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Sample records for calibrain structural mri

  1. Segmentation of human brain using structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Helms, Gunther

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of human brain using structural MRI is a key step of processing in imaging neuroscience. The methods have undergone a rapid development in the past two decades and are now widely available. This non-technical review aims at providing an overview and basic understanding of the most common software. Starting with the basis of structural MRI contrast in brain and imaging protocols, the concepts of voxel-based and surface-based segmentation are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the typical contrast features and morphological constraints of cortical and sub-cortical grey matter. In addition to the use for voxel-based morphometry, basic applications in quantitative MRI, cortical thickness estimations, and atrophy measurements as well as assignment of cortical regions and deep brain nuclei are briefly discussed. Finally, some fields for clinical applications are given. PMID:26739264

  2. Assessment of calvarial structure motion by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Crow, William T; King, Hollis H; Patterson, Rita M; Giuliano, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Practitioners of manual medicine/manual therapy (MM/MT) who utilize techniques thought to have some impact upon and move the solid structures of the human head have been criticized for lack of evidence of cranial bone motion. The present study utilized magnetic resonance imagery (MRI) technology to address the question of whether or not inherent (non-operator initiated) calvarial structure motion can be assessed. Methods Subjects: Twenty healthcare professionals, (physicians, nurses, medical students, pharmacists) between the ages of 24 and 52 were recruited. Seven females (ages 25-47, mean age 36.7) and 13 males (ages 25-53, mean age 31.2) volunteered. Technology: MRI scans were acquired at 450 ms per slice, in a 1.5 Tesla Signa Excite HD closed MRI system. The same scan prescription was repeated serially every 45 seconds to obtain eight serial slices for each subject. Image analysis was accomplished using ImageJ software (ImageJ 1.33 u National Institutes of Health, USA). Data from all eight images for each of the 20 subjects were analyzed to determine the two images with the largest differences in the parameters measured. Results Difference values for the measures of area, width, height, major axis, and feret were statistically different whereas the measures for perimeter and minor axis were not. However, only the difference values for area were both statistically different (p < 0.003) and exceeded the resolution threshold of 0.898 mm/pixel. Discussion The statistically significant difference value for area is suggestive of inherent motion in calvarial structures, and adds to the body of evidence supportive of biomechanically measurable calvarial structure motion in general. That the total intracranial area appeared to expand and recede was consistent with theory and prior studies suggestive of calvarial structure motion due to intracranial fluid volume changes. Conclusion The use of MRI technology was able to demonstrate calvarial structure motion at

  3. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka; Casillas, Christen; Dutt, Shubir; Schuff, Norbert; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Boxer, Adam; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we combined a dataset of 39 scans with already existing manual delineations of the whole brainstem and a dataset of 10 scans in which the brainstem structures were manually labeled with a protocol that was specifically designed for this study. The resulting atlas can be used in a Bayesian framework to segment the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy (mean error under 1mm) and robustness (no failures in 383 scans including 168 AD cases). We also indirectly evaluate the algorithm with a experiment in which we study the atrophy of the brainstem in aging. The results show that, when used simultaneously, the volumes of the midbrain, pons and medulla are significantly more predictive of age than the volume of the entire brainstem, estimated as their sum. The results also demonstrate that the method can detect atrophy patterns in the brainstem structures that have been previously described in the literature. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to detect differential effects of AD on the brainstem structures. The method will be implemented as part of the popular neuroimaging package FreeSurfer. PMID:25776214

  4. Diffusion MRI at 25: Exploring brain tissue structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Denis Le; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (or dMRI) came into existence in the mid-1980s. During the last 25 years, diffusion MRI has been extraordinarily successful (with more than 300,000 entries on Google Scholar for diffusion MRI). Its main clinical domain of application has been neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is also rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fiber structure and provide outstanding maps of brain connectivity. The ability to visualize anatomical connections between different parts of the brain, non-invasively and on an individual basis, has emerged as a major breakthrough for neurosciences. The driving force of dMRI is to monitor microscopic, natural displacements of water molecules that occur in brain tissues as part of the physical diffusion process. Water molecules are thus used as a probe that can reveal microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. PMID:22120012

  5. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  6. Lag structure in resting-state fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, A. Z.; Hacker, C. D.; Raichle, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals contain information about the functional organization of the brain has caused a paradigm shift in neuroimaging. It is now well established that intrinsic brain activity is organized into spatially segregated resting-state networks (RSNs). Less is known regarding how spatially segregated networks are integrated by the propagation of intrinsic activity over time. To explore this question, we examined the latency structure of spontaneous fluctuations in the fMRI BOLD signal. Our data reveal that intrinsic activity propagates through and across networks on a timescale of ∼1 s. Variations in the latency structure of this activity resulting from sensory state manipulation (eyes open vs. closed), antecedent motor task (button press) performance, and time of day (morning vs. evening) suggest that BOLD signal lags reflect neuronal processes rather than hemodynamic delay. Our results emphasize the importance of the temporal structure of the brain's spontaneous activity. PMID:24598530

  7. Differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases using structural MRI data

    PubMed Central

    Koikkalainen, Juha; Rhodius-Meester, Hanneke; Tolonen, Antti; Barkhof, Frederik; Tijms, Betty; Lemstra, Afina W.; Tong, Tong; Guerrero, Ricardo; Schuh, Andreas; Ledig, Christian; Rueckert, Daniel; Soininen, Hilkka; Remes, Anne M.; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hasselbalch, Steen; Mecocci, Patrizia; van der Flier, Wiesje; Lötjönen, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative diseases can cause memory disorders and other cognitive impairments. The early detection and the stratification of patients according to the underlying disease are essential for an efficient approach to this healthcare challenge. This emphasizes the importance of differential diagnostics. Most studies compare patients and controls, or Alzheimer's disease with one other type of dementia. Such a bilateral comparison does not resemble clinical practice, where a clinician is faced with a number of different possible types of dementia. Here we studied which features in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans could best distinguish four types of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies, and control subjects. We extracted an extensive set of features quantifying volumetric and morphometric characteristics from T1 images, and vascular characteristics from FLAIR images. Classification was performed using a multi-class classifier based on Disease State Index methodology. The classifier provided continuous probability indices for each disease to support clinical decision making. A dataset of 504 individuals was used for evaluation. The cross-validated classification accuracy was 70.6% and balanced accuracy was 69.1% for the five disease groups using only automatically determined MRI features. Vascular dementia patients could be detected with high sensitivity (96%) using features from FLAIR images. Controls (sensitivity 82%) and Alzheimer's disease patients (sensitivity 74%) could be accurately classified using T1-based features, whereas the most difficult group was the dementia with Lewy bodies (sensitivity 32%). These results were notable better than the classification accuracies obtained with visual MRI ratings (accuracy 44.6%, balanced accuracy 51.6%). Different quantification methods provided complementary information, and consequently, the best results were obtained by

  8. Differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases using structural MRI data.

    PubMed

    Koikkalainen, Juha; Rhodius-Meester, Hanneke; Tolonen, Antti; Barkhof, Frederik; Tijms, Betty; Lemstra, Afina W; Tong, Tong; Guerrero, Ricardo; Schuh, Andreas; Ledig, Christian; Rueckert, Daniel; Soininen, Hilkka; Remes, Anne M; Waldemar, Gunhild; Hasselbalch, Steen; Mecocci, Patrizia; van der Flier, Wiesje; Lötjönen, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative diseases can cause memory disorders and other cognitive impairments. The early detection and the stratification of patients according to the underlying disease are essential for an efficient approach to this healthcare challenge. This emphasizes the importance of differential diagnostics. Most studies compare patients and controls, or Alzheimer's disease with one other type of dementia. Such a bilateral comparison does not resemble clinical practice, where a clinician is faced with a number of different possible types of dementia. Here we studied which features in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans could best distinguish four types of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies, and control subjects. We extracted an extensive set of features quantifying volumetric and morphometric characteristics from T1 images, and vascular characteristics from FLAIR images. Classification was performed using a multi-class classifier based on Disease State Index methodology. The classifier provided continuous probability indices for each disease to support clinical decision making. A dataset of 504 individuals was used for evaluation. The cross-validated classification accuracy was 70.6% and balanced accuracy was 69.1% for the five disease groups using only automatically determined MRI features. Vascular dementia patients could be detected with high sensitivity (96%) using features from FLAIR images. Controls (sensitivity 82%) and Alzheimer's disease patients (sensitivity 74%) could be accurately classified using T1-based features, whereas the most difficult group was the dementia with Lewy bodies (sensitivity 32%). These results were notable better than the classification accuracies obtained with visual MRI ratings (accuracy 44.6%, balanced accuracy 51.6%). Different quantification methods provided complementary information, and consequently, the best results were obtained by

  9. Implicit structured sequence learning: an fMRI study of the structural mere-exposure effect.

    PubMed

    Folia, Vasiliki; Petersson, Karl Magnus

    2014-01-01

    In this event-related fMRI study we investigated the effect of 5 days of implicit acquisition on preference classification by means of an artificial grammar learning (AGL) paradigm based on the structural mere-exposure effect and preference classification using a simple right-linear unification grammar. This allowed us to investigate implicit AGL in a proper learning design by including baseline measurements prior to grammar exposure. After 5 days of implicit acquisition, the fMRI results showed activations in a network of brain regions including the inferior frontal (centered on BA 44/45) and the medial prefrontal regions (centered on BA 8/32). Importantly, and central to this study, the inclusion of a naive preference fMRI baseline measurement allowed us to conclude that these fMRI findings were the intrinsic outcomes of the learning process itself and not a reflection of a preexisting functionality recruited during classification, independent of acquisition. Support for the implicit nature of the knowledge utilized during preference classification on day 5 come from the fact that the basal ganglia, associated with implicit procedural learning, were activated during classification, while the medial temporal lobe system, associated with explicit declarative memory, was consistently deactivated. Thus, preference classification in combination with structural mere-exposure can be used to investigate structural sequence processing (syntax) in unsupervised AGL paradigms with proper learning designs. PMID:24550865

  10. Incorporating MRI structural information into bioluminescence tomography: system, heterogeneous reconstruction and in vivo quantification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Chen, Duofang; Liang, Jimin; Xue, Huadan; Lei, Jing; Wang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Ming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Combining two or more imaging modalities to provide complementary information has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic biomedical research. By incorporating the structural information provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the ill poseness nature of bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be reduced significantly, thus improve the accuracies of reconstruction and in vivo quantification. In this paper, we present a small animal imaging system combining multi-view and multi-spectral BLT with MRI. The independent MRI-compatible optical device is placed at the end of the clinical MRI scanner. The small animal is transferred between the light tight chamber of the optical device and the animal coil of MRI via a guide rail during the experiment. After the optical imaging and MRI scanning procedures are finished, the optical images are mapped onto the MRI surface by interactive registration between boundary of optical images and silhouette of MRI. Then, incorporating the MRI structural information, a heterogeneous reconstruction algorithm based on finite element method (FEM) with L 1 normalization is used to reconstruct the position, power and region of the light source. In order to validate the feasibility of the system, we conducted experiments of nude mice model implanted with artificial light source and quantitative analysis of tumor inoculation model with MDA-231-GFP-luc. Preliminary results suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of the prototype system. PMID:24940545

  11. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Russell W.; Ho, Leon C.; Zhou, Iris Y.; Gao, Patrick P.; Chan, Kevin C.; Wu, Ed X.

    2015-01-01

    Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline) and seventeen days after mating (G17). G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner. PMID:26658306

  12. Thalamic segmentation based on improved fuzzy connectedness in structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunlan; Wang, Qian; Wu, Weiwei; Xue, Yanqing; Lu, Wangsheng; Wu, Shuicai

    2015-11-01

    Thalamic segmentation serves an important function in localizing targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, thalamic nuclei are still difficult to identify clearly from structural MRI. In this study, an improved algorithm based on the fuzzy connectedness framework was developed. Three-dimensional T1-weighted images in axial orientation were acquired through a 3D SPGR sequence by using a 1.5 T GE magnetic resonance scanner. Twenty-five normal images were analyzed using the proposed method, which involved adaptive fuzzy connectedness combined with confidence connectedness (AFCCC). After non-brain tissue removal and contrast enhancement, the seed point was selected manually, and confidence connectedness was used to perform an ROI update automatically. Both image intensity and local gradient were taken as image features in calculating the fuzzy affinity. Moreover, the weight of the features could be automatically adjusted. Thalamus, ventrointermedius (Vim), and subthalamic nucleus were successfully segmented. The results were evaluated with rules, such as similarity degree (SD), union overlap, and false positive. SD of thalamus segmentation reached values higher than 85%. The segmentation results were also compared with those achieved by the region growing and level set methods, respectively. Higher SD of the proposed method, especially in Vim, was achieved. The time cost using AFCCC was low, although it could achieve high accuracy. The proposed method is superior to the traditional fuzzy connectedness framework and involves reduced manual intervention in time saving. PMID:26433197

  13. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia.

    PubMed

    Rommer, Paulus S; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  14. 7-Tesla MRI demonstrates absence of structural lesions in patients with vestibular paroxysmia

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, Paulus S.; Wiest, Gerald; Kronnerwetter, Claudia; Zach, Heidemarie; Loader, Benjamin; Elwischger, Kirsten; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular parxoysmia (VP) is a rare vestibular disorder. A neurovascular cross-compression (NVCC) between the vestibulochochlear nerve and an artery seems to be responsible for short attacks of vertigo in this entity. An NVCC can be seen in up to every fourth subject. The significance of these findings is not clear, as not all subjects suffer from symptoms. The aim of the present study was to assess possible structural lesions of the vestibulocochlear nerve by means of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and whether high field MRI may help to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic subjects. 7 Tesla MRI was performed in six patients with VP and confirmed NVCC seen on 1.5 and 3.0 MRI. No structural abnormalities were detected in any of the patients in 7 Tesla MRI. These findings imply that high field MRI does not help to differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic NVCC and that the symptoms of VP are not caused by structural nerve lesions. This supports the hypothesis that the nystagmus associated with VP has to be conceived pathophysiologically as an excitatory vestibular phenomenon, being not related to vestibular hypofunction. 7 Tesla MRI outperforms conventional MRI in image resolution and may be useful in vestibular disorders. PMID:26106306

  15. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  16. Predicting aphasia type from brain damage measured with structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Yourganov, Grigori; Smith, Kimberly G; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Chronic aphasia is a common consequence of a left-hemisphere stroke. Since the early insights by Broca and Wernicke, studying the relationship between the loci of cortical damage and patterns of language impairment has been one of the concerns of aphasiology. We utilized multivariate classification in a cross-validation framework to predict the type of chronic aphasia from the spatial pattern of brain damage. Our sample consisted of 98 patients with five types of aphasia (Broca's, Wernicke's, global, conduction, and anomic), classified based on scores on the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). Binary lesion maps were obtained from structural MRI scans (obtained at least 6 months poststroke, and within 2 days of behavioural assessment); after spatial normalization, the lesions were parcellated into a disjoint set of brain areas. The proportion of damage to the brain areas was used to classify patients' aphasia type. To create this parcellation, we relied on five brain atlases; our classifier (support vector machine - SVM) could differentiate between different kinds of aphasia using any of the five parcellations. In our sample, the best classification accuracy was obtained when using a novel parcellation that combined two previously published brain atlases, with the first atlas providing the segmentation of grey matter, and the second atlas used to segment the white matter. For each aphasia type, we computed the relative importance of different brain areas for distinguishing it from other aphasia types; our findings were consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasia. Overall, our results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas. PMID:26465238

  17. Structural MRI Biomarkers for Preclinical and Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Hagler, Donald J.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Wu, Elaine H.; Karow, David S.; Dale, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive MRI biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) may enable earlier clinical diagnosis and the monitoring of therapeutic effectiveness. To assess potential neuroimaging biomarkers, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative is following normal controls (NC) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD. We applied high-throughput image analyses procedures to these data to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting subtle structural changes in prodromal AD. Raw DICOM scans (139 NC, 175 MCI, and 84 AD) were downloaded for analysis. Volumetric segmentation and cortical surface reconstruction produced continuous cortical surface maps and region-of-interest (ROI) measures. The MCI cohort was subdivided into single- (SMCI) and multiple-domain MCI (MMCI) based on neuropsychological performance. Repeated measures analyses of covariance were used to examine group and hemispheric effects while controlling for age, sex, and, for volumetric measures, intracranial vault. ROI analyses showed group differences for ventricular, temporal, posterior and rostral anterior cingulate, posterior parietal, and frontal regions. SMCI and NC differed within temporal, rostral posterior cingulate, inferior parietal, precuneus, and caudal midfrontal regions. With MMCI and AD, greater differences were evident in these regions and additional frontal and retrosplenial cortices; evidence for non-AD pathology in MMCI also was suggested. Mesial temporal right-dominant asymmetries were evident and did not interact with diagnosis. Our findings demonstrate that high-throughput methods provide numerous measures to detect subtle effects of prodromal AD, suggesting early and later stages of the preclinical state in this cross-sectional sample. These methods will enable a more complete longitudinal characterization and allow us to identify changes that are predictive of conversion to AD. PMID:19277975

  18. Structural and functional effects of metastases in rat brain determined by multimodal MRI.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Martin, Christopher J; Sarmiento Soto, Manuel; Bristow, Claire; O'Brien, Emma R; Connell, John J; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-02-15

    Metastasis to the brain results in significant impairment of brain function and poor patient survival. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is under-utilised in monitoring brain metastases and their effects on brain function. Here, we sought to establish a model of focal brain metastasis in the rat that enables serial multimodal structural and functional MRI studies, and to assess the sensitivity of these approaches to metastatic growth. Female Berlin-Druckrey-IX rats were injected intracerebrally with metastatic ENU1564 cells in the ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus, a relay node of the whisker-to-barrel cortex pathway. Animals underwent multimodal structural and vascular MRI, as well as functional MRI of the cortical blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses to whisker pad stimulation. T2 , diffusion, magnetisation transfer and perfusion weighted MRI enabled differentiation between a central area of more advanced metastatic growth and penumbral regions of co-optive perivascular micrometastatic growth, with magnetisation transfer MRI being the most sensitive to micrometastatic growth. Areas of cortical BOLD activation in response to whisker pad stimulation were significantly reduced in the hemisphere containing metastases in the VPM. The reduction in BOLD response correlated with metastatic burden in the thalamus, and was sensitive to the presence of smaller metastases than currently detectable clinically. Our findings suggest that multimodal MRI provides greater sensitivity to tumour heterogeneity and micrometastatic growth than single modality contrast-enhanced MRI. Understanding the relationships between these MRI parameters and the underlying pathology may greatly enhance the utility of MRI in diagnosis, staging and monitoring of brain metastasis. PMID:23913394

  19. Advanced Structural and Functional Brain MRI in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Antonio; De Stefano, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the central nervous system is crucial for an early and reliable diagnosis and monitoring of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Focal white matter (WM) lesions, as detected by MRI, are the pathological hallmark of the disease and show some relation to clinical disability, especially in the long run. Gray matter (GM) involvement is evident from disease onset and includes focal (i.e., cortical lesions) and diffuse pathology (i.e., atrophy). Both accumulate over time and show close relation to physical disability and cognitive impairment. Using advanced quantitative MRI techniques such as magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and iron imaging, subtle MS pathology has been demonstrated from early stages outside focal WM lesions in the form of widespread abnormalities of the normal appearing WM and GM. In addition, studies using functional MRI have demonstrated that brain plasticity is driven by MS pathology, playing adaptive or maladaptive roles to neurologic and cognitive status and explaining, at least in part, the clinicoradiological paradox of MS. PMID:27116723

  20. Structural MRI of Pediatric Brain Development: What Have We Learned and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Giedd, Jay N.; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows unprecedented access to the anatomy and physiology of the developing brain without the use of ionizing radiation. Over the past two decades, thousands of brain MRI scans from healthy youth and those with neuropsychiatric illness have been acquired and analyzed with respect to diagnosis, sex, genetics, and/or psychological variables such as IQ. Initial reports comparing size differences of various brain components averaged across large age spans have given rise to longitudinal studies examining trajectories of development over time and evaluations of neural circuitry as opposed to structures in isolation. Although MRI is still not of routine diagnostic utility for evaluation of pediatric neuropsychiatric disorders, patterns of typical versus atypical development have emerged that may elucidate pathologic mechanisms and suggest targets for intervention. In this review we summarize general contributions of structural MRI to our understanding of neurodevelopment in health and illness. PMID:20826305

  1. Information fusion approach for detection of brain structures in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Azad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an information fusion approach for automatic detection of mid-brain nuclei (caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus) from MRI. The method is based on fusion of anatomical information, obtained from brain atlases and expert physicians, into MRI numerical information within a fuzzy framework, employed to model intrinsic uncertainty of problem. First step of this method is segmentation of brain tissues (gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). Physical landmarks such as inter-hemispheric plane alongside numerical information from segmentation step are then used to describe the nuclei. Each nucleus is defined according to a unique description according to physical landmarks and anatomical landmarks, most of which are the previously detected nuclei. Also, a detected nucleus in slice n serves as key landmark to detect same nucleus in slice n+1. These steps construct fuzzy decision maps. Overall decision is made after fusing all of decisions according to a fusion operator. This approach has been implemented to detect caudate, putamen, and thalamus from a sequence of axial T1-weighted brain MRI's. Our experience shows that final nuclei detection results are highly dependent upon primary tissue segmentation. The method is validated by comparing resultant nuclei volumes with those obtained using manual segmentation performed by expert physicians.

  2. Test-retest reliability of white matter structural brain networks: a multiband diffusion MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tengda; Duan, Fei; Liao, Xuhong; Dai, Zhengjia; Cao, Miao; He, Yong; Shu, Ni

    2015-01-01

    The multiband EPI sequence has been developed for the human connectome project to accelerate MRI data acquisition. However, no study has yet investigated the test-retest (TRT) reliability of the graph metrics of white matter (WM) structural brain networks constructed from this new sequence. Here, we employed a multiband diffusion MRI (dMRI) dataset with repeated scanning sessions and constructed both low- and high-resolution WM networks by volume- and surface-based parcellation methods. The reproducibility of network metrics and its dependence on type of construction procedures was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). We observed conserved topological architecture of WM structural networks constructed from the multiband dMRI data as previous findings from conventional dMRI. For the global network properties, the first order metrics were more reliable than second order metrics. Between two parcellation methods, networks with volume-based parcellation showed better reliability than surface-based parcellation, especially for the global metrics. Between different resolutions, the high-resolution network exhibited higher TRT performance than the low-resolution in terms of the global metrics with a large effect size, whereas the low-resolution performs better in terms of local (region and connection) properties with a relatively low effect size. Moreover, we identified that the association and primary cortices showed higher reproducibility than the paralimbic/limbic regions. The important hub regions and rich-club connections are more reliable than the non-hub regions and connections. Finally, we found WM networks from the multiband dMRI showed higher reproducibility compared with those from the conventional dMRI. Together, our results demonstrated the fair to good reliability of the WM structural brain networks from the multiband EPI sequence, suggesting its potential utility for exploring individual differences and for clinical applications. PMID

  3. Probability distribution function-based classification of structural MRI for the detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, I; Demirel, H

    2015-09-01

    High-dimensional classification methods have been a major target of machine learning for the automatic classification of patients who suffer from Alzheimer's disease (AD). One major issue of automatic classification is the feature-selection method from high-dimensional data. In this paper, a novel approach for statistical feature reduction and selection in high-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data based on the probability distribution function (PDF) is introduced. To develop an automatic computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) technique, this research explores the statistical patterns extracted from structural MRI (sMRI) data on four systematic levels. First, global and local differences of gray matter in patients with AD compared to healthy controls (HCs) using the voxel-based morphometric (VBM) technique with 3-Tesla 3D T1-weighted MRI are investigated. Second, feature extraction based on the voxel clusters detected by VBM on sMRI and voxel values as volume of interest (VOI) is used. Third, a novel statistical feature-selection process is employed, utilizing the PDF of the VOI to represent statistical patterns of the respective high-dimensional sMRI sample. Finally, the proposed feature-selection method for early detection of AD with support vector machine (SVM) classifiers compared to other standard feature selection methods, such as partial least squares (PLS) techniques, is assessed. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated using 130 AD and 130 HC MRI data from the ADNI dataset with 10-fold cross validation(1). The results show that the PDF-based feature selection approach is a reliable technique that is highly competitive with respect to the state-of-the-art techniques in classifying AD from high-dimensional sMRI samples. PMID:26226415

  4. SEMI-AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF BRAIN SUBCORTICAL STRUCTURES FROM HIGH-FIELD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyoung; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; Harel, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Volumetric segmentation of subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus is necessary for non-invasive diagnosis and neurosurgery planning. This is a challenging problem due in part to limited boundary information between structures, similar intensity profiles across the different structures, and low contrast data. This paper presents a semi-automatic segmentation system exploiting the superior image quality of ultra-high field (7 Tesla) MRI. The proposed approach handles and exploits multiple structural MRI modalities. It uniquely combines T1-weighted (T1W), T2-weighted (T2W), diffusion, and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) MRI and introduces a dedicated new edge indicator function. In addition to this, we employ prior shape and configuration knowledge of the subcortical structures in order to guide the evolution of geometric active surfaces. Neighboring structures are segmented iteratively, constraining over-segmentation at their borders with a non-overlapping penalty. Extensive experiments with data acquired on a 7T MRI scanner demonstrate the feasibility and power of the approach for the segmentation of basal ganglia components critical for neurosurgery applications such as deep brain stimulation. PMID:25192576

  5. The Importance of the Default Mode Network in Creativity--A Structural MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kühn, Simone; Ritter, Simone M.; Müller, Barbara C. N.; van Baaren, Rick B.; Brass, Marcel; Dijksterhuis, Ap

    2014-01-01

    Anecdotal reports as well as behavioral studies have suggested that creative performance benefits from unconscious processes. So far, however, little is known about how creative ideas arise from the brain. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the neural correlates of creativity by means of structural MRI research. Given that unconscious…

  6. MRI as a tool to study brain structure from mouse models for mental retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan; Kooy, R. F.; Reyniers, E.; Fransen, E.; Oostra, B. A.; Willems, Peter; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie

    1998-07-01

    Nowadays, transgenic mice are a common tool to study brain abnormalities in neurological disorders. These studies usually rely on neuropathological examinations, which have a number of drawbacks, including the risk of artefacts introduced by fixation and dehydration procedures. Here we present 3D Fast Spin Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in combination with 2D and 3D segmentation techniques as a powerful tool to study brain anatomy. We set up MRI of the brain in mouse models for the fragile X syndrome (FMR1 knockout) and Corpus callosum hypoplasia, mental Retardation, Adducted thumbs, Spastic paraplegia and Hydrocephalus (CRASH) syndrome (L1CAM knockout). Our major goal was to determine qualitative and quantitative differences in specific brain structures. MRI of the brain of fragile X and CRASH patients has revealed alterations in the size of specific brain structures, including the cerebellar vermis and the ventricular system. In the present MRI study of the brain from fragile X knockout mice, we have measured the size of the brain, cerebellum and 4th ventricle, which were reported as abnormal in human fragile X patients, but found no evidence for altered brain regions in the mouse model. In CRASH syndrome, the most specific brain abnormalities are vermis hypoplasia and abnormalities of the ventricular system with some degree of hydrocephalus. With the MRI study of L1CAM knockout mice we found vermis hypoplasia, abnormalities of the ventricular system including dilatation of the lateral and the 4th ventricles. These subtle abnormalities were not detected upon standard neuropathological examination. Here we proved that this sensitive MRI technique allows to measure small differences which can not always be detected by means of pathology.

  7. Rotarod training in mice is associated with changes in brain structure observable with multimodal MRI.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jan; Niibori, Yosuke; Frankland, Paul W; Lerch, Jason P

    2015-02-15

    The brain has been shown to remain structurally plastic even throughout adulthood. However, little is known how motor-skill training affects different MRI modalities in the adult mouse brain. The aim of this study is to investigate whether rotarod training, a simple motor training task taken from the standard test battery, is associated with structural plasticity observable with different MRI modalities in adult C57BL/6 mice. The rotarod is a standard test that taxes motor coordination and balance. We use T2-weighted MRI followed by deformation-based morphometry to assess local volume and fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from diffusion MRI to assess microstructure ex-vivo. Using deformation-based morphometry we found that the hippocampus, frontal cortex and amygdala are larger in rotarod-trained mice compared to untrained controls. Surprisingly, the cerebellum and white matter in the corpus callosum underlying the primary motor cortex are smaller after training. We also found that the volume of the motor cortex is positively correlated with better rotarod performance. Diffusion imaging indicates group differences and behavioral correlations with FA, a measure of microstructure. Trained mice have higher FA in the hippocampus. Better rotarod performance is associated with higher FA in the hippocampus and lower FA in the primary visual cortex. This is the first study to reveal the substantial structural reorganization of the adult mouse brain following only a relatively brief period of motor-skill training by using complementary measures of microstructure and volume. PMID:25497397

  8. Systematic evaluation of MRI findings in different stages of treatment of cervical cancer: Potential of MRI on delineation of target, pathoanatomic structures, and organs at risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes . E-mail: johannes.dimopoulos@akhwien.at; Schard, Gerdi; Berger, Daniel; Lang, Stefan; Goldner, Gregor; Helbich, Thomas; Poetter, Richard

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at different stages of cervix cancer treatment and to define the potential of MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), pathoanatomic structures, and organs at risk (OAR) in brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine patients underwent MRI at diagnosis and at brachytherapy. The ability to discriminate anatomic structures on MRI was assessed (quality factor: 0 = inability to discriminate; 1 = fair discrimination; 2 = good discrimination; 3 = excellent discrimination). The overall ability to visualize (percentage of patients with quality factors greater than 0) and the overall discrimination quality score (mean quality factors of all patients) were estimated for the applicator, GTV at diagnosis (GTV{sub D}), GTV at brachytherapy (GTV{sub BT})/'gray zones,' cervix rim/uterine corpus, OAR, vaginal wall, and parametria. Results: The overall ability to visualize the applicator on MRI at brachytherapy was 100%; for the GTV{sub BT}/'gray zones,' cervix rim/uterine corpus, OAR, and vaginal wall, visualization was 98% (overall discrimination quality factors: 1.2, 2.9, 2.1, 1.9, 1.7, and 2.6). Three of 4 borders of parametrial space were defined in more than 98% (discrimination quality factors: 2.9, 2.1, and 1.2). Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging provides appropriate information for definition of the applicator, GTV, CTV, pathoanatomic structures, and OAR that enables precise delineation for cervix cancer brachytherapy.

