects (group 2). Test tolerability were similar in the patients with cardiovascular or airway disease to others, however dyspnea were observed significantly more common in patients with mild airway disease. Body mass index (BMI) ?30 kg/m2 and age ?45 years were independent predictors of side-effects. The diagnostic value of MPI was similar in both groups. Sensitivity of adenosine MPI SPECT/CT was calculated to be 86%, specificity was 94% and diagnostic accuracy was 92% for diagnosis of CAD. Conclusion: Adenosine MPI is a feasible and well tolerated method in patients who are not suitable for exercise stress test as well as patients with cardiopulmonary disease. However age ?45 years and BMI ?30 kg/m2 are the positive predictors of adenosine-related side-effects, the diagnostic value of adenosine MPI SPECT/CT is not affected by the presence of adenosine related side-effects. PMID:25541932

  9. An ultraviolet-inducible adenosine-adenosine cross-link reflects the catalytic structure of the Tetrahymena ribozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, W.D.; Cech, T.R. )

    1990-06-12

    When a shortened enzymatic version of the Tetrahymena self-splicing intervening sequence (IVS) RNA is placed under catalytic conditions and irradiated at 254 nm, a covalent cross-link forms with high efficiency. The position of the cross-link was mapped by using three independent methods: RNase H digestion, primer extension with reverse transcriptase, and partial hydrolysis of end-labeled RNA. The cross-link is chemically unusual in that it joins two adenosines, A57 and A95. Formation of this cross-link depends upon the identity and concentration of divalent cations present and upon heat-cool renaturation of the IVS in a manner that parallels conditions required for optimal catalytic activity. Furthermore, cross-linking requires the presence of sequences within the core structure, which is conserved among group I intervening sequences and necessary for catalytic activity. Together these correlations suggest that a common folded structure permits cross-linking and catalytic activity. The core can form this structure independent of the presence of P1 and elements at the 3' end of the IVS. The cross-linked RNA loses catalytic activity under destabilizing conditions, presumably due to disruption of the folded structure by the cross-link. One of the nucleotides participating in this cross-link is highly conserved (86%) within the secondary structure of group I intervening sequences. We conclude that A57 and A95 are precisely aligned in a catalytically active conformation of the RNA. A model is presented for the tertiary arrangement in the vicinity of the cross-link.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of new N6-substituted adenosine-5'-N-methylcarboxamides as A3 adenosine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Devine, Shane M; Gregg, Alison; Figler, Heidi; McIntosh, Kate; Urmaliya, Vijay; Linden, Joel; Pouton, Colin W; White, Paul J; Bottle, Steven E; Scammells, Peter J

    2010-05-01

    A number of N(6)-substituted adenosine-5'-N-methylcarboxamides were synthesised and their pharmacology, in terms of their receptor affinity, selectivity and cardioprotective effects, were explored. The first series of compounds, 4a-4f and 5a-5f, showed modest receptor affinity for the A(3)AR with K(i) values in the low to mid muM range. However, the incorporation of a 4-(2-aminoethyl)-2,6-di-tert-butylphenol group in the N(6)-position (in compounds 4g and 5g) significantly improved the affinity with K(i) values of 30 and 9 nM, respectively. Improvements in affinity, as well as selectivity were seen when a functionalized linker was introduced. The N(6)-phenyl series, compounds 7a-7d, demonstrated low to mid nanomolar receptor affinities (K(i)=2.3-45.0 nM), with 7b displaying 109-fold selectivity for the A(3)AR (vs A(1)). The N(6)-benzyl series 9a-9c also proved to be potent and selective A(3)AR agonists and the longer chain length linker 13 was tolerated at the A(3)AR without abrogation of affinity or selectivity. Cardioprotection was demonstrated by a simulated ischaemia cell culture assay, whereby 7b, 7c, 9a, 9b and 9c all showed cardioprotective effects at 100 nM comparable or better than the benchmark A(3)AR agonist IB-MECA, but which were indistinguishable by statistical analysis. For example, compound 9c reduced cell death by 68.0+/-3.6%. PMID:20385496

  11. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  12. Dopamine/adenosine interactions related to locomotion and tremor in animal models: Possible relevance to parkinsonism?

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Ishiwari, Keita; Betz, Adrienne J.; Farrar, Andrew M.; Mingote, Susana M.; Font, Laura; Hockemeyer, Jrg; Mller, Christa E.; Correa, Merc

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A2A antagonists can exert antiparkinsonian effects in animal models. Recent experiments studied the ability of MSX-3 (an adenosine A2A antagonist) to reverse the locomotor suppression and tremor produced by dopamine antagonists in rats. MSX-3 reversed haloperidol-induced suppression of locomotion, and reduced the tremulous jaw movements induced by haloperidol, pimozide, and reserpine. Infusions of MSX-3 into the nucleus accumbens core increased locomotion in haloperidol-treated rats, but there were no effects of infusions into the accumbens shell or ventrolateral neostriatum. In contrast, MSX-3 injected into the ventrolateral neostriatum reduced pimozide-induced tremulous jaw movements. Dopamine/adenosine interactions in different striatal subregions are involved in distinct aspects of motor function. PMID:18585081

  13. Dopamine/adenosine interactions involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Merce

    2010-01-01

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) is involved in effort-related aspects of food motivation. Accumbens DA depletions reduce the tendency of rats to work for food, and alter effort-related choice, but leave other aspects of food motivation and appetite intact. DA and adenosine receptors interact to regulate effort-related processes. Adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and intra-accumbens injections of a adenosine A2A agonist produce effects that are similar to those produced by accumbens DA depletion or antagonism. These studies have implications for understanding the neurochemical interactions that underlie activational aspects of motivation. PMID:19635514

  14. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  15. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Maisa F; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Amorim, Beatriz O; Macedo, Carlos E; Fernandes, Maria José S; Nobrega, José N; Aarão, Mayra C; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  16. [Adenosine for suppression of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in a newborn infant. First case in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Richheimer Wohlmuth, R; Iturralde Torres, P; Rijlaarsdam, M; Capuano Rafael, J

    1995-01-01

    We present the case of a 20-day old baby who was admitted with orthodromic supraventricular reentry tachycardia with a heart-rate of 300/minute. Suppression of the arrhythmia was tried with vagal maneuvers and digoxin. On failure to control the heart rate, a 0.05 mg/kg intravenous bolus of adenosine was given, with immediate response and subsequent normal heart rate and rhythm. In the following year he has been adequately controlled with oral digoxin. This is the first pediatric patient treated with adenosine in Mexico. Even though experience elsewhere in this age group is also limited, the properties of adenosine make it a valuable first-choice drug for the control of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. PMID:7639609

  17. Computational study of the molecular mechanisms of caffeine action: Caffeine complexes with adenosine receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltev, V. I.; Rodríguez, E.; Grokhlina, T. I.; Deriabina, A.; Gonzalez, E.

    To understand the molecular basis of the principal biological action of the caffeine (CAF), the molecular mechanics calculations of possible complexes between CAF and the fragments of human A1 adenosine receptor were performed. The fragments were selected after considerations of the CAF molecular structure and its possible interactions, as well as after an analysis of the extensive bibliography on the structure, biological role, site-directed mutagenesis, and the modeling of the adenosine receptors. The minimum energy configurations of these complexes were obtained using two different computer programs with different force fields. The most favorable configurations correspond to the formation of two hydrogen bonds between the CAF molecule and hydrophilic amino acid residues of the fragments of transmembrane domains of the receptor. These configurations are supposed to contribute to CAF blocking of the adenosine receptors. They will be used later for the construction of model CAF complexes with two transmembrane domains simultaneously.

