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Sample records for calcium-induced conformational transition

  1. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  2. Paramecium calmodulin mutants defective in ion channel regulation can bind calcium and undergo calcium-induced conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Jaren, O R; Harmon, S; Chen, A F; Shea, M A

    2000-06-13

    Calmodulin (CaM) is an essential eukaryotic protein that binds calcium ions cooperatively at four EF-hand binding sites to regulate signal transduction pathways. Interactions between the apo domains of vertebrate CaM reduce the calcium affinities of sites I and II below their intrinsic values, allowing sequential opening of the two hydrophobic clefts in CaM. Viable domain-specific mutants of Parameciumcalmodulin (PCaM) differentially affect ion channels and provide a unique opportunity to dissect the roles of the two highly homologous half-molecule domains. Calcium binding induced an increase in the level of ordered secondary structure and a decrease in Stokes radius in these mutants; such changes were identical in direction to those of wild type CaM, but the magnitude depended on the mutation. Calcium titrations monitored by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of Y138 in site IV showed that the affinities of sites III and IV of wild type PCaM were (i) higher than those of the same sites in rat CaM, (ii) equivalent to those of the same sites in PCaM mutants altered between sites I and II, and (iii) higher than those of PCaM mutants modified in sites III and IV. Thus, calcium saturation drove all mutants to undergo conformational switching in the same direction but not to the same extent as wild type PCaM. The disruption of the allosteric mechanism that is manifest as faulty channel regulation may be explained by altered properties of switching among the 14 possible partially saturated species of PCaM rather than by an inability to adopt two end-state conformations or target interactions similar to those of the wild type protein. PMID:10841769

  3. Quantifying macromolecular conformational transition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyler, Sean; Kumar, Avishek; Thorpe, Michael; Beckstein, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Diverse classes of proteins function through large-scale conformational changes that are challenging for computer simulations. A range of fast path-sampling techniques have been used to generate transitions, but it has been difficult to compare paths from (and assess the relative strengths of) different methods. We introduce a comprehensive method (pathway similarity analysis, PSA) for quantitatively characterizing and comparing macromolecular pathways. The Hausdorff and Fréchet metrics (known from computational geometry) are used to quantify the degree of similarity between polygonal curves in configuration space. A strength of PSA is its use of the full information available from the 3 N-dimensional configuration space trajectory without requiring additional specific knowledge about the system. We compare a sample of eleven different methods for the closed-to-open transitions of the apo enzyme adenylate kinase (AdK) and also apply PSA to an ensemble of 400 AdK trajectories produced by dynamic importance sampling MD and the Geometrical Pathways algorithm. We discuss the method's potential to enhance our understanding of transition path sampling methods, validate them, and help guide future research toward deeper physical insights into conformational transitions.

  4. Conformational Transitions in Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, M.; Janke, W.

    2008-11-01

    Proteins are the "work horses" in biological systems. In almost all functions specific proteins are involved. They control molecular transport processes, stabilize the cell structure, enzymatically catalyze chemical reactions; others act as molecular motors in the complex machinery of molecular synthetization processes. Due to their significance, misfolds and malfunctions of proteins typically entail disastrous diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Therefore, the understanding of the trinity of amino acid composition, geometric structure, and biological function is one of the most essential challenges for the natural sciences. Here, we glance at conformational transitions accompanying the structure formation in protein folding processes.

  5. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nair, Arun Kumar; Uyaver, Sahin; Sun, Shuyu

    2014-10-01

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  6. The Calcium-induced Conformation and Glycosylation of Scavenger-rich Cysteine Repeat (SRCR) Domains of Glycoprotein 340 Influence the High Affinity Interaction with Antigen I/II Homologs*

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-01-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections. PMID:24923446

  7. Atomistic simulations of the MS2 coat protein conformational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkett, Matthew; Pontiggia, Francesco; Hagan, Michael

    2012-02-01

    During the replication of many viruses, hundreds to thousands of proteins self-assemble to form a protective protein coat, called a capsid, around the viral nucleic acid. Often these proteins have identical amino acid sequences with slightly different, or quasi-equivalent, conformations, which join in precise spatial arrangements. Although the structure of completed capsids is known to atomic resolution, little is known about the assembly intermediates and how protein conformations are selected during assembly. In this talk, we will use all-atom simulations to investigate how protein-RNA interactions guide conformational transitions of capsid proteins from the single-stranded RNA bacteriophage MS2. Since conformational changes occur on timescales which are not accessible to all-atom simulations, we use enhanced sampling methods to sample probable transition pathways and corresponding free energy profiles. Specifically, we will present free energy profiles associated with the MS2 capsid protein conformation in the presence and absence of RNA.

  8. Fluctuation Flooding Method (FFM) for accelerating conformational transitions of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Takano, Yu; Shigeta, Yasuteru

    2014-03-01

    A powerful conformational sampling method for accelerating structural transitions of proteins, "Fluctuation Flooding Method (FFM)," is proposed. In FFM, cycles of the following steps enhance the transitions: (i) extractions of largely fluctuating snapshots along anisotropic modes obtained from trajectories of multiple independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and (ii) conformational re-sampling of the snapshots via re-generations of initial velocities when re-starting MD simulations. In an application to bacteriophage T4 lysozyme, FFM successfully accelerated the open-closed transition with the 6 ns simulation starting solely from the open state, although the 1-μs canonical MD simulation failed to sample such a rare event.

  9. Conformational transitions in random heteropolymer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavatska, Viktoria; Janke, Wolfhard

    2014-01-01

    We study the conformational properties of heteropolymers containing two types of monomers A and B, modeled as self-attracting self-avoiding random walks on a regular lattice. Such a model can describe in particular the sequences of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues in proteins [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] and polyampholytes with oppositely charged groups [Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Europhys. Lett. 28, 169 (1994)]. Treating the sequences of the two types of monomers as quenched random variables, we provide a systematic analysis of possible generalizations of this model. To this end we apply the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth chain-growth algorithm, which allows us to obtain the phase diagrams of extended and compact states coexistence as function of both the temperature and fraction of A and B monomers along the heteropolymer chain.

  10. Conformational transitions in random heteropolymer models.

    PubMed

    Blavatska, Viktoria; Janke, Wolfhard

    2014-01-21

    We study the conformational properties of heteropolymers containing two types of monomers A and B, modeled as self-attracting self-avoiding random walks on a regular lattice. Such a model can describe in particular the sequences of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues in proteins [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] and polyampholytes with oppositely charged groups [Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Europhys. Lett. 28, 169 (1994)]. Treating the sequences of the two types of monomers as quenched random variables, we provide a systematic analysis of possible generalizations of this model. To this end we apply the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth chain-growth algorithm, which allows us to obtain the phase diagrams of extended and compact states coexistence as function of both the temperature and fraction of A and B monomers along the heteropolymer chain. PMID:25669411

  11. Native proteins trap high-energy transit conformations

    PubMed Central

    Brereton, Andrew E.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    During protein folding and as part of some conformational changes that regulate protein function, the polypeptide chain must traverse high-energy barriers that separate the commonly adopted low-energy conformations. How distortions in peptide geometry allow these barrier-crossing transitions is a fundamental open question. One such important transition involves the movement of a non-glycine residue between the left side of the Ramachandran plot (that is, ϕ < 0°) and the right side (that is, ϕ > 0°). We report that high-energy conformations with ϕ ~ 0°, normally expected to occur only as fleeting transition states, are stably trapped in certain highly resolved native protein structures and that an analysis of these residues provides a detailed, experimentally derived map of the bond angle distortions taking place along the transition path. This unanticipated information lays to rest any uncertainty about whether such transitions are possible and how they occur, and in doing so lays a firm foundation for theoretical studies to better understand the transitions between basins that have been little studied but are integrally involved in protein folding and function. Also, the context of one such residue shows that even a designed highly stable protein can harbor substantial unfavorable interactions. PMID:26601321

  12. General trends of dihedral conformational transitions in a globular protein.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Dihedral conformational transitions are analyzed systematically in a model globular protein, cytochrome P450cam, to examine their structural and chemical dependences through combined conventional molecular dynamics (cMD), accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) and adaptive biasing force (ABF) simulations. The aMD simulations are performed at two acceleration levels, using dihedral and dual boost, respectively. In comparison with cMD, aMD samples protein dihedral transitions approximately two times faster on average using dihedral boost, and ∼ 3.5 times faster using dual boost. In the protein backbone, significantly higher dihedral transition rates are observed in the bend, coil, and turn flexible regions, followed by the β bridge and β sheet, and then the helices. Moreover, protein side chains of greater length exhibit higher transition rates on average in the aMD-enhanced sampling. Side chains of the same length (particularly Nχ = 2) exhibit decreasing transition rates with residues when going from hydrophobic to polar, then charged and aromatic chemical types. The reduction of dihedral transition rates is found to be correlated with increasing energy barriers as identified through ABF free energy calculations. These general trends of dihedral conformational transitions provide important insights into the hierarchical dynamics and complex free energy landscapes of functional proteins. PMID:26799251

  13. Conformation transition kinetics of Bombyx mori silk protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Shao, Zhengzhong; Knight, David P; Vollrath, Fritz

    2007-07-01

    Time-resolved FTIR analysis was used to monitor the conformation transition induced by treating regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin films and solutions with different concentrations of ethanol. The resulting curves showing the kinetics of the transition for both films and fibroin solutions were influenced by the ethanol concentration. In addition, for silk fibroin solutions the protein concentration also had an effect on the kinetics. At low ethanol concentrations (for example, less than 40% v/v in the case of film), films and fibroin solutions showed a phase in which beta-sheets slowly formed at a rate dependent on the ethanol concentration. Reducing the concentration of the fibroin in solutions also slowed the formation of beta-sheets. These observations suggest that this phase represents a nucleation step. Such a nucleation phase was not seen in the conformation transition at ethanol concentrations > 40% in films or > 50% in silk fibroin solutions. Our results indicate that the ethanol-induced conformation transition of silk fibroin in films and solutions is a three-phase process. The first phase is the initiation of beta-sheet structure (nucleation), the second is a fast phase of beta-sheet growth while the third phase represents a slow perfection of previously formed beta-sheet structure. The nucleation step can be very fast or relatively slow, depending on factors that influence protein chain mobility and intermolecular hydrogen bond formation. The findings give support to the previous evidence that natural silk spinning in silkworms is nucleation-dependent, and that silkworms (like spiders) use concentrated silk protein solutions, and careful control of the pH value and metallic ion content of the processing environment to speed up the nucleation step to produce a rapid conformation transition to convert the water soluble spinning dope to a tough solid silk fiber. PMID:17436322

  14. Accurate Determination of Conformational Transitions in Oligomeric Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Veglia, Gianluigi; De Simone, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics governing collective motions in oligomeric membrane proteins play key roles in vital biomolecular processes at cellular membranes. In this study, we present a structural refinement approach that combines solid-state NMR experiments and molecular simulations to accurately describe concerted conformational transitions identifying the overall structural, dynamical, and topological states of oligomeric membrane proteins. The accuracy of the structural ensembles generated with this method is shown to reach the statistical error limit, and is further demonstrated by correctly reproducing orthogonal NMR data. We demonstrate the accuracy of this approach by characterising the pentameric state of phospholamban, a key player in the regulation of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and by probing its dynamical activation upon phosphorylation. Our results underline the importance of using an ensemble approach to characterise the conformational transitions that are often responsible for the biological function of oligomeric membrane protein states. PMID:26975211

  15. Quantum Hall transitions: An exact theory based on conformal restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettelheim, E.; Gruzberg, I. A.; Ludwig, A. W. W.

    2012-10-01

    We revisit the problem of the plateau transition in the integer quantum Hall effect. Here we develop an analytical approach for this transition, and for other two-dimensional disordered systems, based on the theory of “conformal restriction.” This is a mathematical theory that was recently developed within the context of the Schramm-Loewner evolution which describes the “stochastic geometry” of fractal curves and other stochastic geometrical fractal objects in two-dimensional space. Observables elucidating the connection with the plateau transition include the so-called point-contact conductances (PCCs) between points on the boundary of the sample, described within the language of the Chalker-Coddington network model for the transition. We show that the disorder-averaged PCCs are characterized by a classical probability distribution for certain geometric objects in the plane (which we call pictures), occurring with positive statistical weights, that satisfy the crucial so-called restriction property with respect to changes in the shape of the sample with absorbing boundaries; physically, these are boundaries connected to ideal leads. At the transition point, these geometrical objects (pictures) become fractals. Upon combining this restriction property with the expected conformal invariance at the transition point, we employ the mathematical theory of “conformal restriction measures” to relate the disorder-averaged PCCs to correlation functions of (Virasoro) primary operators in a conformal field theory (of central charge c=0). We show how this can be used to calculate these functions in a number of geometries with various boundary conditions. Since our results employ only the conformal restriction property, they are equally applicable to a number of other critical disordered electronic systems in two spatial dimensions, including for example the spin quantum Hall effect, the thermal metal phase in symmetry class D, and classical diffusion in two

  16. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Conformational Transitions of Adenylate Kinase: A Computational Evidence for the Conformational Selection Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jie; Hao, Pei; Li, Yi-Xue; Wang, Jing-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (ADK) is a monomeric phosphotransferase enzyme that catalyzes reversible transfer of phosphoryl group from ATP to AMP with a large-scale domain motion. The detailed mechanism for this conformational transition remains unknown. In the current study, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations on both open and closed states of ADK. Based on the structural analyses of the simulation trajectories, we detected over 20 times conformational transitions between the open and closed states of ADK and identified two novel conformations as intermediate states in the catalytic processes. With these findings, we proposed a possible mechanism for the large-scale domain motion of Escherichia coli ADK and its catalytic process: (1) the substrate free ADK adopted an open conformation; (2) ATP bound with LID domain closure; (3) AMP bound with NMP domain closure; (4) phosphoryl transfer occurred with ATP, and AMP converted into two ADPs, and no conformational transition was detected in the enzyme; (5) LID domain opened with one ADP released; (6) another ADP released with NMP domain open. As both open and closed states sampled a wide range of conformation transitions, our simulation strongly supported the conformational selection mechanism for Escherichia coli ADK. PMID:23936827

  17. Picosecond conformational transition and equilibration of a cyclic peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredenbeck, Jens; Helbing, Jan; Sieg, Arne; Schrader, Tobias; Zinth, Wolfgang; Renner, Christian; Behrendt, Raymond; Moroder, Luis; Wachtveitl, Josef; Hamm, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Ultrafast IR spectroscopy is used to monitor the nonequilibrium backbone dynamics of a cyclic peptide in the amide I vibrational range with picosecond time resolution. A conformational change is induced by means of a photoswitch integrated into the peptide backbone. Although the main conformational change of the backbone is completed after only 20 ps, the subsequent equilibration in the new region of conformational space continues for times >16 ns. Relaxation and equilibration processes of the peptide backbone occur on a discrete hierarchy of time scales. Albeit possessing only a few conformational degrees of freedom compared with a protein, the peptide behaves highly nontrivially and provides insights into the complexity of fast protein folding.

  18. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  19. Conformational Transition Pathways Explored by Monte Carlo Simulation Integrated with Collective Modes

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci-Carsibasi, Nigar; Haliloglu, Turkan; Doruker, Pemra

    2008-01-01

    Conformational transitions between open/closed or free/bound states in proteins possess functional importance. We propose a technique in which the collective modes obtained from an anisotropic network model (ANM) are used in conjunction with a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach, to investigate conformational transition pathways and pathway intermediates. The ANM-MC technique is applied to adenylate kinase (AK) and hemoglobin. The iterative method, in which normal modes are continuously updated during the simulation, proves successful in accomplishing the transition between open-closed conformations of AK and tense-relaxed forms of hemoglobin (Cα− root mean square deviations between two end structures of 7.13 Å and 3.55 Å, respectively). Target conformations are reached by root mean-square deviations of 2.27 Å and 1.90 Å for AK and hemoglobin, respectively. The intermediate conformations overlap with crystal structures from the AK family within a 3.0-Å root mean-square deviation. In the case of hemoglobin, the transition of tense-to-relaxed passes through the relaxed state. In both cases, the lowest-frequency modes are effective during transitions. The targeted Monte Carlo approach is used without the application of collective modes. Both the ANM-MC and targeted Monte Carlo techniques can explore sequences of events in transition pathways with an efficient yet realistic conformational search. PMID:18676657

  20. Identification of key residues for protein conformational transition using elastic network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji Guo; Jin Xu, Xian; Hua Li, Chun; Chen, Wei Zu; Wang, Cun Xin

    2011-11-01

    Proteins usually undergo conformational transitions between structurally disparate states to fulfill their functions. The large-scale allosteric conformational transitions are believed to involve some key residues that mediate the conformational movements between different regions of the protein. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model is proposed to predict the key residues involved in protein conformational transitions. In our method, the key functional sites are identified as the residues whose perturbations largely influence the free energy difference between the protein states before and after transition. Two proteins, nucleotide binding domain of the heat shock protein 70 and human/rat DNA polymerase β, are used as case studies to identify the critical residues responsible for their open-closed conformational transitions. The results show that the functionally important residues mainly locate at the following regions for these two proteins: (1) the bridging point at the interface between the subdomains that control the opening and closure of the binding cleft; (2) the hinge region between different subdomains, which mediates the cooperative motions between the corresponding subdomains; and (3) the substrate binding sites. The similarity in the positions of the key residues for these two proteins may indicate a common mechanism in their conformational transitions.

  1. Conformational transition in signal transduction: metastable states and transition pathways in the activation of a signaling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Signal transduction is of vital importance to the growth and adaptation of living organisms. The key to understand mechanisms of biological signal transduction is elucidation of the conformational dynamics of its signaling proteins, as the activation of a signaling protein is fundamentally a process of conformational transition from an inactive to an active state. A predominant form of signal transduction for bacterial sensing of environmental changes in the wild or inside their hosts is a variety of two-component systems, in which the conformational transition of a response regulator (RR) from an inactive to an active state initiates responses to the environmental changes. Here, RR activation has been investigated using RR468 as a model system by extensive unbiased all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent, starting from snapshots along a targeted MD trajectory that covers the conformational transition. Markov state modeling, transition path theory, and geometric analyses of the wealth of the MD data have provided a comprehensive description of the RR activation. It involves a network of metastable states, with one metastable state essentially the same as the inactive state and another very similar to the active state that are connected via a small set of intermediates. Five major pathways account for >75% of the fluxes of the conformational transition from the inactive to the active-like state. The thermodynamic stability of the states and the activation barriers between states are found, to identify rate-limiting steps. The conformal transition is initiated predominantly by movements of the β3α3 loop, followed by movements of the β4α4-loop and neighboring α4 helix region, and capped by additional movements of the β3α3 loop. A number of transient hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions are revealed, and they may be important for the conformational transition. PMID:25945797

  2. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Heme Proteins: Validation and Study of Large Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Claudia L; Petruk, Ariel; Bringas, Mauro; Estrin, Dario A; Roitberg, Adrian E; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-07-12

    Heme proteins are ubiquitous in nature and perform many diverse functions in all kingdoms of life. Many of these functions are related to large-scale conformational transitions and allosteric processes. Sampling of these large conformational changes is computationally very challenging. In this context, coarse-grain simulations emerge as an efficient approach to explore the conformational landscape. In this work, we present a coarse-grained model of the heme group and thoroughly validate this model in different benchmark examples, which include the monomeric heme proteins myoglobin and neuroglobin and the tetrameric human hemoglobin where we evaluated the method's ability to explore conformational changes (as the formation of hexacoordinated species) and allosteric transitions (as the well-known R → T transition). The obtained results are compared with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, the results indicate that this approach conserves the essential dynamical information on different allosteric processes. PMID:27267322

  3. Mapping the Dynamics Landscape of Conformational Transitions in Enzyme: The Adenylate Kinase Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Conformational transition describes the essential dynamics and mechanism of enzymes in pursuing their various functions. The fundamental and practical challenge to researchers is to quantitatively describe the roles of large-scale dynamic transitions for regulating the catalytic processes. In this study, we tackled this challenge by exploring the pathways and free energy landscape of conformational changes in adenylate kinase (AdK), a key ubiquitous enzyme for cellular energy homeostasis. Using explicit long-timescale (up to microseconds) molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, we determined at the atomistic level the intermediate conformational states and mapped the transition pathways of AdK in the presence and absence of ligands. There is clearly chronological operation of the functional domains of AdK. Specifically in the ligand-free AdK, there is no significant energy barrier in the free energy landscape separating the open and closed states. Instead there are multiple intermediate conformational states, which facilitate the rapid transitions of AdK. In the ligand-bound AdK, the closed conformation is energetically most favored with a large energy barrier to open it up, and the conformational population prefers to shift to the closed form coupled with transitions. The results suggest a perspective for a hybrid of conformational selection and induced fit operations of ligand binding to AdK. These observations, depicted in the most comprehensive and quantitative way to date, to our knowledge, emphasize the underlying intrinsic dynamics of AdK and reveal the sophisticated conformational transitions of AdK in fulfilling its enzymatic functions. The developed methodology can also apply to other proteins and biomolecular systems. PMID:26244746

  4. Conformational Transitions upon Ligand Binding: Holo-Structure Prediction from Apo Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Daniel; de Groot, Bert L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological function of proteins is frequently associated with the formation of complexes with small-molecule ligands. Experimental structure determination of such complexes at atomic resolution, however, can be time-consuming and costly. Computational methods for structure prediction of protein/ligand complexes, particularly docking, are as yet restricted by their limited consideration of receptor flexibility, rendering them not applicable for predicting protein/ligand complexes if large conformational changes of the receptor upon ligand binding are involved. Accurate receptor models in the ligand-bound state (holo structures), however, are a prerequisite for successful structure-based drug design. Hence, if only an unbound (apo) structure is available distinct from the ligand-bound conformation, structure-based drug design is severely limited. We present a method to predict the structure of protein/ligand complexes based solely on the apo structure, the ligand and the radius of gyration of the holo structure. The method is applied to ten cases in which proteins undergo structural rearrangements of up to 7.1 Å backbone RMSD upon ligand binding. In all cases, receptor models within 1.6 Å backbone RMSD to the target were predicted and close-to-native ligand binding poses were obtained for 8 of 10 cases in the top-ranked complex models. A protocol is presented that is expected to enable structure modeling of protein/ligand complexes and structure-based drug design for cases where crystal structures of ligand-bound conformations are not available. PMID:20066034

  5. A new method to calculate reaction paths for conformation transitions of large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Oliver S.

    1994-05-01

    Path energy minimization (PEM), a novel method for the generation of a reaction path linking two known conformers of a molecule, is presented. The technique is based on optimizing a function which closely approximates the peak potential energy of a quasi-continuous path between the fixed end points. A transition involving the change in the pucker angle of α-D-xylulofuranose is used as a test case. The method is shown to, be capable of identifying transition state structures and energy barries. The utility of the method is demonstrated by an application to substantial conformational transition of the ion-channel forming polypeptide gramicidin A.

  6. Conformational model of the Holliday junction transition deduced from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Ha, Taekjip; Schulten, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination plays a key role in the restart of stalled replication forks and in the generation of genetic diversity. During this process, two homologous DNA molecules undergo strand exchange to form a four-way DNA (Holliday) junction. In the presence of metal ions, the Holliday junction folds into the stacked-X structure that has two alternative conformers. Experiments have revealed the spontaneous transitions between these conformers, but their detailed pathways are not known. Here, we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the Holliday junction at physiological and elevated (400 K) temperatures. The simulations reveal new tetrahedral intermediates and suggest a schematic framework for conformer transitions. The tetrahedral intermediates bear resemblance to the junction conformation in complex with a junction-resolving enzyme, T7 endonuclease I, and indeed, one intermediate forms a stable complex with the enzyme as demonstrated in one simulation. We also describe free energy minima for various states of the Holliday junction system, which arise during conformer transitions. The results show that magnesium ions stabilize the stacked-X form and destabilize the open and tetrahedral intermediates. Overall, our study provides a detailed dynamic model of the Holliday junction undergoing a conformer transition. PMID:15613597

  7. Artificial accelerators of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 facilitate rate-limiting conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Bettina K; Weiwad, Matthias; Rübbelke, Martin; Freiburger, Lee; Fischer, Gunter; Lorenz, Oliver R; Sattler, Michael; Richter, Klaus; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 undergoes an ATP-driven cycle of conformational changes in which large structural rearrangements precede ATP hydrolysis. Well-established small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 compete with ATP-binding. We wondered whether compounds exist that can accelerate the conformational cycle. In a FRET-based screen reporting on conformational rearrangements in Hsp90 we identified compounds. We elucidated their mode of action and showed that they can overcome the intrinsic inhibition in Hsp90 which prevents these rearrangements. The mode of action is similar to that of the co-chaperone Aha1 which accelerates the Hsp90 ATPase. However, while the two identified compounds influence conformational changes, they target different aspects of the structural transitions. Also, the binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy is distinct. This study demonstrates that small molecules are capable of triggering specific rate-limiting transitions in Hsp90 by mechanisms similar to those in protein cofactors. PMID:25244159

  8. Anomalous conformational transitions in cytochrome C adsorbing to Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Nair, B. U.; Dhathathreyan, A.

    2013-05-01

    Helix to beta conformational transitions in proteins has attracted much attention due to their relevance to fibril formation which is implicated in many neurological diseases. This study reports on unusual conformational transition of cytochrome C adsorbing to hydrophilic surface containing pure cationic lipid and mixed Langmuir-Blodgett films (LB films) of cationic and neutral lipids. Evidence for conformational changes of the protein from its native helical state to beta sheet comes from Circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD spectroscopy). Analysis of these samples using High resolution TEM (HRTEM) shows a typical fibrillar pattern with each strand spacing of about 0.41 nm across which can be attributed to the repeat distance of interdigitated neighboring hydrogen-bonded ribbons in a beta sheet. Changes in contact angles of protein adsorbing to the LB films together with the increased mass uptake of water using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) confirm the role of positive charges in the conformational transition. Dehydration of the protein resulting from the excess water entrainment in the polar planes of the cationic lipid in hydrophilic surface seems to trigger the refolding of the protein to beta sheet while it retains its native conformation in hydrophobic films. The results suggest that drastic conformational changes in CytC adsorbing to cationic lipids may be of significance in its role as a peripheral membrane protein.

