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Sample records for calibration curve nonlinearity

  1. Calibration Technique Using Nonlinear Region in Cantilever Magnetometry Experiments and Presence of Universal Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torizuka, Kiyoshi; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Gosuke; Inoue, Munenori

    2013-06-01

    We have presented a calibration technique for commercially available atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers used in torque magnetometry experiments. The absolute values (J/rad) of the torque can be derived against the output signal, which is the change in piezoresistivity due to the deflection of the cantilever beam. The calibration has been performed using the susceptibility of a graphite plane. The linearity between the output signal and the torque is confirmed up to +/-1×10-8 J/rad of the torque. More importantly, since the nonlinear response of the cantilever is reproducible, we have also utilized the nonlinear region, so that the calibration range has been pushed up to +/-4 ×10-8 J/rad. In the nonlinear range, an important finding is that any curve (torque vs output signal curve) that is cantilever-dependent reduces to a single universal curve, after multiplying an appropriate factor. This factor is cantilever-dependent, but can be derived by rotating the sample-mounted cantilever in a zero magnetic field. We have also proposed a simple model regarding the presence of this universal curve.

  2. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear observers for gyro calibration are presented. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. Simulated test results are presented for each system.

  3. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    High precision estimation and control algorithms, to achieve unprecedented levels of pointing accuracy, will be required to support future formation flying missions such as interferometry missions. Achieving high pointing accuracy requires precise knowledge of the spacecraft rotation rate. Typically, the rotation rate is measured by a gyro. The measured rates can be corrupted by errors in alignment and scale factor, gyro biases, and noise. In this work, we present nonlinear observers for gyro calibration. Nonlinear observers are superior to extended or pseudo-linear Kalman filter type approaches for large errors and global stability. Three nonlinear gyro calibration observers are developed. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. The observers are then combined, and the gyro calibration parameters are estimated simultaneously. The stability of the combined observers is addressed, as well as the stability of the resulting closed loop systems. Simulated test results are presented for each scenario. Finally, the nonlinear observers are compared to a pseudo-linear Kalman filter.

  4. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  5. Apollo 16/AS-511/LM-11 operational calibration curves. Volume 1: Calibration curves for command service module CSM 113

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoss, J. F. (Compiler)

    1971-01-01

    Calibration curves for the Apollo 16 command service module pulse code modulation downlink and onboard display are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) measurement calibration curve format, (2) measurement identification, (3) multi-mode calibration data summary, (4) pulse code modulation bilevel events listing, and (5) calibration curves for instrumentation downlink and meter link.

  6. Calibration of a detector for nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Asnin, Leonid; Galinada, Wilmer; Gotmar, Gustaf; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-06-01

    In many studies of nonlinear or preparative chromatography, chromatographic signals must be recorded for relatively concentrated solutions and the detectors, that are designed for analytical applications and are highly sensitive, must be used under such experimental conditions that their responses are often nonlinear. Then, a calibration curve is needed to derive the actual concentration profiles of the eluates from the measured detector response. It becomes necessary to derive a relationship between the concentration of the eluent and the detector signal at any given time. The simplest approach consists in preparing a series of solutions of known concentrations and in flushing them successively through the detector cell, recording the height of the plateau response obtained. However, this method requires relatively large amounts of the pure solutes being studied and these are not always available or they may be most costly, although these solutions can be recovered. We describe and validate an alternative procedure providing this calibration from a series of peaks recorded upon the injection of increasingly large pulses of the studied compound.

  7. D Catenary Curve Fitting for Geometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T.-O.; Lichti, D. D.

    2011-09-01

    In modern road surveys, hanging power cables are among the most commonly-found geometric features. These cables are catenary curves that are conventionally modelled with three parameters in 2D Cartesian space. With the advent and popularity of the mobile mapping system (MMS), the 3D point clouds of hanging power cables can be captured within a short period of time. These point clouds, similarly to those of planar features, can be used for feature-based self-calibration of the system assembly errors of an MMS. However, to achieve this, a well-defined 3D equation for the catenary curve is needed. This paper proposes three 3D catenary curve models, each having different parameters. The models are examined by least squares fitting of simulated data and real data captured with an MMS. The outcome of the fitting is investigated in terms of the residuals and correlation matrices. Among the proposed models, one of them could estimate the parameters accurately and without any extreme correlation between the variables. This model can also be applied to those transmission lines captured by airborne laser scanning or any other hanging cable-like objects.

  8. Nonlinear Growth Curves in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2011-01-01

    Developmentalists are often interested in understanding change processes, and growth models are the most common analytic tool for examining such processes. Nonlinear growth curves are especially valuable to developmentalists because the defining characteristics of the growth process such as initial levels, rates of change during growth spurts, and…

  9. Reduced Calibration Curve for Proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyeva, Olga; de Assis, Joaquim; Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo; Paschuk, Sergei; Milhoretto, Edney; Setti, João; Díaz, Katherin; Hormaza, Joel; Lopes, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    The pCT deals with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Thus, the fidelity of pCT as a tool for proton therapy planning depends on the accuracy of physical formulas used for proton interaction with thick absorbers. Although the actual overall accuracy of the proton stopping power in the Bethe-Bloch domain is about 1%, the analytical calculations and the Monte Carlo simulations with codes like TRIM/SRIM, MCNPX and GEANT4 do not agreed with each other. A tentative to validate the codes against experimental data for thick absorbers bring some difficulties: only a few data is available and the existing data sets have been acquired at different initial proton energies, and for different absorber materials. In this work we compare the results of our Monte Carlo simulations with existing experimental data in terms of reduced calibration curve, i.e. the range—energy dependence normalized on the range scale by the full projected CSDA range for given initial proton energy in a given material, taken from the NIST PSTAR database, and on the final proton energy scale—by the given initial energy of protons. This approach is almost energy and material independent. The results of our analysis are important for pCT development because the contradictions observed at arbitrary low initial proton energies could be easily scaled now to typical pCT energies.

  10. Calibrating Curved Crystals Used for Plasma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Jacoby, K. D., Ross, P. W., Rochau, G. Wu, M., Regan, S. P., Barrios, M. A.

    2012-10-29

    The throughput and resolving power of an X-ray spectrometer that uses a curved crystal as the diffraction element is determined primarily by the crystal X-ray reflectivity properties. This poster presents a measurement technique for these crystal parameters using a simple diode source to produce a narrow spectral band. The results from measurements on concave elliptical polyethylene terephthalate (PET) crystals and convex potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals show large variations in the key parameters compared to those from the flat crystal.

  11. Nonlinearity calibrating algorithm for structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Shuaijun; Lau, Daniel L.; Barner, Kenneth E.; Kiamilev, Fouad

    2014-05-01

    In structured light illumination (SLI), the nonlinear distortion of the optical devices dramatically ruins accuracy of three-dimensional reconstruction when using only a small number of projected patterns. We propose a universal algorithm to calibrate these device nonlinearities to accurately precompensate the patterns. Thus, no postprocessing is needed to correct for the distortions while the number of patterns can be reduced down to as few as possible. Theoretically, the proposed method can be applied to any SLI pattern strategy. Using a three-pattern SLI method, our experimental results will show a 25× to 60× reduction in surface variance for a flat target, depending upon any surface smoothing that might be applied to remove Gaussian noise.

  12. Nonlinear bulging factor based on R-curve data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, David Y.; Tong, Pin

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear bulging factor is derived using a strain energy approach combined with dimensional analysis. The functional form of the bulging factor contains an empirical constant that is determined using R-curve data from unstiffened flat and curved panel tests. The determination of this empirical constant is based on the assumption that the R-curve is the same for both flat and curved panels.

  13. Nonlinear normal modes modal interactions and isolated resonance curves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuether, Robert J.; Renson, L.; Detroux, T.; Grappasonni, C.; Kerschen, G.; Allen, M. S.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of the present study is to explore the connection between the nonlinear normal modes of an undamped and unforced nonlinear system and the isolated resonance curves that may appear in the damped response of the forced system. To this end, an energy balance technique is used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic forcing that is necessary to excite a specific nonlinear normal mode. A cantilever beam with a nonlinear spring at its tip serves to illustrate the developments. Furthermore, the practical implications of isolated resonance curves are also discussed by computing the beam response to sine sweepmore » excitations of increasing amplitudes.« less

  14. Nonlinear normal modes modal interactions and isolated resonance curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Renson, L.; Detroux, T.; Grappasonni, C.; Kerschen, G.; Allen, M. S.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of the present study is to explore the connection between the nonlinear normal modes of an undamped and unforced nonlinear system and the isolated resonance curves that may appear in the damped response of the forced system. To this end, an energy balance technique is used to predict the amplitude of the harmonic forcing that is necessary to excite a specific nonlinear normal mode. A cantilever beam with a nonlinear spring at its tip serves to illustrate the developments. Furthermore, the practical implications of isolated resonance curves are also discussed by computing the beam response to sine sweep excitations of increasing amplitudes.

  15. Using LISREL to Fit Nonlinear Latent Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozis, Shelley A.; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Mels, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Latent curve models offer a flexible approach to the study of longitudinal data when the form of change in a response is nonlinear. This article considers such models that are conditionally linear with regard to the random coefficients at the 2nd level. This framework allows fixed parameters to enter a model linearly or nonlinearly, and random…

  16. Nonlinear dynamical modes of climate variability: from curves to manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Andrey; Mukhin, Dmitry; Loskutov, Evgeny; Feigin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The necessity of efficient dimensionality reduction methods capturing dynamical properties of the system from observed data is evident. Recent study shows that nonlinear dynamical mode (NDM) expansion is able to solve this problem and provide adequate phase variables in climate data analysis [1]. A single NDM is logical extension of linear spatio-temporal structure (like empirical orthogonal function pattern): it is constructed as nonlinear transformation of hidden scalar time series to the space of observed variables, i. e. projection of observed dataset onto a nonlinear curve. Both the hidden time series and the parameters of the curve are learned simultaneously using Bayesian approach. The only prior information about the hidden signal is the assumption of its smoothness. The optimal nonlinearity degree and smoothness are found using Bayesian evidence technique. In this work we do further extension and look for vector hidden signals instead of scalar with the same smoothness restriction. As a result we resolve multidimensional manifolds instead of sum of curves. The dimension of the hidden manifold is optimized using also Bayesian evidence. The efficiency of the extension is demonstrated on model examples. Results of application to climate data are demonstrated and discussed. The study is supported by Government of Russian Federation (agreement #14.Z50.31.0033 with the Institute of Applied Physics of RAS). 1. Mukhin, D., Gavrilov, A., Feigin, A., Loskutov, E., & Kurths, J. (2015). Principal nonlinear dynamical modes of climate variability. Scientific Reports, 5, 15510. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep15510

  17. Perturbation approach to dispersion curves calculation for nonlinear Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of elastic wave propagation in nonlinear media has gained recent research attention due to the recognition of their amplitude-dependent behavior. This creates opportunities for increased accuracy of damage detection and localization, development of new structural monitoring strategies, and design of new structures with desirable acoustic behavior (e.g., amplitude-dependent frequency bandgaps, wave beaming, and filtering). This differs from more traditional nonlinear analysis approaches which target the prediction of higher harmonic growth. Of particular interest in this work is the analysis of amplitude-dependent shifts in Lamb wave dispersion curves. Typically, dispersion curves are calculated for nominally linear material parameters and geometrical features of a waveguide, even when the constitutive law is nonlinear. Instead, this work employs a Lindstedt - Poincare perturbation approach to calculate amplitude-dependent dispersion curves, and shifts thereof, for nonlinearly-elastic plates. As a result, a set of first order corrections to frequency (or equivalently wavenumber) are calculated. These corrections yield significant amplitude dependence in the spectral characteristics of the calculated waves, especially for high frequency waves, which differs fundamentally from linear analyses. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical shifts predicted. Recognition of this amplitude-dependence in Lamb wave dispersion may suggest, among other things, that the analysis of guided wave propagation phenomena within a fully nonlinear framework needs to revisit mode-mode energy flux and higher harmonics generation conditions.

  18. Towards a North Atlantic Marine Radiocarbon Calibration Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, William; Reimer, Paula; Blaauw, Maarten; Bryant, Charlotte; Rae, James; Burke, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Service du dejeuner! Twenty years ago, in 1995, I sailed as a post-doctoral researcher based at the University of Edinburgh (UK) on the first scientific mission of the new Marion Dufresne II. In this presentation, I will provide an update on the work that first quantified North Atlantic marine radiocarbon reservoir ages, highlighting how advances in marine tephrochronology over the last twenty years have significantly improved our understanding (and ability to test) land-ice-ocean linkages. The mechanistic link that connects marine radiocarbon reservoir ages to ocean ventilation state will also be discussed with reference to the Younger Dryas climate anomaly, where models and data have been successfully integrated. I will discuss the use of reference chronologies in the North Atlantic region and evaluate the common practice of climate synchronization between the Greenland ice cores and some of the key MD records that are now available. The exceptional quality of the MD giant piston cores and their potential to capture high-resolution last glacial sediment records from the North Atlantic provides an exciting opportunity to build new regional marine radiocarbon calibration curves. I will highlight new efforts by my co-authors and others to build such curves, setting-out a new agenda for the next twenty years of the IMAGES programme.

  19. Classical black holes: the nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Kip S

    2012-08-01

    Numerical simulations have revealed two types of physical structures, made from curved spacetime, that are attached to black holes: tendexes, which stretch or squeeze anything they encounter, and vortexes, which twist adjacent inertial frames relative to each other. When black holes collide, their tendexes and vortexes interact and oscillate (a form of nonlinear dynamics of curved spacetime). These oscillations generate gravitational waves, which can give kicks up to 4000 kilometers per second to the merged black hole. The gravitational waves encode details of the spacetime dynamics and will soon be observed and studied by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and its international partners. PMID:22859479

  20. Assessment of the calibration curve for transmittance pulse-oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, A.; Fine, I.; Meglinski, I.

    2011-11-01

    Optical/laser modalities provide a broad variety of practical solutions for clinical diagnostics and therapy in a range from imaging of single cells and molecules to non-invasive biopsy of specific biological tissues and organs tomography. Near-infrared transmittance pulse oximetry with laser diodes is the accepted standard in current clinical practice and widely used for noninvasive monitoring of oxygen saturation in arterial blood hemoglobin. Conceptual design of practical pulse oximetry systems requires careful selection of various technical parameters, including intensity, wavelength, beam size and profile of incident laser radiation, size, numerical aperture of the detector, as well as a clear understanding of how the spatial and temporal structural alterations in biological tissues can be linked with and can be distinguished by variations of these parameters. In current letter utilizing state-of-the-art NVIDEA CUDA technology, a new object oriented programming paradigm and on-line solutions we introduce a computational tool applied for human finger transmittance spectra simulation and assessment of calibration curve for near-infrared transmitted pulseoximetry.

  1. Different approaches to multivariate calibration of nonlinear sensor data.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Frank; Busche, Stefan; Gauglitz, Günter

    2004-10-01

    In this study, different approaches to the multivariate calibration of the vapors of two refrigerants are reported. As the relationships between the time-resolved sensor signals and the concentrations of the analytes are nonlinear, the widely used partial least-squares regression (PLS) fails. Therefore, different methods are used, which are known to be able to deal with nonlinearities present in data. First, the Box-Cox transformation, which transforms the dependent variables nonlinearly, was applied. The second approach, the implicit nonlinear PLS regression, tries to account for nonlinearities by introducing squared terms of the independent variables to the original independent variables. The third approach, quadratic PLS (QPLS), uses a nonlinear quadratic inner relationship for the model instead of a linear relationship such as PLS. Tree algorithms are also used, which split a nonlinear problem into smaller subproblems, which are modeled using linear methods or discrete values. Finally, neural networks are applied, which are able to model any relationship. Different special implementations, like genetic algorithms with neural networks and growing neural networks, are also used to prevent an overfitting. Among the fast and simpler algorithms, QPLS shows good results. Different implementations of neural networks show excellent results. Among the different implementations, the most sophisticated and computing-intensive algorithms (growing neural networks) show the best results. Thus, the optimal method for the data set presented is a compromise between quality of calibration and complexity of the algorithm. PMID:15156303

  2. Multivariate standardisation for non-linear calibration range in the chemiluminescence determination of chromium.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Genaro, L A; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2007-05-15

    Multivariate standardisation is proposed for the successful chemiluminescence determination of chromium based on luminol-hydrogen peroxide reaction. In an extended concentration range, non-linear calibration model is needed. The studied instrumental situations were different detection cells, instruments, assemblies, time and their possible combinations. Chemiluminescence kinetic registers have been transferred using piecewise direct standardisation (PDS) method. The optimisation of transfer parameters has been carried out based on the prediction residual error criteria. Non-linear principal component regression (NL-PCR) and non-linear partial least square regression (NL-PLS) were chosen for modelling the relationship signal-concentration of transferred registers. Good accuracy and precision were obtained for water samples. The concentrations of chromium were statistically in agreement with reference method values and with recovery studies. Therefore, it is possible to transfer chemiluminescence curves without loosing ability of prediction, even the presence of a non-linear behaviour. PMID:19071716

  3. Nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded doubly curved shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alijani, F.; Amabili, M.; Karagiozis, K.; Bakhtiari-Nejad, F.

    2011-03-01

    Nonlinear forced vibrations of FGM doubly curved shallow shells with a rectangular base are investigated. Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell theory is used and the shell is assumed to be simply supported with movable edges. The equations of motion are reduced using the Galerkin method to a system of infinite nonlinear ordinary differential equations with quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. Using the multiple scales method, primary and subharmonic resonance responses of FGM shells are fully discussed and the effect of volume fraction exponent on the internal resonance conditions, softening/hardening behavior and bifurcations of the shallow shell when the excitation frequency is (i) near the fundamental frequency and (ii) near two times the fundamental frequency is shown. Moreover, using a code based on arclength continuation method, a bifurcation analysis is carried out for a special case with two-to-one internal resonance between the first and second doubly symmetric modes with respect to the panel's center ( ω13≈2 ω11). Bifurcation diagrams and Poincaré maps are obtained through direct time integration of the equations of motion and chaotic regions are shown by calculating Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimension.

  4. Nonlinear thermoelastic stress analysis of spherically curved solar panels

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhan, C.V.G.; Vungutur, K.; Selvam, R.P.

    1984-10-01

    Spherically curved glass panels are used to concentrate solar energy onto a line focus in fixed mirror distributed focus type solar collectors. These solar panels consists of thin flat glass plates bent to form a spherical surface, glued onto a paper honeycomb backing, and covered with steel plate at the back and with plastic strips on the sides. Stresses are produced in the glass plates as they are formed into spherical surfaces. In addition, when the solar receiver is not in focus relative to the bowl and the sun, a mirror hot spot condition is developed, resulting in large thermally induced stresses within glass plates. The curved glass panel is modeled as a plate on elastic foundation in order to represent the behavior of the plate in relation to other panel components. Since lateral deflections of these plates are large compared to their thickness, nonlinear von Karman plate equations are used in the analysis. A computer model has been prepared to assist in the nonlinear analysis of stresses using finite difference method. The model has flexibility to analyze a variety of rectangular plate geometries subjected to thermal and other applied loads.

