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Sample records for calgary biofilm device

  1. Characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus Biofilms by Using the Calgary Biofilm Device

    PubMed Central

    Pesciaroli, Lorena; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Fedi, Stefano; Firrincieli, Andrea; Federici, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The adequacy of the Calgary biofilm device, often referred to as the MBEC system, as a high-throughput approach to the production and subsequent characterization of Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms was assessed. The hydroxyapatite-coating of pegs was necessary to enable biofilm attachment, and the standardization of vegetative inocula ensured a uniform distribution of P. ostreatus biofilms, which is necessary for high-throughput evaluations of several antimicrobials and exposure conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed surface-associated growth, the occurrence of a complex aggregated growth organized in multilayers or hyphal bundles, and the encasement of hyphae within an extracellular matrix (ECM), the extent of which increased with time. Chemical analyses showed that biofilms differed from free-floating cultures for their higher contents of total sugars (TS) and ECM, with the latter being mainly composed of TS and, to a lesser extent, protein. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of 4-day-old biofilms showed the presence of interspersed interstitial voids and water channels in the mycelial network, the density and compactness of which increased after a 7-day incubation, with the novel occurrence of ECM aggregates with an α-glucan moiety. In 4- and 7-day-old biofilms, tolerance to cadmium was increased by factors of 3.2 and 11.1, respectively, compared to coeval free-floating counterparts. PMID:23892744

  2. A simple and inexpensive device for biofilm analysis.

    PubMed

    Almshawit, Hala; Macreadie, Ian; Grando, Danilla

    2014-03-01

    The Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) has been described as a technology for the rapid and reproducible assay of biofilm susceptibilities to antibiotics. In this study a simple and inexpensive alternative to the CBD was developed from polypropylene (PP) microcentrifuge tubes and pipette tip boxes. The utility of the device was demonstrated using Candida glabrata, a yeast that can develop antimicrobial-resistant biofilm communities. Biofilms of C. glabrata were formed on the outside surface of microcentrifuge tubes and examined by quantitative analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Growth of three C. glabrata strains, including a clinical isolate, demonstrated that biofilms could be formed on the microcentrifuge tubes. After 24 h incubation the three C. glabrata strains produced biofilms that were recovered into cell suspension and quantified. The method was found to produce uniform and reproducible results with no significant differences between biofilms formed on PP tubes incubated in various compartments of the device. In addition, the difference between maximum and minimum counts for each strain was comparable to those which have been reported for the CBD device. PMID:24389040

  3. In situ biofilm coupon device

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent M.; Truex, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements.

  4. In situ biofilm coupon device

    DOEpatents

    Peyton, B.M.; Truex, M.J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for characterization of in-situ microbial biofilm populations in subsurface groundwater. The device permits biofilm-forming microorganisms to adhere to packing material while emplaced in a groundwater strata, so that the packing material can be later analyzed for quantity and type of microorganisms, growth rate, and nutrient requirements. 3 figs.

  5. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  6. Microscale Confinement features in microfluidic devices can affect biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Acharya, Rajesh K; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are aggregations of microbes that are encased by extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) and adhere to surfaces and interfaces. Biofilm development on abiotic surfaces is a dynamic process, which typically proceeds through an initial phase of adhesion of plankntonic microbes to the substrate, followed by events such as growth, maturation and EPS secretion. However, the coupling of hydrodynamics, microbial adhesion and biofilm growth remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of semiconfined features on biofilm formation. Using a microfluidic device and fluorescent time-lapse microscopy, we establish that confinement features can significantly affect biofilm formation. Biofilm dynamics change not only as a function of confinement features, but also of the total fluid flow rate, and our combination of experimental results and numerical simulations reveal insights into the link between hydrodynamics and biofilm formation.

  7. Monitoring biofilm attachment on medical devices surfaces using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Hitchins, Victoria M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Microbial biofilm is a colony of single bacteria cells (planktonic) that attached to surfaces, attract other microorganisms to attach and grow, and together they build an extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides, protein, and DNA. Eventually, some cells will detach and spread to other surface. Biofilm on medical devices can cause severe infection to all age ranges from infant to adult. Therefore, it is important to detect biofilm in a fast and efficient manner. Hyperspectral imaging was utilized for distinguishing wide area of biofilm coverage on various materials and on different textures of stainless steeltest coupons. Not only is the coverage of biofilm important, but also the shear stress of biofilm on the attached surfaces is significant. This study investigates the effects of shear stress on the adhesion of biofilms on common medical device surfaces such as glass, polycarbonate, polytetrafluoroethylene, and stainless steel with different textures. Biofilm was grown using Ps. aeruginosa and growth was monitored after 24 and 48 hours at 37° C. The coupons covered with biofilm were tilted at 45 degrees and 90 degrees for 30 seconds to induce shear stress and Hyperspectral images were taken. We hypothesize that stronger attachment on rough surface would be able to withstand greater shear stress compared to smooth surface.

  8. Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Karig, David K; Neethirajan, Suresh; Suresh, Anil K; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

  9. The Calgary Youth Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Arthur H.

    1971-01-01

    This is a report of the findings gathered from the study of youthful patients presenting at a clinic set up in response to the need felt after a rock festival was held in Calgary. The clinic was staffed by volunteers, and the response was so good that some volunteers had to be turned away. One night per week was found to be sufficient time to meet the demand. Findings were assessed according to age and place of residence. PMID:20468673

  10. Hospice care in Calgary

    PubMed Central

    Spice, Ronald; Lau, Monica; Perez, Grace; Turley, Nathan; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore Calgary family physicians’ knowledge about hospices, their attitudes toward the referral process, and their understanding of barriers to referral for hospice care. Design Surveys were mailed to 400 randomly selected participants. The survey contained 18 questions related to hospice care, physician experience, attitudes, and perceived barriers to making a hospice referral. Setting Calgary, Alta. Participants Family physicians. Main outcome measures Survey responses were analyzed quantitatively using the 2 goodness-of-fit test, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and logistic regression analyses to examine univariate associations. Qualitative analysis of open-ended questions was done by content analysis and thematic coding. Results In total, 104 surveys were mailed back. Family physicians agreed that palliative care in a hospice setting can greatly improve quality of life for patients, but only 2 of 6 knowledge questions about hospice care were answered correctly by most. Family physicians with special areas of interest or subspecialties were more likely to feel well-informed about hospice referrals (P = .017), indicated a higher comfort level discussing hospice and palliative care (P = .030), and were less likely to defer discussing it with patients (P = .023). Physicians with a special interest in palliative medicine were more likely to correctly answer the knowledge questions (P < .034) and to be familiar with the referral process (P < .001), patient eligibility (P < .001), and the palliative home care program (P = .003). Qualitative analysis revealed support for palliative home care and consultation services but concerns about caregiver coping and family issues. Concerns about disengagement of family physicians and uncertainty about the referral process are obstacles to referral. Conclusion While Calgary family physicians are appreciative of hospice care, there are knowledge gaps. It is important to engage family physicians in the referral

  11. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially life-threatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duod...

  12. Devices for In situ Development of Non-disturbed Oral Biofilm. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Prada-López, Isabel; Quintas, Víctor; Vilaboa, Carlos; Suárez-Quintanilla, David; Tomás, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review was to assess the types of devices used for in situ development of oral biofilm analyzed microbiologically. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify all in situ studies of oral biofilm which used an oral device; the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases complemented with manual search were used. Specific devices used to microbiologically analyze oral biofilm in adults were included. After reading of the selected full texts, devices were identified and classified according to the oral cavity zone and manufacturing material. The “ideal” characteristics were analyzed in every group. Results: The search provided 787 abstracts, of which 111 papers were included. The devices used in these studies were classified as palatal, lingual or buccal. The last group was sub-classified in six groups based on the material of the device. Considering the analyzed characteristics, the thermoplastic devices and the Intraoral Device of Overlaid Disk-holding Splints (IDODS) presented more advantages than limitations. Conclusions: Buccal devices were the most commonly used for the study of in situ biofilm. The majority of buccal devices seemed to slightly affect the volunteer's comfort, the IDODS being the closest to the “ideal” model. Clinical Relevance: New devices for in situ oral biofilm microbiological studies should take into account the possible effect of their design on the volunteer's comfort and biofilm formation. PMID:27486437

  13. Host contributions to construction of three device-associated Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nett, Jeniel E; Zarnowski, Robert; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Brooks, Erin G; Bernhardt, Jörg; Marchillo, Karen; Mosher, Deane F; Andes, David R

    2015-12-01

    Among the most fascinating virulence attributes of Candida is the ability to transition to a biofilm lifestyle. As a biofilm, Candida cells adhere to a surface, such as a vascular catheter, and become encased in an extracellular matrix. During this mode of growth, Candida resists the normal immune response, often causing devastating disease. Based on scanning electron microscopy images, we hypothesized that host cells and proteins become incorporated into clinical biofilms. As a means to gain an understanding of these host-biofilm interactions, we explored biofilm-associated host components by using microscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Here we characterize the host proteins associated with several in vivo rat Candida albicans biofilms, including those from vascular catheter, denture, and urinary catheter models as well as uninfected devices. A conserved group of 14 host proteins were found to be more abundant during infection at each of the niches. The host proteins were leukocyte and erythrocyte associated and included proteins involved in inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, myeloperoxidase, and alarmin S100-A9. A group of 59 proteins were associated with both infected and uninfected devices, and these included matricellular and inflammatory proteins. In addition, site-specific proteins were identified, such as amylase in association with the denture device. Cellular analysis revealed neutrophils as the predominant leukocytes associating with biofilms. These experiments demonstrate that host cells and proteins are key components of in vivo Candida biofilms, likely with one subset associating with the device and another being recruited by the proliferating biofilm. PMID:26371129

  14. Host Contributions to Construction of Three Device-Associated Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Zarnowski, Robert; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Brooks, Erin G.; Bernhardt, Jörg; Marchillo, Karen; Mosher, Deane F.

    2015-01-01

    Among the most fascinating virulence attributes of Candida is the ability to transition to a biofilm lifestyle. As a biofilm, Candida cells adhere to a surface, such as a vascular catheter, and become encased in an extracellular matrix. During this mode of growth, Candida resists the normal immune response, often causing devastating disease. Based on scanning electron microscopy images, we hypothesized that host cells and proteins become incorporated into clinical biofilms. As a means to gain an understanding of these host-biofilm interactions, we explored biofilm-associated host components by using microscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Here we characterize the host proteins associated with several in vivo rat Candida albicans biofilms, including those from vascular catheter, denture, and urinary catheter models as well as uninfected devices. A conserved group of 14 host proteins were found to be more abundant during infection at each of the niches. The host proteins were leukocyte and erythrocyte associated and included proteins involved in inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, myeloperoxidase, and alarmin S100-A9. A group of 59 proteins were associated with both infected and uninfected devices, and these included matricellular and inflammatory proteins. In addition, site-specific proteins were identified, such as amylase in association with the denture device. Cellular analysis revealed neutrophils as the predominant leukocytes associating with biofilms. These experiments demonstrate that host cells and proteins are key components of in vivo Candida biofilms, likely with one subset associating with the device and another being recruited by the proliferating biofilm. PMID:26371129

  15. Characterization of Bacterial Etiologic Agents of Biofilm Formation in Medical Devices in Critical Care Setup

    PubMed Central

    Revdiwala, Sangita; Rajdev, Bhaumesh M.; Mulla, Summaiya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Biofilms contaminate catheters, ventilators, and medical implants; they act as a source of disease for humans, animals, and plants. Aim. Critical care units of any healthcare institute follow various interventional strategies with use of medical devices for the management of critical cases. Bacteria contaminate medical devices and form biofilms. Material and Methods. The study was carried out on 100 positive bacteriological cultures of medical devices which were inserted in hospitalized patients. The bacterial isolates were processed as per microtitre plate. All the isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by VITEK 2 compact automated systems. Results. Out of the total 100 bacterial isolates tested, 88 of them were biofilm formers. A 16–20-hour incubation period was found to be optimum for biofilm development. 85% isolates were multidrug resistants and different mechanisms of bacterial drug resistance like ESBL, carbapenemase, and MRSA were found among isolates. Conclusion. Availability of nutrition in the form of glucose enhances the biofilm formation by bacteria. Time and availability of glucose are important factors for assessment of biofilm progress. It is an alarm for those who are associated with invasive procedures and indwelling medical devices especially in patients with low immunity. PMID:22312484

  16. Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the virulence and pathogenesis of Francisella spp. has significantly advanced in recent years, including a new understanding that this organism can form biofilms. What is known so far about Francisella spp. biofilms is summarized here and future research questions are suggested. The molecular basis of biofilm production has begun to be studied, especially the role of extracellular carbohydrates and capsule, quorum sensing and two-component signaling systems. Further work has explored the contribution of amoebae, pili, outer-membrane vesicles, chitinases, and small molecules such as c-di-GMP to Francisella spp. biofilm formation. A role for Francisella spp. biofilm in feeding mosquito larvae has been suggested. As no strong role in virulence has been found yet, Francisella spp. biofilm formation is most likely a key mechanism for environmental survival and persistence. The significance and importance of Francisella spp.’s biofilm phenotype as a critical aspect of its microbial physiology is being developed. Areas for further studies include the potential role of Francisella spp. biofilms in the infection of mammalian hosts and virulence regulation. PMID:24225421

  17. Development of a flow system for studying biofilm formation on medical devices with microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Said, Jawal; Walker, Michael; Parsons, David; Stapleton, Paul; Beezer, Anthony E; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) is particularly suited to the study of microbiological samples in complex or heterogeneous environments because it does not require optical clarity of the sample and can detect metabolic activity from as few as 10(4) CFU/mL cells. While the use of IMC for studying planktonic cultures is well established, in the clinical environment bacteria are most likely to be present as biofilms. Biofilm prevention and eradication present a number of challenges to designers and users of medical devices and implants, since bacteria in biofilm colonies are usually more resistant to antimicrobial agents. Analytical tools that facilitate investigation of biofilm formation are therefore extremely useful. While it is possible to study pre-prepared biofilms in closed ampoules, better correlation with in vivo behaviour can be achieved using a system in which the bacterial suspension is flowing. Here, we discuss the potential of flow microcalorimetry for studying biofilms and report the development of a simple flow system that can be housed in a microcalorimeter. The use of the flow system is demonstrated with biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25498003

  18. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ, Patrícia Costa; de ANDRADE, Ingrid Machado; PERACINI, Amanda; de SOUZA-GUGELMIN, Maria Cristina Monteiro; SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; de SOUZA, Raphael Freitas; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets), mechanical (ultrasonic) and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic) methods. Material and Methods Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20): (1) Brushing with water (Control); (2) Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs); (3) Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D); (4) Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo) and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm) quantified (Image Tool 2.02). The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001), the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9); Chemical (37.2); Mechanical (35.2) and Combined (29.1). Conclusion The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water). Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents for

  19. The intraoral device of overlaid disk-holding splints as a new in situ oral biofilm model

    PubMed Central

    Prada-López, Isabel; Quintas, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To design a device that allows the formation of in situ oral biofilm with similar characteristics to those from the dental plaque, overcoming the limitations of previous devices. Study Design: The Intraoral Device of Overlaid Disk-holding Splints (IDODS) was designed and manufactured. To test its validity, five healthy adult volunteers wore them for two and four days allowing the biofilm to grow without any type of distortion. After each period, the thickness, vitality and structure of the formed biofilm were measured with a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) in combination with a dual fluorescence solution. All volunteers filled out a Likert-type questionnaire to evaluate the device. Results: Mean bacterial vitality in the 2- and 4-day biofilms was 71% and 63%, respectively. Mean thicknesses were 21 µm and 28 µm, respectively. There was predominance in the open and heterogeneous structure whose complexity was ascending as the biofilm matured. The results obtained from the questionnaire were 2/5 in the influence in aesthetics, 3.4/5 in comfort, and 5/5 in ease of maintaining oral hygiene and withdrawal from the oral cavity. Conclusions: A biofilm with optimum characteristics was obtained by IDODS. Its use is associated with good aesthetic and comfort results and is absent of functional limitations, allowing optimal oral hygiene without altering the structure of the in situ oral biofilm. Key words:Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope, fluorochromes, in situ, intraoral device, oral biofilm. PMID:25810823

  20. (Super)hydrophobic coating of orthodontic dental devices and reduction of early oral biofilm retention.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê S; Kaizer, Marina R; Azevedo, Marina S; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to apply (super)hydrophobic crosslinked coatings by means of a sol-gel process on the surface of orthodontic devices and investigate the potential effect of these coatings in reducing the early retention of oral biofilm. Two organosilane-based hydrophobic solutions (HSs) were prepared containing hexadecyltrimethoxysilane diluted in ethanol (HS1) or 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (HS2). Stainless steel plates and ceramic discs were coated with HS1 or HS2 and heated at 150 °C for 2 h for condensation of a crosslinked SiO x network. Organosilane coatings were applied after previous, or no, surface sandblasting. Commercial stainless steel and ceramic brackets were used to evaluate oral biofilm retention after 12 h or 24 h of biofilm growth, using a microcosm model with human saliva as the inoculum. Surface roughness analysis (Ra, μm) indicated that sandblasting associated with organosilane coatings increased roughness for stainless steel brackets only. Analysis of the water contact angle showed that the stainless steel surface treated with HS1 was hydrophobic (~123°), while the ceramic surface treated with HS2 was superhydrophobic (~155°). Biofilm retention after 24 h was significantly lower in groups treated with hydrophobic coatings. An exponential reduction in biofilm accumulation was associated with increased water contact angle for both stainless steel and ceramic at 24 h. Application of (super)hydrophobic coatings on the surface of stainless steel and ceramic orthodontic devices might reduce the retention of oral biofilm. PMID:26526491

  1. Polymicrobial Biofilm Inhibition Effects of Acetate-Buffered Chitosan Sponge Delivery Device.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Jessica Amber; Beenken, Karen E; Parker, Ashley C; Smith, James Keaton; Courtney, Harry S; Smeltzer, Mark S; Haggard, Warren O

    2016-04-01

    Polymicrobial biofilm-associated implant infections present a challenging clinical problem. Through modifications of lyophilized chitosan sponges, degradable drug delivery devices for antibiotic solution have been fabricated for prevention and treatment of contaminated musculoskeletal wounds. Elution of amikacin, vancomycin, or a combination of both follows a burst release pattern with vancomycin released above minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus for 72 h and amikacin released above inhibitory concentrations for Pseudomonas aeruginosa for 3 h. Delivery of a vancomycin, amikacin, or a combination of both reduces biofilm formation on polytetrafluoroethylene catheters in an in vivo model of contamination. Release of dual antibiotics from sponges is more effective at preventing biofilm formation than single-loaded chitosan sponges. Treatment of pre-formed biofilm with high-dose antibiotic release from chitosan sponges shows minimal reduction after 48 h. These results demonstrate infection-preventive efficacy for antibiotic-loaded sponges, as well as the need for modifications in the development of advanced materials to enhance treatment efficacy in removing established biofilm. PMID:26756211

  2. Anti-biofilm activity of ultrashort cinnamic acid peptide derivatives against medical device-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; McCloskey, Alice P; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-10-01

    The threat of antimicrobial resistance has placed increasing emphasis on the development of innovative approaches to eradicate multidrug-resistant pathogens. Biofilm-forming microorganisms, for example, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, are responsible for increased incidence of biomaterial infection, extended hospital stays and patient morbidity and mortality. This paper highlights the potential of ultrashort tetra-peptide conjugated to hydrophobic cinnamic acid derivatives. These peptidomimetic molecules demonstrate selective and highly potent activity against resistant biofilm forms of Gram-positive medical device-related pathogens. 3-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)propionic)-Orn-Orn-Trp-Trp-NH2 displays particular promise with minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values of 125 µg/ml against methicillin sensitive (ATCC 29213) and resistant (ATCC 43300) S. aureus and activity shown against biofilm forms of Escherichia coli (MBEC: 1000 µg/ml). Kill kinetics confirms complete eradication of established 24-h biofilms at MBEC with 6-h exposure. Reduced cell cytotoxicity, relative to Gram-positive pathogens, was proven via tissue culture (HaCaT) and haemolysis assays (equine erythrocytes). Existing in nature as part of the immune response, antimicrobial peptides display great promise for exploitation by the pharmaceutical industry in order to increase the library of available therapeutic molecules. Ultrashort variants are particularly promising for translation as clinical therapeutics as they are more cost-effective, easier to synthesise and can be tailored to specific functional requirements based on the primary sequence allowing factors such as spectrum of activity to be varied. PMID:26310860

  3. Antimicrobial efficacy of combined clarithromycin plus daptomycin against biofilms-formed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on titanium medical devices.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Sato, Tetsuro; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Kawamura, Masato; Furukawa, Emiko; Watanabe, Akira

    2015-10-01

    In vitro efficacy of combined eradication therapy with clarithromycin and daptomycin against biofilm-formed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on the orthopedic titanium devices was evaluated. The bactericidal effect of this antibiotic was investigated by a re-culture test, the scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy using a double-staining dyes. Clarithromycin decreased the amount to half in 24 h. Although MRSA biofilms were not eradicated with clarithromycin or daptomycin alone, clarithromycin combined with daptomycin was useful to sterilize titanium devices within 72 h. This in vitro study showed that combined treatment with clarithromycin plus daptomycin is useful to eradicate staphylococcal biofilms formed on orthopedic devices. PMID:26162777

  4. Flexible microfluidic device for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hohne, Danial N.; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a flexible microfluidic device to characterize the mechanical properties of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms. In the device, stress is imposed on a test specimen by application of a fixed pressure to a thin, flexible poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane that is in contact with the specimen. The stress is applied by pressurizing a microfabricated air channel located above the test area. The strain resulting from the applied stress is quantified by measuring the membrane deflection with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. The deflection is governed by the viscoelastic properties of the PDMS membrane and of the test specimen. The relative contributions of the membrane and test material to the measured deformation are quantified by comparing a finite element analysis and an independent (control) measurement of the PDMS membrane mechanical properties. The flexible microfluidic rheometer was used to characterize both the steady-state elastic modulus and transient strain recoil of two soft materials: gellan gums and bacterial biofilms. The measured linear elastic moduli and viscoelastic relaxation times of gellan gum solutions were in good agreement with the results of conventional mechanical rheometry. The linear Young’s moduli of biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which could not be measured using conventional methods, were found to be 3.2 kPa and 1.1 kPa, respectively, and the relaxation time of the S. epidermidis biofilm was 13.8 s. Additionally, strain hardening was observed in all the biofilms studied. Finally, design parameters and detection limits of the method show that the device is capable of characterizing soft viscoelastic solids with elastic moduli in the range of 102 – 105 Pa. The flexible microfluidic rheometer addresses a need for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids common in fields such as biomaterials, food and consumer products. It requires only ~ 200 p

  5. Flexible microfluidic device for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hohne, Danial N; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    We introduce a flexible microfluidic device to characterize the mechanical properties of soft viscoelastic solids such as bacterial biofilms. In the device, stress is imposed on a test specimen by the application of a fixed pressure to a thin, flexible poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) membrane that is in contact with the specimen. The stress is applied by pressurizing a microfabricated air channel located above the test area. The strain resulting from the applied stress is quantified by measuring the membrane deflection with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The deflection is governed by the viscoelastic properties of the PDMS membrane and of the test specimen. The relative contributions of the membrane and test material to the measured deformation are quantified by comparing a finite element analysis with an independent (control) measurement of the PDMS membrane mechanical properties. The flexible microfluidic rheometer was used to characterize both the steady-state elastic modulus and the transient strain recoil of two soft materials: gellan gums and bacterial biofilms. The measured linear elastic moduli and viscoelastic relaxation times of gellan gum solutions were in good agreement with the results of conventional mechanical rheometry. The linear Young's moduli of biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which could not be measured using conventional methods, were found to be 3.2 and 1.1 kPa, respectively, and the relaxation time of the S. epidermidis biofilm was 13.8 s. Additionally, strain hardening was observed in all the biofilms studied. Finally, design parameters and detection limits of the method show that the device is capable of characterizing soft viscoelastic solids with elastic moduli in the range of 102-105 Pa. The flexible microfluidic rheometer addresses the need for mechanical property characterization of soft viscoelastic solids common in fields such as biomaterials, food, and consumer products. It requires only 200 p

  6. An Essential Role for Coagulase in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development Reveals New Therapeutic Possibilities for Device-Related Infections.