  9. Structural brain MRI studies in eye diseases: are they clinically relevant? A review of current findings.

    PubMed

    Prins, Doety; Hanekamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2016-03-01

    Many eye diseases reduce visual acuity or are associated with visual field defects. Because of the well-defined retinotopic organization of the connections of the visual pathways, this may affect specific parts of the visual pathways and cortex, as a result of either deprivation or transsynaptic degeneration. For this reason, over the past several years, numerous structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have examined the association of eye diseases with pathway and brain changes. Here, we review structural MRI studies performed in human patients with the eye diseases albinism, amblyopia, hereditary retinal dystrophies, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma. We focus on two main questions. First, what have these studies revealed? Second, what is the potential clinical relevance of their findings? We find that all the aforementioned eye diseases are indeed associated with structural changes in the visual pathways and brain. As such changes have been described in very different eye diseases, in our view the most parsimonious explanation is that these are caused by the loss of visual input and the subsequent deprivation of the visual pathways and brain regions, rather than by transsynaptic degeneration. Moreover, and of clinical relevance, for some of the diseases - in particular glaucoma and AMD - present results are compatible with the view that the eye disease is part of a more general neurological or neurodegenerative disorder that also affects the brain. Finally, establishing structural changes of the visual pathways has been relevant in the context of new therapeutic strategies to restore retinal function: it implies that restoring retinal function may not suffice to also effectively restore vision. Future structural MRI studies can contribute to (i) further establish relationships between ocular and neurological neurodegenerative disorders, (ii) investigate whether brain degeneration in eye diseases is reversible, (iii) evaluate the use

  10. The clinical use of structural MRI in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Fox, Nick C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Scheltens, Philip; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Structural imaging based on magnetic resonance is an integral part of the clinical assessment of patients with suspected Alzheimer dementia. Prospective data on the natural history of change in structural markers from preclinical to overt stages of Alzheimer disease are radically changing how the disease is conceptualized, and will influence its future diagnosis and treatment. Atrophy of medial temporal structures is now considered to be a valid diagnostic marker at the mild cognitive impairment stage. Structural imaging is also included in diagnostic criteria for the most prevalent non-Alzheimer dementias, reflecting its value in differential diagnosis. In addition, rates of whole-brain and hippocampal atrophy are sensitive markers of neurodegeneration, and are increasingly used as outcome measures in trials of potentially disease-modifying therapies. Large multicenter studies are currently investigating the value of other imaging and nonimaging markers as adjuncts to clinical assessment in diagnosis and monitoring of progression. The utility of structural imaging and other markers will be increased by standardization of acquisition and analysis methods, and by development of robust algorithms for automated assessment. PMID:20139996

  11. Registration of structurally dissimilar images in MRI-based brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, F. F.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; de Leeuw, A. A. C.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Viergever, M. A.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2014-08-01

    A serious challenge in image registration is the accurate alignment of two images in which a certain structure is present in only one of the two. Such topological changes are problematic for conventional non-rigid registration algorithms. We propose to incorporate in a conventional free-form registration framework a geometrical penalty term that minimizes the volume of the missing structure in one image. We demonstrate our method on cervical MR images for brachytherapy. The intrapatient registration problem involves one image in which a therapy applicator is present and one in which it is not. By including the penalty term, a substantial improvement in the surface distance to the gold standard anatomical position and the residual volume of the applicator void are obtained. Registration of neighboring structures, i.e. the rectum and the bladder is generally improved as well, albeit to a lesser degree.

  12. Fractal Structure in Human Cerebellum Measured by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Luduan; Yue, Guang; Brown, Robert; Liu, Jingzhi

    2003-10-01

    Fractal dimension has been used to quantify the structures of a wide range of objects in biology and medicine. We measured fractal dimension of human cerebellum (CB) in magnetic resonance images of 24 healthy young subjects (12 men, 12 women). CB images were resampled to a series of image sets with different three-dimensional resolutions. At each resolution, the skeleton of the CB white matter was obtained and the number of pixels belonging to the skeleton was determined. Fractal dimension of the CB skeleton was calculated using the box-counting method. The results indicated that the CB skeleton is a highly fractal structure, with a fractal dimension of 2.57+/-0.01. No significant difference in the CB fractal dimension was observed between men and women. Fractal dimension may serve as a quantitative index for structural complexity of the CB at its developmental, degenerative, or evolutionary stages.

  13. Graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional connectivity MRI in normal and pathological brain networks.

    PubMed

    Guye, Maxime; Bettus, Gaelle; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Cozzone, Patrick J

    2010-12-01

    Graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional connectivity MRI data (ie. diffusion tractography or cortical volume correlation and resting-state or task-related (effective) fMRI, respectively) has provided new measures of human brain organization in vivo. The most striking discovery is that the whole-brain network exhibits "small-world" properties shared with many other complex systems (social, technological, information, biological). This topology allows a high efficiency at different spatial and temporal scale with a very low wiring and energy cost. Its modular organization also allows for a high level of adaptation. In addition, degree distribution of brain networks demonstrates highly connected hubs that are crucial for the whole-network functioning. Many of these hubs have been identified in regions previously defined as belonging to the default-mode network (potentially explaining the high basal metabolism of this network) and the attentional networks. This could explain the crucial role of these hub regions in physiology (task-related fMRI data) as well as in pathophysiology. Indeed, such topological definition provides a reliable framework for predicting behavioral consequences of focal or multifocal lesions such as stroke, tumors or multiple sclerosis. It also brings new insights into a better understanding of pathophysiology of many neurological or psychiatric diseases affecting specific local or global brain networks such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia. Graph theoretical analysis of connectivity MRI data provides an outstanding framework to merge anatomical and functional data in order to better understand brain pathologies. PMID:20349109

  14. Quantitative structural MRI for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Linda K; Brewer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is not currently diagnosed until a patient reaches the stage of dementia. There is a pressing need to identify AD at an earlier stage, so that treatment, when available, can begin early. Quantitative structural MRI is sensitive to the neurodegeneration that occurs in mild and preclinical AD, and is predictive of decline to dementia in individuals with mild cognitive impairment. Objective evidence of ongoing brain atrophy will be critical for risk/benefit decisions once potentially aggressive, disease-modifying treatments become available. Recent advances have paved the way for the use of quantitative structural MRI in clinical practice, and initial clinical use has been promising. However, further experience with these measures in the relatively unselected patient populations seen in clinical practice is needed to complete translation of the recent enormous advances in scientific knowledge of AD into the clinical realm. PMID:20977326

  15. Model-based segmentation of individual brain structures from MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. Louis; Peters, Terence M.; Dai, Weiqian; Evans, Alan C.

    1992-09-01

    This paper proposes a methodology that enables an arbitrary 3-D MRI brain image-volume to be automatically segmented and classified into neuro-anatomical components using multiresolution registration and matching with a novel volumetric brain structure model (VBSM). This model contains both raster and geometric data. The raster component comprises the mean MRI volume after a set of individual volumes of normal volunteers have been transformed to a standardized brain-based coordinate space. The geometric data consists of polyhedral objects representing anatomically important structures such as cortical gyri and deep gray matter nuclei. The method consists of iteratively registering the data set to be segmented to the VBSM using deformations based on local image correlation. This segmentation process is performed hierarchically in scale-space. Each step in decreasing levels of scale refines the fit of the previous step and provides input to the next. Results from phantom and real MR data are presented.

  16. Verbal Memory Decline following DBS for Parkinson’s Disease: Structural Volumetric MRI Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Geevarghese, Ruben; Lumsden, Daniel E.; Costello, Angela; Hulse, Natasha; Ayis, Salma; Samuel, Michael; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2016-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease is a chronic degenerative movement disorder. The mainstay of treatment is medical. In certain patients Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) may be offered. However, DBS has been associated with post-operative neuropsychology changes, especially in verbal memory. Objectives Firstly, to determine if pre-surgical thalamic and hippocampal volumes were related to verbal memory changes following DBS. Secondly, to determine if clinical factors such as age, duration of symptoms or motor severity (UPDRS Part III score) were related to verbal memory changes. Methods A consecutive group of 40 patients undergoing bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus (STN)-DBS for PD were selected. Brain MRI data was acquired, pre-processed and structural volumetric data was extracted using FSL. Verbal memory test scores for pre- and post-STN-DBS surgery were recorded. Linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between score change and structural volumetric data. Results A significant relationship was demonstrated between change in List Learning test score and thalamic (left, p = 0.02) and hippocampal (left, p = 0.02 and right p = 0.03) volumes. Duration of symptoms was also associated with List Learning score change (p = 0.02 to 0.03). Conclusion Verbal memory score changes appear to have a relationship to pre-surgical MRI structural volumetric data. The findings of this study provide a basis for further research into the use of pre-surgical MRI to counsel PD patients regarding post-surgical verbal memory changes. PMID:27557088

  17. Inferring functional connectivity in MRI using Bayesian network structure learning with a modified PC algorithm.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Swathi P; Shafran, Izhak; Grayson, David; Gates, Kathleen; Nigg, Joel T; Fair, Damien A

    2013-07-15

    Resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) is a popular technique used to gauge the functional relatedness between regions in the brain for typical and special populations. Most of the work to date determines this relationship by using Pearson's correlation on BOLD fMRI timeseries. However, it has been recognized that there are at least two key limitations to this method. First, it is not possible to resolve the direct and indirect connections/influences. Second, the direction of information flow between the regions cannot be differentiated. In the current paper, we follow-up on recent work by Smith et al. (2011), and apply PC algorithm to both simulated data and empirical data to determine whether these two factors can be discerned with group average, as opposed to single subject, functional connectivity data. When applied on simulated individual subjects, the algorithm performs well determining indirect and direct connection but fails in determining directionality. However, when applied at group level, PC algorithm gives strong results for both indirect and direct connections and the direction of information flow. Applying the algorithm on empirical data, using a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) structural connectivity matrix as the baseline, the PC algorithm outperformed the direct correlations. We conclude that, under certain conditions, the PC algorithm leads to an improved estimate of brain network structure compared to the traditional connectivity analysis based on correlations. PMID:23501054

  18. Discriminative analysis of schizophrenia using support vector machine and recursive feature elimination on structural MRI images.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaobing; Yang, Yongzhe; Wu, Fengchun; Gao, Minjian; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Yue; Yao, Yongcheng; Du, Xin; Li, Chengwei; Wu, Lei; Zhong, Xiaomei; Zhou, Yanling; Fan, Ni; Zheng, Yingjun; Xiong, Dongsheng; Peng, Hongjun; Escudero, Javier; Huang, Biao; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yuping; Wu, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Structural abnormalities in schizophrenia (SZ) patients have been well documented with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and region of interest (ROI) analyses. However, these analyses can only detect group-wise differences and thus, have a poor predictive value for individuals. In the present study, we applied a machine learning method that combined support vector machine (SVM) with recursive feature elimination (RFE) to discriminate SZ patients from normal controls (NCs) using their structural MRI data. We first employed both VBM and ROI analyses to compare gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) between 41 SZ patients and 42 age- and sex-matched NCs. The method of SVM combined with RFE was used to discriminate SZ patients from NCs using significant between-group differences in both GMV and WMV as input features. We found that SZ patients showed GM and WM abnormalities in several brain structures primarily involved in the emotion, memory, and visual systems. An SVM with a RFE classifier using the significant structural abnormalities identified by the VBM analysis as input features achieved the best performance (an accuracy of 88.4%, a sensitivity of 91.9%, and a specificity of 84.4%) in the discriminative analyses of SZ patients. These results suggested that distinct neuroanatomical profiles associated with SZ patients might provide a potential biomarker for disease diagnosis, and machine-learning methods can reveal neurobiological mechanisms in psychiatric diseases. PMID:27472673

  19. Accelerated dynamic MRI exploiting sparsity and low-rank structure: k-t SLR.

    PubMed

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Hu, Yue; DiBella, Edward; Jacob, Mathews

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm to reconstruct dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from under-sampled k-t space data. In contrast to classical model based cine MRI schemes that rely on the sparsity or banded structure in Fourier space, we use the compact representation of the data in the Karhunen Louve transform (KLT) domain to exploit the correlations in the dataset. The use of the data-dependent KL transform makes our approach ideally suited to a range of dynamic imaging problems, even when the motion is not periodic. In comparison to current KLT-based methods that rely on a two-step approach to first estimate the basis functions and then use it for reconstruction, we pose the problem as a spectrally regularized matrix recovery problem. By simultaneously determining the temporal basis functions and its spatial weights from the entire measured data, the proposed scheme is capable of providing high quality reconstructions at a range of accelerations. In addition to using the compact representation in the KLT domain, we also exploit the sparsity of the data to further improve the recovery rate. Validations using numerical phantoms and in vivo cardiac perfusion MRI data demonstrate the significant improvement in performance offered by the proposed scheme over existing methods. PMID:21292593

  20. Discovering anatomical patterns with pathological meaning by clustering of visual primitives in structural brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Juan; Pulido, Andrea; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Computational anatomy is a subdiscipline of the anatomy that studies macroscopic details of the human body structure using a set of automatic techniques. Different reference systems have been developed for brain mapping and morphometry in functional and structural studies. Several models integrate particular anatomical regions to highlight pathological patterns in structural brain MRI, a really challenging task due to the complexity, variability, and nonlinearity of the human brain anatomy. In this paper, we present a strategy that aims to find anatomical regions with pathological meaning by using a probabilistic analysis. Our method starts by extracting visual primitives from brain MRI that are partitioned into small patches and which are then softly clustered, forming different regions not necessarily connected. Each of these regions is described by a co- occurrence histogram of visual features, upon which a probabilistic semantic analysis is used to find the underlying structure of the information, i.e., separated regions by their low level similarity. The proposed approach was tested with the OASIS data set which includes 69 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and 65 healthy subjects (NC).

  1. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  2. Sparse representation of brain aging: extracting covariance patterns from structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Su, Longfei; Wang, Lubin; Chen, Fanglin; Shen, Hui; Li, Baojuan; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    An enhanced understanding of how normal aging alters brain structure is urgently needed for the early diagnosis and treatment of age-related mental diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a reliable technique used to detect age-related changes in the human brain. Currently, multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) enables the exploration of subtle and distributed changes of data obtained from structural MRI images. In this study, a new MVPA approach based on sparse representation has been employed to investigate the anatomical covariance patterns of normal aging. Two groups of participants (group 1:290 participants; group 2:56 participants) were evaluated in this study. These two groups were scanned with two 1.5 T MRI machines. In the first group, we obtained the discriminative patterns using a t-test filter and sparse representation step. We were able to distinguish the young from old cohort with a very high accuracy using only a few voxels of the discriminative patterns (group 1:98.4%; group 2:96.4%). The experimental results showed that the selected voxels may be categorized into two components according to the two steps in the proposed method. The first component focuses on the precentral and postcentral gyri, and the caudate nucleus, which play an important role in sensorimotor tasks. The strongest volume reduction with age was observed in these clusters. The second component is mainly distributed over the cerebellum, thalamus, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These regions are not only critical nodes of the sensorimotor circuitry but also the cognitive circuitry although their volume shows a relative resilience against aging. Considering the voxels selection procedure, we suggest that the aging of the sensorimotor and cognitive brain regions identified in this study has a covarying relationship with each other. PMID:22590522

  3. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  4. Global and structured waves of rs-fMRI signal identified as putative propagation of spontaneous neural activity.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Shiori; Takao, Hidemasa; Hanaoka, Shohei; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-06-01

    Conventional resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) studies have focused on investigating the synchronous neural activity in functionally relevant distant regions that are termed as resting-state networks. On the other hand, less is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of the spontaneous activity of the brain. By examining the characteristics of both rs-fMRI and vascular time lag that was measured using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion weighted imaging, the present study identifies several structured propagation of the rs-fMRI signal as putative neural streams. Temporal shift of both rs-fMRI and perfusion imaging data in each voxel compared with the averaged whole-brain signal was computed using cross-correlation analysis. In contrast to the uniformity of the vascular time lag across subjects, whole-brain rs-fMRI time lag was estimated to be composed of three independent components. After regression of vascular time lag, independent component analysis was applied to rs-fMRI data. The putative neural streams showed slow propagation of the signal from task-positive regions to main nodes of the default mode network, which may represent a mode of transmission underlying the interactions among the resting-state networks. PMID:27012499

  5. New tissue priors for improved automated classification of subcortical brain structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Lorio, S; Fresard, S; Adaszewski, S; Kherif, F; Chowdhury, R; Frackowiak, R S; Ashburner, J; Helms, G; Weiskopf, N; Lutti, A; Draganski, B

    2016-04-15

    Despite the constant improvement of algorithms for automated brain tissue classification, the accurate delineation of subcortical structures using magnetic resonance images (MRI) data remains challenging. The main difficulties arise from the low gray-white matter contrast of iron rich areas in T1-weighted (T1w) MRI data and from the lack of adequate priors for basal ganglia and thalamus. The most recent attempts to obtain such priors were based on cohorts with limited size that included subjects in a narrow age range, failing to account for age-related gray-white matter contrast changes. Aiming to improve the anatomical plausibility of automated brain tissue classification from T1w data, we have created new tissue probability maps for subcortical gray matter regions. Supported by atlas-derived spatial information, raters manually labeled subcortical structures in a cohort of healthy subjects using magnetization transfer saturation and R2* MRI maps, which feature optimal gray-white matter contrast in these areas. After assessment of inter-rater variability, the new tissue priors were tested on T1w data within the framework of voxel-based morphometry. The automated detection of gray matter in subcortical areas with our new probability maps was more anatomically plausible compared to the one derived with currently available priors. We provide evidence that the improved delineation compensates age-related bias in the segmentation of iron rich subcortical regions. The new tissue priors, allowing robust detection of basal ganglia and thalamus, have the potential to enhance the sensitivity of voxel-based morphometry in both healthy and diseased brains. PMID:26854557

  6. Non-parametric Bayesian graph models reveal community structure in resting state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Schmidt, Mikkel N; Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2014-10-15

    Modeling of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data using network models is of increasing interest. It is often desirable to group nodes into clusters to interpret the communication patterns between nodes. In this study we consider three different nonparametric Bayesian models for node clustering in complex networks. In particular, we test their ability to predict unseen data and their ability to reproduce clustering across datasets. The three generative models considered are the Infinite Relational Model (IRM), Bayesian Community Detection (BCD), and the Infinite Diagonal Model (IDM). The models define probabilities of generating links within and between clusters and the difference between the models lies in the restrictions they impose upon the between-cluster link probabilities. IRM is the most flexible model with no restrictions on the probabilities of links between clusters. BCD restricts the between-cluster link probabilities to be strictly lower than within-cluster link probabilities to conform to the community structure typically seen in social networks. IDM only models a single between-cluster link probability, which can be interpreted as a background noise probability. These probabilistic models are compared against three other approaches for node clustering, namely Infomap, Louvain modularity, and hierarchical clustering. Using 3 different datasets comprising healthy volunteers' rs-fMRI we found that the BCD model was in general the most predictive and reproducible model. This suggests that rs-fMRI data exhibits community structure and furthermore points to the significance of modeling heterogeneous between-cluster link probabilities. PMID:24914522

  7. Recognition of upper airway and surrounding structures at MRI in pediatric PCOS and OSAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, J. K.; Odhner, D.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is common in obese children with risk being 4.5 fold compared to normal control subjects. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has recently been shown to be associated with OSAS that may further lead to significant cardiovascular and neuro-cognitive deficits. We are investigating image-based biomarkers to understand the architectural and dynamic changes in the upper airway and the surrounding hard and soft tissue structures via MRI in obese teenage children to study OSAS. At the previous SPIE conferences, we presented methods underlying Fuzzy Object Models (FOMs) for Automatic Anatomy Recognition (AAR) based on CT images of the thorax and the abdomen. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the AAR approach is applicable to a different body region and image modality combination, namely in the study of upper airway structures via MRI. FOMs were built hierarchically, the smaller sub-objects forming the offspring of larger parent objects. FOMs encode the uncertainty and variability present in the form and relationships among the objects over a study population. Totally 11 basic objects (17 including composite) were modeled. Automatic recognition for the best pose of FOMs in a given image was implemented by using four methods - a one-shot method that does not require search, another three searching methods that include Fisher Linear Discriminate (FLD), a b-scale energy optimization strategy, and optimum threshold recognition method. In all, 30 multi-fold cross validation experiments based on 15 patient MRI data sets were carried out to assess the accuracy of recognition. The results indicate that the objects can be recognized with an average location error of less than 5 mm or 2-3 voxels. Then the iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was adopted for delineation of the target organs based on the recognized results. The delineation results showed an overall FP and TP volume fraction of 0.02 and 0.93.

  8. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  9. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  10. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  11. Neurocognitive disorder detection based on feature vectors extracted from VBM analysis of structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Savio, A; García-Sebastián, M T; Chyzyk, D; Hernandez, C; Graña, M; Sistiaga, A; López de Munain, A; Villanúa, J

    2011-08-01

    Dementia is a growing concern due to the aging process of the western societies. Non-invasive detection is therefore a high priority research endeavor. In this paper we report results of classification systems applied to the feature vectors obtained by a feature extraction method computed on structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) volumes for the detection of two neurological disorders with cognitive impairment: myotonic dystrophy of type 1 (MD1) and Alzheimer disease (AD). The feature extraction process is based on the voxel clusters detected by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis of sMRI upon a set of patient and control subjects. This feature extraction process is specific for each kind of disease and is grounded on the findings obtained by medical experts. The 10-fold cross-validation results of several statistical and neural network based classification algorithms trained and tested on these features show high specificity and moderate sensitivity of the classifiers, suggesting that the approach is better suited for rejecting than for detecting early stages of the diseases. PMID:21621760

  12. Susceptibility-weighted MRI of extrapyramidal brain structures in Parkinsonian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Eva; Ng, Kia-Min; Yeoh, Chooi-Sum; Rumpel, Helmut; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Li, Hui-Hua; Tan, Eng-King; Chan, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Susceptibility-weighted MRI (SWI) is sensitive to T2∗ effects and mineralization. We investigated differences in the extrapyramidal brain structures on SWI between Parkinson disease (PD) and postural instability gait disorder (PIGD) patients and correlated the SWI values with the degree of gait dysfunction. Forty patients diagnosed with PD and PIGD underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain study. An SWI sequence (TE/TR/FA 20/33/15) was used. Ten regions of interest were placed in the midbrain and basal ganglia by 2 independent raters blinded to subject data and quantitatively evaluated. The inter-rater reliability between the raters was excellent (interclass correlation coefficient >0.8). The SWI intensity values in all regions were on average lower in PIGD than in PD patients, with the lowest results found in globus pallidus. Multivariate analysis showed a lower SWI hypointensity in the putamen and globus pallidus in PIGD compared with PD patients, with a similar trend for the other basal ganglia nuclei. Pearson correlation analysis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between SWI putaminal hypointensity and the Tinetti total score (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) in both PD and PIGD. SWI putaminal hypointensity may be a useful imaging marker in prospective evaluation for clinical progression for Parkinsonian disorders. PMID:27367979

  13. MRI-detectable changes in mouse brain structure induced by voluntary exercise.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Steadman, Patrick E; Jones, Carly E; Laliberté, Christine L; Dazai, Jun; Lerch, Jason P; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G

    2015-06-01

    Physical exercise, besides improving cognitive and mental health, is known to cause structural changes in the brain. Understanding the structural changes that occur with exercise as well as the neuroanatomical correlates of a predisposition for exercise is important for understanding human health. This study used high-resolution 3D MR imaging, in combination with deformation-based morphometry, to investigate the macroscopic changes in brain structure that occur in healthy adult mice following four weeks of voluntary exercise. We found that exercise induced changes in multiple brain structures that are involved in motor function and learning and memory including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex, olivary complex, inferior cerebellar peduncle and regions of the cerebellum. In addition, a number of brain structures, including the hippocampus, striatum and pons, when measured on MRI prior to the start of exercise were highly predictive of subsequent exercise activity. Exercise tended to normalize these pre-existing differences between mice. PMID:25800209

  14. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  15. Validity of early MRI structural damage end points and potential impact on clinical trial design in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul; Baker, Daniel G; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the construct validity of the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) erosion evaluation as structural damage end point and to assess the potential impact of incorporation in clinical trials. Methods In a randomised trial of early methotrexate-naïve RA (GO-BEFORE), RAMRIS scores were determined from MRIs and van der Heijde-Sharp (vdHS) scores from radiographs, at baseline, week 12, week 24 and week 52. Progression in damage scores was defined as change >0.5. Associations of X-ray and MRI outcomes with clinical features were evaluated for convergent validity. Iterative Wilcoxon rank sum tests and tests of proportion estimated the sample size required to detect differences between combination therapy (methotrexate+golimumab) and methotrexate-monotherapy arms in (A) change in damage score and (B) proportion of patients progressing. Results Patients with early MRI progression had higher DAS28, C reactive protein (CRP) and vdHS at baseline, and higher 2-year HAQ. Associations were similar to those with 1-year vdHS progression. Differences in change in structural damage between treatment arms achieved significance with fewer subjects when 12-week or 24-week MRI erosion score was the outcome (150 patients; 100 among an enriched sample with baseline-synovitis >5) compared with the 52-week vdHS (275 patients). Differences in the proportion progressing could be detected in 234 total subjects with 12-week MRI in an enriched sample whereas 1-year X-ray required between 468 and 1160 subjects. Conclusions Early MRI erosion progression is a valid measure of structural damage that could substantially decrease sample size and study duration if used as structural damage end point in RA clinical trials. PMID:26091907

  16. Longitudinal Alterations to Brain Function, Structure, and Cognitive Performance in Healthy Older Adults: a fMRI-DTI study

    PubMed Central

    Hakun, Jonathan G.; Zhu, Zude; Brown, Christopher A.; Johnson, Nathan F.; Gold, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional research has shown that older adults tend to have different frontal cortex activation patterns, poorer brain structure, and lower task performance than younger adults. However, relationships between longitudinal changes in brain function, brain structure, and cognitive performance in older adults are less well understood. Here we present the results of a longitudinal, combined fMRI-DTI study in cognitive normal (CN) older adults. A two time-point study was conducted in which participants completed a task switching paradigm while fMRI data was collected and underwent the identical scanning protocol an average of 3.3 years later (SD = 2 months). We observed longitudinal fMRI activation increases in bilateral regions of lateral frontal cortex at time point 2. These fMRI activation increases were associated with longitudinal declines in WM microstructure in a portion of the corpus callosum connecting the increasingly recruited frontal regions. In addition, the fMRI activation increase in the left VLPFC was associated with longitudinal increases in response latencies. Taken together, our results suggest that local frontal activation increases in CN older adults may in part reflect a response to reduced inter-hemispheric signaling mechanisms. PMID:25862416

  17. Effect of Cocaine on Structural Changes in Brain: MRI Volumetry using Tensor-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Ponnada A.; Datta, Sushmita; Tao, Guozhi; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in cocaine dependent subjects to determine the structural changes in brain compared to non-drug using controls. Cocaine dependent subjects and controls were carefully screened to rule out brain pathology of undetermined origin. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed using tensor-based morphometry (TBM) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) without and with modulation to adjust for volume changes during normalization. For TBM analysis, unbiased atlases were generated using two different inverse consistent and diffeomorphic nonlinear registration techniques. Two different control groups were used for generating unbiased atlases. Independent of the nonlinear registration technique and normal cohorts used for creating the unbiased atlases, our analysis failed to detect any statistically significant effect of cocaine on brain volumes. These results show that cocaine dependent subjects do not show differences in regional brain volumes compared to non-drug using controls. PMID:20570057

  18. DISC1 gene and affective psychopathology: a combined structural and functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Opmeer, Esther M; van Tol, Marie-José; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J A; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A; Penninx, Brenda W; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2015-02-01

    The gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been indicated as a determinant of psychopathology, including affective disorders, and shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus functioning, regions of major interest for affective disorders. We aimed to investigate whether DISC1 differentially modulates brain function during executive and memory processing, and morphology in regions relevant for depression and anxiety disorders (affective disorders). 128 participants, with (n = 103) and without (controls; n = 25) affective disorders underwent genotyping for Ser704Cys (with Cys-allele considered as risk-allele) and structural and functional (f) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) during visuospatial planning and emotional episodic memory tasks. For both voxel-based morphometry and fMRI analyses, we investigated the effect of genotype in controls and explored genotypeXdiagnosis interactions. Results are reported at p < 0.05 FWE small volume corrected. In controls, Cys-carriers showed smaller bilateral (para)hippocampal volumes compared with Ser-homozygotes, and lower activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral PFC during visuospatial planning. In anxiety patients, Cys-carriers showed larger (para)hippocampal volumes and more ACC activation during visuospatial planning. In depressive patients, no effect of genotype was observed and overall, no effect of genotype on episodic memory processing was detected. We demonstrated that Ser704Cys-genotype influences (para)hippocampal structure and functioning the dorsal PFC during executive planning, most prominently in unaffected controls. Results suggest that presence of psychopathology moderates Ser704Cys effects. PMID:25533973