  9. Local conformational fluctuations can modulate the coupling between proton binding and global structural transitions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Steven T.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2005-01-01

    Local conformational fluctuations in proteins can affect the coupling between ligand binding and global structural transitions. This finding was established by monitoring quantitatively how the population distribution in the ensemble of microstates of staphylococcal nuclease was affected by proton binding. Analysis of acid unfolding and proton-binding data with an ensemble-based model suggests that local fluctuations: (i) can be effective modulators of ligand-binding affinities, (ii) are important determinants of the cooperativity of ligand-driven global structural transitions, and (iii) are well represented thermodynamically as local unfolding processes. These studies illustrate how an ensemble-based description of proteins can be used to describe quantitatively the interdependence of local conformational fluctuations, ligand-binding processes, and global structural transitions. This level of understanding of the relationship between conformation, energy, and dynamics is required for a detailed mechanistic understanding of allostery, cooperativity, and other complex functional and regulatory properties of macromolecules. PMID:15767576

  10. Modeling conformational transitions in kinases by molecular dynamics simulations: achievements, difficulties, and open challenges

    PubMed Central

    D'Abramo, Marco; Besker, Neva; Chillemi, Giovanni; Grottesi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases work because their flexibility allows to continuously switch from inactive to active form. Despite the large number of structures experimentally determined in such states, the mechanism of their conformational transitions as well as the transition pathways are not easily to capture. In this regard, computational methods can help to shed light on such an issue. However, due to the intrinsic sampling limitations, much efforts have been done to model in a realistic way the conformational changes occurring in protein kinases. In this review we will address the principal biological achievements and structural aspects in studying kinases conformational transitions and will focus on the main challenges related to computational approaches such as molecular modeling and MD simulations. PMID:24860596

  11. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line. PMID:27575170

  12. Conformational transitions of single polymer adsorption in poor solvent: Wetting transition due to molecular confinement induced line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsien-Hung; Li, Yen-Ching

    2016-07-01

    We report a theory capable of describing conformational transitions for single polymer adsorption in a poor solvent. We show that an additional molecular confinement effect near the contact line can act exactly like line tension, playing a critical role in the behavior of an absorbed polymer chain. Using this theory, distinct conformational states: desorbed globule (DG), surface attached cap (SAC), and adsorbed lens (AL), can be vividly revealed, resembling the drying-wetting transition of a nanodroplet. But the transitions between these states can behave rather differently from those in the usual wetting transitions. The DG-SAC transition is discrete, occurring at the adsorption threshold when the globule size at the desorbed state is equal to the adsorption blob. The SAC-AL transition is smooth for finite chain lengths, but can change to discontinuous in the infinite chain limit, characterized by the different end-to-end exponent 3/8 and the unique crossover exponent 1/4. Distinctive critical exponents near this transition are also determined, indicating that it is an additional universality class of phase transitions. This work also sheds light on nanodrop spreading, wherein the important role played by line tension might simply be a manifestation of the local molecular confinement near the contact line.

  13. Substrate conformational transitions in the active site of chorismate mutase: Their role in the catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Cui, Qiang; Lipscomb, William N.; Karplus, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Chorismate mutase acts at the first branch-point of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to prephenate. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the substrate in solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase are reported. Two nonreactive conformers of chorismate are found to be more stable than the reactive pseudodiaxial chair conformer in solution. It is shown by QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the motions of the enzyme, that when these inactive conformers are bound to the active site, they are rapidly converted to the reactive chair conformer. This result suggests that one contribution of the enzyme is to bind the more prevalent nonreactive conformers and transform them into the active form in a step before the chemical reaction. The motion of the reactive chair conformer in the active site calculated by using the QM/MM potential generates transient structures that are closer to the transition state than is the stable CHAIR conformer. PMID:11481470

  14. Parallel cascade selection molecular dynamics (PaCS-MD) to generate conformational transition pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2013-07-01

    Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) is proposed as a molecular simulation method to generate conformational transition pathway under the condition that a set of "reactant" and "product" structures is known a priori. In PaCS-MD, the cycle of short multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations and selection of the structures close to the product structure for the next cycle are repeated until the simulated structures move sufficiently close to the product. Folding of 10-residue mini-protein chignolin from the extended to native structures and open-close conformational transition of T4 lysozyme were investigated by PaCS-MD. In both cases, tens of cycles of 100-ps MD were sufficient to reach the product structures, indicating the efficient generation of conformational transition pathway in PaCS-MD with a series of conventional MD without additional external biases. Using the snapshots along the pathway as the initial coordinates, free energy landscapes were calculated by the combination with multiple independent umbrella samplings to statistically elucidate the conformational transition pathways.

  15. pH-Driven Ordering Transitions in Liquid Crystal Induced by Conformational Changes of Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Sidiq, Sumyra; Verma, Indu; Pal, Santanu Kumar

    2015-04-28

    We report an investigation of interfacial phenomena occurring at aqueous-liquid crystal (LC) interfaces that triggers an orientational ordering transition of the LC in the presence of cardiolipin (CL) by varying pH, salt concentration and valence. In particular, the effects of three different conformational isomeric forms of the CL are observed to cause the response of the LC ordering to vary significantly from one to another at those interfaces. An ordering transition of the LC was observed when the CL is mostly in undissociated (at pH 2) and/or in bicyclic (at pH 4) conformation in which LC shows changes in the optical appearance from bright to dark. By contrast, no change in the optical appearance of the LC was observed when the pH of the system increases to 8 or higher in which the CL mostly exists in the open conformation. Fluorescence microscopy measurements further suggest that pH-dependent conformational forms of the CL have different ability to self-assemble (thus different packing efficiency) at aqueous-LC interfaces leading to dissimilar orientational behavior of the LC. Specifically, we found that change in headgroup-headgroup repulsion of the central phosphatidyl groups of the CL plays a key role in tuning the lipid packing efficiency and thus responses to interfacial phenomena. Orientational ordering transition of the LC was also observed as a function of increasing the ionic strength (buffer capacity) and strongly influenced in the presence of mono and divalent cations. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) measurements provide further insight in modulation of the lipid packing efficiency and alkyl chain conformation of the CL at different pH and ionic conditions. Overall, the results presented in this paper establish that LCs offer a promising approach to differentiate different conformations (label free detection) of the CL through ordering transition of the LC at aqueous

  16. Statistical Mechanical Theory of Protein Conformation and Its Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yukio; Wako, Hiroshi; Saitô, Nobuhiko

    2007-07-01

    The statistical mechanical theory of the structural transitions of proteins is developed in accordance with the island model by considering the hydrophobic interactions and the entropy factors while connecting the two hydrophobic residues. The proteins treated here are apo-α-lactalbumin (1B9O), lysozyme (1LZ1), ferrocytochrome c (1CYC), cytochrome c (isozyme 1) (1YCC), chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (2CI2), and ubiquitin (1UBQ). Among them, according to the experiments, 2CI2 and 1UBQ do not exhibit intermediate structures (two-state model), but others do exhibit intermediate structures that are sometimes termed molten globules (three-state model). The theory related to these facts is given in terms of the island model, specifically 1B9O and 1LZ1. The stability or instability of the intermediate structures is explained by the effects of entropy during folding and the amino acid sequence. The intermediate structure is composed of several stable islands, which become unstable during unfolding.

  17. Substrate binding accelerates the conformational transitions and substrate dissociation in multidrug efflux transporter AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Beibei; Weng, Jingwei; Wang, Wenning

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite efflux pump assembly AcrAB-TolC is the major multidrug resistance transporter in E. coli. The inner membrane transporter AcrB is a homotrimer, energized by the proton movement down the transmembrane electrochemical gradient. The asymmetric crystal structures of AcrB with three monomers in distinct conformational states [access (A), binding (B) and extrusion (E)] support a functional rotating mechanism, in which each monomer of AcrB cycles among the three states in a concerted way. However, the relationship between the conformational changes during functional rotation and drug translocation has not been totally understood. Here, we explored the conformational changes of the AcrB homotrimer during the ABE to BEA transition in different substrate-binding states using targeted MD simulations. It was found that the dissociation of substrate from the distal binding pocket of B monomer is closely related to the concerted conformational changes in the translocation pathway, especially the side chain reorientation of Phe628 and Tyr327. A second substrate binding at the proximal binding pocket of A monomer evidently accelerates the conformational transitions as well as substrate dissociation in B monomer. The acceleration effect of the multi-substrate binding mode provides a molecular explanation for the positive cooperativity observed in the kinetic studies of substrate efflux and deepens our understanding of the functional rotating mechanism of AcrB. PMID:25918513

  18. Exploring the Conformational Transitions of Biomolecular Systems Using a Simple Two-State Anisotropic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Bahar, Ivet; Roux, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular conformational transitions are essential to biological functions. Most experimental methods report on the long-lived functional states of biomolecules, but information about the transition pathways between these stable states is generally scarce. Such transitions involve short-lived conformational states that are difficult to detect experimentally. For this reason, computational methods are needed to produce plausible hypothetical transition pathways that can then be probed experimentally. Here we propose a simple and computationally efficient method, called ANMPathway, for constructing a physically reasonable pathway between two endpoints of a conformational transition. We adopt a coarse-grained representation of the protein and construct a two-state potential by combining two elastic network models (ENMs) representative of the experimental structures resolved for the endpoints. The two-state potential has a cusp hypersurface in the configuration space where the energies from both the ENMs are equal. We first search for the minimum energy structure on the cusp hypersurface and then treat it as the transition state. The continuous pathway is subsequently constructed by following the steepest descent energy minimization trajectories starting from the transition state on each side of the cusp hypersurface. Application to several systems of broad biological interest such as adenylate kinase, ATP-driven calcium pump SERCA, leucine transporter and glutamate transporter shows that ANMPathway yields results in good agreement with those from other similar methods and with data obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, in support of the utility of this simple and efficient approach. Notably the method provides experimentally testable predictions, including the formation of non-native contacts during the transition which we were able to detect in two of the systems we studied. An open-access web server has been created to deliver ANMPathway results

  19. Conformational Transition Pathways in Signaling and Enzyme Catalysis Explored by Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachov, Dimitar V.

    Biomolecules are dynamic in nature and visit a number of states while performing their biological function. However, understanding how they interconvert between functional substates is a challenging task. In this thesis, we employ enhanced computational strategies to reveal in atomistic resolution transition states and molecular mechanism along conformational pathways of the signaling protein Nitrogen Regulatory Protein C (NtrC) and the enzyme Adenylate Kinase (Adk). Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) simulations and NMR experiments have previously found the active/inactive interconversion of NtrC is stabilized by non-native transient contacts. To find where along the conformational pathway they lie and probe the existence of multiple intermediates, a beyond 8mus-extensive mapping of the conformational landscape was performed by a multitude of straightforward MD simulations relaxed from the biased TMD pathway. A number of metastable states stabilized by local interactions was found to underline the conformational pathway of NtrC. Two spontaneous transitions of the last stage of the active-to-inactive conversion were identified and used in path sampling procedures to generate an ensemble of truly dynamic reactive pathways. The transition state ensemble (TSE) and mechanistic descriptors of this transition were revealed in atomic detail and verified by committor analysis. By analyzing how pressure affects the dynamics and function of two homologous Adk proteins - the P.Profundum Adk surviving at 700atm pressure in the deep sea, and the E. coli Adk that lives at ambient pressures - we indirectly obtained atomic information about the TSE of the large-amplitude rate-limiting conformational opening of the Adk lids. Guided by NMR experiments showing significantly decreased activation volumes of the piezophile compared to its mesophilic counterpart, TMD simulations revealed the formation of an extended hydrogen-bonded water network in the transition state of the piezophile

  20. Finite-Size Conformational Transitions: A Unifying Concept Underlying Chromosome Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, R. Caré; Pascal, Carrivain; Thierry, Forné; Jean-Marc, Victor; Annick, Lesne

    2014-10-01

    Investigating average thermodynamic quantities is not sufficient to understand conformational transitions of a finite-size polymer. We propose that such transitions are better described in terms of the probability distribution of some finite-size order parameter, and the evolution of this distribution as a control parameter varies. We demonstrate this claim for the coil-globule transition of a linear polymer and its mapping onto a two-state model. In a biological context, polymer models delineate the physical constraints experienced by the genome at different levels of organization, from DNA to chromatin to chromosome. We apply our finite-size approach to the formation of plectonemes in a DNA segment submitted to an applied torque and the ensuing helix-coil transition that can be numerically observed, with a coexistence of the helix and coil states in a range of parameters. Polymer models are also essential to analyze recent in vivo experiments providing the frequency of pairwise contacts between genomic loci. The probability distribution of these contacts yields quantitative information on the conformational fluctuations of chromosome regions. The changes observed in the shape of the distribution when the cell type or the physiological conditions vary may reveal an epigenetic modulation of the conformational constraints experienced by the chromosomes.

  1. Mechanistic picture for conformational transition of a membrane transporter at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2013-11-19

    During their transport cycle, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters undergo large-scale conformational changes between inward- and outward-facing states. Using an approach based on designing system-specific reaction coordinates and using nonequilibrium work relations, we have performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of explicit membrane/solvent to sample a large number of mechanistically distinct pathways for the conformational transition of MsbA, a bacterial ABC exporter whose structure has been solved in multiple functional states. The computational approach developed here is based on (i) extensive exploration of system-specific biasing protocols (e.g., using collective variables designed based on available low-resolution crystal structures) and (ii) using nonequilibrium work relations for comparing the relevance of the transition pathways. The most relevant transition pathway identified using this approach involves several distinct stages reflecting the complex nature of the structural changes associated with the function of the protein. The opening of the cytoplasmic gate during the outward- to inward-facing transition of apo MsbA is found to be disfavored when the periplasmic gate is open and facilitated by a twisting motion of the nucleotide-binding domains that involves a dramatic change in their relative orientation. These results highlight the cooperativity between the transmembrane and the nucleotide-binding domains in the conformational transition of ABC exporters. The approach introduced here provides a framework to study large-scale conformational changes of other membrane transporters whose computational investigation at an atomic resolution may not be currently feasible using conventional methods. PMID:24191018

  2. The kinetics of effector binding to phosphofructokinase. The influence of effectors on the allosteric conformational transition.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Kellett, G L

    1980-01-01

    1. The extent of the allosteric transition from the R into the T conformation of rabbit skeletal muscle phosphofructokinase induced by Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP was determined by stopped-flow fluorimetry from the amplitude of the slow phase of the Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP fluorescence enhancement [Roberts & Kellet (1979) Biochem. J. 183, 349--360]. 2. The amplitude of the slow phase was decreased by low concentrations of the activators cyclic AMP and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, but increased in a complex manner by the inhibitor citrate. 3. Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP and Mg2+-ATP are unable to induce the T conformation to a detectable extent in the presence of saturating cyclic AMP, but can do so readily in the presence of saturating fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. 4. The conformational transitions induced in enzyme alone by different ligands were observed by changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence. In general, an R-type conformation has diminished protein fluorescence compared with a T-type conformation. 5. Mg2+-ATP exerts a complex effect on protein fluorescence; both the enhancement at low concentrations and the quenching at high concentrations of Mg2+-ATP result from the binding of Mg2+-ATP to the inhibitory site and the ensuing allosteric transition. Enhancement reflects the extent of the allosteric transition and involves both tyrosine and tryptophan, probably in the region of the active site; quenching reflects occupation of the inhibitory site and involves tyrosine at the inhibitory site. 6. The mechanism of the allosteric transition from the R into the T conformation induced by Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP at low concentrations occurs predominantly by a 'prior-isomerization' pathway; at higher concentrations a limited contribution from a 'substrate-guided' pathway occurs. 7. The allosteric behaviour of phosphofructokinase with respect to Mg2+-ATP and Mg2+-1,N6-ethenol-ATP binding may be accounted for in terms of the simple, concerted model. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6260084

  3. Deciphering conformational transitions of proteins by small angle X-ray scattering and normal mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Panjkovich, Alejandro; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2016-02-17

    Structural flexibility and conformational rearrangements are often related to important functions of biological macromolecules, but the experimental characterization of such transitions with high-resolution techniques is challenging. At a lower resolution, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can be used to obtain information on biomolecular shapes and transitions in solution. Here, we present SREFLEX, a hybrid modeling approach that uses normal mode analysis (NMA) to explore the conformational space of high-resolution models and refine the structure guided by the agreement with the experimental SAXS data. The method starts from a given conformation of the protein (which does not agree with the SAXS data). The structure is partitioned into pseudo-domains either using structural classification databases or automatically from the protein dynamics as predicted by the NMA. The algorithm proceeds hierarchically employing NMA to first probe large rearrangements and progresses into smaller and more localized movements. At the large rearrangements stage the pseudo-domains stay as rigid bodies allowing one to avoid structural disruptions inherent to the earlier NMA-based algorithms. To validate the approach, we compiled a representative benchmark set of 88 conformational states known experimentally at high resolution. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated in the simulated data on the benchmark set and also in a number of experimental examples. SREFLEX is included into the ATSAS program package freely available to the academic users, both for download and in the on-line mode. PMID:26611321

  4. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: how to represent an environment driven conformational transition.

    PubMed

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Peter, Christine; Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties. PMID:24359360

  5. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Peter, Christine; Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  6. Conformational Transition of Giant DNA in a Confined Space Surrounded by a Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Ayako; Shindo, Eri; Sakaue, Takahiro; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that a long DNA molecule exhibits a large discrete conformational change from a coiled state to a highly folded state in aqueous solution, depending on the presence of various condensing agents such as polyamines. In this study, T4 DNA labeled with fluorescent dyes was encapsulated in a cell-sized microdroplet covered with a phospholipid membrane to investigate the conformational behavior of a DNA molecule in such a confined space. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the presence of Mg2+ induced the adsorption of DNA onto the membrane inner-surface of a droplet composed of phosphatidylethanolamine, while no adsorption was observed onto a phosphatidylcholine membrane. Under the presence of spermine (tetravalent amine), DNA had a folded conformation in the bulk solution. However, when these molecules were encapsulated in the microdroplet, DNA adsorbed onto the membrane surface accompanied by unfolding of its structure into an extended coil conformation under high concentrations of Mg2+. In addition, DNA molecules trapped in large droplets tended not to be adsorbed on the membrane, i.e., no conformational transition occurred. A thermodynamic analysis suggests that the translational entropy loss of a DNA molecule that is accompanied by adsorption is a key factor in these phenomena under micrometer-scale confinement. PMID:19751673

  7. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  8. Conformational Transitions in Protein-Protein Association: Binding of Fasciculin-2 to Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Radic, Zoran; Taylor, Palmer; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The neurotoxin fasciculin-2 (FAS2) is a picomolar inhibitor of synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The dynamics of binding between FAS2 and AChE is influenced by conformational fluctuations both before and after protein encounter. Submicrosecond molecular dynamics trajectories of apo forms of fasciculin, corresponding to different conformational substates, are reported here with reference to the conformational changes of loop I of this three-fingered toxin. This highly flexible loop exhibits an ensemble of conformations within each substate corresponding to its functions. The high energy barrier found between the two major substates leads to transitions that are slow on the timescale of the diffusional encounter of noninteracting FAS2 and AChE. The more stable of the two apo substates may not be the one observed in the complex with AChE. It seems likely that the more stable apo form binds rapidly to AChE and conformational readjustments then occur in the resulting encounter complex. PMID:16473897

  9. Solid-to-hybrid transitioning armature railgun with non-conforming-to-prejudice bore profile

    DOEpatents

    Solberg, Jerome Michael

    2012-12-04

    An improved railgun, railgun barrel, railgun projectile, and railgun system for accelerating a solid-to-hybrid transitioning armature projectile using a barrel having a bore that does not conform to a cross-sectional profile of the projectile, to contact and guide the projectile only by the rails in a low pressure bore volume so as to minimize damage, failure, and/or underperformance caused by plasma armatures, insulator ablation, and/or restrikes.

  10. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 by Triton X-100--identification of two consecutive conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gils, A; Declerck, P J

    1998-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a unique member of the serpin superfamily because of its conformational and functional flexibility. In the present study, we have evaluated the influence of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) on the functional stability and conformational transitions of PAI-1. At 37 degrees C, TX-100 induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the functional half-life of PAI-1 resulting in half-lives of 177 +/- 54 min (mean +/- SD, n = 3), 19 +/- 2 min, 1.7 +/- 0.3 min and 0.53 +/- 0.03 min in the presence of 0.005, 0.010, 0.020 and 0.2% TX-100, respectively, compared to a half-life of 270 +/- 146 min in the absence of TX-100. Conformational analysis at various time points and at different temperatures (0 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 37 degrees C) revealed that this inactivation proceeds through the formation of a substrate-like intermediate followed by the formation of the latent form. Kinetic evaluation demonstrated that this conversion fits to two consecutive first-order transitions, i.e. active k1--> substrate k2--> latent. The k1 value was strongly dependent on the concentration of TX-100 (e.g. 0.002 +/- 0.0006 s(-1) and 0.029 +/- 0.003 s(-1) for 0.01% and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C) whereas the conversion of substrate to latent (k2) was virtually independent of the TX-100 concentration (i.e. 0.012 +/- 0.002 s(-1) and 0.011 +/- 0.001 s(-1) for 0.01 and 0.2% TX-100 at 37 degrees C). Experiments with a variety of other non-ionic amphiphilic compounds revealed that the amphiphilic character of the compound is, at least in part, responsible for the observed effects and strongly indicate that the currently reported mechanism of inactivation is of general importance for the conformational transitions in PAI-1. In conclusion, TX- 100 changes the initial conformation of PAI-1 resulting in altered functional properties. This observation allows us to develop a new model for the mechanism involved in the conformational flexibility of

  11. NMR chemical shift analysis of the conformational transition between the monomer and tetramer of melittin in an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshinori

    2016-05-01

    It is known that melittin in an aqueous solution undergoes a conformational transition between the monomer and tetramer by variation in temperature. The transition correlates closely with isomers of the proline residue; monomeric melittin including a trans proline peptide bond (trans-monomer) is involved directly in the transition, whereas monomeric melittin having a cis proline peptide bond (cis-monomer) is virtually not. The transition has been explored by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in order to clarify the stability of the tetrameric conformation and the cooperativity of the transition. In the light of temperature dependence of chemical shifts of resonances from the isomeric monomers, we qualitatively estimate the temperature-, salt-, and concentration-dependence of the relative equilibrium populations of the trans-monomer and tetramer, and show that the tetramer has a maximum conformational stability at 30-45 °C and that the transition cooperativity is very low. PMID:26658745

  12. Conformational transitions of plasmid ds-DNA on ultrathin films of alkylamines on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Caroline; Liang, Hua; Severin, Nikolai; Zhuang, Wei; Zauscher, Stefan; Rabe, Jürgen P.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is an important process in the human body. Replication of double-stranded (ds)-DNA requires its local melting into two single strands. DNA, when stretched in solution, overwinds and melts. This was argued to give insight onto the replication mechanism. It is difficult, however, to access the direct conformational changes during stretching in solution. Recent work demonstrated that this transition can be imaged with scanning force microscopy on a graphite surface that is coated with an alkylamine layer. ds-DNA can be controlled by an amphiphilic layer, since the DNA conformation depends on the amphiphile concentration. In particular we analyzed different DNA lengths on the same surface, and we found that at a specific concentration of octadecylamine the ds-DNA pUC19 plasmid ring splits into two single strands at one position. We will discuss methods to mark the DNA to determine the exact location at which the plasmid ring splits.

  13. Electronic detection of dsDNA transition from helical to zipper conformation using graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Chaitanya; Girdhar, Anuj; Leburton, Jean-Pierre; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical manipulation of DNA, by forced extension, can lead to a structural transformation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from a helical form to a linear zipper-like form. By employing classical molecular dynamics and quantum mechanical non-equilibrium Greens function-based transport simulations, we show the ability of graphene nanopores to discern different dsDNA conformations, in a helical to zipper transition, using transverse electronic conductance. In particular, conductance oscillations due to helical dsDNA vanish as dsDNA extends from helical to zipper form as it is transported through the nanopore. The predicted ability to detect conformational changes in dsDNA, via transverse electronic conductance, can widen the potential of graphene-based nanosensors for DNA detection. PMID:25325530

  14. Long-range conformational transition of a photoswitchable allosteric protein: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Knecht, Volker; Walser, Reto; Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-11-26

    A local perturbation of a protein may lead to functional changes at some distal site. An example is the PDZ2 domain of human tyrosine phosphatase 1E, which shows an allosteric transition upon binding to a peptide ligand. Recently Buchli et al. presented a time-resolved study of this transition by covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove and using a femtosecond laser pulse that triggers the cis-trans photoisomerization of azobenzene. To aid the interpretation of these experiments, in this work seven microsecond runs of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations each for the wild-type PDZ2 in the ligand-bound and -free state, as well as the photoswitchable protein (PDZ2S) in the cis and trans states of the photoswitch, in explicit water were conducted. First the theoretical model is validated by recalculating the available NMR data from the simulations. By comparing the results for PDZ2 and PDZ2S, it is analyzed to what extent the photoswitch indeed mimics the free-bound transition. A detailed description of the conformational rearrangement following the cis-trans photoisomerization of PDZ2S reveals a series of photoinduced structural changes that propagate from the anchor residues of the photoswitch via intermediate secondary structure segments to the C-terminus of PDZ2S. The changes of the conformational distribution of the C-terminal region is considered as the distal response of the isolated allosteric protein. PMID:25365469

  15. Equilibrium transitions between side-chain conformations in leucine and isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Diego; Smith, W Wendell; O'Hern, Corey S; Regan, Lynne

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent improvements in computational methods for protein design, we still lack a quantitative, predictive understanding of the intrinsic probabilities for amino acids to adopt particular side-chain conformations. Surprisingly, this question has remained unsettled for many years, in part because of inconsistent results from different experimental approaches. To explicitly determine the relative populations of different side-chain dihedral angles, we performed all-atom hard-sphere Langevin Dynamics simulations of leucine (Leu) and isoleucine (Ile) dipeptide mimetics with stereo-chemical constraints and repulsive-only steric interactions between non-bonded atoms. We determine the relative populations of the different χ(1) and χ(2) dihedral angle combinations as a function of the backbone dihedral angles ϕ and ψ. We also propose, and test, a mechanism for inter-conversion between the different side-chain conformations. Specifically, we discover that some of the transitions between side-chain dihedral angle combinations are very frequent, whereas others are orders of magnitude less frequent, because they require rare coordinated motions to avoid steric clashes. For example, to transition between different values of χ(2), the Leu side-chain bond angles κ(1) and κ(2) must increase, whereas to transition in χ(1), the Ile bond angles λ(1) and λ(2) must increase. These results emphasize the importance of computational approaches in stimulating further experimental studies of the conformations of side-chains in proteins. Moreover, our studies emphasize the power of simple steric models to inform our understanding of protein structure, dynamics, and design. PMID:26018846

  16. Modeling protein conformational transitions by a combination of coarse-grained normal mode analysis and robotics-inspired methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obtaining atomic-scale information about large-amplitude conformational transitions in proteins is a challenging problem for both experimental and computational methods. Such information is, however, important for understanding the mechanisms of interaction of many proteins. Methods This paper presents a computationally efficient approach, combining methods originating from robotics and computational biophysics, to model protein conformational transitions. The ability of normal mode analysis to predict directions of collective, large-amplitude motions is applied to bias the conformational exploration performed by a motion planning algorithm. To reduce the dimension of the problem, normal modes are computed for a coarse-grained elastic network model built on short fragments of three residues. Nevertheless, the validity of intermediate conformations is checked using the all-atom model, which is accurately reconstructed from the coarse-grained one using closed-form inverse kinematics. Results Tests on a set of ten proteins demonstrate the ability of the method to model conformational transitions of proteins within a few hours of computing time on a single processor. These results also show that the computing time scales linearly with the protein size, independently of the protein topology. Further experiments on adenylate kinase show that main features of the transition between the open and closed conformations of this protein are well captured in the computed path. Conclusions The proposed method enables the simulation of large-amplitude conformational transitions in proteins using very few computational resources. The resulting paths are a first approximation that can directly provide important information on the molecular mechanisms involved in the conformational transition. This approximation can be subsequently refined and analyzed using state-of-the-art energy models and molecular modeling methods. PMID:24564964

  17. Conformational transition of polyelectrolyte chains extending over the de Gennes regime in slitlike nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Myung-Suk

    2012-09-01

    The confinement-induced conformational transitions of the polyelectrolyte chain are characterized with the coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations and the blob theory. Submicron-sized biopolymer xanthan is chosen as a model polyelectrolyte taking into account both flexible and semiflexible chains for comparison. Confined flexible and semiflexible chains exhibit a nonmonotonic variation in size in weak confinements, where the relative radius of gyration shows a dip and then increases when decreasing the channel width. The rigid chain, realized at low screening, exhibits a sigmoidal transition without minima in size. Major attention should be on the dependence of scaling law exponents on the screening effect of the solution in the moderate confinement of the de Gennes regime. Our findings are expected to provide useful information and new insight into the confined polyelectrolytes when relevant micro/nanochannels are designed and fabricated.