    PubMed

    Zapotoczna, Marta; McCarthy, Hannah; Rudkin, Justine K; O'Gara, James P; O'Neill, Eoghan

    2015-12-15

    High-level resistance to antimicrobial drugs is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated, medical device-related infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis revealed that biofilms grown for ≤ 24 hours on biomaterials conditioned with human plasma under venous shear in iron-free cell culture medium were significantly more susceptible to antistaphylococcal antibiotics. Biofilms formed under these physiologically relevant conditions were regulated by SaeRS and dependent on coagulase-catalyzed conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. In contrast, SarA-regulated biofilms formed on uncoated polystyrene in nutrient-rich bacteriological medium were mediated by the previously characterized biofilm factors poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, fibronectin-binding proteins, or autolytic activity and were antibiotic resistant. Coagulase-mediated biofilms exhibited increased antimicrobial resistance over time (>48 hours) but were always susceptible to dispersal by the fibrinolytic enzymes plasmin or nattokinase. Biofilms recovered from infected central venous catheters in a rat model of device-related infection were dispersed by nattokinase, supporting the important role of the biofilm phenotype and identifying a potentially new therapeutic approach with antimicrobials and fibrinolytic drugs, particularly during the early stages of device-related infection. PMID:26044292

  7. Association between Methicillin Susceptibility and Biofilm Regulation in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Device-Related Infections▿ †

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Eoghan; Pozzi, Clarissa; Houston, Patrick; Smyth, Davida; Humphreys, Hilary; Robinson, D. Ashley; O'Gara, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Production of icaADBC-encoded polysaccharide intercellular adhesin, or poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PIA/PNAG), represents an important biofilm mechanism in staphylococci. We previously described a glucose-induced, ica-independent biofilm mechanism in four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates. Here, biofilm regulation by NaCl and glucose was characterized in 114 MRSA and 98 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from diagnosed device-related infections. NaCl-induced biofilm development was significantly more prevalent among MSSA than MRSA isolates, and this association was independent of the isolate's genetic background as assessed by spa sequence typing. Among MSSA isolates, PIA/PNAG production correlated with biofilm development in NaCl, whereas in MRSA isolates grown in NaCl or glucose, PIA/PNAG production was not detected even though icaADBC was transcribed and regulated. Glucose-induced biofilm in MRSA was ica independent and apparently mediated by a protein adhesin(s). Experiments performed with strains that were amenable to genetic manipulation revealed that deletion of icaADBC had no effect on biofilm in a further six MRSA isolates but abolished biofilm in four MSSA isolates. Mutation of sarA abolished biofilm in seven MRSA and eight MSSA isolates. In contrast, mutation of agr in 13 MRSA and 8 MSSA isolates substantially increased biofilm (more than twofold) in only 5 of 21 (23%) isolates and had no significant impact on biofilm in the remaining 16 isolates. We conclude that biofilm development in MRSA is ica independent and involves a protein adhesin(s) regulated by SarA and Agr, whereas SarA-regulated PIA/PNAG plays a more important role in MSSA biofilm development. PMID:17329452

  8. Tert-butyl benzoquinone: mechanism of biofilm eradication and potential for use as a topical antibiofilm agent

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, N.; Eady, E. A.; Cove, J. H.; O'Neill, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tert-butyl benzoquinone (TBBQ) is the oxidation product of tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ), an antimicrobial food additive with >40 years of safe use. TBBQ displays potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in vitro. Here, we report on studies to further explore the action of TBBQ on staphylococcal biofilms, and provide a preliminary preclinical assessment of its potential for use as a topical treatment for staphylococcal infections involving a biofilm component. Methods The antibacterial properties of TBBQ were assessed against staphylococci growing in planktonic culture and as biofilms in the Calgary Biofilm Device. Established assays were employed to measure the effects of TBBQ on biofilm structure and bacterial membranes, and to assess resistance potential. A living-skin equivalent was used to evaluate the effects of TBBQ on human skin. Results TBBQ eradicated biofilms of S. aureus and other staphylococcal species at concentrations ≤64 mg/L. In contrast to other redox-active agents exhibiting activity against biofilms, TBBQ did not cause substantial destructuring of the biofilm matrix; instead, the antibiofilm activity of the compound was attributed to its ability to kill slow- and non-growing cells via membrane perturbation. TBBQ acted synergistically with gentamicin, did not damage a living-skin equivalent following topical application and exhibited low resistance potential. Conclusions The ability of TBBQ to eradicate biofilms appears to result from its ability to kill bacteria regardless of growth state. Preliminary evaluation suggests that TBBQ represents a promising candidate for development as a topical antibiofilm agent. PMID:27121399

  9. Life under flow: A novel microfluidic device for the assessment of anti-biofilm technologies

    PubMed Central

    Salta, Maria; Capretto, Lorenzo; Carugo, Dario; Wharton, Julian A.; Stokes, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we have developed and fabricated a novel lab-on-a-chip device for the investigation of biofilm responses, such as attachment kinetics and initial biofilm formation, to different hydrodynamic conditions. The microfluidic flow channels are designed using computational fluid dynamic simulations so as to have a pre-defined, homogeneous wall shear stress in the channels, ranging from 0.03 to 4.30 Pa, which are relevant to in-service conditions on a ship hull, as well as other man-made marine platforms. Temporal variations of biofilm formation in the microfluidic device were assessed using time-lapse microscopy, nucleic acid staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Differences in attachment kinetics were observed with increasing shear stress, i.e., with increasing shear stress there appeared to be a delay in bacterial attachment, i.e., at 55, 120, 150, and 155 min for 0.03, 0.60, 2.15, and 4.30 Pa, respectively. CLSM confirmed marked variations in colony architecture, i.e.,: (i) lower shear stresses resulted in biofilms with distinctive morphologies mainly characterised by mushroom-like structures, interstitial channels, and internal voids, and (ii) for the higher shear stresses compact clusters with large interspaces between them were formed. The key advantage of the developed microfluidic device is the combination of three architectural features in one device, i.e., an open-system design, channel replication, and multiple fully developed shear stresses. PMID:24454610

  10. Sustained prevention of biofilm formation on a novel silicone matrix suitable for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Søren Langer; Vestergaard, Merete Hedemark; Groenning, Minna; Alm, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on medical devices constitute major challenges in clinical long-term use of e.g. catheters due to the risk of (re)infection of patients, which would result in additional use of antibiotics risking bacterial resistance development. The aim of the present project was to introduce a novel antibacterial approach involving an advanced composite material applicable for medical devices. The polymeric composites investigated consisted of a hydrogel network of cross-linked poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) embedded in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) silicone elastomer produced using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). In these materials, the hydrogel may contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient while the silicone elastomer provides the sufficient mechanical stability of the material. In these conceptual studies, the antimicrobial agent ciprofloxacin was loaded into the polymer matrix by a post-polymerization loading procedure. Sustained release of ciprofloxacin was demonstrated, and the release could be controlled by varying the hydrogel content in the range 13-38% (w/w) and by changing the concentration of ciprofloxacin during loading in the range of 1-20mg/mL. Devices containing 25% (w/w) hydrogel and loaded with ciprofloxacin displayed a strong antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus bacterial colonization and subsequent biofilm formation on the device material was inhibited for 29days. In conclusion, the hydrogel/silicone composite represents a promising candidate material for medical devices that prevent bacterial colonization during long-term use. PMID:26028273

  11. Permeabilizing biofilms

    DOEpatents

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  12. LRT design choices: Edmonton and Calgary

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, E.

    1983-07-01

    Light rail transit (LRT) has been used as a source of transportation in Alberta's two largest cities, Edmonton and Calgary, since the mid-1970's. In light of their current expansion efforts, some specifics of each system are investigated. Much discussion centers on the advantages and disadvantages of surface option vs. subway option in downtown situations since a surface LRT is used in Calgary and the subway LRT in Edmonton. The surface option is shown to be more affordable than the subway option in terms of initial capital investment, but other factors must be considered including level of service, fare collection methods, permanency of structures, noise level, and passenger comfort. 14 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms exhibit higher tolerance to toxicants than free-floating counterparts.

    PubMed

    Pesciaroli, Lorena; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The MBEC(TM)-High Throughput Assay based on the Calgary Biofilm Device was used to produce and to characterize Pleurotus ostreatus biofilms. Hydroxyapatite coating of pegs was required to enable biofilm attachment; biofilm amounts and homogeneity of distribution were markedly improved upon removal of non-sessile biomass after 48 h from inoculation. Scanning electron microscopy showed surface-associated and multi-layered growth stabilized by the presence of an extracellular matrix (ECM). Biofilms had higher contents of total sugars and ECM than their free-floating counterparts. Tolerance to Cr(VI) in the former was about twice that of the latter as inferred by the respective inhibitory concentrations (48.4 vs 24.1 mM and 114.5 vs 61.0 mM in 4- and 7-d-old cultures, respectively). Biofilms also displayed superior olive-mill wastewater (OMW) treatment efficiency along 5 consecutive batches leading to chemical oxygen demand and total phenol removals higher than 50 and 90%, respectively. Laccase activity peaks in biofilm cultures grown on OMW were significantly higher than those in free-floating cultures. PMID:23998200

  14. Early detection of eukaryotic communities from marine biofilm using high-throughput sequencing: an assessment of different sampling devices.

    PubMed

    Pochon, Xavier; Zaiko, Anastasija; Hopkins, Grant A; Banks, Jonathan C; Wood, Susanna A

    2015-01-01

    Marine biofilms are precursors for colonization by larger fouling organisms, including non-indigenous species (NIS). In this study, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of 18S rRNA metabarcodes was used to investigate four sampling methods (modified syringe, sterilized sponge, underwater tape and sterilized swab) for characterizing eukaryotic communities in marine biofilms. Perspex™ plates were sampled in and out of water. DNA collected with tape did not amplify. Otherwise, there were no statistical differences in communities among the remaining three sampling devices or between the two environments. Sterilized sponges are recommended for ease of use underwater. In-depth HTS analysis identified diverse eukaryotic communities, dominated by Metazoa and Chromoalveolata. Among the latter, diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) were particularly abundant (33% of reads assigned to Chromalveolata). The NIS Ciona savignyi was detected in all samples. The application of HTS in marine biofilm surveillance could facilitate early detection of NIS, improving the probability of successful eradication. PMID:25877857

  15. Preliminary results of a new antibiotic susceptibility test against biofilm installation in device-associated infections: the Antibiofilmogram®.

    PubMed

    Tasse, Jason; Croisier, Delphine; Badel-Berchoux, Stéphanie; Chavanet, Pascal; Bernardi, Thierry; Provot, Christian; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular matrix and adherent to a surface. The development was described as a four-stage process leading to the formation of a mature biofilm which was resistant to immune system and antibiotic actions. In bone and joint infections (BJIs), the formation of biofilms is a leading cause of treatment failure. Here we study the capacity of 11 antibiotics commonly used in the treatment of BJIs to inhibit the biofilm formation on 29 clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates by a new test called Antibiofilmogram(®) The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and biofilm MIC (bMIC) were determined in vitro and showed similar values for clindamycin, fusidic acid, linezolid and rifampin. Reversely, daptomycin, fosfomycin, gentamicin and ofloxacin showed a bMIC distribution different from MIC with bMIC above breakpoint. Finally, cloxacillin, teicoplanin and vancomycin revealed an intermediate bMIC distribution with a strain-dependent pattern. A murine in vivo model of catheter-associated S. aureus infection was made and showed a significant reduction, but not total prevention, of catheter colonization with cloxacillin at bMIC, and no or limited reduction with cloxacillin at MIC. Antibiofilmogram(®) could be of great interest after surgical operations on contaminated prostheses and after bacteremia in order to prevent the colonization of the device. PMID:27316688

  16. Non-destructive monitoring of microbial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces using on-line devices

    SciTech Connect

    Nivens, D.E. . Dept. of Chemistry Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Inst. for Applied Microbiology); Chambers, J.Q. . Dept. of Chemistry); White, D.C. . Inst. for Applied Microbiology Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Microbiology Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion, biofouling, and related problems have been an impetus for investigating interactions between microorganisms and solid surfaces. In recent years, a number of studies have been performed to assess the damages caused by microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). In a number of these studies, electrochemical techniques have monitored the performance of metal surfaces exposed to bacteria. However, most of these methods can only indirectly detect the presence of biofilms. In this paper, two non-destructive on-line monitoring devices, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used to directly monitor biofilm formation. These devices have been developed to study the initial fouling process and subsequent biofilm development and not merely the effects of the living film on the host material. The ATR-FT/IR technique provides information about biomass, exopolymer production, and the nutritional status of microbial biofilms. The QCM provides a direct measure of biomass. ATR-FT/IR and QCM detect 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} Caulobacter crescentus cells/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Both techniques can be coupled with electrochemical methods for deeper insight into mechanisms of MIC. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Genes involved in Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation at a simulated food processing plant temperature of 15 °C.

    PubMed

    Piercey, Marta J; Hingston, Patricia A; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2016-04-16

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogenic foodborne bacterium whose persistence in food processing environments is in part attributed to its biofilm formation. Most biofilm studies have been carried out at 30-37 °C rather than at temperatures found in the food processing plants (i.e., 10-20 °C). The objective of the present study was to mine for novel genes that contribute to L. monocytogenes biofilm formation at 15 °C using the random insertional mutagenesis approach. A library of 11,024 L. monocytogenes 568 (serotype 1/2a) Himar1 insertional mutants was created. Mutants with reduced or enhanced biofilm formation at 15 °C were detected in microtiter plate assays with crystal violet and safranin staining. Fourteen mutants expressed enhanced biofilm phenotypes, and harbored transposon insertions in genes encoding cell wall biosynthesis, motility, metabolism, stress response, and cell surface associated proteins. Deficient mutants (n=5) contained interruptions in genes related to peptidoglycan, teichoic acid, or lipoproteins. Enhanced mutants produced significantly (p<0.05) higher cell densities in biofilm formed on stainless steel (SS) coupons at 15 °C (48 h) than deficient mutants, which were also more sensitive to benzalkonium chloride. All biofilm deficient mutants and four enhanced mutants in the microtiter plate assay (flaA, cheR, lmo2563 and lmo2488) formed no biofilm in a peg lid assay (Calgary biofilm device) while insertions in lmo1224 and lmo0543 led to excess biofilm in all assays. Two enhanced biofilm formers were more resistant to enzymatic removal with DNase, proteinase K or pectinase than the parent strain. Scanning electron microscopy of individual biofilms made by five mutants and the parent on SS surfaces showed formation of heterogeneous biofilm with dense zones by immotile mutants, while deficient mutants exhibited sparse growth. In conclusion, interruptions of 9 genes not previously linked to biofilm formation in L. monocytogenes (lmo2572, lmo

  18. Occurrence and new mutations involved in rifampicin-resistant Propionibacterium acnes strains isolated from biofilm or device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Aubin, Guillaume Ghislain; Eich, Gerhard; Trampuz, Andrej; Corvec, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    We described for the first time the amino acid substitutions conferring rifampicin resistance in eight Propionibacterium acnes strains isolated from patients with biofilm or device-related infections. We identified different mutations in cluster I and one mutation, never reported, in cluster II of the rpoB gene (I480V) associated with the most frequent one in cluster I (S442L). Half of the patients previously received treatment with rifampicin. PMID:25999299

  19. Effects of Azithromycin, Metronidazole, Amoxicillin, and Metronidazole plus Amoxicillin on an In Vitro Polymicrobial Subgingival Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Flavia; Starr, Jacqueline R.; Feres, Magda; Patel, Michele; Martin, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is one of the most prevalent human diseases and is caused by dysbiosis of the subgingival microbiota. Treatment involves primarily mechanical disruption of subgingival biofilms and, in certain cases, adjunctive use of systemic antibiotic therapy. In vitro biofilm models have been developed to study antimicrobial agents targeting subgingival species. However, these models accommodate a limited number of taxa, lack reproducibility, and have low throughput. We aimed to develop an in vitro multispecies biofilm model that mimics subgingival plaque, to test antimicrobial agents. Biofilms were cultivated using the Calgary Biofilm Device and were exposed to amoxicillin (AMX), metronidazole (MTZ), azithromycin (AZM), and AMX-MTZ at four different concentrations for 12, 24, or 36 h. Chlorhexidine (CHX) (0.12%) was used as the positive control. The compositions of the biofilms were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization, and the percent reduction in biofilm metabolic activity was determined using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride and spectrophotometry. Thirty-five of the 40 species used in the inoculum were consistently recovered from the resulting in vitro biofilms. After 36 h of exposure at the 1:27 dilution, AMX-MTZ reduced metabolic activity 11% less than CHX (q = 0.0207) but 54% more than AMX (q = 0.0031), 72% more than MTZ (q = 0.0031), and 67% more than AZM (q = 0.0008). Preliminary evidence of a synergistic interaction between AMX and MTZ was also observed. In summary, we developed reproducible biofilms with 35 subgingival bacterial species, and our results suggested that the combination of AMX and MTZ had greater antimicrobial effects on these in vitro multispecies biofilms than expected on the basis of the independent effects of the drugs. PMID:25733510

  20. Biofilm Formation, icaADBC Transcription, and Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Synthesis by Staphylococci in a Device-Related Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Fluckiger, Ursula; Ulrich, Martina; Steinhuber, Andrea; Döring, Gerd; Mack, Dietrich; Landmann, Regine; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    Biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus is mediated by the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) encoded by the ica operon. We used a device-related animal model to investigate biofilm formation, PIA expression (immunofluorescence), and ica transcription (quantitative transcript analysis) throughout the course of infection by using two prototypic S. aureus strains and one S. epidermidis strain as well as corresponding ica mutants. During infection, the ica mutants were growth attenuated when inoculated in competition with the corresponding wild-type strains but not when grown singly. A typical biofilm was observed at the late course of infection. Only in S. aureus RN6390, not in S. aureus Newman, were PIA and ica-specific transcripts detectable after anaerobic growth in vitro. However, both S. aureus strains were PIA positive in vivo by day 8 of infection. ica transcription preceded PIA expression and biofilm formation in vivo. In S. epidermidis, both PIA and ica expression levels were elevated compared to those in the S. aureus strains in vitro as well as in vivo and were detectable throughout the course of infection. In conclusion, in S. aureus, PIA expression is dependent on the genetic background of the strain as well as on strong inducing conditions, such as those dominating in vivo. In S. epidermidis, PIA expression is elevated and less vulnerable to environmental conditions. PMID:15731082

  1. On-line monitoring of biofilm formation in a brewery water pipeline system with a fibre optical device.

    PubMed

    Tamachkiarow, L; Flemming, H C

    2003-01-01

    Any advanced anti-fouling strategy must be based on early warning systems which allow for timely, precisely directed and optimized countermeasures. Such systems must be able to detect biofilm growth on representative surfaces. In order to meet this requirement, a fibre optical device (FOS) has been developed. It is based on light which is scattered by objects deposited on the tip of an optical fibre. A receiving fibre collects the signal and forwards it to a detection and quantification unit. Both the sending and the receiving fibre are mounted in a measuring head which is integrated evenly on the inner surface of a water pipeline at representative sites. This device was applied to a water system of a brewery in order toput its reliability to test under practical conditions. The FOS detected the build-up of a deposit which was identified independently as consisting of microorganisms, i.e., a biofilm. A stable, well detectable and reproducible signal could be obtained above a colonization of 10(5) cells cm-2. Adjustment of the sensitivity of the amplifier allowed for detection of biofilms up to 10(10) cells cm-2. Cleaning countermeasures could be detected clearly by a decrease of backscattered light intensity. The system proved to be suitable for on-line, non-destructive, real-time and automatic monitoring for a period of almost two years, and thus, provides an important constituent for an advanced anti-fouling strategy. PMID:12701901

  2. A dynamic in vitro model for evaluating antimicrobial activity against bacterial biofilms using a new device and clinical-used catheters.

    PubMed

    García, Isabel; Conejo, M del Carmen; Ojeda, Antonio; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro

    2010-12-01

    The activity of daptomycin compared to vancomycin against Staphylococcus epidermidis-biofilms on intravascular catheters has been evaluated using the new Sevilla device that enables to use medical grade-catheters, in an in vitro model that simulates the in vivo conditions. S. epidermidis-biofilms were obtained on polyurethane catheter segments using the Sevilla device linked to a continuous culture system for 24 h. To assess the antimicrobial activity, at this time the continuous culture system was changed to therapeutic antimicrobial concentration solutions for 48 h. At each 24 h interval time, catheter segments were taken out, washed and sonicated. Viable adherent bacteria were determined by agar plating. Data of surviving bacteria numbers attached to the catheter surface obtained with the Sevilla device showed a very good reproducibility. Daptomycin showed a good activity against S. epidermidis-biofilm on polyurethane catheter surface. After 48 h exposure to daptomycin, surviving adherent bacteria were reduced by 4 log compared to the control with no antimicrobial. Using the same model, vancomycin reduced bacterial survival by only 1.3 log. The Sevilla device enables antimicrobial agent activity against bacterial biofilms grown on the external surface of catheters used in clinical practice to be evaluated. The model used replicates as closely as possible the biofilm formed in a highly standardized way. Using this model, daptomycin demonstrates potent in vitro activity against S. epidermidis-biofilm on a polyurethane catheter; this activity was greater than that showed by vancomycin. PMID:20888868

  3. Calgary Girls' School: 600 Computers for 600 Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article features Calgary Girls' School (CGS), a charter school including grades four through nine that opened with 188 students in 2003. The school was aligned with Alberta Education's charter-school mandate at that time to offer parents a broad range of school choices. Today the Alberta charter school mandate is to focus on innovation and…

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outcompetes other bacteria in the manifestation and maintenance of a biofilm in polyvinylchloride tubing as used in dental devices.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Christoph Gert; Nagl, Markus; Nogler, Michael; Coraça-Huber, Débora Cristina

    2016-05-01

    In a PVC tube as a model system for dental devices, Pseudomonas aeruginosa outcompetes Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae for the biofilm formation. P. aeruginosa has advantage over the other strains due to higher tolerance for low-nutrient situations or direct killing by the production of soluble factors like pyocyanin. PMID:26980595

  5. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation by Esomeprazole in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vandana; Arora, Vaneet; Alam, M. Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are common nosocomial pathogens responsible for biofilm-associated infections. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI), such as esomeprazole, may have novel antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to assess whether esomeprazole prevents sessile bacterial growth and biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic killing effects with standard antibiotics. The antibiofilm activity of esomeprazole at 0.25 mM was tested against two strains each of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Bacterial biofilms were prepared using a commercially available 96-peg-plate Calgary biofilm device. Sessile bacterial CFU counts and biomass were assessed during 72 hours of esomeprazole exposure. The killing activities after an additional 24 hours of vancomycin (against S. aureus) and meropenem (against P. aeruginosa) treatment with or without preexposure to esomeprazole were also assessed by CFU and biomass analyses. P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains exposed to esomeprazole displayed decreased sessile bacterial growth and biomass (P < 0.001, each parameter). After 72 h of exposure, there was a 1-log10 decrease in the CFU/ml of esomeprazole-exposed P. aeruginosa and S. aureus strains compared to controls (P < 0.001). After 72 h of exposure, measured absorbance was 100% greater in P. aeruginosa control strains than in esomeprazole-exposed strains (P < 0.001). Increased killing and decreased biomass were observed for esomeprazole-treated bacteria compared to untreated controls exposed to conventional antibiotics (P < 0.001, each parameter). Reduced biofilm growth after 24 h was visibly apparent by light micrographs for P. aeruginosa and S. aureus isolates exposed to esomeprazole compared to untreated controls. In conclusion, esomeprazole demonstrated an antibiofilm effect against biofilm-producing S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. PMID:22664967

  6. Centralization of a regional clinical microbiology service: The Calgary experience

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre L; Hall, Paula

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS) in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA) and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL). Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs) are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service. PMID:22346397

  7. [Biofilms and public health].

    PubMed

    Choisy, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Micro-organisms do not always exist in planctonic forms (single cells or small groups). To survive, especially in limiting media, they may adhere to inert or living surfaces. This enables them to multiply within a community protected by an extracellular matrix, thus forming a biofilm which protects them from antimicrobials. Biofilms have many potential consequences for public health. Some are positive, such as the commensal biofilms that protect against pathogenic bacteria, while environmental biofilms may be a source of outbreaks of respiratory or gastrointestinal diseases or infections associated with implanted medical devices. Respiratory tract infection can be caused by aerosols of fragmented biofilms growing in warm humid conditions (air cooling towers, hot springs, showers, etc.). Digestive tract infection can arise from biofilms formed during food manufacturing or packaging processes. Colonized implanted medical devices can lead to sepsis. This article examines the role of central venous catheters, taking into account the surgical site. In vivo studies show that the source of catheter infection may be exogenous or endogenous, while in vitro studies of biofilms show that ablation of the device is the best solution. Prevention is difficult, as biofilm formation is multifactorial. Physical and biological knowledge of biofilms may help to limit their formation and growth. PMID:22375373

  8. Biofilms: Microbial Life on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to surfaces and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and the up- and down- regulation of specific genes. Attachment is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of the growth medium, substratum, and cell surface. An established biofilm structure comprises microbial cells and EPS, has a defined architecture, and provides an optimal environment for the exchange of genetic material between cells. Cells may also communicate via quorum sensing, which may in turn affect biofilm processes such as detachment. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and importance in a variety of device-related infections. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management. PMID:12194761

  9. [Biofilms, tolerance and antimicrobial resistance].

    PubMed

    Bahar, Gül

    2002-01-01

    Virtually every surface examined in natural, industrial and pathogenic ecosystems are colonized by biofilms consisting of adherent populations of microorganisms surrounded with a glycocalyx matrix. The development of biofilms has important economic and medical consequences. The development and use of a broad range of medical devices made us recognize a variety of infections caused by microorganisms that were regarded previously as harmless. Infections caused by biofilms are difficult to eradicate with antimicrobial treatment, and in-vitro susceptibility tests show significant resistance of biofilm cells to be killed. Advances in our understanding of biofilm formation can assist in the development of novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by biofilms. In this review article, structures, general properties and antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of biofilms were discussed under the light of recent literature. PMID:12838670

  10. Biofilm Formation by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis R; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses a polysaccharide capsule and can form biofilms on medical devices. The increasing use of ventriculoperitoneal shunts to manage intracranial hypertension associated with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis highlights the importance of investigating the biofilm-forming properties of this organism. Like other microbe-forming biofilms, C. neoformans biofilms are resistant to antimicrobial agents and host defense mechanisms, causing significant morbidity and mortality. This chapter discusses the recent advances in the understanding of cryptococcal biofilms, including the role of its polysaccharide capsule in adherence, gene expression, and quorum sensing in biofilm formation. We describe novel strategies for the prevention or eradication of cryptococcal colonization of medical prosthetic devices. Finally, we provide fresh thoughts on the diverse but interesting directions of research in this field that may result in new insights into C. neoformans biology. PMID:26185073

  11. Biofilms: Survival Mechanisms of Clinically Relevant Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, Rodney M.; Costerton, J. William

    2002-01-01

    Though biofilms were first described by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the theory describing the biofilm process was not developed until 1978. We now understand that biofilms are universal, occurring in aquatic and industrial water systems as well as a large number of environments and medical devices relevant for public health. Using tools such as the scanning electron microscope and, more recently, the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm researchers now understand that biofilms are not unstructured, homogeneous deposits of cells and accumulated slime, but complex communities of surface-associated cells enclosed in a polymer matrix containing open water channels. Further studies have shown that the biofilm phenotype can be described in terms of the genes expressed by biofilm-associated cells. Microorganisms growing in a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents by one or more mechanisms. Biofilm-associated microorganisms have been shown to be associated with several human diseases, such as native valve endocarditis and cystic fibrosis, and to colonize a wide variety of medical devices. Though epidemiologic evidence points to biofilms as a source of several infectious diseases, the exact mechanisms by which biofilm-associated microorganisms elicit disease are poorly understood. Detachment of cells or cell aggregates, production of endotoxin, increased resistance to the host immune system, and provision of a niche for the generation of resistant organisms are all biofilm processes which could initiate the disease process. Effective strategies to prevent or control biofilms on medical devices must take into consideration the unique and tenacious nature of biofilms. Current intervention strategies are designed to prevent initial device colonization, minimize microbial cell attachment to the device, penetrate the biofilm matrix and kill the associated cells, or remove the device from the patient. In the future, treatments may be based on inhibition of genes

  12. The ``Swiss cheese'' instability of bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Bacteria often adhere to surfaces, where they develop polymer-encased communities (biofilms) that display dramatic resistance to antibiotic treatment. A better understanding of cell detachment from biofilms may lead to novel strategies for biofilm disruption. Here we describe a new detachment mode, whereby a biofilm develops a nearly regular array of ~50-100 μm holes. Using surface-treated microfluidic devices, we create biofilms of controlled shape and size. After the passage of an air plug, the break-up of the residual thin liquid film scrapes and rearranges bacteria on the surface, such that a ``Swiss cheese'' pattern is left in the residual biofilm. Fluorescent staining of the polymeric matrix (EPS) reveals that resistance to cell dislodgement correlates with local biofilm age, early settlers having had more time to hunker down. Because few survivors suffice to regrow a biofilm, these results point at the importance of considering microscale heterogeneity in assessing the effectiveness of biofilm removal strategies.