  18. CD73-adenosine: a next-generation target in immuno-oncology.

    PubMed

    Allard, David; Allard, Bertrand; Gaudreau, Pierre-Olivier; Chrobak, Pavel; Stagg, John

    2016-02-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has entered in a new era with the development of first-generation immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 pathways. In this context, considerable research effort is being deployed to find the next generation of cancer immunotherapeutics. The CD73-adenosine axis constitutes one of the most promising pathways in immuno-oncology. We and others have demonstrated the immunosuppressive role of CD73-adenosine in cancer and established proof-of-concept that the targeted blockade of CD73 or adenosine receptors could effectively promote anti-tumor immunity and enhance the activity of first-generation immune checkpoint blockers. With Phase I clinical trials now underway evaluating anti-CD73 or anti-A2A therapies in cancer patients, we here discuss the fundamental, preclinical and clinical findings related to the role of the CD73-adenosinergic pathway in tumor immunity. PMID:26808918

  19. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  20. Alveolar Epithelial A2B Adenosine Receptors in Pulmonary Protection during Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Hoegl, Sandra; Brodsky, Kelley S; Blackburn, Michael R; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zwissler, Bernhard; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2015-08-15

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an acute inflammatory lung disease that causes morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. However, there are many instances where ALI resolves spontaneously through endogenous pathways that help to control excessive lung inflammation. Previous studies have implicated the extracellular signaling molecule adenosine and signaling events through the A2B adenosine receptor in lung protection. In this context, we hypothesized that tissue-specific expression of the A2B adenosine receptor is responsible for the previously described attenuation of ALI. To address this hypothesis, we exposed mice with tissue-specific deletion of Adora2b to ALI, utilizing a two-hit model where intratracheal LPS treatment is followed by injurious mechanical ventilation. Interestingly, a head-to-head comparison of mice with deletion of Adora2b in the myeloid lineage (Adora2b(loxP/loxP) LysM Cre(+)), endothelial cells (Adora2b(loxP/loxP) VE-cadherin Cre(+)), or alveolar epithelial cells (Adora2b(loxP/loxP) SPC Cre(+)) revealed a selective increase in disease susceptibility in Adora2b(loxP/loxP) SPC Cre(+) mice. More detailed analysis of Adora2b(loxP/loxP) SPC Cre(+) mice confirmed elevated lung inflammation and attenuated alveolar fluid clearance. To directly deliver an A2B adenosine receptor-specific agonist to alveolar epithelial cells, we subsequently performed studies with inhaled BAY 60-6583. Indeed, aerosolized BAY 60-6583 treatment was associated with attenuated pulmonary edema, improved histologic lung injury, and dampened lung inflammation. Collectively, these findings suggest that alveolar epithelial A2B adenosine receptor signaling contributes to lung protection, and they implicate inhaled A2B adenosine receptor agonists in ALI treatment. PMID:26188061

  1. Effect of adenosine system in the action of oseltamivir on behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidemori; Hiromura, Makoto; Shiratani, Tomonori; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Honda, Sinichiro; Kosako, Kazuhiro; Soeda, Shinji; Inoue, Kazuhide; Toda, Akihisa

    2015-07-10

    Abnormal behaviors and death associated with the use of oseltamivir (Tamiflu()) have emerged as a major issue in influenza patients. We have previously reported that the mechanisms underlying the effects of caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1/A2 receptor antagonist, combined with oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is rapidly hydrolyzed to its active form (oseltamivir carboxylate, OCB). In this study, we investigated the effects of an adenosine system and OCB on the action of oseltamivir on mice behavior. Oseltamivir for 1 day (150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) alone did not affect ambulation at 2 h post-injection. However, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days increased ambulation, but caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days did not increase. These enhancements were inhibited by an adenosine A2 receptor agonist, CGS21680 (0.2 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)). Furthermore, an adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, SCH58261 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days increased ambulation, but SCH58261 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 3 days did not. Conversely, in phenobarbital (PB)-treated mice, caffeine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir for 1 day increased ambulation. Moreover, OCB for 1 day (0.3 ?g/mouse intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.)) alone increased ambulation. These findings suggest that the actions of oseltamivir may involve the adenosine systems and its metabolism. Our findings suggest an interaction between the central blockade of adenosine A2 receptors by caffeine and OCB-induced behavioral changes. PMID:25980995

  2. Studies on the Presence of Adenosine Cyclic 3?:5?-Monophosphate in Oat Coleoptiles 1

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, James D.; Ross, Cleon W.; Key, Joe L.

    1975-01-01

    The incorporation of adenosine-8-14C into adenosine cyclic 3?:5?-monophosphate in coleoptile-first leaf segments of Avena sativa L. was investigated. Homogenates of segments incubated in adenosine-8-14C for either 4 or 10 hours were partially purified by thin layer chromatography followed by paper electrophoresis. A radioactive fraction, less than 0.06% of the 14C present in the original homogenate, migrated as adenosine cyclic 3?:5?-monophosphate during electrophoresis. Upon treatment with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, however, less than 10% of this radioactive fraction appeared as 5?-AMP. Deamination with NaNO2 as well as further chromatographical purification also suggested that only a small fraction of the 14C in the partially purified samples could be in adenosine cyclic 3?:5?-monophosphate. The data suggest that levels of this nucleotide can probably be no greater than 7 to 11 picomoles per gram of fresh weight in oat coleoptiles. Treatment of such coleoptiles with physiologically active concentrations of indoleacetic acid, furthermore, had no significant effect on the 14C radioactivity in marker adenosine cyclic 3?:5?-monophosphate-containing fractions at any stage of purification during several experiments. In a single experiment, no labeled guanosine cyclic 3?:5?-monophosphate could be detected in oat coleoptile-first leaf segments incubated in guanosine-8-14C either with or without indoleacetic acid. These results do not support the hypothesis that a cyclic nucleotide mediates the action of indoleacetic acid on oat coleoptile extension. PMID:16659080

  3. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  4. Adenosine enhances myocardial glucose uptake only in the presence of insulin.

    PubMed

    Law, W R; McLane, M P

    1991-09-01

    Better understood in other tissues, the effects of adenosine on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the heart are poorly understood. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, we instrumented mongrel dogs to obtain general hemodynamics (blood pressure and heart rate), and arterial and coronary sinus blood samples for measuring oxygen and glucose concentrations. An electromagnetic blood flow probe around the circumflex coronary artery allowed determinations of blood flow, and calculation of substrate uptake by the heart (Fick principle). Somatostatin (SRIF) was infused intravenously (0.8 micrograms/kg/min) along with 0, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, or 10 mU/kg/min regular insulin, and variable quantities of glucose to maintain euglycemia. Concomitant with the SRIF, insulin, and glucose infusions, adenosine was infused in logarithmically increasing rates (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 10 or 100 mumol/min) for 30 minutes each into the main left coronary arteries. Insulin infusions increased myocardial glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner. The heart displayed exquisite sensitivity to insulin, with an ED50 of approximately 14 microU/mL (serum insulin). Adenosine infusions in the absence of insulin (SRIF infusion) increased coronary blood flow, but did not alter myocardial glucose uptake. In the presence of insulin, adenosine increased the maximal value for glucose uptake without changing sensitivity to insulin. These results indicate that adenosine enhances myocardial responsiveness to insulin, with respect to glucose uptake, independent of changes in blood flow. Since glucose can be used for anaerobic metabolism, and adenosine levels are known to increase under situations in which myocardial oxygenation is inadequate, these data have serious implications for conditions such as myocardial ischemia or hypoxia, when glycolytic substrate availability is vital. PMID:1680214