  18. Molecular conformation-controlled vesicle/micelle transition of cationic trimeric surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxian; Hou, Yanbo; Deng, Manli; Huang, Xu; Yu, Defeng; Xiang, Junfeng; Liu, Yu; Li, Zhibo; Wang, Yilin

    2010-06-01

    Two star-like trimeric cationic surfactants with amide groups in spacers, tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) and tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)tris(2-aminoethyl)amine trichloride (DDAD), have been synthesized, and the aggregation behavior of the surfactants in aqueous solution has been investigated by surface tension, electrical conductivity, isothermal titration microcalorimetry, dynamic light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, and NMR techniques. Typically, both the surfactants form vesicles just above critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and then the vesicles transfer to micelles gradually with an increase of the surfactant concentration. It is approved that the conformation of the surfactant molecules changes in this transition process. Just above the CAC, the hydrophobic chains of the surfactant molecules pack more loosely because of the rigid spacer and intramolecular electrostatic repulsion in the three-charged headgroup. With the increase of the surfactant concentration, hydrophobic interaction becomes strong enough to pack the hydrophobic tails tightly and turn the molecular conformation into a pyramid-like shape, thus leading to the vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:20426428

  19. Morphologies and conformation transition of lentinan in aqueous NaOH solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Xiaojuan

    2004-10-01

    Molecular morphologies and conformation transition of lentinan, a beta-(1-->3)-D-glucan from Lentinus edodes, were studied in aqueous NaOH solution by atomic force microscopy (AFM), viscometry, multiangle laser light scattering, and optical rotation measurements. The results revealed that lentinan exists as triple-helical chains and as single random-coil chains at NaOH concentration lower than 0.05M and higher than 0.08M, respectively. Moreover, the dramatic changes in weight-average molecular weight Mw, radius of gyration [s2](1/2), intrinsic viscosity [eta], as well as specific optical rotation at 589 nm [alpha]589 occurred in a narrow range of NaOH concentration between 0.05 and 0.08M NaOH, indicating that the helix-coil conformation transition of lentinan was carried out more easily than that of native schizophyllan and scleroglucan, and was irreversible. For the first time, we confirmed that the denatured lentinan molecule, which was dissolved in 0.15M NaOH to be disrupted into single coil chains, could be renatured as triple helical chain by dialyzing against abundant water in the regenerated cellulose tube at ambient temperature (15 degrees C). In view of the AFM image, lentinan in aqueous solution exhibited the linear, circular, and branched species of triple helix compared with native linear schizophyllan or scleroglucan. PMID:15356872

  20. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein. PMID:24309513

  1. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  2. The kinetics of effector binding to phosphofructokinase. The allosteric conformational transition induced by 1,N6-ethenoadenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Kellett, G L

    1979-01-01

    1. The fluorescent ATP analogue 1,N6-etheno-ATP is a good substrate and an efficient allosteric inhibitor of rabbit skeletal-muscle phosphofructokinase. 2. Fluorescence energy transfer occurs between bound 1,N6-etheno-ATP and phosphofructokinase. 1,N6-Etheno-ATP fluorescence is enhanced, intrinsic protein fluorescence is quenched, and the excitation spectrum of 1,N6-etheno-ATP fluorescence is characteristic of protein absorption. 3. The binding reaction of 1,N6-etheno-ATP observed by stopped-flow fluorimetry is biphasic. The fast phase results from binding to the catalytic site alone. The slow phase results from the allosteric transition of the R conformation into the T conformation induced by the binding of 1,N6-etheno-ATP to the regulatory site. 4. The fluorescence signal that allows the transition of the R conformation into the T conformation to be observed does not arise from 1,N6-etheno-ATP bound to the regulatory site. It arises instead from 1,N6-etheno-ATP bound to the catalytic site as a consequence of changes at the catalytic site caused by the transition of the R conformation into the T conformation. 5. In the presence of excess of Mg2+, the affinity of 1,N6-etheno-ATP for the regulatory site is very much greater in the T state than in the R state. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 8. PMID:160791

  3. Cyanide binding and heme cavity conformational transitions in Drosophila melanogaster hexacoordinate hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Ascenzi, Paolo; Bocedi, Alessio; Dewilde, Sylvia; Burmester, Thorsten; Hankeln, Thomas; Moens, Luc; Bolognesi, Martino

    2006-08-22

    The reason for the presence of hemoglobin-like molecules in insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, that live in fully aerobic environments has yet to be determined. Heme endogenous hexacoordination (where HisE7 and HisF8 axial ligands to the heme Fe atom are both provided by the protein) is a recently discovered mechanism proposed to modulate O(2) affinity in hemoglobins from different species. Previous results have shown that D. melanogaster hemoglobin 1 (product of the glob1 gene) displays heme endogenous hexacoordination in both the ferrous and ferric states. Here we present kinetic data characterizing the exogenous cyanide ligand binding process, and the three-dimensional structure (at 1.4 A resolution) of the ensuing cyano-met D. melanogaster hemoglobin. Comparison with the crystal structure of the endogenously hexacoordinated D. melanogaster hemoglobin shows that the transition to the cyano-met form is supported by conformational readjustment in the CD-D-E region of the protein, which removes HisE7 from the heme. The structural and functional features of D. melanogaster hemoglobin are examined in light of previous results achieved for human and mouse neuroglobins and for human cytoglobin, which display heme endogenous hexacoordination. The study shows that, despite the rather constant value for cyanide association rate constants for the ferric hemoproteins, different distal site conformational readjustments and/or heme sliding mechanisms are displayed by the known hexacoordinate hemoglobins as a result of exogenous ligand binding. PMID:16906763

  4. Mapping the structure and conformational movements of proteins with transition metal ion FRET

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.; Puljung, Michael C.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Visualizing conformational dynamics in proteins has been difficult, and the atomic-scale motions responsible for the behavior of most allosteric proteins are unknown. Here, we report that FRET between a small fluorescent dye and a nickel ion bound to a di-histidine motif can be used to monitor small structural rearrangements in proteins. This method provides several key advantages over classical FRET including the ability to measure the dynamics of close range interactions, the use of small probes with short linkers, a low orientation dependence, and the ability to add and remove unique tunable acceptors. We used this ‘transition metal ion FRET’ approach along with x-ray crystallography to determine the structural changes of the gating-ring of the mouse hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel HCN2. Binding of cAMP to the isolated carboxyl-terminal region of HCN2 caused a structural rearrangement involving a movement of the C-helix towards the β-roll of the cAMP-binding domain and a movement of the F′ helix of the C-linker, along with a stabilization of the secondary structure of the helices. Our results suggest a general model for the conformational switch in the cyclic nucleotide-binding site of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. PMID:19525958

  5. [Effect of divalent metal ions on DNA conformational transitions in water-ethanol solutions].

    PubMed

    Kas'ianenko, N A; Pereviazko, I Iu; Blokova, M I; Zyrianova, I M

    2008-01-01

    The influence of different MgCl2 and MnCl2 concentrations on DNA conformational transitions in water-ethanol solutions was studied. It was shown that the presence of magnesium ions in solution at a concentration of 5 x 10(-4) M did not influence the decrease in the size of DNA without change in its persistent length at an alcohol concentration of about 17 % v/v. In contrast, manganese ions prevent this change in DNA parameters. At sufficiently high ethanol concentrations, the compaction of DNA followed by its precipitation takes place, which is accompanied by an increase of scattering in solution. As the concentration of Mg2+ and Mn2+ in solution increases, this process is observed at lower ethanol concentrations. PMID:18543765

  6. Conformational transition of membrane-associated terminally-acylated HIV-1 Nef

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil; Nanda, Hirsh; Pirrone, Gregory F.; Shi, Xiaomeng; Engen, John R.; Kent, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins are post-translationally modified by acylation targetting them to lipid membranes. While methods such as X-ray crystallography and NMR are available to determine the structure of folded proteins in solution, the precise position of folded domains relative to a membrane remains largely unknown. We used neutron and X-ray reflection methods to measure the displacement of the core domain of HIV Nef from lipid membranes upon insertion of the N-terminal myristate group. Nef is one of several HIV-1 accessory proteins and an essential factor in AIDS progression. Upon insertion of the myristate and residues from the N-terminal arm, Nef transitions from a closed to open conformation that positions the core domain 70 Å from the lipid headgroups. This work rules out speculation that the Nef core remains closely associated with the membrane to optimize interactions with the cytoplasmic domain of MHC-1. PMID:24035710

  7. Conformational transitions of macromolecules in an eluent flow and their manifestation in the chromatography of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurganov, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu; Orekhov, V. A.

    2014-07-01

    The behaviour of macromolecules in a free eluent flow, in a confined space, and in a flow passing through a pore system is considered. It is shown that the behaviour of macromolecules can be described by different theories such as the De Gennes theory and the theory of A DiMarzio and C M Guttman. Specific features of chromatographic fractionation and separation processes with the use of membranes formed from ultrahigh-molecular-mass polymers, which are widely used as constructional materials, are discussed. To account for these features, theoretical models considering conformational transitions of macromolecules in the eluent flow and taking into account possible degradation of macromolecules under the influence of the flow are applied. The current state of theoretical and experimental studies of the behaviour of macromolecules in a fluid flow is surveyed. The bibliography includes 152 references.

  8. Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-02-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), a key enzyme of mevalonate pathway in isoprenoid biosynthesis, from Bacopa monniera (BmMDD), cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli were studied under thermal, chemical and pH-mediated denaturation conditions using fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopy. Native BmMDD is a helix dominant structure with 45% helix and 11% sheets and possesses seven tryptophan residues with two residues exposed on surface, three residues partially exposed and two situated in the interior of the protein. Thermal denaturation of BmMDD causes rapid structural transitions at and above 40°C and transient exposure of hydrophobic residues at 50°C, leading to aggregation of the protein. An acid induced molten globule like structure was observed at pH 4, exhibiting altered but compact secondary structure, distorted tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule displayed different response at higher temperature and similar response to chemical denaturation as compared to the native protein. The surface tryptophans have predominantly positively charged amino acids around them, as indicated by higher KSV for KI as compared to that for CsCl. The native enzyme displayed two different lifetimes, τ1 (1.203±0.036 ns) and τ2 (3.473±0.12 ns) indicating two populations of tryptophan. PMID:26657583

  9. Conformational Transitions in the Glycine-Bound GluN1 NMDA Receptor LBD via Single-Molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, David R.; Dolino, Drew M.; Jaurich, Henriette; Shuang, Bo; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Nurik, Caitlin E.; Chen, Jixin; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Landes, Christy F.

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a member of the glutamate receptor family of proteins and is responsible for excitatory transmission. Activation of the receptor is thought to be controlled by conformational changes in the ligand binding domain (LBD); however, glutamate receptor LBDs can occupy multiple conformations even in the activated form. This work probes equilibrium transitions among NMDAR LBD conformations by monitoring the distance across the glycine-bound LBD cleft using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Recent improvements in photoprotection solutions allowed us to monitor transitions among the multiple conformations. Also, we applied a recently developed model-free algorithm called “step transition and state identification” to identify the number of states, their smFRET efficiencies, and their interstate kinetics. Reversible interstate conversions, corresponding to transitions among a wide range of cleft widths, were identified in the glycine-bound LBD, on much longer timescales compared to channel opening. These transitions were confirmed to be equilibrium in nature by shifting the distribution reversibly via denaturant. We found that the NMDAR LBD proceeds primarily from one adjacent smFRET state to the next under equilibrium conditions, consistent with a cleft-opening/closing mechanism. Overall, by analyzing the state-to-state transition dynamics and distributions, we achieve insight into specifics of long-lived LBD equilibrium structural dynamics, as well as obtain a more general description of equilibrium folding/unfolding in a conformationally dynamic protein. The relationship between such long-lived LBD dynamics and channel function in the full receptor remains an open and interesting question. PMID:26153703

  10. Conformational transitions in the glycine-bound GluN1 NMDA receptor LBD via single-molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David R; Dolino, Drew M; Jaurich, Henriette; Shuang, Bo; Ramaswamy, Swarna; Nurik, Caitlin E; Chen, Jixin; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Landes, Christy F

    2015-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a member of the glutamate receptor family of proteins and is responsible for excitatory transmission. Activation of the receptor is thought to be controlled by conformational changes in the ligand binding domain (LBD); however, glutamate receptor LBDs can occupy multiple conformations even in the activated form. This work probes equilibrium transitions among NMDAR LBD conformations by monitoring the distance across the glycine-bound LBD cleft using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Recent improvements in photoprotection solutions allowed us to monitor transitions among the multiple conformations. Also, we applied a recently developed model-free algorithm called "step transition and state identification" to identify the number of states, their smFRET efficiencies, and their interstate kinetics. Reversible interstate conversions, corresponding to transitions among a wide range of cleft widths, were identified in the glycine-bound LBD, on much longer timescales compared to channel opening. These transitions were confirmed to be equilibrium in nature by shifting the distribution reversibly via denaturant. We found that the NMDAR LBD proceeds primarily from one adjacent smFRET state to the next under equilibrium conditions, consistent with a cleft-opening/closing mechanism. Overall, by analyzing the state-to-state transition dynamics and distributions, we achieve insight into specifics of long-lived LBD equilibrium structural dynamics, as well as obtain a more general description of equilibrium folding/unfolding in a conformationally dynamic protein. The relationship between such long-lived LBD dynamics and channel function in the full receptor remains an open and interesting question. PMID:26153703

  11. Transitions between Closed and Open Conformations of TolC: The Effects of Ions in Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Robert; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, use multidrug efflux pumps to export toxic substrates through their cell membranes. Upon formation of an efflux pump, the aperture of its outer membrane protein TolC opens and thereby enables the extrusion of substrate molecules. The specialty of TolC is its ability to dock to different transporters, making it a highly versatile export protein. Within this study, the transition between two conformations of TolC that are both available as crystal structures was investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. To create a partially open conformation from a closed one, the stability of the periplasmic aperture was weakened by a double point mutation at the constricting ring, which removes some salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. These mutants, which showed partial opening in previous experiments, did not spontaneously open during a 20-ns equilibration at physiological values of the KCl solution. Detailed analysis of the constricting ring revealed that the cations of the solvent were able to constitute ionic bonds in place of the removed salt bridges, which inhibited the opening of the aperture in simulations. To remove the ions from these binding positions within the available simulation time, an extra force was applied onto the ions. To keep the effect of this additional force rather flexible, it was applied in form of an artificial external electric field perpendicular to the membrane. Depending on the field direction and the ion concentration, these simulations led to a partial opening. In experiments, this energy barrier for the ions can be overcome by thermal fluctuations on a longer timescale. PMID:19383457

  12. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  13. Identification of the Conformational transition pathway in PIP2 Opening Kir Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Lü, Shouqin; Liu, Yuzhi; Pang, Chunli; Chen, Yafei; Zhang, Suhua; Yu, Hui; Long, Mian; Zhang, Hailin; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhan, Yong; An, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    The gating of Kir channels depends critically on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), but the detailed mechanism by which PIP2 regulates Kir channels remains obscure. Here, we performed a series of Targeted molecular dynamics simulations on the full-length Kir2.1 channel and, for the first time, were able to achieve the transition from the closed to the open state. Our data show that with the upward motion of the cytoplasmic domain (CTD) the structure of the C-Linker changes from a loop to a helix. The twisting of the C-linker triggers the rotation of the CTD, which induces a small downward movement of the CTD and an upward motion of the slide helix toward the membrane that pulls the inner helix gate open. At the same time, the rotation of the CTD breaks the interaction between the CD- and G-loops thus releasing the G-loop. The G-loop then bounces away from the CD-loop, which leads to the opening of the G-loop gate and the full opening of the pore. We identified a series of interaction networks, between the N-terminus, CD loop, C linker and G loop one by one, which exquisitely regulates the global conformational changes during the opening of Kir channels by PIP2. PMID:26063437

  14. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-21

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments. PMID:27389209

  15. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments.

  16. An allolactose trapped at the lacZ β-galactosidase active site with its galactosyl moiety in a (4)H3 conformation provides insights into the formation, conformation, and stabilization of the transition state.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Robert W; Huber, Reuben E

    2015-12-01

    When lactose was incubated with G794A-β-galactosidase (a variant with a "closed" active site loop that binds transition state analogs well) an allolactose was trapped with its Gal moiety in a (4)H3 conformation, similar to the oxocarbenium ion-like conformation expected of the transition state. The numerous interactions formed between the (4)H3 structure and β-galactosidase indicate that this structure is representative of the transition state. This conformation is also very similar to that of d-galactono-1,5-lactone, a good transition state analog. Evidence indicates that substrates take up the (4)H3 conformation during migration from the shallow to the deep mode. Steric forces utilizing His418 and other residues are important for positioning the O1 leaving group into a quasi-axial position. An electrostatic interaction between the O5 of the distorted Gal and Tyr503 as well as C-H-π bonds with Trp568 are also significant. Computational studies of the energy of sugar ring distortion show that the β-galactosidase reaction itinerary is driven by energetic considerations in utilization of a (4)H3 transition state with a novel (4)C1-(4)H3-(4)C1 conformation itinerary. To our knowledge, this is the first X-ray crystallographic structural demonstration that the transition state of a natural substrate of a glycosidase has a (4)H3 conformation. PMID:26291713

  17. Conformational Transition Pathways of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Domain from Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Bayesian Clustering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is aberrantly activated in various cancer cells and an important target for cancer treatment. Deep understanding of EGFR conformational changes between the active and inactive states is of pharmaceutical interest. Here we present a strategy combining multiply targeted molecular dynamics simulations, unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, and Bayesian clustering to investigate transition pathways during the activation/inactivation process of EGFR kinase domain. Two distinct pathways between the active and inactive forms are designed, explored, and compared. Based on Bayesian clustering and rough two-dimensional free energy surfaces, the energy-favorable pathway is recognized, though DFG-flip happens in both pathways. In addition, another pathway with different intermediate states appears in our simulations. Comparison of distinct pathways also indicates that disruption of the Lys745-Glu762 interaction is critically important in DFG-flip while movement of the A-loop significantly facilitates the conformational change. Our simulations yield new insights into EGFR conformational transitions. Moreover, our results verify that this approach is valid and efficient in sampling of protein conformational changes and comparison of distinct pathways. PMID:25136273

  18. Theoretical study on structure, conformation, stability and electronic transition of C4 and C5 anions of ascorbic acid stereoisomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Azami, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi

    2014-03-01

    The structures, stabilities, conformational analysis and electronic transitions of L-ascorbic acid anions (four stereoisomers) were studied theoretically. These anions are produced from the de-protonation of C4-H and C5-H sites of L-ascorbic acid stereoisomers. The geometries of these anions were fully optimized in gas phase and aqueous phase in order to determine their relative stabilities. It was observed that the de-protonation at C5 site of two stereoisomers leads to the ring opening in both phases. Isomerization of the L-form to one of the D-form was observed during the optimization of the anions at C5. Conformational analysis (potential energy surface scan) of the opened ring anions was performed in search of energy minima and/or maxima. The absorption electronic transitions of the anions in the UV region were calculated using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT).

  19. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  20. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-03-01

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  1. Study on the Application of the Combination of TMD Simulation and Umbrella Sampling in PMF Calculation for Molecular Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Xue, Tuo; Song, Chunnian; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) based on the combination of targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations and umbrella samplings as a function of physical coordinates have been applied to explore the detailed pathways and the corresponding free energy profiles for the conformational transition processes of the butane molecule and the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35). The accurate PMF profiles for describing the dihedral rotation of butane under both coordinates of dihedral rotation and root mean square deviation (RMSD) variation were obtained based on the different umbrella samplings from the same TMD simulations. The initial structures for the umbrella samplings can be conveniently selected from the TMD trajectories. For the application of this computational method in the unfolding process of the HP35 protein, the PMF calculation along with the coordinate of the radius of gyration (Rg) presents the gradual increase of free energies by about 1 kcal/mol with the energy fluctuations. The feature of conformational transition for the unfolding process of the HP35 protein shows that the spherical structure extends and the middle α-helix unfolds firstly, followed by the unfolding of other α-helices. The computational method for the PMF calculations based on the combination of TMD simulations and umbrella samplings provided a valuable strategy in investigating detailed conformational transition pathways for other allosteric processes. PMID:27171075

  2. Study on the Application of the Combination of TMD Simulation and Umbrella Sampling in PMF Calculation for Molecular Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Xue, Tuo; Song, Chunnian; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) based on the combination of targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations and umbrella samplings as a function of physical coordinates have been applied to explore the detailed pathways and the corresponding free energy profiles for the conformational transition processes of the butane molecule and the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35). The accurate PMF profiles for describing the dihedral rotation of butane under both coordinates of dihedral rotation and root mean square deviation (RMSD) variation were obtained based on the different umbrella samplings from the same TMD simulations. The initial structures for the umbrella samplings can be conveniently selected from the TMD trajectories. For the application of this computational method in the unfolding process of the HP35 protein, the PMF calculation along with the coordinate of the radius of gyration (Rg) presents the gradual increase of free energies by about 1 kcal/mol with the energy fluctuations. The feature of conformational transition for the unfolding process of the HP35 protein shows that the spherical structure extends and the middle α-helix unfolds firstly, followed by the unfolding of other α-helices. The computational method for the PMF calculations based on the combination of TMD simulations and umbrella samplings provided a valuable strategy in investigating detailed conformational transition pathways for other allosteric processes. PMID:27171075

  3. Free energy of conformational transition paths in biomolecules: The string method and its application to myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Karplus, Martin; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A set of techniques developed under the umbrella of the string method is used in combination with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the conformation change between the prepowerstroke (PPS) and rigor (R) structures of the converter domain of myosin VI. The challenges specific to the application of these techniques to such a large and complex biomolecule are addressed in detail. These challenges include (i) identifying a proper set of collective variables to apply the string method, (ii) finding a suitable initial string, (iii) obtaining converged profiles of the free energy along the transition path, (iv) validating and interpreting the free energy profiles, and (v) computing the mean first passage time of the transition. A detailed description of the PPS↔R transition in the converter domain of myosin VI is obtained, including the transition path, the free energy along the path, and the rates of interconversion. The methodology developed here is expected to be useful more generally in studies of conformational transitions in complex biomolecules. PMID:21361558

  4. Dynamics of the His79-heme Alkaline Transition of Yeast Iso-1-cytochrome c Probed by Conformationally-gated Electron Transfer with Co(II)bis(terpyridine)†

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Melisa M.; Junior, Carolyn C.; Bergquist, Bryan B.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline conformers of cytochrome c may be involved in both its electron transport and apoptotic functions. We use cobalt(II)bis(terpyridine), Co(terpy)22+, as a reagent for conformationally-gated electron transfer (gated ET) experiments to study the alkaline conformational transition of K79H variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c expressed in Escherichia coli, WT*K79H, with alanine at position 72, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yK79H, with trimethyllysine (Tml) at position 72. Co(terpy)22+ is well-suited to the 100 ms to 1 s time scale of the His79-mediated alkaline conformational transition of these variants. Reduction of the His79-heme alkaline conformer by Co(terpy)22+ occurs primarily by gated ET, which involves conversion to the native state followed by reduction, with a small fraction of the His79- heme alkaline conformer directly reduced by Co(terpy)22+. The gated ET experiments show that the mechanism of formation of the His79-heme alkaline conformer involves only two ionizable groups. In previous work, we showed that the mechanism of the His73-mediated alkaline conformational transition requires three ionizable groups. Thus, the mechanism of heme crevice opening depends upon the position of the ligand mediating the process. The microscopic rate constants provided by gated ET studies show that mutation of Tml72 (yK79H variant) in the heme crevice loop to Ala72 (WT*K79H variant) affects the dynamics of heme crevice opening through a small destabilization of both the native conformer and the transition state relative to the His79-heme alkaline conformer. Previous pH jump data had indicated that the Tml72→Ala mutation primarily stabilized the transition state for the His79-mediated alkaline conformational transition. PMID:23899348

  5. Analysis and elimination of a bias in targeted molecular dynamics simulations of conformational transitions: application to calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Karplus, Martin

    2012-07-26

    The popular targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) method for generating transition paths in complex biomolecular systems is revisited. In a typical TMD transition path, the large-scale changes occur early and the small-scale changes tend to occur later. As a result, the order of events in the computed paths depends on the direction in which the simulations are performed. To identify the origin of this bias, and to propose a method in which the bias is absent, variants of TMD in the restraint formulation are introduced and applied to the complex open ↔ closed transition in the protein calmodulin. Due to the global best-fit rotation that is typically part of the TMD method, the simulated system is guided implicitly along the lowest-frequency normal modes, until the large spatial scales associated with these modes are near the target conformation. The remaining portion of the transition is described progressively by higher-frequency modes, which correspond to smaller-scale rearrangements. A straightforward modification of TMD that avoids the global best-fit rotation is the locally restrained TMD (LRTMD) method, in which the biasing potential is constructed from a number of TMD potentials, each acting on a small connected portion of the protein sequence. With a uniform distribution of these elements, transition paths that lack the length-scale bias are obtained. Trajectories generated by steered MD in dihedral angle space (DSMD), a method that avoids best-fit rotations altogether, also lack the length-scale bias. To examine the importance of the paths generated by TMD, LRTMD, and DSMD in the actual transition, we use the finite-temperature string method to compute the free energy profile associated with a transition tube around a path generated by each algorithm. The free energy barriers associated with the paths are comparable, suggesting that transitions can occur along each route with similar probabilities. This result indicates that a broad ensemble of paths needs to

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on the Conformational Transition of the Mad2 Protein from the Open to the Closed State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaoqun; Zhu, Yanyan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2014-01-01

    The Mad2 protein, with two distinct conformations of open- and closed-states, is a key player in the spindle checkpoint. The closed Mad2 state is more active than the open one. We carried out conventional and targeted molecular dynamics simulations for the two stable Mad2 states and their conformational transition to address the dynamical transition mechanism from the open to the closed state. The intermediate structure in the transition process shows exposure of the β6 strand and an increase of space around the binding sites of β6 strand due to the unfolding of the β7/8 sheet and movement of the β6/4/5 sheet close to the αC helix. Therefore, Mad2 binding to the Cdc20 protein in the spindle checkpoint is made possible. The interconversion between these two states might facilitate the functional activity of the Mad2 protein. Motion correlation analysis revealed the allosteric network between the β1 strand and β7/8 sheet via communication of the β5-αC loop and the β6/4/5 sheet in this transition process. PMID:24690997

  7. Forbidden Transitions in the Microwave Rotational Spectrum of the Tt Conformer of the N-Propanol Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazimova, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    A search for forbidden transitions was made in the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the propanol molecule (n-CH3CH2CH2OH) in the region of 37.0-78.0 GHz. The n-CH3CH2CH2OH molecule has a plane of symmetry containing μb and μa components of the dipole moment (μc = 0). On account of centrifugal distortion an induced component of the dipole moment μa, perpendicular to the symmetry plane of the molecule and leading to the appearance of previously forbidden rotational transitions, appears in such molecules. Forbidden "centrifugal transitions" of this type were found in the microwave rotational spectrum of the Tt conformer of the n-CH3CH2CH2OH molecule. The spectrum was analyzed by means of the Watson A-reduction rotational Hamiltonian. Sixty four forbidden μc transitions with rotational quantum numbers of up to J = 37 inclusive were identified.