  13. Estimates of dark ecosystem respiration of CO 2 from the city of Calgary, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahey, D. M.; Hansen, M. C.

    Carbon dioxide flux can be used as a criterion of the metabolism of terrestrial communities. A method has been developed to estimate this flux from urban areas during nocturnal periods characterized by stable air. The method assumes that biogenic and anthropogenic CO 2 emissions are proportional to one another. This assumption appears to be acceptable for average conditions in Calgary, Alberta, which is an "urban forest" situated in a prairie setting. Application of the method for estimating the CO 2 flux from Calgary's terrestrial ecosystem shows that dark respiration is absent during autumn and winter seasons. It is twice as great in summer as in spring. Its summer level is less than half that observed for an oak—pine forest in New York state. The lesser value is explainable in terms of Calgary's colder climate and the fact that a significant portion of the city is occupied by streets, houses, high-rise buildings and parking lots.

  14. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  15. Small molecule control of bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Richards, Justin J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are defined as a surface attached community of bacteria embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances that they have produced. When in the biofilm state, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and the host immune response than are their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are increasingly recognized as being significant in human disease, accounting for 80% of bacterial infections in the body and diseases associated with bacterial biofilms include: lung infections of cystic fibrosis, colitis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, otitis, endocarditis and periodontitis. Additionally, biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are of particular concern, as once the device is colonized infection is virtually impossible to eradicate. Given the prominence of biofilms in infectious diseases, there has been an increased effort toward the development of small molecules that will modulate bacterial biofilm development and maintenance. In this review, we highlight the development of small molecules that inhibit and/or disperse bacterial biofilms through non-microbicidal mechanisms. The review discuses the numerous approaches that have been applied to the discovery of lead small molecules that mediate biofilm development. These approaches are grouped into: 1) the identification and development of small molecules that target one of the bacterial signaling pathways involved in biofilm regulation, 2) chemical library screening for compounds with anti-biofilm activity, and 3) the identification of natural products that possess anti-biofilm activity, and the chemical manipulation of these natural products to obtain analogues with increased activity. PMID:22733439

  16. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Moser, Claus; Wang, Heng-Zhuang; Høiby, Niels; Song, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the difficulties for the clinical treatment of biofilm infections. Clinical and laboratory investigations demonstrated a perspicuous correlation between biofilm infection and medical foreign bodies or indwelling devices. Clinical observations and experimental studies indicated clearly that antibiotic treatment alone is in most cases insufficient to eradicate biofilm infections. Therefore, to effectively treat biofilm infections with currently available antibiotics and evaluate the outcomes become important and urgent for clinicians. The review summarizes the latest progress in treatment of clinical biofilm infections and scientific investigations, discusses the diagnosis and treatment of different biofilm infections and introduces the promising laboratory progress, which may contribute to prevention or cure of biofilm infections. We conclude that, an efficient treatment of biofilm infections needs a well-established multidisciplinary collaboration, which includes removal of the infected foreign bodies, selection of biofilm-active, sensitive and well-penetrating antibiotics, systemic or topical antibiotic administration in high dosage and combinations, and administration of anti-quorum sensing or biofilm dispersal agents. PMID:25504208

  17. Differentiating and Predictor Variables for Mature Non-Matriculant Students at the University of Calgary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, R. C.; And Others

    A biographical inventory, an ability test, and three reading tests were administered to 699 persons who were hopeful about beginning course work at the University of Calgary. These students were categorized as Mature Non-matriculants because they did not have senior matriculation which is necessary for normal entry to the university. A total of…

  18. Marketing the University of Calgary to Frosh: A Motivational Typology of Student-College Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnetson, Robert James

    This thesis proposes a segmentation of the University of Calgary's (Canada) freshman class based on benefits sought from attendance and provides descriptions of each benefit segment that includes the impact of institutional characteristics. A motivational typology for university participation is presented and the marketing implications of this…

  19. Provision of Coordinated Care for Individuals with Down Syndrome: The Calgary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heerensperger, Donna

    2006-01-01

    In Calgary, Alberta, Canada, cooperation between families, agencies and health care providers has resulted in services that improve the health and quality of life for individuals with Down syndrome. One of these is the multidisciplinary Down syndrome team at the Alberta Children's Hospital, which provides assessment, treatment and support based on…

  20. The Host’s Reply to Candida Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida spp. are among the most common nosocomial fungal pathogens and are notorious for their propensity toward biofilm formation. When growing on a medical device or mucosal surface, these organisms reside as communities embedded in a protective matrix, resisting host defenses. The host responds to Candida biofilm by depositing a variety of proteins that become incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Compared to free-floating Candida, leukocytes are less effective against Candida within a biofilm. This review highlights recent advances describing the host’s response to Candida biofilms using ex vivo and in vivo models of mucosal and device-associated biofilm infections. PMID:26999221

  1. Biomechanical Analysis of Infectious Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Head, David

    2016-01-01

    The removal of infectious biofilms from tissues or implanted devices and their transmission through fluid transport systems depends in part of the mechanical properties of their polymeric matrix. Linking the various physical and chemical microscopic interactions to macroscopic deformation and failure modes promises to unveil design principles for novel therapeutic strategies targeting biofilm eradication, and provide a predictive capability to accelerate the development of devices, water lines, etc, that minimise microbial dispersal. Here, our current understanding of biofilm mechanics is appraised from the perspective of biophysics , with an emphasis on constitutive modelling that has been highly successful in soft matter. Fitting rheometric data to viscoelastic models has quantified linear and nonlinear stress relaxation mechanisms, how they vary between species and environments, and how candidate chemical treatments alter the mechanical response. The rich interplay between growth, mechanics and hydrodynamics is just becoming amenable to computational modelling and promises to provide unprecedented characterisation of infectious biofilms in their native state. PMID:27193540

  2. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  3. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L.; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H.; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  4. Teleconferencing Cme Programs to Rural Physicians: The University of Calgary Teleconference Program

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, C.A.; Challis, E.B.; Lockyer, J.M.; White, L.; Adams, K.; Parboosingh, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) provides practising family physicians with the cornerstone of maintenance and improvement of skills. In rural areas the problems of isolation and distance are a barrier to continuing medical education. Provision of CME programs by audio-teleconferencing is an attempt to overcome these problems. This article describes the teleconference program of The University of Calgary, how it has developed over the five years of its existence, and its impact on rural physicians. PMID:21263789

  5. GENETIC CONTROL OF CANDIDA ALBICANS BIOFILM DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan S.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Candida species cause frequent infections due to their ability to form biofilms – surface-associated microbial communities – primarily on implanted medical devices. Increasingly, mechanistic studies have identified the gene products that participate directly in Candida albicans biofilm formation, as well as the regulatory circuitry and networks that control their expression and activity. These studies have revealed new mechanisms and signals that govern C. albicans biofilm formation and associated drug resistance, thus providing biological insight and therapeutic foresight. PMID:21189476

  6. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Speziale, Pietro; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g., in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue, and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow, and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell–cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA, and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG), clumping factor B (ClfB), serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC), the biofilm-associated protein (Bap), and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB) are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap) contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis, proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC). Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap) and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp) of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC) of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in Staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  7. Multi-depth valved microfluidics for biofilm segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. T.; Subramanian, S.; Kim, Y. W.; Ben-Yoav, H.; Gnerlich, M.; Gerasopoulos, K.; Bentley, W. E.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a societal challenge, as they occur in the majority of infections but are highly resistant to both immune mechanisms and traditional antibiotics. In the pursuit of better understanding biofilm biology for developing new treatments, there is a need for streamlined, controlled platforms for biofilm growth and evaluation. We leverage advantages of microfluidics to develop a system in which biofilms are formed and sectioned, allowing parallel assays on multiple sections of one biofilm. A microfluidic testbed with multiple depth profiles was developed to accommodate biofilm growth and sectioning by hydraulically actuated valves. In realization of the platform, a novel fabrication technique was developed for creating multi-depth microfluidic molds using sequentially patterned photoresist separated and passivated by conformal coatings using atomic layer deposition. Biofilm thickness variation within three separately tested devices was less than 13% of the average thickness in each device, while variation between devices was 23% of the average thickness. In a demonstration of parallel experiments performed on one biofilm within one device, integrated valves were used to trisect the uniform biofilms with one section maintained as a control, and two sections exposed to different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The technology presented here for multi-depth microchannel fabrication can be used to create a host of microfluidic devices with diverse architectures. While this work focuses on one application of such a device in biofilm sectioning for parallel experimentation, the tailored architectures enabled by the fabrication technology can be used to create devices that provide new biological information.

  8. The clinical importance of fungal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Gordon; Williams, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Fungal biofilms have become an increasingly important clinical problem. The widespread use of antibiotics, frequent use of indwelling medical devices, and a trend toward increased patient immunosuppression have resulted in a creation of opportunity for clinically important yeasts and molds to form biofilms. This review will discuss the diversity and importance of fungal biofilms in the context of clinical medicine, provide novel insights into the clinical management of fungal biofilm infection, present evidence why these structures are recalcitrant to antifungal therapy, and discuss how our knowledge and understanding may lead to novel therapeutic intervention. PMID:23763758

  9. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mancl, Kimberly A.; Kirsner, Robert S.; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque,are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible, thus biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well-elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attentionto the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields as well as future therapies are also discussed. PMID:23551419

  10. Sub-Optimal Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianyan; Duperthuy, Marylise; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm is an emerging clinical problem recognized in the treatment of infectious diseases within the last two decades. The appearance of microbial biofilm in clinical settings is steadily increasing due to several reasons including the increased use of quality of life-improving artificial devices. In contrast to infections caused by planktonic bacteria that respond relatively well to standard antibiotic therapy, biofilm-forming bacteria tend to cause chronic infections whereby infections persist despite seemingly adequate antibiotic therapy. This review briefly describes the responses of biofilm matrix components and biofilm-associated bacteria towards sub-lethal concentrations of antimicrobial agents, which may include the generation of genetic and phenotypic variabilities. Clinical implications of bacterial biofilms in relation to antibiotic treatments are also discussed. PMID:27338489

  11. Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Fila, Grzegorz; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses. PMID:23509680

  12. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in dogs and cats in Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Daniel; Van Niekerk, Drew; Gagné, France; Gilleard, John; Kutz, Susan; Lobingier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of endoparasites was evaluated in 619 dogs and 153 cats in the Calgary, Alberta region. Both homed and shelter-sourced pets were evaluated, and prevalence was assessed in various age groups. The overall endoparasite prevalence was 16.5% in canine samples and 7.2% in feline samples. The most common intestinal parasites in dogs were Giardia (8.1%) and ascarids (4.2%). The most common feline endoparasite was ascarids (6.5%). This study will help veterinarians to better plan diagnostic and preventative strategies with regard to companion animal intestinal parasites. PMID:22654137

  13. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in dogs and cats in Calgary, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Daniel; Van Niekerk, Drew; Gagné, France; Gilleard, John; Kutz, Susan; Lobingier, Robert

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of endoparasites was evaluated in 619 dogs and 153 cats in the Calgary, Alberta region. Both homed and shelter-sourced pets were evaluated, and prevalence was assessed in various age groups. The overall endoparasite prevalence was 16.5% in canine samples and 7.2% in feline samples. The most common intestinal parasites in dogs were Giardia (8.1%) and ascarids (4.2%). The most common feline endoparasite was ascarids (6.5%). This study will help veterinarians to better plan diagnostic and preventative strategies with regard to companion animal intestinal parasites. PMID:22654137

  14. GNSS Radio Occultation Methods for CubeSat Missions: The University of Calgary and Spire Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skone, S.; Swab, M.; Platzer, P.; Johl, S.; Cappaert, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 2008, the University of Calgary deployed a low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf dual frequency GPS receiver onboard the CanX-2 nanosatellite, with the goal of demonstrating single-antenna single-receiver GNSS radio occultation capabilities. The team successfully produced ionospheric electron density profiles and continues to operate the CanX-2 GPS payload and collect reliable data six years into the mission. Recently the University of Calgary partnered with Spire to develop low-cost atmospheric sounding methods based on GNSS radio occultations for nanosatellite platforms. The rapidly increasing capabilities on nanosatellites with regards to power production, pointing accuracy and antenna sensitivities provide an ever more attractive platform to create relevant solutions for space and terrestrial weather data. This paper describes future mission concepts and capabilities for multi-GNSS methods to generate high-resolution atmospheric profiles. Building on lessons learned from CanX-2, the system requirements are defined and recommendations made for efficient GNSS payload operations. New methods are assessed for multi-frequency multi-constellation GNSS radio occultation approaches. Software and hardware simulations are conducted for validation of proposed methods using appropriate receiver architectures. Analyses include signal tracking for LEO trajectories (and Dopplers) and high-precision navigation solutions. Initial data analysis is also presented for a miniaturized, multi-frequency, software-­defined GNSS receiver currently operating onboard Spire's innovative CubeSat platform.

  15. Biofilm-degrading enzymes from Lysobacter gummosus

    PubMed Central

    Gökçen, Anke; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Wiesner, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm-degrading enzymes could be used for the gentle cleaning of industrial and medical devices and the manufacture of biofilm-resistant materials. We therefore investigated 20 species and strains of the bacterial genus Lysobacter for their ability to degrade experimental biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, a common nosocomial pathogen typically associated with device-related infections. The highest biofilm-degradation activity was achieved by L. gummosus. The corresponding enzymes were identified by sequencing the L. gummosus genome. Partial purification of the biofilm-degrading activity from an extract of extracellular material followed by peptide mass fingerprinting resulted in the identification of two peptidases (α-lytic protease and β-lytic metalloendopeptidase) that were predicted to degrade bacterial cell walls. In addition, we identified two isoforms of a lysyl endopeptidase and an enzyme similar to metalloproteases from Vibrio spp. Potential peptidoglycan-binding C-terminal fragments of two OmpA-like proteins also co-purified with the biofilm-degrading activity. The L. gummosus genome was found to encode five isoenzymes of α-lytic protease and three isoenzymes of lysyl endopeptidase. These results indicated that the extracellular digestion of biofilms by L. gummosus depends on multiple bacteriolytic and proteolytic enzymes, which could now be exploited for biofilm control. PMID:24518560

  16. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm by Trimethylsilane Plasma Coating

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibao; Jones, John E.; Ritts, Andrew C.; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms. PMID:22964248

  17. Proceedings from the 6th Annual University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jodie I; Beatty, Jennifer K; Peplowski, Michael A; Keough, Michael B; Yipp, Bryan G; Hollenberg, Morley D; Beck, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    On November 14, 2014, the Leaders in Medicine (LIM) program at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary hosted its 6th Annual Research Symposium. Dr. Danuta Skowronski, Epidemiology Lead for Influenza and Emerging Respiratory Pathogens at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), was the keynote speaker and presented a lecture entitled "Rapid response research during emerging public health crises: influenza and reflections from the five year anniversary of the 2009 pandemic". The LIM symposium provides a forum for both LIM and non-LIM medical students to present their research work, either as an oral or poster presentation. There were a total of six oral presentations and 77 posters presented. 
The oral presentations included: Swathi Damaraju, "The role of cell communication and 3D Cell-Matrix environment in a stem cell-based tissue engineering strategy for bone repair"; Menglin Yang, "The proteolytic activity of Nepenthes pitcher fluid as a therapeutic for the treatment of celiac disease"; Amelia Kellar, "Monitoring pediatric inflammatory bowel disease - a retrospective analysis of transabdominal ultrasound"; Monica M. Faria-Crowder, "The design and application of a molecular profiling strategy to identify polymicrobial acute sepsis infections"; Waleed Rahmani, "Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla and modulate hair type"; and, Laura Palmer, "A novel role for amyloid beta protein during hypoxia/ischemia". 
The article on the University of Calgary Leaders in Medicine Program, "A Prescription that Addresses the Decline of Basic Science Education in Medical School," in a previous issue of CIM (2014 37(5):E292) provides more details on the program. Briefly, the LIM Research Symposium has the following objectives: (1) to showcase the impressive variety of projects undertaken by students in the LIM Program as well as University of Calgary medical students; (2) to encourage medical

  18. A Growth Status Measurement Pilot in Four Calgary Area Schools: Perceptions of Grade 5 Students and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, J. Cyne T.; McNeil, Deborah A.; Best, Maureen; MacLeod, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Reliable measures of growth in children are necessary for planning and evaluating obesity prevention programs. Currently, measured growth data are unavailable in Calgary for school-age children. This single sample, cross-sectional study included Grade 5 students and their parents. Height and weight measurements of 305 students (68% of those…

  19. Effects of bacteriocins on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Ken-ichi; Zendo, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Yamada, Satomi; Sonomoto, Kenji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-11-01

    Control of biofilms formed by microbial pathogens is an important subject for medical researchers, since the development of biofilms on foreign-body surfaces often causes biofilm-associated infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. The present study examined the effects of different kinds of bacteriocins, which are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by certain bacteria, on biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The activities and modes of action of three bacteriocins with different structures (nisin A, lacticin Q, and nukacin ISK-1) were evaluated. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used in the treatment of MRSA infections, showed bactericidal activity against planktonic cells but not against biofilm cells. Among the tested bacteriocins, nisin A showed the highest bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Lacticin Q also showed bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells, but its activity against biofilm cells was significantly lower than that of nisin A. Nukacin ISK-1 showed bacteriostatic activity against planktonic cells and did not show bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Mode-of-action studies indicated that pore formation leading to ATP efflux is important for the bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Our results suggest that bacteriocins that form stable pores on biofilm cells are highly potent for the treatment of MRSA biofilm infections. PMID:23979748

  20. Effects of Bacteriocins on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Zendo, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Yamada, Satomi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Control of biofilms formed by microbial pathogens is an important subject for medical researchers, since the development of biofilms on foreign-body surfaces often causes biofilm-associated infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. The present study examined the effects of different kinds of bacteriocins, which are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by certain bacteria, on biofilms formed by a clinical isolate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The activities and modes of action of three bacteriocins with different structures (nisin A, lacticin Q, and nukacin ISK-1) were evaluated. Vancomycin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used in the treatment of MRSA infections, showed bactericidal activity against planktonic cells but not against biofilm cells. Among the tested bacteriocins, nisin A showed the highest bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Lacticin Q also showed bactericidal activity against both planktonic cells and biofilm cells, but its activity against biofilm cells was significantly lower than that of nisin A. Nukacin ISK-1 showed bacteriostatic activity against planktonic cells and did not show bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Mode-of-action studies indicated that pore formation leading to ATP efflux is important for the bactericidal activity against biofilm cells. Our results suggest that bacteriocins that form stable pores on biofilm cells are highly potent for the treatment of MRSA biofilm infections. PMID:23979748

  1. Has the Alberta daily physical activity initiative been successfully implemented in Calgary schools?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Christine Diane; Cantell, Marja; Dewey, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In September 2005, the Alberta government introduced the daily physical activity (DPA) initiative, which requires that students from grades 1 to 9 be physically active in school for a minimum of 30 min per day. OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on whether and how the DPA initiative has been implemented in Calgary schools. METHODS: Information was obtained through a descriptive survey. Principals and vice-principals from elementary schools participated in an interview, in which they were asked questions about the DPA initiative, their definition of physical activity, the types of activities that fulfilled the DPA requirement, and barriers to increasing physical activity and physical education. RESULTS: 98.2% of respondents reported being aware of the DPA initiative; 100% of respondents reported it being successfully implemented. The leading responses to the question, “How do you define physical activity?” were “moving/movement” (43.5%), “increasing the heart rate” (32.7%) and “being active” (29%). 78.2% of participants responded that physical education was the only type of activity that fulfilled the DPA requirement; the other participants reported that recess, intramurals and DPA periods organized by the teacher also counted. 69.1% and 61.1% of respondents, respectively, stated that there were barriers to increasing physical education and physical activity. A lack of time in the curriculum, a lack of space and a lack of funding were the most frequently reported barriers. CONCLUSION: According to principal and vice-principal reports, the DPA initiative has been successfully implemented in elementary schools in Calgary. This suggests that government initiatives directed at increasing physical activity at school could result in increasing the actual amount of physical activity that children participate in. However, prospective longitudinal research directly measuring the amount of physical activity that children engage in is needed to

  2. Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Low, Donald E.; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation. PMID:24185913

  3. In Vitro Models for Candida Biofilm Development.

    PubMed

    Krom, Bastiaan P; Willems, Hubertine M E

    2016-01-01

    Development of Candida spp. biofilms on medical devices such as catheters and voice prosthesis has been recognized as an increasing clinical problem. Different in vitro models are presented with increasing complexity. Each model system can be utilized for analysis of new active compounds to prevent or treat Candida biofilms as well as to study molecular processes involved in biofilm formation. Susceptibility studies of clinical isolates are generally performed in a simple 96-well model system similar to the CLSI standard. In the present chapter, optimized conditions that promote biofilm formation within individual wells of microtiter plates are described. In addition, the method has proven useful in preparing C. albicans biofilms for investigation by a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques. A more realistic and more complex biofilm system is presented by the Amsterdam Active Attachment (AAA) model. In this 24-well model all crucial steps of biofilm formation: adhesion, proliferation, and maturation, can be simulated on various surfaces, while still allowing a medium throughput approach. This model has been applied to study susceptibility, complex molecular mechanisms as well as interspecies (Candida-bacterium) interactions. Finally, a realistic microfluidics channel system is presented to follow dynamic processes in biofilm formation. In this Bioflux-based system, molecular mechanisms as well as dynamic processes can be studied at a high time-resolution. PMID:26519068

  4. Escherichia coli biofilm: development and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, G; Sharma, S; Sharma, P; Chandola, D; Dang, S; Gupta, S; Gabrani, R

    2016-08-01

    Escherichia coli biofilm consists of a bacterial colony embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which protects the microbes from adverse environmental conditions and results in infection. Besides being the major causative agent for recurrent urinary tract infections, E. coli biofilm is also responsible for indwelling medical device-related infectivity. The cell-to-cell communication within the biofilm occurs due to quorum sensors that can modulate the key biochemical players enabling the bacteria to proliferate and intensify the resultant infections. The diversity in structural components of biofilm gets compounded due to the development of antibiotic resistance, hampering its eradication. Conventionally used antimicrobial agents have a restricted range of cellular targets and limited efficacy on biofilms. This emphasizes the need to explore the alternate therapeuticals like anti-adhesion compounds, phytochemicals, nanomaterials for effective drug delivery to restrict the growth of biofilm. The current review focuses on various aspects of E. coli biofilm development and the possible therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of biofilm-related infections. PMID:26811181

  5. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  6. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  7. Biofilms in Infections of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Paulo J. M.; Haas, Wolfgang; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms in a variety of environments is a common trait of bacteria, and may represent one of the earliest defenses against predation. Biofilms are multicellular communities usually held together by a polymeric matrix, ranging from capsular material to cell lysate. In a structure that imposes diffusion limits, environmental microgradients arise to which individual bacteria adapt their physiologies, resulting in the gamut of physiological diversity. Additionally, the proximity of cells within the biofilm creates the opportunity for coordinated behaviors through cell–cell communication using diffusible signals, the most well documented being quorum sensing. Biofilms form on abiotic or biotic surfaces, and because of that are associated with a large proportion of human infections. Biofilm formation imposes a limitation on the uses and design of ocular devices, such as intraocular lenses, posterior contact lenses, scleral buckles, conjunctival plugs, lacrimal intubation devices and orbital implants. In the absence of abiotic materials, biofilms have been observed on the capsule, and in the corneal stroma. As the evidence for the involvement of microbial biofilms in many ocular infections has become compelling, developing new strategies to prevent their formation or to eradicate them at the site of infection, has become a priority. PMID:25806622

  8. Embedded biofilm, a new biofilm model based on the embedded growth of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Gyun; Choi, Jungil; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2015-01-01

    A variety of systems have been developed to study biofilm formation. However, most systems are based on the surface-attached growth of microbes under shear stress. In this study, we designed a microfluidic channel device, called a microfluidic agarose channel (MAC), and found that microbial cells in the MAC system formed an embedded cell aggregative structure (ECAS). ECASs were generated from the embedded growth of bacterial cells in an agarose matrix and better mimicked the clinical environment of biofilms formed within mucus or host tissue under shear-free conditions. ECASs were developed with the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), the most important feature of biofilms, and eventually burst to release planktonic cells, which resembles the full developmental cycle of biofilms. Chemical and genetic effects have also confirmed that ECASs are a type of biofilm. Unlike the conventional biofilms formed in the flow cell model system, this embedded-type biofilm completes the developmental cycle in only 9 to 12 h and can easily be observed with ordinary microscopes. We suggest that ECASs are a type of biofilm and that the MAC is a system for observing biofilm formation. PMID:25326307

  9. Fungal Biofilms: In Vivo Models for Discovery of Anti-Biofilm Drugs.

    PubMed

    Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R

    2015-06-01

    During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate, and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections: oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to the development of new strategies for the eradication of fungal biofilm infections. PMID:26397003

  10. Fungal Biofilms: In vivo models for discovery of anti-biofilm drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Andes, David

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections, oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to development of new strategies for eradication of fungal biofilm infections. PMID:26397003

  11. Embedded Biofilm, a New Biofilm Model Based on the Embedded Growth of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong-Gyun; Choi, Jungil; Kim, Soo-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    A variety of systems have been developed to study biofilm formation. However, most systems are based on the surface-attached growth of microbes under shear stress. In this study, we designed a microfluidic channel device, called a microfluidic agarose channel (MAC), and found that microbial cells in the MAC system formed an embedded cell aggregative structure (ECAS). ECASs were generated from the embedded growth of bacterial cells in an agarose matrix and better mimicked the clinical environment of biofilms formed within mucus or host tissue under shear-free conditions. ECASs were developed with the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), the most important feature of biofilms, and eventually burst to release planktonic cells, which resembles the full developmental cycle of biofilms. Chemical and genetic effects have also confirmed that ECASs are a type of biofilm. Unlike the conventional biofilms formed in the flow cell model system, this embedded-type biofilm completes the developmental cycle in only 9 to 12 h and can easily be observed with ordinary microscopes. We suggest that ECASs are a type of biofilm and that the MAC is a system for observing biofilm formation. PMID:25326307

  12. An optical microfluidic platform for spatiotemporal biofilm treatment monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Wook; Mosteller, Matthew P.; Subramanian, Sowmya; Meyer, Mariana T.; Bentley, William E.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms constitute in excess of 65% of clinical microbial infections, with the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections posing a unique challenge due to their high antibiotic tolerance. Recent studies performed in our group have demonstrated that a bioelectric effect featuring low-intensity electric signals combined with antibiotics can significantly improve the efficacy of biofilm treatment. In this work, we demonstrate the bioelectric effect using sub-micron thick planar electrodes in a microfluidic device. This is critical in efforts to develop microsystems for clinical biofilm infection management, including both in vivo and in vitro applications. Adaptation of the method to the microscale, for example, can enable the development of localized biofilm infection treatment using microfabricated medical devices, while augmenting existing capabilities to perform biofilm management beyond the clinical realm. Furthermore, due to scale-down of the system, the voltage requirement for inducing the electric field is reduced further below the media electrolysis threshold. Enhanced biofilm treatment using the bioelectric effect in the developed microfluidic device elicited a 56% greater reduction in viable cell density and 26% further decrease in biomass growth compared to traditional antibiotic therapy. This biofilm treatment efficacy, demonstrated in a micro-scale device and utilizing biocompatible voltage ranges, encourages the use of this method for future clinical biofilm treatment applications.