  5. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration Coupled with a Nonlinear Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear observers for gyro calibration are presented. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The observers are then combined. The convergence properties of all three observers, and the combined observers, are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. Simulated test results are presented for each system.

  6. Nonlinear problems of the theory of heterogeneous slightly curved shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantor, B. Y.

    1973-01-01

    An account if given of the variational method of the solution of physically and geometrically nonlinear problems of the theory of heterogeneous slightly curved shells. Examined are the bending and supercritical behavior of plates and conical and spherical cupolas of variable thickness in a temperature field, taking into account the dependence of the elastic parameters on temperature. The bending, stability in general and load-bearing capacity of flexible isotropic elastic-plastic shells with different criteria of plasticity, taking into account compressibility and hardening. The effect of the plastic heterogeneity caused by heat treatment, surface work hardening and irradiation by fast neutron flux is investigated. Some problems of the dynamic behavior of flexible shells are solved. Calculations are performed in high approximations. Considerable attention is given to the construction of a machine algorithm and to the checking of the convergence of iterative processes.

  7. How to develop calibration curves for fuel gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, C. ); Stevenson, D. )

    1994-09-01

    Stricter environmental laws require online monitoring for fuels and processes and cross-check methods to prove result accuracy. Because refiners must have procedures to validate analyzers, developmental efforts by California refiners have focused on cylinder-concentration and permeation-tube calibration systems. A better understanding of how these standardization methods handle sample quality problems helps refiners find the best reference method. Due to its reactive nature, obtaining and retaining representative samples of sulfur compounds is very difficult. Often found in refinery fuel gas, sulfur plates out as it passes through a gas chromatograph system and falsifies sample results. Unfortunately, refiners must use these results to monitor and validates sulfur concentrations. Permeation tubes can be used for passivation and calibration of gas samples. To passivate a system, gases containing high-sulfur concentrations are introduced so that sulfur adheres to and coats all valves, tubes and injectors. This process ensures that later samples pass to the detector without losing some of their sulfur content through adherence.

  8. Wavelength selection-based nonlinear calibration for transcutaneous blood glucose sensing using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Barman, Ishan; Kang, Jeon Woong; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-08-01

    While Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for noninvasive and real time diagnostics of biological samples, its translation to the clinical setting has been impeded by the lack of robustness of spectroscopic calibration models and the size and cumbersome nature of conventional laboratory Raman systems. Linear multivariate calibration models employing full spectrum analysis are often misled by spurious correlations, such as system drift and covariations among constituents. In addition, such calibration schemes are prone to overfitting, especially in the presence of external interferences that may create nonlinearities in the spectra-concentration relationship. To address both of these issues we incorporate residue error plot-based wavelength selection and nonlinear support vector regression (SVR). Wavelength selection is used to eliminate uninformative regions of the spectrum, while SVR is used to model the curved effects such as those created by tissue turbidity and temperature fluctuations. Using glucose detection in tissue phantoms as a representative example, we show that even a substantial reduction in the number of wavelengths analyzed using SVR lead to calibration models of equivalent prediction accuracy as linear full spectrum analysis. Further, with clinical datasets obtained from human subject studies, we also demonstrate the prospective applicability of the selected wavelength subsets without sacrificing prediction accuracy, which has extensive implications for calibration maintenance and transfer. Additionally, such wavelength selection could substantially reduce the collection time of serial Raman acquisition systems. Given the reduced footprint of serial Raman systems in relation to conventional dispersive Raman spectrometers, we anticipate that the incorporation of wavelength selection in such hardware designs will enhance the possibility of miniaturized clinical systems for disease diagnosis in the near future.

  9. Wavelength selection-based nonlinear calibration for transcutaneous blood glucose sensing using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Barman, Ishan; Kang, Jeon Woong; Kong, Chae-Ryon; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    While Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for noninvasive and real time diagnostics of biological samples, its translation to the clinical setting has been impeded by the lack of robustness of spectroscopic calibration models and the size and cumbersome nature of conventional laboratory Raman systems. Linear multivariate calibration models employing full spectrum analysis are often misled by spurious correlations, such as system drift and covariations among constituents. In addition, such calibration schemes are prone to overfitting, especially in the presence of external interferences that may create nonlinearities in the spectra-concentration relationship. To address both of these issues we incorporate residue error plot-based wavelength selection and nonlinear support vector regression (SVR). Wavelength selection is used to eliminate uninformative regions of the spectrum, while SVR is used to model the curved effects such as those created by tissue turbidity and temperature fluctuations. Using glucose detection in tissue phantoms as a representative example, we show that even a substantial reduction in the number of wavelengths analyzed using SVR lead to calibration models of equivalent prediction accuracy as linear full spectrum analysis. Further, with clinical datasets obtained from human subject studies, we also demonstrate the prospective applicability of the selected wavelength subsets without sacrificing prediction accuracy, which has extensive implications for calibration maintenance and transfer. Additionally, such wavelength selection could substantially reduce the collection time of serial Raman acquisition systems. Given the reduced footprint of serial Raman systems in relation to conventional dispersive Raman spectrometers, we anticipate that the incorporation of wavelength selection in such hardware designs will enhance the possibility of miniaturized clinical systems for disease diagnosis in the near future. PMID:21895336

  10. Monte Carlo Simulations for the Purpose of Efficiency Curve Calibration for the Fastscan Whole Body Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Hannah Robyn

    In order to be able to qualify and quantify radiation exposure in terms of dose, a Fastscan whole body counter must be calibrated correctly. Current calibration methods do not take the full range of body types into consideration when creating efficiency curve calibrations. The goal of this work is the creation of a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model, that allows the simulation of efficiency curves for a diverse population of subjects. Models were created for both the Darlington and the Pickering Fastscan WBCs, and the simulations were benchmarked against experimental results with good agreement. The Pickering Fastscan was found to have agreement to within +/-9%, and the Darlington Fastscan had agreement to within +/-11%. Further simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of increased body fat on the detected activity, as well as locating the position of external contamination using front/back ratios of activity. Simulations were also conducted to create efficiency calibrations that had good agreement with the manufacturer's efficiency curves. The work completed in this thesis can be used to create efficiency calibration curves for unique body compositions in the future.

  11. Nonlinear Kalman filters for calibration in radio interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasse, C.

    2014-06-01

    The data produced by the new generation of interferometers are affected by a wide variety of partially unknown complex effects such as pointing errors, phased array beams, ionosphere, troposphere, Faraday rotation, or clock drifts. Most algorithms addressing direction-dependent calibration solve for the effective Jones matrices, and cannot constrain the underlying physical quantities of the radio interferometry measurement equation (RIME). A related difficulty is that they lack robustness in the presence of low signal-to-noise ratios, and when solving for moderate to large numbers of parameters they can be subject to ill-conditioning. These effects can have dramatic consequences in the image plane such as source or even thermal noise suppression. The advantage of solvers directly estimating the physical terms appearing in the RIME is that they can potentially reduce the number of free parameters by orders of magnitudes while dramatically increasing the size of usable data, thereby improving conditioning. We present here a new calibration scheme based on a nonlinear version of the Kalman filter that aims at estimating the physical terms appearing in the RIME. We enrich the filter's structure with a tunable data representation model, together with an augmented measurement model for regularization. Using simulations we show that it can properly estimate the physical effects appearing in the RIME. We found that this approach is particularly useful in the most extreme cases such as when ionospheric and clock effects are simultaneously present. Combined with the ability to provide prior knowledge on the expected structure of the physical instrumental effects (expected physical state and dynamics), we obtain a fairly computationally cheap algorithm that we believe to be robust, especially in low signal-to-noise regimes. Potentially, the use of filters and other similar methods can represent an improvement for calibration in radio interferometry, under the condition that

  12. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al

  13. Nonlinear Latent Curve Models for Multivariate Longitudinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozis, Shelley A.; Conger, Katherine J.; Harring, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Latent curve models have become a useful approach to analyzing longitudinal data, due in part to their allowance of and emphasis on individual differences in features that describe change. Common applications of latent curve models in developmental studies rely on polynomial functions, such as linear or quadratic functions. Although useful for…

  14. CABRI Reactor: The fast neutron Hodoscope Calibration curves calculation with MORET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Chevalier, Vincent; Venanzi, Damiano

    2014-06-01

    This poster presents the Hodoscope calibration curves calculation with 3D Monte Carlo code MORET. The fast neutron hodoscope is a facility of the CABRI research reactor at Cadarache (FRANCE). This hodoscope is designed to measure the fuel motion during a RIA in a pressurized water reactor. The fuel motion is measured by counting fast fission neutrons emerging from the test fuel placed in an experimental loop functioning like a Pressurized Water Reactor (T=300°C and P=155 bar), at the center of the CABRI core. The detection system of the hodoscope measures a signal which is a function of the fuel motion. The calibration curves allow then to convert the signal in a fuel mass. In order to calculate these curves, we have developed a method based on a Monte Carlo calculation code.

  15. JPSS-1 VIIRS DNB nonlinearity and its impact on SDR calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shihyan; Wang, Wenhui; Cao, Changyong

    2015-09-01

    During JPSS-1 VIIRS testing at Raytheon El Segundo, a larger than expected radiometric response nonlinearity was discovered in Day-Nigh Band (DNB). In addition, the DNB nonlinearity is aggregation mode dependent, where the most severe non-linear behavior are the aggregation modes used at high scan angles (<~50 degree). The DNB aggregation strategy was subsequently modified to remove modes with the most significant non-linearity. We characterized the DNB radiometric response using pre-launch tests with the modified aggregation strategy. The test data show the DNB non-linearity varies at each gain stages, detectors and aggregation modes. The non-linearity is most significant in the Low Gain Stage (LGS) and could vary from sample-to-sample. The non-linearity is also more significant in EV than in calibration view samples. The HGS nonlinearity is difficult to quantify due to the higher uncertainty in determining source radiance. Since the radiometric response non-linearity is most significant at low dn ranges, it presents challenge in DNB cross-stage calibration, an critical path to calibration DNB's High Gain Stage (HGS) for nighttime imagery. Based on the radiometric characterization, we estimated the DNB on-orbit calibration accuracy and compared the expected DNB calibration accuracy using operational calibration approaches. The analysis showed the non-linearity will result in cross-stage gain ratio bias, and have the most significant impact on HGS. The HGS calibration accuracy can be improved when either SD data or only the more linearly behaved EV pixels are used in cross-stage calibration. Due to constrain in test data, we were not able to achieve a satisfactory accuracy and uniformity for the JPSS-1 DNB nighttime imagery quality. The JPSS-1 DNB nonlinearity is a challenging calibration issue which will likely require special attention after JPSS-1 launch.

  16. LDV measurement of small nonlinearities in flat and curved membranes. A model for eardrum nonlinear acoustic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Gladiné; Pieter, Muyshondt; Joris, Dirckx

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry is an intrinsic highly linear measurement technique which makes it a great tool to measure extremely small nonlinearities in the vibration response of a system. Although the measurement technique is highly linear, other components in the experimental setup may introduce nonlinearities. An important source of artificially introduced nonlinearities is the speaker, which generates the stimulus. In this work, two correction methods to remove the effects of stimulus nonlinearity are investigated. Both correction methods were found to give similar results but have different pros and cons. The aim of this work is to investigate the importance of the conical shape of the eardrum as a source of nonlinearity in hearing. We present measurements on flat and indented membranes. The data shows that the curved membrane exhibit slightly higher levels of nonlinearity compared to the flat membrane.

  17. Extension of working range in Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry by nonlinear calibration with prior correction for stray light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardo, Robert F.; Yuzefovsky, Alexander I.; Zhou, Jack X.; McCaffrey, John T.; Michel, Robert G.

    1996-09-01

    The nonlinear working range of a Perkin-Elmer 4100Zl atomic absorption spectrometer was improved in three steps. Firstly, each absorbance datum within the transient profile was corrected for the presence of stray light by an algorithm originally developed by L'vov and co-workers (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 47 (1992) 889-895 and 1187-1202), but with the incorporation of the Newton method of successive approximations (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 49 (1994) 1643-1656. Secondly, a dip correction procedure was performed on temporal signal profiles that exhibited a dip due to rollover. In the final step, an analytically useful working curve was generated by the nonlinear calibration routine of Barnett (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 39 (1984) 829). Goodness of fit between the resultant calibration curve and the data was measured by the method suggested by Miller-Ihli et al. (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 39 (1984) 1603) that is based on the sum of squares of the percentage deviation (SSPD) and the root mean square (RMS) percentage deviation. For lead, silver, copper, thallium, and cadmium, the analytical nonlinear working range was increased by as much as one and a half orders of magnitude, without any significant effect on the RMS. For chromium and manganese, no significant improvement in the nonlinear working range was observed, while the RMS improved by 50%. In the case of nickel, neither the working range nor the RMS was improved.

  18. A weakly nonlinear theory for wave-vortex interactions in curved channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Zang, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear theory is developed to study the interaction of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and Dean vortices in curved channel flow. The predictions obtained from the theory agree well with results obtained from direct numerical simulations of curved channel flow, especially for low amplitude disturbances. Some discrepancies in the results of a previous theory with direct numerical simulations are resolved.

  19. Experimental Study on Nonlinear Vibrations of Fixed-Fixed Curved Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Patel, B. P.

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear dynamic behavior of fixed-fixed shallow and deep curved beams is studied experimentally using non-contact type of electromagnetic shaker and acceleration measurements. The frequency response obtained from acceleration measurements is found to be in fairly good agreement with the computational response. The travellingwave phenomenon along with participation of higher harmonics and softening nonlinearity are observed. The experimental results on the internal resonance of curved beams due to direct excitation of anti-symmetric mode are reported for the first time. The deep curved beam depicts chaotic response at higher excitation amplitude.

  20. A curve fitting method for extrinsic camera calibration from a single image of a cylindrical object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A. W.; Zagar, B. G.

    2013-08-01

    An important step in the process of optical steel coil quality assurance is to measure the proportions of width and radius of steel coils as well as the relative position and orientation of the camera. This work attempts to estimate these extrinsic parameters from single images by using the cylindrical coil itself as the calibration target. Therefore, an adaptive least-squares algorithm is applied to fit parametrized curves to the detected true coil outline in the acquisition. The employed model allows for strictly separating the intrinsic and the extrinsic parameters. Thus, the intrinsic camera parameters can be calibrated beforehand using available calibration software. Furthermore, a way to segment the true coil outline in the acquired images is motivated. The proposed optimization method yields highly accurate results and can be generalized even to measure other solids which cannot be characterized by the identification of simple geometric primitives.

  1. Feasibility analysis on integration of luminous environment measuring and design based on exposure curve calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yuan; Shen, Tianxing

    2013-03-01

    Besides illumination calculating during architecture and luminous environment design, to provide more varieties of photometric data, the paper presents combining relation between luminous environment design and SM light environment measuring system, which contains a set of experiment devices including light information collecting and processing modules, and can offer us various types of photometric data. During the research process, we introduced a simulation method for calibration, which mainly includes rebuilding experiment scenes in 3ds Max Design, calibrating this computer aid design software in simulated environment under conditions of various typical light sources, and fitting the exposure curves of rendered images. As analytical research went on, the operation sequence and points for attention during the simulated calibration were concluded, connections between Mental Ray renderer and SM light environment measuring system were established as well. From the paper, valuable reference conception for coordination between luminous environment design and SM light environment measuring system was pointed out.

  2. Watershed model calibration to the base flow recession curve with and without evapotranspiration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, S. M.; Harmon, T. C.; Shi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Calibration of watershed models to the shape of the base flow recession curve is a way to capture the important relationship between groundwater discharge and subsurface water storage in a catchment. In some montane Mediterranean regions, such as the midelevation Providence Creek catchment in the southern Sierra Nevada of California (USA), nearly all base flow recession occurs after snowmelt, and during this time evapotranspiration (ET) usually exceeds base flow. We assess the accuracy to which watershed models can be calibrated to ET-dominated base flow recession in Providence Creek, both in terms of fitting a discharge time-series and realistically capturing the observed discharge-storage relationship for the catchment. Model parameters estimated from calibrations to ET-dominated recession are compared to parameters estimated from reference calibrations to base flow recession with ET-effects removed ("potential recession"). We employ the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) for simulations of base flow and ET, and methods that are otherwise general in nature. In models calibrated to ET-dominated recession, simulation errors in ET and the targeted relationship for recession (-dQ/dt versus Q) contribute substantially (up to 57% and 46%, respectively) to overestimates in the discharge-storage differential, defined as d(lnQ)/dS, relative to that derived from water flux observations. These errors result in overestimates of deep-subsurface hydraulic conductivity in models calibrated to ET-dominated recession, by up to an order of magnitude, relative to reference calibrations to potential recession. These results illustrate a potential opportunity for improving model representation of discharge-storage dynamics by calibrating to the shape of base flow recession after removing the complicating effects of ET.

  3. Fitting Nonlinear Curves by use of Optimization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    MULTIVAR is a FORTRAN 77 computer program that fits one of the members of a set of six multivariable mathematical models (five of which are nonlinear) to a multivariable set of data. The inputs to MULTIVAR include the data for the independent and dependent variables plus the user s choice of one of the models, one of the three optimization engines, and convergence criteria. By use of the chosen optimization engine, MULTIVAR finds values for the parameters of the chosen model so as to minimize the sum of squares of the residuals. One of the optimization engines implements a routine, developed in 1982, that utilizes the Broydon-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) variable-metric method for unconstrained minimization in conjunction with a one-dimensional search technique that finds the minimum of an unconstrained function by polynomial interpolation and extrapolation without first finding bounds on the solution. The second optimization engine is a faster and more robust commercially available code, denoted Design Optimization Tool, that also uses the BFGS method. The third optimization engine is a robust and relatively fast routine that implements the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm.

  4. Rhizocarpon calibration curve for the Aoraki/Mount Cook area of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Thomas V.; Schoenenberger, Katherine; Deddens, James A.; Denton, George H.; Smith, Colby; Black, Jessica; Hendy, Chris H.

    2005-05-01

    Development of Rhizocarpon growth curve from the Aoraki/Mount Cook area of New Zealand provides a means to assess Little Ice Age glacier behaviour and suggests approaches that have wider application. Employing a sampling strategy based on large populations affords the opportunity to assess which of various metrics (e.g. single largest, average of five largest, mean of an entire population) best characterise Rhizocarpon growth patterns. The 98% quantile from each population fitted with a quadric curve forms a reliable representation of the growth pattern. Since this metric does not depend on the original sample size, comparisons are valid where sample strategy must be adapted to local situations or where the original sample size differs. For the Aoraki/Mount Cook area a surface 100 years old will have a 98% quantile lichen diameter of 34.3 mm, whereas a 200-year-old surface will have a lichen diameter of 73.7 mm. In the Southern Alps, constraints from the age range of calibration points, the flattening of the quadric calibration curve and ecological factors limit the useful age range to approximately 250 years. Copyright

  5. The physical origin of sigmoidal respiratory pressure-volume curves: Alveolar recruitment and nonlinear elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Amaral, R. A.; Tavares, D. M.; Lucena, L. S.; Brandão-Neto, J.