  8. Calcium-induced contraction of sarcomeres changes the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Anmann, Tiia; Eimre, Margus; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Andrienko, Tatiana; Kaambre, Tuuli; Sikk, Peeter; Seppet, Evelin; Tiivel, Toomas; Vendelin, Marko; Seppet, Enn; Saks, Valdur A

    2005-06-01

    The relationships between cardiac cell structure and the regulation of mitochondrial respiration were studied by applying fluorescent confocal microscopy and analysing the kinetics of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration, during calcium-induced contraction in permeabilized cardiomyocytes and myocardial fibers, and in their 'ghost' preparations (after selective myosin extraction). Up to 3 microm free calcium, in the presence of ATP, induced strong contraction of permeabilized cardiomyocytes with intact sarcomeres, accompanied by alterations in mitochondrial arrangement and a significant decrease in the apparent K(m) for exogenous ADP and ATP in the kinetics of mitochondrial respiration. The V(max) of respiration showed a moderate (50%) increase, with an optimum at 0.4 microm free calcium and a decrease at higher calcium concentrations. At high free-calcium concentrations, the direct flux of ADP from ATPases to mitochondria was diminished compared to that at low calcium levels. All of these effects were unrelated either to mitochondrial calcium overload or to mitochondrial permeability transition and were not observed in 'ghost' preparations after the selective extraction of myosin. Our results suggest that the structural changes transmitted from contractile apparatus to mitochondria modify localized restrictions of the diffusion of adenine nucleotides and thus may actively participate in the regulation of mitochondrial function, in addition to the metabolic signalling via the creatine kinase system. PMID:15955072

  9. Self-Assembled Nanostructures Based on Activatable Red Fluorescent Dye for Site-Specific Protein Probing and Conformational Transition Detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Huang, Yanyan; Hu, Fang; Jin, Yulong; Zhang, Guanxin; Zhang, Deqing; Zhao, Rui

    2016-06-21

    Smart and versatile nanostructures have demonstrated their effectiveness for biomolecule analysis and show great potential in digging insights into the structural/functional relationships. Herein, a nanoscale molecular self-assembly was constructed for probing the site-specific recognition and conformational changes of human serum albumin (HSA) with tunable size and emission. A tetraphenylethylene derivative TPE-red-COOH was used as the building block for tailoring fluorescence-silent nanoparticles. The highly specific and sensitive response to HSA was witnessed by the fast turn-on of the red fluorescence and simultaneous disassembly of the nanostructures, whereas various endogenous biomolecules cannot induce such response. The mechanism investigation indicates that the combination of multiple noncovalent interactions is the driving force for disassembling and trapping TPE-red-COOH into HSA. The resultant restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE-red-COOH in the hydrophobic cavity of HSA induces the significant red emission. By using the fluorescence activatable nanosensor as the structural indicator, the stepwise conformational transitions of HSA during denaturing and the partial refolding of subdomain IIA of HSA were facilely visualized. Benefiting from its activatable signaling, sensitivity, and simplicity, such molecular assembly provides a kind of soft nanomaterial for site-specific biomolecule probing and conformational transition detection concerning their structure, function, and biomedical characteristics. PMID:27232658

  10. Physical factors affecting the storage stability of freeze-dried interleukin-1 receptor antagonist: glass transition and protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Chang, B S; Beauvais, R M; Dong, A; Carpenter, J F

    1996-07-15

    The effects of glass transition of, and protein conformation in, the dried solid on the storage stability of freeze-dried recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) were examined. Glass transition is a temperature-dependent phenomenon. Amorphous materials become hard and brittle at temperatures below their characteristic glass transition temperatures (Tg) such that diffusion of molecules along the matrix is not sufficient to cause large-scale structural changes. To ascertain the importance of the glass transition in protein storage stability, we compared 10 different lyophilized rhIL-1ra formulations, with Tgs ranging from 20 to 56 degrees C, during several weeks of storage at temperatures above and below the samples' Tgs. Protein degradation, both deamidation and aggregation, was greatly accelerated at temperatures above Tg, but for some formulations also arose below Tg. Thus, storage of dried proteins below the Tg is necessary but not sufficient to ensure long-term stability. To examine the effects of protein structure in the dried solid, we prepared formulations with various sucrose concentrations, all of which had a Tg = 66 +/- 2.5 degrees C. With infrared spectroscopy, we determined that the protein lyophilized with /=5% sucrose, conformational change was inhibited during lyophilization. When stored at 50 degrees C, degradation of the freeze-dried protein varied inversely with sucrose concentration. These results indicate that structural changes arising during the lyophilization process led to damage during subsequent storage, even if the storage temperature was less than the Tg. Together the results of these studies document that to obtain optimum stability of dried rhIL-1ra it was necessary to inhibit conformational change during lyophilization and to store at temperatures below the Tg of the dried formulation. PMID:8660705

  11. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation. PMID:26275931

  12. Atomic layer deposition conformality and process optimization: Transitioning from 2-dimensional planar systems to 3-dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson Cleveland, Erin Darcy

    Conformal coatings are becoming increasingly important as technology heads towards the nanoscale. The exceptional thickness control (atomic scale) and conformality (uniformity over nanoscale 3D features) of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has made it the process of choice for numerous applications found in microelectronics and nanotechnology with a wide variety of ALD processes and resulting materials. While its benefits derive from self-limited saturating surface reactions of alternating gas precursors, process optimization for ALD conformality is often difficult as process parameters, such as dosage, purge, temperature and pressure are often interdependent with one another, especially within the confines of an ultra-high aspect ratio nanopore. Therefore, processes must be optimized to achieve self-limiting saturated surfaces and avoid parasitic CVD-like reactions in order to maintain thickness control and achieve uniformity and conformality at the atomic level while preserving the desired materials' properties (electrical, optical, compositional, etc.). This work investigates novel approaches to optimize ALD conformality when transitioning from a 2D planar system to a 3D ultra-high aspect ratio nanopore in the context of a cross-flow wafer-scale reactor used to highlight deviations from ideal ALD behavior. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) is used as a versatile platform to analyze TiO2 ALD profiles via ex-situ SEM, EDS and TEM. Results of TiO2 ALD illustrate enhanced growth rates that can occur when the precursors titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone were used at minimal saturation doses for ALD and for considerably higher doses. The results also demonstrate that ALD process recipes that achieve excellent across-wafer uniformity across full 100 mm wafers do not produce conformal films in ultra-high aspect ratio nanopores. The results further demonstrate that conformality is determined by precursor dose, surface residence time, and purge time, creating large depletion

  13. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic analysis of the conformational transition of poly(vinyl alcohol) by temperature-dependent FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shan; Luan, Ye-Mei; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The conformational change of poly(vinyl alcohol) has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy at various temperatures in the 4000-400 cm-1 region. The molecular motion and the trans/gauche content are sensitive to the Csbnd H, Csbnd C stretching modes. FTIR spectra show that the I2920/I2849 decreases from 1.84 to 1.0 with increasing temperature, companying the decrease in I1047/I1095 from 0.78 to 0.58, implying the conformational transition from trans to gauche in alkyl chain. Based on the van't Hoff relation, the enthalpies and entropies have been calculated in different temperatures, which are 4.61 kJ mol-1 and 15.23 J mol-1 K-1, respectively, in the region of 80-140 °C. From the Cdbnd O stretching mode and Osbnd H band, it can be concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds decrease owing to elevating temperature, which leads to more gauche conformers.

  14. α-Fluorophosphonates reveal how a phosphomutase conserves transition state conformation over hexose recognition in its two-step reaction

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Bhattasali, Debabrata; Pellegrini, Erika; Forget, Stephanie M.; Baxter, Nicola J.; Cliff, Matthew J.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Jakeman, David L.; Blackburn, G. Michael; Waltho, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    β-Phosphoglucomutase (βPGM) catalyzes isomerization of β-d-glucose 1-phosphate (βG1P) into d-glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) via sequential phosphoryl transfer steps using a β-d-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (βG16BP) intermediate. Synthetic fluoromethylenephosphonate and methylenephosphonate analogs of βG1P deliver novel step 1 transition state analog (TSA) complexes for βPGM, incorporating trifluoromagnesate and tetrafluoroaluminate surrogates of the phosphoryl group. Within an invariant protein conformation, the β-d-glucopyranose ring in the βG1P TSA complexes (step 1) is flipped over and shifted relative to the G6P TSA complexes (step 2). Its equatorial hydroxyl groups are hydrogen-bonded directly to the enzyme rather than indirectly via water molecules as in step 2. The (C)O–P bond orientation for binding the phosphate in the inert phosphate site differs by ∼30° between steps 1 and 2. By contrast, the orientations for the axial O–Mg–O alignment for the TSA of the phosphoryl group in the catalytic site differ by only ∼5°, and the atoms representing the five phosphorus-bonded oxygens in the two transition states (TSs) are virtually superimposable. The conformation of βG16BP in step 1 does not fit into the same invariant active site for step 2 by simple positional interchange of the phosphates: the TS alignment is achieved by conformational change of the hexose rather than the protein. PMID:25104750

  15. α-Fluorophosphonates reveal how a phosphomutase conserves transition state conformation over hexose recognition in its two-step reaction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Bhattasali, Debabrata; Pellegrini, Erika; Forget, Stephanie M; Baxter, Nicola J; Cliff, Matthew J; Bowler, Matthew W; Jakeman, David L; Blackburn, G Michael; Waltho, Jonathan P

    2014-08-26

    β-Phosphoglucomutase (βPGM) catalyzes isomerization of β-D-glucose 1-phosphate (βG1P) into D-glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) via sequential phosphoryl transfer steps using a β-D-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (βG16BP) intermediate. Synthetic fluoromethylenephosphonate and methylenephosphonate analogs of βG1P deliver novel step 1 transition state analog (TSA) complexes for βPGM, incorporating trifluoromagnesate and tetrafluoroaluminate surrogates of the phosphoryl group. Within an invariant protein conformation, the β-D-glucopyranose ring in the βG1P TSA complexes (step 1) is flipped over and shifted relative to the G6P TSA complexes (step 2). Its equatorial hydroxyl groups are hydrogen-bonded directly to the enzyme rather than indirectly via water molecules as in step 2. The (C)O-P bond orientation for binding the phosphate in the inert phosphate site differs by ∼ 30° between steps 1 and 2. By contrast, the orientations for the axial O-Mg-O alignment for the TSA of the phosphoryl group in the catalytic site differ by only ∼ 5°, and the atoms representing the five phosphorus-bonded oxygens in the two transition states (TSs) are virtually superimposable. The conformation of βG16BP in step 1 does not fit into the same invariant active site for step 2 by simple positional interchange of the phosphates: the TS alignment is achieved by conformational change of the hexose rather than the protein. PMID:25104750

  16. Molecular Mechanism for Conformational Dynamics of Ras·GTP Elucidated from In-Situ Structural Transition in Crystal.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shigeyuki; Miyano, Nao; Baba, Seiki; Liao, Jingling; Kawamura, Takashi; Tsuda, Chiemi; Takeda, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kataoka, Tohru; Shima, Fumi

    2016-01-01

    Ras•GTP adopts two interconverting conformational states, state 1 and state 2, corresponding to inactive and active forms, respectively. However, analysis of the mechanism for state transition was hampered by the lack of the structural information on wild-type Ras state 1 despite its fundamental nature conserved in the Ras superfamily. Here we solve two new crystal structures of wild-type H-Ras, corresponding to state 1 and state 2. The state 2 structure seems to represent an intermediate of state transition and, intriguingly, the state 1 crystal is successfully derived from this state 2 crystal by regulating the surrounding humidity. Structural comparison enables us to infer the molecular mechanism for state transition, during which a wide range of hydrogen-bonding networks across Switch I, Switch II and the α3-helix interdependently undergo gross rearrangements, where fluctuation of Tyr32, translocation of Gln61, loss of the functional water molecules and positional shift of GTP play major roles. The NMR-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments also support this transition mechanism. Moreover, the unveiled structural features together with the results of the biochemical study provide a new insight into the physiological role of state 1 as a stable pool of Ras•GTP in the GDP/GTP cycle of Ras. PMID:27180801

  17. Molecular Mechanism for Conformational Dynamics of Ras·GTP Elucidated from In-Situ Structural Transition in Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shigeyuki; Miyano, Nao; Baba, Seiki; Liao, Jingling; Kawamura, Takashi; Tsuda, Chiemi; Takeda, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kataoka, Tohru; Shima, Fumi

    2016-01-01

    Ras•GTP adopts two interconverting conformational states, state 1 and state 2, corresponding to inactive and active forms, respectively. However, analysis of the mechanism for state transition was hampered by the lack of the structural information on wild-type Ras state 1 despite its fundamental nature conserved in the Ras superfamily. Here we solve two new crystal structures of wild-type H-Ras, corresponding to state 1 and state 2. The state 2 structure seems to represent an intermediate of state transition and, intriguingly, the state 1 crystal is successfully derived from this state 2 crystal by regulating the surrounding humidity. Structural comparison enables us to infer the molecular mechanism for state transition, during which a wide range of hydrogen-bonding networks across Switch I, Switch II and the α3-helix interdependently undergo gross rearrangements, where fluctuation of Tyr32, translocation of Gln61, loss of the functional water molecules and positional shift of GTP play major roles. The NMR-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments also support this transition mechanism. Moreover, the unveiled structural features together with the results of the biochemical study provide a new insight into the physiological role of state 1 as a stable pool of Ras•GTP in the GDP/GTP cycle of Ras. PMID:27180801

  18. The 32 kDa Enamelin Undergoes Conformational Transitions upon Calcium Binding

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Daming; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The 32 kDa hydrophilic and acidic enamelin, the most stable cleavage fragment of the enamel specific glycoprotein, is believed to play vital roles in controlling crystal nucleation or growth during enamel biomineralization. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectra demonstrate that the secondary structure of the 32 kDa enamelin has a high content of α-helix (81.5%). Quantitative analysis on the circular dichroism data revealed that the 32 kDa enamelin undergoes conformational changes with a structural preference to β-sheet as a function of calcium ions. We suggest that the increase of β-sheet conformation upon presence of Ca2+ may allow preferable interaction of the 32 kDa enamelin with apatite crystal surfaces during enamel biomineralization. The calcium association constant of the 32 kDa enamelin calculated from the fitting curve of ellipticity at 222 nm is Ka = 1.55 (±0.13) × 103 M−1, indicating a relatively low affinity. Our current biophysical studies on the 32 kDa enamelin structure provide novel insights towards understanding the enamelin-mineral interaction and subsequently the functions of enamelin during enamel formation. PMID:18508280

  19. dNTP-dependent Conformational Transitions in the Fingers Subdomain of Klentaq1 DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Paul J.; Allen, William J.; Sisamakis, Evangelos; Kalinin, Stanislav; Felekyan, Suren; Widengren, Jerker; Waksman, Gabriel; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases are responsible for the accurate replication of DNA. Kinetic, single-molecule, and x-ray studies show that multiple conformational states are important for DNA polymerase fidelity. Using high precision FRET measurements, we show that Klentaq1 (the Klenow fragment of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase 1) is in equilibrium between three structurally distinct states. In the absence of nucleotide, the enzyme is mostly open, whereas in the presence of DNA and a correctly base-pairing dNTP, it re-equilibrates to a closed state. In the presence of a dNTP alone, with DNA and an incorrect dNTP, or in elevated MgCl2 concentrations, an intermediate state termed the “nucleotide-binding” state predominates. Photon distribution and hidden Markov modeling revealed fast dynamic and slow conformational processes occurring between all three states in a complex energy landscape suggesting a mechanism in which dNTP delivery is mediated by the nucleotide-binding state. After nucleotide binding, correct dNTPs are transported to the closed state, whereas incorrect dNTPs are delivered to the open state. PMID:23525110

  20. Simulations of CRP:(cAMP)2 in noncrystalline environments show a subunit transition from the open to the closed conformation.

    PubMed

    García, A E; Harman, J G

    1996-01-01

    The CRP:cAMP complex functions as a transcription factor that facilitates RNA polymerase recognition of several bacterial promoters. Detailed crystal structure information is available for CRP:(cAMP)2 and for CRP:(cAMP)2 complexed with DNA. In the crystalline environment, CRP:(cAMP)2 subunits are asymmetrically related; one subunit has a closed conformation and the other has an open conformation. The CRP:(cAMP)2 complexed with DNA shows both subunits in a closed conformation. We have studied the molecular dynamics of CRP:(cAMP)2 in noncrystalline environments. CRP:(cAMP)2 was simulated for 625 ps in vacuo and for 140 ps in solution. The crystal structure of CRP:(cAMP)2 in the absence of DNA was used as the initial conformation. Molecule optimal dynamic coordinates (MODCs) (García A, 1992, Phys Rev Lett 68:2696) were used to analyze protein conformations sampled during the course of the simulations. Two MODCs define a transition of the open subunit to a closed subunit conformation during the first 125 ps of simulation in vacuo; the resulting subunit conformation is similar to that observed in CRP:(cAMP)2:DNA crystals. Simulation of CRP:(cAMP)2 in solution showed that a transition from the open to the closed state also occurs when water is explicitly included in the calculations. These calculations suggest that the asymmetric conformation of CRP:(cAMP)2 is stabilized by crystal lattice interactions. The predicted solution conformation is more symmetric, with both subunits in a closed conformation. PMID:8771197

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guo; Mcmahon, Benjamin H; Tung, Chang - Shung

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

  2. Anthrax Edema Factor: An Ion-Adaptive Mechanism of Catalysis with Increased Transition-State Conformational Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jara, Gabriel E; Martínez, Leandro

    2016-07-14

    Edema Factor (EF) is one of three major toxins of anthrax. EF is an adenylyl cyclase that disrupts cell signaling by accelerating the conversion of ATP into cyclic-AMP. EF has a much higher catalytic rate than that of mammalian adenylyl cyclases (mACs). Crystal structures were obtained for mACs and EF, but the molecular basis for different catalytic activities remained poorly understood. In particular, the arrangement of the active site in EF is unclear in what concerns the number of ions present and the conformation of the substrate. Here, we use quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the free-energy profiles for the reaction catalyzed by EF and a mAC. We found that EF catalysis is possible, and faster than that of mACs, in both one and two Mg(2+)-ion-binding modes, providing adaptive plasticity to host-cell environments. In both enzymes, the reaction mechanisms are highly associative. However, mechanistic differences exist. In the mAC, the nucleophile oxygen (ATP-O3') is consistently coordinated to one of the Mg(2+) ions, increasing its acidity. In EF, on the other hand, this coordination is eventual and not essential for the reaction to proceed. The persistent coordination of O3' to the ion is favored in mACs by a greater ion partial charge. In EF, the reduced acidity of the O3' oxygen is compensated by the presence of the His351 residue for proton abstraction. As proton transfer in EF does not require persistent attachment of the substrate to an ion, the substrate (ATP) and transition state display greater conformational flexibilities. These greater flexibilities allow the sampling of lower-energy conformations and might represent an entropic advantage for catalytic efficiency. PMID:27260163

  3. Tracking Transitions in Spider Wrapping Silk Conformation and Dynamics by (19)F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Orrell, Kathleen E; Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Bak, Jessi J; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-05-31

    Aciniform silk protein (AcSp1) is the primary component of wrapping silk, the toughest of the spider silks because of a combination of high tensile strength and extensibility. Argiope trifasciata AcSp1 contains a core repetitive domain with at least 14 homogeneous 200-amino acid units ("W" units). Upon fibrillogenesis, AcSp1 converts from an α-helix-rich soluble state to a mixed α-helical/β-sheet conformation. Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allowed demonstration of variable local stability within the W unit, but comprehensive characterization was confounded by spectral overlap, which was exacerbated by decreased chemical shift dispersion upon denaturation. Here, (19)F NMR spectroscopy, in the context of a single W unit (W1), is applied to track changes in structure and dynamics. Four strategic positions in the W unit were mutated to tryptophan and biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp). Simulated annealing-based structure calculations implied that these substitutions should be tolerated, while circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and (1)H-(15)N chemical shift displacements indicated minimal structural perturbation in W1 mutants. Fiber formation by W2 concatemers containing 5F-Trp substitutions in both W units demonstrated retention of functionality, a somewhat surprising finding in light of sequence conservation between species. Each 5F-Trp-labeled W1 exhibited a unique (19)F chemical shift, line width, longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1), and solvent isotope shift. Perturbation to (19)F chemical shift and nuclear spin relaxation parameters reflected changes in the conformation and dynamics at each 5F-Trp site upon addition of urea and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). (19)F NMR spectroscopy allowed unambiguous localized tracking throughout titration with each perturbant, demonstrating distinct behavior for each perturbant not previously revealed by heteronuclear NMR experiments. PMID:27153372

  4. PrP Conformational Transitions Alter Species Preference of a PrP-specific Antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wen-Quan; Langeveld, Jan; Xiao, Xiangzhu; Chen, Shugui; McGeer, Patrick L.; Yuan, Jue; Payne, Michael C.; Kang, Hae-Eun; McGeehan, John; Sy, Man-Sun; Greenspan, Neil S.; Kaplan, David; Wang, Gong-Xian; Parchi, Piero; Hoover, Edward; Kneale, Geoff; Telling, Glenn; Surewicz, Witold K.; Kong, Qingzhong; Guo, Jian-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The epitope of the 3F4 antibody most commonly used in human prion disease diagnosis is believed to consist of residues Met-Lys-His-Met (MKHM) corresponding to human PrP-(109–112). This assumption is based mainly on the observation that 3F4 reacts with human and hamster PrP but not with PrP from mouse, sheep, and cervids, in which Met at residue 112 is replaced by Val. Here we report that, by brain histoblotting, 3F4 did not react with PrP of uninfected transgenic mice expressing elk PrP; however, it did show distinct immunoreactivity in transgenic mice infected with chronic wasting disease. Compared with human PrP, the 3F4 reactivity with the recombinant elk PrP was 2 orders of magnitude weaker, as indicated by both Western blotting and surface plasmon resonance. To investigate the molecular basis of these species- and conformer-dependent preferences of 3F4, the epitope was probed by peptide membrane array and antigen competition experiments. Remarkably, the 3F4 antibody did not react with MKHM but reacted strongly with KTNMK (corresponding to human PrP-(106–110)), a sequence that is also present in cervids, sheep, and cattle. 3F4 also reacted with elk PrP peptides containing KTNMKHV. We concluded that the minimal sequence for the 3F4 epitope consists of residues KTNMK, and the species- and conformer-dependent preferences of 3F4 arise largely from the interactions between Met112 (human PrP) or Val115 (cervid PrP) and adjacent residues. PMID:20194495

  5. Large-Scale Conformational Transitions and Dimerization Are Encoded in the Amino-Acid Sequences of Hsp70 Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Malinverni, Duccio; Marsili, Simone; Barducci, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70s are a class of ubiquitous and highly conserved molecular chaperones playing a central role in the regulation of proteostasis in the cell. Hsp70s assist a myriad of cellular processes by binding unfolded or misfolded substrates during a complex biochemical cycle involving large-scale structural rearrangements. Here we show that an analysis of coevolution at the residue level fully captures the characteristic large-scale conformational transitions of this protein family, and predicts an evolutionary conserved–and thus functional–homo-dimeric arrangement. Furthermore, we highlight that the features encoding the Hsp70 dimer are more conserved in bacterial than in eukaryotic sequences, suggesting that the known Hsp70/Hsp110 hetero-dimer is a eukaryotic specialization built on a pre-existing template. PMID:26046683

  6. Reversible transition between alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformation of a transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Wissam; Taib, Nada; Federman, Silvina; Milochau, Alexandra; Castano, Sabine; Sbi, Walid; Manigand, Claude; Laguerre, Michel; Desbat, Bernard; Oda, Reiko; Lang, Jochen

    2009-09-01

    Despite the important functions of protein transmembrane domains, their structure and dynamics are often scarcely known. The SNARE proteins VAMP/synaptobrevin and syntaxin 1 are implicated in membrane fusion. Using different spectroscopic approaches we observed a marked sensitivity of their transmembrane domain structure in regard to the lipid/peptide ratio. In the dilute condition, peptides corresponding to the complete transmembrane domain fold into an alpha-helix inserted at approximately 35 degrees to the normal of the membranes, an observation in line with molecular simulations. Upon an increase in the peptide/lipid ratio, the peptides readily exhibited transition to beta-sheet structure. Moreover, the insertion angle of these beta-sheets increased to 54 degrees and was accompanied by a derangement of lipid acyl chains. For both proteins the transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet was reversible under certain conditions by increasing the peptide/lipid ratio. This phenomenon was observed in different model systems including multibilayers and small unilamellar vesicles. In addition, differences in peptide structure and transitions were observed when using distinct lipids (DMPC, DPPC or DOPC) thus indicating parameters influencing transmembrane domain structure and conversion from helices to sheets. The putative functional consequences of this unprecedented dynamic behavior of a transmembrane domain are discussed. PMID:19482005

  7. Conformational transitions and fibrillation mechanism of human calcitonin as studied by high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Kamihira, M.; Naito, A.; Tuzi, S.; Nosaka, A. Y.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    Conformational transitions of human calcitonin (hCT) during fibril formation in the acidic and neutral conditions were investigated by high-resolution solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. In aqueous acetic acid solution (pH 3.3), a local alpha-helical form is present around Gly10 whereas a random coil form is dominant as viewed from Phe22, Ala26, and Ala31 in the monomer form on the basis of the 13C chemical shifts. On the other hand, a local beta-sheet form as viewed from Gly10 and Phe22, and both beta-sheet and random coil as viewed from Ala26 and Ala31 were detected in the fibril at pH 3.3. The results indicate that conformational transitions from alpha-helix to beta-sheet, and from random coil to beta-sheet forms occurred in the central and C-terminus regions, respectively, during the fibril formation. The increased 13C resonance intensities of fibrils after a certain delay time suggests that the fibrillation can be explained by a two-step reaction mechanism in which the first step is a homogeneous association to form a nucleus, and the second step is an autocatalytic heterogeneous fibrillation. In contrast to the fibril at pH 3.3, the fibril at pH 7.5 formed a local beta-sheet conformation at the central region and exhibited a random coil at the C-terminus region. Not only a hydrophobic interaction among the amphiphilic alpha-helices, but also an electrostatic interaction between charged side chains can play an important role for the fibril formation at pH 7.5 and 3.3 acting as electrostatically favorable and unfavorable interactions, respectively. These results suggest that hCT fibrils are formed by stacking antiparallel beta-sheets at pH 7.5 and a mixture of antiparallel and parallel beta-sheets at pH 3.3. PMID:10850796

  8. Single-Molecule Analysis of Protein Large-Amplitude Conformational Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haw

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have evolved to harness thermal fluctuations, rather than frustrated by them, to carry out chemical transformations and mechanical work. What are, then, the operation and design principles of protein machines? To frame the problem in a tractable way, several basic questions have been formulated to guide the experimental design: (a) How many conformational states can a protein sample on the functionally important timescale? (b) What are the inter-conversion rates between states? (c) How do ligand binding or interactions with other proteins modulate the motions? (d) What are the structural basis of flexibility and its underlying molecular mechanics? Guided by this framework, we have studied protein tyrosine phosphatase B, PtpB, from M. tuberculosis (a virulence factor of tuberculosis and a potential drug target) and adenylate kinase, AK, from E. coli (a ubiquitous energy-balancing enzyme in cells). These domain movements have been followed in real time on their respective catalytic timescales using high-resolution single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. It is shown quantitatively that both PtpB and AK are capable of dynamically sampling two distinct states that correlate well with those observed by x-ray crystallography. Integrating these microscopic dynamics into macroscopic kinetics allows us to place the experimentally measured free-energy landscape in the context of enzymatic turnovers.