  13. Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

  14. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could: 1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, 2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, 3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and 4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  15. Biophysics of biofilm infection.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2014-04-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  16. A novel planar flow cell for studies of biofilm heterogeneity and flow-biofilm interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas S.; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Lee, Jisun; Packman, Aaron I.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities growing on surfaces, and are ubiquitous in nature, in bioreactors, and in human infection. Coupling between physical, chemical, and biological processes is known to regulate the development of biofilms; however, current experimental systems do not provide sufficient control of environmental conditions to enable detailed investigations of these complex interactions. We developed a novel planar flow cell that supports biofilm growth under complex two-dimensional fluid flow conditions. This device provides precise control of flow conditions and can be used to create well-defined physical and chemical gradients that significantly affect biofilm heterogeneity. Moreover, the top and bottom of the flow chamber are transparent, so biofilm growth and flow conditions are fully observable using non-invasive confocal microscopy and high-resolution video imaging. To demonstrate the capability of the device, we observed the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under imposed flow gradients. We found a positive relationship between patterns of fluid velocity and biofilm biomass because of faster microbial growth under conditions of greater local nutrient influx, but this relationship eventually reversed because high hydrodynamic shear leads to the detachment of cells from the surface. These results reveal that flow gradients play a critical role in the development of biofilm communities. By providing new capability for observing biofilm growth, solute and particle transport, and net chemical transformations under user-specified environmental gradients, this new planar flow cell system has broad utility for studies of environmental biotechnology and basic biofilm microbiology, as well as applications in bioreactor design, environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and biomedical research. PMID:21656713

  17. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia biofilm reduction by Bdellovibrio exovorus.

    PubMed

    Chanyi, Ryan M; Koval, Susan F; Brooke, Joanna S

    2016-06-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a bacterium ubiquitous in the environment, is also an opportunistic, multidrug-resistant human pathogen that colonizes tissues and medical devices via biofilm formation. We investigated the ability of an isolate from sewage of the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio exovorus to disrupt preformed biofilms of 18 strains of S. maltophilia isolated from patients, hospital sink drains and water fountain drains. B. exovorus FFRS-5 preyed on all S. maltophilia strains in liquid co-cultures and was able to significantly disrupt the biofilms of 15 of the S. maltophilia strains tested, decreasing as much as 76.7% of the biofilm mass. The addition of ciprofloxacin and kanamycin in general reduced S. maltophilia biofilms but less than that of B. exovorus alone. Furthermore, when antibiotics and B. exovorus were used together, B. exovorus was still effective in the presence of ciprofloxacin whereas the addition of kanamycin reduced the effectiveness of B. exovorus. Overall, B. exovorus was able to decrease the mass of preformed biofilms of S. maltophilia in the presence of clinically relevant antibiotics demonstrating that the predator may prove to be a beneficial tool to reduce S. maltophilia environmental or clinically associated biofilms. PMID:26929093

  18. Report from the 13th Annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference; Calgary, Alberta; September 8–10, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, M.M.; Pasieka, J.; Dixon, E.; McEwan, S.; McKay, A.; Renouf, D.; Schellenberg, D.; Ruether, D.

    2012-01-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8–10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23300370

  19. Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on a Cochlear Implant Following Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    An, Yun Suk; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate biofilm formations on a cochlear implant magnet of a pediatric patient suffering from a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The appearance of biofilm colonies was analyzed on different magnet sections. The appearance of MRSA biofilms on the surface of an explanted cochlear implant was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focusing on the pattern of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the biofilms. SEM revealed unique biofilms with a three-dimensional EPS complex and tower-like formations. Biofilm configurations changed from the margin to the center of the magnet. Biofilms were solitary and scattered at the margin; large and plate-like in the center; and stacked in layers, forming towers and water channels, in the middle region. After a MRSA infection, biofilm formations were observed on the surface of a magnet. Bacterial biofilms provide optimal conditions for bacterial growth and antibiotic resistance and can cause intractable infections that lead to device failure. PMID:26771017

  20. The Validation of a Novel Surveillance System for Monitoring Bloodstream Infections in the Calgary Zone

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Jenine R.; Gregson, Daniel B.; Church, Deirdre L.; Henderson, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Terry; Laupland, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Electronic surveillance systems (ESSs) that utilize existing information in databases are more efficient than conventional infection surveillance methods. The objective was to assess an ESS for bloodstream infections (BSIs) in the Calgary Zone for its agreement with traditional medical record review. Methods. The ESS was developed by linking related data from regional laboratory and hospital administrative databases and using set definitions for excluding contaminants and duplicate isolates. Infections were classified as hospital-acquired (HA), healthcare-associated community-onset (HCA), or community-acquired (CA). A random sample of patients from the ESS was then compared with independent medical record review. Results. Among the 308 patients selected for comparative review, the ESS identified 318 episodes of BSI of which 130 (40.9%) were CA, 98 (30.8%) were HCA, and 90 (28.3%) were HA. Medical record review identified 313 episodes of which 136 (43.4%) were CA, 97 (30.9%) were HCA, and 80 (25.6%) were HA. Episodes of BSI were concordant in 304 (97%) cases. Overall, there was 85.5% agreement between ESS and medical record review for the classification of where BSIs were acquired (kappa = 0.78, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.75–0.80). Conclusion. This novel ESS identified and classified BSIs with a high degree of accuracy. This system requires additional linkages with other related databases. PMID:27375749

  1. Psychometric properties of the Calgary Cambridge guides to assess communication skills of undergraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Heinemann, Stephanie; Nolte, Catharina; Fischer, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyse the psychometric properties of the short version of the Calgary Cambridge Guides and to decide whether it can be recommended for use in the assessment of communications skills in young undergraduate medical students. Methods: Using a translated version of the Guide, 30 members from the Department of General Practice rated 5 videotaped encounters between students and simulated patients twice. Item analysis should detect possible floor and/or ceiling effects. The construct validity was investigated using exploratory factor analysis. Intra-rater reliability was measured in an interval of 3 months, inter-rater reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. Results: The score distribution of the items showed no ceiling or floor effects. Four of the five factors extracted from the factor analysis represented important constructs of doctor-patient communication The ratings for the first and second round of assessing the videos correlated at 0.75 (p < 0.0001). Intraclass correlation coefficients for each item ranged were moderate and ranged from 0.05 to 0.57. Conclusions: Reasonable score distributions of most items without ceiling or floor effects as well as a good test-retest reliability and construct validity recommend the C-CG as an instrument for assessing communication skills in undergraduate medical students. Some deficiencies in inter-rater reliability are a clear indication that raters need a thorough instruction before using the C-CG. PMID:25480988

  2. Prospects for Anti-Biofilm Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary highlights several avenues currently being pursued in research labs to the development of new anti-biofilm pharmaceuticals. There is a real need for alternative therapeutic modalities for treating the persistent infections that sometimes form on implanted medical devices or compromised niches within the body. Strategies being researched include discovering new antimicrobial agents that kill microorganisms in biofilms more effectively than do existing antibiotics, designing drugs that block microbial adhesion or interfere with intercellular communication, developing chemistries to disperse biofilms, and combining agents with different mechanisms of action. Though the need is great, the pathway to commercialization of new drugs is steep. One possible streamlined approach to navigating the regulatory approval process is to repurpose old drugs, a strategy that a few groups have shown can yield agents with anti-biofilm properties. PMID:26343685

  3. Electrochemically active biofilms: facts and fiction. A review.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome; Renslow, Ryan; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the electrochemical techniques used to study extracellular electron transfer in the electrochemically active biofilms that are used in microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems. Electrochemically active biofilms are defined as biofilms that exchange electrons with conductive surfaces: electrodes. Following the electrochemical conventions, and recognizing that electrodes can be considered reactants in these bioelectrochemical processes, biofilms that deliver electrons to the biofilm electrode are called anodic, ie electrode-reducing, biofilms, while biofilms that accept electrons from the biofilm electrode are called cathodic, ie electrode-oxidizing, biofilms. How to grow these electrochemically active biofilms in bioelectrochemical systems is discussed and also the critical choices made in the experimental setup that affect the experimental results. The reactor configurations used in bioelectrochemical systems research are also described and the authors demonstrate how to use selected voltammetric techniques to study extracellular electron transfer in bioelectrochemical systems. Finally, some critical concerns with the proposed electron transfer mechanisms in bioelectrochemical systems are addressed together with the prospects of bioelectrochemical systems as energy-converting and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:22856464

  4. Electrochemically active biofilms: facts and fiction. A review

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome; Renslow, Ryan; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the electrochemical techniques used to study extracellular electron transfer in the electrochemically active biofilms that are used in microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems. Electrochemically active biofilms are defined as biofilms that exchange electrons with conductive surfaces: electrodes. Following the electrochemical conventions, and recognizing that electrodes can be considered reactants in these bioelectrochemical processes, biofilms that deliver electrons to the biofilm electrode are called anodic, ie electrode-reducing, biofilms, while biofilms that accept electrons from the biofilm electrode are called cathodic, ie electrode-oxidizing, biofilms. How to grow these electrochemically active biofilms in bioelec-trochemical systems is discussed and also the critical choices made in the experimental setup that affect the experimental results. The reactor configurations used in bioelectrochemical systems research are also described and the authors demonstrate how to use selected voltammetric techniques to study extracellular electron transfer in bioelectrochemical systems. Finally, some critical concerns with the proposed electron transfer mechanisms in bioelectrochemical systems are addressed together with the prospects of bioelectrochemical systems as energy-converting and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:22856464

  5. On growth and flow: bacterial biofilms in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, William; Leombruni, Alberto; Tranzer, Olivier; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Bacterial biofilms often occur in porous media, where they play pivotal roles in medicine, industry and the environment. Though flow is ubiquitous in porous media, its effects on biofilm growth have been largely ignored. Using patterned microfluidic devices that simulate unconsolidated soil, we find that the structure of Escherichia coli biofilms undergoes a self-organization mediated by the interaction of growth and flow. Intriguingly, we find that biofilm productivity peaks at intermediate flow rates, when the biofilm is irrigated by a minimum number of preferential flow channels. At larger and smaller flow rates, fluid flows more uniformly through the matrix, but productivity drops due to removal by shear and reduced nutrient transport, respectively. These dynamics are correctly predicted by a simple network model. The observed tradeoff between growth and flow may have important consequences on biofilm-mediated processes such as biochemical cycling, antibiotic resistance and water filtration.

  6. Anti-biofilm Activity as a Health Issue.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Sylvie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Souweine, Bertrand; Forestier, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health). Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients' organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections. PMID:27199924

  7. Anti-biofilm Activity as a Health Issue

    PubMed Central

    Miquel, Sylvie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Souweine, Bertrand; Forestier, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The formation and persistence of surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, are responsible for 75% of human microbial infections (National Institutes of Health). Biofilm lifestyle confers several advantages to the pathogens, notably during the colonization process of medical devices and/or patients’ organs. In addition, sessile bacteria have a high tolerance to exogenous stress including anti-infectious agents. Biofilms are highly competitive communities and some microorganisms exhibit anti-biofilm capacities such as bacterial growth inhibition, exclusion or competition, which enable them to acquire advantages and become dominant. The deciphering and control of anti-biofilm properties represent future challenges in human infection control. The aim of this review is to compare and discuss the mechanisms of natural bacterial anti-biofilm strategies/mechanisms recently identified in pathogenic, commensal and probiotic bacteria and the main synthetic strategies used in clinical practice, particularly for catheter-related infections. PMID:27199924

  8. Biofilms: A microbial home

    PubMed Central

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  9. ESCMID guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of biofilm infections 2014.

    PubMed

    Høiby, N; Bjarnsholt, T; Moser, C; Bassi, G L; Coenye, T; Donelli, G; Hall-Stoodley, L; Holá, V; Imbert, C; Kirketerp-Møller, K; Lebeaux, D; Oliver, A; Ullmann, A J; Williams, C

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms cause chronic infections in tissues or by developing on the surfaces of medical devices. Biofilm infections persist despite both antibiotic therapy and the innate and adaptive defence mechanisms of the patient. Biofilm infections are characterized by persisting and progressive pathology due primarily to the inflammatory response surrounding the biofilm. For this reason, many biofilm infections may be difficult to diagnose and treat efficiently. It is the purpose of the guideline to bring the current knowledge of biofilm diagnosis and therapy to the attention of clinical microbiologists and infectious disease specialists. Selected hallmark biofilm infections in tissues (e.g. cystic fibrosis with chronic lung infection, patients with chronic wound infections) or associated with devices (e.g. orthopaedic alloplastic devices, endotracheal tubes, intravenous catheters, indwelling urinary catheters, tissue fillers) are the main focus of the guideline, but experience gained from the biofilm infections included in the guideline may inspire similar work in other biofilm infections. The clinical and laboratory parameters for diagnosing biofilm infections are outlined based on the patient's history, signs and symptoms, microscopic findings, culture-based or culture-independent diagnostic techniques and specific immune responses to identify microorganisms known to cause biofilm infections. First, recommendations are given for the collection of appropriate clinical samples, for reliable methods to specifically detect biofilms, for the evaluation of antibody responses to biofilms, for antibiotic susceptibility testing and for improvement of laboratory reports of biofilm findings in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Second, recommendations are given for the prevention and treatment of biofilm infections and for monitoring treatment effectiveness. Finally, suggestions for future research are given to improve diagnosis and treatment of biofilm infections. PMID:25596784

  10. Fine particulate air pollution, nitrogen dioxide, and systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease in Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Bernatsky, Sasha; Smargiassi, Audrey; Johnson, Markey; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Barnabe, Cheryl; Svenson, Larry; Brand, Allan; Bertazzon, Stefania; Hudson, Marie; Clarke, Ann E; Fortin, Paul; Edworthy, Steven; Bélisle, Patrick; Joseph, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between fine particulate (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollution and systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs). Methods Associations between ambient air pollution (PM2.5 and NO2) and SARDs were assessed using land-use regression models for Calgary, Alberta and administrative health data (1993-2007). SARD case definitions were based on ≥2 physician claims, or ≥1 rheumatology billing code; or ≥1 hospitalization code (for systemic lupus, Sjogren's Syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, or undifferentiated connective tissue disease). Bayesian hierarchical latent class regression models estimated the probability that each resident was a SARD case, based on these case definitions. The sum of individual level probabilities provided the estimated number of cases in each area. The latent class model included terms for age, sex, and an interaction term between age and sex. Bayesian logistic regression models were used to generate adjusted odds ratios (OR) for NO2 and PM2.5. pollutant models, adjusting for neighborhood income, age, sex, and an interaction between age and sex. We also examined models stratified for First-Nations (FN) and non-FN subgroups. Results Residents that were female and/or aged > 45 had a greater probability of being a SARD case, with the highest OR estimates for older females. Independently, the odds of being a SARDs case increased with PM2.5 levels, but the results were inconclusive for NO2. The results stratified by FN and Non-FN groups were not distinctly different. Conclusion In this urban Canadian sample, adjusting for demographics, exposure to PM2.5 was associated with an increased risk of SARDs. The results for NO2 were inconclusive. PMID:25988990

  11. Linking evapotranspiration to stormwater reduction and attenuation in green roofs in Calgary, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breach, P. A.; Robinson, C. E.; Voogt, J. A.; Smart, C. C.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Green roofs have been used for centuries to insulate buildings and beautify urban environments. European countries, especially Germany, have adopted green roofs use in modern buildings, helping raise awareness of their many potential benefits. Green roofs have been shown to: effectively reduce and filter stormwater thereby decreasing the burden on urban sewer systems; provide insulation and lower roof surface temperature leading to a decrease in building energy load and reduced sensible heat flux to the urban atmosphere; and to extend the life of a roof by decreasing the temperature fluctuations which cause roof damage. Given that green buildings can mitigate against the negative impacts of storm water runoff and reduce the heating and cooling demands, use of green roofs in Canada might prove extremely beneficial due to our intense climate. However, the implementation of green roofs in North American urban environments remains underused, in part due to a lack of climate appropriate green roof design guidelines that are supported by scientific understanding of their performance in North American climates. The capacity of a green roof installation to moderate runoff depends on the storage capacity of the rooting medium at the start of the rainfall event which in turn is constrained by roof loading. The influence of medium depth is investigated through comparison to 15 cm and 10cm deep planting modules. Storage capacity has a finite limit, making rapid drainage and evapotranspiration loss essential to restore the retardation of a subsequent storm. Sustaining live plant cover requires avoidance of saturated conditions and retention of minimum soil moisture levels. These limits constrain the design options with distinctive climatic stresses. Here the performance of experimental green roof modules is investigated under particularly high climatic stressing at Calgary Alberta Canada. 10 cm modules show rapid drying to unacceptably low residual moisture content, whereas 15

  12. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  13. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  14. Immobilization of proteases on chitosan for the development of films with anti-biofilm properties.

    PubMed

    Elchinger, Pierre-Henri; Delattre, Cédric; Faure, Sophie; Roy, Olivier; Badel, Stéphanie; Bernardi, Thierry; Taillefumier, Claude; Michaud, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance due to biofilm formation-particularly Staphylococci biofilms-is associated with multiple problems in medical settings where biofilms can colonize medical indwelling devices and cause nosocomial infections. It was against this backdrop that we explored the anti-biofilm activities of a set of proteases against biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The selected screened enzymes were immobilized on chitosan to obtain films with anti-biofilm activities. Immobilization efficiency was about 94% for protease from Bacillus licheniformis and reached up to 96% for Neutrase. In vitro assays performed in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth using the Biofilm Ring Test highlighted that immobilized enzymes were efficient against biofilms of Staphylococci cultures, especially protease from B. licheniformis and Neutrase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. PMID:25451753

  15. Enzymes Enhance Biofilm Removal Efficiency of Cleaners

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Philipp; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Schneider, Jana; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Rosenberg, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Efficient removal of biofilms from medical devices is a big challenge in health care to avoid hospital-acquired infections, especially from delicate devices like flexible endoscopes, which cannot be reprocessed using harsh chemicals or high temperatures. Therefore, milder solutions such as enzymatic cleaners have to be used, which need to be carefully developed to ensure efficacious performance. In vitro biofilm in a 96-well-plate system was used to select and optimize the formulation of novel enzymatic cleaners. Removal of the biofilm was quantified by crystal violet staining, while the disinfecting properties were evaluated by a BacTiter-Glo assay. The biofilm removal efficacy of the selected cleaner was further tested by using European standard (EN) for endoscope cleaning EN ISO 15883, and removal of artificial blood soil was investigated by treating TOSI (Test Object Surgical Instrument) cleaning indicators. Using the process described here, a novel enzymatic endoscope cleaner was developed, which removed 95% of Staphylococcus aureus and 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the 96-well plate system. With a >99% reduction of CFU and a >90% reduction of extracellular polymeric substances, this cleaner enabled subsequent complete disinfection and fulfilled acceptance criteria of EN ISO 15883. Furthermore, it efficiently removed blood soil and significantly outperformed comparable commercial products. The cleaning performance was stable even after storage of the cleaner for 6 months. It was demonstrated that incorporation of appropriate enzymes into the cleaner enhanced performance significantly. PMID:27044552

  16. Enzymes Enhance Biofilm Removal Efficiency of Cleaners.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Philipp; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Schneider, Jana; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Rosenberg, Urs; Ren, Qun

    2016-06-01

    Efficient removal of biofilms from medical devices is a big challenge in health care to avoid hospital-acquired infections, especially from delicate devices like flexible endoscopes, which cannot be reprocessed using harsh chemicals or high temperatures. Therefore, milder solutions such as enzymatic cleaners have to be used, which need to be carefully developed to ensure efficacious performance. In vitro biofilm in a 96-well-plate system was used to select and optimize the formulation of novel enzymatic cleaners. Removal of the biofilm was quantified by crystal violet staining, while the disinfecting properties were evaluated by a BacTiter-Glo assay. The biofilm removal efficacy of the selected cleaner was further tested by using European standard (EN) for endoscope cleaning EN ISO 15883, and removal of artificial blood soil was investigated by treating TOSI (Test Object Surgical Instrument) cleaning indicators. Using the process described here, a novel enzymatic endoscope cleaner was developed, which removed 95% of Staphylococcus aureus and 90% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the 96-well plate system. With a >99% reduction of CFU and a >90% reduction of extracellular polymeric substances, this cleaner enabled subsequent complete disinfection and fulfilled acceptance criteria of EN ISO 15883. Furthermore, it efficiently removed blood soil and significantly outperformed comparable commercial products. The cleaning performance was stable even after storage of the cleaner for 6 months. It was demonstrated that incorporation of appropriate enzymes into the cleaner enhanced performance significantly. PMID:27044552

  17. Candida biofilm formation on voice prostheses.

    PubMed

    Talpaert, Moira J; Balfour, Alistair; Stevens, Sarah; Baker, Mark; Muhlschlegel, Fritz A; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2015-03-01

    Laryngopharyngeal malignancy is treated with radiotherapy and/or surgery. When total laryngectomy is required, major laryngeal functions (phonation, airway control, swallowing and coughing) are affected. The insertion of a silicone rubber voice prosthesis in a surgically created tracheoesophageal puncture is the most effective method for voice rehabilitation. Silicone, as is the case with other synthetic materials such as polymethylmethacrylate, polyurethane, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene and polystyrene, has the propensity to become rapidly colonized by micro-organisms (mainly Candida albicans) forming a biofilm, which leads to the failure of the devices. Silicone is used within voice prosthetic devices because of its flexible properties, which are essential for valve function. Valve failure, as well as compromising speech, may result in aspiration pneumonia, and repeated valve replacement may lead to either tract stenosis or insufficiency. Prevention and control of biofilm formation are therefore crucial for the lifespan of the prosthesis and promotion of tracheoesophageal tissue and lung health. To date, the mechanisms of biofilm formation on voice prostheses are not fully understood. Further studies are therefore required to identify factors influencing Candida biofilm formation. This review describes the factors known to influence biofilm formation on voice prostheses and current strategies employed to prolong their life by interfering with microbial colonization. PMID:25106862

  18. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2015-06-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  19. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  20. In vitro activity of eugenol against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Du, Minquan; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2007-03-01

    Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation occurring on the surfaces of host tissues and medical devices. Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated causative pathogen of candidiasis, and the biofilms display significantly increased levels of resistance to the conventional antifungal agents. Eugenol, the major phenolic component of clove essential oil, possesses potent antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eugenol on preformed biofilms, adherent cells, subsequent biofilm formation and cell morphogenesis of C. albicans. Eugenol displayed in vitro activity against C. albicans cells within biofilms, when MIC(50) for sessile cells was 500 mg/L. C. albicans adherent cell populations (after 0, 1, 2 and 4 h of adherence) were treated with various concentrations of eugenol (0, 20, 200 and 2,000 mg/L). The extent of subsequent biofilm formation were then assessed with the tetrazolium salt reduction assay. Effect of eugenol on morphogenesis of C. albicans cells was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the effect of eugenol on adherent cells and subsequent biofilm formation was dependent on the initial adherence time and the concentration of this compound, and that eugenol can inhibit filamentous growth of C. albicans cells. In addition, using human erythrocytes, eugenol showed low hemolytic activity. These results indicated that eugenol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro with low cytotoxicity and therefore has potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections. PMID:17356790

  1. Natural Sources as Innovative Solutions Against Fungal Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Marion; Imbert, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are capable of adhering to biotic and abiotic surfaces and form biofilms containing one or more microbial species that are microbial reservoirs. These biofilms may cause chronic and acute infections. Fungal biofilms related to medical devices are particularly responsible for serious infections such as candidemia. Nowadays, only a few therapeutic agents have demonstrated activities against fungal biofilms in vitro and/or in vivo. So the discovery of new anti-biofilm molecules is definitely needed. In this context, biodiversity is a large source of original active compounds including some that have already proven effective in therapies such as antimicrobial compounds (antibacterial or antifungal agents). Bioactive metabolites from natural sources, useful for developing new anti-biofilm drugs, are of interest. In this chapter, the role of molecules isolated from plants, lichens, algae, microorganisms, or from animal or human origin in inhibition and/or dispersion of fungal biofilms (especially Candida and Aspergillus biofilms) is discussed. Some essential oils, phenolic compounds, saponins, peptides and proteins and alkaloids could be of particular interest in fighting fungal biofilms. PMID:27115410

  2. The BioFilm Ring Test: a Rapid Method for Routine Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Elodie; Badel-Berchoux, Stéphanie; Provot, Christian; Jaulhac, Benoît; Prévost, Gilles; Bernardi, Thierry; Jehl, François