  19. Advances in functional and structural imaging of the human lung using proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Miller, G Wilson; Mugler, John P; Sá, Rui C; Altes, Talissa A; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2014-12-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measurement. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demonstrate potential for accurate and meaningful measurements of lung function, this technique was used to study gravitational gradients of ventilation, perfusion, and ventilation-perfusion ratio in healthy subjects, yielding quantitative results consistent with expected regional variations. Such techniques can also be applied in the time domain, providing new tools for studying temporal dynamics of lung function. Temporal ASL measurements showed increased spatial-temporal heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow in healthy subjects exposed to hypoxia, suggesting sensitivity to active control mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and illustrating that to fully examine the factors that govern lung function it is necessary to consider temporal as well as spatial variability. Further development to increase spatial coverage and improve robustness would enhance the clinical applicability of these new functional imaging tools. In the realm of structural imaging, pulse sequence techniques such as ultrashort echo-time radial k-space acquisition, ultrafast steady-state free precession, and imaging-based diaphragm triggering can be combined to overcome the significant challenges associated with proton MRI in the lung, enabling high-quality three-dimensional imaging of the whole lung in a clinically reasonable scan time. Images of healthy and cystic fibrosis subjects using these techniques demonstrate substantial promise for non-contrast pulmonary angiography and detailed

  20. Structural MRI correlates of cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis: A Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Preziosa, Paolo; Rocca, Maria A; Pagani, Elisabetta; Stromillo, Maria Laura; Enzinger, Christian; Gallo, Antonio; Hulst, Hanneke E; Atzori, Matteo; Pareto, Deborah; Riccitelli, Gianna C; Copetti, Massimiliano; De Stefano, Nicola; Fazekas, Franz; Bisecco, Alvino; Barkhof, Frederik; Yousry, Tarek A; Arévalo, Maria J; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    In a multicenter setting, we applied voxel-based methods to different structural MR imaging modalities to define the relative contributions of focal lesions, normal-appearing white matter (NAWM), and gray matter (GM) damage and their regional distribution to cognitive deficits as well as impairment of specific cognitive domains in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Approval of the institutional review boards was obtained, together with written informed consent from all participants. Standardized neuropsychological assessment and conventional, diffusion tensor and volumetric brain MRI sequences were collected from 61 relapsing-remitting MS patients and 61 healthy controls (HC) from seven centers. Patients with ≥2 abnormal tests were considered cognitively impaired (CI). The distribution of focal lesions, GM and WM atrophy, and microstructural WM damage were assessed using voxel-wise approaches. A random forest analysis identified the best imaging predictors of global cognitive impairment and deficits of specific cognitive domains. Twenty-three (38%) MS patients were CI. Compared with cognitively preserved (CP), CI MS patients had GM atrophy of the left thalamus, right hippocampus and parietal regions. They also showed atrophy of several WM tracts, mainly located in posterior brain regions and widespread WM diffusivity abnormalities. WM diffusivity abnormalities in cognitive-relevant WM tracts followed by atrophy of cognitive-relevant GM regions explained global cognitive impairment. Variable patterns of NAWM and GM damage were associated with deficits in selected cognitive domains. Structural, multiparametric, voxel-wise MRI approaches are feasible in a multicenter setting. The combination of different imaging modalities is needed to assess and monitor cognitive impairment in MS. PMID:26833969

  1. Thalamotemporal impairment in temporal lobe epilepsy: A combined MRI analysis of structure, integrity, and connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Simon S; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Traynor, Catherine; Towgood, Karren; Barker, Gareth J; Richardson, Mark P

    2014-01-01

    Objective Thalamic abnormality in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is well known from imaging studies, but evidence is lacking regarding connectivity profiles of the thalamus and their involvement in the disease process. We used a novel multisequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol to elucidate the relationship between mesial temporal and thalamic pathology in TLE. Methods For 23 patients with TLE and 23 healthy controls, we performed T1-weighted (for analysis of tissue structure), diffusion tensor imaging (tissue connectivity), and T1 and T2 relaxation (tissue integrity) MRI across the whole brain. We used connectivity-based segmentation to determine connectivity patterns of thalamus to ipsilateral cortical regions (occipital, parietal, prefrontal, postcentral, precentral, and temporal). We subsequently determined volumes, mean tractography streamlines, and mean T1 and T2 relaxometry values for each thalamic segment preferentially connecting to a given cortical region, and of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Results As expected, patients had significant volume reduction and increased T2 relaxation time in ipsilateral hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. There was bilateral volume loss, mean streamline reduction, and T2 increase of the thalamic segment preferentially connected to temporal lobe, corresponding to anterior, dorsomedial, and pulvinar thalamic regions, with no evidence of significant change in any other thalamic segments. Left and right thalamotemporal segment volume and T2 were significantly correlated with volume and T2 of ipsilateral (epileptogenic), but not contralateral (nonepileptogenic), mesial temporal structures. Significance These convergent and robust data indicate that thalamic abnormality in TLE is restricted to the area of the thalamus that is preferentially connected to the epileptogenic temporal lobe. The degree of thalamic pathology is related to the extent of mesial temporal lobe damage in TLE. PMID:24447099

  2. Structural and Functional MRI Differences in Master Sommeliers: A Pilot Study on Expertise in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Sreenivasan, Karthik R; Weintraub, David M; Baldock, Deanna; Noback, Michael; Pierce, Meghan E; Frasnelli, Johannes; James, Jay; Beall, Erik; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Cordes, Dietmar; Leger, Gabriel C

    2016-01-01

    Our experiences, even as adults, shape our brains. Regional differences have been found in experts, with the regions associated with their particular skill-set. Functional differences have also been noted in brain activation patterns in some experts. This study uses multimodal techniques to assess structural and functional patterns that differ between experts and non-experts. Sommeliers are experts in wine and thus in olfaction. We assessed differences in Master Sommeliers' brains, compared with controls, in structure and also in functional response to olfactory and visual judgment tasks. MRI data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry as well as automated parcellation to assess structural properties, and group differences between tasks were calculated. Results indicate enhanced volume in the right insula and entorhinal cortex, with the cortical thickness of the entorhinal correlating with experience. There were regional activation differences in a large area involving the right olfactory and memory regions, with heightened activation specifically for sommeliers during an olfactory task. Our results indicate that sommeliers' brains show specialization in the expected regions of the olfactory and memory networks, and also in regions important in integration of internal sensory stimuli and external cues. Overall, these differences suggest that specialized expertise and training might result in enhancements in the brain well into adulthood. This is particularly important given the regions involved, which are the first to be impacted by many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27597821

  3. Structural and Functional MRI Differences in Master Sommeliers: A Pilot Study on Expertise in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Sarah J.; Sreenivasan, Karthik R.; Weintraub, David M.; Baldock, Deanna; Noback, Michael; Pierce, Meghan E.; Frasnelli, Johannes; James, Jay; Beall, Erik; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Cordes, Dietmar; Leger, Gabriel C.

    2016-01-01

    Our experiences, even as adults, shape our brains. Regional differences have been found in experts, with the regions associated with their particular skill-set. Functional differences have also been noted in brain activation patterns in some experts. This study uses multimodal techniques to assess structural and functional patterns that differ between experts and non-experts. Sommeliers are experts in wine and thus in olfaction. We assessed differences in Master Sommeliers’ brains, compared with controls, in structure and also in functional response to olfactory and visual judgment tasks. MRI data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry as well as automated parcellation to assess structural properties, and group differences between tasks were calculated. Results indicate enhanced volume in the right insula and entorhinal cortex, with the cortical thickness of the entorhinal correlating with experience. There were regional activation differences in a large area involving the right olfactory and memory regions, with heightened activation specifically for sommeliers during an olfactory task. Our results indicate that sommeliers’ brains show specialization in the expected regions of the olfactory and memory networks, and also in regions important in integration of internal sensory stimuli and external cues. Overall, these differences suggest that specialized expertise and training might result in enhancements in the brain well into adulthood. This is particularly important given the regions involved, which are the first to be impacted by many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27597821

  4. Individualized and Clinically Derived Stimuli Activate Limbic Structures in Depression: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Henrik; Taubner, Svenja; Buchheim, Anna; Münte, Thomas F.; Stasch, Michael; Kächele, Horst; Roth, Gerhard; Heinecke, Armin; Erhard, Peter; Cierpka, Manfred; Wiswede, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In the search for neurobiological correlates of depression, a major finding is hyperactivity in limbic-paralimbic regions. However, results so far have been inconsistent, and the stimuli used are often unspecific to depression. This study explored hemodynamic responses of the brain in patients with depression while processing individualized and clinically derived stimuli. Methods Eighteen unmedicated patients with recurrent major depressive disorder and 17 never-depressed control subjects took part in standardized clinical interviews from which individualized formulations of core interpersonal dysfunction were derived. In the patient group such formulations reflected core themes relating to the onset and maintenance of depression. In controls, formulations reflected a major source of distress. This material was thereafter presented to subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) assessment. Results Increased hemodynamic responses in the anterior cingulate cortex, medial frontal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and occipital lobe were observed in both patients and controls when viewing individualized stimuli. Relative to control subjects, patients with depression showed increased hemodynamic responses in limbic-paralimbic and subcortical regions (e.g. amygdala and basal ganglia) but no signal decrease in prefrontal regions. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that individualized stimuli derived from standardized clinical interviewing can lead to hemodynamic responses in regions associated with self-referential and emotional processing in both groups and limbic-paralimbic and subcortical structures in individuals with depression. Although the regions with increased responses in patients have been previously reported, this study enhances the ecological value of fMRI findings by applying stimuli that are of personal relevance to each individual's depression. PMID:21283580

  5. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Goyal, Satnam; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, Namita; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N; Khushu, Subash

    2015-06-01

    Empathy deficit is a core feature of schizophrenia which may lead to social dysfunction. The present study was carried out to investigate functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 schizophrenia patients and 14 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and education were examined with structural highresolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during empathy task in the same session. The analysis was carried out using SPM8 software. On behavioural assessment, schizophrenic patients (83.00+-29.04) showed less scores for sadness compared to healthy controls (128.70+-22.26) (p less than 0.001). fMRI results also showed reduced clusters of activation in the bilateral fusiform gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left middle and inferior occipital gyrus in schizophrenic subjects as compared to controls during empathy task. In the same brain areas, VBM results also showed reduced grey and white matter volumes. The present study provides an evidence for an association between structural alterations and disturbed functional brain activation during empathy task in persons affected with schizophrenia. These findings suggest a biological basis for social cognition deficits in schizophrenics. PMID:25963262

  6. Identifying Individuals at High Risk of Psychosis: Predictive Utility of Support Vector Machine using Structural and Functional MRI Data.

    PubMed

    Valli, Isabel; Marquand, Andre F; Mechelli, Andrea; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Seal, Marc L; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The identification of individuals at high risk of developing psychosis is entirely based on clinical assessment, associated with limited predictive potential. There is, therefore, increasing interest in the development of biological markers that could be used in clinical practice for this purpose. We studied 25 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 25 healthy controls using structural MRI, and functional MRI in conjunction with a verbal memory task. Data were analyzed using a standard univariate analysis, and with support vector machine (SVM), a multivariate pattern recognition technique that enables statistical inferences to be made at the level of the individual, yielding results with high translational potential. The application of SVM to structural MRI data permitted the identification of individuals at high risk of psychosis with a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 76%, resulting in an accuracy of 72% (p < 0.001). Univariate volumetric between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. By contrast, the univariate fMRI analysis identified between-group differences (p < 0.05 corrected), while the application of SVM to the same data did not. Since SVM is well suited at identifying the pattern of abnormality that distinguishes two groups, whereas univariate methods are more likely to identify regions that individually are most different between two groups, our results suggest the presence of focal functional abnormalities in the context of a diffuse pattern of structural abnormalities in individuals at high clinical risk of psychosis. PMID:27092086

  7. Identifying Individuals at High Risk of Psychosis: Predictive Utility of Support Vector Machine using Structural and Functional MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Isabel; Marquand, Andre F.; Mechelli, Andrea; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Seal, Marc L.; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The identification of individuals at high risk of developing psychosis is entirely based on clinical assessment, associated with limited predictive potential. There is, therefore, increasing interest in the development of biological markers that could be used in clinical practice for this purpose. We studied 25 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 25 healthy controls using structural MRI, and functional MRI in conjunction with a verbal memory task. Data were analyzed using a standard univariate analysis, and with support vector machine (SVM), a multivariate pattern recognition technique that enables statistical inferences to be made at the level of the individual, yielding results with high translational potential. The application of SVM to structural MRI data permitted the identification of individuals at high risk of psychosis with a sensitivity of 68% and a specificity of 76%, resulting in an accuracy of 72% (p < 0.001). Univariate volumetric between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. By contrast, the univariate fMRI analysis identified between-group differences (p < 0.05 corrected), while the application of SVM to the same data did not. Since SVM is well suited at identifying the pattern of abnormality that distinguishes two groups, whereas univariate methods are more likely to identify regions that individually are most different between two groups, our results suggest the presence of focal functional abnormalities in the context of a diffuse pattern of structural abnormalities in individuals at high clinical risk of psychosis. PMID:27092086

  8. Construction of a neuroanatomical shape complex atlas from 3D MRI brain structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Rangarajan, Anand; Eisenschenk, Stephan J; Vemuri, Baba C

    2012-04-15

    Brain atlas construction has attracted significant attention lately in the neuroimaging community due to its application to the characterization of neuroanatomical shape abnormalities associated with various neurodegenerative diseases or neuropsychiatric disorders. Existing shape atlas construction techniques usually focus on the analysis of a single anatomical structure in which the important inter-structural information is lost. This paper proposes a novel technique for constructing a neuroanatomical shape complex atlas based on an information geometry framework. A shape complex is a collection of neighboring shapes - for example, the thalamus, amygdala and the hippocampus circuit - which may exhibit changes in shape across multiple structures during the progression of a disease. In this paper, we represent the boundaries of the entire shape complex using the zero level set of a distance transform function S(x). We then re-derive the relationship between the stationary state wave function ψ(x) of the Schrödinger equation [formula in text] and the eikonal equation [formula in text] satisfied by any distance function. This leads to a one-to-one map (up to scale) between ψ(x) and S(x) via an explicit relationship. We further exploit this relationship by mapping ψ(x) to a unit hypersphere whose Riemannian structure is fully known, thus effectively turn ψ(x) into the square-root of a probability density function. This allows us to make comparisons - using elegant, closed-form analytic expressions - between shape complexes represented as square-root densities. A shape complex atlas is constructed by computing the Karcher mean ψ¯(x) in the space of square-root densities and then inversely mapping it back to the space of distance transforms in order to realize the atlas shape. We demonstrate the shape complex atlas computation technique via a set of experiments on a population of brain MRI scans including controls and epilepsy patients with either right anterior

  9. Recent applications of UHF-MRI in the study of human brain function and structure: a review.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, Wietske; Schäfer, Andreas; Marques, José P; Turner, Robert; Trampel, Robert

    2016-09-01

    The increased availability of ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI has led to its application in a wide range of neuroimaging studies, which are showing promise in transforming fundamental approaches to human neuroscience. This review presents recent work on structural and functional brain imaging, at 7 T and higher field strengths. After a short outline of the effects of high field strength on MR images, the rapidly expanding literature on UHF applications of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-based functional MRI is reviewed. Structural imaging is then discussed, divided into sections on imaging weighted by relaxation time, including quantitative relaxation time mapping, phase imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping, angiography, diffusion-weighted imaging, and finally magnetization-transfer imaging. The final section discusses studies using the high spatial resolution available at UHF to identify explicit links between structure and function. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25762497

  10. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cunnington, Ross; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI) activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87%) than the voxel-based approach (65%), and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43–0.73) than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49). More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences. PMID:27487011

  11. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lee B; Cunnington, Ross; Boyd, Roslyn N; Rose, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI) activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87%) than the voxel-based approach (65%), and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43-0.73) than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49). More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences. PMID:27487011

  12. Thalamic involvement in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia: a combined structural and diffusion tensor MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Jung Bin; Suh, Sang-Il; Koh, Seong-Beom

    2015-04-01

    Alteration of basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit has been hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology underlying paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD). We investigated macrostructural and microstructural changes in PKD patients using structural and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses. Twenty-five patients with idiopathic PKD and 25 control subjects were prospectively studied on a 3T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Cortical thickness analysis was used to evaluate cortical gray matter (GM) changes, and automated volumetry and shape analysis were used to assess volume changes and shape deformation of the subcortical GM structures, respectively. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used to evaluate white matter integrity changes in a whole-brain manner, and region-of-interest (ROI) analysis of diffusion tensor metrics was performed in subcortical GM structures. Compared to controls, PKD patients exhibited a reduction in volume of bilateral thalami and regional shape deformation mainly localized to the anterior and medial aspects of bilateral thalami. TBSS revealed an increase in fractional anisotropy (FA) of bilateral thalami and right anterior thalamic radiation in patients relative to controls. ROI analysis also showed an increase in FA of bilateral thalami in patients compared to controls. We have shown evidence for thalamic abnormalities of volume reduction, regional shape deformation, and increased FA in patients with PKD. Our novel findings of concomitant macrostructural and microstructural abnormalities in the thalamus lend further support to previous observations indicating causal relationship between a preferential lesion in the thalamus and development of PKD, thus providing neuroanatomical basis for the involvement of thalamus within the basal ganglia-thalamocortical pathway in PKD. PMID:25504906

  13. Structural alterations in the rat brain and behavioral impairment after status epilepticus: An MRI study.

    PubMed

    Suleymanova, E M; Gulyaev, M V; Abbasova, K R

    2016-02-19

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common neurologic disorders often associated with behavioral impairments and cognitive deficit. Lithium-pilocarpine model of seizures in rodents reproduces many features of human convulsive status epilepticus (SE) and subsequent TLE. In this study, we have investigated changes in the rat brain after lithium-pilocarpine SE using a high-field MRI system for small animals in early and chronic periods after SE. We have studied the relationship between T2 relaxation time measured in these periods and the development of behavioral exploratory response to novelty and habituation in the open field test. A significant increase in T2 in the hippocampus and associated structures was found 2 days after SE and practically resolved by day seven, while an increase in T2 in the parietal and prefrontal cortex appeared 30 days after SE. High T2 values in the parietal cortex and thalamus on day two after SE were associated with an increased mortality risk. A substantial variability in T2 relaxation time was observed in the hippocampus and amygdala 30 days after SE. Rats survived after SE showed locomotor hyperactivity and disruption of long-term habituation in the open field test carried out 5 weeks after the seizures. Interestingly, T2 in the amygdala 30 days after SE had a strong correlation with hyperactivity in the novel open field. Therefore, the amygdala damage may be an important factor in the development of hyperactivity in the chronic period after SE. PMID:26674057

  14. Learning Effective Connectivity Network Structure from fMRI Data Based on Artificial Immune Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ji, Junzhong; Liu, Jinduo; Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Aidong

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches have been designed to extract brain effective connectivity from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. However, few of them can effectively identify the connectivity network structure due to different defects. In this paper, a new algorithm is developed to infer the effective connectivity between different brain regions by combining artificial immune algorithm (AIA) with the Bayes net method, named as AIAEC. In the proposed algorithm, a brain effective connectivity network is mapped onto an antibody, and four immune operators are employed to perform the optimization process of antibodies, including clonal selection operator, crossover operator, mutation operator and suppression operator, and finally gets an antibody with the highest K2 score as the solution. AIAEC is then tested on Smith's simulated datasets, and the effect of the different factors on AIAEC is evaluated, including the node number, session length, as well as the other potential confounding factors of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. It was revealed that, as contrast to other existing methods, AIAEC got the best performance on the majority of the datasets. It was also found that AIAEC could attain a relative better solution under the influence of many factors, although AIAEC was differently affected by the aforementioned factors. AIAEC is thus demonstrated to be an effective method for detecting the brain effective connectivity. PMID:27045295

  15. Multivariate classification of smokers and nonsmokers using SVM-RFE on structural MRI images.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Yang, Yihong; Stein, Elliot A; Ross, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies have revealed gray matter alterations in smokers, but this type of analysis has poor predictive value for individual cases, which limits its applicability in clinical diagnoses and treatment. A predictive model would essentially embody a complex biomarker that could be used to evaluate treatment efficacy. In this study, we applied VBM along with a multivariate classification method consisting of a support vector machine with recursive feature elimination to discriminate smokers from nonsmokers using their structural MRI data. Mean gray matter volumes in 1,024 cerebral cortical regions of interest created using a subparcellated version of the Automated Anatomical Labeling template were calculated from 60 smokers and 60 nonsmokers, and served as input features to the classification procedure. The classifier achieved the highest accuracy of 69.6% when taking the 139 highest ranked features via 10-fold cross-validation. Critically, these features were later validated on an independent testing set that consisted of 28 smokers and 28 nonsmokers, yielding a 64.04% accuracy level (binomial P = 0.01). Following classification, exploratory post hoc regression analyses were performed, which revealed that gray matter volumes in the putamen, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, caudate, thalamus, pre-/postcentral gyrus, precuneus, and the parahippocampal gyrus, were inversely related to smoking behavioral characteristics. These results not only indicate that smoking related gray matter alterations can provide predictive power for group membership, but also suggest that machine learning techniques can reveal underlying smoking-related neurobiology. PMID:26497657

  16. Learning Effective Connectivity Network Structure from fMRI Data Based on Artificial Immune Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Junzhong; Liu, Jinduo; Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Aidong

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches have been designed to extract brain effective connectivity from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. However, few of them can effectively identify the connectivity network structure due to different defects. In this paper, a new algorithm is developed to infer the effective connectivity between different brain regions by combining artificial immune algorithm (AIA) with the Bayes net method, named as AIAEC. In the proposed algorithm, a brain effective connectivity network is mapped onto an antibody, and four immune operators are employed to perform the optimization process of antibodies, including clonal selection operator, crossover operator, mutation operator and suppression operator, and finally gets an antibody with the highest K2 score as the solution. AIAEC is then tested on Smith’s simulated datasets, and the effect of the different factors on AIAEC is evaluated, including the node number, session length, as well as the other potential confounding factors of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. It was revealed that, as contrast to other existing methods, AIAEC got the best performance on the majority of the datasets. It was also found that AIAEC could attain a relative better solution under the influence of many factors, although AIAEC was differently affected by the aforementioned factors. AIAEC is thus demonstrated to be an effective method for detecting the brain effective connectivity. PMID:27045295

  17. Structural MRI Correlates of Episodic Memory Processes in Parkinson’s Disease Without Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pirogovsky-Turk, Eva; Filoteo, J. Vincent; Litvan, Irene; Harrington, Deborah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in episodic memory are common early in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and may be a risk factor for future cognitive decline. Although medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory and frontostriatal (FS) executive systems are thought to play different roles in distinct components of episodic memory impairment in PD, no study has investigated whether different aspects of memory functioning are differentially associated with MTL and FS volumes in nondemented patients without mild cognitive impairment (PD-woMCI). Objectives The present study investigated MRI markers of different facets of memory functioning in 48 PD-woMCI patients and 42 controls. Methods Regional volumes were measured in structures comprising the MTL and FS systems and then correlated with key indices of memory from the California Verbal Learning Test. Results In PD-woMCI patients, memory was impaired only for verbal learning, which was not associated with executive, attention/working memory, or visuospatial functioning. Despite an absence of cortical atrophy, smaller right MTL volumes in patients were associated with poorer verbal learning, long delayed free recall, long delayed cued recall, and recognition memory hits and false positives. Smaller right pars triangularis (inferior frontal) volumes were also associated with poorer long delayed cued recall and recognition memory hits. These relationships were not found in controls. Conclusions The findings indicate that MTL volumes are sensitive to subtle changes in almost all facets of memory in PD-woMCI, whereas FS volumes are sensitive only to memory performances in cued-testing formats. PMID:26577652

  18. How the brain processes different dimensions of argument structure complexity: Evidence from fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer-Asscher, Aya; Mack, Jennifer E.; Barbieri, Elena; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Verbs are central to sentence processing, as they encode argument structure (AS) information, i.e., information about the syntax and interpretation of the phrases accompanying them. The behavioral and neural correlates of AS processing have primarily been investigated in sentence-level tasks, requiring both verb processing and verb-argument integration. In the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated AS processing using a lexical decision task requiring only verb processing. We examined three aspects of AS complexity: number of thematic roles, number of thematic options, and mapping (non)canonicity (unaccusative vs. unergative and transitive verbs). Increased number of thematic roles elicited greater activation in the left posterior perisylvian regions claimed to support access to stored AS representations. However, the number of thematic options had no neural effects. Further, unaccusative verbs elicited longer response times and increased activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus, reflecting the processing cost of unaccusative verbs and, more generally, supporting the role of the IFG in noncanonical argument mapping. PMID:25658635

  19. The human hippocampus is not sexually-dimorphic: Meta-analysis of structural MRI volumes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Anh; Ma, Wenli; Vira, Amit; Marwha, Dhruv; Eliot, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is found in many psychiatric disorders that are more prevalent in women. Sex differences in memory and spatial skills further suggest that males and females differ in hippocampal structure and function. We conducted the first meta-analysis of male-female difference in hippocampal volume (HCV) based on published MRI studies of healthy participants of all ages, to test whether the structure is reliably sexually dimorphic. Using four search strategies, we collected 68 matched samples of males' and females' uncorrected HCVs (in 4418 total participants), and 36 samples of male and female HCVs (2183 participants) that were corrected for individual differences in total brain volume (TBV) or intracranial volume (ICV). Pooled effect sizes were calculated using a random-effects model for left, right, and bilateral uncorrected HCVs and for left and right HCVs corrected for TBV or ICV. We found that uncorrected HCV was reliably larger in males, with Hedges' g values of 0.545 for left hippocampus, 0.526 for right hippocampus, and 0.557 for bilateral hippocampus. Meta-regression revealed no effect of age on the sex difference in left, right, or bilateral HCV. In the subset of studies that reported it, both TBV (g=1.085) and ICV (g=1.272) were considerably larger in males. Accordingly, studies reporting HCVs corrected for individual differences in TBV or ICV revealed no significant sex differences in left and right HCVs (Hedges' g ranging from +0.011 to -0.206). In summary, we found that human males of all ages exhibit a larger HCV than females, but adjusting for individual differences in TBV or ICV results in no reliable sex difference. The frequent claim that women have a disproportionately larger hippocampus than men was not supported. PMID:26334947

  20. Adaptive Modulation of Adult Brain Gray and White Matter to High Altitude: Structural MRI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Jinqiang; Chen, Ji; Han, Qiaoqing; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate brain structural alterations in adult immigrants who adapted to high altitude (HA). Voxel-based morphometry analysis of gray matter (GM) volumes, surface-based analysis of cortical thickness, and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analysis of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) based on MRI images were conducted on 16 adults (20–22 years) who immigrated to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300–4400 m) for 2 years. They had no chronic mountain sickness. Control group consisted of 16 matched sea level subjects. A battery of neuropsychological tests was also conducted. HA immigrants showed significantly decreased GM volumes in the right postcentral gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus, and increased GM volumes in the right middle frontal gyrus, right parahippocampal gyrus, right inferior and middle temporal gyri, bilateral inferior ventral pons, and right cerebellum crus1. While there was some divergence in the left hemisphere, surface-based patterns of GM changes in the right hemisphere resembled those seen for VBM analysis. FA changes were observed in multiple WM tracts. HA immigrants showed significant impairment in pulmonary function, increase in reaction time, and deficit in mental rotation. Parahippocampal and middle frontal GM volumes correlated with vital capacity. Superior frontal GM volume correlated with mental rotation and postcentral GM correlated with reaction time. Paracentral lobule and frontal FA correlated with mental rotation reaction time. There might be structural modifications occurred in the adult immigrants during adaptation to HA. The changes in GM may be related to impaired respiratory function and psychological deficits. PMID:23874692

  1. Clinical prediction from structural brain MRI scans: a large-scale empirical study.

    PubMed

    Sabuncu, Mert R; Konukoglu, Ender

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) methods have become an important tool in neuroimaging, revealing complex associations and yielding powerful prediction models. Despite methodological developments and novel application domains, there has been little effort to compile benchmark results that researchers can reference and compare against. This study takes a significant step in this direction. We employed three classes of state-of-the-art MVPA algorithms and common types of structural measurements from brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans to predict an array of clinically relevant variables (diagnosis of Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, autism, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder; age, cerebrospinal fluid derived amyloid-β levels and mini-mental state exam score). We analyzed data from over 2,800 subjects, compiled from six publicly available datasets. The employed data and computational tools are freely distributed ( https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/mripredict), making this the largest, most comprehensive, reproducible benchmark image-based prediction experiment to date in structural neuroimaging. Finally, we make several observations regarding the factors that influence prediction performance and point to future research directions. Unsurprisingly, our results suggest that the biological footprint (effect size) has a dramatic influence on prediction performance. Though the choice of image measurement and MVPA algorithm can impact the result, there was no universally optimal selection. Intriguingly, the choice of algorithm seemed to be less critical than the choice of measurement type. Finally, our results showed that cross-validation estimates of performance, while generally optimistic, correlate well with generalization accuracy on a new dataset. PMID:25048627