  9. Malignant hyperthermia and calcium-induced heat production.

    PubMed

    Ueda, I; Shinoda, F; Kamaya, H; Krishna, P R

    1994-05-01

    The abnormal increase in intracellular Ca++ in malignant hyperthermia (MH) is well documented, but the link between the increased Ca++ concentration and high temperature remains speculative. We investigated the possibility that the Ca(++)-induced change in the state of cell membranes may contribute to the temperature elevation. Calcium ion transforms phospholipid membranes from the fluid to solid state. This is analogous to the freezing of water, and liberates latent heat. Differential titration calorimetry (DTC) measures heat production or absorption during ligand binding to macromolecules. When CaCl2 solution was added to anionic dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) vesicle membranes in incremental doses, DTC showed that the heat production suddenly increased when the Ca++ concentration exceeded about 120 microM. At this Ca++ concentration range, these lipid membranes underwent phase transition. The latent heat of transition was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The values were 7.1 +/- 0.7 (SD, n = 4) kcal.mol-1 of DMPA and 6.8 +/- 0.7 (SD, n = 4) kcal.mol-1 of DMPG. The study shows that Ca++ produces heat when bound to lipid membranes. We are not proposing, however, that this is the sole source of heat. We contend that the lipid phase transition is one of the heat sources and it may trigger a hypermetabolic state by elevating the temperature of cell membranes. Because Ca++ is implicated as the second messenger in signal transduction, multiple systems may be involved. More studies are needed to clarify how Ca++ increases body temperature. PMID:8055615

  10. Gel formation and low-temperature intramolecular conformation transition of a triple-helical polysaccharide lentinan in water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lina

    2008-10-01

    The gelation behavior of the triple-helical polysaccharide lentinan fractions having different molecular weights in water at 25 degrees C were studied by using a rheometer. The analysis of concentration and molecular weight dependence of shear stress and shear viscosity showed that aqueous lentinan is a typical shear-thinning fluid, possessing potential as a viscosity control agent, and that a weak gel with entangled network structure formed. The dynamic oscillatory behavior of lentinan in the temperature range of 1-15 degrees C was also investigated by rheologic method. The storage modulus G' and complex viscosity eta* increased first with decreasing temperature, and underwent a maximum centered at 7-9 degrees C, and then decreased with further decreasing temperature. This abnormal phenomenon was ascribed to formation of rigid structure in the gel state, which was confirmed by the experimental results from micro-DSC. The micro-DSC curves showed that an endothermic peak appeared at 7-9 degrees C for lentinan in water upon heating, which was attributable to the intramolecular order-disorder structure transition similar to triple-helical polysaccharide schizophyllan. Namely, at lower temperature, the side glucose residues of lentinan (triplix II) formed a well-organized triple-helical structure (triplix I) through hydrogen-bonding with the surrounding water molecules. Moreover, this conformation transition was proved to be thermally reversible. PMID:18506809

  11. Intrinsic Free Energy of the Conformational Transition of the KcsA Signature Peptide from Conducting to Nonconducting State

    PubMed Central

    Khavrutskii, Ilja V.; Fajer, Mikolai; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We explore a conformational transition of the TATTVGYG signature peptide of the KcsA ion selectivity filter and its GYG to AYA mutant from the conducting α-strand state into the nonconducting pII-like state using a novel technique for multidimensional optimization of transition path ensembles and free energy calculations. We find that the wild type peptide, unlike the mutant, intrinsically favors the conducting state due to G77 backbone propensities and additional hydrophobic interaction between the V76 and Y78 side chains in water. The molecular mechanical free energy profiles in explicit water are in very good agreement with the corresponding adiabatic energies from the Generalized Born Molecular Volume (GBMV) implicit solvent model. However comparisons of the energies to higher level B3LYP/6–31G(d) Density Functional Theory calculations with Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) suggest that the nonconducting state might be more favorable than predicted by molecular mechanics simulations. By extrapolating the single peptide results to the tetrameric channel, we propose a novel hypothesis for the ion selectivity mechanism. PMID:20357907

  12. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its prokaryotic homologues: Structure, conformational transitions & allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marco; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger - a neurotransmitter - into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism boosted by X-ray crystallography of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologues of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in conjunction with time-resolved analyses based on single-channel electrophysiology and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The available data consistently point to a global mechanism of gating that involves a large reorganization of the receptor mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions: a global twisting and a radial expansion/contraction of the extracellular domain. These transitions profoundly modify the organization of the interface between subunits, which host several sites for orthosteric and allosteric modulatory ligands. The same mechanism may thus mediate both positive and negative allosteric modulations of pLGICs ligand binding at topographically distinct sites. The emerging picture of signal transduction is expected to pave the way to new pharmacological strategies for the development of allosteric modulators of nAChR and pLGICs in general. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25529272

  13. Network representation of conformational transitions between hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Mojie; Liu, Hanzhong; Li, Minghai; Huo, Shuanghong

    2015-10-01

    The folding kinetics of Rd-apocytochrome b562 is two-state, but native-state hydrogen exchange experiments show that there are discrete partially unfolded (PUF) structures in equilibrium with the native state. These PUF structures are called hidden intermediates because they are not detected in kinetic experiments and they exist after the rate-limiting step. Structures of the mimics of hidden intermediates of Rd-apocytochrome b562 are resolved by NMR. Based upon their relative stability and structural features, the folding mechanism was proposed to follow a specific pathway (unfolded → rate-limiting transition state → PUF1 → PUF2 → native). Investigating the roles of equilibrium PUF structures in folding kinetics and their interrelationship not only deepens our understanding of the details of folding mechanism but also provides guides in protein design and prevention of misfolding. We performed molecular dynamics simulations starting from a hidden intermediate and the native state of Rd-apocytochrome b562 in explicit solvent, for a total of 37.18 μs mainly with Anton. We validated our simulations by detailed comparison with experimental data and other computations. We have verified that we sampled the post rate-limiting transition state region only. Markov state model was used to analyze the simulation results. We replace the specific pathway model with a network model. Transition-path theory was employed to calculate the net effective flux from the most unfolded state towards the most folded state in the network. The proposed sequential folding pathway via PUF1 then more stable, more native-like PUF2 is one of the routes in our network, but it is not dominant. The dominant path visits PUF2 without going through PUF1. There is also a route from PUF1 directly to the most folded state in the network without visiting PUF2. Our results indicate that the PUF states are not necessarily sequential in the folding. The major routes predicted in our network are

  14. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  15. Phosphoprotein Phosphatase 1 Is Required for Extracellular Calcium-Induced Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong; Zeng, Qin; Pennypacker, Sally D.; Xie, Zhongjian

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular calcium is a major regulator of keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and appears to play that role in vivo, but the mechanism is unclear. We have previously demonstrated that, following calcium stimulation, PIP5K1α is recruited by the E-cadherin-β-catenin complex to the plasma membrane where it provides the substrate PIP2 for both PI3K and PLC-γ1. This signaling pathway is critical for calcium-induced generation of second messengers including IP3 and intracellular calcium and keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the upstream regulatory mechanism by which calcium activates PIP5K1α and the role of this activation in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. We found that treatment of human keratinocytes in culture with calcium resulted in an increase in serine dephosphorylation and PIP5K1α activation. PP1 knockdown blocked extracellular calcium-induced increase in serine dephosphorylation and activity of PIP5K1α and induction of keratinocyte differentiation markers. Knockdown of PLC-γ1, the downstream effector of PIP5K1α, blocked upstream dephosphorylation and PIP5K1α activation induced by calcium. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed calcium induced recruitment of PP1 to the E-cadherin-catenin-PIP5K1α complex in the plasma membrane. These results indicate that PP1 is recruited to the extracellular calcium-dependent E-cadherin-catenin-PIP5K1α complex in the plasma membrane to activate PIP5K1α, which is required for PLC-γ1 activation leading to keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27340655

  16. Phosphoprotein Phosphatase 1 Is Required for Extracellular Calcium-Induced Keratinocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Chandrama; Tang, Yuanyuan; Fan, Hong; Li, Lusha; Zeng, Qin; Pennypacker, Sally D; Bikle, Daniel D; Xie, Zhongjian

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular calcium is a major regulator of keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and appears to play that role in vivo, but the mechanism is unclear. We have previously demonstrated that, following calcium stimulation, PIP5K1α is recruited by the E-cadherin-β-catenin complex to the plasma membrane where it provides the substrate PIP2 for both PI3K and PLC-γ1. This signaling pathway is critical for calcium-induced generation of second messengers including IP3 and intracellular calcium and keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the upstream regulatory mechanism by which calcium activates PIP5K1α and the role of this activation in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. We found that treatment of human keratinocytes in culture with calcium resulted in an increase in serine dephosphorylation and PIP5K1α activation. PP1 knockdown blocked extracellular calcium-induced increase in serine dephosphorylation and activity of PIP5K1α and induction of keratinocyte differentiation markers. Knockdown of PLC-γ1, the downstream effector of PIP5K1α, blocked upstream dephosphorylation and PIP5K1α activation induced by calcium. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed calcium induced recruitment of PP1 to the E-cadherin-catenin-PIP5K1α complex in the plasma membrane. These results indicate that PP1 is recruited to the extracellular calcium-dependent E-cadherin-catenin-PIP5K1α complex in the plasma membrane to activate PIP5K1α, which is required for PLC-γ1 activation leading to keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27340655

  17. To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2016-04-01

    The conformation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) has a profound impact in opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) in the inner membrane. Fixing the ANT in 'c' conformation by phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside as well as the interaction of 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) with mitochondrial thiols markedly attenuated the ability of ADP to inhibit the MPTP opening. We earlier found (Korotkov and Saris, 2011) that calcium load of rat liver mitochondria in medium containing TlNO3 and KNO3 stimulated the Tl(+)-induced MPTP opening in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The MPTP opening as well as followed increase in swelling, a drop in membrane potential (ΔΨmito), and a decrease in state 3, state 4, and 2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled respiration were visibly enhanced in the presence of PAO, tBHP, DIDS, and carboxyatractyloside. However, these effects were markedly inhibited by ADP and membrane-penetrant hydrophobic thiol reagent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) which fix the ANT in 'm' conformation. Cyclosporine A additionally potentiated these effects of ADP and NEM. Our data suggest that conformational changes of the ANT may be directly involved in the opening of the Tl(+)-induced MPTP in the inner membrane of Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria. Using the Tl(+)-induced MPTP model is discussed in terms finding new transition pore inhibitors and inducers among different chemical and natural compounds. PMID:26835787

  18. Tight conformational coupling between the domains of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin CfaE regulates binding state transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE. PMID:23393133

  19. Tight Conformational Coupling between the Domains of the Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Fimbrial Adhesin CfaE Regulates Binding State Transition*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE. PMID:23393133

  20. Anatomy of a conformational transition of beta-strand 6 in soybean beta-amylase caused by substrate (or inhibitor) binding to the catalytical site.

    PubMed Central

    Pujadas, G.; Palau, J.

    1997-01-01

    A computational study of the five soybean beta-amylase X-ray structure reported so far revealed a peculiar conformational transition after substrate (or inhibitor) binding, which affects a segment of the beta-strand 6 (residues 341-343) in the (beta/alpha)8 molecular scaffold. Backbone distortions that involve considerable changes in the phi and psi angles were observed, as well as two sharp rotamer transitions for the Thr342 and Cys343 side chains. These changes caused the outermost CA-layer (at the C-terminal side of the barrel), which is involved in the catalysis, to shrink. Our observations strongly suggest that the 341FTC343 residue conformations in the free enzyme are not optimal for protein stability. Furthermore, as a result of conformational transitions in the ligand-binding process, there is a negative enthalpy change for these residues (-27 and -34 kcal/mol, after substrate or inhibitor binding, respectively). These findings support the proposed "stability-function" hypothesis for proteins that recognize a ligand (Shoichet BK, Baase WA, Kuroki R, Matthews BW. 1995. A relationship between protein stability and protein function. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 92:452-456). They are also in good agreement with other experimental results in the literature that describe the role of the 341-343 segment in beta-amylase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis focused on these residues could be useful for undertaking functional studies of beta-amylase. PMID:9385643

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Escherichia coli HPPK apo-enzyme reveal a network of conformational transitions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kaifu; He, Hongqing; Yang, Minghui; Yan, Honggao

    2015-11-10

    6-Hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (HPPK) catalyzes the first reaction in the folate biosynthetic pathway. Comparison of its X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance structures suggests that the enzyme undergoes significant conformational change upon binding to its substrates, especially in three catalytic loops. Experimental research has shown that even when confined by crystal contacts, loops 2 and 3 remain rather flexible when the enzyme is in its apo form, raising questions about the putative large-scale induced-fit conformational change of HPPK. To investigate the loop dynamics in a crystal-free environment, we performed conventional molecular dynamics simulations of the apo-enzyme at two different temperatures (300 and 350 K). Our simulations show that the crystallographic B-factors considerably underestimate the loop dynamics; multiple conformations of loops 2 and 3, including the open, semi-open, and closed conformations that an enzyme must adopt throughout its catalytic cycle, are all accessible to the apo-enzyme. These results revise our previous view of the functional mechanism of conformational change upon MgATP binding and offer valuable structural insights into the workings of HPPK. In this paper, conformational network analysis and principal component analysis related to the loops are discussed to support the presented conclusions. PMID:26492157

  2. The Highly Conserved Layer-3 Component of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Critical for CD4-Required Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Désormeaux, Anik; Coutu, Mathieu; Medjahed, Halima; Pacheco, Beatriz; Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Mao, Youdong; Sodroski, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mediates virus entry into host cells. CD4 engagement with the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein subunit represents the first step during HIV-1 entry. CD4-induced conformational changes in the gp120 inner domain involve three potentially flexible topological layers (layers 1, 2, and 3). Structural rearrangements between layer 1 and layer 2 have been shown to facilitate the transition of the envelope glycoprotein trimer from the unliganded to the CD4-bound state and to stabilize gp120-CD4 interaction. However, our understanding of CD4-induced conformational changes in the gp120 inner domain remains incomplete. Here, we report that a highly conserved element of the gp120 inner domain, layer 3, plays a pivot-like role in these allosteric changes. In the unliganded state, layer 3 modulates the association of gp120 with the Env trimer, probably by influencing the relationship of the gp120 inner and outer domains. Importantly, layer 3 governs the efficiency of the initial gp120 interaction with CD4, a function that can also be fulfilled by filling the Phe43 cavity. This work defines the functional importance of layer 3 and completes a picture detailing the role of the gp120 inner domain in CD4-induced conformational transitions in the HIV-1 Env trimer. PMID:23255784

  3. Substrate-induced conformational transition in human phenylalanine hydroxylase as studied by surface plasmon resonance analyses: the effect of terminal deletions, substrate analogues and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stokka, Anne J; Flatmark, Torgeir

    2003-01-01

    The optical biosensor technique, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon, was used for real-time measurements of the slow conformational transition (isomerization) which occurs in human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH) on the binding/dissociation of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe). The binding to immobilized tetrameric wt-hPAH resulted in a time-dependent increase in the refractive index (up to approx. 3 min at 25 degrees C) with an end point of approx. 75 RU (resonance units)/(pmol subunit/mm(2)). By contrast, the contribution of binding the substrate (165 Da) to its catalytic core enzyme [DeltaN(1-102)/DeltaC(428-452)-hPAH] was only approx. 2 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)). The binding isotherm for tetrameric and dimeric wt-hPAH revealed a [S](0.5)-value of 98+/-7 microM (h =1.0) and 158+/-11 microM, respectively, i.e. for the tetramer it is slightly lower than the value (145+/-5 microM) obtained for the co-operative binding (h =1.6+/-0.4) of L-Phe as measured by the change in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The responses obtained by SPR and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence are both considered to be related to the slow reversible conformational transition which occurs in the enzyme upon L-Phe binding, i.e. by the transition from a low-activity state ('T-state') to a relaxed high-activity state ('R-state') characteristic of this hysteretic enzyme, however, the two methods reflect different elements of the transition. Studies on the N- and C-terminal truncated forms revealed that the N-terminal regulatory domain (residues 1-117) plus catalytic domain (residues 118-411) were required for the full signal amplitude of the SPR response. Both the on- and off-rates for the conformational transition were biphasic, which is interpreted in terms of a difference in the energy barrier and the rate by which the two domains (catalytic and regulatory) undergo a conformational change. The substrate analogue 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine revealed an SPR response comparable with

  4. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier.

    PubMed

    Harborne, Steven P D; Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  5. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P.D.; Ruprecht, Jonathan J.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  6. Conformational transitions and stop-and-go nanopore transport of single-stranded DNA on charged graphene.

    PubMed

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2014-01-01

    Control over interactions with biomolecules holds the key to applications of graphene in biotechnology. One such application is nanopore sequencing, where a DNA molecule is electrophoretically driven through a graphene nanopore. Here we investigate how interactions of single-stranded DNA and a graphene membrane can be controlled by electrically biasing the membrane. The results of our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that electric charge on graphene can force a DNA homopolymer to adopt a range of strikingly different conformations. The conformational response is sensitive to even very subtle nucleotide modifications, such as DNA methylation. The speed of DNA motion through a graphene nanopore is strongly affected by the graphene charge: a positive charge accelerates the motion, whereas a negative charge arrests it. As a possible application of the effect, we demonstrate stop-and-go transport of DNA controlled by the charge of graphene. Such on-demand transport of DNA is essential for realizing nanopore sequencing. PMID:25296960

  7. Conformational transitions and stop-and-go nanopore transport of single-stranded DNA on charged graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankla, Manish; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2014-10-01

    Control over interactions with biomolecules holds the key to applications of graphene in biotechnology. One such application is nanopore sequencing, where a DNA molecule is electrophoretically driven through a graphene nanopore. Here we investigate how interactions of single-stranded DNA and a graphene membrane can be controlled by electrically biasing the membrane. The results of our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that electric charge on graphene can force a DNA homopolymer to adopt a range of strikingly different conformations. The conformational response is sensitive to even very subtle nucleotide modifications, such as DNA methylation. The speed of DNA motion through a graphene nanopore is strongly affected by the graphene charge: a positive charge accelerates the motion, whereas a negative charge arrests it. As a possible application of the effect, we demonstrate stop-and-go transport of DNA controlled by the charge of graphene. Such on-demand transport of DNA is essential for realizing nanopore sequencing.

  8. A conformational transition in the structure of a 2'-thiomethyl-modified DNA visualized at high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Li, Feng; Eoff, Robert L.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Egli, Martin

    2009-06-17

    Crystal structures of A-form and B-form DNA duplexes containing 2'-S-methyl-uridines reveal that the modified residues adopt a RNA-like C3'-endo pucker, illustrating that the replacement of electronegative oxygen at the 2'-carbon of RNA by sulfur does not appear to fundamentally alter the conformational preference of the sugar in the oligonucleotide context and sterics trump stereoelectronics.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of conformational transitions in oligonucleotide complexes in presence of Na(+) and Mg(2+) ions, using "staggering zipper" model.

    PubMed

    Blagoi, Yurii; Zozulya, Victor; Egupov, Sergey; Onishchenko, Vladimir; Gladchenko, Galina

    2007-05-01

    Curves of transitions in double (2-->1 transition) and triple (3-->2 transition) complexes of oligonucleotides dA(N1)with dT(N2) in solutions with Na(+) and Mg(2+) are calculated for the case of oligomer lengths from 10 to 500 nucleotides in the wide range of ion concentrations. The calculated curves of transitions and their differential analogs reflect rather exactly the position and form of experimental curves and describe dependences of transition temperatures on the length of molecules, their concentration, and ionic conditions. Values of the nucleation parameter beta for the systems studied are determined by comparison of the calculated and experimental data obtained in a number of works. The average beta value equal to 10(-3) l/mole is in an agreement with values reported for similar systems earlier. It is shown that disordering of duplex and triplex ends ("end fraying") has an essential influence on the form of melting curves, their asymmetry and the increase of the transition interval. PMID:17309076

  10. Calcium-induced associations of the caseins: a thermodynamic linkage approach to precipitation and resolubilization.

    PubMed

    Farrell, H M; Kumosinski, T F; Pulaski, P; Thompson, M P

    1988-08-15

    Calcium-induced changes in protein solubility play a role in a variety of important biological processes including the deposition of bone and dentin and the secretion of milk. The phenomena of salt-induced (calcium) precipitation of proteins (salting-out), and the resolubilization of these proteins at higher salt concentrations (salting-in) have been studied and quantitated using an approach based on the concepts of Wyman's thermodynamic linkage. Salting-out has been described by a salt-binding constant, k1, the number of moles of salt bound per mole of protein, n, and S1, the fraction soluble at saturation of n; salting-in has been described by corresponding constants k2, m, and S2. Analysis of salt-induced solubility profiles was performed using nonlinear regression analysis. Results of calcium-induced solubility profiles of two genetic variants of alpha s1-casein (alpha s1-A), (alpha s1-B), and beta-casein C (beta-C) at 37 degrees C, where hydrophobic interactions are maximized, showed no salting-in behavior and for salting-out, yielded k1 values of 157, 186, and 156 liters.mol-1 and n values of 8, 8, and 4, respectively. The values of k1 can be correlated with the apparent association constant for calcium binding to casein, while the values of n can be correlated with the number of calcium binding sites of the respective caseins. At 1 degree C, where hydrophobic interactions are minimized, nominally only hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions can be linked to the salt-induced solubility profiles; here beta-C is totally soluble at all calcium concentrations and alpha s1-B and alpha s1-A were now found to have salting-in parameters, k2 and m, of 2.5 liters.mol-1 and 4, and 11 liters.mol-1 and 8, respectively. alpha s1-A is more readily salted-in and studies on the variation of S1 with added KCl for this protein at 1 degree C indicated that salting-in is also mainly electrostatic in nature and may result from competition between K+ and Ca2+ for binding sites

  11. Structure Analysis and Conformational Transitions of the Cell Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 in the Membrane-Bound State

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Erik; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Bürck, Jochen; Ehni, Sebastian; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K.; Afonin, Sergii; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Komarov, Igor V.; Brock, Roland; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure analysis of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (TP10) revealed an exemplary range of different conformations in the membrane-bound state. The bipartite peptide (derived N-terminally from galanin and C-terminally from mastoparan) was found to exhibit prominent characteristics of (i) amphiphilic α-helices, (ii) intrinsically disordered peptides, as well as (iii) β-pleated amyloid fibrils, and these conformational states become interconverted as a function of concentration. We used a complementary approach of solid-state 19F-NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples to characterize the structural and dynamical behaviour of TP10 in its monomeric and aggregated forms. Nine different positions in the peptide were selectively substituted with either the L- or D-enantiomer of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-bicyclopent-[1.1.1]-1-ylglycine (CF3-Bpg) as a reporter group for 19F-NMR. Using the L-epimeric analogs, a comprehensive three-dimensional structure analysis was carried out in lipid bilayers at low peptide concentration, where TP10 is monomeric. While the N-terminal region is flexible and intrinsically unstructured within the plane of the lipid bilayer, the C-terminal α-helix is embedded in the membrane with an oblique tilt angle of ∼55° and in accordance with its amphiphilic profile. Incorporation of the sterically obstructive D-CF3-Bpg reporter group into the helical region leads to a local unfolding of the membrane-bound peptide. At high concentration, these helix-destabilizing C-terminal substitutions promote aggregation into immobile β-sheets, which resemble amyloid fibrils. On the other hand, the obstructive D-CF3-Bpg substitutions can be accommodated in the flexible N-terminus of TP10 where they do not promote aggregation at high concentration. The cross-talk between the two regions of TP10 thus exerts a delicate balance on its conformational switch, as the presence of the α-helix counteracts the tendency of the unfolded N

  12. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Korotkov, Sergey M.