    2016-03-01

    Currently, few techniques are available for the evaluation of bacterial biofilm adhesion. These detection tools generally require time for culture and/or arduous handling steps. In this work, the BioFilm Ring Test (BRT), a new technology, was used to estimate the biofilm formation kinetics of 25 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The principle of the new assay is based on the mobility measurement of magnetic microbeads mixed with a bacterial suspension in a polystyrene microplate. If free to move under the magnetic action, particles gather to a visible central spot in the well bottom. Therefore, the absence of spot formation in the plate reflects the bead immobilization by a biofilm in formation. The BRT device allowed us to classify the bacterial strains into three general adhesion profiles. Group 1 consists of bacteria, which are able to form a solid biofilm in <2 h. Group 2 comprises the strains that progressively set up a biofilm during 24 h. Lastly, group 3 includes the strains that stay in a planktonic form. The grouping of our strains did not differ according to culture conditions, i.e., the use of different sets of beads or culture media. The BRT is shown to be an informative tool for the characterization of biofilm-forming bacteria. Various application perspectives may be investigated for this device, such as the addition of antibiotics to the bacterial suspension to select which would have the ability to inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:26719437

  3. The BioFilm Ring Test: a Rapid Method for Routine Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Elodie; Badel-Berchoux, Stéphanie; Provot, Christian; Jaulhac, Benoît; Prévost, Gilles; Bernardi, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Currently, few techniques are available for the evaluation of bacterial biofilm adhesion. These detection tools generally require time for culture and/or arduous handling steps. In this work, the BioFilm Ring Test (BRT), a new technology, was used to estimate the biofilm formation kinetics of 25 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The principle of the new assay is based on the mobility measurement of magnetic microbeads mixed with a bacterial suspension in a polystyrene microplate. If free to move under the magnetic action, particles gather to a visible central spot in the well bottom. Therefore, the absence of spot formation in the plate reflects the bead immobilization by a biofilm in formation. The BRT device allowed us to classify the bacterial strains into three general adhesion profiles. Group 1 consists of bacteria, which are able to form a solid biofilm in <2 h. Group 2 comprises the strains that progressively set up a biofilm during 24 h. Lastly, group 3 includes the strains that stay in a planktonic form. The grouping of our strains did not differ according to culture conditions, i.e., the use of different sets of beads or culture media. The BRT is shown to be an informative tool for the characterization of biofilm-forming bacteria. Various application perspectives may be investigated for this device, such as the addition of antibiotics to the bacterial suspension to select which would have the ability to inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:26719437

  4. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D; Chen, Meng; Sun, Hongmin

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. PMID:26369955

  5. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E.; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. PMID:26369955

  6. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K; Mazaitis, Mark J; Costerton, J William; Leid, Jeff G; Powers, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on understanding bacterial biofilms and this growth modality's relation to human disease. In this review we explore the genetic regulation and molecular components involved in biofilm formation and maturation in the context of the Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, we discuss diseases and host immune responses, along with current therapies associated with S. aureus biofilm infections and prevention strategies. PMID:21921685

  7. Bioluminescence imaging of fungal biofilm development in live animals.

    PubMed

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Kucharíková, Soňa; Van Dijck, Patrick; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Fungal biofilms formed on various types of medical implants represent a major problem for hospitalized patients. These biofilms and related infections are usually difficult to treat because of their resistance to the classical antifungal drugs. Animal models are indispensable for investigating host-pathogen interactions and for identifying new antifungal targets related to biofilm development. A limited number of animal models is available that can be used for testing novel antifungal drugs in vivo against C. albicans, one of the most common pathogens causing fungal biofilms. Fungal load in biofilms in these models is traditionally analyzed postmortem, requiring host sacrifice and enumeration of microorganisms from individual biofilms in order to evaluate the amount of colony forming units and the efficacy of antifungal treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) made compatible with small animal models for in vivo biofilm formation is a valuable noninvasive tool to follow-up biofilm development and its treatment longitudinally, reducing the number of animals needed for such studies. Due to the nondestructive and noninvasive nature of BLI, the imaging procedure can be repeated in the same animal, allowing follow-up of the biofilm growth in vivo without removing the implanted device or detaching the biofilm from its substrate. The method described here introduces BLI of C. albicans biofilm formation in vivo on subcutaneously implanted catheters in mice. One of the main challenges to overcome for BLI of fungi is the hampered intracellular substrate delivery through the fungal cell wall, which is managed by using extracellularly located Gaussia luciferase. Although detecting a quantifiable in vivo BLI signal from biofilms formed on the inside of implanted catheters is challenging, BLI proved to be a practical tool in the study of fungal biofilms. This method describing the use of BLI for in vivo follow-up of device-related fungal biofilm formation has the potential for

  8. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  9. Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2006 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (30th, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Jun 3-7, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  10. Novel Strategies for the Prevention and Treatment of Biofilm Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong; Sun, Hongmin

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by human bacterial pathogens on implanted medical devices causes major morbidity and mortality among patients, and leads to billions of dollars in healthcare cost. Biofilm is a complex bacterial community that is highly resistant to antibiotics and human immunity. As a result, novel therapeutic solutions other than the conventional antibiotic therapies are in urgent need. In this review, we will discuss the recent research in discovery of alternative approaches to prevent or treat biofilms. Current anti-biofilm technologies could be divided into two groups. The first group focuses on targeting the biofilm forming process of bacteria based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of biofilm formation. Small molecules and enzymes have been developed to inhibit or disrupt biofilm formation. Another group of anti-biofilm technologies focuses on modifying the biomaterials used in medical devices to make them resistant to biofilm formation. While these novel anti-biofilm approaches are still in nascent phases of development, efforts devoted to these technologies could eventually lead to anti-biofilm therapies that are superior to the current antibiotic treatment. PMID:24018891

  11. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P < 0.05). The water stream alone showed no statistically significant difference in removal compared with the untreated control (P = 0.24). High-speed videography demonstrated a rapid rate (151 mm(2) in 1 s) of biofilm removal. The UAS was also highly effective at S. mutans, A. naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene. PMID:26056055

  12. Stress relaxation analysis facilitates a quantitative approach towards antimicrobial penetration into biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Peterson, Brandon W; Jongsma, Marije A; Ren, Yijin; Sharma, Prashant K; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections can develop everywhere in the human body and are rarely cleared by the host immune system. Moreover, biofilms are often tolerant to antimicrobials, due to a combination of inherent properties of bacteria in their adhering, biofilm mode of growth and poor physical penetration of antimicrobials through biofilms. Current understanding of biofilm recalcitrance toward antimicrobial penetration is based on qualitative descriptions of biofilms. Here we hypothesize that stress relaxation of biofilms will relate with antimicrobial penetration. Stress relaxation analysis of single-species oral biofilms grown in vitro identified a fast, intermediate and slow response to an induced deformation, corresponding with outflow of water and extracellular polymeric substances, and bacterial re-arrangement, respectively. Penetration of chlorhexidine into these biofilms increased with increasing relative importance of the slow and decreasing importance of the fast relaxation element. Involvement of slow relaxation elements suggests that biofilm structures allowing extensive bacterial re-arrangement after deformation are more open, allowing better antimicrobial penetration. Involvement of fast relaxation elements suggests that water dilutes the antimicrobial upon penetration to an ineffective concentration in deeper layers of the biofilm. Next, we collected biofilms formed in intra-oral collection devices bonded to the buccal surfaces of the maxillary first molars of human volunteers. Ex situ chlorhexidine penetration into two weeks old in vivo formed biofilms followed a similar dependence on the importance of the fast and slow relaxation elements as observed for in vitro formed biofilms. This study demonstrates that biofilm properties can be derived that quantitatively explain antimicrobial penetration into a biofilm. PMID:23723995

  13. Stress Relaxation Analysis Facilitates a Quantitative Approach towards Antimicrobial Penetration into Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Peterson, Brandon W.; Jongsma, Marije A.; Ren, Yijin; Sharma, Prashant K.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections can develop everywhere in the human body and are rarely cleared by the host immune system. Moreover, biofilms are often tolerant to antimicrobials, due to a combination of inherent properties of bacteria in their adhering, biofilm mode of growth and poor physical penetration of antimicrobials through biofilms. Current understanding of biofilm recalcitrance toward antimicrobial penetration is based on qualitative descriptions of biofilms. Here we hypothesize that stress relaxation of biofilms will relate with antimicrobial penetration. Stress relaxation analysis of single-species oral biofilms grown in vitro identified a fast, intermediate and slow response to an induced deformation, corresponding with outflow of water and extracellular polymeric substances, and bacterial re-arrangement, respectively. Penetration of chlorhexidine into these biofilms increased with increasing relative importance of the slow and decreasing importance of the fast relaxation element. Involvement of slow relaxation elements suggests that biofilm structures allowing extensive bacterial re-arrangement after deformation are more open, allowing better antimicrobial penetration. Involvement of fast relaxation elements suggests that water dilutes the antimicrobial upon penetration to an ineffective concentration in deeper layers of the biofilm. Next, we collected biofilms formed in intra-oral collection devices bonded to the buccal surfaces of the maxillary first molars of human volunteers. Ex situ chlorhexidine penetration into two weeks old in vivo formed biofilms followed a similar dependence on the importance of the fast and slow relaxation elements as observed for in vitro formed biofilms. This study demonstrates that biofilm properties can be derived that quantitatively explain antimicrobial penetration into a biofilm. PMID:23723995

  14. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  15. Biofilm formation by haloarchaea.

    PubMed

    Fröls, Sabrina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based live-cell adhesion assay was used to examine biofilm formation by 20 different haloarchaea, including species of Halobacterium, Haloferax and Halorubrum, as well as novel natural isolates from an Antarctic salt lake. Thirteen of the 20 tested strains significantly adhered (P-value  < 0.05) to a plastic surface. Examination of adherent cell layers on glass surfaces by differential interference contrast, fluorescence and confocal microscopy showed two types of biofilm structures. Carpet-like, multi-layered biofilms containing micro- and macrocolonies (up to 50 μm in height) were formed by strains of Halobacterium salinarum and the Antarctic isolate t-ADL strain DL24. The second type of biofilm, characterized by large aggregates of cells adhering to surfaces, was formed by Haloferax volcanii DSM 3757T and Halorubrum lacusprofundi DL28. Staining of the biofilms formed by the strongly adhesive haloarchaeal strains revealed the presence of extracellular polymers, such as eDNA and glycoconjugates, substances previously shown to stabilize bacterial biofilms. For Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T and Hfx. volcanii DSM 3757T , cells adhered within 1 day of culture and remained viable for at least 2 months in mature biofilms. Adherent cells of Hbt. salinarum DSM 3754T showed several types of cellular appendages that could be involved in the initial attachment. Our results show that biofilm formation occurs in a surprisingly wide variety of haloarchaeal species. PMID:23057712

  16. Biofilms--a microbial life perspective: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Gupta, Yashwant; Agrawal, Rahul; Khare, Piush; Jain, Sanjay K

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms attach to surfaces, start multiplying, and develop biofilms. Biofilm-associated cells can be differentiated from their suspended counterparts by the generation of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) matrix, reduced growth rates, and up- and downregulation of their specific genes. The attachment of microorganisms is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics--growth medium, substratum, and cell surfaces. An established biofilm structure comprises microbial cells and EPS, has a defined architecture, and provides an optimal environment for the exchange of genetic material between cells. Cells may also communicate via quorum sensing, which may in turn affect biofilm processes such as detachment. Biofilms have great importance for public health because of their role in certain infectious diseases and their importance in a variety of device-related infections. Because many antibiotics are unable to eradicate dense biofilms, much work is required to devise ways to prevent their occurrence and clear them from the host. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective strategies for biofilm control and improvement in patient care and management. PMID:18197780

  17. Biofilm streamers cause rapid clogging of flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard

    2012-11-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant, sessile bacterial communities that are found on most surfaces on Earth. In addition to constituting the most abundant form of bacterial life, biofilms also cause chronic and medical device-associated infections. Despite their importance, basic information about how biofilms behave in common ecological environments is lacking. Here we demonstrate that flow through soil-like porous materials, industrial filters, and medical stents dramatically modifies the morphology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms to form streamers which over time bridge the space between obstacles and corners in non-uniform environments. Using a microfluidic model system we find that, contrary to the accepted paradigm, the accumulation of surface-attached bacterial biofilm has little effect on flow resistance whereas the formation of biofilm streamers causes sudden and rapid clogging. The time at which clogging happens depends on bacterial growth, while the duration of the clogging transition is driven by flow-mediated transport of bacteria to the clogging site. Flow-induced shedding of extracellular matrix from the resident biofilm generates a sieve-like network that catches bacteria flowing by, which add to the network of extracellular matrix, to cause exponentially rapid clogging. We expect these biofilm streamers to be ubiquitous in nature, and to have profound effects on flow through porous materials in environmental, industrial, and medical environments.

  18. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  19. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group) and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group). This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ). Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p <.001). Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The combined results from

  20. Mechanical signatures of microbial biofilms in micropillar-embedded growth chambers.

    PubMed

    Chew, S C; Kundukad, B; Teh, W K; Doyle, P; Yang, L; Rice, S A; Kjelleberg, S

    2016-06-21

    Biofilms are surface-attached communities of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular matrix and are essential for the cycling of organic matter in natural and engineered environments. They are also the leading cause of many infections, for example, those associated with chronic wounds and implanted medical devices. The extracellular matrix is a key biofilm component that determines its architecture and defines its physical properties. Herein, we used growth chambers embedded with micropillars to study the net mechanical forces (differential pressure) exerted during biofilm formation in situ. Pressure from the biofilm is transferred to the micropillars via the extracellular matrix, and reduction of major matrix components decreases the magnitude of micropillar deflections. The spatial arrangement of micropillar deflections caused by pressure differences in the different biofilm strains may potentially be used as mechanical signatures for biofilm characterization. Hence, we submit that micropillar-embedded growth chambers provide insights into the mechanical properties and dynamics of the biofilm and its matrix. PMID:27191395

  1. Role of Capsular Polysaccharides in Biofilm Formation: An AFM Nanomechanics Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabin; Wilksch, Jonathan J; Strugnell, Richard A; Gee, Michelle L

    2015-06-17

    Bacteria form biofilms to facilitate colonization of biotic and abiotic surfaces, and biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices is a common cause of hospital-acquired infection. Although it is well-recognized that the exopolysaccharide capsule is one of the key bacterial components for biofilm formation, the underlying biophysical mechanism is poorly understood. In the present study, nanomechanical measurements of wild type and specific mutants of the pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, were performed in situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Theoretical modeling of the mechanical data and static microtiter plate biofilm assays show that the organization of the capsule can influence bacterial adhesion, and thereby biofilm formation. The capsular organization is affected by the presence of type 3 fimbriae. Understanding the biophysical mechanisms for the impact of the structural organization of the bacterial polysaccharide capsule on biofilm formation will aid the development of strategies to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:26034816

  2. Prevention and treatment of biofilms by hybrid- and nanotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Kasimanickam, Ramanathan K; Ranjan, Ashish; Asokan, GV; Kasimanickam, Vanmathy R; Kastelic, John P

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria growing as adherent biofilms are difficult to treat and frequently develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. To counter biofilms, various approaches, including prevention of bacterial surface adherence, application of device applicators, and assimilation of antimicrobials in targeted drug delivery machinery, have been utilized. These methods are also combined to achieve synergistic bacterial killing. This review discusses various multimodal technologies, presents general concepts, and describes therapies relying on the principles of electrical energy, ultrasound, photodynamics, and targeted drug delivery for prevention and treatment of biofilms. PMID:23946652

  3. Electrical spiking in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Elisa; Ciszak, Marzena; Santopolo, Luisa; Frascella, Arcangela; Giovannetti, Luciana; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Mancuso, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In nature, biofilms are the most common form of bacterial growth. In biofilms, bacteria display coordinated behaviour to perform specific functions. Here, we investigated electrical signalling as a possible driver in biofilm sociobiology. Using a multi-electrode array system that enables high spatio-temporal resolution, we studied the electrical activity in two biofilm-forming strains and one non-biofilm-forming strain. The action potential rates monitored during biofilm-forming bacterial growth exhibited a one-peak maximum with a long tail, corresponding to the highest biofilm development. This peak was not observed for the non-biofilm-forming strain, demonstrating that the intensity of the electrical activity was not linearly related to the bacterial density, but was instead correlated with biofilm formation. Results obtained indicate that the analysis of the spatio-temporal electrical activity of bacteria during biofilm formation can open a new frontier in the study of the emergence of collective microbial behaviour. PMID:25392401

  4. The New Teacher Orientation and Training Program. Calgary Board of Education June 2010 & Northland School Division #61 Beginning Teacher Institute August 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, D. Theophilus; Deering, Michelle J.

    2011-01-01

    It is always an enlightening experience to observe how ideas around change are executed. The Calgary Board of Education program for inducting new teachers into its system merited some investigation. For a period of six weeks, the authors participated in this process, with a view that, some elements of the program could be used in a similar format…

  5. Association of vitamin D status with socio-demographic factors in Calgary, Alberta: an ecological study using Census Canada data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are a global health problem with northern countries such as Canada at particular risk. A number of sociodemographic factors have been reported to be associated with low vitamin D levels but prior studies have been limited by the ability of the researchers to gather this data directly from clinical trial participants. The purpose of this study was to use a novel methodology of inferring sociodemographic variables to evaluate the correlates of vitamin D levels in individuals dwelling in the City of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Methods We utilized data on vitamin D test results from Calgary Laboratory Services between January 1 2010 and August 31 2011. In addition to vitamin D level, we recorded age, sex, and vitamin D testing month as individual-level variables. We inferred sociodemographic variables by associating results with census dissemination areas and using Census Canada data to determine immigration status, education, median household income and first nations status as clustered variables. Associations between vitamin D status and the individual- and dissemination area-specific variables were examined using the population-averaged regression model by a generalized estimating equations approach to account for the clustering in the data. Results 158,327 individuals were included. Age, sex, month of vitamin D testing (at an individual level), and education, immigrant status, first nations status and income (at an aggregate level) were all statistically significant predictors of vitamin D status. Conclusions Vitamin D status was associated with a number of sociodemographic variables. Knowledge of these variables may improve targeted education and public health initiatives. PMID:23566290

  6. Voice prostheses, microbial colonization and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Matthias; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Total laryngectomy is performed in advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer stages and results in reduced quality of life due to the loss of voice and smell, permanent tracheostoma and occasionally dysphagia. Therefore, successful voice rehabilitation is highly beneficial for the patients' quality of life after surgery. Over the past decades, voice prostheses have evolved to the gold standard in rehabilitation and allow faster and superior voicing results after laryngectomy compared to esophageal speech. Polyspecies biofilm formation has become the limiting factor for device lifetimes and causes prosthesis dysfunction, leakage and in consequence pneumonia, if not replaced immediately. Although major improvements in prosthesis design have been made and scientific insight in the complexity of biofilm evolution and material interaction progresses, the microbial colonization continues to restrict device lifetimes, causing patient discomfort and elevated health costs. However, present scientific findings and advances in technology yield promising future approaches to improve the situation for laryngectomized patients. PMID:25366225

  7. Liquid Flow in Biofilm Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stoodley, Paul; deBeer, Dirk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    1994-01-01

    A model biofilm consisting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was developed to study the relationships between structural heterogeneity and hydrodynamics. Local fluid velocity in the biofilm system was measured by a noninvasive method of particle image velocimetry, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Velocity profiles were measured in conduit and porous medium reactors in the presence and absence of biofilm. Liquid flow was observed within biofilm channels; simultaneous imaging of the biofilm allowed the liquid velocity to be related to the physical structure of the biofilm. Images PMID:16349345

  8. Ambroxol influences voriconazole resistance of Candida parapsilosis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pulcrano, Giovanna; Panellis, Dimitrios; De Domenico, Giovanni; Rossano, Fabio; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2012-06-01

    The ability to form biofilm on different surfaces is typical of most Candida species. Microscopic structure and genetic aspects of fungal biofilms have been the object of many studies because of very high resistance to antimycotic agents because of the scarce permeability of the external matrix and to the alterations in cell metabolism. In our study, 31 isolates of Candida parapsilosis, isolated from bloodstream infections, were tested for their ability to produce biofilm and were found to be good producers. The susceptibility to voriconazole, assayed by colorimetrical XTT assay, revealed a very elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations for sessile cells in comparison with planktonic ones. The addition of ambroxol, a mucolytic agent, increased the susceptibility of biofilm forming cells to voriconazole. Expression of the efflux pump genes CDR and MDR was analyzed in biofilms alone or treated with ambroxol, evidencing a role of ambroxol in the expression of genes involved in azole resistance mechanisms of C. parapsilosis biofilms. In conclusion, our data seem to encourage the use of different substances in combination with classical antimycotics, with the aim of finding a solution to the increasing problem of the resistance of biofilms formed on medical devices by nonalbicans Candida species. PMID:22315984

  9. Bacterial adherence and biofilm formation on medical implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Veerachamy, Suganthan; Yarlagadda, Tejasri; Manivasagam, Geetha; Yarlagadda, Prasad Kdv

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are a complex group of microbial cells that adhere to the exopolysaccharide matrix present on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm-associated infections in the medical devices pose a serious problem to the public health and adversely affect the function of the device. Medical implants used in oral and orthopedic surgery are fabricated using alloys such as stainless steel and titanium. The biological behavior, such as osseointegration and its antibacterial activity, essentially depends on both the chemical composition and the morphology of the surface of the device. Surface treatment of medical implants by various physical and chemical techniques are attempted in order to improve their surface properties so as to facilitate bio-integration and prevent bacterial adhesion. The potential source of infection of the surrounding tissue and antimicrobial strategies are from bacteria adherent to or in a biofilm on the implant which should prevent both biofilm formation and tissue colonization. This article provides an overview of bacterial biofilm formation and methods adopted for the inhibition of bacterial adhesion on medical implants. PMID:25406229

  10. Fungi, Water Supply and Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann-Lacroix, Catherine; Costa, Damien; Imbert, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Even though it has been studied for many years, water-related infectious risk still exists in both care and community environments due to the possible presence of numerous microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and protists. People can be exposed directly to these microorganisms either through aerosols and water, after ingestion, inhalation, skin contact and entry through mucosal membranes, or indirectly usually due to pre-treatment of some medical devices. Species belonging to genera such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Pseudallesheria, Fusarium, Cuninghamella, Mucor and in some particular cases Candida have been isolated in water from health facilities and their presence is particularly related to the unavoidable formation of a polymicrobial biofilm in waterlines. Fungi isolation methods are based on water filtration combined with conventional microbiology cultures and/or molecular approaches; unfortunately, these are still poorly standardized. Moreover, due to inappropriate culture media and inadequate sampling volumes, the current standardized methods used for bacterial research are not suitable for fungal search. In order to prevent water-related fungal risk, health facilities have implemented measures such as ultraviolet radiation to treat the input network, continuous chemical treatment, chemical or thermal shock treatments, or microfiltration at points of use. This article aims to provide an overview of fungal colonization of water (especially in hospitals), involvement of biofilms that develop in waterlines and application of preventive strategies. PMID:27167410

  11. Bacterial Composition of Biofilms Collected From Two Service Areas in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and succession of bacteria were examined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from various biofilms within a metropolitan water distribution system. Biofilms were obtained from off-line devices using polycarbonate coupons from annular reactors incubated for ...

  12. Protocol for Detection of Biofilms on Needleless Connectors Attached to Central Venous Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, R. M.; Murga, R.; Bell, M.; Toscano, C. M.; Carr, J. H.; Novicki, T. J.; Zuckerman, C.; Corey, L. C.; Miller, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  13. Protocol for detection of biofilms on needleless connectors attached to central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Donlan, R M; Murga, R; Bell, M; Toscano, C M; Carr, J H; Novicki, T J; Zuckerman, C; Corey, L C; Miller, J M

    2001-02-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  14. An overview on the reactors to study drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gomes, I B; Simões, M; Simões, L C

    2014-10-01

    The development of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can cause pipe degradation, changes in the water organoleptic properties but the main problem is related to the public health. Biofilms are the main responsible for the microbial presence in drinking water (DW) and can be reservoirs for pathogens. Therefore, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation and behavior is of utmost importance in order to create effective control strategies. As the study of biofilms in real DWDS is difficult, several devices have been developed. These devices allow biofilm formation under controlled conditions of physical (flow velocity, shear stress, temperature, type of pipe material, etc), chemical (type and amount of nutrients, type of disinfectant and residuals, organic and inorganic particles, ions, etc) and biological (composition of microbial community - type of microorganism and characteristics) parameters, ensuring that the operational conditions are similar as possible to the DWDS conditions in order to achieve results that can be applied to the real scenarios. The devices used in DW biofilm studies can be divided essentially in two groups, those usually applied in situ and the bench top laboratorial reactors. The selection of a device should be obviously in accordance with the aim of the study and its advantages and limitations should be evaluated to obtain reproducible results that can be transposed into the reality of the DWDS. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the main reactors used in DW biofilm studies, describing their characteristics and applications, taking into account their main advantages and limitations. PMID:24937357

  15. New strategic insights into managing fungal biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Elisa; Morace, Giulia; Borgo, Francesca; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sherry, Leighann; Nile, Christopher; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections have dramatically increased in the last decades in parallel with an increase of populations with impaired immunity, resulting from medical conditions such as cancer, transplantation, or other chronic diseases. Such opportunistic infections result from a complex relationship between fungi and host, and can range from self-limiting to chronic or life-threatening infections. Modern medicine, characterized by a wide use of biomedical devices, offers new niches for fungi to colonize and form biofilm communities. The capability of fungi to form biofilms is well documented and associated with increased drug tolerance and resistance. In addition, biofilm formation facilitates persistence in the host promoting a persistent inflammatory condition. With a limited availability of antifungals within our arsenal, new therapeutic approaches able to address both host and pathogenic factors that promote fungal disease progression, i.e., chronic inflammation and biofilm formation, could represent an advantage in the clinical setting. In this paper we discuss the antifungal properties of myriocin, fulvic acid, and acetylcholine in light of their already known anti-inflammatory activity and as candidate dual action therapeutics to treat opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:26500623

  16. Importance of Candida-bacterial polymicrobial biofilms in disease

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Melphine M.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, with an ability to inhabit diverse host niches and cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. C. albicans also readily forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices and mucosal tissues, which serve as an infectious reservoir that is difficult to eradicate, and can lead to lethal systemic infections. Biofilm formation occurs within a complex milieu of host factors and other members of the human microbiota. Polymicrobial interactions will likely dictate the cellular and biochemical composition of the biofilm, as well as influence clinically relevant outcomes such as drug and host resistance and virulence. In this manuscript, we review C. albicans infections in the context of in vivo polymicrobial biofilms and implications for pathogenesis. PMID:21855346

  17. Modeling of Fungal Biofilms Using a Rat Central-vein Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida frequently grows as a biofilm, or an adherent community of cells protected from both the host immune system and antimicrobial therapies. Biofilms represent the predominant mode of growth for many clinical infections, including those associated with placement of a medical device. Here we describe a model for Candida biofilm infection of one important clinical niche, a venous catheter. This animal model system incorporates the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of a patient venous catheter infection and can be used for study of biofilm formation, drug resistance, and gene expression. PMID:22328403

  18. Investigations into Monochloramine Biofilm Penetration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. However, this hypothesis remains unconfirmed by direct b...