  5. Myocardial blood flow and adenosine A2A receptor density in endurance athletes and untrained men.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Nesterov, Sergey V; Liukko, Kaisa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Ngren, Kjell; Luotolahti, Matti; Virsu, Pauliina; Oikonen, Vesa; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kujala, Urho M; Kainulainen, Heikki; Boushel, Robert; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2008-11-01

    Previous human studies have shown divergent results concerning the effects of exercise training on myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest or during adenosine-induced hyperaemia in humans. We studied whether these responses are related to alterations in adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) density in the left-ventricular (LV) myocardium, size and work output of the athlete's heart, or to fitness level. MBF at baseline and during intravenous adenosine infusion, and A2AR density at baseline were measured using positron emission tomography, and by a novel A(2A)R tracer in 10 healthy male endurance athletes (ET) and 10 healthy untrained (UT) men. Structural LV parameters were measured with echocardiography. LV mass index was 71% higher in ET than UT (193 +/- 18 g m(-2) versus 114 +/- 13 g m(-2), respectively). MBF per gram of tissue was significantly lower in the ET than UT at baseline, but this was only partly explained by reduced LV work load since MBF corrected for LV work was higher in ET than UT, as well as total MBF. The MBF during adenosine-induced hyperaemia was reduced in ET compared to UT, and the fitter the athlete was, the lower was adenosine-induced MBF. A2AR density was not different between the groups and was not coupled to resting or adenosine-mediated MBF. The novel findings of the present study show that the adaptations in the heart of highly trained endurance athletes lead to relative myocardial 'overperfusion' at rest. On the other hand hyperaemic perfusion is reduced, but is not explained by A2AR density. PMID:18772204

  6. Extracellular adenosine concentrations during in vitro ischaemia in rat hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Serena; Bordoni, Francesca; Pedata, Felicita; Corradetti, Renato

    1999-01-01

    The application of an ischaemic insult in hippocampal slices results in the depression of synaptic transmission, mainly attributed to the activation of A1 adenosine receptors by adenosine released in the extracellular space. To estimate the concentration of endogenous adenosine acting at the receptor level during an ischaemic episode, we recorded field e.p.s.ps (fe.p.s.ps) from hippocampal slices, and evaluated the ability of the selective A1 receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), to reverse the fe.p.s.p. depression induced by in vitro ischaemia. A relationship between the IC50 of an antagonist and the endogenous concentration of a neurotransmitter has been used for pharmacological analysis. The complete and reversible depression of fe.p.s.p. in the CA1 region induced by 5?min ischaemia was decreased in the presence of DPCPX (50500?nM). 8-Phenyltheophylline (10??M) abolished the depression of fe.p.s.ps during the ischaemic period, while a small (peak effect 124%) decrease in fe.p.s.ps was observed during the initial phase of reperfusion. In the time-interval of maximal depression of fe.p.s.ps., IC50 and adenosine concentration changed as function of time with a good degree of correlation. The maximal value of adenosine concentration was 30??M. Our data provide an estimation of the adenosine concentration reached at the receptor level during an ischaemic episode, with a higher time discrimination (15?s) than that achieved with any biochemical approach. This estimation may be useful in order to establish appropriate concentrations of purinergic compounds to be tested for their pharmacological effects during an ischaemic episode. PMID:10401564

  7. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases. PMID:26297614

  8. Serum Adenosine Deaminase as Inflammatory Marker in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vinapamula, Kiranmayi S.; Bhattaram, Siddartha Kumar; Bitla, Aparna R.; Manohar, Suchitra M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a prototypical inflammatory joint disease. The degree of inflammation is reflected in the extent of joint damage, which further has influence on the quality of life of patients with RA, including risk of atherosclerosis. Hence, besides clinical indices, estimation of degree of inflammation using biochemical markers helps in effecting optimum treatment strategies. C-reactive protein (CRP) is established as an inflammatory marker in patients with RA. Adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme of purine metabolism is considered as a marker of cell mediated immunity and has also been suggested as a marker of inflammatory process in RA. The present study attempts to study the efficacy of serum ADA activity as an inflammatory marker in RA. Materials and Methods Forty six RA patients and forty six age and sex matched healthy controls were included in the study. ADA activity and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in serum were measured in all the subjects. Statistical analyses were done using Medcalc statistical software version 12.2.2. Results ADA activity and hsCRP levels were increased in RA patients compared to controls (p<0.0001 and 0.0001 respectively). Significant positive correlation was obtained between hsCRP and ADA in patients (r=0.316, p=0.033). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed statistically significant area under curve (AUC) for ADA that is comparable to that obtained for hsCRP (0.776, p<0.0001 for ADA, 0.726, p<0.0001 for hsCRP). Similar diagnostic utility was obtained with ROC generated cut-off value of 25.3 IU/L (82.6% sensitivity and 65.2% specificity) and with control mean value of 23.48 IU/L (86.96% sensitivity and 54.35% specificity) for ADA. Conclusion Findings of the present study indicate the importance of ADA as a marker of inflammation. Considering the higher sensitivity obtained, we propose control mean (23.48 IU/L) as a cut-off for serum ADA activity as an inflammatory marker. Owing to the simplicity and also the cost effectiveness of ADA assay, ADA may be recommended as a marker of inflammation in patients with RA. However, further larger and well controlled studies are needed to establish its role as inflammatory marker. PMID:26500897

  9. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 ?g/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  10. Interactions between adenosine, angiotensin II and nitric oxide on the afferent arteriole influence sensitivity of the tubuloglomerular feedback

    PubMed Central

    Persson, A. E. G.; Lai, En Yin; Gao, Xiang; Carlstrm, Mattias; Patzak, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine, via activation of A1 receptors on the afferent arteriole (AA), mediates the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. Angiotensin II and nitric oxide (NO) can modulate the sensitivity of the TGF mechanism. However, the interaction among these substances in regulating the TGF resetting phenomenon has been debated. Studies in isolated perfused AA have shown a biphasic response to accumulating doses of adenosine alone. In the nanomolar range adenosine has a weak contractile effect (7%), whereas vasodilatation is observed at high concentrations. However, a synergistic interaction between the contractile response by adenosine and that of angiotensin II has been demonstrated. Adenosine in low concentrations strongly enhances the response to angiotensin II. At the same time, angiotensin II in physiological concentrations increases significantly the contractile response to adenosine. Moreover, addition of a NO donor (spermine NONOate) to increase NO bioavailability abolished the contractile response from combined application of angiotensin II and adenosine. These mutual modulating effects of adenosine and angiotensin II, and the effect of NO on the response of AA can contribute to the resetting of the TGF sensitivity. PMID:23882224

  11. 75 FR 8981 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Treatment of Glaucoma by Administration of Adenosine A3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Glaucoma by Administration of Adenosine A3 Antagonists AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health... the field of use may be limited to the use of adenosine A3 antagonists for treatment of glaucoma and... reduction in intraocular pressure, which is a means of treating glaucoma. The invention relates to...