    2016-01-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) ‘c’ conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca2+-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25–75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca2+. The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca2+ alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca2+-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in ‘m’ conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript “To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl+-induced permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria” (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  13. Specificity Rendering ‘Hot-Spots’ for Aurora Kinase Inhibitor Design: The Role of Non-Covalent Interactions and Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the conformational transitions occurring among the major structural motifs of Aurora kinase (AK) concomitant with the DFG-flip and deciphers the role of non-covalent interactions in rendering specificity. Multiple sequence alignment, docking and structural analysis of a repertoire of 56 crystal structures of AK from Protein Data Bank (PDB) has been carried out. The crystal structures were systematically categorized based on the conformational disposition of the DFG-loop [in (DI) 42, out (DO) 5 and out-up (DOU) 9], G-loop [extended (GE) 53 and folded (GF) 3] and αC-helix [in (CI) 42 and out (CO) 14]. The overlapping subsets on categorization show the inter-dependency among structural motifs. Therefore, the four distinct possibilities a) 2W1C (DI, CI, GE) b) 3E5A (DI, CI, GF) c) 3DJ6 (DI, CO, GF) d) 3UNZ (DOU, CO, GF) along with their co-crystals and apo-forms were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations of 40 ns each to evaluate the variations of individual residues and their impact on forming interactions. The non-covalent interactions formed by the 157 AK co-crystals with different regions of the binding site were initially studied with the docked complexes and structure interaction fingerprints. The frequency of the most prominent interactions was gauged in the AK inhibitors from PDB and the four representative conformations during 40 ns. Based on this study, seven major non-covalent interactions and their complementary sites in AK capable of rendering specificity have been prioritized for the design of different classes of inhibitors. PMID:25485544

  14. Data supporting the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocase conformation in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M

    2016-06-01

    There we made available information about the effects of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) 'c' conformation fixers (phenylarsine oxide (PAO), tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP), and carboxyatractyloside) as well as thiol reagent (4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS)) on isolated rat liver mitochondria. We observed a decrease in A540 (mitochondrial swelling) and respiratory control rates (RCRADP [state 3/state 4] and RCRDNP [2,4-dinitrophenol-uncoupled state/basal state or state 4]), as well as an increase in Ca(2+)-induced safranin fluorescence (F485/590, arbitrary units), showed a dissipation in the inner membrane potential (ΔΨmito), in experiments with energized rat liver mitochondria, injected into the buffer containing 25-75 mM TlNO3, 125 mM KNO3, and 100 µM Ca(2+). The fixers and DIDS, in comparison to Ca(2+) alone, greatly increased A540 decline and the rate of Ca(2+)-induced ΔΨmito dissipation. These reagents also markedly decreased RCRADP and RCRDNP. The MPTP inhibitors (ADP, cyclosporin A, bongkrekic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide) fixing the ANT in 'm' conformation significantly hindered the above-mentioned effects of the fixers and DIDS. A more complete scientific analysis of these findings may be obtained from the manuscript "To involvement the conformation of the adenine nucleotide translocase in opening the Tl(+)-induced permeability transition pore in Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria" (Korotkov et al., 2016 [1]). PMID:27054168

  15. Conformational transitions of duplex and triplex nucleic acid helices: thermodynamic analysis of effects of salt concentration on stability using preferential interaction coefficients.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. P.; Anderson, C. F.; Record, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    For order-disorder transitions of double- and triple-stranded nucleic acid helices, the midpoint temperatures Tm depend strongly on a +/-, the mean ionic activity of uniunivalent salt. Experimental determinations of dTm/d ln a +/- and of the enthalpy change (delta H(o)) accompanying the transition in excess salt permit evaluation of delta gamma, the stoichiometrically weighted combination of preferential interaction coefficients, each of which reflects thermodynamic effects of interactions of salt ions with a reactant or product of the conformational transition (formula; see text) Here delta H(o) is defined per mole of nucleotide by analogy to delta gamma. Application of Eq. 1 to experimental values of delta H(o) and Tm yields values of delta gamma for the denaturation of B-DNA over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-0.20 M (Privalov et al. (1969), Biopolymers 8,559) and for each of four order-disorder transitions of poly rA.(poly rU)n, n = 1, 2 over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-1.0 M (Krakauer and Sturtevant (1968), Biopolymers 6, 491). For denaturation of duplexes and triplexes, delta gamma is negative and not significantly dependent on a +/-, but delta gamma is positive and dependent on a +/- for the disproportionation transition of poly rA.poly rU duplexes. Quantitative interpretations of these trends and magnitudes of delta gamma in terms of coulombic and excluded volume effects are obtained by fitting separately each of the two sets of thermodynamic data using Eq. 1 with delta gamma PB evaluated from the cylindrically symmetric Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for a standard model of salt-polyelectrolyte solutions. The only structural parameters required by this model are: b, the mean axial distance between the projections of adjacent polyion charges onto the cylindrical axis; and a, the mean distance of closest approach between a salt ion center and the cylindrical axis. Fixing bMS and aMS for the multi-stranded (ordered) conformations, we

  16. Distinct docking and stabilization steps of the pseudopilus conformational transition path suggest rotational assembly of type IV pilus-like fibers

    PubMed Central

    Nivaskumar, Mangayarkarasi; Bouvier, Guillaume; Campos, Manuel; Nadeau, Nathalie; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H.; Nilges, Michael; Francetic, Olivera

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The closely related bacterial type II secretion (T2S) and type IV pilus (T4P) systems are sophisticated machines that assemble dynamic fibers promoting protein transport, motility or adhesion. Despite their essential role in virulence, the molecular mechanisms underlying helical fiber assembly remain unknown. Here we use electron microscopy and flexible modeling to study conformational changes of PulG pili assembled by the Klebsiella oxytoca T2SS. Neural network analysis of 3900 pilus models suggested a transition path towards low-energy conformations driven by progressive increase in fiber helical twist. Detailed predictions of inter-protomer contacts along this path were tested by site-directed mutagenesis, pilus assembly and protein secretion analyses. We demonstrate that electrostatic interactions between adjacent protomers (P-P+1) in the membrane drive pseudopilin docking, while P-P+3 and P-P+4 contacts determine downstream fiber stabilization steps. These results support a new model of a spool-like assembly mechanism for fibers of the T2SS-T4P superfamily. PMID:24685147

  17. Distinct docking and stabilization steps of the Pseudopilus conformational transition path suggest rotational assembly of type IV pilus-like fibers.

    PubMed

    Nivaskumar, Mangayarkarasi; Bouvier, Guillaume; Campos, Manuel; Nadeau, Nathalie; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H; Nilges, Michael; Francetic, Olivera

    2014-05-01

    The closely related bacterial type II secretion (T2S) and type IV pilus (T4P) systems are sophisticated machines that assemble dynamic fibers promoting protein transport, motility, or adhesion. Despite their essential role in virulence, the molecular mechanisms underlying helical fiber assembly remain unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy and flexible modeling to study conformational changes of PulG pili assembled by the Klebsiella oxytoca T2SS. Neural network analysis of 3,900 pilus models suggested a transition path toward low-energy conformations driven by progressive increase in fiber helical twist. Detailed predictions of interprotomer contacts along this path were tested by site-directed mutagenesis, pilus assembly, and protein secretion analyses. We demonstrate that electrostatic interactions between adjacent protomers (P-P+1) in the membrane drive pseudopilin docking, while P-P+3 and P-P+4 contacts determine downstream fiber stabilization steps. These results support a model of a spool-like assembly mechanism for fibers of the T2SS-T4P superfamily. PMID:24685147

  18. pH Induced Conformational Transitions in the Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein (TGFβIp) Associated Corneal Dystrophy Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Elavazhagan; Venkatraman, Anandalakshmi; Lei, Zhou; Mouvet, Victoria; Rui Yi Lim, Rayne; Muruganantham, Nandhakumar; Goh, Eunice; Swee Lim Peh, Gary; Beuerman, Roger W.; Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Most stromal corneal dystrophies are associated with aggregation and deposition of the mutated transforming growth factor-β induced protein (TGFβIp). The 4th_FAS1 domain of TGFβIp harbors ~80% of the mutations that forms amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic aggregates. To understand the mechanism of aggregation and the differences between the amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic phenotypes, we expressed the 4th_FAS1 domains of TGFβIp carrying the mutations R555W (non-amyloidogenic) and H572R (amyloidogenic) along with the wild-type (WT). R555W was more susceptible to acidic pH compared to H572R and displayed varying chemical stabilities with decreasing pH. Thermal denaturation studies at acidic pH showed that while WT did not undergo any conformational transition, the mutants exhibited a clear pH-dependent irreversible conversion from αβ conformation to β-sheet oligomers. The β-oligomers of both mutants were stable at physiological temperature and pH. Electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies showed that β-oligomers of H572R were larger compared to R555W. The β-oligomers of both mutants were cytotoxic to primary human corneal stromal fibroblast (pHCSF) cells. The β-oligomers of both mutants exhibit variations in their morphologies, sizes, thermal and chemical stabilities, aggregation patterns and cytotoxicities. PMID:27030015

  19. Structural Exploration and Conformational Transitions in MDM2 upon DHFR Interaction from Homo sapiens: A Computational Outlook for Malignancy via Epigenetic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-01-01

    Structural basis for exploration into MDM2 and MDM2-DHFR interaction plays a vital role in analyzing the obstruction in folate metabolism, nonsynthesis of purines, and further epigenetic regulation in Homo sapiens. Therefore, it leads to suppression of normal cellular behavior and malignancy. This has been earlier documented via yeast two-hybrid assays. So, with a novel outlook, this study explores the molecular level demonstration of the best satisfactory MDM2 model selection after performing manifold modeling techniques. Z-scores and other stereochemical features were estimated for comparison. Further, protein-protein docking was executed with MDM2 and the experimentally validated X-ray crystallographic DHFR. Residual disclosure from the best suited simulated protein complex disclosed 18 side chain and 3 ionic interactions to strongly accommodate MDM2 protein into the pocket-like zone in DHFR due to the positive environment by charged residues. Lysine residues from MDM2 played a predominant role. Moreover, evaluation from varied energy calculations, folding rate, and net area for solvent accessibility implied the active participation of MDM2 with DHFR. Fascinatingly, conformational transitions from coils to helices and β-sheets after interaction with DHFR affirm the conformational strength and firmer interaction of human MDM2-DHFR. Therefore, this probe instigates near-future clinical research and interactive computational investigations with mutations. PMID:27213086

  20. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a bacterial type IV pilus reveal characteristics of an experimentally-observed, force-induced conformational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Joseph; Biais, Nicolas; Tama, Florence

    2011-10-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are long, filamentous structures that emanate from the cellular surface of many infectious bacteria. They are built from a 158 amino acid long subunit called pilin. T4P can grow to many micrometers in length, and can withstand large tension forces. During the infection process, pili attach themselves to host cells, and therefore naturally find themselves under tension. We investigated the response of a T4 pilus to a pulling force using the method of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation. Our simulations expose to the external environment an amino acid sequence initially hidden in the native filament, in agreement with experimental data. Therefore, our simulations might be probing the initial stage of the transition to a force-induced conformation of the T4 pilus. Additional exposed amino acid sequences that might be useful targets for drugs designed to mitigate bacterial infection were also predicted.

  1. Phase Transitions of PYR14-TFSI as a Function of Pressure and Temperature: the Competition between Smaller Volume and Lower Energy Conformer.

    PubMed

    Capitani, F; Trequattrini, F; Palumbo, O; Paolone, A; Postorino, P

    2016-03-24

    A detailed Raman study has been carried out on the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR14-TFSI) over a wide pressure (0-8 GPa) and temperature (100-300 K) range. The explored thermodynamic region allowed us to study the evolution of the system across different solid and liquid phases. Calculated Raman spectra remarkably helped in the spectral data analysis. In particular, the pressure behavior of the most intense Raman peak and the shape analysis of the ruby fluorescence (used as a local pressure gauge) allowed us to identify a liquid-solid transition around 2.2 GPa at T = 300 K. The low-frequency Raman signal as well as the absence of remarkable spectral shape modifications on crossing the above threshold and the comparison with the spectra of the crystalline phase suggest a glassy nature of the high-pressure phase. A detailed analysis of the pressure dependence of the relative concentration of two conformers of TFSI allowed us to obtain an estimate of the volume variation between trans-TFSI and the smaller cis-TFSI, which is the favored configuration on applying the pressure. Finally, the combined use of both visual inspection and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the peculiar sequence of phase transitions observed as a function of temperature at ambient pressure and the different spectral/morphological characteristics of the two crystalline phases. PMID:26937556

  2. Fibrillar morphology of derivatives of poly(3-alkylthiophene)s by solvent vapor annealing: effects of conformational transition and conjugate length.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyang; Liu, Jiangang; Xu, Yaozhuo; Han, Yanchun

    2013-05-16

    A fibrillar morphology was obtained, compared to the featherless pristine films, via solvent annealing the films of a series of derivatives of poly(3-alkylthiophene)s (P3ATs): poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (P3DDT), poly(3,3'''-didodecyl-quaterthiophene) (PQT12), and poly(2,5-bis(3-dodecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (pBTTT12). Among the solvents used, including dichloromethane, chloroform, tetrahydrofuran, and carbon disulfide (CS2), CS2 was the best to induce fibril formation because its solubility parameter is closest to those of the P3AT derivatives. It was found that higher critical CS2 vapor pressures were needed to form crystal nuclei with increasing conjugation length and molecular weight of the P3AT derivatives; i.e., the critical vapor pressures for P3DDT 13.9k and PQT12 15.5k were 59.0% and 80.7%, respectively, and there were no nuclei of fibrils for pBTTT12 15.6k with the highest conjugation length, even at a CS2 vapor pressure of 98.3%. Meanwhile, at the highest vapor pressure, the fibril density decreased with increasing conjugation length and molecular weight of the P3AT derivatives. This is attributed to the rod-like conformation prevailing for polymers with larger conjugation length and higher molecular weight during solvent annealing, making the conformational transition toward coils more difficult and hindering diffusion of molecules. The results presented here are expected to be helpful for the design and processing of conjugated semiconductor polymers. PMID:23590386

  3. Structural basis of conformational transitions in the active site and 80′s loop in the FK506-binding protein FKBP12

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hongmin; Lemaster, David M.; Hernández, Griselda

    2014-01-01

    The extensive set of NMR doublings exhibited by the immunophilin FKBP12 (FK506-binding protein 12) arose from a slow transition to the cis-peptide configuration at Gly89 near the tip of the 80′s loop, the site for numerous protein-recognition interactions for both FKBP12 and other FKBP domain proteins. The 80′s loop also exhibited linebroadening, indicative of microsecond to millisecond conformational dynamics, but only in the trans-peptide state. The G89A variant shifted the trans–cis peptide equilibrium from 88:12 to 33:67, whereas a proline residue substitution induced fully the cis-peptide configuration. The 80′s loop conformation in the G89P crystal structure at 1.50 Å resolution differed from wild-type FKBP12 primarily at residues 88, 89 and 90, and it closely resembled that reported for FKBP52. Structure-based chemical-shift predictions indicated that the microsecond to millisecond dynamics in the 80′s loop probably arose from a concerted main chain (ψ88 and ϕ89) torsion angle transition. The indole side chain of Trp59 at the base of the active-site cleft was reoriented ~90o and the adjacent backbone was shifted in the G89P crystal structure. NOE analysis of wild-type FKBP12 demonstrated that this indole populates the perpendicular orientation at 20%. The 15N relaxation analysis was consistent with the indole reorientation occurring in the nanosecond timeframe. Recollection of the G89P crystal data at 1.20 Å resolution revealed a weaker wild-type-like orientation for the indole ring. Differences in the residues that underlie the Trp59 indole ring and altered interactions linking the 50′s loop to the active site suggested that reorientation of this ring may be disfavoured in the other six members of the FKBP domain family that bear this active-site tryptophan residue. PMID:24405377

  4. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  5. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  6. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment. PMID:27209386

  7. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  8. Coupling of Conformational Transitions in the N-terminal Domain of the 51-kDa FK506-binding Protein (FKBP51) Near Its Site of Interaction with the Steroid Receptor Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    LeMaster, David M.; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Brecher, Matthew; Zhang, Jing; Héroux, Annie; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2015-01-01

    Interchanging Leu-119 for Pro-119 at the tip of the β4-β5 loop in the first FK506 binding domain (FK1) of the FKBP51 and FKBP52 proteins, respectively, has been reported to largely reverse the inhibitory (FKBP51) or stimulatory (FKBP52) effects of these co-chaperones on the transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid and androgen receptor-protein complexes. Previous NMR relaxation studies have identified exchange line broadening, indicative of submillisecond conformational motion, throughout the β4-β5 loop in the FK1 domain of FKBP51, which are suppressed by the FKBP52-like L119P substitution. This substitution also attenuates exchange line broadening in the underlying β2 and β3a strands that is centered near a bifurcated main chain hydrogen bond interaction between these two strands. The present study demonstrates that these exchange line broadening effects arise from two distinct coupled conformational transitions, and the transition within the β2 and β3a strands samples a transient conformation that resembles the crystal structures of the selectively inhibited FK1 domain of FKBP51 recently reported. Although the crystal structures for their series of inhibitors were interpreted as evidence for an induced fit mechanism of association, the presence of a similar conformation being significantly populated in the unliganded FKBP51 domain is more consistent with a conformational selection binding process. The contrastingly reduced conformational plasticity of the corresponding FK1 domain of FKBP52 is consistent with the current model in which FKBP51 binds to both the apo- and hormone-bound forms of the steroid receptor to modulate its affinity for ligand, whereas FKBP52 binds selectively to the latter state. PMID:25953903

  9. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify keratinocyte differentiation, we performed western blots using a specific antibody for involucrin, which is a precursor protein of the keratinocyte cornified envelope and a marker for keratinocyte terminal differentiation. We also performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We examined whether LDR induces changes in involucrin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Results Exposure of HaCaT cells to LDR (0.1 Gy) induced p21 expression. p21 is a key regulator that induces growth arrest and represses stemness, which accelerates keratinocyte differentiation. We correlated involucrin expression with keratinocyte differentiation, and examined the effects of LDR on involucrin levels and keratinocyte development. LDR significantly increased involucrin mRNA and protein levels during calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. Conclusion These studies provide new evidence for the biological role of LDR, and identify the potential to utilize LDR to regulate or induce keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27489424

  10. The Transition from Closed to Open Conformation of Treponema pallidum Outer Membrane-associated Lipoprotein TP0453 Involves Membrane Sensing and Integration by Two Amphipathic Helices*

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Zhu, Guangyu; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Eggers, Christian H.; Mulay, Vishwaroop; Anand, Arvind; McArthur, Fiona A.; Romano, Fabian B.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Heuck, Alejandro P.; Malkowski, Michael G.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular architecture and composition of the outer membrane (OM) of Treponema pallidum (Tp), the noncultivable agent of venereal syphilis, differ considerably from those of typical Gram-negative bacteria. Several years ago we described TP0453, the only lipoprotein associated with the inner leaflet of the Tp OM. Whereas polypeptides of other treponemal lipoproteins are hydrophilic, non-lipidated TP0453 can integrate into membranes, a property attributed to its multiple amphipathic helices (AHs). Furthermore, membrane integration of the TP0453 polypeptide was found to increase membrane permeability, suggesting the molecule functions in a porin-like manner. To better understand the mechanism of membrane integration of TP0453 and its physiological role in Tp OM biogenesis, we solved its crystal structure and used mutagenesis to identify membrane insertion elements. The crystal structure of TP0453 consists of an α/β/α-fold and includes five stably folded AHs. In high concentrations of detergent, TP0453 transitions from a closed to open conformation by lateral movement of two groups of AHs, exposing a large hydrophobic cavity. Triton X-114 phase partitioning, liposome floatation assay, and bis-1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate binding revealed that two adjacent AHs are critical for membrane sensing/integration. Using terbium-dipicolinic acid complex-loaded large unilamellar vesicles, we found that TP0453 increased efflux of fluorophore only at acidic pH. Gel filtration and cross-linking experiments demonstrated that one AH critical for membrane sensing/insertion also forms a dimeric interface. Based on structural dynamics and comparison with Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins LprG and LppX, we propose that TP0453 functions as a carrier of lipids, glycolipids, and/or derivatives during OM biogenesis. PMID:21965687

  11. Accounting for conformational flexibility and torsional anharmonicity in the H + CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH hydrogen abstraction reactions: A multi-path variational transition state theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2014-05-07

    This work reports a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from ethanol by atomic hydrogen. The calculated thermal rate constants take into account torsional anharmonicity and conformational flexibility, in addition to the variational and tunneling effects. Specifically, the kinetics calculations were performed by using multi-path canonical variational transition state theory with least-action path tunneling corrections, to which we have added the two-dimensional non-separable method to take into account torsional anharmonicity. The multi-path thermal rate constant is expressed as a sum over conformational reaction channels. Each of these channels includes all the transition states that can be reached by internal rotations. The results show that, in the interval of temperatures between 250 and 2500 K, the account for multiple paths leads to higher thermal rate constants with respect to the single path approach, mainly at low and at high temperatures. In addition, torsional anharmonicity enhances the slope of the Arrhenius plot in this range of temperatures. Finally, we show that the incorporation of tunneling into the hydrogen abstraction reactions substantially changes the contribution of each of the transition states to the conformational reaction channel.

  12. The conformal bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, David; Simmons-Duffin, David

    2016-06-01

    The conformal bootstrap was proposed in the 1970s as a strategy for calculating the properties of second-order phase transitions. After spectacular success elucidating two-dimensional systems, little progress was made on systems in higher dimensions until a recent renaissance beginning in 2008. We report on some of the main results and ideas from this renaissance, focusing on new determinations of critical exponents and correlation functions in the three-dimensional Ising and O(N) models.

  13. Calcium-induced alterations in mitochondrial morphology quantified in situ with optical scatter imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Boustany, Nada N; Drezek, Rebekah; Thakor, Nitish V

    2002-01-01

    Optical scatter imaging (OSI), a technique we developed recently, was used to measure the ratio of wide-to-narrow angle scatter (OSIR) within endothelial cells subjected to calcium overload (1.6 mM) after permeabilization by ionomycin. Within a few minutes of calcium overload, the mitochondria, which started as elongated organelles, rounded up into spherically shaped particles. This change in morphology was accompanied by a statistically significant 14% increase in OSIR in the cells' cytoplasm. Mitochondrial rounding and OSIR increase were suppressed by cyclosporin A (25 microM), implying that the observed geometrical and scattering changes were directly attributable to the mitochondrial permeability transition. The angular scattering properties of a long mitochondrion rounding up were approximated by numerical simulations of light scatter from an ellipsoid rounding up into a sphere. The simulations predicted a relative increase in OSIR comparable to that measured experimentally for the case where the shape transition takes place with little or no volume increase. The simulations also suggested that mitochondrial refractive index changes could not account for the OSIR changes observed. Our data show that changes in OSIR correlate with mitochondrial morphology change in situ. OSI provides a new tool for subcellular imaging and complements other microscopy methods, such as fluorescence. PMID:12202392

  14. Calcium Induced Regulation of Skeletal Troponin — Computational Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Genchev, Georgi Z.; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; Lu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between calcium and the regulatory site(s) of striated muscle regulatory protein troponin switches on and off muscle contraction. In skeletal troponin binding of calcium to sites I and II of the TnC subunit results in a set of structural changes in the troponin complex, displaces tropomyosin along the actin filament and allows myosin-actin interaction to produce mechanical force. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the calcium dependent dynamics of the fast skeletal troponin molecule and its TnC subunit in the calcium saturated and depleted states. We focused on the N-lobe and on describing the atomic level events that take place subsequent to removal of the calcium ion from the regulatory sites I and II. A main structural event - a closure of the A/B helix hydrophobic pocket results from the integrated effect of the following conformational changes: the breakage of H-bond interactions between the backbone nitrogen atoms of the residues at positions 2, 9 and sidechain oxygen atoms of the residue at position 12 (N2-OE12/N9-OE12) in sites I and II; expansion of sites I and II and increased site II N-terminal end-segment flexibility; strengthening of the β-sheet scaffold; and the subsequent re-packing of the N-lobe hydrophobic residues. Additionally, the calcium release allows the N-lobe to rotate relative to the rest of the Tn molecule. Based on the findings presented herein we propose a novel model of skeletal thin filament regulation. PMID:23554884

  15. Conformational changes in biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vassili

    2005-12-01

    Biopolymer conformational changes are involved in many biological processes. This thesis summarizes some theoretical and experimental approaches which I have taken at UCLA to explore conformational changes in biopolymers. The reversible thermal denaturation of the DNA double helix is, perhaps, the simplest example of biopolymer conformational change. I have developed a statistical mechanics model of DNA melting with reduced degrees of freedom, which allows base stacking interaction to be taken into account and treat base pairing and stacking separately. Unlike previous models, this model describes both the unpairing and unstacking parts of the experimental melting curves and explains the observed temperature dependence of the effective thermodynamic parameters used in models of the nearest neighbor type. I developed a basic kinetic model for irreversible thermal denaturation of F-actin, which incorporates depolymerization of F-actin from the ends and breaking of F-actin fiber in the middle. The model explains the cooperativity of F-actin thermal denaturation observed by D. Pavlov et al. in differential calorimetry measurements. CG-rich DNA sequences form left-handed Z-DNA at high ionic strength or upon binding of polyvalent ions and some proteins. I studied experimentally the B-to-Z transition of the (CG)6 dodecamer. Improvement of the locally linearized model used to interpret the data gives evidence for an intermediate state in the B-to-Z transition of DNA, contrary to previous research on this subject. In the past 15 years it has become possible to study the conformational changes of biomolecules using single-molecule techniques. In collaboration with other lab members I performed a single-molecule experiment, where we monitored the displacement of a micrometer-size bead tethered to a surface by a DNA probe undergoing the conformational change. This technique allows probing of conformational changes with subnanometer accuracy. We applied the method to detect

  16. Dissecting the Calcium-Induced Differentiation of Human Primary Keratinocytes Stem Cells by Integrative and Structural Network Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toufighi, Kiana; Yang, Jae-Seong; Luis, Nuno Miguel; Aznar Benitah, Salvador; Lehner, Ben; Serrano, Luis; Kiel, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The molecular details underlying the time-dependent assembly of protein complexes in cellular networks, such as those that occur during differentiation, are largely unexplored. Focusing on the calcium-induced differentiation of primary human keratinocytes as a model system for a major cellular reorganization process, we look at the expression of genes whose products are involved in manually-annotated protein complexes. Clustering analyses revealed only moderate co-expression of functionally related proteins during differentiation. However, when we looked at protein complexes, we found that the majority (55%) are composed of non-dynamic and dynamic gene products (‘di-chromatic’), 19% are non-dynamic, and 26% only dynamic. Considering three-dimensional protein structures to predict steric interactions, we found that proteins encoded by dynamic genes frequently interact with a common non-dynamic protein in a mutually exclusive fashion. This suggests that during differentiation, complex assemblies may also change through variation in the abundance of proteins that compete for binding to common proteins as found in some cases for paralogous proteins. Considering the example of the TNF-α/NFκB signaling complex, we suggest that the same core complex can guide signals into diverse context-specific outputs by addition of time specific expressed subunits, while keeping other cellular functions constant. Thus, our analysis provides evidence that complex assembly with stable core components and competition could contribute to cell differentiation. PMID:25946651

  17. Self-assembly in a near-frictionless granular material: conformational structures and transitions in uniaxial cyclic compression of hydrogel spheres.