  19. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties. PMID:21741878

  20. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  1. Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Maria José; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.; Lourenço, Inês; Costa, Eduardo; Martins, Anabela; Pintado, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii) isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%). Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8%) and Mycenas rosea (44.8%) presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4%) and Russula delica (53.1%). Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition—almost 29%, by Russula delica extract). This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other studies are

  2. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  3. Differential effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on biofilm formation by different strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Maria; Davies, Julia R; Chávez de Paz, Luis E; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2010-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis are common opportunistic pathogens associated with medical device-related biofilm infections. 16S rRNA-FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study these two bacteria in dual-species biofilms. Two of the four S. epidermidis strains used were shown to form biofilms more avidly on polymer surfaces than the other two strains. In dual-species biofilms, the presence of P. aeruginosa reduced biofilm formation by S. epidermidis, although different clinical isolates differed in their susceptibility to this effect. The most resistant isolate coexisted with P. aeruginosa for up to 18 h and was also resistant to the effects of the culture supernatant from P. aeruginosa biofilms, which caused dispersal from established biofilms of other S. epidermidis strains. Thus, different strains of S. epidermidis differed in their capacity to withstand the action of P. aeruginosa, with some being better equipped than others to coexist in biofilms with P. aeruginosa. Our data suggest that where S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa are present on abiotic surfaces such as medical devices, S. epidermidis biofilm formation can be inhibited by P. aeruginosa through two mechanisms: disruption by extracellular products, possibly polysaccharides, and, in the later stages, by cell lysis. PMID:20528934

  4. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chusri, S.; Sompetch, K.; Mukdee, S.; Jansrisewangwong, S.; Srichai, T.; Maneenoon, K.; Limsuwan, S.; Voravuthikunchai, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E) could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63–5 μg/mL) could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL) and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL) for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:22919409

  5. New In Vitro Model To Study the Effect of Human Simulated Antibiotic Concentrations on Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Haagensen, Janus A. J.; Verotta, Davide; Huang, Liusheng; Spormann, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    A new in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulator for bacterial biofilms utilizing flow cell technology and confocal laser scanning microscopy is described. The device has the ability to simulate the changing antibiotic concentrations in humans associated with intravenous dosing on bacterial biofilms grown under continuous culture conditions. The free drug concentrations of a single 2-g meropenem intravenous bolus dose and first-order elimination utilizing a half-life of 0.895 h (elimination rate constant, 0.776 h−1) were simulated. The antibacterial activity of meropenem against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and three clinical strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis was investigated. Additionally, the effect of meropenem on PAO1 biofilms cultured for 24 h versus that on biofilms cultured for 72 h was examined. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, rapid biofilm killing was observed in the first hour of the dosing interval for all biofilms. However, for PAO1 biofilms cultured for 72 h, only bacterial subpopulations at the periphery of the biofilm were affected, with subpopulations at the substratum remaining viable, even at the conclusion of the dosing interval. The described model is a novel method to investigate antimicrobial killing of bacterial biofilms using human simulated concentrations. PMID:25918138

  6. Evidence for inter- and intraspecies biofilm formation variability among a small group of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando; Lima, Cláudia Afonso; Brás, Susana; França, Ângela; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-10-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are common bacterial colonizers of the human skin. They are often involved in nosocomial infections due to biofilm formation in indwelling medical devices. While biofilm formation has been extensively studied in Staphylococcus epidermidis, little is known regarding other CoNS species. Here, biofilms from six different CoNS species were characterized in terms of biofilm composition and architecture. Interestingly, the ability to form a thick biofilm was not associated with any particular species, and high variability on biofilm accumulation was found within the same species. Cell viability assays also revealed different proportions of live and dead cells within biofilms formed by different species, although this parameter was particularly similar at the intraspecies level. On the other hand, biofilm disruption assays demonstrated important inter- and intraspecies differences regarding extracellular matrix composition. Lastly, confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments confirmed this variability, highlighting important differences and common features of CoNS biofilms. We hypothesized that the biofilm formation heterogeneity observed was rather associated with biofilm matrix composition than with cells themselves. Additionally, our results indicate that polysaccharides, DNA and proteins are fundamental pieces in the process of CoNS biofilm formation. PMID:26403430

  7. [Synergism of the combination of enzymes or surfactants and a phenolic disinfectant on a bacterial biofilm].

    PubMed

    Jacquelin, L F; Le Magrex, E; Brisset, L; Carquin, J; Berthet, A; Choisy, C

    1994-05-01

    Disrupting bacterial biofilms is necessary for a wide application domains such as reusable medical devices, or systems of pipes for water or fluids in cosmetics, food and chemicals industry. Bacterial cells embedded in a biofilm are less susceptible to disinfectants than suspended cells. This property is referable to the structure of the biofilm itself. The gangue of exopolymers and the thickness of a 5-day-old biofilm of Escherichia coli (more than 200 layers of bacteria), contribute to this decrease of susceptibility. The present work deals with the release of an Escherichia coli biofilm by the sequential action of enzymes and a phenolic disinfectant on the one hand, and by the sequential or simultaneous action of surfactants and the previous disinfectant on the other hand. The decrease of bacteria count per mm2 and the Scanning Electron Microscope observations exhibited a synergic action in every case. Nevertheless, Escherichia coli biofilms quickly reconstructed even after exposition to the previous treatment. PMID:7824307

  8. The Staphylococcal Biofilm: Adhesins, Regulation, and Host Response.

    PubMed

    Paharik, Alexandra E; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    The staphylococci comprise a diverse genus of Gram-positive, nonmotile commensal organisms that inhabit the skin and mucous membranes of humans and other mammals. In general, staphylococci are benign members of the natural flora, but many species have the capacity to be opportunistic pathogens, mainly infecting individuals who have medical device implants or are otherwise immunocompromised. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are major sources of hospital-acquired infections and are the most common causes of surgical site infections and medical device-associated bloodstream infections. The ability of staphylococci to form biofilms in vivo makes them highly resistant to chemotherapeutics and leads to chronic diseases. These biofilm infections include osteomyelitis, endocarditis, medical device infections, and persistence in the cystic fibrosis lung. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of our current understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation, with an emphasis on adhesins and regulation, while also addressing how staphylococcal biofilms interact with the immune system. On the whole, this review will provide a thorough picture of biofilm formation of the staphylococcus genus and how this mode of growth impacts the host. PMID:27227309

  9. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned. PMID:27075274

  10. Sport participation, sport injury, risk factors and sport safety practices in Calgary and area junior high schools

    PubMed Central

    Emery, CA; Tyreman, H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine rates of sport participation, sport injury, risk factors and sport safety practices in young adolescents. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Calgary and area junior high schools. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 1466 students (aged 12 to 15 years). OUTCOME MEASURES: Sport injury within one year prior to completing the survey. RESULTS: Ninety-three per cent of students participated in sports in the previous year. The injury rate was 60.85 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 58.29 to 63.35) for students reporting at least one sport injury, 29.4 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 27.08 to 31.81) for medically treated injuries, and 12.28 injuries/100 students/year (95% CI 10.64 to 14.07) for injuries presenting to a hospital emergency department. The greatest proportion of injuries occurred in basketball (14%), soccer (12%), hockey (8.6%) and snowboarding/skiing (7.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The rates of participation and injury in sports are high in junior high school students. Future research should focus on prevention strategies in sports with high participation and injury rates to have the greatest population health impact. PMID:20808471

  11. Molecular Characterization by Using Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasmids Containing blaNDM-7 in Enterobacteriaceae from Calgary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Peirano, G; Lynch, T; Chavda, K D; Gregson, D B; Church, D L; Conly, J; Kreiswirth, B N; Pitout, J D

    2016-03-01

    Enterobacteriaceae with blaNDM-7 are relatively uncommon and had previously been described in Europe, India, the United States, and Japan. This study describes the characteristics of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella pneumoniae [n = 2], Escherichia coli [n = 2], Serratia marcescens [n = 1], and Enterobacter hormaechei [n = 1] isolates) with blaNDM-7 obtained from 4 patients from Calgary, Canada, from 2013 to 2014. The 46,161-bp IncX3 plasmids with blaNDM-7 are highly similar to other blaNDM-harboring IncX3 plasmids and, interestingly, showed identical structures within the different isolates. This finding may indicate horizontal transmission within our health region, or it may indicate contact with individuals from areas of endemicity within the hospital setting. Patients infected or colonized with bacteria containing blaNDM-7 IncX3 plasmids generate infection control challenges. Epidemiological and molecular studies are required to better understand the dynamics of transmission, the risk factors, and the reservoirs for bacteria harboring blaNDM-7. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of S. marcescens and E. hormaechei with blaNDM-7. PMID:26643346

  12. Biofilm in endodontics: A review.

    PubMed

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms' formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  13. Imaging, Intervention, and Workflow in Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Calgary Approach.

    PubMed

    Zerna, C; Assis, Z; d'Esterre, C D; Menon, B K; Goyal, M

    2016-06-01

    Five recently published clinical trials showed dramatically higher rates of favorable functional outcome and a satisfying safety profile of endovascular treatment compared with the previous standard of care in acute ischemic stroke with proximal anterior circulation artery occlusion. Eligibility criteria within these trials varied by age, stroke severity, imaging, treatment-time window, and endovascular treatment devices. This focused review provides an overview of the trial results and explores the heterogeneity in imaging techniques, workflow, and endovascular techniques used in these trials and the consequent impact on practice. Using evidence from these trials and following a case from start to finish, this review recommends strategies that will help the appropriate patient undergo a fast, focused clinical evaluation, imaging, and intervention. PMID:26659339

  14. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  15. Manipulatiaon of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Palmer, R.J.; Smith, C.A.; Whitaker, K.W.; White, D.C.; Zinn, M.; kirkegaard, R.

    1998-08-09

    The Biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms by generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desquamation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in the distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  16. Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the basis of many persistent diseases. The persistence of these infections is primarily attributed to the increased antibiotic resistance exhibited by the cells within the biofilms. This resistance is multifactorial; there are multiple mechanisms of resistance that act together in order to provide an increased overall level of resistance to the biofilm. These mechanisms are based on the function of wild-type genes and are not the result of mutations. This article reviews the known mechanisms of resistance, including the ability of the biofilm matrix to prevent antibiotics from reaching the cells and the function of individual genes that are preferentially expressed in biofilms. Evidence suggests that these mechanisms have been developed as a general stress response of biofilms that enables the cells in the biofilm to respond to all of the changes in the environment that they may encounter. PMID:22953707

  17. Characterization of the effect of serum and chelating agents on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation; chelating agents augment biofilm formation through clumping factor B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nabil Mathew

    Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent of a diverse array of acute and chronic infections, and some these infections, including infective endocarditis, joint infections, and medical device-associated bloodstream infections, depend upon its capacity to form tenacious biofilms on surfaces. Inserted medical devices such as intravenous catheters, pacemakers, and artificial heart valves save lives, but unfortunately, they can also serve as a substrate on which S. aureus can form a biofilm, attributing S. aureus as a leading cause of medical device-related infections. The major aim of this work was take compounds to which S. aureus would be exposed during infection and to investigate their effects on its capacity to form a biofilm. More specifically, the project investigated the effects of serum, and thereafter of catheter lock solutions on biofilm formation by S. aureus. Pre-coating polystyrene with serum is frequently used as a method to augment biofilm formation. The effect of pre-coating with serum is due to the deposition of extracellular matrix components onto the polystyrene, which are then recognized by MSCRAMMs. We therefore hypothesized that the major component of blood, serum, would induce biofilm formation. Surprisingly, serum actually inhibited biofilm formation. The inhibitory activity was due to a small molecular weight, heat-stable, non-proteinaceous component/s of serum. Serum-mediated inhibition of biofilm formation may represent a previously uncharacterized aspect of host innate immunity that targets the expression of a key bacterial virulence factor: the ability to establish a resistant biofilm. Metal ion chelators like sodium citrate are frequently chosen to lock intravenous catheters because they are regarded as potent inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation and viability. We found that, while chelating compounds abolished biofilm formation in most strains of S. aureus, they actually augmented the phenotype in a subset of strains. We

  18. Biofilm in endodontics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jhajharia, Kapil; Parolia, Abhishek; Shetty, K Vikram; Mehta, Lata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. The most common endodontic infection is caused by the surface-associated growth of microorganisms. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. It is foremost to understand how the biofilm formed by root canal bacteria resists endodontic treatment measures. Bacterial etiology has been confirmed for common oral diseases such as caries and periodontal and endodontic infections. Bacteria causing these diseases are organized in biofilm structures, which are complex microbial communities composed of a great variety of bacteria with different ecological requirements and pathogenic potential. The biofilm community not only gives bacteria effective protection against the host's defense system but also makes them more resistant to a variety of disinfecting agents used as oral hygiene products or in the treatment of infections. Successful treatment of these diseases depends on biofilm removal as well as effective killing of biofilm bacteria. So, the fundamental to maintain oral health and prevent dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis is to control the oral biofilms. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defense mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. The aim of this article was to review the mechanisms of biofilms’ formation, their roles in pulpal and periapical pathosis, the different types of biofilms, the factors influencing biofilm formation, the mechanisms of their antimicrobial resistance, techniques to

  19. Merocyanine-540 mediated photodynamic effects on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbarra, Maria Sonia; Di Poto, Antonella; Saino, Enrica; Visai, Livia; Minzioni, Paolo; Bragheri, Francesca; Cristiani, Ilaria

    2009-07-01

    Staphylococci are important causes of nosocomial and medical-device-related infections. Their virulence is attributed to the elaboration of biofilms that protect the organisms from immune system clearance and to increased resistance to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Photodynamic treatment (PDT) has been proposed as an alternative approach for the inactivation of bacteria in biofilms. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of merocyanine 540 (MC 540), a photosensitizing dye that is used for purging malignant cells from autologous bone marrow grafts, against Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. We evaluated the effect of the combined photodynamic action of MC 540 and 532 nm laser on the viability and structure of biofilms of two Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Significant inactivation of cells was observed in the biofilms treated with MC-540 and then exposed to laser radiation. Furthermore we found that the PDT effect, on both types of cells, was significantly dependent on both the light-dose and on the impinging lightintensity. Disruption of PDT-treated biofilm was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  20. Retention of a model pathogen in a porous media biofilm.

    PubMed

    Bauman, W J; Nocker, A; Jones, W L; Camper, A K

    2009-01-01

    The inadvertent or the deliberate introduction of pathogens into drinking water can lead to public health consequences. Distribution system sampling strategies are needed to provide information on the identity, source and fate of the introduced pathogens. Porous media biofilm reactors conditioned with undefined drinking water biofilms were tested for their ability to immobilize Escherichia coli 0157:H7. Biofilms were established by applying continuous flow of biologically activated carbon treated water with natural microflora and supplemented nutrient solution (0.5 mg l(-1) C) for 2 or 3 weeks. Control reactors were clean and were not colonized with biofilm. All reactors were injected with slug doses of approximately 1 x 10(9) cfu E. coli O157:H7. On the basis of the plate count enumeration of the introduced pathogen, reactors pre-colonized for 2 or 3 weeks retained significantly more cells (0.75 and 9.37% of the introduced spike dose, respectively) compared with uncolonized control reactors (0.22%). Compared with cultivation, microscopic direct counts and quantitative PCR suggested significantly higher and lower numbers of pathogens, respectively. Plate counts were thus considered as the method of choice for pathogen enumeration in this study. In addition to providing general insights into interactions between pathogens and drinking water biofilms, the study concluded that engineered biofilm systems may be considered as a device to capture pathogens from the bulk flow for monitoring purposes. PMID:19173097

  1. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Stewart, Philip S.; Hozalski, Raymond M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacterial biofilms appear to be designed to withstand extreme forces rather than typical or average loads. In scenarios requiring the removal or control of unwanted biofilms, this emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for structurally weakening the biofilms in conjunction with bacterial inactivation. PMID:26819559

  2. Electric current and magnetic field effects on bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Elizabeth Louise

    The ability of bacteria to form and grow as biofilm presents a major challenge in clinical medicine. Through this work, two alternative electromagnetic treatment strategies were investigated to combat bacterial biofilms like those that cause chronic infections on indwelling medical devices. Direct electric current (DC) was applied at current densities of 0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm2 alone and in conjunction with antibiotic. Unlike most previous studies, chloride ions were included in the treatment solution at a physiologically-relevant concentration. Using this approach, low levels of DC alone were demonstrated to have a dose-responsive, biocidal effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms with no synergistic enhancement of antibiotic activity. Through a series of experiments using chemical measures, cell viability, and global gene expression, electrolytic generation of chlorine, a potent disinfectant, was identified as the predominant mechanism by which DC kills bacteria in biofilm. The second treatment strategy investigated weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) as a noninvasive approach, involving an extension of concepts from well-studied ELF-MF effects observed in eukaryotic systems to bacterial biofilm. S. epidermidis biofilms grown in weak, extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) at Ca2+ and K+ ion resonance frequencies were assessed using global gene expression to determine if S. epidermidis in biofilm detect and respond to ELF-MFs. Frequency-dependent changes in gene expression were observed with upregulation of genes involved in transposase activity, signal transduction systems, and membrane transport processes indicating possible effects consistent with theories of ELF-MF induced changes in ion transport reported in eukaryotic cells. This is the first transcriptome study to indentify ELF-MF effects in bacteria. While no direct biocidal effect was observed with ELF-MF treatment, alteration of membrane

  3. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  4. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  5. Biofilm Formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, L. L.; Edwards, J. L.; Shao, J.; Rabinak, C.; Entz, D.; Apicella, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in continuous-flow chambers to determine whether Neisseria gonorrhoeae could form a biofilm. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae formed a biofilm with or without the addition of 10 μM sodium nitrite to the perfusion medium. Microscopic analysis of a 4-day growth of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 revealed evidence of a biofilm with organisms embedded in matrix, which was interlaced with water channels. N. gonorrhoeae strains MS11 and FA1090 were found to also form biofilms under the same growth conditions. Cryofield emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that organisms were embedded in a continuous matrix with membranous structures spanning the biofilm. These studies also demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae has the capability to form a matrix in the presence and absence of CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac). Studies with monoclonal antibody 6B4 and the lectins soy bean agglutinin and Maackia amurensis indicated that the predominate terminal sugars in the biofilm matrix formed a lactosamine when the biofilm was grown in the absence of CMP-Neu5Ac and sialyllactosamine in the presence of CMP-Neu5Ac. N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291 formed a biofilm on primary urethral epithelial cells and cervical cells in culture without loss of viability of the epithelial cell layer. Our studies demonstrated that N. gonorrhoeae can form biofilms in continuous-flow chambers and on living cells. Studies of these biofilms may have implications for understanding asymptomatic gonococcal infection. PMID:15784536

  6. Antibody-Mediated Immobilization of Cryptococcus neoformans Promotes Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Emma J.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Most microbes, including the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, can grow as biofilms. Biofilms confer upon microbes a range of characteristics, including an ability to colonize materials such as shunts and catheters and increased resistance to antibiotics. Here, we provide evidence that coating surfaces with a monoclonal antibody to glucuronoxylomannan, the major component of the fungal capsular polysaccharide, immobilizes cryptococcal cells to a surface support and, subsequently, promotes biofilm formation. We used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the growth of cryptococcal biofilms, generating the first movies of fungal biofilm growth. We show that when fungal cells are immobilized using surface-attached specific antibody to the capsule, the initial stages of biofilm formation are significantly faster than those on surfaces with no antibody coating or surfaces coated with unspecific monoclonal antibody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that biofilm growth was a dynamic process in which cells shuffled position during budding and was accompanied by emergence of planktonic variant cells that left the attached biofilm community. The planktonic variant cells exhibited mobility, presumably by Brownian motion. Our results indicate that microbial immobilization by antibody capture hastens biofilm formation and suggest that antibody coating of medical devices with immunoglobulins must exclude binding to common pathogenic microbes and the possibility that this effect could be exploited in industrial microbiology. PMID:19251903

  7. Effective inactivation of Candida albicans biofilms by using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyong Seok; Yang, Jungwoo; Choi, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-09-01

    Present sterilization methods for biofilms in medical devices have limitations. Therefore, an alternative sterilization method using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was tested on Candida albicans biofilms. The effect of varying pressure, temperature, and treatment time on the inactivation of C. albicans spores in suspensions and in biofilms was examined. The parameters such as treatment time, pressure, and temperature that led to the complete inactivation of C. albicans biofilms ranged 5-20 min, 100-200 bar, and 35-45 °C, respectively. Notably, treatment of SC-CO2 at either 100 bar and 40 °C or 200 bar and 30 °C induced complete inactivation of spores within 5 min. Furthermore, it was found that wet biofilms (0.4 %, w/w) had higher sensitivity to SC-CO2 than dried biofilms. Finally, spore inactivation was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In this study, the use of a low-temperature SC-CO2 sterilization method was proven to be effective in fungal biofilm inactivation, and the moisture content of biofilms was revealed to be the key factor for biofilm inactivation. PMID:26109343

  8. Biofilm formation and biocides sensitivity of Pseudomonas marginalis isolated from a maple sap collection system.

    PubMed

    Lagacé, L; Jacques, M; Mafu, A A; Roy, D

    2006-10-01

    The susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm cells of Pseudomonas marginalis toward four commonly used biocides at different temperatures (15 and 30 degrees C) and biofilm growth times (24 and 48 h) was assessed. Using the MBEC biofilm device, biofilm production in maple sap was shown to be highly reproducible for each set of conditions tested. Biofilm formation was influenced by growth temperature and time. A temperature of 15 degrees C and incubation time of 24 h yielded fewer CFU per peg and showed fewer adhered cells and typical biofilm structures, based on scanning electron microscopy observations as compared with other conditions. Minimal biofilm eradication concentration values for P. marginalis were significantly greater (P. < 0.001) than were MBCs for planktonic cells and for every biocide tested, with the exception of minimal biofilm eradication concentration values for peracetic acid at 15 degrees C and 24 h. Sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid sanitizers were able to eliminate P. marginalis biofilms at lower concentrations as compared with hydrogen peroxide- and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (P < 0.001). According to the results obtained, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid sanitizers would be more appropriate for maple sap collection system sanitation. PMID:17066920

  9. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D.; Cameron, David R.; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A.; Qu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of “persister cells” were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics. PMID:26687035

  10. Prevention and Treatment of Virulent Bacterial Biofilms with an Enzymatic Nitric Oxide-Releasing Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Sulemankhil, Imran; Ganopolsky, Jorge Gabriel; Dieni, Christopher Anthony; Dan, Andrei Florin; Jones, Mitchell Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The use of percutaneous medical devices often results in nosocomial infections. Attachment of microorganisms to the surfaces of these medical devices triggers biofilm formation, which presents significant complications to the health of a patient and may lead to septicemia, thromboembolism, or endocarditis if not correctly treated. Although several antimicrobials are commonly used for prevention of biofilm formation, they have limited efficacy against formed biofilms. In this study, we report the use of an enzymatic, gaseous nitric oxide (gNO)-releasing dressing for the prevention and treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Results show that the bactericidal activity against biofilms of the test strains was dependent on time and rate of gNO release from the dressing. Following 6 h of treatment, gNO-releasing dressings significantly inhibited the growth of test strains relative to vehicle control dressings, demonstrating eradication of bacterial concentrations of up to 105 CFU/cm2. Complete cell death was observed for both prevention of biofilm formation and treatment of 24-h-grown biofilms after 6 h of treatment with the gNO-releasing dressings. Further, gNO-releasing dressings were more efficient against formed biofilms than other antimicrobial agents currently used. These results demonstrate that the gNO-releasing dressing can produce sufficient levels of gNO over a therapeutically relevant duration for maximal bactericidal effects against virulent bacterial strains known to cause nosocomial infections. PMID:22948868

  11. Successful treatment of biofilm infections using shock waves combined with antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Janardhanraj, S.; Srinandan, C. S.; Datey, Akshay; Strugnell, Richard A.; Gopalan, Jagadeesh; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria secrete a highly hydrated framework of extracellular polymer matrix on suitable substrates and embed within the matrix to form a biofilm. Bacterial biofilms are observed on many medical devices, endocarditis, periodontitis and lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Bacteria in biofilm are protected from antibiotics and >1,000 times of the minimum inhibitory concentration may be required to treat biofilm infections. Here, we demonstrated that shock waves could be used to remove Salmonella, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus biofilms in urinary catheters. The studies were extended to a Pseudomonas chronic pneumonia lung infection and Staphylococcus skin suture infection model in mice. The biofilm infections in mice, treated with shock waves became susceptible to antibiotics, unlike untreated biofilms. Mice exposed to shock waves responded to ciprofloxacin treatment, while ciprofloxacin alone was ineffective in treating the infection. These results demonstrate for the first time that, shock waves, combined with antibiotic treatment can be used to treat biofilm infection on medical devices as well as in situ infections. PMID:26658706

  12. High-throughput dental biofilm growth analysis for multiparametric microenvironmental biochemical conditions using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond H W; Cui, Xin; Guo, Weijin; Thorsen, Todd