  2. Effects of Non-Local Diffusion on Structural MRI Preprocessing and Default Network Mapping: Statistical Comparisons with Isotropic/Anisotropic Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xi-Nian; Xing, Xiu-Xia

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging community usually employs spatial smoothing to denoise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, e.g., Gaussian smoothing kernels. Such an isotropic diffusion (ISD) based smoothing is widely adopted for denoising purpose due to its easy implementation and efficient computation. Beyond these advantages, Gaussian smoothing kernels tend to blur the edges, curvature and texture of images. Researchers have proposed anisotropic diffusion (ASD) and non-local diffusion (NLD) kernels. We recently demonstrated the effect of these new filtering paradigms on preprocessing real degraded MRI images from three individual subjects. Here, to further systematically investigate the effects at a group level, we collected both structural and functional MRI data from 23 participants. We first evaluated the three smoothing strategies' impact on brain extraction, segmentation and registration. Finally, we investigated how they affect subsequent mapping of default network based on resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) data. Our findings suggest that NLD-based spatial smoothing maybe more effective and reliable at improving the quality of both MRI data preprocessing and default network mapping. We thus recommend NLD may become a promising method of smoothing structural MRI images of R-fMRI pipeline. PMID:22066005

  3. Effect of Psychostimulants on Brain Structure and Function in ADHD: A Qualitative Literature Review of MRI-Based Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Brown, Ariel; Seidman, Larry J.; Valera, Eve M.; Makris, Nikos; Lomedico, Alexandra; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of therapeutic oral doses of stimulants on the brains of ADHD subjects as measured by MRI-based neuroimaging studies (morphometric, functional, spectroscopy). Data Sources We searched PubMed and ScienceDirect through the end of calendar year 2011 using the keywords: 1) “psychostimulants” or “methylphenidate” or “amphetamine”, and 2) “neuroimaging” or “MRI” or “fMRI”, and 3) “ADHD” or “ADD” or “Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder” or “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder”. Study Selection We included only English language articles with new data that were case or placebo-controlled and examined ADHD subjects on and off psychostimulants (as well as 5 relevant review papers). Data Extraction We combined details of study design and medication effects in each imaging modality. Results We found 29 published studies that met our criteria. These included 6 structural MRI, 20 functional MRI studies and 3 spectroscopy studies. Methods varied widely in terms of design, analytic technique, and regions of the brain investigated. Despite heterogeneity in methods, however, results were consistent. With only a few exceptions, the data on the effect of therapeutic oral doses of stimulant medication suggest attenuation of structural and functional alterations found in unmedicated ADHD subjects relative to findings in Controls. Conclusions Despite the inherent limitations and heterogeneity of the extant MRI literature, our review suggests that therapeutic oral doses of stimulants decrease alterations in brain structure and function in subjects with ADHD relative to unmedicated subjects and Controls. These medication-associated brain effects parallel, and may underlie, the well-established clinical benefits. PMID:24107764

  4. Brain Correlates of Self-Evaluation Deficits in Schizophrenia: A Combined Functional and Structural MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shuping; Zhao, Yanli; Fan, Fengmei; Zou, Yizhuang; Jin, Zhen; Zen, Yawei; Zhu, Xiaolin; Yang, Fude; Tan, Yunlong; Zhou, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation plays an important role in adaptive functioning and is a process that is typically impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Underlying neural mechanisms for this dysfunction may be associated with manifested psychosis. However, the brain substrates underlying this deficit are not well known. The present study used brain blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and gray matter voxel-based morphometry to explore the functional and structural brain correlates of self-evaluation deficits in schizophrenia. Eighteen patients with schizophrenia and 17 healthy controls were recruited and asked to judge whether a set of personality-trait adjectives were appropriate for describing themselves, a familiar other, or whether the adjectives were of positive or negative valence. Patients had slower response times for negative trait attributions than controls did; responses to positive trait attributions were faster than those for negative traits among the patient group, while no differences were observed in the control group. Control subjects showed greater activation within the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) than the patient group during the self-evaluation > semantic positivity-evaluation contrast. Patients showed greater activation mainly within the posterior cingulate gyrus (PCC) as compared to controls for the other-evaluation > semantic positivity-evaluation contrast. Furthermore, gray matter volume was reduced in the MPFC, temporal lobe, cuneus, and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) among the patient group when compared to controls. The present study adds to previous findings regarding self- and other-referential processing in schizophrenia, providing support for neurobiological models of self-reflection impairment. PMID:26406464

  5. Brain Correlates of Self-Evaluation Deficits in Schizophrenia: A Combined Functional and Structural MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fengmei; Zou, Yizhuang; Jin, Zhen; Zen, Yawei; Zhu, Xiaolin; Yang, Fude; Tan, Yunlong; Zhou, Dongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation plays an important role in adaptive functioning and is a process that is typically impaired in patients with schizophrenia. Underlying neural mechanisms for this dysfunction may be associated with manifested psychosis. However, the brain substrates underlying this deficit are not well known. The present study used brain blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and gray matter voxel-based morphometry to explore the functional and structural brain correlates of self-evaluation deficits in schizophrenia. Eighteen patients with schizophrenia and 17 healthy controls were recruited and asked to judge whether a set of personality-trait adjectives were appropriate for describing themselves, a familiar other, or whether the adjectives were of positive or negative valence. Patients had slower response times for negative trait attributions than controls did; responses to positive trait attributions were faster than those for negative traits among the patient group, while no differences were observed in the control group. Control subjects showed greater activation within the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) than the patient group during the self-evaluation > semantic positivity-evaluation contrast. Patients showed greater activation mainly within the posterior cingulate gyrus (PCC) as compared to controls for the other-evaluation > semantic positivity-evaluation contrast. Furthermore, gray matter volume was reduced in the MPFC, temporal lobe, cuneus, and the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) among the patient group when compared to controls. The present study adds to previous findings regarding self- and other-referential processing in schizophrenia, providing support for neurobiological models of self-reflection impairment. PMID:26406464

  6. Prediction of Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Disease Using MRI and Structural Network Features.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rizhen; Li, Chuhan; Fogelson, Noa; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Optimized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and abnormalities of brain network architectures may allow earlier detection and accurate prediction of the progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we proposed a classification framework to distinguish MCI converters (MCIc) from MCI non-converters (MCInc) by using a combination of FreeSurfer-derived MRI features and nodal features derived from the thickness network. At the feature selection step, we first employed sparse linear regression with stability selection, for the selection of discriminative features in the iterative combinations of MRI and network measures. Subsequently the top K features of available combinations were selected as optimal features for classification. To obtain unbiased results, support vector machine (SVM) classifiers with nested cross validation were used for classification. The combination of 10 features including those from MRI and network measures attained accuracies of 66.04, 76.39, 74.66, and 73.91% for mixed conversion time, 6, 12, and 18 months before diagnosis of probable AD, respectively. Analysis of the diagnostic power of different time periods before diagnosis of probable AD showed that short-term prediction (6 and 12 months) achieved more stable and higher AUC scores compared with long-term prediction (18 months), with K-values from 1 to 30. The present results suggest that meaningful predictors composed of MRI and network measures may offer the possibility for early detection of progression from MCI to AD. PMID:27148045

  7. Prediction of Conversion from Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Disease Using MRI and Structural Network Features

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rizhen; Li, Chuhan; Fogelson, Noa; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Optimized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and abnormalities of brain network architectures may allow earlier detection and accurate prediction of the progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we proposed a classification framework to distinguish MCI converters (MCIc) from MCI non-converters (MCInc) by using a combination of FreeSurfer-derived MRI features and nodal features derived from the thickness network. At the feature selection step, we first employed sparse linear regression with stability selection, for the selection of discriminative features in the iterative combinations of MRI and network measures. Subsequently the top K features of available combinations were selected as optimal features for classification. To obtain unbiased results, support vector machine (SVM) classifiers with nested cross validation were used for classification. The combination of 10 features including those from MRI and network measures attained accuracies of 66.04, 76.39, 74.66, and 73.91% for mixed conversion time, 6, 12, and 18 months before diagnosis of probable AD, respectively. Analysis of the diagnostic power of different time periods before diagnosis of probable AD showed that short-term prediction (6 and 12 months) achieved more stable and higher AUC scores compared with long-term prediction (18 months), with K-values from 1 to 30. The present results suggest that meaningful predictors composed of MRI and network measures may offer the possibility for early detection of progression from MCI to AD. PMID:27148045

  8. Tissue segmentation: a crucial tool for quantitative MRI and visualization of anatomical structures.

    PubMed

    Schick, Fritz

    2016-04-01

    Automatic or semi-automatic segmentation of tissue types or organs is well established for X-ray-based computed tomography, with its fixed grey-scale and tissue classes with well-established ranges of Hounsfield units. MRI is much more powerful with regard to soft tissue contrast and quantitative assessment of tissue properties (e.g., perfusion, diffusion, fat content), but the principle of signal generation and recording in MRI leads to inherent problems if simple threshold based segmentation procedures are applied. In this editorial in the special issue of MAGMA on tissue segmentation, a number of relevant methodical, scientific, and clinical aspects of reliable tissue segmentation using data recording by MRI are reported and discussed. PMID:27052370

  9. A Comparison of Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms and Feature Vectors for MS Lesion Segmentation Using Multimodal Structural MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Elizabeth M.; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Reich, Daniel S.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Shinohara, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning is a popular method for mining and analyzing large collections of medical data. We focus on a particular problem from medical research, supervised multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion segmentation in structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We examine the extent to which the choice of machine learning or classification algorithm and feature extraction function impacts the performance of lesion segmentation methods. As quantitative measures derived from structural MRI are important clinical tools for research into the pathophysiology and natural history of MS, the development of automated lesion segmentation methods is an active research field. Yet, little is known about what drives performance of these methods. We evaluate the performance of automated MS lesion segmentation methods, which consist of a supervised classification algorithm composed with a feature extraction function. These feature extraction functions act on the observed T1-weighted (T1-w), T2-weighted (T2-w) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI voxel intensities. Each MRI study has a manual lesion segmentation that we use to train and validate the supervised classification algorithms. Our main finding is that the differences in predictive performance are due more to differences in the feature vectors, rather than the machine learning or classification algorithms. Features that incorporate information from neighboring voxels in the brain were found to increase performance substantially. For lesion segmentation, we conclude that it is better to use simple, interpretable, and fast algorithms, such as logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis, and quadratic discriminant analysis, and to develop the features to improve performance. PMID:24781953

  10. Validity of semi-quantitative scale for brain MRI in unilateral cerebral palsy due to periventricular white matter lesions: Relationship with hand sensorimotor function and structural connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Pannek, Kerstin; Ware, Robert S.; Rossi, Giuseppe; Klingels, Katrijn; Feys, Hilde; Coulthard, Alan; Cioni, Giovanni; Rose, Stephen; Boyd, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To provide first evidence of construct validity of a semi-quantitative scale for brain structural MRI (sqMRI scale) in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) secondary to periventricular white matter (PWM) lesions, by examining the relationship with hand sensorimotor function and whole brain structural connectivity. Methods Cross-sectional study of 50 children with UCP due to PWM lesions using 3 T (MRI), diffusion MRI and assessment of hand sensorimotor function. We explored the relationship of lobar, hemispheric and global scores on the sqMRI scale, with fractional anisotropy (FA), as a measure of brain white matter microstructure, and with hand sensorimotor measures (Assisting Hand Assessment, AHA; Jebsen–Taylor Test for Hand Function, JTTHF; Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function, MUUL; stereognosis; 2-point discrimination). Results Lobar and hemispheric scores on the sqMRI scale contralateral to the clinical side of hemiplegia correlated with sensorimotor paretic hand function measures and FA of a number of brain structural connections, including connections of brain areas involved in motor control (postcentral, precentral and paracentral gyri in the parietal lobe). More severe lesions correlated with lower sensorimotor performance, with the posterior limb of internal capsule score being the strongest contributor to impaired hand function. Conclusion The sqMRI scale demonstrates first evidence of construct validity against impaired motor and sensory function measures and brain structural connectivity in a cohort of children with UCP due to PWM lesions. More severe lesions correlated with poorer paretic hand sensorimotor function and impaired structural connectivity in the hemisphere contralateral to the clinical side of hemiplegia. The quantitative structural MRI scoring may be a useful clinical tool for studying brain structure–function relationships but requires further validation in other populations of CP. PMID:26106533

  11. Using fMRI non-local means denoising to uncover activation in sub-cortical structures at 1.5 T for guided HARDI tractography

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Michaël; Chamberland, Maxime; Houde, Jean-Christophe; Descoteaux, Maxime; Whittingstall, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been ever-increasing interest in combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) for better understanding the link between cortical activity and connectivity, respectively. However, it is challenging to detect and validate fMRI activity in key sub-cortical areas such as the thalamus, given that they are prone to susceptibility artifacts due to the partial volume effects (PVE) of surrounding tissues (GM/WM interface). This is especially true on relatively low-field clinical MR systems (e.g., 1.5 T). We propose to overcome this limitation by using a spatial denoising technique used in structural MRI and more recently in diffusion MRI called non-local means (NLM) denoising, which uses a patch-based approach to suppress the noise locally. To test this, we measured fMRI in 20 healthy subjects performing three block-based tasks : eyes-open closed (EOC) and left/right finger tapping (FTL, FTR). Overall, we found that NLM yielded more thalamic activity compared to traditional denoising methods. In order to validate our pipeline, we also investigated known structural connectivity going through the thalamus using HARDI tractography: the optic radiations, related to the EOC task, and the cortico-spinal tract (CST) for FTL and FTR. To do so, we reconstructed the tracts using functionally based thalamic and cortical ROIs to initiates seeds of tractography in a two-level coarse-to-fine fashion. We applied this method at the single subject level, which allowed us to see the structural connections underlying fMRI thalamic activity. In summary, we propose a new fMRI processing pipeline which uses a recent spatial denoising technique (NLM) to successfully detect sub-cortical activity which was validated using an advanced dMRI seeding strategy in single subjects at 1.5 T. PMID:25309391

  12. Multimodal visualization of 3D enhanced MRI and CT of acoustic schwannoma and related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    According to the necessity of supporting vestibular schwannoma surgery, there is a demand to develop a convenient method of medical data visualization. The process of making choice of optimal operating access way has been uncomfortable for a surgeon so far, because there has been a necessity of analyzing two independent 3D images series (CT -bone tissues visible, MRI - soft tissues visible) in the region of ponto-cerebellar angle tumors. The authors propose a solution that will improve this process. The system used is equipped with stereoscopic helmet mounted display. It allows merged CT and MRI data representing tissues in the region of of ponto-cerebellar angle to be visualized in stereoscopic way. The process of data preparation for visualization includes: -automated segmentation algorithms, -different types of 3D images (CT, MRI) fusion. The authors focused on the development of novel algorithms for segmentation of vestibular schwannoma. It is important and difficult task due to different types of tumors and their inhomogeneous character dependent on growth models. The authors propose algorithms based on histogram spectrum and multimodal character of MRI imaging (T1 and T2 modes). However due to a variety of objects the library of algorithms with specific modifications matching to selected types of images is proposed. The applicability and functionality of the algorithms and library was proved on the series of data delivered by Warsaw Central Medical University Hospital.

  13. Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling of Resting-state fMRI: applicability of group models to individual subjects

    PubMed Central

    James, G. Andrew; Kelley, Mary E.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Holtzheimer, Paul E.; Dunlop, Boadie; Nemeroff, Charles; Mayberg, Helen S.; Hu, Xiaoping P.

    2009-01-01

    The extension of group-level connectivity methods to individual subjects remains a hurdle for statistical analyses of neuroimaging data. Previous group analyses of positron emission tomography data in clinically depressed patients, for example, have shown that resting-state connectivity prior to therapy predicts how patients eventually respond to pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Such applications would be considerably more informative for clinical decision making if these connectivity methods could be extended into the individual subject domain. To test such an extension, 46 treatment-naïve depressed patients were enrolled in an fMRI study to model baseline resting-state functional connectivity. Resting-state fMRI scans were acquired and submitted to exploratory structural equation modeling (SEM) to derive the optimal group connectivity model. Jackknife and split sample tests confirm that group model was highly reproducible, and path weights were consistent across the best five group models. When this model was applied to data from individual subjects, 85% of patients fit the group model. Histogram analysis of individual subjects’ paths indicate that some paths are better representative of group membership. These results suggest that exploratory SEM is a viable technique for neuroimaging connectivity analyses of individual subjects’ resting-state fMRI data. PMID:19162206

  14. Combining EEG Microstates with fMRI Structural Features for Modeling Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulos, Kostas; Bourbakis, Nikolaos

    2015-12-01

    Combining information from Electroencephalography (EEG) and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has been a topic of increased interest recently. The main advantage of the EEG is its high temporal resolution, in the scale of milliseconds, while the main advantage of fMRI is the detection of functional activity with good spatial resolution. The advantages of each modality seem to complement each other, providing better insight in the neuronal activity of the brain. The main goal of combining information from both modalities is to increase the spatial and the temporal localization of the underlying neuronal activity captured by each modality. This paper presents a novel technique based on the combination of these two modalities (EEG, fMRI) that allow a better representation and understanding of brain activities in time. EEG is modeled as a sequence of topographies, based on the notion of microstates. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) were used to model the temporal evolution of the topography of the average Event Related Potential (ERP). For each model the Fisher score of the sequence is calculated by taking the gradient of the trained model parameters. The Fisher score describes how this sequence deviates from the learned HMM. Canonical Partial Least Squares (CPLS) were used to decompose the two datasets and fuse the EEG and fMRI features. In order to test the effectiveness of this method, the results of this methodology were compared with the results of CPLS using the average ERP signal of a single channel. The presented methodology was able to derive components that co-vary between EEG and fMRI and present significant differences between the two tasks. PMID:26584584

  15. A survey of current trends in diffusion MRI for structural brain connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aurobrata; Deriche, Rachid

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) and we present current trends in modelling the brain's tissue microstructure and the human connectome. dMRI is today the only tool that can probe the brain's axonal architecture in vivo and non-invasively, and has grown in leaps and bounds in the last two decades since its conception. A plethora of models with increasing complexity and better accuracy have been proposed to characterise the integrity of the cerebral tissue, to understand its microstructure and to infer its connectivity. Here, we discuss a wide range of the most popular, important and well-established local microstructure models and biomarkers that have been proposed from these models. Finally, we briefly present the state of the art in tractography techniques that allow us to understand the architecture of the brain's connectivity.

  16. The Collagen Fibril Structure in the Superficial Zone of Articular Cartilage by μMRI

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, ShaoKuan; Xia, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the fibril architecture of the collage matrix in the superficial zone of articular cartilage non-destructively by microscopic MRIMRI) T2 anisotropy. Method Six specimens of canine humeral cartilage were rotated in such a way that the normal axis of the articular surface of the cartilage specimen remained stationary and perpendicular to the static magnetic field, over a range of 180° and at a step of 15°. At each rotation angle, a quantitative T2 image was constructed at 13μm pixel resolution. Results A set of complex and depth-dependent patterns was found in the μMRI T2 anisotropy along the depth of the tissue. In the superficial zone, the T2 anisotropy is clearly periodic, which demonstrates that the distribution of the collagen fibrils in the superficial zone is not random. In the transitional zone, the periodicity of the T2 anisotropy approximately doubles with respect to that in the superficial zone. In the initial part of the radial zone, the T2 anisotropy is also periodic but inverse to that in the superficial zone. In the deep part of the radial zone, the T2 anisotropy becomes increasingly weaker and eventually disappears. Conclusion There exists a certain degree of collagen anisotropy in all zones of articular cartilage. The anisotropic imaging data can be interpreted with the aid of a collagen architecture model. PMID:19527808

  17. Time-variant fMRI activity in the brainstem and higher structures in response to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Napadow, Vitaly; Dhond, Rupali; Park, Kyungmo; Kim, Jieun; Makris, Nikos; Kwong, Kenneth K; Harris, Richard E; Purdon, Patrick L; Kettner, Norman; Hui, Kathleen K S

    2009-08-01

    Acupuncture modulation of activity in the human brainstem is not well known. This structure is plagued by physiological artifact in neuroimaging experiments. In addition, most studies have used short (<15 min) block designs, which miss delayed responses following longer duration stimulation. We used brainstem-focused cardiac-gated fMRI and evaluated time-variant brain response to longer duration (>30 min) stimulation with verum (VA, electro-stimulation at acupoint ST-36) or sham point (SPA, non-acupoint electro-stimulation) acupuncture. Our results provide evidence that acupuncture modulates brainstem nuclei important to endogenous monoaminergic and opioidergic systems. Specifically, VA modulated activity in the substantia nigra (SN), nucleus raphe magnus, locus ceruleus, nucleus cuneiformis, and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Activation in the ventrolateral PAG was greater for VA compared to SPA. Linearly decreasing time-variant activation, suggesting classical habituation, was found in response to both VA and SPA in sensorimotor (SII, posterior insula, premotor cortex) brain regions. However, VA also produced linearly time-variant activity in limbic regions (amygdala, hippocampus, and SN), which was bimodal and not likely habituation--consisting of activation in early blocks, and deactivation by the end of the run. Thus, acupuncture induces different brain response early, compared to 20-30 min after stimulation. We attribute the fMRI differences between VA and SPA to more varied and stronger psychophysical response induced by VA. Our study demonstrates that acupuncture modulation of brainstem structures can be studied non-invasively in humans, allowing for comparison to animal studies. Our protocol also demonstrates a fMRI approach to study habituation and other time-variant phenomena over longer time durations. PMID:19345268

  18. Gray Matter Alterations in Schizophrenia High-Risk Youth and Early-Onset Schizophrenia: A Review of Structural MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Benjamin K.; Thermenos, Heidi W.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Seidman, Larry J.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on structural MRI findings in pediatric and young adult populations at clinical or genetic high-risk for schizophrenia, as well as in early-onset schizophrenia. The authors discuss the implications of this research for understanding the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and for early intervention strategies for prevention of the illness. The evidence linking brain structural changes in pre-psychosis development and early-onset schizophrenia with disruptions of normal neurodevelopmental processes during childhood and/or adolescence are described. In addition, the authors outline future directions for research to address current knowledge gaps regarding the neurobiological basis of brain structural abnormalities in schizophrenia and to help improve the utility of these abnormalities for preventative interventions. PMID:24012081

  19. The Lumbar Spine as a Dynamic Structure Depicted in Upright MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kubosch, David; Vicari, Marco; Siller, Alexander; Strohm, Peter C.; Kubosch, Eva J.; Knöller, Stefan; Hennig, Jürgen; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Izadpanah, Kaywan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinal canal stenosis is a dynamic phenomenon that becomes apparent during spinal loading. Current diagnostic procedures have considerable short comings in diagnosing the disease to full extend, as they are performed in supine situation. Upright MRI imaging might overcome this diagnostic gap. This study investigated the lumbar neuroforamenal diameter, spinal canal diameter, vertebral body translation, and vertebral body angles in 3 different body positions using upright MRI imaging. Fifteen subjects were enrolled in this study. A dynamic MRI in 3 different body positions (at 0° supine, 80° upright, and 80° upright + hyperlordosis posture) was taken using a 0.25 T open-configuration scanner equipped with a rotatable examination bed allowing a true standing MRI. The mean diameter of the neuroforamen at L5/S1 in 0° position was 8.4 mm on the right and 8.8 mm on the left, in 80° position 7.3 mm on the right and 7.2 mm on the left, and in 80° position with hyperlordosis 6.6 mm (P < 0.05) on the right and 6.1 mm on the left (P < 0.001). The mean area of the neuroforamen at L5/S1 in 0° position was 103.5 mm2 on the right and 105.0 mm2 on the left, in 80° position 92.5 mm2 on the right and 94.8 mm2 on the left, and in 80° position with hyperlordosis 81.9 mm2 on the right and 90.2 mm2 on the left. The mean volume of the spinal canal at the L5/S1 level in 0° position was 9770 mm3, in 80° position 10600 mm3, and in 80° position with hyperlordosis 9414 mm3. The mean intervertebral translation at level L5/S1 was 8.3 mm in 0° position, 9.9 mm in 80° position, and 10.1 mm in the 80° position with hyperlordosis. The lordosis angle at level L5/S1 was 49.4° in 0° position, 55.8° in 80° position, and 64.7 mm in the 80° position with hyperlordosis. Spinal canal stenosis is subject to a dynamic process, that can be displayed in upright MRI imaging. The range of anomalies is clinically relevant and dynamic

  20. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  1. A structural-functional MRI-based disease atlas: application to computer-aided-diagnosis of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, G.; Bloch, B.; Chappelow, J.; Genega, E.; Rofsky, N.; Lenkinski, R.; Madabhushi, A.

    2010-03-01

    Different imaging modalities or protocols of a single patient may convey different types of information regarding a disease for the same anatomical organ/tissue. On the other hand, multi-modal/multi-protocol medical images from several different patients can also provide spatial statistics of the disease occurrence, which in turn can greatly aid in disease diagnosis and aid in improved, accurate biopsy and targeted treatment. It is therefore important to not only integrate medical images from multiple patients into a common coordinate frame (in the form of a population-based atlas), but also find the correlation between these multi-modal/multi-protocol data features and the disease spatial distribution in order to identify different quantitative structural and functional disease signatures. Most previous work on construction of anatomical atlases has focused on deriving a population-based atlas for the purpose of deriving the spatial statistics. Moreover, these models are typically derived from normal or healthy subjects, either explicitly or implicitly, where it is assumed that the inter-patient pathological variation is not large. These methods are not suitable for constructing a disease atlas, where significant differences between patients on account of disease related variations can be expected. In this paper, we present a novel framework for the construction of a multi-parametric MRI-based data-driven disease atlas consisting of multi-modal and multi-protocol data from across multiple patient studies. Our disease atlas contains 3 Tesla structural (T2) and functional (dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)) prostate in vivo MRI with corresponding whole mount histology specimens obtained via radical prostatectomy. Our atlas construction framework comprises 3 distinct modules: (a) determination of disease spatial extent on the multi-protocol MR imagery for each patient, (b) construction of a multi-protocol MR imaging spatial atlas which captures the geographical

  2. Structural analysis of fMRI data: a surface-based framework for multi-subject studies.

    PubMed

    Operto, Grégory; Rivière, Denis; Fertil, Bernard; Bulot, Rémy; Mangin, Jean-François; Coulon, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    We present a method for fMRI data group analysis that makes the link between two distinct frameworks: surface-based techniques, which process data in the domain defined by the surface of the cortex, and structural techniques, which use object-based representations of the data as opposed to voxel-based ones. This work is a natural surface-based extension of the volume-based structural approach presented in a previous paper. A multi-scale surface-based representation of individual activation maps is first computed for each subject. Then the inter-subject matching and the activation detection decision are performed jointly by optimization of a Markovian model. Finally, a significance measure is computed in a non-parametric way for the results, in order to assess their relevance and control the risk of type I error. The method is applied on simulated and real data and the results are compared to those produced by standard analyses. The surface-based structural analysis is shown to be particularly robust to inter-subject spatial variability and to produce relevant results with good specificity and sensitivity. We also demonstrate the advantages of the surface-based approach by comparing with the results of a 3D structural analysis. PMID:22465075

  3. Gender differences in brain development in Chinese children and adolescents: a structural MRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Jin, Zhen; Chen, Kewei; Peng, Danling; Yao, Li

    2008-03-01

    Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), this study systematically investigated gender differences in brain development through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 158 Chinese normal children and adolescents aged 7.26 to 22.80 years (mean age 15.03+/-4.70 years, 78 boys and 80 girls). Gender groups were matched for measures of age, handedness, education level. The customized brain templates, including T I-weighted image and gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM)/cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) prior probability maps, were created from all participants. Results showed that the total intracranial volume (TIV), global absolute GM and global WM volume in girls were significantly smaller than those in boys. The hippocampus grew faster in girls than that in boys, but the amygdala grew faster in boys than that in girls. The rate of regional GM decreases with age was steeper in the left superior parietal lobule, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, left precuneus, and bilateral supramarginal gyrus in boys compared to girls, which was possibly related to better spatial processing ability in boys. Regional GM volumes were greater in bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. Regional WM volumes were greater in the left temporal lobe, right inferior parietal and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. The gender differences in the temporal and frontal lobe maybe be related to better language ability in girls. These findings may aid in understanding the differences in cognitive function between boys and girls.

  4. Automatic ROI selection in structural brain MRI using SOM 3D projection.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Andrés; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Martinez-Murcia, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method for selecting Regions of Interest (ROI) in brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for diagnostic purposes, using statistical learning and vector quantization techniques. The proposed method models the distribution of GM and WM tissues grouping the voxels belonging to each tissue in ROIs associated to a specific neurological disorder. Tissue distribution of normal and abnormal images is modelled by a Self-Organizing map (SOM), generating a set of representative prototypes, and the receptive field (RF) of each SOM prototype defines a ROI. Moreover, the proposed method computes the relative importance of each ROI by means of its discriminative power. The devised method has been assessed using 818 images from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) which were previously segmented through Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). The proposed algorithm was used over these images to parcel ROIs associated to the Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Additionally, this method can be used to extract a reduced set of discriminative features for classification, since it compresses discriminative information contained in the brain. Voxels marked by ROIs which were computed using the proposed method, yield classification results up to 90% of accuracy for controls (CN) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and 84% of accuracy for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and AD patients. PMID:24728041

  5. Standardized evaluation of algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of dementia based on structural MRI: the CADDementia challenge.