    PubMed

    Walker, David M; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Brodu, Nicolas; Dijksman, Joshua A; Behringer, Robert P; Froyland, Gary

    2015-03-21

    We use a Markov transition matrix-based analysis to explore the structures and structural transitions in a three-dimensional assembly of hydrogel spheres under cyclic uniaxial compression. We apply these methods on experimental data obtained from a packing of nearly frictionless hydrogel balls. This allows an exploration of the emergence and evolution of mesoscale internal structures - a key micromechanical property that governs self-assembly and self-organization in dense granular media. To probe the mesoscopic force network structure, we consider two structural state spaces: (i) a particle and its contacting neighbours, and (ii) a particle's local minimal cycle topology summarized by a cycle vector. In both spaces, our analysis of the transition dynamics reveals which structures and which sets of structures are most prevalent and most likely to transform into each other during the compression/decompression of the material. In compressed states, structures rich in 3-cycle or triangle topologies form in abundance. In contrast, in uncompressed states, transitions comprising poorly connected structures are dominant. An almost-invariant transition set within the cycle vector space is discovered that identifies an intermediate set of structures crucial to the material's transition from weakly jammed to strongly jammed, and vice versa. Preferred transition pathways are also highlighted and discussed with respect to thermo-micro-mechanical constitutive formulations. PMID:25634109

  18. Protein Allostery and Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The functions of many proteins are regulated through allostery, whereby effector binding at a distal site changes the functional activity (e.g., substrate binding affinity or catalytic efficiency) at the active site. Most allosteric studies have focused on thermodynamic properties, in particular, substrate binding affinity. Changes in substrate binding affinity by allosteric effectors have generally been thought to be mediated by conformational transitions of the proteins or, alternatively, by changes in the broadness of the free energy basin of the protein conformational state without shifting the basin minimum position. When effector binding changes the free energy landscape of a protein in conformational space, the change affects not only thermodynamic properties but also dynamic properties, including the amplitudes of motions on different time scales and rates of conformational transitions. Here we assess the roles of conformational dynamics in allosteric regulation. Two cases are highlighted where NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation have been used as complementary approaches to identify residues possibly involved in allosteric communication. Perspectives on contentious issues, for example, the relationship between picosecond-nanosecond local and microsecond-millisecond conformational exchange dynamics, are presented. PMID:26876046

  19. Liquid methionine hydroxy analog (free acid) and DL-methionine attenuate calcium-induced kidney damage in domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Ford, B C; Leach, R M; Wise, D F; Robey, W W

    1993-07-01

    To evaluate the possibility that kidney damage may be induced by the commercial practice of feeding high-Ca (HCa) prelayer rations, and to evaluate the protective efficacy of supplementing HCa diets with liquid methionine hydroxy analog free acid or DL-methionine, 12-wk-old female Single Comb White Leghorn pullets were fed one of the following corn-soybean meal-based diets until they reached 22 wk of age: normal-Ca (NC, 1% Ca); HCa (HC, 3.5% Ca); HCa supplemented with .34 or .68% liquid methionine hydroxy analog free acid (HC3A or HC6A); or HCa supplemented with .3 or .6% DL-methionine (HC3DL or HC6DL). The unsupplemented HC diet caused a significant reduction in kidney mass and a significant increase in the incidence of gross kidney damage and urolithiasis in pullets necropsied at 22 wk of age. Calcium-induced kidney damage was attenuated in a dose-response fashion by supplementing the HC diet with liquid methionine hydroxy analog and DL-methionine. None of the diets caused a significant metabolic acidosis. Plasma uric acid concentrations were not predictive of the extent of Ca-induced kidney damage. Analyses of glomerular size distributions indicated that subclinical or "hidden" kidney damage may not progressively develop into urolithiasis as hens mature. When compared with hens reared on the NC diet, rearing hens on the HC, HC3A, HC3DL, HC6A, or HC6DL diets did not consistently affect hen-day egg production, egg mass, eggshell mass, percentage eggshell, or bone mineralization. PMID:8346150

  20. Vitamin D receptor is required for dietary calcium-induced repression of calbindin-D9k expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Merry J G; Cao, Li-Ping; Kong, Juan; Sitrin, Michael D; Li, Yan Chun

    2005-05-01

    Calbindin (CaBP), the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, is believed to play an important role in intracellular calcium transport. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high dietary calcium on the expression of CaBP-D9k and CaBP-D28k in the presence and absence of a functional vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment with the HCa-Lac diet containing 2% calcium, 1.5% phosphorus and 20% lactose reversed the hypocalcemia seen in adult VDR-null mice in 3 weeks but did not significantly change the blood ionized calcium in wild-type mice. This dietary treatment dramatically suppressed both the duodenal and the renal CaBP-D9k expression in wild-type mice at both mRNA and protein levels but had little effect on the expression of the same gene in VDR-null mice. Removal of this diet gradually restored the expression of CaBP-D9k to the untreated level in wild-type mice. Only moderate or little change in CaBP-D28k expression was seen in wild-type and VDR-null mice fed with the HCa-Lac diet. The VDR content in the duodenum or kidney of wild-type mice was not altered by the dietary treatment. These results suggest that calcium regulates CaBP-D9k expression by modulating the circulating 1,25-dihydrxyvitamin D(3) level and that VDR is thus required for the dietary calcium-induced suppression of CaBP-D9k expression. Calcium regulation of the CaBP-D9k level may represent an important mechanism by which animals maintain their calcium balance. PMID:15866228

  1. Combined Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings and Solution X-ray Scattering To Rapidly Probe Rigid-Body Conformational Transitions in a Non-phosphorylatable Active-Site Mutant of the 128 kDa Enzyme I Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Yuki; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Clore, G. Marius

    2012-10-23

    The first component of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, enzyme I (EI), is a multidomain 128 kDa dimer that undergoes large rigid-body conformational transitions during the course of its catalytic cycle. Here we investigate the solution structure of a non-phosphorylatable active-site mutant in which the active-site histidine is substituted by glutamine. We show that perturbations in the relative orientations and positions of the domains and subdomains can be rapidly and reliably determined by conjoined rigid-body/torsion angle/Cartesian simulated annealing calculations driven by orientational restraints from residual dipolar couplings and shape and translation information afforded by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Although histidine and glutamine are isosteric, the conformational space available to a Gln side chain is larger than that for the imidazole ring of His. An additional hydrogen bond between the side chain of Gln189 located on the EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomain and an aspartate (Asp129) on the EIN{sup {alpha}} subdomain results in a small ({approx}9{sup o}) reorientation of the EIN{sup {alpha}} and EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomains that is in turn propagated to a larger reorientation ({approx}26{sup o}) of the EIN domain relative to the EIC dimerization domain, illustrating the positional sensitivity of the EIN domain and its constituent subdomains to small structural perturbations.

  2. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: Explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    D’Abramo, Marco; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2014-04-28

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D’Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Theoretical modeling of UV-Vis absorption and emission spectra in liquid state systems including vibrational and conformational effects: explicit treatment of the vibronic transitions.

    PubMed

    D'Abramo, Marco; Aschi, Massimiliano; Amadei, Andrea

    2014-04-28

    Here, we extend a recently introduced theoretical-computational procedure [M. D'Alessandro, M. Aschi, C. Mazzuca, A. Palleschi, and A. Amadei, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114102 (2013)] to include quantum vibrational transitions in modelling electronic spectra of atomic molecular systems in condensed phase. The method is based on the combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and quantum chemical calculations within the Perturbed Matrix Method approach. The main aim of the presented approach is to reproduce as much as possible the spectral line shape which results from a subtle combination of environmental and intrinsic (chromophore) mechanical-dynamical features. As a case study, we were able to model the low energy UV-vis transitions of pyrene in liquid acetonitrile in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:24784250

  4. Conformational dynamics through an intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2014-04-01

    The self-assembly of biological and synthetic nanostructures commonly proceeds via intermediate states. In living systems in particular, the intermediates have the capacity to tilt the balance between functional and potentially fatal behavior. This work develops a statistical mechanical treatment of conformational dynamics through an intermediate under a variable force. An analytical solution is derived for the key experimentally measurable quantity—the distribution of forces at which a conformational transition occurs. The solution reveals rich kinetics over a broad range of parameters and enables one to locate the intermediate and extract the activation barriers and rate constants.

  5. Attitudinal Conformity and Anonymity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Herbert; Kaplowitz, Stan

    1977-01-01

    Tested college students for conformity when conditions contributing to conformity were absent. Found that social pressures (responding in public, being surveyed by fellow group members) are necessary to produce conformity. (RL)

  6. Intramolecular interactions in the polar headgroup of sphingosine: serinol† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Ab initio parameters for serinol conformers within 1000 cm–1, measured transition frequencies, typical a-type transition for conformer aa1, interconversion barriers and possible tunnelling pathways. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc09423b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Loru, Donatella; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular interactions in the lipid sphingosine have been elucidated through the investigation of the amino alcohol serinol which mimics its polar headgroup. Intricate networks of intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl groups and the amino group contribute to the stabilisation of five different conformations observed in the broadband rotational spectrum. PMID:26727395

  7. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  8. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  9. 40 CFR 93.104 - Frequency of conformity determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Frequency of conformity determinations..., Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws § 93.104 Frequency of conformity... implementation plan. (b) Frequency of conformity determinations for transportation plans. (1) Each...

  10. Implementation of a k/k(0) method to identify long-range structure in transition states during conformational folding/unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Lovy; Kurinov, Igor; Ealick, Steven E; Scheraga, Harold A

    2007-10-01

    A previously introduced kinetic-rate constant (k/k(0)) method, where k and k(0) are the folding (unfolding) rate constants in the mutant and the wild-type forms, respectively, of a protein, has been applied to obtain qualitative information about structure in the transition state ensemble (TSE) of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A), which contains four native disulfide bonds. The method compares the folding (unfolding) kinetics of RNase A, with and without a covalent crosslink and tests whether the crosslinked residues are associated in the folding (unfolding) transition state (TS) of the noncrosslinked version. To confirm that the fifth disulfide bond has not introduced a significant structural perturbation, we solved the crystal structure of the V43C-R85C mutant to 1.6 A resolution. Our findings suggest that residues Val43 and Arg85 are not associated, and that residues Ala4 and Val118 may form nonnative contacts, in the folding (unfolding) TSE of RNase A. PMID:17937908

  11. Implementation of a k/k0 method to identify long-range structure in transition states during conformational folding/unfolding of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Lovy; Kurinov, Igor; Ealick, Steven E.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A previously-introduced kinetic-rate constant (k/k0) method, where k and k0 are the folding (unfolding) rate constants in the mutant and the wild-type forms, respectively, of a protein, has been applied to obtain qualitative information about structure in the transition state (TS) ensemble of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) which contains four native disulfide bonds. The method compares the folding (unfolding) kinetics of two versions of RNase A, with and without a covalent crosslink (in the form of a fifth disulfide bond); the method tests whether the crosslinked residues are associated in the folding (unfolding) transition state of the non-crosslinked version. To confirm that the fifth disulfide bond has not introduced a significant structural perturbation, we solved the crystal structure of the V43C-R85C mutant to 1.6 Å resolution. Our findings suggest that residues Val 43 and Arg 85 are not associated in the folding (unfolding) TS ensemble of RNase A, and also that Ala 4 and Val 118 may form non-native contacts in the folding (unfolding) TS ensemble. PMID:17937908

  12. Binding, Conformational Transition and Dimerization of Amyloid-β Peptide on GM1-Containing Ternary Membrane: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Moutusi; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2013-01-01

    Interactions of amyloid-β (Aβ) with neuronal membrane are associated with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Ganglioside GM1 has been shown to promote the structural conversion of Aβ and increase the rate of peptide aggregation; but the exact nature of interaction driving theses processes remains to be explored. In this work, we have carried out atomistic-scale computer simulations (totaling 2.65 µs) to investigate the behavior of Aβ monomer and dimers in GM1-containing raft-like membrane. The oligosaccharide head-group of GM1 was observed to act as scaffold for Aβ-binding through sugar-specific interactions. Starting from the initial helical peptide conformation, a β-hairpin motif was formed at the C-terminus of the GM1-bound Aβ-monomer; that didn’t appear in absence of GM1 (both in fluid POPC and liquid-ordered cholesterol/POPC bilayers and also in aqueous medium) within the simulation time span. For Aβ-dimers, the β-structure was further enhanced by peptide-peptide interactions, which might influence the propensity of Aβ to aggregate into higher-ordered structures. The salt-bridges and inter-peptide hydrogen bonds were found to account for dimer stability. We observed spontaneous formation of intra-peptide D23-K28 salt-bridge and a turn at V24GSN27 region - long been accepted as characteristic structural-motifs for amyloid self-assembly. Altogether, our results provide atomistic details of Aβ-GM1 and Aβ-Aβ interactions and demonstrate their importance in the early-stages of GM1-mediated Aβ-oligomerisation on membrane surface. PMID:23951128

  13. Holographic multiverse and conformal invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2009-11-01

    We consider a holographic description of the inflationary multiverse, according to which the wave function of the universe is interpreted as the generating functional for a lower dimensional Euclidean theory. We analyze a simple model where transitions between inflationary vacua occur through bubble nucleation, and the inflating part of spacetime consists of de Sitter regions separated by thin bubble walls. In this model, we present some evidence that the dual theory is conformally invariant in the UV.

  14. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction. PMID:22023717

  15. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity.

    PubMed

    Saldaño, Tadeo E; Monzon, Alexander M; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  16. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  17. Conformational Interconversions of Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Jensen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Exhaustive conformational interconversions including transition structure analyses of N-acetyl-l-glycine-N-methylamide as well as its alanine, serine, and cysteine analogues have been investigated at the MP2/6-31G** level, yielding a total of 142 transition states. Improved estimates of relative energies were obtained by separately extrapolating the Hartree-Fock and MP2 energies to the basis set limit and adding the difference between CCSD(T) and MP2 results with the cc-pVDZ basis set to the extrapolated MP2 results. The performance of eight empirical force fields (AMBER94, AMBER14SB, MM2, MM3, MMFFs, CHARMM22_CMAP, OPLS_2005, and AMOEBAPRO13) in reproducing ab initio energies of transition states was tested. Our results indicate that commonly used class I force fields employing a fixed partial charge model for the electrostatic interaction provide mean errors in the ∼10 kJ/mol range for energies of conformational transition states for amino acid conformers. Modern reparametrized versions, such as CHARMM22_CMAP, and polarizable force fields, such as AMOEBAPRO13, have slightly lower mean errors, but maximal errors are still in the 35 kJ/mol range. There are differences between the force fields in their ability for reproducing conformational transitions classified according to backbone/side-chain or regions in the Ramachandran angles, but the data set is likely too small to draw any general conclusions. Errors in conformational interconversion barriers by ∼10 kJ/mol suggest that the commonly used force field may bias certain types of transitions by several orders of magnitude in rate and thus lead to incorrect dynamics in simulations. It is therefore suggested that information for conformational transition states should be included in parametrizations of new force fields. PMID:26691979

  18. Fake conformal symmetry in conformal cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, R.; Pi, So-Young

    2015-03-01

    We examine the local conformal invariance (Weyl invariance) in tensor-scalar theories used in recently proposed conformal cosmological models. We show that the Noether currents associated with Weyl invariance in these theories vanish. We assert that the corresponding Weyl symmetry does not have any dynamical role.

  19. Conformational kinetics of aliphatic tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, Alberta; Moro, Giorgio; Nordio, Pier Luigi

    The master equation describing the random walk between sites identified with the stable conformers of a chain molecule, represents the extension to the time domain of the Rotational Isomeric State model. The asymptotic analysis of the multidimensional diffusion equation in the continuous torsional variables subjected to the configurational potential, provides a rigorous justification for the discrete models, and it supplies, without resorting to phenomenological parameters, molecular definitions of the kinetic rates for the conformational transitions occurring at each segment of the chain. The coupling between the torsional variables is fully taken into account, giving rise to cooperative effects. A complete calculation of the specific correlation functions which describe the time evolution of the angular functions probed by N.M.R. and dielectric relaxation measurements, has been performed for alkyl chains attached to a massive core. The resulting behaviour has been compared with the decay of trans and gauche populations of specific bonds, expressed in terms of suitable correlation functions whose time integrals lead quite naturally to the definition of effective kinetic constants for the conformational transitions.

  20. Conformational isomerism in 1-heptanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jonathan M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Suenram, R. D.; Pate, Brooks; Douglass, Kevin

    2006-08-01

    The rotational spectrum of 1-heptanal has been recorded over the 10-22 GHz region using a pulsed-molecular-beam, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The spectrum has been analyzed using the jb95 spectral analysis program. The spectra of 13 conformational isomers have been identified and assigned in the rich soup of observed transitions. Transitions of these isomers have relative intensities that are well above the intensity level of the onset of 13C isotopomers, which are a factor of 100 down in intensity. In addition to the above 13 isomers, two additional spectra were identified and assigned that belong to dimers that consist of 1-heptanal and one water molecule. In order to map the observed spectra to conformational geometries, high-level ab initio calculations have been carried out. All 15 observed conformers have been associated with ab initio determined structure configurations. In general, the agreement in rotational constants and dipole intensity pattern between the ab initio results and the experimentally observed spectra is quite good.

  1. Conformational Isomerism in 1-Heptanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jonathan M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Suemran, R. D.; Pate, Brooks; Douglass, Kevin

    2006-03-01

    The rotational spectrum of 1-heptanal has been recorded over the 10 GHz to 22 GHz region using a pulsed-molecular-beam, Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The spectrum has been analyzed using the jb95 spectral analysis program. The spectra of thirteen conformational isomers have been identified and assigned in the rich soup of observed transitions. Transitions of these isomers have relative intensities that are well above the intensity level of the onset of ^13C isotopomers, which are a factor of 100 down in intensity. In addition to the above 13 isomers, two additional spectra were identified and assigned that belong to dimers that consist of 1-heptanal and one water molecule. In order to map the observed spectra to conformational geometries, high-level ab initio calculations have been carried out. All fifteen observed conformers have been associated with ab initio determined structure configurations. In general, the agreement in rotational constants and dipole intensity pattern between the ab initio results and the experimentally observed spectra is quite good.

  2. Conformational Transformations in Aromatic Nitroso Oxides.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, Alfia R; Safiullin, Rustam L; Khursan, Sergey L

    2016-07-21

    A systematic theoretical study on conformational transformations of monosubstituted (ortho- and para-) aromatic nitroso oxides R-C6H4NOO was performed. The existence of two rotation axes enables two types of conformational transitions in substituted arylnitroso oxides: trans/cis (rotation around the N-O bond) and syn/anti (rotation around the C-N bond, which is important in ortho isomers). The complete set of conformers was localized for R-C6H4NOO using four selected density functional (M06-L, mPWPW91, OLYP, and HCTH) and augmented polarization basis set of triple splitting. It was found that the activation enthalpy of the trans-cis conformational transition is nearly insensitive to the nature of R and ranges within 58-60 kJ/mol for para isomers. The ortho substituent has an insignificant effect on ΔH(≠)trans→cis: it increases this value by ∼5 kJ/mol in syn isomers and decreases it by ∼3 kJ/mol in anti isomers. On the contrary, the syn-anti conformational barrier is considerably affected by the substituent R; an increase in the electron-withdrawing properties of R decreases ΔH(≠)syn→anti. The activation enthalpies grow with increasing polarity of the solvent, as it was found using IEFPCM calculation. The values of relaxation time for all conformational equilibria were calculated and compared with known lifetimes of aromatic nitroso oxides. Our results suggest that syn/anti transitions occur fast enough in the scale of the experimental lifetime. However, trans/cis transformations proceed more slowly. And under certain conditions discussed in the paper, the rate of this conformational transition limits that of irreversible decay of nitroso oxide. PMID:27356269

  3. Magnetic circular dichroism of peralkylated tetrasilane conformers

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Heather A.; Imhof, Roman; Michl, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of five peralkylated tetrasilanes (1–5) conformationally constrained to angles ranging from nearly 0° to 180° and of the open chain tetrasilane Si4Me10 (6) shows a clear conformational dependence and permits the detection of previously hidden transitions. In the tetrasilane CH2Si4Me8 (1), with the smallest dihedral angle, comparison of MCD with absorption spectra reveals four low-energy electronic transitions. In the tetrasilanes 2–4, three distinct transitions are apparent. In tetrasilanes 5 and 6, MCD reveals the very weak transition that has been predicted to be buried under the first intense peak and to which the anomalous thermochromism of 6 and other short-chain oligosilanes has been attributed. PMID:15249672

  4. Toward TeV Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T; Avakian, A; Babich, R; Brower, R C; Cheng, M; Clark, M A; Cohen, S D; Fleming, G T; Kiskis, J; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Schaich, D; Soltz, R; Vranas, P

    2009-11-30

    We study the chiral condensate <{bar {psi}}{psi}> for an SU(3) gauge theory with N{sub f} massless Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation when N{sub f} is increased from 2 to 6. For N{sub f} = 2, our lattice simulations of <{bar {psi}}{psi}>/F{sup 3}, where F is the Nambu-Goldstone-boson decay constant, agree with the measured QCD value. For N{sub f} = 6, this ratio shows significant enhancement, presaging an even larger enhancement anticipated as N{sub f} increases further, toward the critical value for transition from confinement to infrared conformality.

  5. Conformational Dynamics in DNA Replication Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieba, Luis G.

    2007-11-01

    Replicative DNA polymerases are remarkable molecular machines that carry out DNA synthesis accordingly to the Watson and Crick rules (Guanine pairs with Cytosine and Adenine with Thymidine) with high specificity or fidelity. The biochemical mechanism that dictates polymerase fidelity has its fundaments in the tight active site of replicative polymerases and the shape and size of the Watson-Crick base pairs. Pre-steady state kinetic analysis have shown that during polymerase nucleotide addition, the chemical reaction is not the rate limiting step and it was postulated that DNA polymerases suffer a conformational change from an "open" to a "closed" conformation before chemistry which is also the step responsible for their high fidelity. Crystal structures of replicative DNA polymerases demonstrated that the fingers subdomain suffers a large conformational change during catalysis and that this conformational transition aligns the polymerase active site in a proper conformation for catalysis. Recent studies using single molecule techniques and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer analysis also shown that at least in the case of T7 DNA polymerase, the closure of the fingers subdomain is in part the rate limiting step associated with the high fidelity of DNA polymerases, although the overall fidelity of the reaction maybe involves an assemble of chemical steps and several conformational changes. Our current knowledge indicates that the mechanisms of enzyme specificity in DNA replication involve several energy landscapes that maybe correlated with conformational changes and active site assemblies.

  6. Conformational Diffusion and Helix Formation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hummer, Gerhard; Garcia, Angel E.; Garde, Shekhar

    2000-09-18

    The time, temperature, and sequence dependences of helix formation kinetics of fully atomistic peptide models in explicit solvent are described quantitatively by a diffusive search within the coil state with barrierless transitions into the helical state. Conformational diffusion leads to nonexponential kinetics and jump-width dependences in temperature jump experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Galilean conformal electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Arjun; Basu, Rudranil; Mehra, Aditya

    2014-11-01

    Maxwell's Electrodynamics admits two distinct Galilean limits called the Electric and Magnetic limits. We show that the equations of motion in both these limits are invariant under the Galilean Conformal Algebra in D = 4, thereby exhibiting non-relativistic conformal symmetries. Remarkably, the symmetries are infinite dimensional and thus Galilean Electrodynamics give us the first example of an infinitely extended Galilean Conformal Field Theory in D > 2. We examine details of the theory by looking at purely non-relativistic conformal methods and also use input from the limit of the relativistic theory.

  8. Conformal bootstrap in embedding space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean-François; Skiba, Witold

    2016-05-01

    It is shown how to obtain conformal blocks from embedding space with the help of the operator product expansion. The minimal conformal block originates from scalar exchange in a four-point correlation function of four scalars. All remaining conformal blocks are simple derivatives of the minimal conformal block. With the help of the orthogonality properties of the conformal blocks, the analytic conformal bootstrap can be implemented directly in embedding space, leading to a Jacobi-like definition of conformal field theories.

  9. Conformations of Substituted Ethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Charles A.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews state-of-the-art of conformational analysis and factors which affect it. Emphasizes sp-3 hybridized acrylic molecules. Provides examples on the importance of certain factors in determining conformation. Purpose, is to provide examples for examination questions. (Author/SA)

  10. Ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions of platinum(II) complexes with arylacetylide ligands with different chain lengths: spectroscopic characterization, effect of molecular conformations, and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Tong, Glenna So Ming; Law, Yuen-Chi; Kui, Steven C F; Zhu, Nianyong; Leung, King Hong; Phillips, David Lee; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-11

    The complexes [Pt(tBu(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C[triple bond]C)(n-1)R}](+) (n = 1: R = alkyl and aryl (Ar); n = 1-3: R = phenyl (Ph) or Ph-N(CH(3))(2)-4; n = 1 and 2, R = Ph-NH(2)-4; tBu(3)tpy = 4,4',4''-tri-tert-butyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) and [Pt(Cl(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (R = tert-butyl (tBu), Ph, 9,9'-dibutylfluorene, 9,9'-dibutyl-7-dimethyl-amine-fluorene; Cl(3)tpy = 4,4',4''-trichloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) were prepared. The effects of substituent(s) on the terpyridine (tpy) and acetylide ligands and chain length of arylacetylide ligands on the absorption and emission spectra were examined. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of [Pt(tBu(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (R = n-butyl, Ph, and C(6)H(4)-OCH(3)-4) obtained in acetonitrile at 298 K reveal that the structural distortion of the C[triple bond]C bond in the electronic excited state obtained by 502.9 nm excitation is substantially larger than that obtained by 416 nm excitation. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations on [Pt(H(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (R = n-propyl (nPr), 2-pyridyl (Py)), [Pt(H(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C[triple bond]C)(n-1)Ph}](+) (n = 1-3), and [Pt(H(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C[triple bond]C)(n-1)C(6)H(4)-N(CH(3))(2)-4}](+)/+H(+) (n = 1-3; H(3)tpy = nonsubstituted terpyridine) at two different conformations were performed, namely, with the phenyl rings of the arylacetylide ligands coplanar ("cop") with and perpendicular ("per") to the H(3)tpy ligand. Combining the experimental data and calculated results, the two lowest energy absorption peak maxima, lambda(1) and lambda(2), of [Pt(Y(3)tpy)(C[triple bond]CR)](+) (Y = tBu or Cl, R = aryl) are attributed to (1)[pi(C[triple bond]CR)-->pi*(Y(3)tpy)] in the "cop" conformation and mixed (1)[d(pi)(Pt)-->pi*(Y(3)tpy)]/(1)[pi(C[triple bond]CR)-->pi*(Y(3)tpy)] transitions in the "per" conformation. The lowest energy absorption peak lambda(1) for [Pt(tBu(3)tpy){C[triple bond]C(C(6)H(4)C

  11. High-resolution KMM radiative Auger x-ray emission spectra of calcium induced by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.-P.; Szlachetko, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Budnar, M.; Zitnik, M.; Szlachetko, J.

    2011-04-15

    The KMM radiative Auger (RA) x-ray spectra of solid Ca were induced by monochromatic synchrotron radiation and measured with a high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer. Two excitation energies were employed, one in the near K threshold region and the second well above the K absorption edge. The KMM RA spectral structure and relative intensity with respect to the diagram K{beta}{sub 1,3} (K-M{sub 3,2}) line are found to be independent of the excitation energy. The overall RA structure resembles the density of unoccupied s, p, and d states. Due to solid-state effects, however, spectral features resulting from the major discrete shake-up transitions could not be resolved. For the total KMM RA to K{beta}{sub 1,3} yield ratio, a value of 0.053(3) is obtained. The latter is compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data obtained by various types of target excitation.

  12. Dynamics and Conformational Energetics of a Peptide Hormone: Vasopressin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagler, A. T.; Osguthorpe, D. J.; Dauber-Osguthorpe, P.; Hempel, J. C.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical methodology for use in conjunction with experiment was applied to the neurohypophyseal hormone lysine vasopressin for elucidation of its accessible molecular conformations and associated flexibility, conformational transitions, and dynamics. Molecular dynamics and energy minimization techniques make possible a description of the conformational properties of a peptide in terms of the precise positions of atoms, their fluctuations in time, and the interatomic forces acting on them. Analysis of the dynamic trajectory of lysine vasopressin shows the ability of a flexible peptide hormone to undergo spontaneous conformational transitions. The excursions of an individual phenylalanine residue exemplify the dynamic flexibility and multiple conformational states available to small peptide hormones and their component residues, even within constraints imposed by a cyclic hexapeptide ring.

  13. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  14. Discovering conformational sub-states relevant to protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function.

  15. Discovering Conformational Sub-States Relevant to Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. Methods and Findings To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Conclusions Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function. PMID:21297978

  16. [Conformers of carnosine].