  12. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z; O'Brien, John

    2014-05-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologs Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals, respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study, we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus, the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to regulate photoreceptor coupling via a push-pull mechanism. However, the lower concentration of adenosine present in the daytime actually reinforces the dopamine signal through action on the A1 receptor. PMID:24844306

  13. Mechanism of adenosine-induced airways obstruction in allergic guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Sandra; Boswell-Smith, Victoria; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive

    2006-01-01

    Inhaled adenosine induces airway obstruction in asthmatic but not healthy subjects, a phenomenon that is also observed in various animal species when they are immunised to a relevant antigen, but which does not occur in naïve animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of airway responsiveness to adenosine receptor agonists in anaesthetised allergic guinea pigs. Inhaled adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), the A1-selective adenosine receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and ovalbumin all caused airway obstruction in allergic guinea pigs, but not naïve animals, as assessed by changes in total lung resistance. In contrast, the A2a-selective (CGS 21680; 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethylcarboxoamido adenosine) and A3-selective (IB-MECA; 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[3-iodophenyl)-methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamide) adenosine receptor agonists failed to elicit airway obstruction in passively sensitised guinea pigs. Airway obstruction induced by AMP or CPA was not inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine (1 mg kg−1) in passively sensitised guinea-pigs. In contrast, airway obstruction to ovalbumin was significantly inhibited by this antagonist. Airway obstruction induced by AMP and CPA was significantly inhibited in sensitised animals chronically treated with capsaicin. In contrast, airway obstruction to ovalbumin was not inhibited by this treatment. Airway obstruction induced by AMP, CPA and ovalbumin was significantly inhibited following bilateral vagotomy or pharmacological treatment with atropine (2 mg kg−1). Airway obstruction to CPA was inhibited by the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX: 0.1–1 mg kg−1). In contrast, airway obstruction to ovalbumin was not inhibited by this treatment. These observations provide evidence indicating that AMP and CPA may induce airway obstruction in sensitised guinea pigs by a mechanism unrelated to histamine release from mast cells, but is mediated via an adenosine A1-receptor-dependent mechanism. The inhibition of AMP- and CPA-induced airway obstruction by atropine, capsaicin and bilateral vagotomy suggests a neuronal-dependent mechanism with the particular involvement of capsaicin-sensitive nerves. PMID:16432507

  14. Structure-activity studies of 5-substituted pyridopyrimidines as adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cowart, M; Lee, C H; Gfesser, G A; Bayburt, E K; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K L; McGaraughty, S; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Zhu, C; Alexander, K M; Jarvis, M F; Kowaluk, E A

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis and SAR of a novel series of non-nucleoside pyridopyrimidine inhibitors of the enzyme adenosine kinase (AK) are described. It was found that pyridopyrimidines with a broad range of medium and large non-polar substituents at the 5-position potently inhibited AK activity. A narrower range of analogues was capable of potently inhibiting adenosine phosphorylation in intact cells indicating an enhanced ability of these analogues to penetrate cell membranes. Potent AK inhibitors were found to effectively reduce nociception in animal models of thermal hyperalgesia and persistent pain. PMID:11140740

  15. Characterization of nitrobenzylthioinosine binding to nucleoside transport sites selective for adenosine in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, J.D.; LaBella, F.S.; Nagy, J.I.

    1985-03-01

    Nucleoside transport sites in rat brain membrane preparations were labeled with (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H) NBI), a potent inhibitor of nucleoside transport systems. The membranes contained a single class of very high affinity binding sites with K/sub D/ and B/sub max/ values of 0.06 nM and 147 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The displacement of (/sup 3/H)NBI binding by various nucleosides, adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists, and known nucleoside transport inhibitors was examined. The K/sub i/ values (micromolar concentration) of (/sup 3/H)NBI displacement by the nucleosides tested were: adenosine, 3.0; inosine, 160; thymidine, 240; uridine, 390; guanosine, 460; and cytidine, 1000. These nucleosides displayed parallel displacement curves indicating their interaction with a common site labeled by (/sup 3/H)NBI. The nucleobases, hypoxanthine and adenine, exhibited K/sub i/ values of 220 and 3640 microM, respectively. Adenosine receptor agonists exhibited moderate affinities for the (/sup 3/H)NBI site, whereas the adenosine receptor antagonists, caffeine, theophylline, and enprofylline, were ineffective displacers. The K/sub i/ values for cyclohexyladenosine, (+)- and (-)-phenylisopropyladenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, and adenosine 5'-ethylcarboxamide were 0.8, 0.9, 2.6, 12, and 54 microM, respectively. These affinities and the rank order of potencies indicate that (/sup 3/H)NBI does not label any known class of adenosine receptors (i.e., A1, A2, and P). The K/sub i/ values of other nucleoside transport inhibitors were: nitrobenzylthioguanosine, 0.05 nM; dipyridamole, 16 nM; papaverine, 3 microM; and 2'-deoxyadenosine, 22 microM. These results indicate that (/sup 3/H)NBI binds to a nucleoside transporter in brain which specifically recognizes adenosine as its preferred endogenous substrate. This ligand may aid in the identification of CNS neural systems that selectively accumulate adenosine and thereby control adenosinergic function.

  16. Adenosine modification may be preferred for reducing siRNA immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fucini, Raymond V; Haringsma, Henry J; Deng, Patricia; Flanagan, W Michael; Willingham, Aarron T

    2012-06-01

    The immune stimulation induced by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) has been reported to be quieted or abrogated by methoxy or fluoro modifications of the 2' position of the ribose sugar. However, variables such as the type of modification, nucleotide preference, and strand bias have not been systematically evaluated. Here, we report the results of a screen of several modified siRNAs via a human peripheral blood monocyte cytokine induction assay. Unlike corresponding modifications of guanosine, cytidine, or uridine, 2'-fluoro modification of adenosine significantly reduced cytokine induction while retaining siRNA knockdown activity. The results of this study suggest adenosine as an optimal target for modification. PMID:22519815

  17. Synthesis of alkyne derivatives of a novel triazolopyrazine as A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Haque, Serajul; Sha, Li; Kumaravel, Gnanasambandam; Wang, Joy; Engber, Thomas M; Whalley, Eric T; Conlon, Patrick R; Chang, Hexi; Kiesman, William F; Petter, Russell C

    2005-02-01

    A novel [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrazine core was synthesized and coupled with terminal acetylenes. The structure-activity relationship of the alkynes from this novel template was studied for their in vitro and in vivo adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonism. Selected compounds from this series were shown to have potent in vitro and in vivo activities against adenosine A(2A) receptor. Compound 12, in particular, was found to be orally active at 3mg/kg in both a mouse catalepsy model and a 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model. PMID:15664803

  18. Would calcium or potassium channels be responsible for cardiac arrest produced by adenosine and ATP in the right atria of Wistar rats?