    2016-04-26

    Dental biofilm formation is not only a precursor to tooth decay, but also induces more serious systematic health problems such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Understanding the conditions promoting colonization and subsequent biofilm development involving complex bacteria coaggregation is particularly important. In this paper, we report a high-throughput microfluidic 'artificial teeth' device offering controls of multiple microenvironmental factors (e.g. nutrients, growth factors, dissolved gases, and seeded cell populations) for quantitative characteristics of long-term dental bacteria growth and biofilm development. This 'artificial teeth' device contains multiple (up to 128) incubation chambers to perform parallel cultivation and analyses (e.g. biofilm thickness, viable-dead cell ratio, and spatial distribution of multiple bacterial species) of bacteria samples under a matrix of different combinations of microenvironmental factors, further revealing possible developmental mechanisms of dental biofilms. Specifically, we applied the 'artificial teeth' to investigate the growth of two key dental bacteria, Streptococci species and Fusobacterium nucleatum, in the biofilm under different dissolved gas conditions and sucrose concentrations. Together, this high-throughput microfluidic platform can provide extended applications for general biofilm research, including screening of the biofilm properties developing under combinations of specified growth parameters such as seeding bacteria populations, growth medium compositions, medium flow rates and dissolved gas levels. PMID:27045372

  13. Lysostaphin Disrupts Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms on Artificial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Julie A.; Kusuma, Caroline; Mond, James J.; Kokai-Kun, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococci often form biofilms, sessile communities of microcolonies encased in an extracellular matrix that adhere to biomedical implants or damaged tissue. Infections associated with biofilms are difficult to treat, and it is estimated that sessile bacteria in biofilms are 1,000 to 1,500 times more resistant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. This antibiotic resistance of biofilms often leads to the failure of conventional antibiotic therapy and necessitates the removal of infected devices. Lysostaphin is a glycylglycine endopeptidase which specifically cleaves the pentaglycine cross bridges found in the staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Lysostaphin kills Staphylococcus aureus within minutes (MIC at which 90% of the strains are inhibited [MIC90], 0.001 to 0.064 μg/ml) and is also effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis at higher concentrations (MIC90, 12.5 to 64 μg/ml). The activity of lysostaphin against staphylococci present in biofilms compared to those of other antibiotics was, however, never explored. Surprisingly, lysostaphin not only killed S. aureus in biofilms but also disrupted the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms in vitro on plastic and glass surfaces at concentrations as low as 1 μg/ml. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that lysostaphin eradicated both the sessile cells and the extracellular matrix of the biofilm. This disruption of S. aureus biofilms was specific for lysostaphin-sensitive S. aureus, as biofilms of lysostaphin-resistant S. aureus were not affected. High concentrations of oxacillin (400 μg/ml), vancomycin (800 μg/ml), and clindamycin (800 μg/ml) had no effect on the established S. aureus biofilms in this system, even after 24 h. Higher concentrations of lysostaphin also disrupted S. epidermidis biofilms. PMID:14576095

  14. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  15. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Michael J; Chang, Connie; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Bothner, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  16. New Technologies for Studying Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    FRANKLIN, MICHAEL J.; CHANG, CONNIE; AKIYAMA, TATSUYA; BOTHNER, BRIAN

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have traditionally been studied as single-cell organisms. In laboratory settings, aerobic bacteria are usually cultured in aerated flasks, where the cells are considered essentially homogenous. However, in many natural environments, bacteria and other microorganisms grow in mixed communities, often associated with surfaces. Biofilms are comprised of surface-associated microorganisms, their extracellular matrix material, and environmental chemicals that have adsorbed to the bacteria or their matrix material. While this definition of a biofilm is fairly simple, biofilms are complex and dynamic. Our understanding of the activities of individual biofilm cells and whole biofilm systems has developed rapidly, due in part to advances in molecular, analytical, and imaging tools and the miniaturization of tools designed to characterize biofilms at the enzyme level, cellular level, and systems level. PMID:26350329

  17. Electrochemical biofilm control: a review.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sujala T; Babauta, Jerome T; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods of controlling biofilms that has widely been discussed in the literature is to apply a potential or electrical current to a metal surface on which the biofilm is growing. Although electrochemical biofilm control has been studied for decades, the literature is often conflicting, as is detailed in this review. The goals of this review are: (1) to present the current status of knowledge regarding electrochemical biofilm control; (2) to establish a basis for a fundamental definition of electrochemical biofilm control and requirements for studying it; (3) to discuss current proposed mechanisms; and (4) to introduce future directions in the field. It is expected that the review will provide researchers with guidelines on comparing datasets across the literature and generating comparable datasets. The authors believe that, with the correct design, electrochemical biofilm control has great potential for industrial use. PMID:26592420

  18. Potential of shock waves to remove calculus and biofilm.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Attin, Thomas; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2011-12-01

    Effective calculus and biofilm removal is essential to treat periodontitis. Sonic and ultrasonic technologies are used in several scaler applications. This was the first feasibility study to assess the potential of a shock wave device to remove calculus and biofilms and to kill bacteria. Ten extracted teeth with visible subgingival calculus were treated with either shock waves for 1 min at an energy output of 0.4 mJ/mm(2) at 3 Hz or a magnetostrictive ultrasonic scaler at medium power setting for 1 min, which served as a control. Calculus was determined before and after treatment planimetrically using a custom-made software using a grey scale threshold. In a second experiment, multispecies biofilms were formed on saliva-preconditioned bovine enamel discs during 64.5 h. They were subsequently treated with shock waves or the ultrasonic scaler (N = 6/group) using identical settings. Biofilm detachment and bactericidal effects were then assessed. Limited efficiency of the shock wave therapy in terms of calculus removal was observed: only 5% of the calculus was removed as compared to 100% when ultrasound was used (P ≤ 0.0001). However, shock waves were able to significantly reduce adherent bacteria by three orders of magnitude (P ≤ 0.0001). The extent of biofilm removal by the ultrasonic device was statistically similar. Only limited bactericidal effects were observed using both methods. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, the shock wave device was not able to reliably remove calculus but had the potential to remove biofilms by three log steps. To increase the efficacy, technical improvements are still required. This novel noninvasive intervention, however, merits further investigation. PMID:20821262

  19. Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm associated components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossard, Kari A.

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative aerobic coccobaccillus that is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Infected individuals may develop pneumonia, urinary tract, wound, and other infections that are associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and mechanical ventilation. Treatment is difficult because many A. baumannii isolates have developed multi-drug resistance and the bacterium can persist on abiotic surfaces. Persistence and resistance may be due to formation of biofilms, which leads to long-term colonization, evasion of the host immune system and resistance to treatment with antibiotics and disinfectants. While biofilms are complex multifaceted structures, two bacterial components that have been shown to be important in formation and stability are exopolysaccharides (EPS) and the biofilm-associated protein (Bap). An EPS, poly-beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine, PNAG, has been described for E. coli and S. epidermidis. PNAG acts as an intercellular adhesin. Production of this adhesin is dependent on the pga/icaABCD locus. We have identified a homologous locus in A. baumannii 307-0294 that is involved in production of an exopolysaccharide, recognized by an anti-PNAG antibody. We hypothesized that the A. baumannii pgaABCD locus plays a role in biofilm formation, and protection against host innate defenses and disinfectants suggesting that PNAG is a possible virulence factor for the organism. The first aim of this thesis will define the pgaABCD locus. We have previously identified Bap, a protein with similarity to those described for S. aureus and we have demonstrated that this protein is involved in maintaining the stability of biofilms on glass. We hypothesized that A. baumannii Bap plays a role in persistence and pathogenesis and is regulated by quorum sensing. In our second aim we will examine the role of Bap in attachment and biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces and also determine if Bap is involved in

  20. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  1. Insights into discharge argon mediated biofilm inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Danni; Azzam, Robin; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in biomedical sciences. Conventional sterilization and decontamination methods are not suitable for new and more sophisticated biomaterials. In this paper, the efficiency and effectiveness of gas discharges in inactivation and removal of biofilms on biomaterials were studied. We found that although discharge oxygen, nitrogen and argon all demonstrated excellent antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, gases with distinct chemical/physical properties underwent different mechanisms of action. Discharge oxygen and nitrogen mediated decontamination was associated with strong etching effects, which can cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. On the contrary, although discharge argon at low powers maintained excellent antibacterial ability, it had negligible etching effects. Based on these results, an effective decontamination approach using discharge argon was established in which bacteria and biofilms were killed in situ and then removed from contaminated biomaterials. This novel procedure is applicable for a wide range of biomaterials and biomedical devices in an in vivo and clinical setting. PMID:24070412

  2. Nitrification in a vertically moving biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Healy, M G; Prendergast, J

    2006-05-01

    A laboratory continuous feed biofilm reactor, comprising a bulk fluid reactor, a biofilm plastic module, a feed tank, and pneumatic devices and controls, was operated for a total period of 257 days, including seeding time, to treat domestic-strength synthetic wastewater under increasing ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)--N) loading rates, ranging from 0.17+/-0.01 (0.71+/-0.06 gm(-2)d(-1)) to 0.70+/-0.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) (2.9+/-0.1 gm(-2)d(-1)). The biofilm plastic module was moved vertically in and out of the wastewater in continuous cycles. The maximum NH(4)(+)-N removal rate was reached during the maximum loading phase, when a NH(4)(+)--N loading rate of 0.70+/-0.02 kgm(-3)d(-1) (2.9+/-0.1 gm(-2)d(-1)) was applied to the system. During this loading period, the average NH(4)(+)--N removal rate was 0.30+/-0.10 kgm(-3)d(-1) (1.30+/-0.40 gm(-2)d(-1)). PMID:16182437

  3. Novel application for the prevention and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traba, Christian

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in both industrial and biomedical sciences. In this dissertation, the application of plasma from two very different facets was studied. In part one, the susceptibility of pre-formed Staphylococcus aureus biofilms on biomaterials to different plasmas was investigated. It was found that the distinct chemical/physical properties of plasmas generated from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon all demonstrated very potent but very different anti-biofilm mechanisms of action. An in depth analysis of these results show: 1) different reactive species produced in each plasma demonstrate specific activity, and 2) the commonly associated etching effect could be manipulated and even controlled, depending on experimental conditions and the discharge gas. These studies provide insights into the anti-biofilm mechanisms of plasma as well as the effects of different reactive species on biofilm inactivation. Under experimental parameters, bacterial cells in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were killed (>99.9%) by plasmas within minutes of exposure and no bacteria nor biofilm re-growth from discharge gas treated biofilms was observed throughout the life-span of the re-growth experiment. The decontamination ability of plasmas for the treatment of biofilm related infections on biomedical materials was confirmed and novel applications involving the use of low power argon and oxygen for the treatment of biofilm contaminated biomaterials and indwelling devices is proposed. The second facet of this dissertation explores the interaction between biofilm forming Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on different antibacterial/anti-biofilm surfaces. The antibiotic-free anti-fouling surfaces constructed in this study were generated from the plasma-assisted graft polymerization technique. These sophisticated surfaces were stable, biocompatible and capable of preventing biofilm formation on biomaterials and medical devices. Under

  4. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation. PMID:26758863

  5. Dynamic behavior of biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, R.M. ); Donaldson, T.L. )

    1986-01-01

    Biological fixed films, or biofilms, are composed of a dense cluster of cells bound to one another or a support surface by the glycocalyx, a cell-secreted carbohydrate matrix. A key advantage of fixed films over other types of immobilized-cell systems is that the immobilization occurs naturally, and hence does not require the additional materials and labor for cell entrapment within gels or covalent bonding to supports. Applications of microbial film fermenters have included animal-cell culture, bacterial leaching of ores, waste treatment, and the production of vinegar, ethanol, critic acid, and beer. Analysis of the unsteady-state behavior of biofilms can provide insight into basic scientific phenomena such as intracellular metabolic regulation patterns.

  6. The Use of Commercially Available Alpha-Amylase Compounds to Inhibit and Remove Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Craigen, Bradford; Dashiff, Aliza; Kadouri, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a versatile human pathogen, is commonly associated with medical device infections. Its capacity to establish and maintain these infections is thought to be related to its ability to form adherent biofilms. In this study, commercially available α-amylase compounds from various biological sources were evaluated for their ability to reduce and prevent biofilm formation of several S. aureus isolates. Our data demonstrates that α-amylase compounds can rapidly detach biofilms of S. aureus, as well as inhibit biofilm formation. Our data also demonstrates that α-amylase compounds have an ability to reduce and disassociate S. aureus cell-aggregates grown in liquid suspension. These findings suggest that commercially available α-amylase compounds could be used in the future to control S. aureus biofilm-related infections. PMID:21760865

  7. The Effect of Gold and Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles on Biofilm-Forming Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayanan, Madhu Bala; Balachandranath, Reneta; Genji Srinivasulu, Yuvasri; Kannaiyan, Sathish Kumar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biofilms on biomaterial implants or devices are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to their protection by exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune-cells. Application of metals in their nanoparticulated form is currently considered to resolve bacterial infections. Gold and iron-oxide nanoparticles are widely used in different medical applications, but their utilisation to eradicate biofilms on biomaterials implants is novel. Here, we studied the effect of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We report that biofilm growth was reduced at higher concentrations of gold and iron-oxide nanoparticles compared to absence of nanoparticles. Thus nanoparticles with appropriate concentration could show significant reduction in biofilm formation. PMID:24187645

  8. Biofilm architecture in a novel pressurized biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Siqing; Duan, Liang; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2015-01-01

    A novel pure-oxygen pressurized biofilm reactor was operated at different organic loading, mechanical shear and hydrodynamic conditions to understand the relationships between biofilm architecture and its operation. The ultimate goal was to improve the performance of the biofilm reactor. The biofilm was labeled with seven stains and observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Unusual biofilm architecture of a ribbon embedded between two surfaces with very few points of attachment was observed. As organic loading increased, the biofilm morphology changed from a moderately rough layer into a locally smoother biomass with significant bulging protuberances, although the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained unchanged at about 75%. At higher organic loadings, biofilms contained a larger fraction of active cells distributed uniformly within a proteinaceous matrix with decreasing polysaccharide content. Higher hydrodynamic shear in combination with high organic loading resulted in the collapse of biofilm structure and a substantial decrease in reactor performance (a COD removal of 16%). Moreover, the important role of proteins for the spatial distribution of active cells was demonstrated quantitatively. PMID:25990377

  9. Exploring Mechanisms of Biofilm Removal

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Karan; Khashai, Fatemeh; Forghany, Ali; Krasieva, Tatiana; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel anti-plaque formulation on oral biofilm removal. Specific aim was to elucidate the role of 2 potentially complementary mechanisms on dental biofilm removal using EPIEN Dental Debriding Solution (EDDS) like desiccating action leading to denaturation and destabilization of plaque and mechanical removal of destabilized plaque through forceful rinsing action Materials and Methods 25 extracted teeth, after routine debriding and cleaning, underwent standard biofilm incubation model over 4 days. Then samples were randomly divided into 5 groups of 5 teeth each, treated and stained with GUM®Red-Cote® plaque disclosing solution and imaged. Samples were subsequently treated with HYBENX® Oral Decontaminant. Group 1 samples were treated with a standardized “static” water dip exposure following biofilm incubation. Samples in Group 2 were given a standardized “dynamic” exposure to a dental high pressure air/water syringe for 20 s. Group 3 samples were exposed to a standardized “static” application of test agent (30 s dip rinse) followed by a standardized “static” water rinse (30 s dip rinse). Samples in Group 4 were given both the standardized “static” application of test formulation followed by the standardized “dynamic” exposure to a dental high pressure air/water syringe. Finally, samples in Group 5 were treated with a standardized “dynamic” application of test agent (20 s high pressure syringe at 10 ml/s) followed by the standardized “dynamic” exposure to a dental high pressure air/water syringe. Results The MPM images demonstrated that the water dip treatment resulted in the persistence of an almost continuous thick layer of biofilm coverage on the tooth surface. Similarly, test agent dip treatment followed by water dip only removed a few patches of biofilm, with the majority of the tooth surface remaining covered by an otherwise continuous layer of biofilm. Samples

  10. Aryl Rhodanines Specifically Inhibit Staphylococcal and Enterococcal Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Opperman, Timothy J.; Kwasny, Steven M.; Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are the leading causative agents of indwelling medical device infections because of their ability to form biofilms on artificial surfaces. Here we describe the antibiofilm activity of a class of small molecules, the aryl rhodanines, which specifically inhibit biofilm formation of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and E. gallinarum but not the gram-negative species Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli. The aryl rhodanines do not exhibit antibacterial activity against any of the bacterial strains tested and are not cytotoxic against HeLa cells. Preliminary mechanism-of-action studies revealed that the aryl rhodanines specifically inhibit the early stages of biofilm development by preventing attachment of the bacteria to surfaces. PMID:19651903

  11. Antibiotic Resistance Related to Biofilm Formation in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Vuotto, Claudia; Longo, Francesca; Balice, Maria Pia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Varaldo, Pietro E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, is responsible for causing a spectrum of community-acquired and nosocomial infections and typically infects patients with indwelling medical devices, especially urinary catheters, on which this microorganism is able to grow as a biofilm. The increasingly frequent acquisition of antibiotic resistance by K. pneumoniae strains has given rise to a global spread of this multidrug-resistant pathogen, mostly at the hospital level. This scenario is exacerbated when it is noted that intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents dramatically increases when K. pneumoniae strains grow as a biofilm. This review will summarize the findings about the antibiotic resistance related to biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae. PMID:25438022

  12. Effects of Material Properties on Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Song, F; Koo, H; Ren, D

    2015-08-01

    Adhesion of microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, to surfaces and the subsequent formation of biofilms cause multidrug-tolerant infections in humans and fouling of medical devices. To address these challenges, it is important to understand how material properties affect microbe-surface interactions and engineer better nonfouling materials. Here we review the recent progresses in this field and discuss the main challenges and opportunities. In particular, we focus on bacterial biofilms and review the effects of surface energy, charge, topography, and stiffness of substratum material on bacterial adhesion. We summarize how these surface properties influence oral biofilm formation, and we discuss the important findings from nondental systems that have potential applications in dental medicine. PMID:26001706

  13. Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kristi L; Vergidis, Paschalis; Brinkman, Cassandra L; Greenwood Quaintance, Kerryl E; Barnes, Aaron M T; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Schlievert, Patrick M; Dunny, Gary M; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis can cause healthcare-associated biofilm infections, including those of orthopedic devices. Treatment of enterococcal prosthetic joint infection is difficult, in part, due to biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. We previously showed that the E. faecalis OG1RF genes ahrC and eep are in vitro biofilm determinants and virulence factors in animal models of endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. In this study, we evaluated the role of these genes in a rat acute foreign body osteomyelitis model and in in vitro biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Osteomyelitis was established for one week following the implantation of stainless steel orthopedic wires inoculated with E. faecalis strains OG1RF, ΩahrC, and ∆eep into the proximal tibiae of rats. The median bacterial loads recovered from bones and wires did not differ significantly between the strains at multiple inoculum concentrations. We hypothesize that factors present at the infection site that affect biofilm formation, such as the presence or absence of shear force, may account for the differences in attenuation in the various animal models we have used to study the ΩahrC and ∆eep strains. No differences among the three strains were observed in the planktonic and biofilm antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline. These findings suggest that neither ahrC nor eep directly contribute to E. faecalis biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Notably, the experimental evidence that the biofilm attachment mutant ΩahrC displays biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance suggests that surface colonization alone is sufficient for E. faecalis cells to acquire the biofilm antimicrobial resistance phenotype. PMID:26076451

  14. Evaluation of the Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm-Associated Virulence Factors AhrC and Eep in Rat Foreign Body Osteomyelitis and In Vitro Biofilm-Associated Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Vergidis, Paschalis; Brinkman, Cassandra L.; Greenwood Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Barnes, Aaron M. T.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Dunny, Gary M.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis can cause healthcare-associated biofilm infections, including those of orthopedic devices. Treatment of enterococcal prosthetic joint infection is difficult, in part, due to biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. We previously showed that the E. faecalis OG1RF genes ahrC and eep are in vitro biofilm determinants and virulence factors in animal models of endocarditis and catheter-associated urinary tract infection. In this study, we evaluated the role of these genes in a rat acute foreign body osteomyelitis model and in in vitro biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Osteomyelitis was established for one week following the implantation of stainless steel orthopedic wires inoculated with E. faecalis strains OG1RF, ΩahrC, and ∆eep into the proximal tibiae of rats. The median bacterial loads recovered from bones and wires did not differ significantly between the strains at multiple inoculum concentrations. We hypothesize that factors present at the infection site that affect biofilm formation, such as the presence or absence of shear force, may account for the differences in attenuation in the various animal models we have used to study the ΩahrC and ∆eep strains. No differences among the three strains were observed in the planktonic and biofilm antimicrobial susceptibilities to ampicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tetracycline. These findings suggest that neither ahrC nor eep directly contribute to E. faecalis biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. Notably, the experimental evidence that the biofilm attachment mutant ΩahrC displays biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance suggests that surface colonization alone is sufficient for E. faecalis cells to acquire the biofilm antimicrobial resistance phenotype. PMID:26076451

  15. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the 'holy grail' in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters. PMID:27582732

  16. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-07-01

    Biofilm-grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline-binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  17. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations

    PubMed Central

    Steenackers, Hans P.; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R.; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  18. Experimental evolution in biofilm populations.

    PubMed

    Steenackers, Hans P; Parijs, Ilse; Foster, Kevin R; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2016-05-01

    Biofilms are a major form of microbial life in which cells form dense surface associated communities that can persist for many generations. The long-life of biofilm communities means that they can be strongly shaped by evolutionary processes. Here, we review the experimental study of evolution in biofilm communities. We first provide an overview of the different experimental models used to study biofilm evolution and their associated advantages and disadvantages. We then illustrate the vast amount of diversification observed during biofilm evolution, and we discuss (i) potential ecological and evolutionary processes behind the observed diversification, (ii) recent insights into the genetics of adaptive diversification, (iii) the striking degree of parallelism between evolution experiments and real-life biofilms and (iv) potential consequences of diversification. In the second part, we discuss the insights provided by evolution experiments in how biofilm growth and structure can promote cooperative phenotypes. Overall, our analysis points to an important role of biofilm diversification and cooperation in bacterial survival and productivity. Deeper understanding of both processes is of key importance to design improved antimicrobial strategies and diagnostic techniques. PMID:26895713

  19. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Biofilms

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work we have studied the interaction and adsorption of engineered nanoparticles such as TiO2, ZnO, CeO2 , and carbon nanotubes with biofilms. Biofilm is an extracellular polymeric substance coating comprised of living material and it is an aggregation of bacteria, algae, ...

  20. Quantitative analyses of Streptococcus mutans biofilms with quartz crystal microbalance, microjet impingement and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kreth, J; Hagerman, E; Tam, K; Merritt, J; Wong, D T W; Wu, B M; Myung, N V; Shi, W; Qi, F

    2004-10-01

    Microbial biofilm formation can be influenced by many physiological and genetic factors. The conventional microtiter plate assay provides useful but limited information about biofilm formation. With the fast expansion of the biofilm research field, there are urgent needs for more informative techniques to quantify the major parameters of a biofilm, such as adhesive strength and total biomass. It would be even more ideal if these measurements could be conducted in a real-time, non-invasive manner. In this study, we used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and microjet impingement (MJI) to measure total biomass and adhesive strength, respectively, of S. mutans biofilms formed under different sucrose concentrations. In conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and the COMSTAT software, we show that sucrose concentration affects the biofilm strength, total biomass, and architecture in both qualitative and quantitative manners. Our data correlate well with previous observations about the effect of sucrose on the adherence of S. mutans to the tooth surface, and demonstrate that QCM is a useful tool for studying the kinetics of biofilm formation in real time and that MJI is a sensitive, easy-to-use device to measure the adhesive strength of a biofilm. PMID:16429589

  1. Impact of Environmental Cues on Staphylococcal Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Development.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-06-10

    Staphylococci are commensal bacteria that colonize the epithelial surfaces of humans and many other mammals. These bacteria can also attach to implanted medical devices and develop surface-associated biofilm communities that resist clearance by host defenses and available chemotherapies. These communities are often associated with persistent staphylococcal infections that place a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. Understanding the regulatory program that controls staphylococcal biofilm development, as well as the environmental conditions that modulate this program, has been a focal point of research in recent years. A central regulator controlling biofilm development is a peptide quorum-sensing system, also called the accessory gene regulator or agr system. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, the agr system controls production of exo-toxins and exo-enzymes essential for causing infections, and simultaneously, it modulates the ability of this pathogen to attach to surfaces and develop a biofilm, or to disperse from the biofilm state. In this review, we explore advances on the interconnections between the agr quorum-sensing system and biofilm mechanisms, and topics covered include recent findings on how different environmental conditions influence quorum sensing, the impact on biofilm development, and ongoing questions and challenges in the field. As our understanding of the quorum sensing and biofilm interconnection advances, there are growing opportunities to take advantage of this knowledge and develop therapeutic approaches to control staphylococcal infections. PMID:27129223

  2. Surface-attached cells, biofilms and biocide susceptibility: implications for hospital cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Otter, J A; Vickery, K; Walker, J T; deLancey Pulcini, E; Stoodley, P; Goldenberg, S D; Salkeld, J A G; Chewins, J; Yezli, S; Edgeworth, J D

    2015-01-01

    Microbes tend to attach to available surfaces and readily form biofilms, which is problematic in healthcare settings. Biofilms are traditionally associated with wet or damp surfaces such as indwelling medical devices and tubing on medical equipment. However, microbes can survive for extended periods in a desiccated state on dry hospital surfaces, and biofilms have recently been discovered on dry hospital surfaces. Microbes attached to surfaces and in biofilms are less susceptible to biocides, antibiotics and physical stress. Thus, surface attachment and/or biofilm formation may explain how vegetative bacteria can survive on surfaces for weeks to months (or more), interfere with attempts to recover microbes through environmental sampling, and provide a mixed bacterial population for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. The capacity of existing detergent formulations and disinfectants to disrupt biofilms may have an important and previously unrecognized role in determining their effectiveness in the field, which should be reflected in testing standards. There is a need for further research to elucidate the nature and physiology of microbes on dry hospital surfaces, specifically the prevalence and composition of biofilms. This will inform new approaches to hospital cleaning and disinfection, including novel surfaces that reduce microbial attachment and improve microbial detachment, and methods to augment the activity of biocides against surface-attached microbes such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides. Future strategies to address environmental contamination on hospital surfaces should consider the presence of microbes attached to surfaces, including biofilms. PMID:25447198