    2011-05-01

    An important unsolved problem in medical science concerns the physical origin of the sigmoidal shape of pressure-volume curves of healthy (and some unhealthy) lungs. Conventional wisdom holds that linear response, i.e., Hooke’s law, together with alveolar overdistention play a dominant role in respiration, but such assumptions cannot explain the crucial empirical sigmoidal shape of the curves. Here, we propose a theory of alveolar recruitment together with nonlinear elasticity of the alveoli. The proposed model surprisingly and correctly predicts the observed sigmoidal pressure-volume curves. We discuss the importance of this result and its implications for medical practice.

  6. On Fitting Nonlinear Latent Curve Models to Multiple Variables Measured Longitudinally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozis, Shelley A.

    2007-01-01

    This article shows how nonlinear latent curve models may be fitted for simultaneous analysis of multiple variables measured longitudinally using Mx statistical software. Longitudinal studies often involve observation of several variables across time with interest in the associations between change characteristics of different variables measured…

  7. Nonlinear Gompertz Curve Models of Achievement Gaps in Mathematics and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Claire E.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Steele, Joel S.; Castro-Schilo, Laura; Grissmer, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined achievement trajectories in mathematics and reading from school entry through the end of middle school with linear and nonlinear growth curves in 2 large longitudinal data sets (National Longitudinal Study of Youth--Children and Young Adults and Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten Cohort [ECLS-K]). The S-shaped…

  8. Comparison of proton energy loss in thick absorbers in terms of a reduced calibration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyeva, O.; de Assis, J. T.; Evseev, I. G.; Schelin, H. R.; Ahmann, F.; Paschuk, S. A.; Milhoretto, E.; Setti, J. A. P.; Diaz, K. S.; Hormaza, J. M.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are essential for the support of particle experiments and developments of novel particle registration systems ranging from detectors developed for high-energy physics experiments at CERN to those for medical tomography. For proton beams, popular Monte Carlo codes like TRIM/SRIM, MCNPX and GEANT4 generate very similar final energy spectra for relatively thin absorbers, with differences unlikely to be detected in experiments. For thick absorbers, however, the disagreement is much larger, even for a moderate energy resolution. The reason for this is unclear because the actual overall accuracy of the proton stopping power in the Bethe-Bloch domain is known to be about 1%. One approach to investigate these differences is to compare, for example, the data from the NIST PSTAR and the SRIM reference data tables with the output of the Monte Carlo codes. When the various codes are validated against these tables, the differences in the simulated spectra mainly reflect the differences in the reference tables. Of more practical interest is the validation of the codes against experimental data for thick absorbers. However, only few experimental data sets are available here, and the existing data have been acquired at different initial proton energies and for different absorber materials. In order to compare the results of Monte Carlo simulations with existing experimental data, we applied the so-called reduced calibration method. This reduced calibration curve represents the range-energy dependence normalizing the range scale to the full projected range (for a given initial proton energy in a given material), and the proton energy scale to the given initial proton energy. The advantage of this approach is that the reduced calibration curve is nearly energy and material independent, and, thus, experimental, simulated and published reference data obtained at different energies and for different materials can be compared in one graph.

  9. A Low Processing Cost Adaptive Algorithm Identifying Nonlinear Unknown System with Piecewise Linear Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kensaku; Aoki, Ryo; Muneyasu, Mitsuji

    This paper proposes an adaptive algorithm for identifying unknown systems containing nonlinear amplitude characteristics. Usually, the nonlinearity is so small as to be negligible. However, in low cost systems, such as acoustic echo canceller using a small loudspeaker, the nonlinearity deteriorates the performance of the identification. Several methods preventing the deterioration, polynomial or Volterra series approximations, have been hence proposed and studied. However, the conventional methods require high processing cost. In this paper, we propose a method approximating the nonlinear characteristics with a piecewise linear curve and show using computer simulations that the performance can be extremely improved. The proposed method can also reduce the processing cost to only about twice that of the linear adaptive filter system.

  10. Harmonisation of coupled calibration curves to reduce correlated effects in the analysis of natural gas by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vargha, Gergely; Milton, Martin; Cox, Maurice; Kamvissis, Sarantis

    2005-01-14

    Quantitative analysis of natural gas depends on the calibration of a gas chromatograph with certified gas mixtures and the determination of a response relationship for each species by regression analysis. The uncertainty in this calibration is dominated by variations in the amount of the sample used for each analysis that are strongly correlated for all species measured in the same run. The "harmonisation" method described here minimises the influence of these correlations on the calculated calibration curves and leads to a reduction in the root-mean-square residual deviations from the fitted curve of a factor between 2 and 5. Consequently, it removes the requirement for each run in the calibration procedure to be carried out under the same external conditions, and opens the possibility that new data, measured under different environmental or instrumental conditions, can be appended to an existing calibration database. PMID:15679161

  11. Solvent free energy curves for electron transfer reactions: A nonlinear solvent response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko

    1996-05-01

    Marcus theory for electron transfer assumes a linear response of the solvent so that both the reactant and product free energy curves are parabolic functions of the solvent polarization, each with the same solvent force constant k characterizing the curvature. Simulation data by other workers indicate that the assumption of parabolic free energy curves is good for the Fe2+-Fe3+ self-exchange reaction but that the k of the reactant and product free energy curves are different for the reaction D0+A0→D1-+A1+. However, the fluctuations sampled in these simulations were not large enough to reach the activation barrier region, which was thus treated either by umbrella sampling or by parabolic extrapolation. Here, we present free energy curves calculated from a simple model of ionic solvation developed in an earlier paper by Hyun, Babu, and Ichiye, which we refer to here as the HBI model. The HBI model describes the nonlinearity of the solvent response due to the orientation of polar solvent molecules. Since it is a continuum model, it may be considered the first-order nonlinear correction to the linear response Born model. Moreover, in the limit of zero charge or infinite radius, the Born model and the Marcus relations are recovered. Here, the full free energy curves are calculated using analytic expressions from the HBI model. The HBI reactant and product curves have different k for D0+A0→D1-+A1+ as in the simulations, but examining the full curves shows they are nonparabolic due to the nonlinear response of the solvent. On the other hand, the HBI curves are close to parabolic for the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction, also in agreement with simulations, while those for another self-exchange reaction D0-A1+ show greater deviations from parabolic behavior than the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction. This indicates that transitions from neutral to charged species will have the largest deviations. Thus, the second moment of the polarization is shown to be a measure of the deviation from Marcus

  12. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against

  13. Lmfit: Non-Linear Least-Square Minimization and Curve-Fitting for Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, Matthew; Stensitzki, Till; Allen, Daniel B.; Rawlik, Michal; Ingargiola, Antonino; Nelson, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Lmfit provides a high-level interface to non-linear optimization and curve fitting problems for Python. Lmfit builds on and extends many of the optimization algorithm of scipy.optimize, especially the Levenberg-Marquardt method from optimize.leastsq. Its enhancements to optimization and data fitting problems include using Parameter objects instead of plain floats as variables, the ability to easily change fitting algorithms, and improved estimation of confidence intervals and curve-fitting with the Model class. Lmfit includes many pre-built models for common lineshapes.

  14. Nonlinear effects and Joule heating in I-V curves in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercone, Silvana; Frésard, Raymond; Caignaert, Vincent; Martin, Christine; Saurel, Damien; Simon, Charles; André, Gilles; Monod, Philippe; Fauth, François

    2005-07-01

    We study the influence of the Joule effect on the nonlinear behavior of the transport I-V curves in polycrystalline samples of the manganite Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3 by using the crystalline unit-cell parameters as an internal thermometer in x-ray and neutron diffractions. We develop a simple analytical model to estimate the temperature profile in the samples. Under the actual experimental conditions we show that the internal temperature gradient or the difference between the temperature of the sample and that of the thermal bath is at the origin of the nonlinearity observed in the I-V curves. Consequences on other compounds with colossal magnetoresistance are also discussed.

  15. Optimization of the stopping-power-ratio to Hounsfield-value calibration curve in proton and heavy ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Witt, Matthias; Weber, Uli; Kellner, Daniel; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2015-09-01

    For CT-based dose calculation in ion therapy a link between the attenuation coefficients of photons and the stopping-power of particles has to be provided. There are two commonly known approaches to establish such a calibration curve, the stoichiometric calibration and direct measurements with tissue substitutes or animal samples. Both methods were investigated and compared. As input for the stoichiometric calibration the data from ICRP-report 23 were compared to newly available data from ICRP-report 110. By employing the newer data no relevant difference could be observed. The differences between the two acquisition methods (direct measurement and stoichiometric calibration) were systematically analyzed and quantified. The most relevant change was caused by the exchange of carbon and oxygen content in the substitutes in comparison to the data of the ICRP-reports and results in a general overshoot of the Bragg peak. The consequence of the differences between the calibration curves was investigated with treatment planning studies and iso-range surfaces. Range differences up to 6mm in treatment plans of the head were observed. Additionally two improvements are suggested which increase the accuracy of the calibration curve. PMID:25497583

  16. A BAYESIAN METHOD FOR CALCULATING REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR CALIBRATION CURVES USING ABSOLUTE PLASMID DNA STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In real-time quantitative PCR studies using absolute plasmid DNA standards, a calibration curve is developed to estimate an unknown DNA concentration. However, potential differences in the amplification performance of plasmid DNA compared to genomic DNA standards are often ignore...

  17. Nonlinear I-V Curve at a Quantum Impurity Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranger, Harold; Chung, Chung-Hou; Lin, Chao-Yun; Zhang, Gu; Ke, Chung-Ting; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The nonlinear I-V curve at an interacting quantum critical point (QCP) is typically out of reach theoretically. Here, however, we provide a striking example of an analytical calculation of the full nonlinear I-V curve at the QCP. The system that we consider is a quantum dot coupled to resistive leads - a spinless resonant level interacting with an ohmic EM environment in which a QCP similar to the two-channel Kondo QCP occurs. Recent experiments studied this criticality via transport measurements: the transmission approaches unity at low temperature and applied bias when tuned exactly to the QCP (on resonance and symmetric tunnel barriers) and approaches zero in all other cases. To obtain the current at finite temperature and arbitrary bias, we write the problem as a one-dimensional field theory and transform from electrons in the left/right leads to right-going and left-going channels between which there is weak two-body backscattering. Drawing on dynamical Coulomb blockade theory, we thus obtain an analytical expression for the full I-V curve. The agreement with the experimental result is remarkable.

  18. [Application of calibration curve method and partial least squares regression analysis to quantitative analysis of nephrite samples using XRF].

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Su, Bo-min; Li, Qing-hui; Gan, Fu-xi

    2015-01-01

    The authors tried to find a method for quantitative analysis using pXRF without solid bulk stone/jade reference samples. 24 nephrite samples were selected, 17 samples were calibration samples and the other 7 are test samples. All the nephrite samples were analyzed by Proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE) quantitatively. Based on the PIXE results of calibration samples, calibration curves were created for the interested components/elements and used to analyze the test samples quantitatively; then, the qualitative spectrum of all nephrite samples were obtained by pXRF. According to the PIXE results and qualitative spectrum of calibration samples, partial least square method (PLS) was used for quantitative analysis of test samples. Finally, the results of test samples obtained by calibration method, PLS method and PIXE were compared to each other. The accuracy of calibration curve method and PLS method was estimated. The result indicates that the PLS method is the alternate method for quantitative analysis of stone/jade samples. PMID:25993858

  19. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  20. Modified hyperspheres algorithm to trace homotopy curves of nonlinear circuits composed by piecewise linear modelled devices.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Benhammouda, B; Filobello-Nino, U; Sarmiento-Reyes, A; Ramirez-Pinero, A; Marin-Hernandez, A; Huerta-Chua, J

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  1. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  2. Modified Hyperspheres Algorithm to Trace Homotopy Curves of Nonlinear Circuits Composed by Piecewise Linear Modelled Devices

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Leal, H.; Jimenez-Fernandez, V. M.; Benhammouda, B.; Filobello-Nino, U.; Sarmiento-Reyes, A.; Ramirez-Pinero, A.; Marin-Hernandez, A.; Huerta-Chua, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM) for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL) representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation. PMID:25184157

  3. Improved calibration of the nonlinear regime of a single-beam gradient optical trap.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Jamianne C; Lopez, Benjamin J; Campàs, Otger; Valentine, Megan T

    2016-05-15

    We report an improved method for calibrating the nonlinear region of a single-beam gradient optical trap. Through analysis of the position fluctuations of a trapped object that is displaced from the trap center by controlled flow we measure the local trap stiffness in both the linear and nonlinear regimes without knowledge of the magnitude of the applied external forces. This approach requires only knowledge of the system temperature, and is especially useful for measurements involving trapped objects of unknown size, or objects in a fluid of unknown viscosity. PMID:27177009

  4. Semi-analytical expression of stochastic closed curve attractors in nonlinear dynamical systems under weak noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kongming; Jiang, Jun; Xu, Yalan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a simple but accurate semi-analytical method to approximate probability density function of stochastic closed curve attractors is proposed. The expression of distribution applies to systems with strong nonlinearities, while only weak noise condition is needed. With the understanding that additive noise does not change the longitudinal distribution of the attractors, the high-dimensional probability density distribution is decomposed into two low-dimensional distributions: the longitudinal and the transverse probability density distributions. The longitudinal distribution can be calculated from the deterministic systems, while the probability density in the transverse direction of the curve can be approximated by the stochastic sensitivity function method. The effectiveness of this approach is verified by comparing the expression of distribution with the results of Monte Carlo numerical simulations in several planar systems.

  5. Interactive application of quadratic expansion of chi-square statistic to nonlinear curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Everhart, Joel L.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains a detailed theoretical description of an all-purpose, interactive curve-fitting routine that is based on P. R. Bevington's description of the quadratic expansion of the Chi-Square statistic. The method is implemented in the associated interactive, graphics-based computer program. Taylor's expansion of Chi-Square is first introduced, and justifications for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations is derived, then solved by matrix algebra. A brief description of the code is presented along with a limited number of changes that are required to customize the program of a particular task. To evaluate the performance of the method and the goodness of nonlinear curve fitting, two typical engineering problems are examined and the graphical and tabular output of each is discussed. A complete listing of the entire package is included as an appendix.

  6. Differential evolution algorithm for nonlinear inversion of high-frequency Rayleigh wave dispersion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianhai; Li, Lei; Zhang, Xueqiang; Huang, Jianquan; Shi, Xinchun; Jin, Si; Bai, Yiming

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, Rayleigh waves are gaining popularity to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. However, inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves is challenging for most local-search methods due to its high nonlinearity and to its multimodality. In this study, we proposed and tested a new Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion scheme based on differential evolution (DE) algorithm. DE is a novel stochastic search approach that possesses several attractive advantages: (1) Capable of handling non-differentiable, non-linear and multimodal objective functions because of its stochastic search strategy; (2) Parallelizability to cope with computation intensive objective functions without being time consuming by using a vector population where the stochastic perturbation of the population vectors can be done independently; (3) Ease of use, i.e. few control variables to steer the minimization/maximization by DE's self-organizing scheme; and (4) Good convergence properties. The proposed inverse procedure was applied to nonlinear inversion of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves for near-surface S-wave velocity profiles. To evaluate calculation efficiency and stability of DE, we firstly inverted four noise-free and four noisy synthetic data sets. Secondly, we investigated effects of the number of layers on DE algorithm and made an uncertainty appraisal analysis by DE algorithm. Thirdly, we made a comparative analysis with genetic algorithms (GA) by a synthetic data set to further investigate the performance of the proposed inverse procedure. Finally, we inverted a real-world example from a waste disposal site in NE Italy to examine the applicability of DE on Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Furthermore, we compared the performance of the proposed approach to that of GA to further evaluate scores of the inverse procedure described here. Results from both synthetic and actual field data demonstrate that differential evolution algorithm applied

  7. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  8. A simple method for wind tunnel balance calibration including non-linear interaction terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, M. A.; Srinivas, T.; Holla, V. S.

    The conventional method for calibrating wind tunnel balances to obtain the coupled linear and nonlinear interaction terms requires the application of combinations of pure components of the loads on the calibration body compensating the deflection of the balance. For a six-component balance, this calls for a complex loading system and an arrangement to translate and tilt the balance support about all three axes. A simple method called the least-square method is illustrated for a three-component balance. The simplicity arises from the fact that application of the pure components of the loads or reorientation of the balance is not required. A single load is applied that has various components whose magnitudes can be easily found knowing the orientation of the calibration body under load and the point of application of the load. The coefficients are obtained by using the least-square-fit approach to match the outputs obtained for various combinations of load.

  9. Nonlinear Analysis and Post-Test Correlation for a Curved PRSEUS Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn; Neal, Albert L.; Linton, Kim, A.; Bergan, Andrew C.; Bakuckas, John G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, developed by The Boeing Company, has been extensively studied as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA s) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program. The PRSEUS concept provides a light-weight alternative to aluminum or traditional composite design concepts and is applicable to traditional-shaped fuselage barrels and wings, as well as advanced configurations such as a hybrid wing body or truss braced wings. Therefore, NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and The Boeing Company partnered in an effort to assess the performance and damage arrestments capabilities of a PRSEUS concept panel using a full-scale curved panel in the FAA Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility. Testing was conducted in the FASTER facility by subjecting the panel to axial tension loads applied to the ends of the panel, internal pressure, and combined axial tension and internal pressure loadings. Additionally, reactive hoop loads were applied to the skin and frames of the panel along its edges. The panel successfully supported the required design loads in the pristine condition and with a severed stiffener. The panel also demonstrated that the PRSEUS concept could arrest the progression of damage including crack arrestment and crack turning. This paper presents the nonlinear post-test analysis and correlation with test results for the curved PRSEUS panel. It is shown that nonlinear analysis can accurately calculate the behavior of a PRSEUS panel under tension, pressure and combined loading conditions.

  10. Nonlinear and Buckling Behavior of Curved Panels Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear and buckling response characteristics of curved panels subjected to combined loads are presented. Aluminum and laminated composite panels are considered in the study and a flat and shallow curved panel configurations are considered as well. The panels are subjected to combined axial compression and transverse tension or compression loads or combined axial compression and inplane shear loads. Results illustrating the effects of various combined load states on the buckling response of the panels are presented. In addition, results illustrating the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy and panel curvature on the panel response are presented. The results indicate that panel curvature can have a significant effect on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels subjected to combined loads. Results are included that show that geometrically perfect panels do not exhibit bifurcation points for some combined loads. Results are also presented that show the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the interaction of combined loads.

  11. Correspondence between energy levels and evolution curves of fixed points in nonlinear Landau-Zener model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan-Zuo; Tian, Dong-Ping; Chong, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Liu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90(17), 170404 (2003)] proved that the characters of transition probabilities in the adiabatic limit should be entirely determined by the topology of energy levels and the stability of fixed points in the classical Hamiltonian system, according to the adiabatic theorem. In the special case of nonlinear Landau-Zener model, we simplify their results to be that the properties of transition probabilities in the adiabatic limit should just be determined by the attributes of fixed points. It is because the topology of energy levels is governed by the behavior and symmetries of fixed points, and intuitively this fact is represented as a correspondence between energy levels and evolution curves of the fixed points which can be quantitatively described as the same complexity numbers.