    PubMed

    Camara, Henrique; Rodrigues, Juliano Quintella Dantas; Alves, Gabriel Andrade; Silva Junior, Edilson Dantas da; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Garcia, Antnio G; Jurkiewicz, Aron

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic nerves release ATP, which is processed into adenosine in the synaptic cleft. Adenosine and ATP exert a negative chronotropic effect in the heart. This study aims to evaluate adenosine and P2 receptors and cellular signalling in cardiac arrest produced by purines in the heart. Right atria of adult Wistar rats were used to evaluate the effects of adenosine, ATP and CPA (an adenosine A1 receptor agonist), in the presence and absence of DPCPX, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. Effects of adenosine A2 and A3 receptors agonists and antagonists were also investigated. Finally, involvement of calcium and potassium channels in these responses was assessed using BayK 8644 and 4-Aminopyridine. Cumulative concentration-effect curves of adenosine and CPA resulted in a negative chronotropic effect culminating in cardiac arrest at 1000?M (adenosine) and 1M (CPA). Furthermore, ATP produced a negative chronotropic effect at 1-300M and cardiac arrest at 1000?M in the right atrium. ATP?S (a non-hydrolysable analogue of ATP) reduced chronotropism only. The effects of adenosine, CPA and ATP were inhibited by DPCPX, a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. The selective adenosine A2 and A3 receptors antagonists did not alter the chronotropic response of adenosine. 4-Aminopyridine, a blocker of potassium channels at 10mM, prevented the cardiac arrest produced by adenosine and ATP, while BayK 8644, activator of calcium channels, did not prevent cardiac arrest. Adenosine A1 receptor activation by adenosine and ATP produces cardiac arrest in the right atrium of Wistar rats predominantly through activation of potassium channels. PMID:26528795

  19. Cardioprotection induced by adenosine A1 receptor agonists in a cardiac cell ischemia model involves cooperative activation of adenosine A2A and A2B receptors by endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Urmaliya, Vijay B; Church, Jarrod E; Coupar, Ian M; Rose'Meyer, Roselyn B; Pouton, Colin W; White, Paul J

    2009-05-01

    Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase within the heart during ischemia, and any exogenous adenosine receptor agonists therefore work in the context of significant local agonist concentrations. We evaluated the interactions between A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors in the presence and absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA, which is used to remove endogenous adenosine) in a cardiac cell ischemia model. Simulated ischemia (SI) was induced by incubating H9c2(2-1) cells in SI medium for 12 hours in 100% N2 gas before assessment of necrosis using propidium iodide (5 microM) or apoptosis using AnnexinV-PE flow cytometry. N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 10(-7)M) and N6-(3-iodobenzyl) adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA; 10(-7)M) reduced the proportion of nonviable cells to 30.87 +/- 2.49% and 35.18 +/- 10.30%, respectively (% of SI group). In the presence of ADA, the protective effect of CPA was reduced (62.82 +/- 3.52% nonviable), whereas the efficacy of IB-MECA was unchanged (35.81 +/- 3.84% nonviable; P < 0.05, n = 3-5, SI vs. SI + ADA). The protective effects of CPA and IB-MECA were abrogated in the presence of their respective antagonists DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) and MRS1191 [3-ethyl-5-benzyl-2-methyl-4-phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-(+/-)-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate], whereas A2A and A2B agonists had no significant effect. CPA-mediated protection was abrogated in the presence of both A2A (ZM241385, 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-lamino]ethyl)phenol; 50 nM) and A2B (MRS1754, 8-[4-[((4-cyanophenyl)carbamoylmethyl)oxy]phenyl]-1,3-di(n-propyl)xanthine; 200 nM) antagonists (n = 3-5, P < 0.05). In the absence of endogenous adenosine, significant protection was observed with CPA in presence of CGS21680 (4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid) or LUF5834 [2-amino-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-6-(1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylsulfanyl)pyridine-3,5-dicarbonitrile] (P < 0.05 vs. SI + ADA + CPA). Apoptosis (14.35 +/- 0.15% of cells in SI + ADA group; P < 0.05 vs. control) was not significantly reduced by CPA or IB-MECA. In conclusion, endogenous adenosine makes a significant contribution to A1 agonist-mediated prevention of necrosis in this SI model by cooperative interactions with both A2A and A2B receptors but does not play a role in A3 agonist-mediated protection. PMID:19333129

  20. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  1. Occupancy of adenosine receptors raises cyclic AMP alone and in synergy with occupancy of chemoattractant receptors and inhibits membrane depolarization.

    PubMed Central

    Cronstein, B N; Kramer, S B; Rosenstein, E D; Korchak, H M; Weissmann, G; Hirschhorn, R

    1988-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that adenosine, acting via adenosine A2 receptors, inhibits generation of superoxide anions (O2-) by stimulated neutrophils. To determine the mechanism(s) by which adenosine inhibits O2- generation stimulated by the chemoattractant N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), we examined cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations, stimulated membrane depolarization and Ca2+ movements. Neither adenosine nor 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), the most potent agonist at adenosine A2 receptors, increases neutrophil cAMP content. However in the presence of the non-methylxanthine phosphodiesterase inhibitor, Ro-20-1724, both adenosine and NECA elicit a reversible increase in intracellular cAMP concentration. The chemoattractant FMLP also elicits an increment in the neutrophil cAMP content. NECA, in the presence of Ro-20-1724, synergistically enhances the increment in cAMP following stimulation by FMLP. However Ro-20-1724 does not potentiate the inhibition of O2- generation by NECA. Unlike other agents which increase neutrophil cAMP concentrations, NECA, even in the presence of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, only trivially inhibits degranulation. We also found that adenosine markedly inhibits stimulated membrane depolarization but does not affect the stimulated increment in free ionized intracellular calcium. Moreover, inhibition by adenosine of O2- generation does not vary with the concentration of extracellular calcium. These results fulfil the last criterion for the demonstration of an A2 receptor on human neutrophils, and indicate that adenosine occupies an A2 receptor on neutrophils to raise intracellular cAMP in synergy with occupancy of the FMLP receptor. The results reported here also indicate that cAMP is not the second messenger for inhibition of O2- generation by adenosine and its analogues. PMID:2844154

  2. [Central-adenosine A1 receptor involved in the thermal regulation effect of YZG-330, a N6-substituted adenosine derivative, in mice].

    PubMed

    Jia, Shao-bo; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Jian-gong; Zhang, Jian-jun

    2015-06-01

    Adenosine receptors (AR) play an important role in the regulation processes for body temperature and vigilance states. During our previous studies, we noticed that aminophylline (a non-selective, blood-brain-barrier penetrably AR antagonist) could attenuate the effects of YZG-330 [(2R,3S,4R,5R)-2-(hydroxymethyl-5-(6-(((R)-1-phenylpropyl)amino)-9H-purin-9-yl)tetrahydrofuran-3, 4-diol] on lowering the body temperature. Hereby, we focused ourselves on the character of thermal regulation effect of YZG-330 in mice and tried to specify the receptor subtype via giving typical adenosine receptor antagonists. The results showed that both of the magnitude and lasting time of the effect that YZG-330 played on decreasing body temperature are in a dose-dependent manner: within the next 3 hour after intragastric administration (ig) of 0.25, 1 or 4 mg . kg-1 YZG-330, the extreme values on body temperature decreasing were (1.2 ± 0.3) °C, (3.6 ± 0.4) °C (P<0.001) and (7.4±0.5) °C (P<0.001), separately; whereas the duration that body temperature below 34 °C were 0, (10±5) and (153±4) min, separately. Adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist (DPCPX) could effectively reverse YZG-330's effect on decreasing body temperature, with intraperitoneal administration of DPCPX (5 mg . kg-1) 20 min prior than YZG-330 (4 mg.kg-1, ig), the extreme value on body temperature decreasing was (3.5 ± 0.7) °C (P<0.001), the duration that body temperature below 34 °C was (8±6) min (P<0.001). However, adenosine A2a receptor antagonist, SCH-58261, did not show any influence on the effects of YZG-330 at all. Combined with the fact that 8-SPT (a non-selective, blood-brain-barrier impenetrably AR antagonist) did not reverse the effect of YZG-330, we come to the conclusion that central-adenosine A, receptor plays a significant role on the thermal regulation effect of YZG-330. PMID:26521438