  3. Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Biomass, Metabolic Activity and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Production.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sónia; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    According to epidemiological data, Candida tropicalis has been related to urinary tract infections and haematological malignancy. Several virulence factors seem to be responsible for C. tropicalis infections, for example: their ability to adhere and to form biofilms onto different indwelling medical devices; their capacity to adhere, invade and damage host human tissues due to enzymes production such as proteinases. The main aim of this work was to study the behaviour of C. tropicalis biofilms of different ages (24-120 h) formed in artificial urine (AU) and their ability to express aspartyl proteinase (SAPT) genes. The reference strain C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and two C. tropicalis isolates from urine were used. Biofilms were evaluated in terms of culturable cells by colony-forming units enumeration; total biofilm biomass was evaluated using the crystal violet staining method; metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT assay; and SAPT gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. All strains of C. tropicalis were able to form biofilms in AU, although with differences between strains. Candida tropicalis biofilms showed a decrease in terms of the number of culturable cells from 48 to 72 h. Generally, SAPT3 was highly expressed. C. tropicalis strains assayed were able to form biofilms in the presence of AU although in a strain- and time-dependent way, and SAPT genes are expressed during C. tropicalis biofilm formation. PMID:26572148

  4. Inhibitory Effects of d-Amino Acids on Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hochbaum, Allon I.; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Foulston, Lucy; Kolter, Roberto; Aizenberg, Joanna; Losick, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of cells held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix typically consisting of protein, exopolysaccharide, and often DNA. A natural signal for biofilm disassembly in Bacillus subtilis is certain d-amino acids, which are incorporated into the peptidoglycan and trigger the release of the protein component of the matrix. d-Amino acids also prevent biofilm formation by the related Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Here we employed fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate how d-amino acids prevent biofilm formation by S. aureus. We report that biofilm formation takes place in two stages, initial attachment to surfaces, resulting in small foci, and the subsequent growth of the foci into large aggregates. d-Amino acids did not prevent the initial surface attachment of cells but blocked the subsequent growth of the foci into larger assemblies of cells. Using protein- and polysaccharide-specific stains, we have shown that d-amino acids inhibited the accumulation of the protein component of the matrix but had little effect on exopolysaccharide production and localization within the biofilm. We conclude that d-amino acids act in an analogous manner to prevent biofilm development in B. subtilis and S. aureus. Finally, to investigate the potential utility of d-amino acids in preventing device-related infections, we have shown that surfaces impregnated with d-amino acids were effective in preventing biofilm growth. PMID:21856845

  5. Genetic dissection of mycobacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Anil K; Jacobs, William R; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the biological principles of mycobacterial tolerance to antibiotics is crucial for developing shorter anti-tuberculosis regimens. Various in vitro approaches have been developed to identify the conditions that promote mycobacterial persistence against antibiotics. In our laboratories, we have developed a detergent-free in vitro growth model, in which mycobacteria spontaneously grow at the air-medium interface as self-organized multicellular structures, called biofilms. Mycobacterial biofilms harbor a subpopulation of drug tolerant persisters at a greater frequency than their planktonic counterpart. Importantly, development of these structures is genetically programmed, and defective biofilms of isogenic mutants harbor fewer persisters. Thus, genetic analysis of mycobacterial biofilms in vitro could potentially be a powerful tool to unravel the biology of drug tolerance in mycobacteria. In this chapter we describe a method for screening biofilm-defective mutants of mycobacteria in a 96-well format, which readily yields a clonally pure mutant for further studies. PMID:25779318

  6. Genetic control of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Krystyna I; Grudniak, Anna M; Rudnicka, Zofia; Markowska, Katarzyna

    2016-05-01

    Nearly all bacterial species, including pathogens, have the ability to form biofilms. Biofilms are defined as structured ecosystems in which microbes are attached to surfaces and embedded in a matrix composed of polysaccharides, eDNA, and proteins, and their development is a multistep process. Bacterial biofilms constitute a large medical problem due to their extremely high resistance to various types of therapeutics, including conventional antibiotics. Several environmental and genetic signals control every step of biofilm development and dispersal. From among the latter, quorum sensing, cyclic diguanosine-5'-monophosphate, and small RNAs are considered as the main regulators. The present review describes the control role of these three regulators in the life cycles of biofilms built by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Vibrio cholerae. The interconnections between their activities are shown. Compounds and strategies which target the activity of these regulators, mainly quorum sensing inhibitors, and their potential role in therapy are also assessed. PMID:26294280

  7. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun; Gregory, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria. PMID:21778817

  8. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  9. Bacterial interactions in dental biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruijie; Li, Mingyun

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are masses of microorganisms that bind to and multiply on a solid surface, typically with a fluid bathing the microbes. The microorganisms that are not attached but are free-floating in an aqueous environment are termed planktonic cells. Traditionally, microbiology research has addressed results from planktonic bacterial cells. However, many recent studies have indicated that biofilms are the preferred form of growth of most microbes and particularly those of a pathogenic nature. Biofilms on animal hosts have significantly increased resistance to various antimicrobials compared to planktonic cells. These microbial communities form microcolonies that interact with each other using very sophisticated communication methods (i.e., quorum-sensing). The development of unique microbiological tools to detect and assess the various biofilms around us is a tremendously important focus of research in many laboratories. In the present review, we discuss the major biofilm mechanisms and the interactions among oral bacteria. PMID:21778817

  10. Community-Based Outbreaks in Vulnerable Populations of Invasive Infections Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes 5 and 8 in Calgary, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Vanderkooi, Otto G.; Church, Deirdre L.; MacDonald, Judy; Zucol, Franziska; Kellner, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) typically occur within institutions. Beginning in 2005, we detected an increase in serotype (ST) 5 and ST8 IPD cases, predominantly in homeless persons living in an open community. Methodology/Principal Findings CASPER (Calgary Area S. pneumoniae Epidemiology Research) surveillance study of all IPD (sterile site isolates) in our region (pop ∼1,100,000). Interviews and chart reviews of all cases and all isolates phenotypically analyzed and selected isolated tested by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Conclusions/Significance During 2005–2007, 162 cases of ST5 IPD and 45 cases of ST8 IPD were identified. The isolates demonstrated phenotypic and genotypic clonality. The ST5 isolates were sequence type (ST) 289 and demonstrated intermediate susceptibility to TMP-SMX. The ST8 isolates were predominantly ST1268, with a susceptible antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Individuals with ST5 IPD were more likely to be middle aged (OR 2.6), homeless (OR 4.4), using illicit drugs(OR 4.8), and asthmatic(OR 2.6). Those with ST8 were more likely to be male (OR 4.4), homeless (OR 2.6), aboriginal (OR7.3), and a current smoker (OR 2.5). Overlapping outbreaks of ST5 and ST8 IPD occurred in an open community in Calgary, Canada and homelessness was a predominant risk factor. Homelessness represents a unique community in which pneumococcal outbreaks can occur. PMID:22216100

  11. The application of biofilm science to the study and control of chronic bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Costerton, William; Veeh, Richard; Shirtliff, Mark; Pasmore, Mark; Post, Christopher; Ehrlich, Garth

    2003-01-01

    Unequivocal direct observations have established that the bacteria that cause device-related and other chronic infections grow in matrix-enclosed biofilms. The diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that have served us so well in the partial eradication of acute epidemic bacterial diseases have not yielded accurate data or favorable outcomes when applied to these biofilm diseases. We discuss the potential benefits of the application of the new methods and concepts developed by biofilm science and engineering to the clinical management of infectious diseases. PMID:14617746

  12. Spatial patterns of carbonate biomineralization in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobao; Chopp, David L; Russin, William A; Brannon, Paul T; Parsek, Matthew R; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-11-01

    Microbially catalyzed precipitation of carbonate minerals is an important process in diverse biological, geological, and engineered systems. However, the processes that regulate carbonate biomineralization and their impacts on biofilms are largely unexplored, mainly because of the inability of current methods to directly observe biomineralization within biofilms. Here, we present a method for in situ, real-time imaging of biomineralization in biofilms and use it to show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms produce morphologically distinct carbonate deposits that substantially modify biofilm structures. The patterns of carbonate biomineralization produced in situ were substantially different from those caused by accumulation of particles produced by abiotic precipitation. Contrary to the common expectation that mineral precipitation should occur at the biofilm surface, we found that biomineralization started at the base of the biofilm. The carbonate deposits grew over time, detaching biofilm-resident cells and deforming the biofilm morphology. These findings indicate that biomineralization is a general regulator of biofilm architecture and properties. PMID:26276112

  13. Spatial Patterns of Carbonate Biomineralization in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobao; Chopp, David L.; Russin, William A.; Brannon, Paul T.; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbially catalyzed precipitation of carbonate minerals is an important process in diverse biological, geological, and engineered systems. However, the processes that regulate carbonate biomineralization and their impacts on biofilms are largely unexplored, mainly because of the inability of current methods to directly observe biomineralization within biofilms. Here, we present a method for in situ, real-time imaging of biomineralization in biofilms and use it to show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms produce morphologically distinct carbonate deposits that substantially modify biofilm structures. The patterns of carbonate biomineralization produced in situ were substantially different from those caused by accumulation of particles produced by abiotic precipitation. Contrary to the common expectation that mineral precipitation should occur at the biofilm surface, we found that biomineralization started at the base of the biofilm. The carbonate deposits grew over time, detaching biofilm-resident cells and deforming the biofilm morphology. These findings indicate that biomineralization is a general regulator of biofilm architecture and properties. PMID:26276112

  14. Free Chlorine and Monochloramine Application to Nitrifying Biofilm: Comparison of Biofilm Penetration, Activity, and Viability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofilm in drinking water systems is undesirable and effective biofilm control maintains public health. Free chlorine and monochloramine are commonly used as secondary drinking water disinfectants, but monochloramine is perceived to penetrate biofilm better than free chlorine. ...

  15. In-vivo Candida biofilms in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paulitsch, Astrid Helga; Willinger, Birgit; Zsalatz, Benedikt; Stabentheiner, Edith; Marth, Egon; Buzina, Walter

    2009-11-01

    Candida biofilms on indwelling devices are an increasing problem in patients treated at intensive care units. The goal of this study was to examine the occurrence and frequency of these biofilms. A total of 172 catheters were collected from 105 male and 67 female patients (the age range of both patient groups was from 3 weeks to 98 years old). The catheters were incubated on blood agar plates and the resulting yeast colonies were subsequently identified. Furthermore, pieces of catheters were fixed, dried and sputter coated with gold for investigation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Yeasts were recovered from significantly more catheters obtained from men than from women (chi(2): n = 67; P < 0.01). In SEM, 56.4% catheters turned out to be positive for biofilm formation. Again catheters from male patients were statistically significant (chi(2): n = 40; P < 0.01) more often positive than those from women. Candida albicans (71.1%) was the most common species isolated from the catheters, followed by C. glabrata (10.3%), C. parapsilosis (8.2%) and C. tropicalis (5.2%). Based on the results of this investigation, the epidemiology of Candida biofilms on indwelling devices seems to be a promising target for future investigations. PMID:19888801

  16. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm‐grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline‐binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S. pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S. pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  17. Biofilm formation by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Stark, R M; Gerwig, G J; Pitman, R S; Potts, L F; Williams, N A; Greenman, J; Weinzweig, I P; Hirst, T R; Millar, M R

    1999-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori NCTC 11637 produces a water-insoluble biofilm when grown under defined conditions with a high carbon:nitrogen ratio in continuous culture and in 10% strength Brucella broth supplemented with 3 g l-1 glucose. Biofilm accumulated at the air/liquid interface of the culture. Light microscopy of frozen sections of the biofilm material showed few bacterial cells in the mass of the biofilm. The material stained with periodic acid Schiff's reagent. Fucose, glucose, galactose, and glycero-manno-heptose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid were identified in partially purified and in crude material, using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The sugar composition strongly indicates the presence of a polysaccharide as a component of the biofilm material. Antibodies (IgG) to partially purified material were found in both sero-positive and sero-negative individuals. Treatment of the biofilm material with periodic acid reduced or abolished immunoreactivity. Treatment with 5 mol l-1 urea at 100 degrees C and with phenol did not remove antigenic recognition by patient sera. The production of a water-insoluble biofilm by H. pylori may be important in enhancing resistance to host defence factors and antibiotics, and in microenvironmental pH homeostasis facilitating the growth and survival of H. pylori in vivo. PMID:10063642

  18. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development. PMID:27139354

  19. Establishment and early succession of bacterial communities in monochloramine-treated drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Revetta, Randy P; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Gerke, Tammie L; Curioso, Claudine; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2013-12-01

    Monochloramine is an increasingly used drinking water disinfectant and has been shown to increase nitrifying bacteria and mycobacteria in drinking waters. The potential successions and development of these bacteria were examined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from various biofilms within a water distribution system simulator. Biofilms were obtained from in-line and off-line devices using borosilicate glass beads, along with polycarbonate coupons from annular reactors incubated for up to 8 months in monochloramine-treated drinking water. No significant difference in community structures was observed between biofilm devices and coupon material; however, all biofilm communities that developed on different devices underwent similar successions over time. Early stages of biofilm formation were dominated by Serratia (29%), Cloacibacterium (23%), Diaphorobacter (16%), and Pseudomonas (7%), while Mycobacterium-like phylotypes were the most predominant populations (> 27%) in subsequent months. The development of members of the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) after 3 months may impact individuals with predisposing conditions, while nitrifiers (related to Nitrospira moscoviensis and Nitrosospira multiformis) could impact water quality. Overall, 90% of the diversity in all the clone library samples was associated with the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. These results provide an ecological insight into biofilm bacterial successions in monochloramine-treated drinking water. PMID:23789638

  20. Effects of temperature on the morphological, polymeric, and mechanical properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Leonid; Sturtevant, Rachael A; Younger, John G; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-02-17

    Changes in temperature were found to affect the morphology, cell viability, and mechanical properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacterial biofilms. S. epidermidis biofilms are commonly associated with hospital-acquired medical device infections. We observed the effect of heat treatment on three physical properties of the biofilms: the bacterial cell morphology and viability, the polymeric properties of the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and the rheological properties of the bulk biofilm. After application of a 1 h heat treatment at 45 °C, cell reproduction had ceased, and at 60 °C, cell viability was significantly reduced. Size exclusion chromatography was used to fractionate the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) based on size. Chemical analysis of each fraction showed that the relative concentrations of the polysaccharide, protein, and DNA components of the EPS were unchanged by the heat treatment at 45 and 60 °C. The results suggest that the EPS molecular constituents are not significantly degraded by the temperature treatment. However, some aggregation on the scale of 100 nm was found by dynamic light scattering at 60 °C. Finally, relative to control biofilms maintained at 37 °C, we observed an order of magnitude reduction in the biofilm yield stress after 60 °C temperature treatment. No such difference was found for treatment at 45 °C. From these results, we conclude that the yield stress of bacterial biofilms is temperature-sensitive and that this sensitivity is correlated with cell viability. The observed significant decrease in yield stress with temperature suggests a means to weaken the mechanical integrity of S. epidermidis biofilms with applications in areas such as the treatment of biofilm-infected medical devices. PMID:25602470

  1. Relationship of biofilm formation and different virulence genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from Northwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Sargol; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Nahai, Mohammad Reza; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Nori, Roghaya; Aghazadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: The Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium is one of the main causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTI) worldwide. The ability of this bacterium to form biofilms on medical devices such as catheters plays an important role in the development of UTI. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible relationship between virulence factors and biofilm formation of E. coli isolates responsible for urinary tract infection. Materials and methods: A total of 100 E. coli isolates isolated from patients with UTI were collected and characterized by routine bacteriological methods. In vitro biofilm formation by these isolates was determined using the 96-well microtiter-plate test, and the presence of fimA, papC, and hly virulence genes was examined by PCR assay. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0 software. Results: From 100 E. coli isolates isolated from UTIs, 92% were shown to be biofilm positive. The genes papC, fimA, and hly were detected in 43%, 94% and 26% of isolates, respectively. Biofilm formation in isolates that expressed papC, fimA, and hly genes was 100%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. A significant relationship was found between presence of the papC gene and biofilm formation in E. coli isolates isolated from UTI (P<0.01), but there was no statistically significant correlation between presence of fimA and hly genes with biofilm formation (P<0.072, P<0.104). Conclusion: Results showed that fimA and hly genes do not seem to be necessary or sufficient for the production of biofilm in E. coli, but the presence of papC correlates with increased biofilm formation of urinary tract isolates. Overall, the presence of fimA, papC, and hly virulence genes coincides with in vitro biofilm formation in uropathogenic E. coli isolates. PMID:26213679

  2. Anticandidal efficacy of cinnamon oil against planktonic and biofilm cultures of Candida parapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis.

    PubMed

    Pires, Regina Helena; Montanari, Lilian Bueno; Martins, Carlos Henrique G; Zaia, José Eduardo; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Matsumoto, Marcelo T; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José S

    2011-12-01

    Candida parapsilosis is yeast capable of forming biofilms on medical devices. Novel approaches for the prevention and eradication of the biofilms are desired. This study investigated the anticandidal activity of sixteen essential oils on planktonic and biofilm cultures of C. parapsilosis complex. We used molecular tools, enumeration of colony-forming units, the colourimetric MTT assay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a chequerboard assay coupled with software analyses to evaluate the growth kinetics, architecture, inhibition and reduction in biofilms formed from environmental isolates of the Candida parapsilosis complex; further, we also evaluated whether essential oils would interact synergistically with amphotericin B to increase their anticandidal activities. Of the environmental C. parapsilosis isolates examined, C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis were identified. Biofilm growth on polystyrene substrates peaked within 48 h, after which growth remained relatively stable up to 72 h, when it began to decline. Details of the architectural analysis assessed by SEM showed that C. parapsilosis complex formed less complex biofilms compared with C. albicans biofilms. The most active essential oil was cinnamon oil (CO), which showed anticandidal activity against C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis in both suspension (minimum inhibitory concentration-MIC-250 and 500 μg/ml) and biofilm (minimum biofilm reduction concentration-MBRC-1,000 and 2,000 μg/ml) cultures. CO also inhibited biofilm formation (MBIC) at concentrations above 250 μg/ml for both species tested. However, synergism with amphotericin B was not observed. Thus, CO is a natural anticandidal agent that can be effectively utilised for the control of the yeasts tested. PMID:21761153

  3. Disassembling bacterial extracellular matrix with DNase-coated nanoparticles to enhance antibiotic delivery in biofilm infections.

    PubMed

    Baelo, Aida; Levato, Riccardo; Julián, Esther; Crespo, Anna; Astola, José; Gavaldà, Joan; Engel, Elisabeth; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel Angel; Torrents, Eduard

    2015-07-10

    Infections caused by biofilm-forming bacteria are a major threat to hospitalized patients and the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. There is an urgent necessity for novel therapeutic approaches, since current antibiotic delivery fails to eliminate biofilm-protected bacteria. In this study, ciprofloxacin-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles, which were functionalized with DNase I, were fabricated using a green-solvent based method and their antibiofilm activity was assessed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Such nanoparticles constitute a paradigm shift in biofilm treatment, since, besides releasing ciprofloxacin in a controlled fashion, they are able to target and disassemble the biofilm by degrading the extracellular DNA that stabilize the biofilm matrix. These carriers were compared with free-soluble ciprofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin encapsulated in untreated and poly(lysine)-coated nanoparticles. DNase I-activated nanoparticles were not only able to prevent biofilm formation from planktonic bacteria, but they also successfully reduced established biofilm mass, size and living cell density, as observed in a dynamic environment in a flow cell biofilm assay. Moreover, repeated administration over three days of DNase I-coated nanoparticles encapsulating ciprofloxacin was able to reduce by 95% and then eradicate more than 99.8% of established biofilm, outperforming all the other nanoparticle formulations and the free-drug tested in this study. These promising results, together with minimal cytotoxicity as tested on J774 macrophages, allow obtaining novel antimicrobial nanoparticles, as well as provide clues to design the next generation of drug delivery devices to treat persistent bacterial infections. PMID:25913364

  4. Impact of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength.

    PubMed

    Paramonova, E; Kalmykowa, O J; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Sharma, P K

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical removal of oral biofilms is ubiquitously accepted as the best way to prevent caries and periodontal diseases. Removal effectiveness strongly depends on biofilm strength. To investigate the influence of hydrodynamics on oral biofilm strength, we grew single- and multi-species biofilms of Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii TV14-J1, and full dental plaque at shear rates ranging from 0.1 to 50 1/sec and measured their compressive strength. Subsequently, biofilm architecture was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Multi-species biofilms were stronger than single-species biofilms, with strength values ranging from 6 to 51 Pa and from 5 to 17 Pa, respectively. In response to increased hydrodynamic shear, biofilm strength decreased, and architecture changed from uniform carpet-like to more "fluffy" with higher thickness. S. oralis biofilms grown under variable shear of 7 and 50 1/sec possessed properties intermediate of those measured at the respective single shears. PMID:19783800

  5. Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157467.html Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics: Report Germ forms slimy layer that makes it ... bacteria that causes Lyme disease protects itself from antibiotics by forming a slime-like layer called a ...

  6. Bacterial resistance in biofilm-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Perumal, Govindaraj; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are structured groups of different bacterial species that are responsible for most chronic and recurrent infections. Biofilm-related infections reoccur in approximately 65-80% of cases. Bacteria associated with the biofilm are highly resistant to antibiotics. Knowledge of biofilm formation, its propagation and the resistance associated with it is scant and a multidisciplinary approach is followed to understand the science and develop strategies to address this problem. This article discusses the role of various biochemical factors, molecular mechanisms and altered host environment causes associated with bacterial resistance in biofilm. It also reveals the target sites and different multidisciplinary strategies adapted for destroying or preventing the formation of biofilms. PMID:26517598

  7. Bacterial Biofilms as Complex Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlamakis, Hera

    2010-03-01

    Many microbial populations form surface-associated multicellular communities known as biofilms. These multicellular communities are encased in a self-produced extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides and proteins. Division of labor is a key feature of these communities and different cells serve distinct functions. We have found that in biofilms of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, different cell types including matrix-producing and sporulating cells coexist and localize to distinct regions within the structured community. We were interested in understanding how these different cell types arise. Using fluorescence reporters under the control of promoters that are specific for distinct cell types we were able to follow the dynamics of differentiation throughout biofilm development. We found that a series of extracellular signals leads to differentiation of distinct cell types during biofilm formation. In addition, we found that extracellular matrix functions as a differentiation signal for timely sporulation within a biofilm and mutants unable to produce matrix were delayed in sporulation. Our results indicate that within a biofilm, cell-cell signaling is directional in that one cell type produces a signal that is sensed by another distinct cell type. Furthermore, once differentiated, cells become resistant to the action of other signaling molecules making it possible to maintain distinct cell populations over prolonged periods.

  8. In Vitro Effects of Antimicrobial Agents on Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Clinical Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kristi L.; Reichert, Emily J.; Piper, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is an atypically virulent coagulase-negative staphylococcal species associated with acute and destructive infections that often resemble Staphylococcus aureus infections. Several types of infection caused by S. lugdunensis (e.g., native valve endocarditis, prosthetic joint infection, and intravascular catheter infection) are associated with biofilm formation, which may lead to an inability to eradicate the infection due to the intrinsic nature of biofilms to resist high levels of antibiotics. In this study, planktonic MICs and MBCs and biofilm bactericidal concentrations of 10 antistaphylococcal antimicrobial agents were measured for 15 S. lugdunensis isolates collected from patients with endocarditis, medical device infections, or skin and soft tissue infections. Planktonic isolates were susceptible to all agents studied, but biofilms were resistant to high concentrations of most of the drugs. However, moxifloxacin was able to kill 73% of isolates growing in biofilms at ≤0.5 μg/ml. Relative to the effect on cell density, subinhibitory concentrations of nafcillin substantially stimulated biofilm formation of most isolates, whereas tetracycline and linezolid significantly decreased biofilm formation in 93 and 80% of isolates, respectively. An unexpected outcome of MBC testing was the observation that vancomycin was not bactericidal against 93% of S. lugdunensis isolates, suggesting widespread vancomycin tolerance in this species. These data provide insights into the response of S. lugdunensis isolates when challenged with various levels of antimicrobial agents in clinical use. PMID:17158933

  9. Escherichia coli adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility on biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Gomes, L C; Silva, L N; Simões, M; Melo, L F; Mergulhão, F J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to test materials typically used in the construction of medical devices regarding their influence in the initial adhesion, biofilm development and antibiotic susceptibility of Escherichia coli biofilms. Adhesion and biofilm development was monitored in 12-well microtiter plates containing coupons of different biomedical materials--silicone (SIL), stainless steel (SS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC)--and glass (GLA) as control. The susceptibility of biofilms to ciprofloxacin and ampicillin was assessed, and the antibiotic effect in cell morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface hydrophobicity of the bacterial strain and materials was also evaluated from contact angle measurements. Surface hydrophobicity was related with initial E. coli adhesion and subsequent biofilm development. Hydrophobic materials, such as SIL, SS, and PVC, showed higher bacterial colonization than the hydrophilic GLA. Silicone was the surface with the greatest number of adhered cells and the biofilms formed on this material were also less susceptible to both antibiotics. It was found that different antibiotics induced different levels of elongation on E. coli sessile cells. Results revealed that, by affecting the initial adhesion, the surface properties of a given material can modulate biofilm buildup and interfere with the outcome of antimicrobial therapy. These findings raise the possibility of fine-tuning surface properties as a strategy to reach higher therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25044887

  10. Biofilm formation in Candida glabrata: What have we learnt from functional genomics approaches?

    PubMed

    d'Enfert, Christophe; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are a source of therapeutic failures because of their intrinsic tolerance to antimicrobials. Candida glabrata is one of the pathogenic yeasts that is responsible for life-threatening disseminated infections and able to form biofilms on medical devices such as vascular and urinary catheters. Recent progresses in the functional genomics of C. glabrata have been applied to the study of biofilm formation, revealing the contribution of an array of genes to this process. In particular, the Yak1 kinase and the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex have been shown to relieve the repression exerted by subtelomeric silencing on the expression of the EPA6 and EPA7 genes, thus allowing the encoded adhesins to exert their key roles in biofilm formation. This provides a framework to evaluate the contribution of other genes that have been genetically linked to biofilm development and, based on the function of their orthologs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, appear to have roles in adaptation to nutrient deprivation, calcium signaling, cell wall remodeling and adherence. Future studies combining the use of in vitro and animal models of biofilm formation, omics approaches and forward or reverse genetics are needed to expand the current knowledge of C. glabrata biofilm formation and reveal the mechanisms underlying their antifungal tolerance. PMID:26678748