  12. Linearization of calibration curves by aerosol carrier effect of CCl 4 vapor in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2005-03-01

    Carbon tetrachloride vapor as gaseous phase modifier in a graphite furnace electrothermal vaporizer (GFETV) converts heavy volatile analyte forms to volatile and medium volatile chlorides and produces aerosol carrier effect, the latter being a less generally recognized benefit. However, the possible increase of polyatomic interferences in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GFETV-ICP-MS) by chlorine and carbon containing species due to CCl 4 vapor introduction has been discouraging with the use of low resolution, quadrupole type MS equipment. Being aware of this possible handicap, it was aimed at to investigate the feasibility of the use of this halogenating agent in ICP-MS with regard of possible hazards to the instrument, and also to explore the advantages under these specific conditions. With sample gas flow (inner gas flow) rate not higher than 900 ml min -1 Ar in the torch and 3 ml min -1 CCl 4 vapor flow rate in the furnace, the long-term stability of the instrument was ensured and the following benefits by the halocarbon were observed. The non-linearity error (defined in the text) of the calibration curves (signal versus mass functions) with matrix-free solution standards was 30-70% without, and 1-5% with CCl 4 vapor introduction, respectively, at 1 ng mass of Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb analytes. The sensitivity for these elements increased by 2-4-fold with chlorination, while the relative standard deviation (RSD) was essentially the same (2-5%) for the two cases in comparison. A vaporization temperature of 2650 °C was required for Cr in Ar atmosphere, while 2200 °C was sufficient in Ar + CCl 4 atmosphere to attain complete vaporization. Improvements in linear response and sensitivity were the highest for this least volatile element. The pyrolytic graphite layer inside the graphite tube was protected by the halocarbon, and tube life time was further increased by using traces of hydrocarbon vapor in the external sheath gas of the graphite furnace. Details

  13. Combining biomarkers linearly and nonlinearly for classification using the area under the ROC curve.

    PubMed

    Fong, Youyi; Yin, Shuxin; Huang, Ying

    2016-09-20

    In biomedical studies, it is often of interest to classify/predict a subject's disease status based on a variety of biomarker measurements. A commonly used classification criterion is based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Many methods have been proposed to optimize approximated empirical AUC criteria, but there are two limitations to the existing methods. First, most methods are only designed to find the best linear combination of biomarkers, which may not perform well when there is strong nonlinearity in the data. Second, many existing linear combination methods use gradient-based algorithms to find the best marker combination, which often result in suboptimal local solutions. In this paper, we address these two problems by proposing a new kernel-based AUC optimization method called ramp AUC (RAUC). This method approximates the empirical AUC loss function with a ramp function and finds the best combination by a difference of convex functions algorithm. We show that as a linear combination method, RAUC leads to a consistent and asymptotically normal estimator of the linear marker combination when the data are generated from a semiparametric generalized linear model, just as the smoothed AUC method. Through simulation studies and real data examples, we demonstrate that RAUC outperforms smooth AUC in finding the best linear marker combinations, and can successfully capture nonlinear pattern in the data to achieve better classification performance. We illustrate our method with a dataset from a recent HIV vaccine trial. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27058981

  14. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  15. A truncated Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for the calibration of highly parameterized nonlinear models

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a modification to the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm for a more robust and more efficient calibration of highly parameterized, strongly nonlinear models of multiphase flow through porous media. The new method combines the advantages of truncated singular value decomposition with those of the classical Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, thus enabling a more robust solution of underdetermined inverse problems with complex relations between the parameters to be estimated and the observable state variables used for calibration. The truncation limit separating the solution space from the calibration null space is re-evaluated during the iterative calibration process. In between these re-evaluations, fewer forward simulations are required, compared to the standard approach, to calculate the approximate sensitivity matrix. Truncated singular values are used to calculate the Levenberg-Marquardt parameter updates, ensuring that safe small steps along the steepest-descent direction are taken for highly correlated parameters of low sensitivity, whereas efficient quasi-Gauss-Newton steps are taken for independent parameters with high impact. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated for a synthetic data set representing infiltration into a partially saturated, heterogeneous soil, where hydrogeological, petrophysical, and geostatistical parameters are estimated based on the joint inversion of hydrological and geophysical data.

  16. Growth curve by Gompertz nonlinear regression model in female and males in tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum).

    PubMed

    De Mello, Fernanda; Oliveira, Carlos A L; Ribeiro, Ricardo P; Resende, Emiko K; Povh, Jayme A; Fornari, Darci C; Barreto, Rogério V; McManus, Concepta; Streit, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Was evaluated the pattern of growth among females and males of tambaqui by Gompertz nonlinear regression model. Five traits of economic importance were measured on 145 animals during the three years, totaling 981 morphometric data analyzed. Different curves were adjusted between males and females for body weight, height and head length and only one curve was adjusted to the width and body length. The asymptotic weight (a) and relative growth rate to maturity (k) were different between sexes in animals with ± 5 kg; slaughter weight practiced by a specific niche market, very profitable. However, there was no difference between males and females up to ± 2 kg; slaughter weight established to supply the bigger consumer market. Females showed weight greater than males (± 280 g), which are more suitable for fish farming purposes defined for the niche market to larger animals. In general, males had lower maximum growth rate (8.66 g / day) than females (9.34 g / day), however, reached faster than females, 476 and 486 days growth rate, respectively. The height and length body are the traits that contributed most to the weight at 516 days (P <0.001). PMID:26628036

  17. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri; Hlongwane, Miranda; Heitmann, Uwe; Florek, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 μg·L- 1 using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed.

  18. A Computer Program for Calculation of Calibration Curves for Quantitative X-Ray Diffraction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Frank N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a FORTRAN IV program written to supplement a laboratory exercise dealing with quantitative x-ray diffraction analysis of mixtures of polycrystalline phases in an introductory course in x-ray diffraction. Gives an example of the use of the program and compares calculated and observed calibration data. (Author/GS)

  19. Estimating of a nonlinear power curve for a Wind Turbine Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calif, R.; Schmitt, F. G.

    2012-04-01

    The output power from a Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) is an intermittent resource, due to the high variability of the atmospheric wind at all spatial or temporal scales ranging from large scale variations to very short variations. Generally, a function transfer or a power curve of WTG is estimated with the IEC standard 61400 - 12 giving a relation of coupling between the measured wind speed and the output power for the considered WTG. However, this relation is a statistical representation and not takes into account the dynamics of the power output, more precisely on small time scales. The goal is to provide a method to estimate and to model the function transfer of a WTG, in order to synthesize the output power mimicking the statistical and the dynamical properties of the real output power. For that, we study the statistics of power curve in the multifractal framework motivated by the presence of spectral scaling for the wind speed and the output power data from a WTG. The first step consists to quantify the power curve or the transfer function of two intermittent stochastic processes such as the wind speed u(t) and the output power p(t) at all temporal scales and at all intensities. In this study, firstly, we define the time increment of the wind speed measurement u'(t) = u(t + τ) - u(t) and the time increment of the output power measurement p'(t) = p(t + τ) - p(t) characterized by mth and nth order structure functions to estimate the exponent functions ζu'(m) and ζp'(n) that characterize respectively the multifractal properties of the wind speed fluctuations u'(t) and the output power fluctuations p'(t) from the WTG. The exponent function ζ defines the types of scaling behavior of a process: if ζ is linear the statistical behavior is monoscaling corresponding to a monofractal process. If ζ is nonlinear and concave, the statistical behavior is multiscaling corresponding to a multifractal process. The concavity of this function is a characteristic of the

  20. Automatable on-line generation of calibration curves and standard additions in solution-cathode glow discharge optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-03-01

    Two methods are described that enable on-line generation of calibration standards and standard additions in solution-cathode glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (SCGD-OES). The first method employs a gradient high-performance liquid chromatography pump to perform on-line mixing and delivery of a stock standard, sample solution, and diluent to achieve a desired solution composition. The second method makes use of a simpler system of three peristaltic pumps to perform the same function of on-line solution mixing. Both methods can be computer-controlled and automated, and thereby enable both simple and standard-addition calibrations to be rapidly performed on-line. Performance of the on-line approaches is shown to be comparable to that of traditional methods of sample preparation, in terms of calibration curves, signal stability, accuracy, and limits of detection. Potential drawbacks to the on-line procedures include signal lag between changes in solution composition and pump-induced multiplicative noise. Though the new on-line methods were applied here to SCGD-OES to improve sample throughput, they are not limited in application to only SCGD-OES-any instrument that samples from flowing solution streams (flame atomic absorption spectrometry, ICP-OES, ICP-mass spectrometry, etc.) could benefit from them.

  1. Quantifying the Antibody Binding on Protein Microarrays using Microarray Nonlinear Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; Wallstrom, Garrick; Magee, Dewey Mitchell; Qiu, Ji; Mendoza, D. Eliseo A.; Wang, Jie; Bian, Xiaofang; Graves, Morgan; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    To address the issue of quantification for antibody assays with protein microarrays, we firstly developed a Microarray Nonlinear Calibration (MiNC) method that applies in the quantification of antibody binding to the surface of microarray spots. We found that MiNC significantly increased the linear dynamic range and reduced assay variations. A serological analysis of guinea pig Mycobacterium tuberculosis models showed that a larger number of putative antigen targets were identified with MiNC, which is consistent with the improved assay performance of protein microarrays. We expect that our cumulative results will provide scientists with a new appreciation of antibody assays with protein microarrays. Our MiNC method has the potential to be employed in biomedical research with multiplex antibody assays which need quantitation, including the discovery of antibody biomarkers, clinical diagnostics with multi-antibody signatures and construction of immune mathematical models. PMID:23662896

  2. Linear and Nonlinear Calibration Methods for Predicting Mechanical Properties of Polypropylene Pellets Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Banquet-Terán, Julio; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Hernández-Morelo, Alveiro; Ropero, Jorge; Fontalvo-Gomez, Miriam; Romañach, Rodolfo J

    2016-07-01

    A nondestructive and faster methodology to quantify mechanical properties of polypropylene (PP) pellets, obtained from an industrial plant, was developed with Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra data were obtained from several types of samples such as homopolymer PP, random ethylene-propylene copolymer, and impact ethylene-propylene copolymer. Multivariate calibration models were developed by relating the changes in the Raman spectra to mechanical properties determined by ASTM tests (Young's traction modulus, tensile strength at yield, elongation at yield on traction, and flexural modulus at 1% secant). Several strategies were evaluated to build robust models including the use of preprocessing methods (baseline correction, vector normalization, de-trending, and standard normal variate), selecting the best subset of wavelengths to model property response and discarding irrelevant variables by applying genetic algorithm (GA). Linear multivariable models were investigated such as partial least square regression (PLS) and PLS with genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) while nonlinear models were implemented with artificial neural network (ANN) preceded by GA (GA-ANN). The best multivariate calibration models were obtained when a combination of genetic algorithms and artificial neural network were used on Raman spectral data with relative standard errors (%RSE) from 0.17 to 0.41 for training and 0.42 to 0.88% validation data sets. PMID:27287847

  3. Multigrid solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and calculation of titration curves.

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, H; Allewell, N M

    1993-01-01

    Although knowledge of the pKa values and charge states of individual residues is critical to understanding the role of electrostatic effects in protein structure and function, calculating these quantities is challenging because of the sensitivity of these parameters to the position and distribution of charges. Values for many different proteins which agree well with experimental results have been obtained with modified Tanford-Kirkwood theory in which the protein is modeled as a sphere (reviewed in Ref. 1); however, convergence is more difficult to achieve with finite difference methods, in which the protein is mapped onto a grid and derivatives of the potential function are calculated as differences between the values of the function at grid points (reviewed in Ref. 6). Multigrid methods, in which the size of the grid is varied from fine to coarse in several cycles, decrease computational time, increase rates of convergence, and improve agreement with experiment. Both the accuracy and computational advantage of the multigrid approach increase with grid size, because the time required to achieve a solution increases slowly with grid size. We have implemented a multigrid procedure for solving the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and, using lysozyme as a test case, compared calculations for several crystal forms, different refinement procedures, and different charge assignment schemes. The root mean square difference between calculated and experimental pKa values for the crystal structure which yields best agreement with experiment (1LZT) is 1.1 pH units, with the differences in calculated and experimental pK values being less than 0.6 pH units for 16 out of 21 residues. The calculated titration curves of several residues are biphasic. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:8369451

  4. Use of positive ion appearance curves for energy scale calibration in electron beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chantry, P.J.

    1989-02-01

    Linearly extrapolated ion appearance curves are frequently used to obtain a corrected electron energy scale in electron beam experiments. The relative merits of the rare gases are critically examined using the published total ion collection data of Rapp and Englander-Golden. For each gas the error in the linearly extrapolated threshold has been calculated as a function of the extent of the data included in the linear regression fit. The results clearly indicate that He is the best choice in this context, allowing the linear fit to be extended to 8 eV above threshold without introducing any significant error. With Xe the error is less than 0.07 eV, provided the fitted data does not extend beyond 7 eV above the threshold. The worst choice is argon, for which the error increases rapidly with the range of the fit, and can exceed 0.3 eV.

  5. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  6. Modelling lactation curve for milk fat to protein ratio in Iranian buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) using non-linear mixed models.

    PubMed

    Hossein-Zadeh, Navid Ghavi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare seven non-linear mathematical models (Brody, Wood, Dhanoa, Sikka, Nelder, Rook and Dijkstra) to examine their efficiency in describing the lactation curves for milk fat to protein ratio (FPR) in Iranian buffaloes. Data were 43 818 test-day records for FPR from the first three lactations of Iranian buffaloes which were collected on 523 dairy herds in the period from 1996 to 2012 by the Animal Breeding Center of Iran. Each model was fitted to monthly FPR records of buffaloes using the non-linear mixed model procedure (PROC NLMIXED) in SAS and the parameters were estimated. The models were tested for goodness of fit using Akaike's information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC) and log maximum likelihood (-2 Log L). The Nelder and Sikka mixed models provided the best fit of lactation curve for FPR in the first and second lactations of Iranian buffaloes, respectively. However, Wood, Dhanoa and Sikka mixed models provided the best fit of lactation curve for FPR in the third parity buffaloes. Evaluation of first, second and third lactation features showed that all models, except for Dijkstra model in the third lactation, under-predicted test time at which daily FPR was minimum. On the other hand, minimum FPR was over-predicted by all equations. Evaluation of the different models used in this study indicated that non-linear mixed models were sufficient for fitting test-day FPR records of Iranian buffaloes. PMID:27600968

  7. A unified approach for nonlinear vibration analysis of curved structures using non-uniform rational B-spline representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, H.; Esmailzadeh, E.; Barari, A.

    2015-09-01

    A novel procedure for the nonlinear vibration analysis of curved beam is presented. The Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) is combined with the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to define the curvature of the structure. The governing equation of motion and the general frequency formula, using the NURBS variables, is applicable for any type of curvatures, is developed. The Galerkin procedure is implemented to obtain the nonlinear ordinary differential equation of curved system and the multiple time scales method is utilized to find the corresponding frequency responses. As a case study, the nonlinear vibration of carbon nanotubes with different shapes of curvature is investigated. The effect of oscillation amplitude and the waviness on the natural frequency of the curved nanotube is evaluated and the primary resonance case of system with respect to the variations of different parameters is discussed. For the sake of comparison of the results obtained with those from the molecular dynamic simulation, the natural frequencies evaluated from the proposed approach are compared with those reported in literature for few types of carbon nanotube simulation.

  8. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source) Booster Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Nelson, D.; Marks, S.; Gee, B.; Wong, W.; Meneghetti, J.

    1989-03-01

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs.

  9. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  10. Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    Commercial spectrographic systems are usually supplied with some wave-length calibration, but it is essential that the experimenter performs his own calibration for reliable measurements. A number of sources emitting well-known emission lines are available, and the best values of their wavelengths may be taken from data banks accessible on the internet. Data have been critically evaluated for many decades by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the USA [13], see also p. 3. Special data bases have been established by the astronomy and fusion communities (Appendix B).

  11. Research Experience for Teachers at Green Bank: High-Precision Calibration, Baselines and Nonlinearities with the GBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, Shelly; Maddalena, R. J.; Figura, C.

    2006-12-01

    The traditional methods for calibrating single-dish radio telescopes assume that the system gain is linear: detected power is taken to be proportional to the power incident on the antenna. The assumption is wrong at some low level and noticeably breaks down when observing an object that has a large dynamic range. The high sensitivity, clean beam, and very stable electronics of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) allow us to detect nonlinearities that would be masked in most other radio telescopes. In particular, the signal processing components of the GBT produce an output power that exhibits at least a quadratic dependence on incident power. Our study indicates that measuring and compensating for the nonlinearity is rather trivial and improves calibration when observing objects with a high dynamic range. Once measured, the nonlinearity is shown to be stable over a typical observing run ( 6-8 hours) with evidence of stability for up to several weeks. We also investigated ways to improve spectral-line calibration and baseline shape when observing over a band that is many GHz wide, as is typical with many high frequency GBT projects. We have found that baselines are seriously degraded when using the traditional methods of calibration via scalar values for the system temperature and calibration noise diode that are averaged over the entire bandwidth of the observations. System calibration and baselines are shown to be substantially improved when we use noise diode and system temperature values that have a frequency resolution of a few MHz. Incorporating this research and the general topic of radio astronomy into the high school science classroom will also be discussed. This work was funded in part by the NSF-RET program.

  12. LEPTON ACCELERATORS AND COLLIDERS: Linear optics calibration and nonlinear optimization during the commissioning of the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shun-Qiang; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Li, Hao-Hu; Zhang, Man-Zhou; Hou, Jie; Zhou, Xue-Mei; Liu, Gui-Min

    2009-06-01

    Phase I commissioning of the SSRF storage ring on 3.0 GeV beam energy was started at the end of December 2007. A lot of encouraging results have been obtained so far. In this paper, calibrations of the linear optics during the commissioning are discussed, and some measured results about the nonlinearity given. Calibration procedure emphasizes correcting quadrupole magnetic coefficients with the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) technique. After fitting the closed orbit response matrix, the linear optics of the four test modes is substantially corrected, and the measured physical parameters agree well with the designed ones.

  13. Experiments on nonlinear acoustic landmine detection: Tuning curve studies of soil-mine and soil-mass oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korman, Murray S.; Witten, Thomas R.; Fenneman, Douglas J.

    2004-10-01

    Donskoy [SPIE Proc. 3392, 211-217 (1998); 3710, 239-246 (1999)] has suggested a nonlinear technique that is insensitive to relatively noncompliant targets that can detect an acoustically compliant buried mine. Airborne sound at two primary frequencies eventually causes interactions with the soil and mine generating combination frequencies that can affect the vibration velocity at the surface. In current experiments, f1 and f2 are closely spaced near a mine resonance and a laser Doppler vibrometer profiles the surface. In profiling, certain combination frequencies have a much greater contrast ratio than the linear profiles at f1 and f2-but off the mine some nonlinearity exists. Near resonance, the bending (a softening) of a family of tuning curves (over the mine) exhibits a linear relationship between peak velocity and corresponding frequency, which is characteristic of nonlinear mesoscopic elasticity effects that are observed in geomaterials like rocks or granular media. Results are presented for inert plastic VS 1.6, VS 2.2 and M14 mines buried 3.6 cm in loose soil. Tuning curves for a rigid mass plate resting on a soil layer exhibit similar results, suggesting that nonresonant conditions off the mine are desirable. [Work supported by U.S. Army RDECOM, CERDEC, NVESD, Fort Belvoir, VA.