  3. Recent developments in A2B adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A selective, high-affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist will be useful as a pharmacological tool to help determine the role of the A(2B)AR in inflammatory diseases and angiogenic diseases. Based on early A(2B)AR-selective ligands with nonoptimal pharmaceutical properties, such as 15 (MRS 1754: K(i)(hA(2B)) = 2 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 403 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 503 NM, and K(i)(hA(3)) = 570 nM), several groups have discovered second-generation A(2B)AR ligands that are suitable for development. Scientists at CV Therapeutics have discovered the selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist 22, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative, (CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM). Compound 22 has demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (T(1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat), and it is a functional antagonist at the A(2B)AR(K (B) = 6 nM). In a mouse model of asthma, compound 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent efficacy supporting the role of the A(2B)AR in asthma. In two Phase I clinical trails, 22 (CVT-6883) was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once-daily dosing. Baraldi et al. have independently discovered a selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 30 (MRE2029F20), 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 200 nM; K(i)(hA(2A), A(3)) > 1,000, that has been selected for development in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals. Compound 30 has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist of the A(2B)AR, and it has been radiolabeled for use in pharmacological studies. A third compound, 58 (LAS-38096), is a 2-aminopyrimidine derivative (discovered by the Almirall group) that has high A(2B)AR affinity and selectivity (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM), and 58 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. A fourth selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 54 (OSIP339391 K(i))(hA(2B)) = 0.5 nM; K(i))(hA(1)) = 37 nM; K(i))(hA(2A)) = 328; and K(i))(hA(3)) = 450 nm) was discovered by the OSI group. The three highly selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonists that have been selected for development should prove useful in subsequent clinical trials that will establish the role of the A(2B)ARs in various disease states. PMID:19639280

  4. Uptake of adenosine and release of adenine derivatives in mammalian non-myelinated nerve fibres at rest and during activity

    PubMed Central

    Maire, J. C.; Medilanski, J.; Straub, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    1. Influx of adenosine into rabbit non-myelinated nerve fibres was measured using [2-3H]adenosine. The uptake of radioactivity increased linearly with duration of incubation for up to 60 min and adenosine concentration up to 200 ?m. The uptake at different adenosine concentrations showed a saturable component with a half-maximal activation at 171 ?m and a linear part. 2. The radioactivity taken up was rapidly incorporated into AMP, ADP and ATP. Isotopic equilibrium between the nucleotides was achieved within 15 min. 3. The uptake of 3H from 02 ?m-adenosine was almost completely inhibited by addition of 200 ?m-adenosine and to a similar extent by 200 ?m-tubercidin and AMP; a 70% inhibition was found with ATP and ADP; ?, ? methylene-ADP had no effect. 4. ATP, ADP and AMP added to the extracellular medium of a desheathed vagus were slowly hydrolysed. 5. In preparations loaded with [2-3H]adenosine and then washed with adenosine and label-free solution there was a steady efflux of radioactivity amounting to 018 10-3/min. Addition of adenosine or tubercidin transiently increased the efflux. 6. Electrical stimulation caused an extra release of radioactivity. The extra fractional loss was 218 10-6/impulse in preparations that had rested for several hours; it decreased to 23 10-6/impulse when stimulation was applied after a 30 min rest. 7. The radioactivity of the resting efflux and of the extra efflux after stimulation was found mostly in inosine and hypoxanthine; adenosine and adenine accounted for only 3%, and the nucleotides for less than 1% of the efflux. 8. Adenosine added to the external medium of a desheathed nerve was slowly deaminated. 9. It is concluded that inosine and hypoxanthine found in the effluent from desheathed vagus nerve trunk result from release of these compounds from nerve fibres and not from extracellular breakdown of released ATP or adenosine. 10. Electrical activity in non-myelinated nerve fibres of the nerve trunk thus causes the release of metabolites (inosine and hypoxanthine) together with small amounts of adenosine and adenine, while release of ATP and other nucleotides is almost completely absent. PMID:7097586

  5. Adenosine Analogues as Selective Inhibitors of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase of Trypanosomatidae via Structure-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Bressi, Jerome C.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Aronov, Alex M.; Shaw, My Le; Shin, Sam S.; Nguyen, Lisa N.; Suresh, Stephen; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Kuntz, Irwin D.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    In our continuation of the structure-based design of anti-trypanosomatid drugs, parasite-selective adenosine analogues were identified as low micromolar inhibitors of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Crystal structures of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania mexicana, and human GAPDHs provided details of how the adenosyl moiety of NAD+ interacts with the proteins, and this facilitated the understanding of the relative affinities of a series of adenosine analogues for the various GAPDHs. From exploration of modifications of the naphthalenemethyl and benzamide substituents of a lead compound, N6-(1-naphthalenemethyl)-2?-deoxy-2?-(3-methoxybenzamido)adenosine (6e), N6-(substituted-naphthalenemethyl)-2?-deoxy-2?-(substituted-benzamido)adenosine analogues were investigated. N6-(1-Naphthalenemethyl)-2?-deoxy-2?-(3,5-dimethoxybenzamido)adenosine (6m), N6-[1-(3-hydroxy-naphthalene)methyl]-2?-deoxy-2?-(3,5-dimethoxybenzamido)adenosine (7m), N6-[1-(3-methoxy-naphthalene)methyl]-2?-deoxy-2?-(3,5-dimethoxybenzamido)adenosine (9m), N6-(2-naphthalene-methyl)-2?-deoxy-2?-(3-methoxybenzamido)adenosine (11e), and N6-(2-naphthalenemethyl)-2?-deoxy-2?-(3,5-dimethoxybenzamido)adenosine (11m) demonstrated a 2- to 3-fold improvement over 6e and a 7100- to 25000-fold improvement over the adenosine template. IC50s of these compounds were in the range 212 ?M for T. brucei, T. cruzi, and L. mexicana GAPDHs, and these compounds did not inhibit mammalian GAPDH when tested at their solubility limit. To explore more thoroughly the structureactivity relationships of this class of compounds, a library of 240 N6-(substituted)-2?-deoxy-2?-(amido)adenosine analogues was generated using parallel solution-phase synthesis with N6 and C2? substituents chosen on the basis of computational docking scores. This resulted in the identification of 40 additional compounds that inhibit parasite GAPDHs in the low micromolar range. We also explored adenosine analogues containing 5?-amido substituents and found that 2?,5?-dideoxy-2?-(3,5-dimethoxy-benzamido)-5?-(diphenylacetamido)adenosine (49) displays an IC50 of 60100 ?M against the three parasite GAPDHs. PMID:11405646

  6. Modulation by adenosine of Adelta and C primary-afferent glutamatergic transmission in adult rat substantia gelatinosa neurons.