    PubMed

    Bron, Esther E; Smits, Marion; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Vrenken, Hugo; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Papma, Janne M; Steketee, Rebecca M E; Méndez Orellana, Carolina; Meijboom, Rozanna; Pinto, Madalena; Meireles, Joana R; Garrett, Carolina; Bastos-Leite, António J; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Ronneberger, Olaf; Amoroso, Nicola; Bellotti, Roberto; Cárdenas-Peña, David; Álvarez-Meza, Andrés M; Dolph, Chester V; Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Eskildsen, Simon F; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir S; Franke, Katja; Gaser, Christian; Ledig, Christian; Guerrero, Ricardo; Tong, Tong; Gray, Katherine R; Moradi, Elaheh; Tohka, Jussi; Routier, Alexandre; Durrleman, Stanley; Sarica, Alessia; Di Fatta, Giuseppe; Sensi, Francesco; Chincarini, Andrea; Smith, Garry M; Stoyanov, Zhivko V; Sørensen, Lauge; Nielsen, Mads; Tangaro, Sabina; Inglese, Paolo; Wachinger, Christian; Reuter, Martin; van Swieten, John C; Niessen, Wiro J; Klein, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Algorithms for computer-aided diagnosis of dementia based on structural MRI have demonstrated high performance in the literature, but are difficult to compare as different data sets and methodology were used for evaluation. In addition, it is unclear how the algorithms would perform on previously unseen data, and thus, how they would perform in clinical practice when there is no real opportunity to adapt the algorithm to the data at hand. To address these comparability, generalizability and clinical applicability issues, we organized a grand challenge that aimed to objectively compare algorithms based on a clinically representative multi-center data set. Using clinical practice as the starting point, the goal was to reproduce the clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we evaluated algorithms for multi-class classification of three diagnostic groups: patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, patients with mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The diagnosis based on clinical criteria was used as reference standard, as it was the best available reference despite its known limitations. For evaluation, a previously unseen test set was used consisting of 354 T1-weighted MRI scans with the diagnoses blinded. Fifteen research teams participated with a total of 29 algorithms. The algorithms were trained on a small training set (n=30) and optionally on data from other sources (e.g., the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, the Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle flagship study of aging). The best performing algorithm yielded an accuracy of 63.0% and an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC) of 78.8%. In general, the best performances were achieved using feature extraction based on voxel-based morphometry or a combination of features that included volume, cortical thickness, shape and intensity. The challenge is open for new submissions via the web-based framework: http://caddementia.grand-challenge.org. PMID:25652394

  6. MRI assessment of suppression of structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving rituximab: results from the randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind RA-SCORE study

    PubMed Central

    Peterfy, Charles; Emery, Paul; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; DiCarlo, Julie; Otsa, Kati; Navarro Sarabia, Federico; Pavelka, Karel; Bagnard, Marie-Agnes; Gylvin, Lykke Hinsch; Bernasconi, Corrado; Gabriele, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in structural damage and joint inflammation assessed by MRI following rituximab treatment in a Phase 3 study of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX) who were naive to biological therapy. Methods Patients were randomised to receive two infusions of placebo (n=63), rituximab 500 mg (n=62), or rituximab 1000 mg (n=60) intravenously on days 1 and 15. MRI scans and radiographs of the most inflamed hand and wrist were acquired at baseline, weeks 12 (MRI only), 24 and 52. The primary end point was the change in MRI erosion score from baseline at week 24. Results Patients treated with rituximab demonstrated significantly less progression in the mean MRI erosion score compared with those treated with placebo at weeks 24 (0.47, 0.18 and 1.60, respectively, p=0.003 and p=0.001 for the two rituximab doses vs placebo) and 52 (−0.30, 0.11 and 3.02, respectively; p<0.001 and p<0.001). Cartilage loss at 52 weeks was significantly reduced in the rituximab group compared with the placebo group. Other secondary end points of synovitis and osteitis improved significantly with rituximab compared with placebo as early as 12 weeks and improved further at weeks 24 and 52. Conclusions This study demonstrated that rituximab significantly reduced erosion and cartilage loss at week 24 and week 52 in MTX-inadequate responder patients with active RA, suggesting that MRI is a valuable tool for assessing inflammatory and structural damage in patients with established RA receiving rituximab. Trial registration number NCT00578305 PMID:25355728

  7. Microstructural parameter estimation in vivo using diffusion MRI and structured prior information

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltan; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Alexander, Daniel C.; Clark, Chris A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion MRI has recently been used with detailed models to probe tissue microstructure. Much of this work has been performed ex vivo with powerful scanner hardware, to gain sensitivity to parameters such as axon radius. By contrast, performing microstructure imaging on clinical scanners is extremely challenging. Methods We use an optimized dual spin‐echo diffusion protocol, and a Bayesian fitting approach, to obtain reproducible contrast (histogram overlap of up to 92%) in estimated maps of axon radius index in healthy adults at a modest, widely‐available gradient strength (35 mT m −1). A key innovation is the use of influential priors. Results We demonstrate that our priors can improve precision in axon radius estimates—a 7‐fold reduction in voxelwise coefficient of variation in vivo—without significant bias. Our results may reflect true axon radius differences between white matter regions, but this interpretation should be treated with caution due to the complexity of the tissue relative to our model. Conclusions Some sensitivity to relatively large axons (3–15 μm) may be available at clinical field and gradient strengths. Future applications at higher gradient strength will benefit from the favorable eddy current properties of the dual spin‐echo sequence, and greater precision available with suitable priors. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1787–1796, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25994918

  8. Linking contemporary high resolution magnetic resonance imaging to the von Economo legacy: A study on the comparison of MRI cortical thickness and histological measurements of cortical structure.

    PubMed

    Scholtens, Lianne H; de Reus, Marcel A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2015-08-01

    The cerebral cortex is a distinctive part of the mammalian nervous system, displaying a spatial variety in cyto-, chemico-, and myelinoarchitecture. As part of a rich history of histological findings, pioneering anatomists von Economo and Koskinas provided detailed mappings on the cellular structure of the human cortex, reporting on quantitative aspects of cytoarchitecture of cortical areas. Current day investigations into the structure of human cortex have embraced technological advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to assess macroscale thickness and organization of the cortical mantle in vivo. However, direct comparisons between current day MRI estimates and the quantitative measurements of early anatomists have been limited. Here, we report on a simple, but nevertheless important cross-analysis between the histological reports of von Economo and Koskinas on variation in thickness of the cortical mantle and MRI derived measurements of cortical thickness. We translated the von Economo cortical atlas to a subdivision of the commonly used Desikan-Killiany atlas (as part of the FreeSurfer Software package and a commonly used parcellation atlas in studies examining MRI cortical thickness). Next, values of "width of the cortical mantle" as provided by the measurements of von Economo and Koskinas were correlated to cortical thickness measurements derived from high-resolution anatomical MRI T1 data of 200+ subjects of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Cross-correlation revealed a significant association between group-averaged MRI measurements of cortical thickness and histological recordings (r = 0.54, P < 0.001). Further validating such a correlation, we manually segmented the von Economo parcellation atlas on the standardized Colin27 brain dataset and applied the obtained three-dimensional von Economo segmentation atlas to the T1 data of each of the HCP subjects. Highly consistent with our findings for the mapping to the Desikan-Killiany regions, cross

  9. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  10. Age-related reorganization of functional networks for successful conflict resolution: A combined functional and structural MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Tilman; Müller-Oehring, Eva M.; Chanraud, Sandra; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2009-01-01

    Aging has readily observable effects on the ability to resolve conflict between competing stimulus attributes that are likely related to selective structural and functional brain changes. To identify age-related differences in neural circuits subserving conflict processing, we combined structural and functional MRI and a Stroop Match-to-Sample task involving perceptual cueing and repetition to modulate resources in healthy young and older adults. In our Stroop Match-to-Sample task, older adults handled conflict by activating a frontoparietal attention system more than young adults and engaged a visuomotor network more than young adults when processing repetitive conflict and when processing conflict following valid perceptual cueing. By contrast, young adults activated frontal regions more than older adults when processing conflict with perceptual cueing. These differential activation patterns were not correlated with regional gray matter volume despite smaller volumes in older than young adults. Given comparable performance in speed and accuracy of responding between both groups, these data suggest that successful aging is associated with functional reorganization of neural systems to accommodate functionally increasing task demands on perceptual and attentional operations. PMID:20022675

  11. Brain structural deficits and working memory fMRI dysfunction in young adults who were diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Roman-Urrestarazu, Andres; Lindholm, Päivi; Moilanen, Irma; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Miettunen, Jouko; Jääskeläinen, Erika; Mäki, Pirjo; Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Barnett, Jennifer H; Nikkinen, Juha; Suckling, John; Jones, Peter B; Veijola, Juha; Murray, Graham K

    2016-05-01

    When adolescents with ADHD enter adulthood, some no longer meet disorder diagnostic criteria but it is unknown if biological and cognitive abnorma lities persist. We tested the hypothesis that people diagnosed with ADHD during adolescence present residual brain abnormalities both in brain structure and in working memory brain function. 83 young adults (aged 20-24 years) from the Northern Finland 1986 Birth Cohort were classified as diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence (adolescence ADHD, n = 49) or a control group (n = 34). Only one patient had received medication for ADHD. T1-weighted brain scans were acquired and processed in a voxel-based analysis using permutation-based statistics. A sub-sample of both groups (ADHD, n = 21; controls n = 23) also performed a Sternberg working memory task whilst acquiring fMRI data. Areas of structural difference were used as a region of interest to evaluate the implications that structural abnormalities found in the ADHD group might have on working memory function. There was lower grey matter volume bilaterally in adolescence ADHD participants in the caudate (p < 0.05 FWE corrected across the whole brain) at age 20-24. Working memory was poorer in adolescence ADHD participants, with associated failure to show normal load-dependent caudate activation. Young adults diagnosed with ADHD in adolescence have structural and functional deficits in the caudate associated with abnormal working memory function. These findings are not secondary to stimulant treatment, and emphasise the importance of taking a wider perspective on ADHD outcomes than simply whether or not a particular patient meets diagnostic criteria at any given point in time. PMID:26307356

  12. Marked effects of intracranial volume correction methods on sex differences in neuroanatomical structures: a HUNT MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Pintzka, Carl W. S.; Hansen, Tor I.; Evensmoen, Hallvard R.; Håberg, Asta K.

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus whether sexual dimorphism in the size of neuroanatomical structures exists, or if such differences are caused by choice of intracranial volume (ICV) correction method. When investigating volume differences in neuroanatomical structures, corrections for variation in ICV are used. Commonly applied methods are the ICV-proportions, ICV-residuals and ICV as a covariate of no interest, ANCOVA. However, these different methods give contradictory results with regard to presence of sex differences. Our aims were to investigate presence of sexual dimorphism in 18 neuroanatomical volumes unrelated to ICV-differences by using a large ICV-matched subsample of 304 men and women from the HUNT-MRI general population study, and further to demonstrate in the entire sample of 966 healthy subjects, which of the ICV-correction methods gave results similar to the ICV-matched subsample. In addition, sex-specific subsamples were created to investigate whether differences were an effect of head size or sex. Most sex differences were related to volume scaling with ICV, independent of sex. Sex differences were detected in a few structures; amygdala, cerebellar cortex, and 3rd ventricle were larger in men, but the effect sizes were small. The residuals and ANCOVA methods were most effective at removing the effects of ICV. The proportions method suffered from systematic errors due to lack of proportionality between ICV and neuroanatomical volumes, leading to systematic mis-assignment of structures as either larger or smaller than their actual size. Adding additional sexual dimorphic covariates to the ANCOVA gave opposite results of those obtained in the ICV-matched subsample or with the residuals method. The findings in the current study explain some of the considerable variation in the literature on sexual dimorphisms in neuroanatomical volumes. In conclusion, sex plays a minor role for neuroanatomical volume differences; most differences are related to ICV

  13. Co-analysis of Brain Structure and Function using fMRI and Diffusion-weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jeffrey S.; Greenberg, Adam S.; Pyles, John A.; Pathak, Sudhir K.; Behrmann, Marlene; Schneider, Walter; Tarr, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The study of complex computational systems is facilitated by network maps, such as circuit diagrams. Such mapping is particularly informative when studying the brain, as the functional role that a brain area fulfills may be largely defined by its connections to other brain areas. In this report, we describe a novel, non-invasive approach for relating brain structure and function using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This approach, a combination of structural imaging of long-range fiber connections and functional imaging data, is illustrated in two distinct cognitive domains, visual attention and face perception. Structural imaging is performed with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fiber tractography, which track the diffusion of water molecules along white-matter fiber tracts in the brain (Figure 1). By visualizing these fiber tracts, we are able to investigate the long-range connective architecture of the brain. The results compare favorably with one of the most widely-used techniques in DWI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI is unable to resolve complex configurations of fiber tracts, limiting its utility for constructing detailed, anatomically-informed models of brain function. In contrast, our analyses reproduce known neuroanatomy with precision and accuracy. This advantage is partly due to data acquisition procedures: while many DTI protocols measure diffusion in a small number of directions (e.g., 6 or 12), we employ a diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI)1, 2 protocol which assesses diffusion in 257 directions and at a range of magnetic gradient strengths. Moreover, DSI data allow us to use more sophisticated methods for reconstructing acquired data. In two experiments (visual attention and face perception), tractography reveals that co-active areas of the human brain are anatomically connected, supporting extant hypotheses that they form functional networks. DWI allows us to create a "circuit diagram" and reproduce it on an individual-subject basis, for

  14. Functional and structural aging of the speech sensorimotor neural system: fMRI evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pascale; Dick, Anthony Steven; Small, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to perceive and produce speech undergoes important changes in late adulthood. The goal of the present study was to characterize functional and structural age-related differences in the cortical network supporting speech perception and production using magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the relationship between functional and structural age-related changes occurring in this network. We asked young and older adults to (1) observe videos of a speaker producing single words (perception), and (B) observe and repeat the words produced (production). Results show a widespread bilateral network of brain activation for Perception and Production that was uncorrelated with age. In addition, several regions did show age-related change (auditory cortex, planum temporale, superior temporal sulcus, premotor cortices, SMA-proper). Examination of the relationship between brain signal and regional and global gray matter volume and cortical thickness revealed a complex set of relationships between structure and function, with some regions showing a relationship between structure and function and not. The present results provide novel findings about the neurobiology of aging and verbal communication. PMID:23523270

  15. In vitro flow assessment: from PC-MRI to computational fluid dynamics including fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzke, Jonas; Rengier, Fabian; Weis, Christian; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Initiation and development of cardiovascular diseases can be highly correlated to specific biomechanical parameters. To examine and assess biomechanical parameters, numerical simulation of cardiovascular dynamics has the potential to complement and enhance medical measurement and imaging techniques. As such, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have shown to be suitable to evaluate blood velocity and pressure in scenarios, where vessel wall deformation plays a minor role. However, there is a need for further validation studies and the inclusion of vessel wall elasticity for morphologies being subject to large displacement. In this work, we consider a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model including the full elasticity equation to take the deformability of aortic wall soft tissue into account. We present a numerical framework, in which either a CFD study can be performed for less deformable aortic segments or an FSI simulation for regions of large displacement such as the aortic root and arch. Both of the methods are validated by means of an aortic phantom experiment. The computational results are in good agreement with 2D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) velocity measurements as well as catheter-based pressure measurements. The FSI simulation shows a characteristic vessel compliance effect on the flow field induced by the elasticity of the vessel wall, which the CFD model is not capable of. The in vitro validated FSI simulation framework can enable the computation of complementary biomechanical parameters such as the stress distribution within the vessel wall.

  16. Control-group feature normalization for multivariate pattern analysis of structural MRI data using the support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Linn, Kristin A; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Doshi, Jimit; Davatzikos, Christos; Shinohara, Russell T

    2016-05-15

    Normalization of feature vector values is a common practice in machine learning. Generally, each feature value is standardized to the unit hypercube or by normalizing to zero mean and unit variance. Classification decisions based on support vector machines (SVMs) or by other methods are sensitive to the specific normalization used on the features. In the context of multivariate pattern analysis using neuroimaging data, standardization effectively up- and down-weights features based on their individual variability. Since the standard approach uses the entire data set to guide the normalization, it utilizes the total variability of these features. This total variation is inevitably dependent on the amount of marginal separation between groups. Thus, such a normalization may attenuate the separability of the data in high dimensional space. In this work we propose an alternate approach that uses an estimate of the control-group standard deviation to normalize features before training. We study our proposed approach in the context of group classification using structural MRI data. We show that control-based normalization leads to better reproducibility of estimated multivariate disease patterns and improves the classifier performance in many cases. PMID:26915498

  17. Hierarchical statistical shape models of multiobject anatomical structures: application to brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Cerrolaza, Juan J; Villanueva, Arantxa; Cabeza, Rafael

    2012-03-01

    The accurate segmentation of subcortical brain structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images is of crucial importance in the interdisciplinary field of medical imaging. Although statistical approaches such as active shape models (ASMs) have proven to be particularly useful in the modeling of multiobject shapes, they are inefficient when facing challenging problems. Based on the wavelet transform, the fully generic multiresolution framework presented in this paper allows us to decompose the interobject relationships into different levels of detail. The aim of this hierarchical decomposition is twofold: to efficiently characterize the relationships between objects and their particular localities. Experiments performed on an eight-object structure defined in axial cross sectional MR brain images show that the new hierarchical segmentation significantly improves the accuracy of the segmentation, and while it exhibits a remarkable robustness with respect to the size of the training set. PMID:22194238

  18. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL BRAIN CONNECTIVITY USING DICCCOL MODELS OF DIFFUSION MRI IN 522 TWINS

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dajiang; Zhan, Liang; Faskowitz, Joshua; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors affect white matter connectivity in the normal brain, and they also influence diseases in which brain connectivity is altered. Little is known about genetic influences on brain connectivity, despite wide variations in the brain's neural pathways. Here we applied the “DICCCOL” framework to analyze structural connectivity, in 261 twin pairs (522 participants, mean age: 21.8 y ± 2.7SD). We encoded connectivity patterns by projecting the white matter (WM) bundles of all “DICCCOLs” as a tracemap (TM). Next we fitted an A/C/E structural equation model to estimate additive genetic (A), common environmental (C), and unique environmental/error (E) components of the observed variations in brain connectivity. We found 44 “heritable DICCCOLs” whose connectivity was genetically influenced (a2>1%); half of them showed significant heritability (a2>20%). Our analysis of genetic influences on WM structural connectivity suggests high heritability for some WM projection patterns, yielding new targets for genome-wide association studies. PMID:26413210

  19. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  20. SU-E-J-230: Evaluation of ViewRay 0.35 T MRI Normal Structure Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Paliwal, B; Asprey, W; Yan, Y; Saenz, D; Bayouth, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to take advantage of the high resolution soft tissue imaging available in MR images, we investigated 3D images obtained with the low field 0.35 T MR in ViewRay to serve as an alternative to CT scans for radiotherapy treatment planning. In these images, normal and target structure delineation can be visualized. Assessment is based upon comparison with the CT images and the ability to produce comparable contours. Methods: Routine radiation oncology CT scans were acquired on five patients. Contours of brain, brainstem, esophagus, heart, lungs, spinal cord, and the external body were drawn. The same five patients were then scanned on the ViewRay TrueFISP-based imaging pulse sequence. The same organs were selected on the MR images and compared to those from the CT scan. Physical volume and the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) were used to assess the contours from the two systems. Image quality stability was quantitatively ensured throughout the study following the recommendations of the ACR MR accreditation procedure. Results: The highest DSC of 0.985, 0.863, and 0.843 were observed for brain, lungs, and heart respectively. On the other hand, the brainstem, spinal cord, and esophagus had the lowest DSC. Volume agreement was most satisfied for the heart (within 5%) and the brain (within 2%). Contour volume for the brainstem and lung (a widely dynamic organ) varied the most (27% and 19%). Conclusion: The DSC and volume measurements suggest that the results obtained from ViewRay images are quantitatively consistent and comparable to those obtained from CT scans for the brain, heart, and lungs. MR images from ViewRay are well-suited for treatment planning and for adaptive MRI-guided radiotherapy. The physical data from 0.35 T MR imaging is consistent with our geometrical understanding of normal structures.

  1. Ultra-High Field MRI Post Mortem Structural Connectivity of the Human Subthalamic Nucleus, Substantia Nigra, and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Roebroeck, Alard; Kemper, Valentin G.; Uludağ, Kâmil; Melse, Maartje; Mai, Jürgen; Kuijf, Mark L.; Herrler, Andreas; Jahanshahi, Ali; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Temel, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus, three nuclei of the human basal ganglia, play an important role in motor, associative, and limbic processing. The network of the basal ganglia is generally characterized by a direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathway. This study aims to investigate the mesoscopic nature of these connections between the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus and their surrounding structures. Methods: A human post mortem brain specimen including the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus was scanned on a 7 T MRI scanner. High resolution diffusion weighted images were used to reconstruct the fibers intersecting the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. The course and density of these tracks was analyzed. Results: Most of the commonly established projections of the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus were successfully reconstructed. However, some of the reconstructed fiber tracks such as the connections of the substantia nigra pars compacta to the other included nuclei and the connections with the anterior commissure have not been shown previously. In addition, the quantitative tractography approach showed a typical degree of connectivity previously not documented. An example is the relatively larger projections of the subthalamic nucleus to the substantia nigra pars reticulata when compared to the projections to the globus pallidus internus. Discussion: This study shows that ultra-high field post mortem tractography allows for detailed 3D reconstruction of the projections of deep brain structures in humans. Although the results should be interpreted carefully, the newly identified connections contribute to our understanding of the basal ganglia. PMID:27378864

  2. Using structural MRI to identify individuals at genetic risk for bipolar disorders: a 2-cohort, machine learning study

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Tomas; Cooke, Christopher; Kopecek, Miloslav; Novak, Tomas; Hoschl, Cyril; Alda, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain imaging is of limited diagnostic use in psychiatry owing to clinical heterogeneity and low sensitivity/specificity of between-group neuroimaging differences. Machine learning (ML) may better translate neuroimaging to the level of individual participants. Studying unaffected offspring of parents with bipolar disorders (BD) decreases clinical heterogeneity and thus increases sensitivity for detection of biomarkers. The present study used ML to identify individuals at genetic high risk (HR) for BD based on brain structure. Methods We studied unaffected and affected relatives of BD probands recruited from 2 sites (Halifax, Canada, and Prague, Czech Republic). Each participant was individually matched by age and sex to controls without personal or family history of psychiatric disorders. We applied support vector machines (SVM) and Gaussian process classifiers (GPC) to structural MRI. Results We included 45 unaffected and 36 affected relatives of BD probands matched by age and sex on an individual basis to healthy controls. The SVM of white matter distinguished unaffected HR from control participants (accuracy = 68.9%, p = 0.001), with similar accuracy for the GPC (65.6%, p = 0.002) or when analyzing data from each site separately. Differentiation of the more clinically heterogeneous affected familiar group from healthy controls was less accurate (accuracy = 59.7%, p = 0.05). Machine learning applied to grey matter did not distinguish either the unaffected HR or affected familial groups from controls. The regions that most contributed to between-group discrimination included white matter of the inferior/middle frontal gyrus, inferior/middle temporal gyrus and precuneus. Limitations Although we recruited 126 participants, ML benefits from even larger samples. Conclusions Machine learning applied to white but not grey matter distinguished unaffected participants at high and low genetic risk for BD based on regions previously implicated in the

  3. MRI-based surface area estimates in the normal adult human brain: evidence for structural organisation.

    PubMed Central

    Sisodiya, S; Free, S; Fish, D; Shorvon, S

    1996-01-01

    There are a number of quantitative relationships between geometric parameters describing the structure of the normal human cerebral cortex examined in vivo using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. A voxel-counting method is used to estimate grey-white interface surface area. The effects of bias associated with the method are considered. In 33 normal controls, the cerebral hemispheres were symmetric in terms of total volume, irrespective of handedness, but not in terms of surface areas for right-handers. The surface area of the grey matter-white matter interface was directly proportional to the cortical grey matter volume, suggesting that growth of the neocortex is primarily tangential, with repetition of a basic structural element rather than gross alterations in the thickness of the cortex. The majority of the surface area of the grey-white interface lies within gyral white matter cores. The mean thickness of the cortex of the right cerebral hemisphere in vivo was 3.0 mm and that of the left 3.3 mm. There was a relationship between the cross-sectional area of the corpus callosum and grey-white interface surface area, suggesting that a fixed proportion and cortical neurons extend interhemispheric axons. These findings suggest that there are general architectural principles governing the organisation of the complex, but ordered, human cerebral cortex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8621342

  4. The Differentiation of Amnestic Type MCI from the Non-Amnestic Types by Structural MRI

    PubMed Central

    Csukly, Gábor; Sirály, Enikő; Fodor, Zsuzsanna; Horváth, András; Salacz, Pál; Hidasi, Zoltán; Csibri, Éva; Rudas, Gábor; Szabó, Ádám

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment (naMCI) are theoretically different entities, only a few investigations studied the structural brain differences between these subtypes of mild cognitive impairment. The aim of the study was to find the structural differences between aMCI and naMCI, and to replicate previous findings on the differentiation between aMCI and healthy controls. Methods: Altogether 62 aMCI, naMCI, and healthy control subjects were included into the study based on the Petersen criteria. All patients underwent a routine brain MR examination, and a detailed neuropsychological examination. Results: The sizes of the hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex and the amygdala were decreased in aMCI relative to naMCI and to controls. Furthermore the cortical thickness of the entorhinal cortex, the fusiform gyrus, the precuneus and the isthmus of the cingulate gyrus were significantly decreased in aMCI relative to naMCI and healthy controls. The largest differences relative to controls were detected for the volume of the hippocampus (18% decrease vs. controls) and the cortical thickness (20% decrease vs. controls) of the entorhinal cortex: 1.6 and 1.4 in terms of Cohen's d. Only the volume of the precuneus were decreased in the naMCI group (5% decrease) compared to the control subjects: 0.9 in terms of Cohen's d. Significant between group differences were also found in the neuropsychological test results: a decreased anterograde, retrograde memory, and category fluency performance was detected in the aMCI group relative to controls and naMCI subjects. Subjects with naMCI showed decreased letter fluency relative to controls, while both MCI groups showed decreased executive functioning relative to controls as measured by the Trail Making test part B. Memory performance in the aMCI group and in the entire sample correlated with the thickness of the entorhinal cortex and with the volume of the amygdala

  5. Alzheimer's disease markers from structural MRI and FDG-PET brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chincarini, Andrea; Bosco, Paolo; Gemme, Gianluca; Morbelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Dario; Sensi, Francesco; Solano, Ilaria; Amoroso, Nicola; Tangaro, Sabina; Longo, Renata; Squarcia, Sandro; Nobili, Flavio

    2012-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of neuroimaging tools (morphological and functional) in the routine diagnostic of cerebral diseases, the information available by the end user -the clinician- remains largely limited to qualitative visual analysis. This restriction greatly reduces the diagnostic impact of neuroimaging in routine clinical practice and increases the risk of misdiagnosis. In this context, researches are focussing on the development of sophisticated automatic analyses able to extract clinically relevant information from the captured data. The identification of biological markers at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) contributes to diagnostic accuracy and adds prognostic value. However, in spite of recent developments, results of structural and functional imaging studies on predicting conversion to AD are not uniform. We provide here an overview of analysis methods and approaches, discussing their contribution to clinical assessment.

  6. Obstetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for pregnant patients. However, MRI is increasingly utilized in patients in whom the sonographic diagnosis is unclear. These include maternal conditions unique to pregnancy such as ectopic pregnancy, placenta accreta, and uterine dehiscence. MRI is also being increasingly utilized in the assessment of abdominopelvic pain in pregnancy, in particular in assessment for appendicitis. Fetal MRI is performed to assess central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and patients who are considering fetal surgery for conditions such as neural tube defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and masses that obstruct the airway. In the future, functional MRI and fetal volumetry may provide additional information that can aid in our care of complicated pregnancies. PMID:16736491

  7. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging method that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the heart. It does ... radiation involved in MRI. The magnetic fields and radio waves used during the scan have not been shown ...

  8. Functional connectivity analysis in resting state fMRI with echo-state networks and non-metric clustering for network structure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismüller, Axel; DSouza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.

    2015-03-01

    Echo state networks (ESN) are recurrent neural networks where the hidden layer is replaced with a fixed reservoir of neurons. Unlike feed-forward networks, neuron training in ESN is restricted to the output neurons alone thereby providing a computational advantage. We demonstrate the use of such ESNs in our mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) framework for recovering the primary motor cortex network associated with hand movement from resting state functional MRI (fMRI) data. Such a framework consists of two steps - (1) defining a pair-wise affinity matrix between different pixel time series within the brain to characterize network activity and (2) recovering network components from the affinity matrix with non-metric clustering. Here, ESNs are used to evaluate pair-wise cross-estimation performance between pixel time series to create the affinity matrix, which is subsequently subject to non-metric clustering with the Louvain method. For comparison, the ground truth of the motor cortex network structure is established with a task-based fMRI sequence. Overlap between the primary motor cortex network recovered with our model free MCA approach and the ground truth was measured with the Dice coefficient. Our results show that network recovery with our proposed MCA approach is in close agreement with the ground truth. Such network recovery is achieved without requiring low-pass filtering of the time series ensembles prior to analysis, an fMRI preprocessing step that has courted controversy in recent years. Thus, we conclude our MCA framework can allow recovery and visualization of the underlying functionally connected networks in the brain on resting state fMRI.