  14. Nonlinear radiative heat transfer and Hall effects on a viscous fluid in a semi-porous curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Z.; Naveed, M.; Sajid, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, effects of Hall currents and nonlinear radiative heat transfer in a viscous fluid passing through a semi-porous curved channel coiled in a circle of radius R are analyzed. A curvilinear coordinate system is used to develop the mathematical model of the considered problem in the form partial differential equations. Similarity solutions of the governing boundary value problems are obtained numerically using shooting method. The results are also validated with the well-known finite difference technique known as the Keller-Box method. The analysis of the involved pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature distributions is presented through graphs and tables.

  15. Nonlinear radiative heat transfer and Hall effects on a viscous fluid in a semi-porous curved channel

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Z.; Naveed, M.; Sajid, M.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, effects of Hall currents and nonlinear radiative heat transfer in a viscous fluid passing through a semi-porous curved channel coiled in a circle of radius R are analyzed. A curvilinear coordinate system is used to develop the mathematical model of the considered problem in the form partial differential equations. Similarity solutions of the governing boundary value problems are obtained numerically using shooting method. The results are also validated with the well-known finite difference technique known as the Keller-Box method. The analysis of the involved pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature distributions is presented through graphs and tables.

  16. Nonlinear estimation of Monod growth kinetic parameters from a single substrate depletion curve.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J A; Tiedje, J M

    1983-01-01

    Monod growth kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting sigmoidal substrate depletion data to the integrated Monod equation, using nonlinear least-squares analysis. When the initial substrate concentration was in the mixed-order region, nonlinear estimation of simulated data sets containing known measurement errors provided accurate estimates of the mu max, Ks, and Y values used to create these data. Nonlinear regression analysis of sigmoidal substrate depletion data was also evaluated for H2-limited batch growth of Desulfovibrio sp. strain G11. The integrated Monod equation can be more convenient for the estimation of growth kinetic parameters, particularly for gaseous substrates, but it must be recognized that the estimates of mu max, Ks, and Y obtained may be influenced by the growth rate history of the inoculum. PMID:6870238

  17. A new method for calibrating the nonlinear range of a single-beam optical trap (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Jamianne C.; Lopez, Benjamin J.; Campas, Otger; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-08-01

    Optical traps allow for the precise application and measurement of pico-Newton forces in a wide variety of situations, and are particularly well suited for biophysical measurements of motor proteins and cells. Nearly all experiments exploit the linear regime of the optical trap, where force and displacement are related by a simple spring constant that does not depend on the trapped object's position. This typically limits the useful force range to < 100 pN for high-NA objective lenses and reasonable laser powers. Several biological studies require larger forces, which are not accessible in the linear regime of the trap. The best means to extend the maximum force is to make use of the entire nonlinear range; however, current techniques for calibrating the full nonlinear regime are limited. Here we report a new method for calibrating the nonlinear trap region that uses the fluctuations in the position of a trapped object when it is displaced from the center of a single gradient optical trap by controlled flow. From the position fluctuations, we measure the local trap stiffness, in both the linear and non-linear regimes. This approach requires only knowledge of the system temperature, and is especially useful for measurements involving trapped objects of unknown size, or objects in a fluid of unknown viscosity.

  18. SWRC fit - a nonlinear fitting program with a water retention curve for soils having unimodal and bimodal pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.

    2007-02-01

    The soil hydraulic parameters for analyzing soil water movement can be determined by fitting a soil water retention curve to a certain function, i.e., a soil hydraulic model. For this purpose, the program "SWRC Fit," which performs nonlinear fitting of soil water retention curves to 5 models by Levenberg-Marquardt method, was developed. The five models are the Brooks and Corey model, the van Genuchten model, Kosugi's log-normal pore-size distribution model, Durner's bimodal pore-size distribution model, and a bimodal log-normal pore-size distribution model propose in this study. This program automatically determines all the necessary conditions for the nonlinear fitting, such as the initial estimate of the parameters, and, therefore, users can simply input the soil water retention data to obtain the necessary parameters. The program can be executed directly from a web page at http://purl.org/net/swrc/; a client version of the software written in numeric calculation language GNU Octave is included in the electronic supplement of this paper. The program was used for determining the soil hydraulic parameters of 420 soils in UNSODA database. After comparing the root mean square error of the unimodal models, the van Genuchten and Kosugi's models were better than the Brooks and Corey model. The bimodal log-normal pore-size distribution model had similar fitting performance to Durner's bimodal pore-size distribution model.

  19. Nonlinear and snap-through responses of curved panels to intense acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1989-01-01

    Assuming a single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load-displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the nonlinear dynamic response of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. The highly nonlinear motion of snap-through can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Experimental results are obtained with buckled and cylindrical aluminum panels using discrete frequency and broadband excitation of mechanical and acoustic forces. Some important effects of the snap-through motion on the dynamic response of the postbuckled plates are described. Static tests were used to identify the deformation shape during snap-through.

  20. On the nonlinear stability of the unsteady, viscous flow of an incompressible fluid in a curved pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortis, Trudi A.; Hall, Philip

    1995-01-01

    The stability of the flow of an incompressible, viscous fluid through a pipe of circular cross-section curved about a central axis is investigated in a weakly nonlinear regime. A sinusoidal pressure gradient with zero mean is imposed, acting along the pipe. A WKBJ perturbation solution is constructed, taking into account the need for an inner solution in the vicinity of the outer bend, which is obtained by identifying the saddle point of the Taylor number in the complex plane of the cross-sectional angle co-ordinate. The equation governing the nonlinear evolution of the leading order vortex amplitude is thus determined. The stability analysis of this flow to periodic disturbances leads to a partial differential system dependent on three variables, and since the differential operators in this system are periodic in time, Floquet theory may be applied to reduce this system to a coupled infinite system of ordinary differential equations, together with homogeneous uncoupled boundary conditions. The eigenvalues of this system are calculated numerically to predict a critical Taylor number consistent with the analysis of Papageorgiou. A discussion of how nonlinear effects alter the linear stability analysis is also given, and the nature of the instability determined.

  1. Estimation of Material Parameters in Nonlinear Hardening Plasticity Models and Strain Life Curves for CuAg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srnec Novak, J.; Benasciutti, D.; De Bona, F.; Stanojević, A.; De Luca, A.; Raffaglio, Y.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the cyclic response and low-cycle fatigue behaviour of a CuAg alloy used in crystallizer for continuous casting lines. Therefore isothermal strain-based fatigue tests are first performed on CuAg specimens at different temperature levels (20 °C, 250 °C, 300 °C). The evolution of stress-strain loops recorded during the cyclic tests is used for the parameter identification of several nonlinear hardening models (nonlinear kinematic, nonlinear isotropic). Cyclic stress-strain data from experiments are compared with results from numerical simulations with the identified material parameters, showing a satisfying agreement. Critical examination of numerical results from different models is also performed. Finally, the strain- life fatigue curves estimated from experimental data are compared with approximate strain-life equations (Universal Slopes Equation, 10% Rule) which are obtained from simple tensile tests. The material parameters determined in this work can conveniently be used as inputs in a elasto- plastic finite element simulations of a crystallizer.

  2. Issues in energy calibration, nonlinearity, and signal processing for gamma-ray microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Mike W; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Hoteling, Nathan; Croce, M; Karpius, P J; Ullom, J N; Bennett, D A; Horansky, R D; Vale, L R; Doriese, W B

    2009-01-01

    Issues regarding the energy calibration of high dynamic range microcalorimeter detector arrays are presented with respect to new results from a minor actinide-mixed oxide radioactive source. The need to move to larger arrays of such detectors necessitates the implementation of automated analysis procedures, which turn out to be nontrivial due to complex calibration shapes and pixel-to-pixel variability. Some possible avenues for improvement, including a more physics-based calibration procedure, are suggested.

  3. Nonlinear flutter of curved panels under yawed supersonic flow using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouz, Mohamed Salim

    2005-11-01

    In the extensive published literature on panel flutter, a large number of papers are dedicated to investigation of flat plates in the supersonic flow regime. Very few authors have extended their work to flutter of curved panels. The curved geometry generates a pre-flutter behavior, triggering a static deflection due to a static aerodynamic load (SAL) over the panel as well as dynamic characteristics unique to this geometry. The purpose of this dissertation is to provide new insights in the subject of flutter of curved panels. Finite element frequency and time domain methods are developed to predict the pre/post flutter responses and the flutter onset of curved panels under a yaw flow angle. The first-order shear deformation theory, the Marguerre plate theory, the von Karman large deflection theory, and the quasi-steady first-order piston theory appended with SAL are used in the formulation. The principle of virtual work is applied to develop the equations of motion of the fluttering system in structural node degrees of freedom. In the frequency domain method, the Newton-Raphson method is used to determine the panel static deflection under the SAL, and an eigen-value solution is employed for the determination of the stability boundary margins at different panel height-rises and yaw flow angles. Pre-flutter static deflection shape, flutter coalescence frequency, and damping rate of various cylindrical panels are thoroughly investigated. The main results revealed that the pre-flutter static response of cylindrical panels is fundamentally different from the one associated with flat plates. It is shown that curvature has a detrimental effect for 2-dimensional (2-D) curved panels, and is beneficial for 3-D components at an optimum height-rise. In the time domain method, the system equations of motion are transformed into modal coordinates, and solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical scheme. Time history responses, phase plots, power spectrum density plots, and

  4. Unidirectional growth, rocking curve, linear and nonlinear optical properties of LPHCl single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P. Ramesh; Gunaseelan, R.; Raj, A. Antony; Selvakumar, S.; Sagayaraj, P.

    2012-06-01

    Nonlinear optical amino-acid single crystal of L-phenylalanine hydrochloride (LPHCl) was successfully grown by unidirectional Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method under ambient conditions for the first time. The grown single crystal was subjected to different characterization analyses in order to find out its suitability for device fabrication. The crystalline perfection was evaluated using high-resolution X-ray diffractometry. It is evident from the optical absorption study that crystal has excellent transmission in the entire visible region with its lower cut off wavelength around 290 nm.

  5. Calibration of a T-History calorimeter to measure enthalpy curves of phase change materials in the temperature range from 40 to 200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathgeber, Christoph; Schmit, Henri; Hennemann, Peter; Hiebler, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Thermal energy storage using phase change materials (PCMs) provides high storage capacities in small temperature ranges. For the design of efficient latent heat storage, the enthalpy curve of a PCM has to be measured with high precision. Measurements are most commonly performed with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The T-History method, however, proved to be favourable for the characterization of typical PCMs due to large samples and a measuring procedure close to conditions found in applications. As T-History calorimeters are usually individual constructions, performing a careful calibration procedure is decisive to ensure optimal measuring accuracy. We report in this paper on the calibration of a T-History calorimeter with a working range from 40 to 200 °C that was designed and built at our institute. A three-part procedure, consisting of an indium calibration, a measurement of the specific heat of copper and measurements of three solid-liquid PCMs (stearic acid, dimethyl terephthalate and d-mannitol), was performed and an advanced procedure for the correction of enthalpy curves was developed. When comparing T-History enthalpy curves to literature data and DSC step measurements, good agreement within the uncertainty limits demanded by RAL testing specifications was obtained. Thus, our design of a T-History calorimeter together with the developed calibration procedure provides the measuring accuracy that is required to identify the most suitable PCM for a given application. In addition, the dependence of the enthalpy curve on the sample size can be analysed by comparing results obtained with T-History and DSC and the behaviour of the bulk material in real applications can be predicted.

  6. Comparison of non-linear models to describe the lactation curves for milk yield and composition in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Ghavi Hossein-Zadeh, N

    2016-02-01

    In order to describe the lactation curves of milk yield (MY) and composition in buffaloes, seven non-linear mathematical equations (Wood, Dhanoa, Sikka, Nelder, Brody, Dijkstra and Rook) were used. Data were 116,117 test-day records for MY, fat (FP) and protein (PP) percentages of milk from the first three lactations of buffaloes which were collected from 893 herds in the period from 1992 to 2012 by the Animal Breeding Center of Iran. Each model was fitted to monthly production records of dairy buffaloes using the NLIN and MODEL procedures in SAS and the parameters were estimated. The models were tested for goodness of fit using adjusted coefficient of determination (Radj(2)), root means square error (RMSE), Durbin-Watson statistic and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The Dijkstra model provided the best fit of MY and PP of milk for the first three parities of buffaloes due to the lower values of RMSE and AIC than other models. For the first-parity buffaloes, Sikka and Brody models provided the best fit of FP, but for the second- and third-parity buffaloes, Sikka model and Brody equation provided the best fit of lactation curve for FP, respectively. The results of this study showed that the Wood and Dhanoa equations were able to estimate the time to the peak MY more accurately than the other equations. In addition, Nelder and Dijkstra equations were able to estimate the peak time at second and third parities more accurately than other equations, respectively. Brody function provided more accurate predictions of peak MY over the first three parities of buffaloes. There was generally a positive relationship between 305-day MY and persistency measures and also between peak yield and 305-day MY, calculated by different models, within each lactation in the current study. Overall, evaluation of the different equations used in the current study indicated the potential of the non-linear models for fitting monthly productive records of buffaloes. PMID:26354679

  7. A New Calibration Procedure which Accounts for Non-linearity in Single-monochromator Brewer Ozone Spectrophotometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaziri, Zahra; Moeini, Omid; McElroy, Tom; Savastiouk, Vladimir; Barton, David

    2014-05-01

    It is now known that Single-Monochromator Brewer Spectrophotometer ozone and sulphur dioxide measurements suffer from non-linearity due to the presence of instrumental stray light caused by scattering from the optics of the instrument. Because of the large gradient in the ozone absorption spectrum in the ultraviolet, the atmospheric spectra measured by the instrument possess a very large gradient in intensity in the 300 to 325 nm wavelength region. This results in a significant sensitivity to stray light when there is more than 1000 Dobson Units (D.U.) of ozone in the light path. As the light path (airmass) increases, the stray light effect on the measurements also increases. The measurements can be on the order of 8% low for an ozone column of 600 D.U. and an airmass factor of 3 (1800 D.U.) causing an underestimation of the ozone column amount. Primary calibrations for the Brewer instrument are carried out at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. They are done using the Langley plot method to extrapolate a set of measurements made under a constant ozone value to an extraterrestrial measurement. Since the effects of a small non-linearity at lower ozone paths may still be important, a better calibration procedure should account for the non-linearity of the instrument response. Previous methods involve scanning a laser beam with known wavelength with the Brewer spectrophotometer and observing the out of band signals. This paper presents a much more practical method to correct for stray light effects that includes a mathematical model of the instrument response and a non-linear retrieval approach that calculates the best values for the model parameters. The parameterization used was validated using an instrument physical model simulation. The model can then be used in reverse to provide correct ozone values up to a defined maximum ozone slant path.

  8. Uncertainty due to non-linearity in radiation thermometers calibrated by multiple fixed points

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2013-09-11

    A new method to estimate the uncertainty due to non-linearity is described on the n= 3 scheme basis. The expression of uncertainty is mathematically derived applying the random walk method. The expression is simple and requires only the temperatures of the fixed points and a relative uncertainty value for each flux-doubling derived from the non-linearity measurement. We also present an example of the method, in which the uncertainty of temperature measurement by a radiation thermometer is calculated on the basis of non-linearity measurement.

  9. Characterization of acid functional groups of carbon dots by nonlinear regression data fitting of potentiometric titration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Larissa A.; de Castro, Arthur H.; de Mendonça, Fernanda G.; de Mesquita, João P.

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenated functional groups present on the surface of carbon dots with an average size of 2.7 ± 0.5 nm were characterized by a variety of techniques. In particular, we discussed the fit data of potentiometric titration curves using a nonlinear regression method based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The results obtained by statistical treatment of the titration curve data showed that the best fit was obtained considering the presence of five Brønsted-Lowry acids on the surface of the carbon dots with constant ionization characteristics of carboxylic acids, cyclic ester, phenolic and pyrone-like groups. The total number of oxygenated acid groups obtained was 5 mmol g-1, with approximately 65% (∼2.9 mmol g-1) originating from groups with pKa < 6. The methodology showed good reproducibility and stability with standard deviations below 5%. The nature of the groups was independent of small variations in experimental conditions, i.e. the mass of carbon dots titrated and initial concentration of HCl solution. Finally, we believe that the methodology used here, together with other characterization techniques, is a simple, fast and powerful tool to characterize the complex acid-base properties of these so interesting and intriguing nanoparticles.

  10. High-precision 2MASS JHK{sub s} light curves and other data for RR Lyrae star SDSS J015450 + 001501: Strong constraints for nonlinear pulsation models

    SciTech Connect

    Szabó, Róbert; Ivezić, Željko; Kiss, László L.; Kolláth, Zoltán; Jones, Lynne; Becker, Andrew C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Sesar, Branimir; Cutri, Roc M.

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss an extensive data set for the non-Blazhko ab-type RR Lyrae star SDSS J015450+001501, including optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz light curves and spectroscopic data, LINEAR and Catalina Sky Survey unfiltered optical light curves, and infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer W1 and W2 light curves. Most notable is that light curves obtained by 2MASS include close to 9000 photometric measures collected over 3.3 yr and provide an exceedingly precise view of near-infrared variability. These data demonstrate that static atmosphere models are insufficient to explain multiband photometric light-curve behavior and present strong constraints for nonlinear pulsation models for RR Lyrae stars. It is a challenge to modelers to produce theoretical light curves that can explain data presented here, which we make publicly available.