    PubMed

    Kliuev, S A

    2006-01-01

    The geometric and energetic parameters of most stable conformations of carnosine were calculated by the semiempirical guantum-chemical method PM3. The carnosine-water-zinc (II) clusters were simulated. PMID:16909845

  17. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  18. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  19. Conformational sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Marcus P D; Lovas, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy hyper-surface of a protein relates the potential energy of the protein to its conformational space. This surface is useful in determining the native conformation of a protein or in examining a statistical-mechanical ensemble of structures (canonical ensemble). In determining the potential energy hyper-surface of a protein three aspects must be considered; reducing the degrees of freedom, a method to determine the energy of each conformation and a method to sample the conformational space. For reducing the degrees of freedom the choice of solvent, coarse graining, constraining degrees of freedom and periodic boundary conditions are discussed. The use of quantum mechanics versus molecular mechanics and the choice of force fields are also discussed, as well as the sampling of the conformational space through deterministic and heuristic approaches. Deterministic methods include knowledge-based statistical methods, rotamer libraries, homology modeling, the build-up method, self-consistent electrostatic field, deformation methods, tree-based elimination and eigenvector following routines. The heuristic methods include Monte Carlo chain growing, energy minimizations, metropolis monte carlo and molecular dynamics. In addition, various methods to enhance the conformational search including the deformation or smoothing of the surface, scaling of system parameters, and multi copy searching are also discussed. PMID:23947647

  20. The open pore conformation of potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Youxing; Lee, Alice; Chen, Jiayun; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2002-05-01

    Living cells regulate the activity of their ion channels through a process known as gating. To open the pore, protein conformational changes must occur within a channel's membrane-spanning ion pathway. KcsA and MthK, closed and opened K+ channels, respectively, reveal how such gating transitions occur. Pore-lining `inner' helices contain a `gating hinge' that bends by approximately 30°. In a straight conformation four inner helices form a bundle, closing the pore near its intracellular surface. In a bent configuration the inner helices splay open creating a wide (12Å) entryway. Amino-acid sequence conservation suggests a common structural basis for gating in a wide range of K+ channels, both ligand- and voltage-gated. The open conformation favours high conduction by compressing the membrane field to the selectivity filter, and also permits large organic cations and inactivation peptides to enter the pore from the intracellular solution.

  1. An automated efficient conformation search of L-serine by the scaled hypersphere search method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Harayama, Manami; Ohno, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Stable conformers of L-serine were automatically explored by applications of the scaled hypersphere search (SHS) method to equilibrium structures maintaining the chemical bond skeletons of serine. Energy barriers for conformational changes of L-serine were estimated from the heights of obtained transition structures. Zero-point-corrected electronic energies and Gibbs free energies of the 24 lowest energy conformers and 21 transition structures were calculated at 100, 298, and 400 K by a composite quantum chemistry method (Gaussian-4). Relative populations of 24 conformers including nine new conformers were calculated from the Gibbs energies assuming thermal equilibrium.

  2. Calcium-induced proline accumulation contributes to amelioration of NaCl injury and expression of glutamine synthetase in greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tai-Sheng; Hung, Meng-Ju; Cheng, Yen-I; Cheng, Lee-Ju

    2013-11-15

    The calcium-mediated proline accumulation is a critical response under NaCl stress and the function of the induced proline as a glutamine synthetase (GS) protectant in greater duckweed was investigated. The plants were treated with solutions containing 100mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl, 200 mM NaCl plus 10mM CaCl2, or 10mM CaCl2 alone for 4 days. At the end of the experiment, the fronds of inoculum treated with 200 mM NaCl showed the chlorotic effect, higher glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH) activity and lower GS activity. At the lower salinity, the activities of GS and NADH-GDH were not altered markedly. A significant accumulation of proline was not found under either low or high salinity. The activity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) was enhanced only at 200 mM NaCl but remained unchanged at 100mM NaCl. The activity of Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS) did not change under salinity-stressed. Addition of CaCl2 to the salt stressed plants not only lowered NaCl injury but also showed an elevated level of proline contents in response to the salinity treatment. In addition, both GS activity and corresponding polypeptides were expressed close to the level of control. Exogenous proline protects GS2 and the 32 kDa protein in photosystem II reaction center (D1) from H2O2-induced redox degradation in the chloroplast lysates of duckweed. The results suggest that calcium-induced proline accumulation may play an important role as a GS protectant under NaCl exposure in S. polyrhiza. PMID:24200992

  3. Conformal Collineations in String Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Hüsnü; Camci, U.ğur; Tarhan, İsmail; Yilmaz, İhsan; Yavuz, İlhami; Dolgov, A.

    In this paper, we study the consequences of the existence of conformal collineations (CC) for string cloud in the context of general relativity. Especially, we interest in special conformal collineation (SCC), generated by a special affine conformal collineation (SACC) in the string cloud. Some results on the restrictions imposed by a conformal collineation symmetry in the string cloud are obtained.

  4. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  5. Conformational flexibility of mephenesin.

    PubMed

    Écija, Patricia; Evangelisti, Luca; Vallejo, Montserrat; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Lesarri, Alberto; Castaño, Fernando; Caminati, Walther; Cocinero, Emilio J

    2014-05-22

    The mephenesin molecule (3-(2-methylphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol) serves as a test bank to explore several structural and dynamical issues, such as conformational flexibility, the orientation of the carbon linear chain relative to the benzene plane, or the effect of substituent position on the rotational barrier of a methyl group. The molecule has been studied by rotational spectroscopy in the 4-18 GHz frequency range by Fourier-transform methods in a supersonic expansion. The experiment has been backed by a previous conformational search plus optimization of the lowest energy structures by ab initio and density functional quantum calculations. The three lowest-lying conformers that can interconvert to each other by simple bond rotations have been detected in the jet. Rotational parameters for all structures have been obtained, and methyl torsional barriers have been determined for the two lowest-lying rotamers. The lowest-lying structure of mephenesin is highly planar, with all carbon atoms lying nearly in the benzene ring plane, and is stabilized by the formation of cooperative intramolecular hydrogen bonding. An estimation of the relative abundance of the detected conformers indicates that the energetically most stable conformer will have an abundance near 80% at temperatures relevant for biological activity. PMID:24754523

  6. Conformers of Gaseous Serine.

    PubMed

    He, Kedan; Allen, Wesley D

    2016-08-01

    The myriad conformers of the neutral form of natural amino acid serine (Ser) have been investigated by systematic computations with reliable electronic wave function methods. A total of 85 unique conformers were located using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The 12 lowest-energy conformers of serine fall within a 8 kJ mol(-1) window, and for these species, geometric structures, precise relative energies, equilibrium and vibrationally averaged rotational constants, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants, dipole moments, and (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants were computed. The relative energies were refined through composite focal-point analyses employing basis sets as large as aug-cc-pV5Z and correlation treatments through CCSD(T). The rotational constants for seven conformers measured by Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy are in good agreement with the vibrationally averaged rotational constants computed in this study. Our anharmonic vibrational frequencies are compared to the large number of experimental vibrational absorptions attributable to at least six conformers. PMID:27294314

  7. Two-Dimensional Heterospectral Correlation Analysis of the Redox-Induced Conformational Transition in Cytochrome c Using Surface-Enhanced Raman and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopies on a Two-Layer Gold Surface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heme protein cytochrome c adsorbed to a two-layer gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol was analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) heterospectral correlation analysis that combined surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Stepwise increasing electric potentials were applied to alter the redox state of the protein and to induce conformational changes within the protein backbone. We demonstrate herein that 2D heterospectral correlation analysis is a particularly suitable and useful technique for the study of heme-containing proteins as the two spectroscopies address different portions of the protein. Thus, by correlating SERS and SEIRAS data in a 2D plot, we can obtain a deeper understanding of the conformational changes occurring at the redox center and in the supporting protein backbone during the electron transfer process. The correlation analyses are complemented by molecular dynamics calculations to explore the intramolecular interactions. PMID:23930980

  8. Extended conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwknegt, Peter

    1988-06-01

    We investigate extensions of the Virasoro algebra by a single primary field of integer or halfinteger conformal dimension Δ. We argue that for vanishing structure constant CΔΔΔ, the extended conformal algebra can only be associative for a generic c-value if Δ=1/2, 1, 3/2, 2 or 3. For the other Δ<=5 we compute the finite set of allowed c-values and identify the rational solutions. The case CΔΔΔ≠0 is also briefly discussed. I would like to thank Kareljan Schoutens for discussions and Sander Bais for a careful reading of the manuscript.

  9. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of the conformation of sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    Lerbret, A.; Mason, P.E.; Venable, R.M.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Pastor, R.W.; Brady, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a 3 m aqueous solution of D-sorbitol (also called D-glucitol) have been performed at 300 K, as well as at two elevated temperatures to promote conformational transitions. In principle, sorbitol is more flexible than glucose since it does not contain a constraining ring. However, a conformational analysis revealed that the sorbitol chain remains extended in solution, in contrast to the bent conformation found experimentally in the crystalline form. While there are 243 staggered conformations of the backbone possible for this open-chain polyol, only a very limited number were found to be stable in the simulations. Although many conformers were briefly sampled, only eight were significantly populated in the simulation. The carbon backbones of all but two of these eight conformers were completely extended, unlike the bent crystal conformation. These extended conformers were stabilized by a quite persistent intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl groups of carbon C-2 and C-4. The conformational populations were found to be in good agreement with the limited available NMR data except for the C-2–C-3 torsion (spanned by the O-2–O-4 hydrogen bond), where the NMR data supports a more bent structure. PMID:19744646

  11. Conformal cloak for waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huanyang; Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomas

    2011-05-15

    Conformal invisibility devices are only supposed to work within the valid range of geometrical optics. Here, we show by numerical simulations and analytical arguments that for certain quantized frequencies, they are nearly perfect even in a regime that clearly violates geometrical optics. The quantization condition follows from the analogy between the Helmholtz equation and the stationary Schroedinger equation.

  12. PERSONALITY AND CONFORMITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAROCAS, RALPH; GORLOW, LEON

    AN INVESTIGATION WAS MADE OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY FACTORS AND CONFORMITY. THE SUBJECTS WERE 243 RANDOMLY SELECTED STUDENTS ENROLLED IN COLLEGE PSYCHOLOGY COURSES WHO WERE DIVIDED INTO GROUPS OF 97, 96, AND 50 SUBJECTS. A PERSONALITY FACTOR INVENTORY WAS OBTAINED FROM RESPONSES TO A LARGE LIST OF TRUE-FALSE PERSONALITY ITEM…

  13. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity. PMID:22625856

  14. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  15. A Physical Picture of Protein Dynamics and Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Achterhold, Klaus; Croci, Simonetta; Schmidt, Marius

    2008-01-01

    A physical model is reviewed which explains different aspects of protein dynamics consistently. At low temperatures, the molecules are frozen in conformational substates. Their average energy is 3/2RT. Solid-state vibrations occur on a time scale of femtoseconds to nanoseconds. Above a characteristic temperature, often called the dynamical transition temperature, slow modes of motions can be observed occurring on a time scale between about 140 and 1 ns. These motions are overdamped, quasidiffusive, and involve collective motions of segments of the size of an α-helix. Molecules performing these types of motion are in the “flexible state”. This state is reached by thermal activation. It is shown that these motions are essential for conformational relaxation. Based on this picture, a new approach is proposed to understand conformational changes. It connects structural fluctuations and conformational transitions. PMID:19669525

  16. Galilean conformal and superconformal symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lukierski, J.

    2012-10-15

    Firstly we discuss briefly three different algebras named as nonrelativistic (NR) conformal: Schroedinger, Galilean conformal, and infinite algebra of local NR conformal isometries. Further we shall consider in some detail Galilean conformal algebra (GCA) obtained in the limit c{yields}{infinity} from relativistic conformal algebraO(d+1, 2) (d-number of space dimensions). Two different contraction limits providing GCA and some recently considered realizations will be briefly discussed. Finally by considering NR contraction of D = 4 superconformal algebra the Galilei conformal superalgebra (GCSA) is obtained, in the formulation using complexWeyl supercharges.

  17. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  18. Protein Conformational Populations and Functionally Relevant Sub-states

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K; Burger, Virginia; Savol, Andrej; Ramanathan, Arvind; Chennubhotla, Chakra

    2013-01-01

    it to attain the transition state, therefore promoting the reaction mechanism. In the long term, this emerging view of proteins with conformational substates has broad implications for improving our understanding of enzymes, enzyme engineering, and better drug design. Researchers have already used photoactivation to modulate protein conformations as a strategy to develop a hypercatalytic enzyme. In addition, the alteration of the conformational substates through binding of ligands at locations other than the active site provides the basis for the design of new medicines through allosteric modulation.

  19. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. PMID:27038223

  20. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  1. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  2. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  3. Conformal gripping device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a conformal gripping device. In an embodiment of the present invention a conformal gripper device may be disclosed comprising a frame that includes an array of movable pins. The device may also include a roller locking and unlocking system within the frame. The system may comprise a pair of locking rollers for each row of gripper pins to facilitate locking and unlocking the array of gripper pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may also include a striker element that may force the locking rollers to roll along an angled roll surface to facilitate unlocking of the array of pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may further include an electromagnetic actuator or solenoid and permanent magnets to facilitate movement of the striker element and the locking rollers.

  4. Conforming quadrilaterals meshes on the cubed sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark A.; Levy, Michael Nathan; Overfelt, James Robert

    2010-08-01

    The cubed sphere geometry, obtained by inscribing a cube in a sphere and mapping points between the two surfaces using a gnomonic (central) projection, is commonly used in atmospheric models because it is free of polar singularities and is well-suited for parallel computing. Global meshes on the cubed-sphere typically project uniform (square) grids from each face of the cube onto the sphere, and if refinement is desired then it is done with non-conforming meshes - overlaying the area of interest with a finer uniform mesh, which introduces so-called hanging nodes on edges along the boundary of the fine resolution area. An alternate technique is to tile each face of the cube with quadrilaterals without requiring the quads to be rectangular. These meshes allow for refinement in areas of interest with a conforming mesh, providing a smoother transition between high and low resolution portions of the grid than non-conforming refinement. The conforming meshes are demonstrated in HOMME, NCAR's High Order Method Modeling Environment, where two modifications have been made: the dependence on uniform meshes has been removed, and the ability to read arbitrary quadrilateral meshes from a previously-generated file has been added. Numerical results come from a conservative spectral element method modeling a selection of the standard shallow water test cases.

  5. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  6. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore » field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  7. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  8. Hot conformal gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    We compute the nonzero temperature free energy up to the order g6ln⁡(1/g) in the coupling constant for vectorlike SU(N) gauge theories featuring matter transforming according to different representations of the underlying gauge group. The number of matter fields, i.e. flavors, is arranged in such a way that the theory develops a perturbative stable infrared fixed point at zero temperature. Because of large distance conformality we trade the coupling constant with its fixed point value and define a reduced free energy which depends only on the number of flavors, colors, and matter representation. We show that the reduced free energy changes sign, at the second, fifth, and sixth order in the coupling, when decreasing the number of flavors from the upper end of the conformal window. If the change in sign is interpreted as a signal of an instability of the system then we infer a critical number of flavors. Surprisingly this number, if computed to the order g2, agrees with previous predictions for the lower boundary of the conformal window for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The higher order results tend to predict a higher number of critical flavors. These are universal properties, i.e. they are independent of the specific matter representation.

  9. Conformal superalgebras via tractor calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-01

    We use the manifestly conformally invariant description of a Lorentzian conformal structure in terms of a parabolic Cartan geometry in order to introduce a superalgebra structure on the space of twistor spinors and normal conformal vector fields formulated in purely algebraic terms on parallel sections in tractor bundles. Via a fixed metric in the conformal class, one reproduces a conformal superalgebra structure that has been considered in the literature before. The tractor approach, however, makes clear that the failure of this object to be a Lie superalgebra in certain cases is due to purely algebraic identities on the spinor module and to special properties of the conformal holonomy representation. Moreover, it naturally generalizes to higher signatures. This yields new formulas for constructing new twistor spinors and higher order normal conformal Killing forms out of existing ones, generalizing the well-known spinorial Lie derivative. Moreover, we derive restrictions on the possible dimension of the space of twistor spinors in any metric signature.

  10. Mapping L1 Ligase ribozyme conformational switch

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2012-01-01

    L1 Ligase (L1L)molecular switch is an in vitro optimized synthetic allosteric ribozyme that catalyzes the regioselective formation of a 5’-to-3’ phosphodiester bond, a reaction for which there is no known naturally occurring RNA catalyst. L1L serves as a proof of principle that RNA can catalyze a critical reaction for prebiotic RNA self-replication according to the RNA World hypothesis. L1L crystal structure captures two distinct conformations that differ by a re-orientation of one of the stems by around 80 Å and are presumed to correspond to the active and inactive state, respectively. It is of great interest to understand the nature of these two states in solution, and the pathway for their interconversion. In this study, we use explicit solvent molecular simulation together with a novel enhanced sampling method that utilizes concepts from network theory to map out the conformational transition between active and inactive states of L1L. We find that the overall switching mechanism can be described as a 3-state/2-step process. The first step involves a large-amplitude swing that re-orients stem C. The second step involves the allosteric activation of the catalytic site through distant contacts with stem C. Using a conformational space network representation of the L1L switch transition, it is shown that the connection between the three states follows different topographical patterns: the stem C swing step passes through a narrow region of the conformational space network, whereas the allosteric activation step covers a much wider region and a more diverse set of pathways through the network. PMID:22771572

  11. OSI Conformance Testing for Bibliographic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbez, Gilbert; Swain, Leigh

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) conformance testing sites, conformance testing tools, and conformance testing services. Discusses related topics such as interoperability testing, arbitration testing, and international harmonization of conformance testing. A glossary is included. (24 references) (SD)

  12. Metamaterials with conformational nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapine, Mikhail; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2011-11-01

    Within a decade of fruitful development, metamaterials became a prominent area of research, bridging theoretical and applied electrodynamics, electrical engineering and material science. Being man-made structures, metamaterials offer a particularly useful playground to develop interdisciplinary concepts. Here we demonstrate a novel principle in metamaterial assembly which integrates electromagnetic, mechanical, and thermal responses within their elements. Through these mechanisms, the conformation of the meta-molecules changes, providing a dual mechanism for nonlinearity and offering nonlinear chirality. Our proposal opens a wide road towards further developments of nonlinear metamaterials and photonic structures, adding extra flexibility to their design and control.

  13. Leaf growth is conformal.

    PubMed

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour. PMID:27597439

  14. Movement of Elongation Factor G between Compact and Extended Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pre- or posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to, but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation. PMID:25463439

  15. Conformally symmetric traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-10-15

    Exact solutions of traversable wormholes are found under the assumption of spherical symmetry and the existence of a nonstatic conformal symmetry, which presents a more systematic approach in searching for exact wormhole solutions. In this work, a wide variety of solutions are deduced by considering choices for the form function, a specific linear equation of state relating the energy density and the pressure anisotropy, and various phantom wormhole geometries are explored. A large class of solutions impose that the spatial distribution of the exotic matter is restricted to the throat neighborhood, with a cutoff of the stress-energy tensor at a finite junction interface, although asymptotically flat exact solutions are also found. Using the 'volume integral quantifier', it is found that the conformally symmetric phantom wormhole geometries may, in principle, be constructed by infinitesimally small amounts of averaged null energy condition violating matter. Considering the tidal acceleration traversability conditions for the phantom wormhole geometry, specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity are also deduced.

  16. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  17. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  18. Conformational ensembles and sampled energy landscapes: Analysis and comparison.

    PubMed

    Cazals, Frédéric; Dreyfus, Tom; Mazauric, Dorian; Roth, Christine-Andrea; Robert, Charles H

    2015-06-15

    We present novel algorithms and software addressing four core problems in computational structural biology, namely analyzing a conformational ensemble, comparing two conformational ensembles, analyzing a sampled energy landscape, and comparing two sampled energy landscapes. Using recent developments in computational topology, graph theory, and combinatorial optimization, we make two notable contributions. First, we present a generic algorithm analyzing height fields. We then use this algorithm to perform density-based clustering of conformations, and to analyze a sampled energy landscape in terms of basins and transitions between them. In both cases, topological persistence is used to manage (geometric) frustration. Second, we introduce two algorithms to compare transition graphs. The first is the classical earth mover distance metric which depends only on local minimum energy configurations along with their statistical weights, while the second incorporates topological constraints inherent to conformational transitions. Illustrations are provided on a simplified protein model (BLN69), whose frustrated potential energy landscape has been thoroughly studied. The software implementing our tools is also made available, and should prove valuable wherever conformational ensembles and energy landscapes are used. PMID:25994596

  19. A novel approach to the study of conformality in the SU(3) theory with multiple flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, R.; Hasenfratz, A.; Rebbi, C. Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-03-15

    We investigate the transition between spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and conformal behavior in the SU(3) theory with multiple fermion flavors. We propose a new strategy for studying this transition. Instead of changing the number of flavors, we lift the mass of a subset of the fermions, keeping the rest of the fermions near the massless chiral limit in order to probe the transition.

  20. A study of local crankshaft-type mobility in vitreous polyvinyl chloride and polyacrylonitrile by the method of conformational probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalova, D. I.; Kolyadko, I. M.; Remizov, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Secondary relaxation transitions and local conformational dynamics in polyacrylonitrile and polyvinyl chloride were studied by the method of conformational probes. Relaxation transitions at 210 and 260 K (polyvinyl chloride) and 165 K (polyacrylonitrile) were explained by freezing of “crankshaft-type” motions.

  1. Dissecting conformational contributions to glycosidase catalysis and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Speciale, Gaetano; Thompson, Andrew J; Davies, Gideon J; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are classified into >100 sequence-based families. These enzymes process a wide variety of complex carbohydrates with varying stereochemistry at the anomeric and other ring positions. The shapes that these sugars adopt upon binding to their cognate GHs, and the conformational changes that occur along the catalysis reaction coordinate is termed the conformational itinerary. Efforts to define the conformational itineraries of GHs have focussed upon the critical points of the reaction: substrate-bound (Michaelis), transition state, intermediate (if relevant) and product-bound. Recent approaches to defining conformational itineraries that marry X-ray crystallography of enzymes bound to ligands that mimic the critical points, along with advanced computational methods and kinetic isotope effects are discussed. PMID:25016573

  2. In silico Exploration of the Conformational Universe of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espigares, Ismael; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The structural plasticity of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a conformational universe going from inactive to active receptor states with several intermediate states. Many of them have not been captured yet and their role for GPCR activation is not well understood. The study of this conformational space and the transition dynamics between different receptor populations is a major challenge in molecular biophysics. The rational design of effector molecules that target such receptor populations allows fine-tuning receptor signalling with higher specificity to produce drugs with safer therapeutic profiles. In this minireview, we outline highly conserved receptor regions which are considered determinant for the establishment of distinct receptor states. We then discuss in-silico approaches such as dimensionality reduction methods and Markov State Models to explore the GPCR conformational universe and exploit the obtained conformations through structure-based drug design. PMID:27492237

  3. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  4. Intramolecular conformational changes optimize protein kinase C signaling.

    PubMed

    Antal, Corina E; Violin, Jonathan D; Kunkel, Maya T; Skovsø, Søs; Newton, Alexandra C

    2014-04-24

    Optimal tuning of enzyme signaling is critical for cellular homeostasis. We use fluorescence resonance energy transfer reporters in live cells to follow conformational transitions that tune the affinity of a multidomain signal transducer, protein kinase C (PKC), for optimal response to second messengers. This enzyme comprises two diacylglycerol sensors, the C1A and C1B domains, that have a sufficiently high intrinsic affinity for ligand so that the enzyme would be in a ligand-engaged, active state if not for mechanisms that mask its domains. We show that both diacylglycerol sensors are exposed in newly synthesized PKC and that conformational transitions following priming phosphorylations mask the domains so that the lower affinity sensor, the C1B domain, is the primary diacylglycerol binder. The conformational rearrangements of PKC serve as a paradigm for how multimodule transducers optimize their dynamic range of signaling. PMID:24631122

  5. Conformations of Low-Molecular-Weight Lignin Polymers in Water.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight lignin binds to cellulose during the thermochemical pretreatment of biomass for biofuel production, which prevents the efficient hydrolysis of the cellulose to sugars. The binding properties of lignin are influenced strongly by the conformations it adopts. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution to investigate the dependence of the shape of lignin polymers on chain length and temperature. Lignin is found to adopt collapsed conformations in water at 300 and 500 K. However, at 300 K, a discontinuous transition is found in the shape of the polymer as a function of the chain length. Below a critical degree of polymerization, Nc =15, the polymer adopts less spherical conformations than above Nc. The transition disappears at high temperatures (500 K) at which only spherical shapes are adopted. An implication relevant to cellulosic biofuel production is that lignin will self-aggregate even at high pretreatment temperatures. PMID:26763657

  6. Conformational distributions of unfolded polypeptides from novel NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Sebastian; Blackledge, Martin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2008-02-01

    How the information content of an unfolded polypeptide sequence directs a protein towards a well-formed three-dimensional structure during protein folding remains one of the fundamental questions in structural biology. Unfolded proteins have recently attracted further interest due to their surprising prevalence in the cellular milieu, where they fulfill not only central regulatory functions, but also are implicated in diseases involving protein aggregation. The understanding of both the protein folding transition and these often natively unfolded proteins hinges on a more detailed experimental characterization of the conformations and conformational transitions in the unfolded state. This description is intrinsically very difficult due to the very large size of the conformational space. In principle, solution NMR can monitor unfolded polypeptide conformations and their transitions at atomic resolution. However, traditional NMR parameters such as chemical shifts, J couplings, and nuclear Overhauser enhancements yield only rather limited and often qualitative descriptions. This situation has changed in recent years by the introduction of residual dipolar couplings and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements, which yield a high number of well-defined, quantitative parameters reporting on the averages of local conformations and long-range interactions even under strongly denaturing conditions. This information has been used to obtain plausible all-atom models of the unfolded state at increasing accuracy. Currently, the best working model is the coil model, which derives amino acid specific local conformations from the distribution of amino acid torsion angles in the nonsecondary structure conformations of the protein data bank. Deviations from the predictions of such models can often be interpreted as increased order resulting from long-range contacts within the unfolded ensemble.

  7. Conformal Gravity and Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca; Paranjape, M. B.

    We consider monochromatic, plane gravitational waves in a conformally invariant theory of general relativity. We show that the simple, standard ansatz for the metric, usually that which is taken for the linearized theory of these waves, is reducible to the metric of Minkowski spacetime via a sequence of conformal and coordinate transformations. This implies that we have in fact, exact plane wave solutions. However they are simply coordinate/conformal artifacts. As a consequence, they carry no energy.

  8. Killing and conformal Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an appropriate formalism in order to study conformal Killing (symmetric) tensors on Riemannian manifolds. We reprove in a simple way some known results in the field and obtain several new results, like the classification of conformal Killing 2-tensors on Riemannian products of compact manifolds, Weitzenböck formulas leading to non-existence results, and construct various examples of manifolds with conformal Killing tensors.

  9. Loop Virasoro Lie conformal algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Henan Chen, Qiufan; Yue, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-15

    The Lie conformal algebra of loop Virasoro algebra, denoted by CW, is introduced in this paper. Explicitly, CW is a Lie conformal algebra with C[∂]-basis (L{sub i} | i∈Z) and λ-brackets [L{sub i} {sub λ} L{sub j}] = (−∂−2λ)L{sub i+j}. Then conformal derivations of CW are determined. Finally, rank one conformal modules and Z-graded free intermediate series modules over CW are classified.

  10. Reflections on conformal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungrok; Kravchuk, Petr; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2016-04-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function.