  9. Quantitative MRI of the spinal cord and brain in adrenomyeloneuropathy: in vivo assessment of structural changes.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Antonella; Papinutto, Nico; Cadioli, Marcello; Brugnara, Gianluca; Iadanza, Antonella; Scigliuolo, Graziana; Pareyson, Davide; Uziel, Graziella; Köhler, Wolfgang; Aubourg, Patrick; Falini, Andrea; Henry, Roland G; Politi, Letterio S; Salsano, Ettore

    2016-06-01

    Adrenomyeloneuropathy is the late-onset form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and is considered the most frequent metabolic hereditary spastic paraplegia. In adrenomyeloneuropathy the spinal cord is the main site of pathology. Differently from quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, little is known about the feasibility and utility of advanced neuroimaging in quantifying the spinal cord abnormalities in hereditary diseases. Moreover, little is known about the subtle pathological changes that can characterize the brain of adrenomyeloneuropathy subjects in the early stages of the disease. We performed a cross-sectional study on 13 patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and 12 age-matched healthy control subjects who underwent quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to assess the structural changes of the upper spinal cord and brain. Total cord areas from C2-3 to T2-3 level were measured, and diffusion tensor imaging metrics, i.e. fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity values were calculated in both grey and white matter of spinal cord. In the brain, grey matter regions were parcellated with Freesurfer and average volume and thickness, and mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy from co-registered diffusion maps were calculated in each region. Brain white matter diffusion tensor imaging metrics were assessed using whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics, and tractography-based analysis on corticospinal tracts. Correlations among clinical, structural and diffusion tensor imaging measures were calculated. In patients total cord area was reduced by 26.3% to 40.2% at all tested levels (P < 0.0001). A mean 16% reduction of spinal cord white matter fractional anisotropy (P ≤ 0.0003) with a concomitant 9.7% axial diffusivity reduction (P < 0.009) and 34.5% radial diffusivity increase (P < 0.009) was observed, suggesting co-presence of axonal degeneration and demyelination. Brain tract-based spatial statistics showed a marked reduction

  10. White matter structure and clinical characteristics of stroke patients: A diffusion tensor MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Ryo; Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Senoo, Atsushi

    2016-03-15

    Fractional anisotropy has been used in many studies that examined post-stroke changes in white matter. This study was performed to clarify cerebral white matter changes after stroke using generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA). White matter structure was visualized using diffusion tensor imaging in 72 patients with post-stroke arm paralysis. Exercise-related brain regions were examined in cerebral white matter using GFA. The relationship between GFA and clinical characteristics was examined. Overall, the mean GFA of the lesioned hemisphere was significantly lower than that of the non-lesioned hemisphere (P<0.05), the white matter of the lesioned side was severely affected by stroke. A weak negative correlation between GFA and time since stroke onset was found in Brodmann area 5 of the non-lesioned hemisphere. Age correlated negatively with GFA in Brodmann areas 5 and 7 of the lesioned hemisphere. Though these results may be due to a decrease in the frequency of use of the paralyzed limb over time, GFA overall was significantly and negatively affected by the subject's age. The GFA values of patients with paralysis of the dominant hand were significantly different from those of patients with paralysis of the nondominant hand in Brodmann areas 4 and 6 of the non-lesioned hemisphere and Brodmann area 4 of the lesioned hemisphere (P<0.05). The stroke size and location were not associated with GFA differences. Differences between the GFA of the lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres varied depending on the affected brain region, age at onset of paralysis, and paralysis of the dominant or non-dominant hand. PMID:26783693

  11. A combined DTI and structural MRI study in medicated-naïve chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Lai, Yunyao; Wang, Xijin; Hao, Chuanxi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Zhenyu; Yu, Xin; Hong, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Disconnection in white matter (WM) pathway and alterations in gray matter (GM) structure have been hypothesized as pathogenesis in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between the abnormal WM integrity and the alteration of GM in anatomically connected areas remains uncertain. Moreover, the potential influence of antipsychotic medication on WM anisotropy and cortical morphology was not excluded in previous studies. In this study, a total number of 34 subjects were enrolled, including 17 medicated-naïve chronic schizophrenia patients and 17 healthy controls. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were applied to investigate the level of WM integrity. The FreeSurfer surface-based analysis was used to determine GM volume, cortical thickness and the surface area of GM regions which corresponded to abnormal WM fiber tracts. We observed that patients possessed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), along with smaller GM volume and cortical thinning in temporal lobe than the healthy controls, which reflected the underlying WM and GM disruption that contributed to the disease. In the patient population, the lower connectivity of ILF and IFOF was positively associated with cortical thickness in left lateral orbitofrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus and lingual gyrus in males, and positively correlated with GM volume in left lateral orbitofrontal cortex in females. On the other hand, it was negatively correlated with cortical area of middle temporal gyrus in males and temporal pole in females respectively, but not when genders were combined. These findings suggested that abnormal WM integrity and anatomical correspondence of GM alterations in schizophrenia were interdependent on gender-separated analysis in patients with schizophrenia. Moreover, combining TBSS and FreeSurfer might be a useful method to provide significant insight into interacting processes

  12. Integrating structural and functional imaging for computer assisted detection of prostate cancer on multi-protocol in vivo 3 Tesla MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Rosen, Mark; Chappelow, Jonathan; Toth, Robert; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2009-02-01

    Screening and detection of prostate cancer (CaP) currently lacks an image-based protocol which is reflected in the high false negative rates currently associated with blinded sextant biopsies. Multi-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high resolution functional and structural data about internal body structures (such as the prostate). In this paper we present a novel comprehensive computer-aided scheme for CaP detection from high resolution in vivo multi-protocol MRI by integrating functional and structural information obtained via dynamic-contrast enhanced (DCE) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MRI, respectively. Our scheme is fully-automated and comprises (a) prostate segmentation, (b) multimodal image registration, and (c) data representation and multi-classifier modules for information fusion. Following prostate boundary segmentation via an improved active shape model, the DCE/T2-w protocols and the T2-w/ex vivo histological prostatectomy specimens are brought into alignment via a deformable, multi-attribute registration scheme. T2-w/histology alignment allows for the mapping of true CaP extent onto the in vivo MRI, which is used for training and evaluation of a multi-protocol MRI CaP classifier. The meta-classifier used is a random forest constructed by bagging multiple decision tree classifiers, each trained individually on T2-w structural, textural and DCE functional attributes. 3-fold classifier cross validation was performed using a set of 18 images derived from 6 patient datasets on a per-pixel basis. Our results show that the results of CaP detection obtained from integration of T2-w structural textural data and DCE functional data (area under the ROC curve of 0.815) significantly outperforms detection based on either of the individual modalities (0.704 (T2-w) and 0.682 (DCE)). It was also found that a meta-classifier trained directly on integrated T2-w and DCE data (data-level integration) significantly outperformed a decision-level meta

  13. Integrating Structural and Functional Imaging for Computer Assisted Detection of Prostate Cancer on Multi-Protocol In Vivo 3 Tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B Nicolas; Rosen, Mark; Chappelow, Jonathan; Toth, Robert; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elisabeth; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2009-02-27

    Screening and detection of prostate cancer (CaP) currently lacks an image-based protocol which is reflected in the high false negative rates currently associated with blinded sextant biopsies. Multi-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high resolution functional and structural data about internal body structures (such as the prostate). In this paper we present a novel comprehensive computer-aided scheme for CaP detection from high resolution in vivo multi-protocol MRI by integrating functional and structural information obtained via dynamic-contrast enhanced (DCE) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MRI, respectively. Our scheme is fully-automated and comprises (a) prostate segmentation, (b) multimodal image registration, and (c) data representation and multi-classifier modules for information fusion. Following prostate boundary segmentation via an improved active shape model, the DCE/T2-w protocols and the T2-w/ex vivo histological prostatectomy specimens are brought into alignment via a deformable, multi-attribute registration scheme. T2-w/histology alignment allows for the mapping of true CaP extent onto the in vivo MRI, which is used for training and evaluation of a multi-protocol MRI CaP classifier. The meta-classifier used is a random forest constructed by bagging multiple decision tree classifiers, each trained individually on T2-w structural, textural and DCE functional attributes. 3-fold classifier cross validation was performed using a set of 18 images derived from 6 patient datasets on a per-pixel basis. Our results show that the results of CaP detection obtained from integration of T2-w structural textural data and DCE functional data (area under the ROC curve of 0.815) significantly outperforms detection based on either of the individual modalities (0.704 (T2-w) and 0.682 (DCE)). It was also found that a meta-classifier trained directly on integrated T2-w and DCE data (data-level integration) significantly outperformed a decision-level meta

  14. Voxel-based structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of patients with early onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Yujiro; Sugihara, Genichi; Matsumoto, Hideo; Suckling, John; Nishimura, Katsuhiko; Toyoda, Takao; Isoda, Haruo; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Sakahara, Harumi; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Mori, Norio; Takei, Nori

    2008-01-01

    Background Investigation into the whole brain morphology of early onset schizophrenia (EOS) to date has been sparse. We studied the regional brain volumes in EOS patients, and the correlations between regional volume measures and symptom severity. Methods A total of 18 EOS patients (onset under 16 years) and 18 controls matched for age, gender, parental socioeconomic status, and height were examined. Voxel-based morphometric analysis using the Brain Analysis Morphological Mapping (BAMM) software package was employed to explore alterations of the regional grey (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes in EOS patients. Symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results EOS patients had significantly reduced GM volume in the left parahippocampal, inferior frontal, and superior temporal gyri, compared with the controls. They also had less WM volume in the left posterior limb of the internal capsule and the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The positive symptom score of PANSS (higher values corresponding to more severe symptoms) was negatively related to GM volume in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus. The negative symptom score was positively correlated with GM volume in the right thalamus. As for the association with WM volume, the positive symptom score of PANSS was positively related to cerebellar WM (vermis region), and negatively correlated with WM in the brain stem (pons) and in the bilateral cerebellum (hemisphere region). Conclusion Our findings of regional volume alterations of GM and WM in EOS patients coincide with those of previous studies of adult onset schizophrenia patients. However, in brain regions that had no overall structural differences between EOS patients and controls (that is, the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus, the right thalamus, the cerebellum, and the pons), within-subject analysis of EOS patients alone revealed that there were significant associations of the volume in these areas and the symptom

  15. Multiclass Classification for the Differential Diagnosis on the ADHD Subtypes Using Recursive Feature Elimination and Hierarchical Extreme Learning Machine: Structural MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Muhammad Naveed Iqbal; Min, Beomjun; Jo, Hang Joon; Lee, Boreom

    2016-01-01

    The classification of neuroimaging data for the diagnosis of certain brain diseases is one of the main research goals of the neuroscience and clinical communities. In this study, we performed multiclass classification using a hierarchical extreme learning machine (H-ELM) classifier. We compared the performance of this classifier with that of a support vector machine (SVM) and basic extreme learning machine (ELM) for cortical MRI data from attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients. We used 159 structural MRI images of children from the publicly available ADHD-200 MRI dataset. The data consisted of three types, namely, typically developing (TDC), ADHD-inattentive (ADHD-I), and ADHD-combined (ADHD-C). We carried out feature selection by using standard SVM-based recursive feature elimination (RFE-SVM) that enabled us to achieve good classification accuracy (60.78%). In this study, we found the RFE-SVM feature selection approach in combination with H-ELM to effectively enable the acquisition of high multiclass classification accuracy rates for structural neuroimaging data. In addition, we found that the most important features for classification were the surface area of the superior frontal lobe, and the cortical thickness, volume, and mean surface area of the whole cortex. PMID:27500640

  16. Multiclass Classification for the Differential Diagnosis on the ADHD Subtypes Using Recursive Feature Elimination and Hierarchical Extreme Learning Machine: Structural MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Muhammad Naveed Iqbal; Min, Beomjun; Jo, Hang Joon; Lee, Boreom

    2016-01-01

    The classification of neuroimaging data for the diagnosis of certain brain diseases is one of the main research goals of the neuroscience and clinical communities. In this study, we performed multiclass classification using a hierarchical extreme learning machine (H-ELM) classifier. We compared the performance of this classifier with that of a support vector machine (SVM) and basic extreme learning machine (ELM) for cortical MRI data from attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients. We used 159 structural MRI images of children from the publicly available ADHD-200 MRI dataset. The data consisted of three types, namely, typically developing (TDC), ADHD-inattentive (ADHD-I), and ADHD-combined (ADHD-C). We carried out feature selection by using standard SVM-based recursive feature elimination (RFE-SVM) that enabled us to achieve good classification accuracy (60.78%). In this study, we found the RFE-SVM feature selection approach in combination with H-ELM to effectively enable the acquisition of high multiclass classification accuracy rates for structural neuroimaging data. In addition, we found that the most important features for classification were the surface area of the superior frontal lobe, and the cortical thickness, volume, and mean surface area of the whole cortex. PMID:27500640

  17. Complex interplay between brain function and structure during cerebral amyloidosis in APP transgenic mouse strains revealed by multi-parametric MRI comparison.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Joanes; Derungs, Rebecca; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Henkelman, Mark; Nitsch, Roger M; Rudin, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the aging population. Neuroimaging methods, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have helped reveal alterations in the brain structure, metabolism, and function of patients and in groups at risk of developing AD, yet the nature of these alterations is poorly understood. Neuroimaging in mice is attractive for investigating mechanisms underlying functional and structural changes associated with AD pathology. Several preclinical murine models of AD have been generated based on transgenic insertion of human mutated APP genes. Depending on the specific mutations, mouse strains express different aspects of amyloid pathology, e.g. intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates, parenchymal plaques, or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We have applied multi-parametric MRI in three transgenic mouse lines to compare changes in brain function with resting-state fMRI and structure with diffusion tensor imaging and high resolution anatomical imaging. E22ΔAβ developing intracellular Aβ aggregates did not present functional or structural alterations compared to their wild-type littermates. PSAPP mice displaying parenchymal amyloid plaques displayed mild functional changes within the supplementary and barrel field cortices, and increased isocortical volume relative to controls. Extensive reduction in functional connectivity in the sensory-motor cortices and within the default mode network, as well as local volume increase in the midbrain relative to wild-type have been observed in ArcAβ mice bearing intracellular Aβ aggregates as well as parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. Patterns of functional and structural changes appear to be strain-specific and not directly related to amyloid deposition. PMID:27033685

  18. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  19. Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Quantitative Analysis of Structural MRI from the ABIDE Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucharsky Hiess, R.; Alter, R.; Sojoudi, S.; Ardekani, B. A.; Kuzniecky, R.; Pardoe, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial…

  20. Methods for Acquiring Structural MRI Data in Very Young Children with Autism without the Use of Sedation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordahl, Christine Wu; Simon, Tony J.; Zierhut, Cynthia; Solomon, Marjorie; Rogers, Sally J.; Amaral, David G.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a protocol with which we achieved a 93% success rate in acquiring high quality MRI scans without the use of sedation in 2.5-4.5 year old children with autism, developmental delays, and typical development. Our main strategy was to conduct MRIs during natural nocturnal sleep in the evenings after the child's normal bedtime.…

  1. Fusing fMRI and DTI Measures of Brain Function and Structure to Predict Working Memory and Processing Speed Performance among Inter-episode Bipolar Patients

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Benjamin S.; Theilmann, Rebecca J.; Sutherland, Ashley N.; Eyler, Lisa T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence for abnormal brain function as measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and cognitive dysfunction have been observed in inter-episode bipolar disorder (BD) patients. We aimed to create a joint statistical model of white matter integrity and functional response measures in explaining differences in working memory and processing speed among BD patients. Method Medicated inter-episode BD (n=26, age=45.2±10.1yrs) and healthy comparison (HC; n=36, age=46.3±11.5yrs) participants completed 51-direction DTI and fMRI while performing a working memory task. Participants also completed a processing speed test. Tract-based spatial statistics identified common white matter tracts where fractional anisotropy was calculated from atlas-defined regions of interest. Brain responses within regions of interest activation clusters were also calculated. Least angle regression was used to fuse fMRI and DTI data to select the best joint neuroimaging predictors of cognitive performance for each group. Results While there was overlap between groups in which regions were most related to cognitive performance, some relationships differed between groups. For working memory accuracy, BD-specific predictors included bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex from fMRI, splenium of the corpus callosum, left uncinate fasciculus, and bilateral superior longitudinal fasciculi from DTI. For processing speed, the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum and right superior longitudinal fasciculus from DTI were significant predictors of cognitive performance selectively for BD patients. Conclusions BD patients demonstrated unique brain-cognition relationships compared to HC. These findings are a first step in discovering how interactions of structural and functional brain abnormalities contribute to cognitive impairments in BD. PMID:26037664

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess Pain and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based (MRI-Based) Structural Spine Changes in Low Back Pain Patients After Yoga Practice.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Bhardwaj, Abhishek K; Gupta, Ram K; Sharma, Sachin K; Monro, Robin; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The present study aimed at determining whether 12 weeks of yoga practice in patients with chronic LBP and MRI-based degenerative changes would result in differences in: (i) self-reported pain, anxiety, and spinal flexibility; and (ii) the structure of the discs or vertebrae. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-two persons with MRI-proven degenerative intervertebral discs (group mean ±S.D., 36.2±6.4 years; 30 females) were randomly assigned to yoga and control groups. However, testing was conducted on only 40 subjects, so only their data are included in this study. The assessments were: self-reported pain, state anxiety, spinal flexibility, and MRI of the lumbosacral spine, performed using a 1.5 Tesla system with a spinal surface column. The yoga group was taught light exercises, physical postures, breathing techniques, and yoga relaxation techniques for 1 hour daily for 3 months. No intervention was given to the control group except for routine medical care. A repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc analyses (which was Bonferroni-adjusted) was used. The Ethics Committee of Patanjali Research Foundation had approved the study which had been registered in the Clinical Trials Registry of India (CTRI/2012/11/003094). RESULTS The yoga group showed a significant reduction in self-reported pain and state anxiety in a before/after comparison at 12 weeks. A few patients in both groups showed changes in the discs and vertebrae at post-intervention assessment. CONCLUSIONS Within 12 weeks, yoga practice reduced pain and state anxiety but did not alter MRI-proven changes in the intervertebral discs and in the vertebrae. PMID:27619104

  3. From prosodic structure to acoustic saliency: A fMRI investigation of speech rate, clarity, and emphasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, Elisa

    Acoustic variability in fluent speech can arise at many stages in speech production planning and execution. For example, at the phonological encoding stage, the grouping of phonemes into syllables determines which segments are coarticulated and, by consequence, segment-level acoustic variation. Likewise phonetic encoding, which determines the spatiotemporal extent of articulatory gestures, will affect the acoustic detail of segments. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure brain activity of fluent adult speakers in four speaking conditions: fast, normal, clear, and emphatic (or stressed) speech. These speech manner changes typically result in acoustic variations that do not change the lexical or semantic identity of productions but do affect the acoustic saliency of phonemes, syllables and/or words. Acoustic responses recorded inside the scanner were assessed quantitatively using eight acoustic measures and sentence duration was used as a covariate of non-interest in the neuroimaging analysis. Compared to normal speech, emphatic speech was characterized acoustically by a greater difference between stressed and unstressed vowels in intensity, duration, and fundamental frequency, and neurally by increased activity in right middle premotor cortex and supplementary motor area, and bilateral primary sensorimotor cortex. These findings are consistent with right-lateralized motor planning of prosodic variation in emphatic speech. Clear speech involved an increase in average vowel and sentence durations and average vowel spacing, along with increased activity in left middle premotor cortex and bilateral primary sensorimotor cortex. These findings are consistent with an increased reliance on feedforward control, resulting in hyper-articulation, under clear as compared to normal speech. Fast speech was characterized acoustically by reduced sentence duration and average vowel spacing, and neurally by increased activity in left anterior frontal

  4. MRI Anatomy of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    McCarley, Robert W.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Frumin, Melissa; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Levitt, James J.; Fischer, Iris A.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2010-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data have provided much evidence in support of our current view that schizophrenia is a brain disorder with altered brain structure, and consequently involving more than a simple disturbance in neurotransmission. This review surveys 118 peer–reviewed studies with control group from 1987 to May 1998. Most studies (81%) do not find abnormalities of whole brain/intracranial contents, while lateral ventricle enlargement is reported in 77%, and third ventricle enlargement in 67%. The temporal lobe was the brain parenchymal region with the most consistently documented abnormalities. Volume decreases were found in 62% of 37 studies of whole temporal lobe, and in 81% of 16 studies of the superior temporal gyrus (and in 100% with gray matter separately evaluated). Fully 77% of the 30 studies of the medial temporal lobe reported volume reduction in one or more of its constituent structures (hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus). Despite evidence for frontal lobe functional abnormalities, structural MRI investigations less consistently found abnormalities, with 55% describing volume reduction. It may be that frontal lobe volume changes are small, and near the threshold for MRI detection. The parietal and occipital lobes were much less studied; about half of the studies showed positive findings. Most studies of cortical gray matter (86%) found volume reductions were not diffuse, but more pronounced in certain areas. About two thirds of the studies of subcortical structures of thalamus, corpus callosum and basal ganglia (which tend to increase volume with typical neuroleptics), show positive findings, as do almost all (91%) studies of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP). Most data were consistent with a developmental model, but growing evidence was compatible also with progressive, neurodegenerative features, suggesting a “two– hit” model of schizophrenia, for which a cellular hypothesis is discussed. The relationship of

  5. What insights can fMRI offer into the structure and function of mid-tier visual areas?

    PubMed

    Olman, Cheryl A

    2015-01-01

    Inferring neural responses from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is challenging. Even if we take advantage of high-field systems to acquire data with submillimeter resolution, we are still acquiring data in which a single datum summarizes the responses of tens of thousands of neurons. Excitation and inhibition, spikes and subthreshold membrane potential modulations, local and long-range computations, and tuned and nonselective responses are mixed together in one signal. With a priori knowledge of the underlying neural population responses, careful experiment design allows us to manipulate the experiment or task design so that subpopulations are selectively modulated, and our experiments can reveal those tuning functions. However, because we want to be able to use fMRI to discover new kinds of tuning functions and selectivity, we cannot limit ourselves to experiments in which we already know what we are looking for. Broadly speaking, analyses that rely on classification of responses that are distributed across the local neural population [multi-voxel pattern analyses (MVPA)] offer the ability to discover new kinds of information representation and selectivities in neural subpopulations. There is, however, no way to determine how the information discovered with MVPA or other analyses is related to the underlying neuronal tuning functions. Therefore, we must continue to rely on behavioral, computational, and animal models to develop theories of information representation in mid-tier visual cortical areas. Once encoding models exist, fMRI can be powerful for testing these a priori models of information representation. As an aide in developing these models, an important contribution that fMRI can make to our understanding of mid-tier visual areas is derived from connectivity analyses and experiments that study information sharing between visual areas. This ability to quantify localized population average responses throughout the brain is the strength we

  6. MRI as a Novel In Vivo Approach for Assessing Structural Changes of Chlamydia Pathology in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shubing; Meng, Xiangjun; Skinner, Julie M.; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Boddicker, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent of sexually transmitted diseases. While Chlamydia infection is a reportable event and screening has increased over time, enhanced surveillance has not resulted in a reduction in the rate of infections, and Chlamydia infections frequently recur. The development of a preventative vaccine for Chlamydia may be the only effective approach for reducing infection and the frequency of pathological outcomes. Current vaccine research efforts involve time consuming and/or invasive approaches for assessment of disease state, and MRI presents a clinically translatable method for assessing infection and related pathology both quickly and non-invasively. Longitudinal T2-weighted MRI was performed over 63 days on both control or Chlamydia muridarum challenged mice, either with or without elementary body (EB) immunization, and gross necropsy was performed on day 65. A scoring system was developed to assess the number of regions affected by Chlamydia pathology and was used to document pathology over time and at necropsy. The scoring system documented increasing incidence of pathology in the unimmunized and challenged mice (significantly greater compared to the control and EB immunized-challenged groups) by 21 days post-challenge. No differences between the unchallenged and EB immunized-challenged mice were observed. MRI scores at Day 63 were consistently higher than gross necropsy scores at Day 65, although two of the three groups of mice showed no significant differences between the two techniques. In this work we describe the application of MRI in mice for the potential evaluation of disease pathology and sequelae caused by C. muridarum infection and this technique’s potential for evaluation of vaccines for Chlamydia. PMID:27467585

  7. MRI as a Novel In Vivo Approach for Assessing Structural Changes of Chlamydia Pathology in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hines, Catherine D G; Wang, Shubing; Meng, Xiangjun; Skinner, Julie M; Heinrichs, Jon H; Smith, Jeffrey G; Boddicker, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent of sexually transmitted diseases. While Chlamydia infection is a reportable event and screening has increased over time, enhanced surveillance has not resulted in a reduction in the rate of infections, and Chlamydia infections frequently recur. The development of a preventative vaccine for Chlamydia may be the only effective approach for reducing infection and the frequency of pathological outcomes. Current vaccine research efforts involve time consuming and/or invasive approaches for assessment of disease state, and MRI presents a clinically translatable method for assessing infection and related pathology both quickly and non-invasively. Longitudinal T2-weighted MRI was performed over 63 days on both control or Chlamydia muridarum challenged mice, either with or without elementary body (EB) immunization, and gross necropsy was performed on day 65. A scoring system was developed to assess the number of regions affected by Chlamydia pathology and was used to document pathology over time and at necropsy. The scoring system documented increasing incidence of pathology in the unimmunized and challenged mice (significantly greater compared to the control and EB immunized-challenged groups) by 21 days post-challenge. No differences between the unchallenged and EB immunized-challenged mice were observed. MRI scores at Day 63 were consistently higher than gross necropsy scores at Day 65, although two of the three groups of mice showed no significant differences between the two techniques. In this work we describe the application of MRI in mice for the potential evaluation of disease pathology and sequelae caused by C. muridarum infection and this technique's potential for evaluation of vaccines for Chlamydia. PMID:27467585

  8. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  9. Language structure in the brain: A fixation-related fMRI study of syntactic surprisal in reading.

    PubMed

    Henderson, John M; Choi, Wonil; Lowder, Matthew W; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2016-05-15

    How is syntactic analysis implemented by the human brain during language comprehension? The current study combined methods from computational linguistics, eyetracking, and fMRI to address this question. Subjects read passages of text presented as paragraphs while their eye movements were recorded in an MRI scanner. We parsed the text using a probabilistic context-free grammar to isolate syntactic difficulty. Syntactic difficulty was quantified as syntactic surprisal, which is related to the expectedness of a given word's syntactic category given its preceding context. We compared words with high and low syntactic surprisal values that were equated for length, frequency, and lexical surprisal, and used fixation-related (FIRE) fMRI to measure neural activity associated with syntactic surprisal for each fixated word. We observed greater neural activity for high than low syntactic surprisal in two predicted cortical regions previously identified with syntax: left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and less robustly, left anterior superior temporal lobe (ATL). These results support the hypothesis that left IFG and ATL play a central role in syntactic analysis during language comprehension. More generally, the results suggest a broader cortical network associated with syntactic prediction that includes increased activity in bilateral IFG and insula, as well as fusiform and right lingual gyri. PMID:26908322

  10. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  11. Synthetic Generation of Myocardial Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent MRI Time Series via Structural Sparse Decomposition Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Cristian; Morisi, Rita; Boschetto, Davide; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify approaches that generate appropriate synthetic data (computer generated) for Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent (CP–BOLD) MRI. CP–BOLD MRI is a new contrast agent- and stress-free approach for examining changes in myocardial oxygenation in response to coronary artery disease. However, since signal intensity changes are subtle, rapid visualization is not possible with the naked eye. Quantifying and visualizing the extent of disease relies on myocardial segmentation and registration to isolate the myocardium and establish temporal correspondences and ischemia detection algorithms to identify temporal differences in BOLD signal intensity patterns. If transmurality of the defect is of interest pixel-level analysis is necessary and thus a higher precision in registration is required. Such precision is currently not available affecting the design and performance of the ischemia detection algorithms. In this work, to enable algorithmic developments of ischemia detection irrespective to registration accuracy, we propose an approach that generates synthetic pixel-level myocardial time series. We do this by (a) modeling the temporal changes in BOLD signal intensity based on sparse multi-component dictionary learning, whereby segmentally derived myocardial time series are extracted from canine experimental data to learn the model; and (b) demonstrating the resemblance between real and synthetic time series for validation purposes. We envision that the proposed approach has the capacity to accelerate development of tools for ischemia detection while markedly reducing experimental costs so that cardiac BOLD MRI can be rapidly translated into the clinical arena for the noninvasive assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24691119

  12. MRI of plants and foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  13. Impossible expectations: fMRI adaptation in the lateral occipital complex (LOC) is modulated by the statistical regularities of 3D structural information.