  11. Investigating the discrimination potential of linear and nonlinear spectral multivariate calibrations for analysis of phenolic compounds in their binary and ternary mixtures and calculation pKa values.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Zolaikha; Ghavami, Raouf

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (VA), vanillic acid (VAI) and syringaldehyde (SIA) are important food additives as flavor enhancers. The current study for the first time is devote to the application of partial least square (PLS-1), partial robust M-regression (PRM) and feed forward neural networks (FFNNs) as linear and nonlinear chemometric methods for the simultaneous detection of binary and ternary mixtures of VA, VAI and SIA using data extracted directly from UV-spectra with overlapped peaks of individual analytes. Under the optimum experimental conditions, for each compound a linear calibration was obtained in the concentration range of 0.61-20.99 [LOD=0.12], 0.67-23.19 [LOD=0.13] and 0.73-25.12 [LOD=0.15] μgmL(-1) for VA, VAI and SIA, respectively. Four calibration sets of standard samples were designed by combination of a full and fractional factorial designs with the use of the seven and three levels for each factor for binary and ternary mixtures, respectively. The results of this study reveal that both the methods of PLS-1 and PRM are similar in terms of predict ability each binary mixtures. The resolution of ternary mixture has been accomplished by FFNNs. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was applied for the description of spectra from the acid-base titration systems each individual compound, i.e. the resolution of the complex overlapping spectra as well as to interpret the extracted spectral and concentration profiles of any pure chemical species identified. Evolving factor analysis (EFA) and singular value decomposition (SVD) were used to distinguish the number of chemical species. Subsequently, their corresponding dissociation constants were derived. Finally, FFNNs has been used to detection active compounds in real and spiked water samples. PMID:27176001

  12. Investigating the discrimination potential of linear and nonlinear spectral multivariate calibrations for analysis of phenolic compounds in their binary and ternary mixtures and calculation pKa values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Zolaikha; Ghavami, Raouf

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (VA), vanillic acid (VAI) and syringaldehyde (SIA) are important food additives as flavor enhancers. The current study for the first time is devote to the application of partial least square (PLS-1), partial robust M-regression (PRM) and feed forward neural networks (FFNNs) as linear and nonlinear chemometric methods for the simultaneous detection of binary and ternary mixtures of VA, VAI and SIA using data extracted directly from UV-spectra with overlapped peaks of individual analytes. Under the optimum experimental conditions, for each compound a linear calibration was obtained in the concentration range of 0.61-20.99 [LOD = 0.12], 0.67-23.19 [LOD = 0.13] and 0.73-25.12 [LOD = 0.15] μg mL- 1 for VA, VAI and SIA, respectively. Four calibration sets of standard samples were designed by combination of a full and fractional factorial designs with the use of the seven and three levels for each factor for binary and ternary mixtures, respectively. The results of this study reveal that both the methods of PLS-1 and PRM are similar in terms of predict ability each binary mixtures. The resolution of ternary mixture has been accomplished by FFNNs. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was applied for the description of spectra from the acid-base titration systems each individual compound, i.e. the resolution of the complex overlapping spectra as well as to interpret the extracted spectral and concentration profiles of any pure chemical species identified. Evolving factor analysis (EFA) and singular value decomposition (SVD) were used to distinguish the number of chemical species. Subsequently, their corresponding dissociation constants were derived. Finally, FFNNs has been used to detection active compounds in real and spiked water samples.

  13. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  14. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-01

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of ɛ = AΕa+BΕb, where ɛ is efficiency, Ε is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a "knee" at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  15. The nonlinear interaction of Tollmien-Schlichting waves and Taylor-Goertler vortices in curved channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, P.; Smith, F. T.

    1988-06-01

    The development of Tollmien-Schlichting waves (TSWs) and Taylor-Goertler vortices (TGVs) in fully developed viscous curved-channel flows is investigated analytically, with a focus on their nonlinear interactions. Two types of interactions are identified, depending on the amplitude of the initial disturbances. In the low-amplitude type, two TSWs and one TGV interact, and the scaled amplitudes go to infinity on a finite time scale; in the higher-amplitude type, which can also occur in a straight channel, the same singularity occurs if the angle between the TSW wavefront and the TGV is greater than 41.6 deg, but the breakdown is exponential and takes an infinite time if the angle is smaller. The implications of these findings for external flow problems such as the design of laminar-flow wings are indicated. It is concluded that longitudinal vortices like those observed in the initial stages of the transition to turbulence can be produced unless the present interaction mechanism is destroyed by boundary-layer growth.

  16. The nonlinear interaction of Tollmien-Schlichting waves and Taylor-Goertler vortices in curved channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P.; Smith, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    The development of Tollmien-Schlichting waves (TSWs) and Taylor-Goertler vortices (TGVs) in fully developed viscous curved-channel flows is investigated analytically, with a focus on their nonlinear interactions. Two types of interactions are identified, depending on the amplitude of the initial disturbances. In the low-amplitude type, two TSWs and one TGV interact, and the scaled amplitudes go to infinity on a finite time scale; in the higher-amplitude type, which can also occur in a straight channel, the same singularity occurs if the angle between the TSW wavefront and the TGV is greater than 41.6 deg, but the breakdown is exponential and takes an infinite time if the angle is smaller. The implications of these findings for external flow problems such as the design of laminar-flow wings are indicated. It is concluded that longitudinal vortices like those observed in the initial stages of the transition to turbulence can be produced unless the present interaction mechanism is destroyed by boundary-layer growth.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Cross-Peak Volumes in Multidimensional Spectra by Nonlinear-Least-Squares Curve Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, K. H.; Barsukov, I. L.; Roberts, G. C. K.

    A procedure for quantitative evaluation of cross-peak volumes in spectra of any order of dimensions is described; this is based on a generalized algorithm for combining appropriate one-dimensional integrals obtained by nonlinear-least-squares curve-fitting techniques. This procedure is embodied in a program, NDVOL, which has three modes of operation: a fully automatic mode, a manual mode for interactive selection of fitting parameters, and a fast reintegration mode. The procedures used in the NDVOL program to obtain accurate volumes for overlapping cross peaks are illustrated using various simulated overlapping cross-peak patterns. The precision and accuracy of the estimates of cross-peak volumes obtained by application of the program to these simulated cross peaks and to a back-calculated 2D NOESY spectrum of dihydrofolate reductase are presented. Examples are shown of the use of the program with real 2D and 3D data. It is shown that the program is able to provide excellent estimates of volume even for seriously overlapping cross peaks with minimal intervention by the user.

  18. Study of Welding Distortion and Residual Stress Considering Nonlinear Yield Stress Curves and Multi-constraint Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Youmin; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Inherent strain analysis has been successfully applied to predict welding deformations of large-scale structural components, while thermal-elastic-plastic finite element method is rarely used for its disadvantages of long calculation period and large storage space. In this paper, a hybrid model considering nonlinear yield stress curves and multi-constraint equations to thermal-elastic-plastic analysis is further proposed to predict welding distortions and residual stresses of large-scale structures. For welding T-joint structural steel S355JR by metal active gas welding, the published experiment results of temperature and displacement fields are applied to illustrate the credibility of the proposed integration model. By comparing numerical results of four different cases with the experiment results, it is verified that prediction precision of welding deformations and residual stresses is apparently improved considering the power-law hardening model, and computational time is also obviously shortened about 30.14% using multi-constraint equations. On the whole, the proposed hybrid method can be further used to precisely and efficiently predict welding deformations and residual stresses of large-scale structures.

  19. Kinematic Modeling and Function Generation for Non-linear Curves Using 5R Double Arm Parallel Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavkumar Kamaliya, Parth; Patel, Yashavant Kumar Dashrathlal

    2016-01-01

    Double arm configuration using parallel manipulator mimic the human arm motions either for planar or spatial space. These configurations are currently lucrative for researchers as it also replaces human workers without major redesign of work-place in industries. Humans' joint ranges limitation of arms can be resolved by replacement of either revolute or spherical joints in manipulator. Hence, the scope of maximum workspace utilization is prevailed. Planar configuration with five revolute joints (5R) is considered to imitate human arm motions in a plane using Double Arm Manipulator (DAM). Position analysis for tool that can be held in end links of configuration is carried out using Pro/mechanism in Creo® as well as SimMechanics. D-H parameters are formulated and its results derived using developed MATLAB programs are compared with mechanism simulation as well as SimMechanics results. Inverse kinematics model is developed for trajectory planning in order to trace tool trajectory in a continuous and smooth sequence. Polynomial functions are derived for position, velocity and acceleration for linear and non-linear curves in joint space. Analytical results obtained for trajectory planning are validated with simulation results of Creo®.

  20. Determining PM2.5 calibration curves for a low-cost particle monitor: common indoor residential aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dacunto, Philip J; Klepeis, Neil E; Cheng, Kai-Chung; Acevedo-Bolton, Viviana; Jiang, Ruo-Ting; Repace, James L; Ott, Wayne R; Hildemann, Lynn M

    2015-11-01

    Real-time particle monitors are essential for accurately estimating exposure to fine particles indoors. However, many such monitors tend to be prohibitively expensive for some applications, such as a tenant or homeowner curious about the quality of the air in their home. A lower cost version (the Dylos Air Quality Monitor) has recently been introduced, but it requires appropriate calibration to reflect the mass concentration units required for exposure assessment. We conducted a total of 64 experiments with a suite of instruments including a Dylos DC1100, another real-time laser photometer (TSI SidePak™ Model AM-510 Personal Aerosol Monitor), and a gravimetric sampling apparatus to estimate Dylos calibration factors for emissions from 17 different common indoor sources including cigarettes, incense, fried bacon, chicken, and hamburger. Comparison of minute-by-minute data from the Dylos with the gravimetrically calibrated SidePak yielded relationships that enable the conversion of the raw Dylos particle counts less than 2.5 μm (in #/0.01 ft(3)) to estimated PM2.5 mass concentration (e.g. μg m(-3)). The relationship between the exponentially-decaying Dylos particle counts and PM2.5 mass concentration can be described by a theoretically-derived power law with source-specific empirical parameters. A linear relationship (calibration factor) is applicable to fresh or quickly decaying emissions (i.e., before the aerosol has aged and differential decay rates introduce curvature into the relationship). The empirical parameters for the power-law relationships vary greatly both between and within source types, although linear factors appear to have lower uncertainty. The Dylos Air Quality Monitor is likely most useful for providing instantaneous feedback and context on mass particle levels in home and work situations for field-survey or personal awareness applications. PMID:26487426

  1. High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Propofol in Human Plasma: Comparison of Different Heteroscedastic Calibration Curve Models

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi Moghaddam, Pooria; Pipelzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Nesioonpour, Sholeh; Saki, Nader; Rezaee, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to select the best calibration model for determination of propofol plasma concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography method. Methods: Determination of propofol in plasma after deproteinization with acetonitrile containing thymol (as internal standard) was carried out on a C18 column with a mixture of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid 0.1% (60:40) as mobile phase which delivered at the flow rate of 1.2 mL/minute . Fluorescence detection was done at the excitation and emission wavelengths of 276 and 310 nm, respectively. After fitting different equations to the calibration data using weighted regression, the adequacy of models were assessed by lack-of-fit test, significance of all model parameters, adjusted coefficient of determination (R2adjusted) and by measuring the predictive performance with median relative prediction error and median absolute relative prediction error of the validation data set. Results: The best model was a linear equation without intercept with median relative prediction error and median absolute relative prediction error of 4.0 and 9.4%, respectively in the range of 10-5000 ng/mL. The method showed good accuracy and precision. Conclusion: The presented statistical framework could be used to choose the best model for heteroscedastic calibration data for analytes like propofol with wide range of expected concentration. PMID:25436190

  2. Analytical investigation of curved steel girder behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Michael Donald

    Horizontally curved bridges meet an increasing demand for complex highway geometries in congested urban areas. A popular type of curved bridge consists of steel I-girders interconnected by cross-frames and a composite concrete deck slab. Prior to hardening of the concrete deck each I-girder is susceptible to a lateral torsional buckling-type failure. Unlike a straight I-girder, a curved I-girder resists major components of stress resulting from strong axis bending, weak axis bending and warping. The combination of these stresses reduce the available strength of a curved girder versus that of an equivalent straight girder. Experiments demonstrating the ultimate strength characteristics of curved girders are few in number. Of the available experimental research, few studies have used full scale-tests and boundary conditions indicative of those found in an actual bridge structure. Unlike straight girders, curved girders are characterized by nonlinear out-of-plane deformations which, depending upon the magnitude of curvature, may occur at very low load levels. Because of the inherent nonlinear behaviour, some have questioned the application of the term lateral torsional buckling to curved girders; rather curved girders behave in a manner consistent with a deflection-amplification problem. Even with the advent of sophisticated analytical techniques, there is a glaring void in the documented literature regarding calibration of these techniques with known experimental curved girder behaviour. Presented here is an analytical study of the nonlinear modelling of curved steel girders and bridges. This is accomplished by incorporating large deflection and nonlinear material behaviour into three dimensional finite element models generated using the program ANSYS. Emphasis is placed on the calibration of the finite method with known experimental ultimate strength data. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of load deformation and ultimate strength are attainable via the

  3. Challenges for the Sequential Interaction Between Optimal Design of Field Campaigns and Model Calibration for Non-Linear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiges, A.; Nowak, W.; Rubin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Stochastic models of sub-surface systems generally suffer from parametric and conceptual uncertainty. To reduce the model uncertainty, model parameters are calibrated using additional collected data. These data often come from costly data acquisition campaigns that need to be optimized to collect the data with the highest data utility (DU) or value of information. In model-based approaches, the DU is evaluated based on the uncertain model itself and is therefore uncertain as well. Additionally, for non-linear models, data utility depends on the yet unobserved measurement values and can only be estimated as an expected value over an assumed distribution of possible measurement values. Both factors introduce uncertainty into the optimization of field campaigns. We propose and investigate a sequential interaction scheme between campaign optimization, data collection and model calibration. The field campaign is split in individual segments. Each segment consists of optimization, segment-wise data collection, and successive model calibration or data assimilation. By doing so, (1) the expected data utility for the newly collected data is replaced by their actual one, (2) the calibration restricts both conceptual and parametric model uncertainty, and thus (3) the distribution of possible future data values for the subsequent campaign segments also changes. Hence, the model to describe the real system improves successively with each collected data segment, and so does the estimate of the yet remaining data requirements to achieve the overall investigation goals. We will show that using the sequentially improved model for the optimal design (OD) of the remaining field campaign leads to superior and more targeted designs.However, this traditional sequential OD optimizes small data segments one-by-one. In such a strategy, possible mutual dependencies with the possible data values and the optimization of data values collection in later segments are neglected. This allows a

  4. Simple solution for a complex problem: proanthocyanidins, galloyl glucoses and ellagitannins fit on a single calibration curve in high performance-gel permeation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stringano, Elisabetta; Gea, An; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2011-10-28

    This study was undertaken to explore gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for estimating molecular weights of proanthocyanidin fractions isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia). The results were compared with data obtained by thiolytic degradation of the same fractions. Polystyrene, polyethylene glycol and polymethyl methacrylate standards were not suitable for estimating the molecular weights of underivatized proanthocyanidins. Therefore, a novel HPLC-GPC method was developed based on two serially connected PolarGel-L columns using DMF that contained 5% water, 1% acetic acid and 0.15 M LiBr at 0.7 ml/min and 50 °C. This yielded a single calibration curve for galloyl glucoses (trigalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose), ellagitannins (pedunculagin, vescalagin, punicalagin, oenothein B, gemin A), proanthocyanidins (procyanidin B2, cinnamtannin B1), and several other polyphenols (catechin, epicatechin gallate, epicallocatechin gallate, amentoflavone). These GPC predicted molecular weights represented a considerable advance over previously reported HPLC-GPC methods for underivatized proanthocyanidins. PMID:21930278

  5. A strategy for multivariate calibration based on modified single-index signal regression: Capturing explicit non-linearity and improving prediction accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Qingbo; Zhang, Guangjun

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a modified single-index signal regression (mSISR) method is proposed to construct a nonlinear and practical model with high-accuracy. The mSISR method defines the optimal penalty tuning parameter in P-spline signal regression (PSR) as initial tuning parameter and chooses the number of cycles based on minimizing root mean squared error of cross-validation (RMSECV). mSISR is superior to single-index signal regression (SISR) in terms of accuracy, computation time and convergency. And it can provide the character of the non-linearity between spectra and responses in a more precise manner than SISR. Two spectra data sets from basic research experiments, including plant chlorophyll nondestructive measurement and human blood glucose noninvasive measurement, are employed to illustrate the advantages of mSISR. The results indicate that the mSISR method (i) obtains the smooth and helpful regression coefficient vector, (ii) explicitly exhibits the type and amount of the non-linearity, (iii) can take advantage of nonlinear features of the signals to improve prediction performance and (iv) has distinct adaptability for the complex spectra model by comparing with other calibration methods. It is validated that mSISR is a promising nonlinear modeling strategy for multivariate calibration.

  6. The theoretical and experimental study of the nonlinear and chaotic response of curved panels to intense acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. F.

    1988-01-01

    Assuming a single-mode transverse displacement, a simple formula is derived for the transverse load-displacement relationship of a plate under in-plane compression. The formula is used to derive a simple analytical expression for the nonlinear dynamic response of postbuckled plates under sinusoidal or random excitation. The highly nonlinear motion of snap-through can be easily interpreted using the single-mode formula. Experimental results are obtained using buckled and cylindrical aluminum panels using discrete frequency and broadband excitation of mechanical and acoustic forces.

  7. Accounting For Nonlinearity In A Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, Charles T.

    1991-01-01

    Simple mathematical technique found to account adequately for nonlinear component of response of microwave radiometer. Five prescribed temperatures measured to obtain quadratic calibration curve. Temperature assumed to vary quadratically with reading. Concept not limited to radiometric application; applicable to other measuring systems in which relationships between quantities to be determined and readings of instruments differ slightly from linearity.

  8. Parameter estimation procedure for complex non-linear systems: calibration of ASM No. 1 for N-removal in a full-scale oxidation ditch.