    PubMed

    Lao, L-J; Kawasaki, Y; Yang, K; Fujita, T; Kumamoto, E

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined the actions of adenosine on monosynaptic Adelta and C primary-afferent excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) recorded from substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons of an adult rat spinal cord slice. In 67% of the neurons examined, adenosine reversibly decreased the amplitude of the Adelta-fiber EPSC, while in 13% of the neurons the amplitude was reduced or unaffected, which was followed by its increase persisting for several minutes after adenosine washout. The remaining neurons did not exhibit a change in the amplitude. The reduction in Adelta-fiber EPSC amplitude by adenosine was dose-dependent with an effective concentration for half-inhibition (EC50) value of 217 microM. When examined by using a paired-pulse stimulus, a ratio of the second to first Adelta-fiber EPSC amplitude under the reduction was larger than that of EPSC amplitude in the control, suggesting a presynaptic action of adenosine. In 69% of the neurons tested, the C-fiber EPSC was reversibly decreased in amplitude by adenosine (100 microM) by an extent comparable to that of Adelta-fiber EPSC; the remaining neurons were without adenosine actions. Similar inhibitory actions of adenosine were also seen in neurons where both Adelta-fiber and C-fiber EPSCs were elicited. Similar reduction in the Adelta-fiber or C-fiber EPSC amplitude was induced by an A1 adenosine-receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (1 microM), and the adenosine-induced reduction was not observed in the presence of an A1 antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (1 microM). An A2a agonist, CGS 21680 (1 microM), did not significantly affect the Adelta-fiber EPSC amplitude. It is concluded that adenosine presynaptically inhibits monosynaptic Adelta-fiber and C-fiber transmission by a similar extent through the activation of the A1 receptor in many but not all SG neurons; this could contribute to at least a part of antinociception by intrathecally administered adenosine analogues and probably by endogenous adenosine. PMID:15051161

  7. SELECTIVE IMMUNOTOXIC EFFECTS IN MICE TREATED WITH THE ADENOSINE DEAMINASE INHIBITOR 2-DEOXYCOFORMYCIN (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mice given the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2-deoxycoformycin, for five days were evaluated 24 h, 72 h and 6 days after the final dose. Spleen weight was decreased for up to 6 days after treatment. The number and relative percentage of circulating lymphocytes were decreased 24 a...

  8. Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  9. Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

    1982-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

  10. IFN-? Prevents Adenosine Receptor (A2bR) Upregulation To Sustain the Macrophage Activation Response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Heather B; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M

    2015-10-15

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-? prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we demonstrate that, following TLR stimulation, macrophages upregulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This upregulation of A2bR leads to the induction of macrophages with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the downregulation of inflammation. IFN-? priming of macrophages selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and to prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-?-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNF-? and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacologic inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyperinflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-? treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-? effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-? contributes to host defense by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the antimicrobial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  11. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E.

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  12. Hyperalgesia, anxiety, and decreased hypoxic neuroprotection in mice lacking the adenosine A1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Bjrn; Halldner, Linda; Dunwiddie, Thomas V.; Masino, Susan A.; Poelchen, Wolfgang; Gimnez-Llort, Lydia; Escorihuela, Rosa M.; Fernndez-Teruel, Alberto; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Hrdemark, Anna; Betsholtz, Christer; Herlenius, Eric; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine is believed to act by blocking adenosine A1 and A2A receptors (A1R, A2AR), indicating that some A1 receptors are tonically activated. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the second coding exon of the A1R (A1R?/?). These animals bred and gained weight normally and had a normal heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. In most behavioral tests they were similar to A1R+/+ mice, but A1R?/? mice showed signs of increased anxiety. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices revealed that both adenosine-mediated inhibition and theophylline-mediated augmentation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission were abolished in A1R?/? mice. In A1R+/? mice the potency of adenosine was halved, as was the number of A1R. In A1R?/? mice, the analgesic effect of intrathecal adenosine was lost, and thermal hyperalgesia was observed, but the analgesic effect of morphine was intact. The decrease in neuronal activity upon hypoxia was reduced both in hippocampal slices and in brainstem, and functional recovery after hypoxia was attenuated. Thus A1Rs do not play an essential role during development, and although they significantly influence synaptic activity, they play a nonessential role in normal physiology. However, under pathophysiological conditions, including noxious stimulation and oxygen deficiency, they are important. PMID:11470917

  13. Identification of A3 adenosine receptor agonists as novel non-narcotic analgesics.

    PubMed

    Janes, K; Symons-Liguori, A M; Jacobson, K A; Salvemini, D

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain negatively impacts the quality of life in a variety of patient populations. The current therapeutic repertoire is inadequate in managing patient pain and warrants the development of new therapeutics. Adenosine and its four cognate receptors (A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 ) have important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states, including chronic pain. Preclinical and clinical studies have revealed that while adenosine and agonists of the A1 and A2A receptors have antinociceptive properties, their therapeutic utility is limited by adverse cardiovascular side effects. In contrast, our understanding of the A3 receptor is only in its infancy, but exciting preclinical observations of A3 receptor antinociception, which have been bolstered by clinical trials of A3 receptor agonists in other disease states, suggest pain relief without cardiovascular side effects and with sufficient tolerability. Our goal herein is to briefly discuss adenosine and its receptors in the context of pathological pain and to consider the current data regarding A3 receptor-mediated antinociception. We will highlight recent findings regarding the impact of the A3 receptor on pain pathways and examine the current state of selective A3 receptor agonists used for these studies. The adenosine-to-A3 receptor pathway represents an important endogenous system that can be targeted to provide safe, effective pain relief from chronic pain. PMID:26804983

  14. Cardiac myocyte–secreted cAMP exerts paracrine action via adenosine receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Yassine; Ahles, Andrea; Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Baqi, Younis; Lee, Sang-Yong; Husse, Britta; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Foinquinos, Ariana; Thum, Thomas; Müller, Christa E.; Dendorfer, Andreas; Laggerbauer, Bernhard; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Acute stimulation of cardiac β-adrenoceptors is crucial to increasing cardiac function under stress; however, sustained β-adrenergic stimulation has been implicated in pathological myocardial remodeling and heart failure. Here, we have demonstrated that export of cAMP from cardiac myocytes is an intrinsic cardioprotective mechanism in response to cardiac stress. We report that infusion of cAMP into mice averted myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis in a disease model of cardiac pressure overload. The protective effect of exogenous cAMP required adenosine receptor signaling. This observation led to the identification of a potent paracrine mechanism that is dependent on secreted cAMP. Specifically, FRET-based imaging of cAMP formation in primary cells and in myocardial tissue from murine hearts revealed that cardiomyocytes depend on the transporter ABCC4 to export cAMP as an extracellular signal. Extracellular cAMP, through its metabolite adenosine, reduced cardiomyocyte cAMP formation and hypertrophy by activating A1 adenosine receptors while delivering an antifibrotic signal to cardiac fibroblasts by A2 adenosine receptor activation. Together, our data reveal a paracrine role for secreted cAMP in intercellular signaling in the myocardium, and we postulate that secreted cAMP may also constitute an important signal in other tissues. PMID:25401477

  15. An update on adenosine A2A receptors as drug target in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vallano, Antoni; Fernandez-Duenas, Victor; Pedros, Consuelo; Arnau, Josep Maria; Ciruela, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Adenosine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate the physiological functions of adenosine. In the central nervous system adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) are highly enriched in striatopallidal neurons where they form functional oligomeric complexes with other GPCRs such us the dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)R). Furthermore, it is assumed that the formation of balanced A(2A)R/D(2)R receptor oligomers are essential for correct striatal function as the allosteric receptor-receptor interactions established within the oligomer are needed for properly sensing adenosine and dopamine. Interestingly, A(2A)R activation reduces the affinity of striatal D(2)R for dopamine and the blockade of A(2A)R with specific antagonists facilitates function of the D(2)R. Thus, it may be postulated that A(2A)R antagonists are pro-dopaminergic agents. Therefore, A(2A)R antagonists will potentially reduce the effects associated with dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease (PD). Accordingly, this class of compounds have recently attracted considerable attention as potential therapeutic agents for PD pharmacotherapy as they have shown potential effectiveness in counteracting motor dysfunctions and also displayed neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of PD. Overall, we provide here an update of the current state of the art of these A(2A)R-based approaches that are under clinical study as agents devoted to alleviate PD symptoms. PMID:21838670