    PubMed

    Freud, Erez; Ganel, Tzvi; Avidan, Galia

    2015-11-15

    fMRI adaptation (fMRIa), the attenuation of fMRI signal which follows repeated presentation of a stimulus, is a well-documented phenomenon. Yet, the underlying neural mechanisms supporting this effect are not fully understood. Recently, short-term perceptual expectations, induced by specific experimental settings, were shown to play an important modulating role in fMRIa. Here we examined the role of long-term expectations, based on 3D structural statistical regularities, in the modulation of fMRIa. To this end, human participants underwent fMRI scanning while performing a same-different task on pairs of possible (regular, expected) objects and spatially impossible (irregular, unexpected) objects. We hypothesized that given the spatial irregularity of impossible objects in relation to real-world visual experience, the visual system would always generate a prediction which is biased to the possible version of the objects. Consistently, fMRIa effects in the lateral occipital cortex (LOC) were found for possible, but not for impossible objects. Additionally, in alternating trials the order of stimulus presentation modulated LOC activity. That is, reduced activation was observed in trials in which the impossible version of the object served as the prime object (i.e. first object) and was followed by the possible version compared to the reverse order. These results were also supported by the behavioral advantage observed for trials that were primed by possible objects. Together, these findings strongly emphasize the importance of perceptual expectations in object representation and provide novel evidence for the role of real-world statistical regularities in eliciting fMRIa. PMID:26254586

  14. Structural brain abnormalities in patients with inflammatory illness acquired following exposure to water-damaged buildings: a volumetric MRI study using NeuroQuant®.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Ritchie C; House, Dennis; Ryan, James C

    2014-01-01

    Executive cognitive and neurologic abnormalities are commonly seen in patients with a chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) acquired following exposure to the interior environment of water-damaged buildings (WDB), but a clear delineation of the physiologic or structural basis for these abnormalities has not been defined. Symptoms of affected patients routinely include headache, difficulty with recent memory, concentration, word finding, numbness, tingling, metallic taste and vertigo. Additionally, persistent proteomic abnormalities in inflammatory parameters that can alter permeability of the blood-brain barrier, such as C4a, TGFB1, MMP9 and VEGF, are notably present in cases of CIRS-WDB compared to controls, suggesting a consequent inflammatory injury to the central nervous system. Findings of gliotic areas in MRI scans in over 45% of CIRS-WDB cases compared to 5% of controls, as well as elevated lactate and depressed ratios of glutamate to glutamine, are regularly seen in MR spectroscopy of cases. This study used the volumetric software program NeuroQuant® (NQ) to determine specific brain structure volumes in consecutive patients (N=17) seen in a medical clinic specializing in inflammatory illness. Each of these patients presented for evaluation of an illness thought to be associated with exposure to WDB, and received an MRI that was evaluated by NQ. When compared to those of a medical control group (N=18), statistically significant differences in brain structure proportions were seen for patients in both hemispheres of two of the eleven brain regions analyzed; atrophy of the caudate nucleus and enlargement of the pallidum. In addition, the left amygdala and right forebrain were also enlarged. These volumetric abnormalities, in conjunction with concurrent abnormalities in inflammatory markers, suggest a model for structural brain injury in "mold illness" based on increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier due to chronic, systemic inflammation

  15. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  16. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor wants to perform a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam, there is a possibility that your ...

  17. MRI of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparent clinically. In priapism, it is an emerging technique for assessing corporal viability, and in fracture it can in most cases make the diagnosis and locate the injury. In some cases of penile fibrosis and Peyronie's disease, it may aid surgical planning, and in complex pelvic fracture may replace or augment conventional urethrography. It is an excellent investigation for the malfunctioning penile prosthesis. PMID:23118102

  18. Gadolinium(III)-loaded nanoparticulate zeolites as potential high-field MRI contrast agents: relationship between structure and relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Csajbók, Eva; Bányai, István; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Zhou, Wuzong; Peters, Joop A

    2005-08-01

    The effects of dealumination, pore size, and calcination on the efficiency (as expressed in the relaxivity) of Gd3+-loaded zeolites for potential application as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were studied. Partial dealumination of zeolites NaY or NaA by treatment with (NH4)2SiF6 or diluted HCl resulted in materials that, upon loading with Gd3+, had a much higher relaxivity than the corresponding non-dealuminated materials. Analysis of the 1H NMR dispersion profiles of the various zeolites showed that this can be mainly ascribed to an increase of the amount of water inside the zeolite cavities as a result of the destruction of walls between cavities. However, the average residence time of water inside the Gd3+-loaded cavities did not change significantly, which suggests that the windows of the Gd3+-loaded cavities are not affected by the dealumination. Upon calcination, the Gd3+ ions moved to the small sodalite cavities and became less accessible for water, resulting in a decrease in relaxivity. The important role of diffusion for the relaxivity was demonstrated by a comparison of the relaxivity of Gd3+-loaded zeolite NaY and NaA samples. NaA had much lower relaxivities due to the smaller pore sizes. The transversal relaxivities of the Gd3+-doped zeolites are comparable in magnitude to the longitudinal ones at low magnetic fields (<60 MHz). However at higher fields, the transversal relaxivities steeply increased, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities decreased as field strength increased. Therefore, these materials have potential as T1 MRI contrast agents at low field, and as T2 agents at higher fields. PMID:15929138

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  20. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: Evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Zoë A.; Sun, Jessica; Laura Case; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005). Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years) in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17), who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM) connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study. PMID:25610796

  1. Brain structural connectivity increases concurrent with functional improvement: evidence from diffusion tensor MRI in children with cerebral palsy during therapy.

    PubMed

    Englander, Zoë A; Sun, Jessica; Laura Case; Mikati, Mohamad A; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Song, Allen W

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) refers to a heterogeneous group of permanent but non-progressive movement disorders caused by injury to the developing fetal or infant brain (Bax et al., 2005). Because of its serious long-term consequences, effective interventions that can help improve motor function, independence, and quality of life are critically needed. Our ongoing longitudinal clinical trial to treat children with CP is specifically designed to meet this challenge. To maximize the potential for functional improvement, all children in this trial received autologous cord blood transfusions (with order randomized with a placebo administration over 2 years) in conjunction with more standard physical and occupational therapies. As a part of this trial, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to improve our understanding of how these interventions affect brain development, and to develop biomarkers of treatment efficacy. In this report, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and subsequent brain connectome analyses were performed in a subset of children enrolled in the clinical trial (n = 17), who all exhibited positive but varying degrees of functional improvement over the first 2-year period of the study. Strong correlations between increases in white matter (WM) connectivity and functional improvement were demonstrated; however no significant relationships between either of these factors with the age of the child at time of enrollment were identified. Thus, our data indicate that increases in brain connectivity reflect improved functional abilities in children with CP. In future work, this potential biomarker can be used to help differentiate the underlying mechanisms of functional improvement, as well as to identify treatments that can best facilitate functional improvement upon un-blinding of the timing of autologous cord blood transfusions at the completion of this study. PMID:25610796

  2. Spontaneous Slow Fluctuation of EEG Alpha Rhythm Reflects Activity in Deep-Brain Structures: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Kei; Hanakawa, Takashi; Morimoto, Masako; Honda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the occipital alpha rhythm on brain electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with brain activity in the cerebral neocortex and deep brain structures. To further understand the mechanisms of alpha rhythm power fluctuation, we performed simultaneous EEGs and functional magnetic resonance imaging recordings in human subjects during a resting state and explored the dynamic relationship between alpha power fluctuation and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the brain. Based on the frequency characteristics of the alpha power time series (APTS) during 20-minute EEG recordings, we divided the APTS into two components: fast fluctuation (0.04–0.167 Hz) and slow fluctuation (0–0.04 Hz). Analysis of the correlation between the MRI signal and each component revealed that the slow fluctuation component of alpha power was positively correlated with BOLD signal changes in the brain stem and the medial part of the thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex, while the fast fluctuation component was correlated with the lateral part of the thalamus and the anterior cingulate cortex, but not the brain stem. In summary, these data suggest that different subcortical structures contribute to slow and fast modulations of alpha spectra on brain EEG. PMID:23824708

  3. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  4. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  5. [MRI of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI. PMID:25394927

  6. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration in the presurgical evaluation of refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Donaire, A; Serès, E; Setoain, X; Bargalló, N; Falcón, C; Sanmartí, F; Maestro, I; Rumià, J; Pintor, L; Boget, T; Aparicio, J; Carreño, M

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the usefulness of coregistration of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (PET/MRI) and of coregistration of PET/MRI with subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) (PET/MRI/SISCOM) in localizing the potential epileptogenic zone in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. We prospectively included 35 consecutive patients with refractory focal epilepsy whose presurgical evaluation included a PET study. Separately acquired PET and structural MRI images were coregistered for each patient. When possible, ictal SPECT and SISCOM were obtained and coregistered with PET/MRI. The potential location of the epileptogenic zone determined by neuroimaging was compared with the seizure onset zone determined by long-term video-EEG monitoring and with invasive EEG studies in patients who were implanted. Structural MRI showed no lesions in 15 patients. In these patients, PET/MRI coregistration showed a hypometabolic area in 12 (80%) patients that was concordant with seizure onset zone on EEG in 9. In 7 patients without MRI lesions, PET/MRI detected a hypometabolism that was undetected on PET alone. SISCOM, obtained in 25 patients, showed an area of hyperperfusion concordant with the seizure onset zone on EEG in 7 (58%) of the 12 of these patients who had normal MRI findings. SISCOM hyperperfusion was less extensive than PET hypometabolism. A total of 19 patients underwent surgery; 11 of these underwent invasive-EEG monitoring and the seizure onset zone was concordant with PET/MRI in all cases. PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration, performed in 4 of these patients, was concordant in 3 (75%). After epilepsy surgery, 13 (68%) patients are seizure-free after a mean follow-up of 4.5 years. PET/MRI and PET/MRI/SISCOM coregistration are useful for determining the potential epileptogenic zone and thus for planning invasive EEG studies and surgery more precisely, especially in

  7. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... The table slides into the middle of the MRI machine. Small devices, called coils, may be placed around ... anxious. Or your provider may suggest an open MRI in which the machine is not as close to the body. Before ...

  8. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  9. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast MRI may be done in combination with mammography or ultrasound . It is not a replacement for mammography. ... breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography. CA Cancer J Clin . 2007;57:75-89. ...

  10. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  11. Cardiac MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  12. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  13. Interhemispheric Functional and Structural Disconnection in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Combined Resting-State fMRI and DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Mchugh, Robert; Sun, Xiaoyu; Li, Kuncheng; Yang, Qing X.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that patients with Alzheimer’s disease presented disconnection syndrome. However, little is known about the alterations of interhemispheric functional interactions and underlying structural connectivity in the AD patients. In this study, we combined resting-state functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate interhemispheric functional and structural connectivity in 16 AD, 16 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as well as 16 cognitive normal healthy subjects (CN). The pattern of the resting state interhemispheric functional connectivity was measured with a voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) method. Decreased VMHC was observed in AD and MCI subjects in anterior brain regions including the prefrontal cortices and subcortical regions with a pattern of ADstructures. These results suggest that VMHC can be used as a biomarker for the degeneration of the interhemispheric connectivity in AD. PMID:25938561

  14. The Effects of X Chromosome Loss on Neuroanatomical and Cognitive Phenotypes During Adolescence: a Multi-modal Structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Zhang, Zhixin; Zhao, Qiuling; Zhang, Jiaying; Zhong, Suyu; Bi, Yanchao; He, Yong; Pan, Hui; Gong, Gaolang

    2015-09-01

    The absence of all or part of one X chromosome in female humans causes Turner's syndrome (TS), providing a unique "knockout model" to investigate the role of the X chromosome in neuroanatomy and cognition. Previous studies have demonstrated TS-associated brain differences; however, it remains largely unknown 1) how the brain structures are affected by the type of X chromosome loss and 2) how X chromosome loss influences the brain-cognition relationship. Here, we addressed these by investigating gray matter morphology and white matter connectivity using a multimodal MRI dataset from 34 adolescent TS patients (13 mosaic and 21 nonmosaic) and 21 controls. Intriguingly, the 2 TS groups exhibited significant differences in surface area in the right angular gyrus and in white matter integrity of the left tapetum of corpus callosum; these data support a link between these brain phenotypes and the type of X chromosome loss in TS. We further showed that the X chromosome modulates specific brain-cognition relationships: thickness and surface area in multiple cortical regions are positively correlated with working-memory performance in controls but negatively in TS. These findings provide novel insights into the X chromosome effect on neuroanatomical and cognitive phenotypes and highlight the role of genetic factors in brain-cognition relationships. PMID:24770708

  15. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  16. Patient-Specific Carotid Plaque Progression Simulation Using 3D Meshless Generalized Finite Difference Models with Fluid-Structure Interactions Based on Serial In Vivo MRI Data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Atluri, Satya

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we introduced a computational procedure based on three-dimensional meshless generalized finite difference (MGFD) method and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to quantify patient-specific carotid atherosclerotic plaque growth functions and simulate plaque progression. Structure-only models were used in our previous report. In this paper, fluid-stricture interaction (FSI) was added to improve on prediction accuracy. One participating patient was scanned three times (T1, T2, and T3, at intervals of about 18 months) to obtain plaque progression data. Blood flow was assumed to laminar, Newtonian, viscous and incompressible. The Navier-Stokes equations with arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation were used as the governing equations. Plaque material was assumed to be uniform, homogeneous, isotropic, linear, and nearly incompressible. The linear elastic model was used. The 3D FSI plaque model was discretized and solved using a meshless generalized finite difference (GFD) method. Growth functions with a) morphology alone; b) morphology and plaque wall stress (PWS); morphology and flow shear stress (FSS), and d) morphology, PWS and FSS were introduced to predict future plaque growth based on previous time point data. Starting from the T2 plaque geometry, plaque progression was simulated by solving the FSI model and adjusting plaque geometry using plaque growth functions iteratively until T3 is reached. Numerically simulated plaque progression agreed very well with the target T3 plaque geometry with errors ranging from 8.62%, 7.22%, 5.77% and 4.39%, with the growth function including morphology, plaque wall stress and flow shear stress terms giving the best predictions. Adding flow shear stress term to the growth function improved the prediction error from 7.22% to 4.39%, a 40% improvement. We believe this is the first time 3D plaque progression FSI simulation based on multi-year patient-tracking data was reported. Serial MRI-based progression

  17. Microtesla MRI of the human brain combined with MEG

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Savukov, Igor M.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Gomez, John J.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    One of the challenges in functional brain imaging is integration of complementary imaging modalities, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). MEG, which uses highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to directly measure magnetic fields of neuronal currents, cannot be combined with conventional high-field MRI in a single instrument. Indirect matching of MEG and MRI data leads to significant co-registration errors. A recently proposed imaging method-SQUID-based microtesla MRI-can be naturally combined with MEG in the same system to directly provide structural maps for MEG-localized sources. It enables easy and accurate integration of MEG and MRI/fMRI, because microtesla MR images can be precisely matched to structural images provided by high-field MRI and other techniques. Here we report the first images of the human brain by microtesla MRI, together with auditory MEG (functional) data, recorded using the same seven-channel SQUID system during the same imaging session. The images were acquired at 46 microtesla measurement field with pre-polarization at 30 mT. We also estimated transverse relaxation times for different tissues at microtesla fields. Our results demonstrate feasibility and potential of human brain imaging by microtesla MRI. They also show that two new types of imaging equipment-low-cost systems for anatomical MRI of the human brain at microtesla fields, and more advanced instruments for combined functional (MEG) and structural (microtesla MRI) brain imaging-are practical. PMID:18619876

  18. Can Structural MRI Indices of Cerebral Integrity Track Cognitive Trends in Executive Control Function During Normal Maturation and Adulthood?

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Robin, Don A.; Royall, Don R.; Coyle, Thomas; Lancaster, Jack; Kochunov, Valeria; Schlosser, Anita E.; Fox, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    We explored the relationship between structural neuroimaging-based indices of cerebral integrity and executive control function (ECF) in two groups of healthy subjects: A maturing group (33 subjects; 19–29 years) and a senescing group (38 adults; 30–90 years). ECF was assessed using the Executive Interview (EXIT) battery. Cortical indices of cerebral integrity included GM thickness, intergyral span, and sulcal span, each measured for five cortical regions per hemisphere. Subcortical indices included fractional anisotropy (FA), measured using track-based-spatial-statistics (TBSS), and the volume of T2-hyperintense WM (HWM). In the maturing group, no significant relationships between neuroanatomical changes and ECF were found; however, there were hints that late-term maturation of cerebral WM influenced variability in ECF. In the senescing group, the decline in ECF corresponded to atrophic changes in cerebral WM (sulcal and intergyral span) primarily in the superior frontal and anterior cingulate regions. A large fraction of the variability in ECF (62%) can be explained by variability in the structural indices from these two regions. PMID:19067326

  19. Word tones cueing morphosyntactic structure: Neuroanatomical substrates and activation time-course assessed by EEG and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Roll, Mikael; Söderström, Pelle; Mannfolk, Peter; Shtyrov, Yury; Johansson, Mikael; van Westen, Danielle; Horne, Merle

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies distinguish between right hemisphere-dominant processing of prosodic/tonal information and left-hemispheric modulation of grammatical information as well as lexical tones. Swedish word accents offer a prime testing ground to better understand this division. Although similar to lexical tones, word accents are determined by words' morphosyntactic structure, which enables listeners to use the tone at the beginning of a word to predict its grammatical ending. We recorded electrophysiological and hemodynamic brain responses to words where stem tones matched or mismatched inflectional suffixes. Tones produced brain potential effects after 136 ms, correlating with subject variability in average BOLD in left primary auditory cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and inferior frontal gyrus. Invalidly cued suffixes activated the left inferior parietal lobe, arguably reflecting increased processing cost of their meaning. Thus, interaction of word accent tones with grammatical morphology yielded a rapid neural response correlating in subject variability with activations in predominantly left-hemispheric brain areas. PMID:26291769

  20. [STRUCTURE OF HUMAN CORPUS CALLOSUM IN AFTER-DEATH STATE COMPARED TO INTRA-VITAM MRI IMAGES].

    PubMed

    Boiagina, O

    2016-05-01

    Our preliminary results suggest that the corpus callosum is composed of a certain number of stringy formations visualized on macroscopic and microscopic level that we proposed to call commissural funiculi. They are treated as subcallous units of the first order. The purpose of this research is to find out the form of the above-mentioned corpus callosum formations as being displayed on its sagittal profile as well as the extent to which they are displayed. The material used was male and female cerebrum of mature age people, who died for reasons not related to the pathology of the central nervous system. Cerebrum extracted from the skull after being washed was exposed to a two week fixation in 10% formalin solution. The sagittal plane slicer was used for brain dissection. Photo fixation of the medial surface of hemispheres was implemented with a digital camera. It was found out that the sagittal cut of the corpus callosum can be represented as a formation having segmental structure principle. Also, according to our observations, the trunk of the corpus callosum has distinct morphological features of bilateral asymmetry. PMID:27348174

  1. Age-Related Differences in White Matter Integrity in Healthy Human Brain: Evidence from Structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Rishu; Rallabandi, V.P. Subramanyam; Roy, Prasun K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to investigate the relationship between microstructural white matter (WM) diffusivity indices and macrostructural WM volume (WMV) among healthy individuals (20–85 years). Whole-brain diffusion measures were calculated from diffusion tensor imaging using FMRIB software library while WMV was estimated through voxel-based morphometry, and voxel-based analysis was carried out using tract-based spatial statistics. Our results revealed that mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity had shown good correlation with WMV but not for fractional anisotropy (FA). Voxel-wise tract-based spatial statistics analysis for FA showed a significant decrease in four regions for middle-aged group compared to young-aged group, in 22 regions for old-aged group compared to middle-aged group, and in 26 regions for old-aged group compared to young-aged group (P < 0.05). We found significantly lower WMV, FA, and mean diffusivity values in females than males and inverted-U trend for FA in males. We conclude differential age- and gender-related changes for structural WMV and WM diffusion indices. PMID:27279747

  2. Short-term group cognitive behavior therapy contributes to recovery from mild depression: Evidence from functional and structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Du, Xue; Mao, Yu; Ran, Qian; Zhang, Qinglin; Luo, QingHua; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-05-30

    We used the functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging to explore the neural correlates of response to group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in mild depression. College students with mild depressive symptoms participated in our 4-week group CBT training. The behavioral results showed that depression symptoms decreased after participation in group CBT. After the training, the gray matter volume (GMV) in the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) increased and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) decreased. In addition, GMV in the left postcentral gyrus decreased after the group CBT. Moreover, the increase of percentage change in the right MFG was positively correlated with the decrease of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score, while less decrease in percentage change in the left postcentral gyrus was significantly correlated with greater decrease of BDI score. Finally, after the training, functional connectivity between the right MFG and the insula decreased, while the connectivity between the left postcentral gyrus and the parahippocampal gyrus increased. These findings suggested that short-term participation in group CBT had an effective impact on mild depression. It contributed to decreasing negative bias (salience detection for negative stimuli). PMID:27124424

  3. Microtesla MRI of the human brain combined with MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Savukov, Igor M.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Gomez, John J.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-09-01

    One of the challenges in functional brain imaging is integration of complementary imaging modalities, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). MEG, which uses highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to directly measure magnetic fields of neuronal currents, cannot be combined with conventional high-field MRI in a single instrument. Indirect matching of MEG and MRI data leads to significant co-registration errors. A recently proposed imaging method—SQUID-based microtesla MRI—can be naturally combined with MEG in the same system to directly provide structural maps for MEG-localized sources. It enables easy and accurate integration of MEG and MRI/fMRI, because microtesla MR images can be precisely matched to structural images provided by high-field MRI and other techniques. Here we report the first images of the human brain by microtesla MRI, together with auditory MEG (functional) data, recorded using the same seven-channel SQUID system during the same imaging session. The images were acquired at 46 μT measurement field with pre-polarization at 30 mT. We also estimated transverse relaxation times for different tissues at microtesla fields. Our results demonstrate feasibility and potential of human brain imaging by microtesla MRI. They also show that two new types of imaging equipment—low-cost systems for anatomical MRI of the human brain at microtesla fields, and more advanced instruments for combined functional (MEG) and structural (microtesla MRI) brain imaging—are practical.

  4. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5–3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  5. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; LaPierre, Cristen D; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E J; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm(3) imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices. PMID:26469756

  6. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (<10 mT) will complement traditional MRI, providing clinically relevant images and setting new standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  7. MRI of the shoulder

    SciTech Connect

    Zlatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Schnall, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating shoulder disorders. The book gives detailed information on MRI techniques and shoulder anatomy, describes and illustrates MRI findings for a wide range of shoulder disorders, and explains how abnormalities seen on MIR images relate to pathophysiology and clinical signs. Special attention is given to imaging of rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability conditions for which MRI is the imaging procedure of choice. Complementing the text are 365 high-quality scans depicting normal shoulder anatomy and showing the wide variety of pathologic findings encountered in practice.

  8. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A.; Li Chun; Swanson, David A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  9. Structure-property relationships in manganese oxide--mesoporous silica nanoparticles used for T1-weighted MRI and simultaneous anti-cancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Zhang, Shengjian; Chen, Feng; Sun, Shikuan; He, Qianjun; Ma, Ming; Wang, Xia; Wu, Huixia; Zhang, Lingxia; Zhang, Linlin; Shi, Jianlin

    2012-03-01

    The extremely low longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) of manganese oxide has severely impeded their substitution for cytotoxic gadolinium-based contrast agents for safe clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report on a synthetic strategy of chemical oxidation/reduction reaction in-situ in mesopores, followed by hydrogen reduction, for the fabrication of non-toxic manganese oxide/MSNs-based MRI-T(1) contrast agents with highly comparable imaging performance to commercial Gd-based agents. This strategy involves a "soft-templating" process to prepare mesoporous silica nanoparticles, in-situ reduction of MnO(4)(-) by the "soft templates" in mesopores and heat treatment under reducing atmosphere, to disperse manganese oxide nanoparticles within mesopores. This special nanostructure combines the merits of nanopores for maximum manganese paramagnetic center accessibility for water molecules for enhanced MRI performance and encapsulation/sustained release/intracellular delivery of drugs. The synthesized manganese oxide/MSNs were successfully assessed as a high performance contrast agent for MRI-T(1) both in intro and in vivo, and meanwhile, was also demonstrated as an effective anti-cancer drug delivery (doxorubicin) vehicle, therefore, a family of manganese-based theranostics was successfully demonstrated based on the manganese oxide/MSNs composite. PMID:22177841

  10. Current MRI Techniques for the Assessment of Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Takamune; Wang, Feng; Quarles, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Over the past decade a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have been developed and applied to many kidney diseases. These MRI techniques show great promise, enabling the noninvasive assessment of renal structure, function, and injury in individual subjects. This review will highlight current applications of functional MRI techniques for the assessment of renal disease and discuss future directions. Recent findings Many pathological (functional and structural) changes or factors in renal disease can be assessed by advanced MRI techniques. These include renal vascular structure and function (contrast-enhanced MRI, arterial spin labeling), tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), renal tissue injury and fibrosis (diffusion or magnetization transfer imaging, MR elastography), renal metabolism (chemical exchange saturation transfer, spectroscopic imaging), nephron endowment (cationic-contrast imaging), sodium concentration (23Na-MRI), and molecular events (targeted-contrast imaging). Summary Current advances in MRI techniques have enabled the non-invasive investigation of renal disease. Further development, evaluation, and application of the MRI techniques should facilitate better understanding and assessment of renal disease and the development of new imaging biomarkers, enabling the intensified treatment to high-risk populations and a more rapid interrogation of novel therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:26066472

  11. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B; Hricak, Hedvig

    2013-09-16

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot's accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  12. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot’s accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  13. Diffusion MRI and its role in neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain’s white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition. PMID:26255305

  14. Diffusion MRI and its Role in Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O; Hemmy, Laura; Camchong, Jazmin

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) is a popular method used by neuroscientists to uncover unique information about the structural connections within the brain. dMRI is a non-invasive imaging methodology in which image contrast is based on the diffusion of water molecules in tissue. While applicable to many tissues in the body, this review focuses exclusively on the use of dMRI to examine white matter in the brain. In this review, we begin with a definition of diffusion and how diffusion is measured with MRI. Next we introduce the diffusion tensor model, the predominant model used in dMRI. We then describe acquisition issues related to acquisition parameters and scanner hardware and software. Sources of artifacts are then discussed, followed by a brief review of analysis approaches. We provide an overview of the limitations of the traditional diffusion tensor model, and highlight several more sophisticated non-tensor models that better describe the complex architecture of the brain's white matter. We then touch on reliability and validity issues of diffusion measurements. Finally, we describe examples of ways in which dMRI has been applied to studies of brain disorders and how identified alterations relate to symptomatology and cognition. PMID:26255305

  15. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  16. An MRI-based attenuation correction method for combined PET/MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hesheng

    2009-02-01

    We are developing MRI-based attenuation correction methods for PET images. PET has high sensitivity but relatively low resolution and little anatomic details. MRI can provide excellent anatomical structures with high resolution and high soft tissue contrast. MRI can be used to delineate tumor boundaries and to provide an anatomic reference for PET, thereby improving quantitation of PET data. Combined PET/MRI can offer metabolic, functional and anatomic information and thus can provide a powerful tool to study the mechanism of a variety of diseases. Accurate attenuation correction represents an essential component for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative PET images. Unfortunately, the present design of hybrid PET/MRI does not offer measured attenuation correction using a transmission scan. This problem may be solved by deriving attenuation maps from corresponding anatomic MR images. Our approach combines image registration, classification, and attenuation correction in a single scheme. MR images and the preliminary reconstruction of PET data are first registered using our automatic registration method. MRI images are then classified into different tissue types using our multiscale fuzzy C-mean classification method. The voxels of classified tissue types are assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients to generate attenuation correction factors. Corrected PET emission data are then reconstructed using a threedimensional filtered back projection method and an order subset expectation maximization method. Results from simulated images and phantom data demonstrated that our attenuation correction method can improve PET data quantitation and it can be particularly useful for combined PET/MRI applications.

  17. Towards MRI microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids. PMID:20379545

  18. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thomsen HS, Reimer P. Intravascular contrast media for radiology, CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, ... JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  19. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  20. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  1. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  2. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  3. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  4. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  5. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  6. Clinical application of MRI in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Kelly A.; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    MRI has long been applied to clinical medical and neurological cases for the structural assessment of tissues as well as their physiological and functional needs and processes. These uses are at a variety of developmental stages in ophthalmology, from common use of clinical structural assessment for neuro-ophthalmology and evaluation of space-occupying lesions to the beginning stages of experimentally measuring functional activation of specific layers within the retina and measurement of physiological oxygen responses. New MRI methodologies, such as the use of orbital coils and Gd-DTPA image enhancement, have been researched, developed, and validated in the eye, opening new possibilities for this technology to enter the clinic. This review aims to summarize the clinical ophthalmological uses of MRI, focusing on the current use of the technology and future applications. PMID:18384176

  7. Optogenetic Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  8. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  9. Comparison of Coregistration Accuracy of Pelvic Structures Between Sequential and Simultaneous Imaging During Hybrid PET/MRI in Patients with Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Balar, Arjun V.; Huang, William C.; Jackson, Kimberly; Friedman, Kent P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare coregistration of the bladder wall, bladder masses, and pelvic lymph nodes between sequential and simultaneous PET and MRI acquisitions obtained during hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI performed using a diuresis protocol in bladder cancer patients. Methods Six bladder cancer patients underwent 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI, including IV Lasix administration and oral hydration, before imaging to achieve bladder clearance. Axial T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) was obtained approximately 40 minutes before PET (“sequential”) and concurrently with PET (“simultaneous”). Three-dimensional spatial coordinates of the bladder wall, bladder masses, and pelvic lymph nodes were recorded for PET and T2WI. Distances between these locations on PET and T2WI sequences were computed and used to compare in-plane (x-y plane) and through-plane (z-axis) misregistration relative to PET between T2WI acquisitions. Results The bladder increased in volume between T2WI acquisitions (sequential, 176 [139]mL; simultaneous, 255 [146]mL). Four patients exhibited a bladder mass, all with increased activity (SUV, 9.5–38.4). Seven pelvic lymph nodes in 4 patients showed increased activity (SUV, 2.2–9.9). The bladder wall exhibited substantially less misregistration relative to PET for simultaneous, compared with sequential, acquisitions in in-plane (2.8 [3.1]mm vs 7.4 [9.1]mm) and through-plane (1.7 [2.2]mm vs 5.7 [9.6]mm) dimensions. Bladder masses exhibited slightly decreased misregistration for simultaneous, compared with sequential, acquisitions in in-plane (2.2 [1.4]mm vs 2.6 [1.9]mm) and through-plane (0.0 [0.0]mm vs 0.3 [0.8]mm) dimensions. FDG-avid lymph nodes exhibited slightly decreased in-plane misregistration (1.1 [0.8]mm vs 2.5 [0.6]mm), although identical through-plane misregistration (4.0 [1.9]mm vs 4.0 [2.8]mm). Conclusions Using hybrid PET/MRI, simultaneous imaging substantially improved bladder wall coregistration and slightly improved

  10. [MRI compatibility of deep brain stimulator].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujing

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy develops rapidly in clinical application. The structures of deep brain stimulator and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are introduced, the interactions are analyzed, and the two compatible problems of radio frequency (RF) heating and imaging artifact are summarized in this paper. PMID:24195387

  11. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments

    PubMed Central

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4–8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic). PMID:21243106

  12. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  13. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  14. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  15. Development of hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.