    PubMed

    Abusam, A; Keesman, K J; van Straten, G; Spanjers, H; Meinema, K

    2001-01-01

    When applied to large simulation models, the process of parameter estimation is also called calibration. Calibration of complex non-linear systems, such as activated sludge plants, is often not an easy task. On the one hand, manual calibration of such complex systems is usually time-consuming, and its results are often not reproducible. On the other hand, conventional automatic calibration methods are not always straightforward and often hampered by local minima problems. In this paper a new straightforward and automatic procedure, which is based on the response surface method (RSM) for selecting the best identifiable parameters, is proposed. In RSM, the process response (output) is related to the levels of the input variables in terms of a first- or second-order regression model. Usually, RSM is used to relate measured process output quantities to process conditions. However, in this paper RSM is used for selecting the dominant parameters, by evaluating parameters sensitivity in a predefined region. Good results obtained in calibration of ASM No. 1 for N-removal in a full-scale oxidation ditch proved that the proposed procedure is successful and reliable. PMID:11385868

  9. Calibration of a conodont apatite-based Ordovician 87Sr/86Sr curve to biostratigraphy and geochronology: Implications for stratigraphic resolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltzman, M. R.; Edwards, C. T.; Leslie, S. A.; Dwyer, G. S.; Bauer, J. A.; Repetski, John E.; Harris, A. G.; Bergstrom, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Ordovician 87Sr/86Sr isotope seawater curve is well established and shows a decreasing trend until the mid-Katian. However, uncertainties in calibration of this curve to biostratigraphy and geochronology have made it difficult to determine how the rates of 87Sr/86Sr decrease may have varied, which has implications for both the stratigraphic resolution possible using Sr isotope stratigraphy and efforts to model the effects of Ordovician geologic events. We measured 87Sr/86Sr in conodont apatite in North American Ordovician sections that are well studied for conodont biostratigraphy, primarily in Nevada, Oklahoma, the Appalachian region, and Ohio Valley. Our results indicate that conodont apatite may provide an accurate medium for Sr isotope stratigraphy and strengthen previous reports that point toward a significant increase in the rate of fall in seawater 87Sr/86Sr during the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian Stage. Our 87Sr/86Sr results suggest that Sr isotope stratigraphy will be most useful as a high-resolution tool for global correlation in the mid-Darriwilian to mid-Sandbian, when the maximum rate of fall in 87Sr/86Sr is estimated at ∼5.0–10.0 × 10–5 per m.y. Variable preservation of conodont elements limits the precision for individual stratigraphic horizons. Replicate conodont analyses from the same sample differ by an average of ∼4.0 × 10–5 (the 2σ standard deviation is 6.2 × 10–5), which in the best case scenario allows for subdivision of Ordovician time intervals characterized by the highest rates of fall in 87Sr/86Sr at a maximum resolution of ∼0.5–1.0 m.y. Links between the increased rate of fall in 87Sr/86Sr beginning in the mid-late Darriwilian (Phragmodus polonicus to Pygodus serra conodont zones) and geologic events continue to be investigated, but the coincidence with a long-term rise in sea level (Sauk-Tippecanoe megasequence boundary) and tectonic events (Taconic orogeny) in North America provides a plausible

  10. Characterization of calibration curves and energy dependence GafChromic{sup TM} XR-QA2 model based radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomic, Nada Quintero, Chrystian; Aldelaijan, Saad; Bekerat, Hamed; Liang, LiHeng; DeBlois, François; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R.; Seuntjens, Jan

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the energy response of XR-QA2 GafChromic{sup TM} film over a broad energy range used in diagnostic radiology examinations. The authors also made an assessment of the most suitable functions for both reference and relative dose measurements. Methods: Pieces of XR-QA2 film were irradiated to nine different values of air kerma in air, following reference calibration of a number of beam qualities ranging in HVLs from 0.16 to 8.25 mm Al, which corresponds to effective energy range from 12.7 keV to 56.3 keV. For each beam quality, the authors tested three functional forms (rational, linear exponential, and power) to assess the most suitable function by fitting the delivered air kerma in air as a function of film response in terms of reflectance change. The authors also introduced and tested a new parameterχ = netΔR·e{sup m} {sup netΔR} that linearizes the inherently nonlinear response of the film. Results: The authors have found that in the energy range investigated, the response of the XR-QA2 based radiochromic film dosimetry system ranges from 0.222 to 0.420 in terms of netΔR at K{sub air}{sup air} = 8 cGy. For beam qualities commonly used in CT scanners (4.03–8.25 mm Al), the variation in film response (netΔR at K{sub air}{sup air} = 8 cGy) amounts to ± 5%, while variation in K{sub air}{sup air} amounts to ± 14%. Conclusions: Results of our investigation revealed that the use of XR-QA2 GafChromic{sup TM} film is accompanied by a rather pronounced energy dependent response for beam qualities used for x-ray based diagnostic imaging purposes. The authors also found that the most appropriate function for the reference radiochromic film dosimetry would be the power function, while for the relative dosimetry one may use the exponential response function that can be easily linearized.

  11. Effect of nonideal square-law detection on static calibration in noise-injection radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of nonideal square-law detection on the static calibration for a class of Dicke radiometers is examined. It is shown that fourth-order curvature in the detection characteristic adds a nonlinear term to the linear calibration relationship normally ascribed to noise-injection, balanced Dicke radiometers. The minimum error, based on an optimum straight-line fit to the calibration curve, is derived in terms of the power series coefficients describing the input-output characteristics of the detector. These coefficients can be determined by simple measurements, and detection nonlinearity is, therefore, quantitatively related to radiometric measurement error.

  12. A methodological approach to estimate the lactation curve and net energy and protein requirements of beef cows using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling.

    PubMed

    Albertini, T Z; Medeiros, S R; Torres, R A A; Zocchi, S S; Oltjen, J W; Strathe, A B; Lanna, D P D

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate methods to predict the secretion of milk and net energy and protein requirements of beef cows (Bos indicus and B. taurus) after approximately 1 mo postpartum using nonlinear mixed-effect modeling (NLME). Twenty Caracu × Nellore (CN) and 10 Nellore (NL) cows were inseminated to Red Angus bulls, and 10 Angus × Nellore (AN) were bred to Canchim bulls. Cows were evaluated from just after calving (25 ± 11 d) to weaning (220 d). Milk yield was estimated by weighing calves before and after suckling (WSW) and by machine milking (MM) methods at 25, 52, 80, 109, 136, 164, 193, and 220 ± 11 d of lactation. Brody and simple linear equations were consecutively fitted to the data and compared using information criteria. For the Brody equation, a NLME model was used to estimate all lactation profiles incorporating different sources of variation (calf sex and breed of cow, cow as a nested random effect, and within-cow auto-correlation). The CV for the MM method (29%) was less than WSW (45%). Consequently, the WSW method was responsible for reducing the variance about 1.5 times among individuals, which minimized the ability to detect differences among cows. As a result, only milk yield MM data were used in the NLME models. The Brody equation provided the best fit to this dataset, and inclusion of a continuous autoregressive process improved fit (P < 0.01). Milk, energy and protein yield at the beginning of lactation were affected by cow genotype and calf sex (P < 0.001). The exponential decay of the lactation curves was affected only by genotype (P < 0.001). Angus × Nellore cows produced 15 and 48% more milk than CN and NL during the trial, respectively (P < 0.05). Caracu × Nellore cows produced 29% more milk than NL (P < 0.05). The net energy and net protein requirements for milk yield followed a similar ranking. Male calves stimulated their dams to produce 11.7, 11.4, and 11.9% more milk, energy and protein, respectively (P < 0

  13. Compliance calibration of specimens used in the R-curve practice. [for compact, crack-line-wedge-loaded, and center-crack tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, D. E.; Sha, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    The compliance calibrations for the compact (CS) and crack-line-wedge-loaded (CLWL) specimens have been determined by experimental measurements and by boundary-collocation analysis. The CS and CLWL specimen configurations were modeled more accurately than those used in previous analytical investigations. Polynomial expressions for the compliance at various stations along the crack line for CS and CLWL specimens are presented. The compliance calibrations for the center-crack tension (CCT) specimen have been determined theoretically by boundary-collocation and finite-element analysis. The calculated compliance values for the CCT specimen are compared with values obtained from the Irwin-Westergaard expression and from a modification to the Irwin-Westergaard expression proposed by Eftis and Liebowitz. The Eftis-Liebowitz expression was found to be in good agreement (plus or minus 2 percent) with both analyses for crack aspect ratios up to 0.8 and for gage half-span to specimen width ratios up to 0.5.

  14. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  15. Direct fabrication of thin film gold resistance temperature detection sensors on a curved surface using a flexible dry film photoresist and their calibration up to 450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C. H.; Park, H. W.; Kim, H. H.; Park, S. H.; Son, C.; Kim, M. C.; Lee, J. H.; Go, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    High efficiency heat exchangers, such as intercoolers and recuperators, are composed of complex and compact structures to enhance heat transfer. This limits the installation of conventional temperature sensors to measure the temperature inside the heat exchanger without flow disturbance. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a direct patterning method in which metal is sputtered onto a curved surface using film photoresist and the fabrication of thin film Au resistance temperature detection (RTD) temperature sensors. A photosensitive film resist has been used to overcome the difficulty of 3-dimensional photolithography on a curved surface. The film resist after 2-dimensional photolithography is laminated over an alumina rod which is deposited with Au as an RTD sensing material. The Au metal is etched chemically, and the film resist is removed to form the thin film Au-RTD temperature sensors. They are calibrated by measuring the resistance change against temperature in a thermally controlled furnace. The second order polynomial fit shows good agreement with the measured temperatures with a standard deviation of 0.02 for the temperature range of 20-450 °C. Finally, the performance of the Au-RTD temperature sensors was evaluated.

  16. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  17. 40 CFR 92.120 - NDIR analyzer calibration and checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curve for each range used as follows: (i) Zero the analyzer. (ii) Span the analyzer to give a response..., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 percent of full-scale concentration. (v) Generate a calibration curve. The... calibration curve need not be generated if: (A) A calibration curve conforming to paragraph (c)(2)(v) of...

  18. 40 CFR 92.120 - NDIR analyzer calibration and checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curve for each range used as follows: (i) Zero the analyzer. (ii) Span the analyzer to give a response..., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 percent of full-scale concentration. (v) Generate a calibration curve. The... calibration curve need not be generated if: (A) A calibration curve conforming to paragraph (c)(2)(v) of...

  19. MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION OF NON-LINEAR SURVIVAL CURVES OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES AS DETERMINED IN A BEEF GRAVY MODEL SYSTEM AT 57.5 TO 65C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a nonlinear model for predicting the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, suspended in beef broth after heat treatment. A five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was used in developing inactivation data at 57.5C, 60C, 62.5C and 65C, where maximum observed lethalities were mo...

  20. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading

  1. A robust method for determining calibration coefficients for VIIRS reflective solar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qiang; McIntire, Jeffrey; Efremova, Boryana; Schwarting, Thomas; Oudrari, Hassan; Zeng, Jinan; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a robust method for determining the calibration coefficients in polynomial calibration equations, and discusses the corresponding calibration uncertainties. An attenuator method that takes into account all measurements with and without an attenuator screen was used to restrict the impact of the absolute calibration of the light source. The originally proposed procedure attempts to simultaneously determine all unknowns nonlinearly using polynomial curve fitting. The newly proposed method divides the task into two simpler parts. For example, in the case of a quadratic calibration equation, the first part becomes a quadratic equation solely for the transmittance of attenuator, which has an analytical solution using three or four sets of measurements. Additionally, it is straightforward to determine the median value and the standard deviation of the transmittance from the solutions using all combinations of measured data points. In conjunction, the second part becomes a linear fit, with the ratio of the zeroth-order to first-order calibration coefficients as the intercept and the ratio of the second-order to first-order calibration coefficients as the slope. These ratios are unaffected by the absolute calibration of the light source and are then used in the calibration equation to calculate the first-order calibration coefficient. How the new method works is straightforward to visualize, which makes its results easier to verify. This is demonstrated using measurements from the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) J1 Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) reflective solar bands (RSB) pre-launch testing.

  2. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  3. The role of ANS acuity and numeracy for the calibration and the coherence of subjective probability judgments

    PubMed Central

    Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter; Lindskog, Marcus; Nilsson, Håkan; Kerimi, Neda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how numeracy and acuity of the approximate number system (ANS) relate to the calibration and coherence of probability judgments. Based on the literature on number cognition, a first hypothesis was that those with lower numeracy would maintain a less linear use of the probability scale, contributing to overconfidence and nonlinear calibration curves. A second hypothesis was that also poorer acuity of the ANS would be associated with overconfidence and non-linearity. A third hypothesis, in line with dual-systems theory (e.g., Kahneman and Frederick, 2002) was that people higher in numeracy should have better access to the normative probability rules, allowing them to decrease the rate of conjunction fallacies. Data from 213 participants sampled from the Swedish population showed that: (i) in line with the first hypothesis, overconfidence and the linearity of the calibration curves were related to numeracy, where people higher in numeracy were well calibrated with zero overconfidence. (ii) ANS was not associated with overconfidence and non-linearity, disconfirming the second hypothesis. (iii) The rate of conjunction fallacies was slightly, but to a statistically significant degree decreased by numeracy, but still high at all numeracy levels. An unexpected finding was that participants with better ANS acuity gave more realistic estimates of their performance relative to others. PMID:25140163

  4. Nonlinear Analysis of Pulsating White Dwarf Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, J. L.; Montgomery, M. H.; Shipman, H.; WET TEam

    2015-06-01

    Convection remains one of the largest sources of theoretical uncertainty in our understanding of stellar physics. For example, Bergeron (1995) show that basic parameters such as flux, line profiles, energy distribution, color indices, and equivalent widths are extremely sensitive to the assumed convective parameterization. This is compelling, since we use our knowledge of these basic parameters to calibrate white dwarf cooling sequences, provide detailed estimates for the ages of individual white dwarfs, and determine the age of the Galactic disk. The Whole Earth Telescope (WET) is engaged in a long term project to empirically calibrate the physical properties of convection in pulsating white dwarfs by combining asteroseismology and analysis of nonlinear light curves. Nonsinusoidal distortions, in the form of narrow peaks and wider valleys, are observed in many pulsating white dwarf light curves. These are a reflection of the local depth of the convection zone, a value which varies during a pulsation cycle. Applying asteroseismology and convective light curve fitting to a wide sample of pulsating white dwarfs provides an empirical map of how the convective response time (the convection zone “depth”) varies as a function of effective temperature, and this can be compared with theoretical models, both MLT and hydrodynamic. This project has resulted in a large database of white dwarf lightcurves and pulsation frequencies. We present current results for DA and DB pulsators, and provide a few examples of interesting pulsation behavior seen along the way.

  5. Photometric Calibration of Consumer Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and techniques have been developed to implement a method of photometric calibration of consumer video cameras for imaging of objects that are sufficiently narrow or sufficiently distant to be optically equivalent to point or line sources. Heretofore, it has been difficult to calibrate consumer video cameras, especially in cases of image saturation, because they exhibit nonlinear responses with dynamic ranges much smaller than those of scientific-grade video cameras. The present method not only takes this difficulty in stride but also makes it possible to extend effective dynamic ranges to several powers of ten beyond saturation levels. The method will likely be primarily useful in astronomical photometry. There are also potential commercial applications in medical and industrial imaging of point or line sources in the presence of saturation.This development was prompted by the need to measure brightnesses of debris in amateur video images of the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The purpose of these measurements is to use the brightness values to estimate relative masses of debris objects. In most of the images, the brightness of the main body of Columbia was found to exceed the dynamic ranges of the cameras. A similar problem arose a few years ago in the analysis of video images of Leonid meteors. The present method is a refined version of the calibration method developed to solve the Leonid calibration problem. In this method, one performs an endto- end calibration of the entire imaging system, including not only the imaging optics and imaging photodetector array but also analog tape recording and playback equipment (if used) and any frame grabber or other analog-to-digital converter (if used). To automatically incorporate the effects of nonlinearity and any other distortions into the calibration, the calibration images are processed in precisely the same manner as are the images of meteors, space-shuttle debris, or other objects that one seeks to

  6. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  7. STIS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbert, S.; Hodge, P.; Lindler, D.; Shaw, R.; Goudfrooij, P.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; McGrath, M.; Bohlin, R.; Baum, S.

    1997-05-01

    Routine calibration of STIS observations in the HST data pipeline is performed by the CALSTIS task. CALSTIS can: subtract the over-scan region and a bias image from CCD observations; remove cosmic ray features from CCD observations; correct global nonlinearities for MAMA observations; subtract a dark image; and, apply flat field corrections. In the case of spectral data, CALSTIS can also: assign a wavelength to each pixel; apply a heliocentric correction to the wavelengths; convert counts to absolute flux; process the automatically generated spectral calibration lamp observations to improve the wavelength solution; rectify two-dimensional (longslit) spectra; subtract interorder and sky background; and, extract one-dimensional spectra. CALSTIS differs in significant ways from the current HST calibration tasks. The new code is written in ANSI C and makes use of a new C interface to IRAF. The input data, reference data, and output calibrated data are all in FITS format, using IMAGE or BINTABLE extensions. Error estimates are computed and include contributions from the reference images. The entire calibration can be performed by one task, but many steps can also be performed individually.

  8. Nonlinear Growth Models in M"plus" and SAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Ram, Nilam

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear growth curves or growth curves that follow a specified nonlinear function in time enable researchers to model complex developmental patterns with parameters that are easily interpretable. In this article we describe how a variety of sigmoid curves can be fit using the M"plus" structural modeling program and the nonlinear mixed-effects…

  9. A new method for automated dynamic calibration of tipping-bucket rain gauges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphrey, M.D.; Istok, J.D.; Lee, J.Y.; Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Existing methods for dynamic calibration of tipping-bucket rain gauges (TBRs) can be time consuming and labor intensive. A new automated dynamic calibration system has been developed to calibrate TBRs with minimal effort. The system consists of a programmable pump, datalogger, digital balance, and computer. Calibration is performed in two steps: 1) pump calibration and 2) rain gauge calibration. Pump calibration ensures precise control of water flow rates delivered to the rain gauge funnel; rain gauge calibration ensures precise conversion of bucket tip times to actual rainfall rates. Calibration of the pump and one rain gauge for 10 selected pump rates typically requires about 8 h. Data files generated during rain gauge calibration are used to compute rainfall intensities and amounts from a record of bucket tip times collected in the field. The system was tested using 5 types of commercial TBRs (15.2-, 20.3-, and 30.5-cm diameters; 0.1-, 0.2-, and 1.0-mm resolutions) and using 14 TBRs of a single type (20.3-cm diameter; 0.1-mm resolution). Ten pump rates ranging from 3 to 154 mL min-1 were used to calibrate the TBRs and represented rainfall rates between 6 and 254 mm h-1 depending on the rain gauge diameter. All pump calibration results were very linear with R2 values greater than 0.99. All rain gauges exhibited large nonlinear underestimation errors (between 5% and 29%) that decreased with increasing rain gauge resolution and increased with increasing rainfall rate, especially for rates greater than 50 mm h-1. Calibration curves of bucket tip time against the reciprocal of the true pump rate for all rain gauges also were linear with R2 values of 0.99. Calibration data for the 14 rain gauges of the same type were very similar, as indicated by slope values that were within 14% of each other and ranged from about 367 to 417 s mm h-1. The developed system can calibrate TBRs efficiently, accurately, and virtually unattended and could be modified for use with other

  10. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  11. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  12. New approach to calibrating bed load samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbell, D.W.; Stevens, H.H.; Skinner, J.V.; Beverage, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic variations in bed load discharge at a point, which are an inherent part of the process of bed load movement, complicate calibration of bed load samplers and preclude the use of average rates to define sampling efficiencies. Calibration curves, rather than efficiencies, are derived by two independent methods using data collected with prototype versions of the Helley‐Smith sampler in a large calibration facility capable of continuously measuring transport rates across a 9 ft (2.7 m) width. Results from both methods agree. Composite calibration curves, based on matching probability distribution functions of samples and measured rates from different hydraulic conditions (runs), are obtained for six different versions of the sampler. Sampled rates corrected by the calibration curves agree with measured rates for individual runs.

  13. Field calibration of binocular stereo vision based on fast reconstruction of 3D control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Changjie; Fu, Luhua; Guo, Yin

    2015-08-01

    Construction of high-speed railway in China has entered a period of rapid growth. To accurately and quickly obtain the dynamic envelope curve of high-speed vehicle is an important guarantee for safe driving. The measuring system is based on binocular stereo vision. Considering the difficulties in field calibration such as environmental changes and time limits, carried out a field calibration method based on fast reconstruction of three-dimensional control field. With the rapid assembly of pre-calibrated three-dimensional control field, whose coordinate accuracy is guaranteed by manufacture accuracy and calibrated by V-STARS, two cameras take a quick shot of it at the same time. The field calibration parameters are then solved by the method combining linear solution with nonlinear optimization. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy can reach up to +/- 0.5mm, and more importantly, in the premise of guaranteeing accuracy, the speed of the calibration and the portability of the devices have been improved considerably.

  14. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  15. Relative Locality in Curved Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a nontrivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are present. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (de Sitter) spacetimes, relying on their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with κ-Poincaré momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  16. Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, Chris P.