  16. Adenosine-dopamine interactions: development of a concept and some comments on therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Bertil B; Svenningsson, Per

    2003-12-01

    This brief review presents a personal perspective on the historical development of the current knowledge about the biologically important concept of functional antagonism between adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors in caudate-putamen, accumbens, and tuberculum olfactorium. In the 1970s, studies of dopamine actions suggested an unexpected role of adenosine. Developments during the next decade substantiated this finding and demonstrated that a subform of adenosine A2 receptors was enriched in the basal ganglia. Cloning of adenosine receptors provided better tools for cellular localization and showed that A2A receptors are closely associated with D2 receptors. Distinct functional interactions at several levels were discovered, and there is now strong evidence that A2A receptors are tonically active and modified by dopamine acting at D2 receptors. Development of selective antagonists and knockout mice have highlighted the potential usefulness of A2A antagonists in decreasing symptoms and progression of Parkinson's disease-something that has also been vindicated by careful epidemiologic studies. There are issues of efficacy and potential side effects that need to be resolved, but the future looks bright. PMID:14663001

  17. Antiepileptic drugs prevent changes in adenosine deamination during acute seizure episodes in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Piato, Angelo Luis; Schaefer, Isabel Costa; Nery, Laura Roesler; Bogo, Maurcio Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2013-03-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous modulator of brain functions, which presents anticonvulsant properties. In addition, its levels can be increased during neural injury. The modulation of extracellular adenosine levels by ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities may represent a key mechanism in the control of epileptogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute seizure episodes and antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments on ectonucleotidases and ADA activities in adult zebrafish brain. Our data have demonstrated that pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures did not alter ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis in brain membrane fractions. However, there was a significant increase on ecto-ADA and soluble ADA activities in PTZ-treated animals immediately after a clonus-like convulsion and loss of posture, which are typical behavioral changes observed in Stage 3. Furthermore, our results have demonstrated that AED pretreatments prevented the stimulatory effect promoted by PTZ exposure on ADA activities. The PTZ and AED treatments did not promote alterations on ADA gene expression. Interestingly, when exposed to PTZ, animals pretreated with AEDs showed longer latency to reach the clonus-like seizure status, which is an effect that matches the suppression of the increase of ADA activity promoted by the AEDs. These data suggest that the adenosine deamination could be involved in the control of seizure development in zebrafish and may be modulated by AED treatments. PMID:23287800

  18. Phenylephrine stimulated breakdown of phosphoinositides in brown adipocytes is attenuated by adenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmel, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Selective activation of alpha adrenergic receptors on brown adipocytes brings about increased mitochondrial respiration. This response is associated with a rapid breakdown of phosphoinositides in the plasma membrane. The authors have shown that respiration increased by alpha receptor activation can be inhibited by adenosine but the mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. The present study probes the possibility that adenosine inhibition of alpha receptor stimulated respiration is secondary to an inhibition of stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Phospholipids were labeled with (/sup 32/P) by incubation with (/sup 32/P)-Pi for up to four hours. Phenylephrine and other ligands were then added and the radioactivity present in individual lipids determined following their resolution by thin layer chromatography. Addition of 2-chloroadenosine or phenylisopropyl adenosine, but not 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, inhibited phenylephrine promoted breakdown of phosphoinositides. The dose response relation for this effect was similar to that for attenuation of stimulated respiration. This finding demonstrates adenosine inhibition of a phospholipase in brown fat cells and suggests the possibility that breakdown of inositol phospholipids is a critical control site for stimulation and attenuation of respiration.

  19. CD73-generated Adenosine Restricts Lymphocyte Migration into Draining Lymph Nodes1

    PubMed Central

    Takedachi, Masahide; Qu, Dongfeng; Ebisuno, Yukihiko; Oohara, Hiroyuki; Joachims, Michelle L.; McGee, Stephanie T.; Maeda, Emiko; McEver, Rodger P.; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Murakami, Shinya; Krahn, Thomas; Blackburn, Michael R.; Thompson, Linda F.

    2009-01-01

    After an inflammatory stimulus, lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes increases dramatically to facilitate the encounter of nave T cells with antigen-loaded dendritic cells. Here we show that CD73 (ecto-5?-nucleotidase) plays an important role in regulating this process. CD73 produces adenosine from AMP and is expressed on high endothelial venules (HEV) and subsets of lymphocytes. Cd73-/- mice have normal sized lymphoid organs in the steady state, but approximately 1.5-fold larger draining lymph nodes and 2.5-fold increased rates of L-selectin-dependent lymphocyte migration from the blood through HEV compared to wild type mice 24 hours after LPS administration. Migration rates of cd73+/+ and cd73-/- lymphocytes into lymph nodes of wild type mice are equal, suggesting that it is CD73 on HEV that regulates lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes. The A2B receptor is a likely target of CD73-generated adenosine, as it is the only adenosine receptor expressed on the HEV-like cell line KOP2.16 and it is up regulated by TNF?. Furthermore, increased lymphocyte migration into draining lymph nodes of cd73-/- mice is largely normalized by pretreatment with the selective A2B receptor agonist BAY 60-6583. Adenosine receptor signaling to restrict lymphocyte migration across HEV may be an important mechanism to control the magnitude of an inflammatory response. PMID:18424752

  20. A2BR Adenosine Receptor Modulates Sweet Taste in Circumvallate Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Shultz, Nicole; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Ravid, Katya; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3) on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR) is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate), but not anterior (fungiform, palate) taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express G?14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields. PMID:22253866

  1. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  2. Stimulation of Glia Reveals Modulation of Mammalian Spinal Motor Networks by Adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Acton, David; Miles, Gareth B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that glia can release modulators to influence the excitability of neighbouring neurons, the importance of gliotransmission for the operation of neural networks and in shaping behaviour remains controversial. Here we characterise the contribution of glia to the modulation of the mammalian spinal central pattern generator for locomotion, the output of which is directly relatable to a defined behaviour. Glia were stimulated by specific activation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), an endogenous G-protein coupled receptor preferentially expressed by spinal glia during ongoing activity of the spinal central pattern generator for locomotion. Selective activation of PAR1 by the agonist TFLLR resulted in a reversible reduction in the frequency of locomotor-related bursting recorded from ventral roots of spinal cord preparations isolated from neonatal mice. In the presence of the gliotoxins methionine sulfoximine or fluoroacetate, TFLLR had no effect, confirming the specificity of PAR1 activation to glia. The modulation of burst frequency upon PAR1 activation was blocked by the non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist theophylline and by the A1-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, but not by the A2A-receptor antagonist SCH5826, indicating production of extracellular adenosine upon glial stimulation, followed by A1-receptor mediated inhibition of neuronal activity. Modulation of network output following glial stimulation was also blocked by the ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, indicating glial release of ATP and its subsequent degradation to adenosine rather than direct release of adenosine. Glial stimulation had no effect on rhythmic activity recorded following blockade of inhibitory transmission, suggesting that glial cell-derived adenosine acts via inhibitory circuit components to modulate locomotor-related output. Finally, the modulation of network output by endogenous adenosine was found to scale with the frequency of network activity, implying activity-dependent release of adenosine. Together, these data indicate that glia play an active role in the modulation of mammalian locomotor networks, providing negative feedback control that may stabilise network activity. PMID:26252389