    1998-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using the MR signal from hyperpolarized noble gases 129Xe and 3He may become an important new diagnostic technique. Alex Pines (adapting the hyperpolarization technique pioneered by William Happer) presented MR spectroscopy studies using hyperpolarized 129Xe. The current authors recognized that the enormous enhancement in the detectability of 129Xe, promised by hyperpolarization, would solve the daunting SNR problems impeding their attempts to use 129Xe as an in vivo MR probe, especially in order to study the action of general anesthetics. It was hoped that hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI would yield resolutions equivalent to that achievable with conventional 1H 2O MRI, and that xenon's solubility in lipids would facilitate investigations of lipid-rich tissues that had as yet been hard to image. The publication of hyperpolarized 129Xe images of excised mouse lungs heralded the emergence of hyperpolarized noble-gas MRI. Using hyperpolarized 3He, researchers have obtained images of the lung gas space of guinea pigs and of humans. Lung gas images from patients with pulmonary disease have recently been reported. 3He is easier to hyperpolarize than 129Xe, and it yields a stronger MR signal, but its extremely low solubility in blood precludes its use for the imaging of tissue. Xenon, however, readily dissolves in blood, and the T1 of dissolved 129Xe is long enough for sufficient polarization to be carried by the circulation to distal tissues. Hyperpolarized 129Xe dissolved-phase tissue spectra from the thorax and head of rodents and humans have been obtained, as have chemical shift 129Xe images from the head of rats. Lung gas 129Xe images of rodents, and more recently of humans, have been reported. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) may elucidate the link between the structure of the lung and its function. The technique may also be useful in identifying ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with pulmonary embolism, in staging and tracking the

  16. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  17. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  18. Detectability of MRI Turbulence in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, Richard; Semenov, Dmitry; Flock, Mario; Henning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the nurseries of planet formation. Within them, turbulence acts as a stirring mechanism, combining the large population of small grains successively into pebbles, planetesimals and eventually planetary cores. There are many tuburbulent mechanisms proposed to fulfil this role, however, current observations are not sufficient to distinguish one mechanism from the other.This poster looks at the hallmarks of magneto-rotational instabilities (MRI), which relies on the coupling of the gas to the magnetic fields of the disk. Previous attempts to determine the electron fraction necessary for MRI to be present are hampered by the lack of atomic ions observed in disks and a large uncertainty when scaling abundance molecualr ions which are readily observed.It has been shown with global-MHD models, however, that MRI turbulence can incite distinct azimuthal dependent strucutres in the gas of the disk. We explore the possibility of identifying this non-Keplerian nature of a disk's kinematical structure and discuss whether, through a mode analysis of the kinematic structure, one can isolate MRI tuburlence from other forms with full ALMA capabilities.

  19. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  20. 3D-MRI rendering of the anatomical structures related to acupuncture points of the Dai mai, Yin qiao mai and Yang qiao mai meridians within the context of the WOMED concept of lateral tension: implications for musculoskeletal disease

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo, Roy; Rudisch, Ansgar; Kremser, Christian; Moncayo, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Background A conceptual model of lateral muscular tension in patients presenting thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) has been recently described. Clinical improvement has been achieved by using acupuncture on points belonging to the so-called extraordinary meridians. The aim of this study was to characterize the anatomical structures related to these acupuncture points by means of 3D MRI image rendering relying on external markers. Methods The investigation was carried out the index case patient of the lateral tension model. A licensed medical acupuncture practitioner located the following acupuncture points: 1) Yin qiao mai meridian (medial ankle): Kidney 3, Kidney 6, the plantar Kidney 6 (Nan jing description); 2) Yang qiao mai meridian (lateral ankle): Bladder 62, Bladder 59, Bladder 61, and the plantar Bladder 62 (Nan jing description); 3) Dai mai meridian (wait): Liver 13, Gall bladder 26, Gall bladder 27, Gall bladder 28, and Gall bladder 29. The points were marked by taping a nitro-glycerin capsule on the skin. Imaging was done on a Siemens Magnetom Avanto MR scanner using an array head and body coil. Mainly T1-weighted imaging sequences, as routinely used for patient exams, were used to obtain multi-slice images. The image data were rendered in 3D modus using dedicated software (Leonardo, Siemens). Results Points of the Dai mai meridian – at the level of the waist – corresponded to the obliquus externus abdominis and the obliquus internus abdominis. Points of the Yin qiao mai meridian – at the medial side of the ankle – corresponded to tendinous structures of the flexor digitorum longus as well as to muscular structures of the abductor hallucis on the foot sole. Points of the Yang qiao mai meridian – at the lateral side of the ankle – corresponded to tendinous structures of the peroneus brevis, the peroneous longus, and the lateral surface of the calcaneus and close to the foot sole to the abductor digiti minimi. Conclusion This non

  1. Combination analysis of neuropsychological tests and structural MRI measures in differentiating AD, MCI and control groups--the AddNeuroMed study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawu; Paajanen, Teemu; Zhang, Yi; Westman, Eric; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Simmons, Andrew; Tunnard, Catherine; Sobow, Tomasz; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Muehlboeck, Sebastian; Evans, Alan; Spenger, Christian; Lovestone, Simon; Soininen, Hilkka

    2011-07-01

    To study the ability of neuropsychological tests, manual MRI hippocampal volume measures, regional volume and cortical thickness measures to identify subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy age-matched controls. Neuropsychological tests, manual hippocampal volume, automated regional volume and regional cortical thickness measures were performed in 120 AD patients, 120 MCI subjects, and 111 controls. The regional cortical thickness and volumes in MCI subjects were significantly decreased in limbic/paralimbic areas and temporal lobe compared to controls. Atrophy was much more extensive in the AD patients compared to MCI subjects and controls. The combination of neuropsychological tests and volumes revealed the highest accuracy (82% AD vs. MCI; 94% AD vs. control; 83% MCI vs. control). Adding regional cortical thicknesses into the discriminate analysis did not improve accuracy. We conclude that regional cortical thickness and volume measures provide a panoramic view of brain atrophy in AD and MCI subjects. A combination of neuropsychological tests and regional volumes are important when discriminating AD from healthy controls and MCI. PMID:19683363

  2. Brain Morphometry using MRI in Schizophrenia Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanshina, I.; Pirogov, Yu.; Kupriyanov, D.; Orlova, V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Although its fundamental pathobiology remains elusive, neuroimaging studies provide evidence of abnormalities of cerebral structure and function in patients with schizophrenia. We used morphometry as a quantitative method for estimation of volume of brain structures. Seventy eight right-handed subjects aged 18-45 years were exposed to MRI-examination. Patients were divided into 3 groups: patients with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy controls. The volumes of interested structures (caudate nucleus, putamen, ventricles, frontal and temporal lobe) were measured using T2-weighted MR-images. Correlations between structural differences and functional deficit were evaluated.

  3. Alterations of Gray and White Matter Networks in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Multimodal Fusion Analysis of Structural MRI and DTI Using mCCA+jICA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, Sung Nyun; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Many of previous neuroimaging studies on neuronal structures in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) used univariate statistical tests on unimodal imaging measurements. Although the univariate methods revealed important aberrance of local morphometry in OCD patients, the covariance structure of the anatomical alterations remains unclear. Motivated by recent developments of multivariate techniques in the neuroimaging field, we applied a fusion method called "mCCA+jICA" on multimodal structural data of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of 30 unmedicated patients with OCD and 34 healthy controls. Amongst six highly correlated multimodal networks (p < 0.0001), we found significant alterations of the interrelated gray and white matter networks over occipital and parietal cortices, frontal interhemispheric connections and cerebella (False Discovery Rate q ≤ 0.05). In addition, we found white matter networks around basal ganglia that correlated with a subdimension of OC symptoms, namely 'harm/checking' (q ≤ 0.05). The present study not only agrees with the previous unimodal findings of OCD, but also quantifies the association of the altered networks across imaging modalities. PMID:26038825

  4. Alterations of Gray and White Matter Networks in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Multimodal Fusion Analysis of Structural MRI and DTI Using mCCA+jICA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Goo; Jung, Wi Hoon; Kim, Sung Nyun; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Many of previous neuroimaging studies on neuronal structures in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) used univariate statistical tests on unimodal imaging measurements. Although the univariate methods revealed important aberrance of local morphometry in OCD patients, the covariance structure of the anatomical alterations remains unclear. Motivated by recent developments of multivariate techniques in the neuroimaging field, we applied a fusion method called “mCCA+jICA” on multimodal structural data of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of 30 unmedicated patients with OCD and 34 healthy controls. Amongst six highly correlated multimodal networks (p < 0.0001), we found significant alterations of the interrelated gray and white matter networks over occipital and parietal cortices, frontal interhemispheric connections and cerebella (False Discovery Rate q ≤ 0.05). In addition, we found white matter networks around basal ganglia that correlated with a subdimension of OC symptoms, namely ‘harm/checking’ (q ≤ 0.05). The present study not only agrees with the previous unimodal findings of OCD, but also quantifies the association of the altered networks across imaging modalities. PMID:26038825

  5. Analysis of the Metabolic and Structural Brain Changes in Patients With Torture-Related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (TR-PTSD) Using ¹⁸F-FDG PET and MRI.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Shahin; Bernt, Reinhard; Knoll, Peter; Wenzel, Thomas; Hittmair, Karl; Haller, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus; Mirzaei, Siroos

    2016-04-01

    Many people exposed to torture later suffer from torture-related post-traumatic stress disorder (TR-PTSD). The aim of this study was to analyze the morphologic and functional brain changes in patients with TR-PTSD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). This study evaluated 19 subjects. Thirteen subcortical brain structures were evaluated using FSL software. On the T1-weighted images, normalized brain volumes were measured using SIENAX software. The study compared the volume of the brain and 13 subcortical structures in 9 patients suffering from TR-PTSD after torture and 10 healthy volunteers (HV). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the transverse plane. In addition, the 18F-FDG PET data were evaluated to identify the activity of the elected regions. The mean left hippocampal volume for the TR-PTSD group was significantly lower than in the HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the gray matter volume of the patients with TR-PTSD and the HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). The TR-PTSD group showed low significant expansion of the ventricles in contrast to the HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed significant differences in the right frontal lobe and the left occipital lobe between the TR-PTSD and HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). Moderate hypometabolism was noted in the occipital lobe in 6 of the 9 patients with TR-PTSD, in the temporal lobe in 1 of the 9 patients, and in the caudate nucleus in 5 of the 9 patients. In 2 cases, additional hypometabolism was observed in the posterior cingulate cortex and in the parietal and frontal lobes. The findings from this study show that TR-PTSD might have a deleterious influence on a set of specific brain structures. This study also demonstrated that PET combined with MRI is sensitive in detecting possible metabolic and structural

  6. Analysis of the Metabolic and Structural Brain Changes in Patients With Torture-Related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (TR-PTSD) Using 18F-FDG PET and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zandieh, Shahin; Bernt, Reinhard; Knoll, Peter; Wenzel, Thomas; Hittmair, Karl; Haller, Joerg; Hergan, Klaus; Mirzaei, Siroos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many people exposed to torture later suffer from torture-related post-traumatic stress disorder (TR-PTSD). The aim of this study was to analyze the morphologic and functional brain changes in patients with TR-PTSD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). This study evaluated 19 subjects. Thirteen subcortical brain structures were evaluated using FSL software. On the T1-weighted images, normalized brain volumes were measured using SIENAX software. The study compared the volume of the brain and 13 subcortical structures in 9 patients suffering from TR-PTSD after torture and 10 healthy volunteers (HV). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the transverse plane. In addition, the 18F-FDG PET data were evaluated to identify the activity of the elected regions. The mean left hippocampal volume for the TR-PTSD group was significantly lower than in the HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the gray matter volume of the patients with TR-PTSD and the HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). The TR-PTSD group showed low significant expansion of the ventricles in contrast to the HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed significant differences in the right frontal lobe and the left occipital lobe between the TR-PTSD and HV group (post hoc test (Bonferroni) P < 0.001). Moderate hypometabolism was noted in the occipital lobe in 6 of the 9 patients with TR-PTSD, in the temporal lobe in 1 of the 9 patients, and in the caudate nucleus in 5 of the 9 patients. In 2 cases, additional hypometabolism was observed in the posterior cingulate cortex and in the parietal and frontal lobes. The findings from this study show that TR-PTSD might have a deleterious influence on a set of specific brain structures. This study also demonstrated that PET combined with MRI is sensitive in detecting possible metabolic and

  7. Mapping Primary Gyrogenesis During Fetal Development in Primate Brains: High-Resolution in Utero Structural MRI of Fetal Brain Development in Pregnant Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Castro, Carlos; Davis, Duff; Dudley, Donald; Brewer, Jordan; Zhang, Yi; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Purdy, David; Fox, Peter T.; Simerly, Calvin; Schatten, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The global and regional changes in the fetal cerebral cortex in primates were mapped during primary gyrification (PG; weeks 17–25 of 26 weeks total gestation). Studying pregnant baboons using high-resolution MRI in utero, measurements included cerebral volume, cortical surface area, gyrification index and length and depth of 10 primary cortical sulci. Seven normally developing fetuses were imaged in two animals longitudinally and sequentially. We compared these results to those on PG that from the ferret studies and analyzed them in the context of our recent studies of phylogenetics of cerebral gyrification. We observed that in both primates and non-primates, the cerebrum undergoes a very rapid transformation into the gyrencephalic state, subsequently accompanied by an accelerated growth in brain volume and cortical surface area. However, PG trends in baboons exhibited some critical differences from those observed in ferrets. For example, in baboons, the growth along the long (length) axis of cortical sulci was unrelated to the growth along the short (depth) axis and far outpaced it. Additionally, the correlation between the rate of growth along the short sulcal axis and heritability of sulcal depth was negative and approached significance (r = −0.60; p < 0.10), while the same trend for long axis was positive and not significant (p = 0.3; p = 0.40). These findings, in an animal that shares a highly orchestrated pattern of PG with humans, suggest that ontogenic processes that influence changes in sulcal length and depth are diverse and possibly driven by different factors in primates than in non-primates. PMID:20631812

  8. The relation of MRI-detected structural damage in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint to knee pain: The Multicenter and Framingham Osteoarthritis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Joshua J.; Gross, K. Douglas; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T.; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuquing; Niu, Jingbo; Segal, Neil A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Nevitt, Michael; Neogi, Tuhina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain. Methods We categorized the location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee MRIs from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). We determined the relation of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression. Results In MOST (n=1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no association with knee pain.. BMLs in both the medial and lateral PFJ had 1.5 (1.1, 2.0) times the odds of knee pain compared with knees without BMLs. Knee pain severity was lowest in knees with isolated medial PFJ cartilage loss or BMLs. In FOA (n=934 knees), neither isolated medial nor lateral cartilage loss was associated with knee pain, whereas isolated BMLs in either region were associated with pain. Conclusions Results were not completely concordant but suggest that knee pain risk and severity is greatest with cartilage loss isolated to (MOST) or inclusive of (MOST and FOA) the lateral PFJ. While BMLs in either the medial or lateral PFJ are related to pain. PMID:25575967

  9. Occupational exposure in MRI.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, D W

    2012-04-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B(0), imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B(0) fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2-0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42 ± 24% of B(0), with time-averaged exposures of 5.2 ± 2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6-4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B(0) fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s(-1). Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  10. [MRI in coma survivors].

    PubMed

    Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Bruno, M A; Boly, M; Soddu, A; Laureys, S; Moonen, G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injured disorders of consciousness patients are still challenging for diagnosis, prognosis, ethical and socio-economic reasons. Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers, et al. 2009). Recent advances in MRI techniques (diffusion tensor, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional imaging) provide data that could improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:20085015

  11. Diffusion-MRI in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Goveas, Joseph; O'Dwyer, Laurence; Mascalchi, Mario; Cosottini, Mirco; Diciotti, Stefano; De Santis, Silvia; Passamonti, Luca; Tessa, Carlo; Toschi, Nicola; Giannelli, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The ability to image the whole brain through ever more subtle and specific methods/contrasts has come to play a key role in understanding the basis of brain abnormalities in several diseases. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), "diffusion" (i.e. the random, thermally-induced displacements of water molecules over time) represents an extraordinarily sensitive contrast mechanism, and the exquisite structural detail it affords has proven useful in a vast number of clinical as well as research applications. Since diffusion-MRI is a truly quantitative imaging technique, the indices it provides can serve as potential imaging biomarkers which could allow early detection of pathological alterations as well as tracking and possibly predicting subtle changes in follow-up examinations and clinical trials. Accordingly, diffusion-MRI has proven useful in obtaining information to better understand the microstructural changes and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying various neurodegenerative disorders. In this review article, we summarize and explore the main applications, findings, perspectives as well as challenges and future research of diffusion-MRI in various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease and degenerative ataxias. PMID:25917917

  12. MRI Findings in Neuroferritinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Emiko; Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a neurodegenerative disease which demonstrates brain iron accumulation caused by the mutations in the ferritin light chain gene. On brain MRI in neuroferritinopathy, iron deposits are observed as low-intensity areas on T2WI and as signal loss on T2∗WI. On T2WI, hyperintense abnormalities reflecting tissue edema and gliosis are also seen. Another characteristic finding is the presence of symmetrical cystic changes in the basal ganglia, which are seen in the advanced stages of this disorder. Atrophy is sometimes noted in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The variety in the MRI findings is specific to neuroferritinopathy. Based on observations of an excessive iron content in patients with chronic neurologic disorders, such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease, the presence of excess iron is therefore recognized as a major risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. The future development of multimodal and advanced MRI techniques is thus expected to play an important role in accurately measuring the brain iron content and thereby further elucidating the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21808735

  13. SU-E-J-239: IMRT Planning of Prostate Cancer for a MRI-Linac Based On MRI Only

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Prior, P; Paulson, E; Lawton, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: : To investigate dosimetric differences between MRI- and CT-based IMRT planning for prostate cancer, the impact of a magnetic field in a MRI-Linac, and to explore the feasibility of IMRT planning based on MRI alone. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on CT and MRI images acquired on two representative prostate-cancer patients using clinical dose volume constraints. A research planning system (Monaco, Elekta), which employs a Monte Carlo dose engine and includes a perpendicular magnetic field of 1.5T from an MRI-Linac, was used. Bulk electron density assignments based on organ-specific values from ICRU 46 were used to convert MRI (T2) to pseudo CT. With the same beam configuration as in the original CT plan, 5 additional plans were generated based on CT or MRI, with or without optimization (i.e., just recalculation) and with or without the magnetic field. The plan quality in terms of commonly used dose volume (DV) parameters for all plans was compared. The statistical uncertainty on dose was < 1%. Results: For plans with the same contour set but without re-optimization, the DV parameters were different from those for the original CT plan, mostly less than 5% with a few exceptions. These differences were reduced to mostly less than 3% when the plans were re-optimized. For plans with contours from MRI, the differences in the DV parameters varied depending on the difference in the contours as compared to CT. For the optimized plans with contours from MR, the differences for PTV were less than 3%. Conclusion: The prostate IMRT plans based on MRI-only for a MR-Linac were practically similar as compared to the CT plan under the same beam and optimization configuration if the difference on the structure delineation is excluded, indicating the feasibility of using MRI-only for prostate IMRT.

  14. A Combined fMRI and DTI Examination of Functional Language Lateralization and Arcuate Fasciculus Structure: Effects of Degree versus Direction of Hand Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propper, Ruthe E.; O'Donnell, Lauren J.; Whalen, Stephen; Tie, Yanmei; Norton, Isaiah H.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Zollei, Lilla; Radmanesh, Alireza; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between hand preference degree and direction, functional language lateralization in Broca's and Wernicke's areas, and structural measures of the arcuate fasciculus. Results revealed an effect of degree of hand preference on arcuate fasciculus structure, such that consistently-handed individuals,…

  15. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy: ultrasound and MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brook; Amin, Tania; Leone, Valentina; Wood, Mark; Kraft, Jeannette K

    2016-05-01

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is a rare genetic disorder related to failures in prostaglandin metabolism. Patients present with joint pain, limb enlargement, skin thickening and finger clubbing. Radiographs show characteristic periosteal reaction and thickening along the long bones. We present MRI and US findings in a child with the condition. Ultrasound showed echogenic tissue surrounding the long bones, presumably reflecting oedema and inflammatory tissue. Doppler sonograms demonstrated increased vascularity on the surface of some superficial bony structures. PMID:26939972

  16. Prediction of mechanical properties of trabecular bone using quantitative MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammentausta, E.; Hakulinen, M. A.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Nieminen, M. T.

    2006-12-01

    Techniques for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been developed for non-invasive estimation of the mineral density and structure of trabecular bone. The R*2 relaxation rate (i.e. 1/T*2) is sensitive to bone mineral density (BMD) via susceptibility differences between trabeculae and bone marrow, and by binarizing MRI images, structural variables, such as apparent bone volume fraction, can be assessed. In the present study, trabecular bone samples of human patellae were investigated in vitro at 1.5 T to determine the ability of MRI-derived variables (R*2 and bone volume fraction) to predict the mechanical properties (Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate strength). Further, the MRI variables were correlated with reference measurements of volumetric BMD and bone area fraction as determined with a clinical pQCT system. The MRI variables correlated significantly (p < 0.01) with the mechanical variables (r = 0.32-0.46), BMD (r = 0.56) and bone structure (r = 0.51). A combination of R*2 and MRI-derived bone volume fraction further improved the prediction of yield stress and ultimate strength. Although pQCT showed a trend towards better prediction of the mechanical properties, current results demonstrate the feasibility of combined MR imaging of marrow susceptibility and bone volume fraction in predicting the mechanical strength of trabecular bone and bone mineral density.

  17. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  18. Sodium MRI: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-05-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges, limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  19. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  20. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  1. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  2. MRI of trauma to the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, E C; Zoga, Adam C

    2006-12-01

    Traumatic injuries involving the foot and ankle are very common. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its unsurpassed ability for soft tissue characterization, its utility in the investigation of these patients with foot and ankle trauma has rapidly expanded over the last decade. MRI has the unique capability to evaluate osseous, ligamentous, tendinous, and muscular injuries about the foot and ankle, with a single imaging study. MRI also allows for characterization of injury based on known biomechanical patterns. Injuries to specific soft tissue structures such as the Lisfranc and Spring ligaments can be accurately assessed on MRI when the imager considers both direct and indirect or supportive findings, allowing appropriate therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation. PMID:17387644

  3. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  4. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol.

    PubMed

    Finn, J P; Nguyen, K-L; Han, F; Zhou, Z; Salusky, I; Ayad, I; Hu, P

    2016-08-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications. PMID:27221526

  5. Structural brain changes associated with antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia as revealed by voxel-based morphometric MRI: an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The results of multiple studies on the association between antipsychotic use and structural brain changes in schizophrenia have been assessed only in qualitative literature reviews to date. We aimed to perform a meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies on this association to quantitatively synthesize the findings of these studies. Methods A systematic computerized literature search was carried out through MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS and PsycINFO databases aiming to identify all VBM studies addressing this question and meeting predetermined inclusion criteria. All studies reporting coordinates representing foci of structural brain changes associated with antipsychotic use were meta-analyzed by using the activation likelihood estimation technique, currently the most sophisticated and best-validated tool for voxel-wise meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies. Results Ten studies (five cross-sectional and five longitudinal) met the inclusion criteria and comprised a total of 548 individuals (298 patients on antipsychotic drugs and 250 controls). Depending on the methodologies of the selected studies, the control groups included healthy subjects, drug-free patients, or the same patients evaluated repeatedly in longitudinal comparisons (i.e., serving as their own controls). A total of 102 foci associated with structural alterations were retrieved. The meta-analysis revealed seven clusters of areas with consistent structural brain changes in patients on antipsychotics compared to controls. The seven clusters included four areas of relative volumetric decrease in the left lateral temporal cortex [Brodmann area (BA) 20], left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44), superior frontal gyrus extending to the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), and right rectal gyrus (BA 11), and three areas of relative volumetric increase in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24), left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24) and right putamen

  6. Fabrication of hollow and porous structured GdVO4:Dy3+ nanospheres as anticancer drug carrier and MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojiao; Yang, Dongmei; Ma, Ping'an; Dai, Yunlu; Shang, Mengmeng; Geng, Dongling; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2013-01-29

    Hollow and porous structured GdVO(4):Dy(3+) spheres were fabricated via a facile self-sacrificing templated method. The large cavity allows them to be used as potential hosts for therapeutic drugs, and the porous feature of the shell allows guest molecules to easily pass through the void space and surrounding environment. The samples show strong yellow-green emission of Dy(3+) (485 nm, (4)F(9/2) → (6)H(15/2); 575 nm, (4)F(9/2) → (6)H(13/2)) under UV excitation. The emission intensity of GdVO(4):Dy(3+) was weakened after encapsulation of anticancer drug (doxorubicin hydrochloride, DOX) and gradually restored with the cumulative released time of DOX. These hollow spheres were nontoxic to HeLa cells, while DOX-loaded samples led to apparent cytotoxicity as a result of the sustained release of DOX. ICP measurement indicates that free toxic Gd ions can hardly dissolate from the matrix. The endocytosis process of DOX-loaded hollow spheres is observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Furthermore, GdVO(4):Dy(3+) hollow spheres can be used for T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These results implicate that the luminescent GdVO(4):Dy(3+) spheres with hollow and porous structure are promising platforms for drug storage/release and MR imaging. PMID:23281806

  7. Bolus-tracking MRI with a simultaneous T1- and T2*-measurement.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, S; Heilmann, M; Biffar, A; Walczak, C; Vautier, J; Volk, A; Peller, M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to propose and evaluate a methodology to analyze simultaneously acquired T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI and T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Two generalized models of T2*-relaxation are proposed to account for tracer leakage, and a two-compartment exchange model is used to separate tracer in intra- and extravascular spaces. The methods are evaluated using data extracted from ROIs in three mice with subcutaneously implanted human colorectal tumors. Comparing plasma flow values obtained from DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI data defines a practical experimental paradigm to measure T2*-relaxivities, and reveals a factor of 15 between values in tissue and blood. Comparing mean transit time values obtained from DCE-MRI and DSC-MRI without leakage correction, indicates a significant reduction of susceptibility weighting in DSC-MRI during tracer leakage. A one-parameter gradient correction model provides a good approximation for this susceptibility loss, but redundancy of the parameter limits the practical potential of this model for DSC-MRI. Susceptibility loss is modeled more accurately with a variable T2*-relaxivity, which allows to extract new parameters that cannot be derived from DSC-MRI or DCE-MRI alone. They reflect the cellular and vessel geometry, and thus may lead to a more complete characterization of tissue structure. PMID:19585599

  8. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies. PMID:26703375

  9. Linewidth Narrowing for 31Phosphorus MRI of Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Merideth; Barrett, Sean

    2011-03-01

    Bone is a particularly challenging tissue to study with conventional MRI given the relatively low water density and wider linewidths of its solid components. Recent fundamental research in quantum computing gave rise to a new NMR pulse sequence that can be used to narrow the broad NMR spectrum of solids. Here we narrow the spectrum of the 31 P in natural bone mineral (by a factor of up to 1600x). This technique offers a new route to do high spatial resolution, 3D 31 P MRI of bone which complements conventional MRI and x-ray based techniques to study bone physiology and structure. Thus far we have used our pulse sequence to do high spatial resolution (sub-250 μ m)3 3 D 31 P MRI of ex vivo dry bovine cortical bones, wet procine rib bones, and wet rabbit femoral bones at 4T. We have also explored the use of compressive sampling to push imaging time down to less than two hours without distracting artifacts. F. W. Wehrli, J. MRI 25, 390 (2007); S. Anumula et al., Bone 42, 405 (2008); D. Idiyatullin et al., J. Mag Res 193, 267 (2008); E.E. Sigmund et al., NMR Biomed 22, 436 (2009); Y. Wu et al., J. MRI 31, 954 (2010)

  10. MRI Segmentation of the Human Brain: Challenges, Methods, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Despotović, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important tasks in medical image analysis and is often the first and the most critical step in many clinical applications. In brain MRI analysis, image segmentation is commonly used for measuring and visualizing the brain's anatomical structures, for analyzing brain changes, for delineating pathological regions, and for surgical planning and image-guided interventions. In the last few decades, various segmentation techniques of different accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper we review the most popular methods commonly used for brain MRI segmentation. We highlight differences between them and discuss their capabilities, advantages, and limitations. To address the complexity and challenges of the brain MRI segmentation problem, we first introduce the basic concepts of image segmentation. Then, we explain different MRI preprocessing steps including image registration, bias field correction, and removal of nonbrain tissue. Finally, after reviewing different brain MRI segmentation methods, we discuss the validation problem in brain MRI segmentation. PMID:25945121