    1997-01-01

    A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

  17. Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

  18. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  19. Standard Mastery Curves and Skew Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warries, Egbert

    The objective of the study is to convince educational researchers of the necessity for "standard mastery curves" for the graphical representation of scores on summative tests for a group of students. Attention is drawn to the study of theoretical and empirical skew curves in education and biology. Use of standard mastery curves and study of skew…

  20. A Bionic Polarization Navigation Sensor and Its Calibration Method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijie; Xu, Wujian

    2016-01-01

    The polarization patterns of skylight which arise due to the scattering of sunlight in the atmosphere can be used by many insects for deriving compass information. Inspired by insects' polarized light compass, scientists have developed a new kind of navigation method. One of the key techniques in this method is the polarimetric sensor which is used to acquire direction information from skylight. In this paper, a polarization navigation sensor is proposed which imitates the working principles of the polarization vision systems of insects. We introduce the optical design and mathematical model of the sensor. In addition, a calibration method based on variable substitution and non-linear curve fitting is proposed. The results obtained from the outdoor experiments provide support for the feasibility and precision of the sensor. The sensor's signal processing can be well described using our mathematical model. A relatively high degree of accuracy in polarization measurement can be obtained without any error compensation. PMID:27527171

  1. FY2008 Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.

    2009-01-01

    The Calibrations project has been exploring alternative technologies for calibration of passive sensors in the infrared (IR) spectral region. In particular, we have investigated using quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) because these devices offer several advantages over conventional blackbodies such as reductions in size and weight while providing a spectral source in the IR with high output power. These devices can provide a rapid, multi-level radiance scheme to fit any nonlinear behavior as well as a spectral calibration that includes the fore-optics, which is currently not available for on-board calibration systems.

  2. TS - Dean interactions in curved channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Zang, Thomas A.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear theory is developed to study the interaction of TS waves and Dean vortices in curved channel flow. The prediction obtained from the theory agree well with results obtained from direct numerical simulations of curved channel flow, especially for low amplitude disturbances. At low Reynolds numbers the wave interaction is generally stabilizing to both disturbances, though as the Reynolds number increases, many linearly unstable TS waves are further destabilized by the presence of Dean vortices.

  3. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  4. The In-Flight Calibration Program for the XRS on Astro-E2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottam, J.; Kilbourne, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) will be launched in February 2005 as part of the Astro-E2 mission. It will provide unprecedented throughput and resolving powers particularly at high energies. In this presentation we will describe the in-flight calibration program. The energy scale of the XRS is a complex, non-linear function of the noise and power conditions on the array. It will be calibrated empirically using the bright point sources, Capella and GX301-2. Ground calibration of the line spread function show it to be almost perfectly Gaussian. The in-flight calibration is designed to verify this using the energy scale targets. The effective area curve of the XRS contains discreet edge structure from the mirrors, the optical blocking filters, and the microcalorimeter HgTe absorbers. The effective area Calibration program will simultaneously measure these absorption edges and the global effective area properties using the relatively featureless sources 3C273 and Mrk421. Additional monitoring of any ice build-up on the filters will be conducted using observations of the supernova remnants N132D and E0102.

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 42: Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H; Menon, G; Sloboda, R

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of radiochromic film calibration procedures used in external beam radiotherapy when applied to I-125 brachytherapy sources delivering higher doses, and to determine any necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. GafChromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 6 MV, 75 kVp and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. A custom phantom was used for the I-125 irradiations to obtain a larger film area with nearly constant dose to reduce the effects of film heterogeneities on the optical density (OD) measurements. RGB transmission images were obtained with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner, and calibration curves relating OD and dose using a rational function were determined for each colour channel and at each energy using a non-linear least square minimization method. Differences found between the 6 MV calibration curve and those for the lower energy sources are large enough that 6 MV beams should not be used to calibrate film for low-energy sources. However, differences between the 75 kVp and I-125 calibration curves were quite small; indicating that 75 kVp is a good choice. Compared with I-125 irradiation, this gives the advantages of lower type B uncertainties and markedly reduced irradiation time. To obtain high accuracy calibration for the dose range up to 35 Gy, two-segment piece-wise fitting was required. This yielded absolute dose measurement accuracy above 1 Gy of ∼2% for 75 kVp and ∼5% for I-125 seed exposures.

  6. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  7. Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves.

    PubMed

    Ringbauer, Martin; Broome, Matthew A; Myers, Casey R; White, Andrew G; Ralph, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein's field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics--essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence. PMID:24942489

  8. ``Once Nonlinear, Always Nonlinear''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackstock, David T.

    2006-05-01

    The phrase "Once nonlinear, always nonlinear" is attributed to David F. Pernet. In the 1970s he noticed that nonlinearly generated higher harmonic components (both tones and noise) don't decay as small signals, no matter how far the wave propagates. Despite being out of step with the then widespread notion that small-signal behavior is restored in "old age," Pernet's view is supported by the Burgers-equation solutions of the early 1960s. For a plane wave from a sinusoidally vibrating source in a thermoviscous fluid, the old-age decay of the nth harmonic is e-nαx, not e-n2αx (small-signal expectation), where α is the absorption coefficient at the fundamental frequency f and x is propagation distance. Moreover, for spherical waves (r the distance) the harmonic diminishes as e-nαx/rn, not e-n2αx/r. While not new, these results have special application to aircraft noise propagation, since the large propagation distances of interest imply old age. The virtual source model may be used to explain the "anomalous" decay rates. In old age most of the nth harmonic sound comes from virtual sources close to the receiver. Their strength is proportional to the nth power of the local fundamental amplitude, and that sets the decay law for the nth harmonic.

  9. High accuracy calibration of the fiber spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhifeng; Dai, Caihong; Wang, Yanfei; Chen, Binhua

    2014-11-01

    Comparing to the big-size scanning spectroradiometer, the compact and convenient fiber spectroradiometer is widely used in various kinds of fields, such as the remote sensing, aerospace monitoring, and solar irradiance measurement. High accuracy calibration should be made before the use, which involves the wavelength accuracy, the background environment noise, the nonlinear effect, the bandwidth, the stray light and et al. The wavelength lamp and tungsten lamp are frequently used to calibration the fiber spectroradiometer. The wavelength difference can be easily reduced through the software or calculation. However, the nonlinear effect and the bandwidth always can affect the measurement accuracy significantly.

  10. Study on self-calibration angle encoder using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Zi; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    The angle measurement technology is very important in precision manufacture, optical industry, aerospace, aviation and navigation, etc. Further, the angle encoder, which uses concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' and transforms the angle into number of electronic pulse, is the most common instrument for angle measurement. To improve the accuracy of the angle encoder, a novel self-calibration method was proposed that enables the angle encoder to calibrate itself without angle reference. An angle deviation curve among 0° to 360° was simulated with equal weights Fourier components for the study of the self-calibration method. In addition, a self-calibration algorithm was used in the process of this deviation curve. The simulation result shows the relationship between the arrangement of multi-reading heads and the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. Besides, an actual self-calibration angle encoder was calibrated by polygon angle standard in national institute of metrology, China. The experiment result indicates the actual self-calibration effect on the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. In the end, the comparison, which is between the simulation self-calibration result and the experiment self-calibration result, reflects good consistency and proves the reliability of the self-calibration angle encoder.

  11. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the CBCT device to

  12. Silicon double spring for the simultaneous calibration of probing forces and deflections in the micro range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe; Li, Zhi; Gao, Sai; Hahn, Susan; Hiller, Karla

    2016-01-01

    A new reference spring for the simultaneous calibration of probing force and displacement has been developed. The spring consists of two single silicon springs, which are placed at a distance of 3 μm from each other. Each single spring consists of a moveable shaft, which is suspended and guided by four double-folded silicon springs. This leads to a much higher stiffness of the spring perpendicular to the direction of movement than in the direction of movement. The area of contact of the double spring has a size of 50 μm  ×  60 μm. However, measurable changes in the calibration parameters could not be observed when we varied the location of the loading point within this area. Furthermore, it could be shown for measurements at different temperatures that the calibration parameters also show a very small dependence on temperature (<0.4%/K between 22 °C and 23 °C). A further outstanding property of this new reference spring is its small non-linearity of the force deflection curve of 0.1%. The spring can be used for the calibration of force and the displacement of atomic force microscopes, nanoindenters, and stylus instruments in the micro-Newton range up to 12 μN and up to 3 μm displacements.

  13. Compensation of Phase Nonlinearity of Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator for High-Resolution Wavefront Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhou, H.; Li, J.; Qiao, Y. J.; Si, J.; Gao, W.

    2015-07-01

    The ability of phase modulation enables liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) to control wavefront. However, the disadvantage of its inherent nonlinear phase response will decrease the wavefront control accuracy. In this paper, a compensation for the nonlinear phase response is proposed based on Inverse Interpolation method. Characteristic curve of phase retardation versus gray levels for a 256x256 pixels phase-only LCSLM has been measured and calibrated by Inverse Interpolation. A mapping relationship between input gray levels and driving gray levels has been built and recorded by a linear look-up table ANTI2.LUT. The nonlinear error of the phase drops from 15.9% to 2.42% by using ANTI2.LUT. Further more, the mapping curve of ANTI2.LUT is almost consistent with 290.LUT from the manufacturer, which proved the efficiency of the compensation of phase nonlinearity. Finally, the distorted wavefront caused by a liquid crystal flake is corrected using LCSLM based on ANTI2.LUT. Experimental results show that the peak-valley value of the distorted wavefront decreases from 1.56l to 0.26l (l =0.6328 λm), the root-mean-square value decreases from 0.25l to 0.02l and the Strehl ratio of diffractive spots increases from 0.08 to 0.97. So LCSLM can be applied to realize high-precision and high-resolution wavefront correction with linear phase response.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1325-94 - Methane analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... point, then concentration values may be calculated by using the linear calibration equation for that range. If the deviation exceeds these limits, then the best-fit non-linear equation which represents...

  15. Non-linear meteor trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Martin

    1988-08-01

    In this essay an attempt is made to not only review but reopen the debate on nonlinear meteor trails. On the basis of data culled from various, now historical, sources it is found that approximately one in every two hundred of the visual meteors is likely to show a nonlinear trail, and that of such trails about 60 percent will be continuously curved and 40 percent sinusoidal. It is suggested that two mechanisms may explain the various trail types: the continuously curved trails being a manifestation of the classical Magnus effect, and the sinusoidal trails resulting from torque-free precession.

  16. A correction method for nonlinear artifacts in CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haining; Qiu, Shaokun; Lou, Shanshan; Liu, Jinjun; Li, Changjun; Jiang, Genmiao

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a new method to reduce nonlinear artifacts in computed tomography (CT). Based on the traditional water-equivalent beam hardening correction method, a new systematic iterative algorithm has been designed to modify the original spectrum, which is under the influences of certain added filter materials and some unknown factors. By incorporating the characters of polychromatic beam hardening and the insensibility and nonuniformity of detectors into consideration, a new polynomial function curve is calculated. The curve can calibrate CT raw data and reduce the nonlinear artifacts, such as shading artifacts, dark artifacts, cupping artifacts and ring artifacts, in soft tissue. Comparing with the traditional water-equivalent correction, results show that this method can significantly improve the image quality. Meanwhile, the method is pre-processing and will not increase the normal reconstruction time. That is, all the time-consuming works can be done before scanning patients. However, it is still depending on the size of phantoms currently used, and more detailed works need to be done in the future. PMID:17271926

  17. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  18. Calibration system for albedo neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermich, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Albedo neutron dosimeters have proven to be effective as a method of measuring the dose from neutron exposures that other types of neutron detectors cannot measure. Results of research conducted to calibrate an albedo neutron dosemeter are presented. The calibration procedure consisted of exposing the TLD chips to a 46 curie /sup 238/PuBe source at known distances, dose rates and exposure periods. The response of the TLD's is related to the dose rate measured with a dose rate meter to obtain the calibration factor. This calibration factor is then related to the ratio of the counting rates determined by 9-inch and 3-inch Bonner spheres (also called remmeters) and a calibration curve was determined. 17 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Research on calibration method of relative infrared radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen; Li, Chengwei

    2016-02-01

    The Relative Infrared Radiometer (RIR) is commonly used to measure the irradiance of the Infrared Target Simulator (ITS), and the calibration of the RIR is central for the measurement accuracy. RIR calibration is conventionally performed using the Radiance Based (RB) calibration method or Irradiance Based (IB) calibration method, and the relationship between the radiation of standard source and the response of RIR is determined by curve fitting. One limitation existing in the calibration of RIR is the undesirable calibration voltage fluctuation in single measurement or in the reproducibility measurement, which reduces the calibration reproducibility and irradiance measurement accuracy. To address this limitation, the Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Based (EBTB) calibration method is proposed for the calibration of RIR. The purpose of this study is to compare the proposed EBTB calibration method with conventional RB and IB calibration methods. The comparison and experiment results have shown that the EBTB calibration method is not only able to provide comparable correlation between radiation and response to other calibration methods (IB and RB) in the irradiance measurement but also reduces the influence of calibration voltage fluctuation on the irradiance measurement result, which improves the calibration reproducibility and irradiance measurement accuracy.

  20. GIADA: extended calibration activity: . the Electrostatic Micromanipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator), one of the scientific instruments onboard Rosetta/ESA space mission, is devoted to study dynamical properties of dust particles ejected by the short period comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. In preparation for the scientific phase of the mission, we are performing laboratory calibration activities on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM), housed in a clean room in our laboratory. Aim of the calibration activity is to characterize the response curve of the GIADA measurement sub-systems. These curves are then correlated with the calibration curves obtained for the GIADA payload onboard the Rosetta S/C. The calibration activity involves two of three sub-systems constituting GIADA: Grain Detection System (GDS) and Impact Sensor (IS). To get reliable calibration curves, a statistically relevant number of grains have to be dropped or shot into the GIADA instrument. Particle composition, structure, size, optical properties and porosity have been selected in order to obtain realistic cometary dust analogues. For each selected type of grain, we estimated that at least one hundred of shots are needed to obtain a calibration curve. In order to manipulate such a large number of particles, we have designed and developed an innovative electrostatic system able to capture, manipulate and shoot particles with sizes in the range 20 - 500 μm. The electrostatic Micromanipulator (EM) is installed on a manual handling system composed by X-Y-Z micrometric slides with a 360o rotational stage along Z, and mounted on a optical bench. In the present work, we display the tests on EM using ten different materials with dimension in the range 50 - 500 μm: the experimental results are in compliance with the requirements.

  1. Analysis of light curve of LP Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudil, Z.; Skarka, M.; Zejda, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present photometric analysis of the RRab type pulsating star LP Cam. The star was observed at Brno Observatory and Planetarium during nine nights. Measurements were calibrated to the Johnson photometric system. Four captured and thirteen previously published maxima timings allowed us to refine the pulsation period and the zero epoch. The light curve was Fourier decomposed to estimate physical parameters using empirical relations. Our results suggest that LP Cam is a common RR Lyrae star with high, almost solar metallicity.

  2. Dynamic Curving Simulation of Tilting Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jing; Luo, Ren

    The application of carbody tilting technology is the most efficient way to raise train speed during curve negotiations. This paper mainly deals with the dynamic performance simulation of the tilting train. Through the establishment of the nonlinear mathematical model for the titling train electromechanical coupled system, the carbody tilting control law, bogie radial steering mechanism, and titling train curving performance are investigated. The effect of time delay caused by the sensing and control system on the tilting performance of the train is analyzed, and the compensation methods for the time delay effect are studied.

  3. Definition of energy-calibrated spectra for national reachback

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Christopher L.; Hertz, Kristin L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the timeliness and accuracy of analysis results of spectra submitted to National Reachback, particularly for the detection of threat items. Many spectra submitted for analysis include either a calibration spectrum using 137Cs or no calibration spectrum at all. The single line provided by 137Cs is insufficient to adequately calibrate nonlinear spectra. A calibration source that provides several lines that are well-spaced, from the low energy cutoff to the full energy range of the detector, is needed for a satisfactory energy calibration. This paper defines the requirements of an energy calibration for the purposes of National Reachback, outlines a method to validate whether a given spectrum meets that definition, discusses general source considerations, and provides a specific operating procedure for calibrating the GR-135.

  4. Baseflow recession and recharge as nonlinear storage processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenberg, Hartmut

    1999-04-01

    Discharge in many rivers is often fed by outflow from a shallow groundwater reservoir. It is becoming clear that the outflow from this aquifer is not linearly proportional to storage as is commonly assumed in many algorithms. Numerical analysis of flow recession curves from about 100 river gauging stations instead reveals a nonlinear relationship between baseflow, Q, and storage, S, for which the equation S=aQb was adopted. Values of the exponent b are found by calibration to be between 0 and 1 but with a high concentration around 0·5, which is in accordance with the findings of other studies and theoretical approaches yielding b=0·5 for unconfined aquifers and relating the coefficient a to catchment properties, primarily area and shape of basin, pore volume and transmissivity. This non-linear reservoir function is proposed as a more realistic alternative to the linear reservoir function.The relatively fast response of groundwater flow to rainfall is mainly a result of the increase of hydraulic head of the groundwater reservoir accelerating the exfiltration of old, pre-event water into the river bed. As fissure and pore volumes communicate hydraulically, it appears physically reasonable to model the system by one non-linear reservoir for catchments, or parts of them, instead of applying independent parallel linear reservoirs. The non-linear reservoir algorithms are supported by an analytical derivation. They are extended for the automatic separation of baseflow from a time-series of daily discharge in rivers and the computation of storage and effective recharge of groundwater in river basins by inverse nonlinear reservoir routing. The time-series obtained allow the identification and quantification of long-term changes to the water balance. Relationships between computed groundwater storage and observed groundwater level can also be established.

  5. [Quantitative analysis of calibration dependence of biosensors].

    PubMed

    Borisov, I A; Lobanov, A V; Reshetilov, A N; Kurganov, B I

    2000-01-01

    Three-parameter Hill's equation, which is used in enzyme kinetics, was shown to applicable to calibration curves of both potentiometric (glucose, pesticides, urea, etc.) and amperometric (surfactants, biphenyl, etc.) biosensors. Possible causes of errors of analyte concentration measurements are discussed. PMID:10867941

  6. Uncertainty Analysis of Instrument Calibration and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Tcheng, Ping

    1999-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic researchers require estimated precision and bias uncertainties of measured physical quantities, typically at 95 percent confidence levels. Uncertainties of final computed aerodynamic parameters are obtained by propagation of individual measurement uncertainties through the defining functional expressions. In this paper, rigorous mathematical techniques are extended to determine precision and bias uncertainties of any instrument-sensor system. Through this analysis, instrument uncertainties determined through calibration are now expressed as functions of the corresponding measurement for linear and nonlinear univariate and multivariate processes. Treatment of correlated measurement precision error is developed. During laboratory calibration, calibration standard uncertainties are assumed to be an order of magnitude less than those of the instrument being calibrated. Often calibration standards do not satisfy this assumption. This paper applies rigorous statistical methods for inclusion of calibration standard uncertainty and covariance due to the order of their application. The effects of mathematical modeling error on calibration bias uncertainty are quantified. The effects of experimental design on uncertainty are analyzed. The importance of replication is emphasized, techniques for estimation of both bias and precision uncertainties using replication are developed. Statistical tests for stationarity of calibration parameters over time are obtained.

  7. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  9. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  10. Calibration of a slimehole density sonde using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Byeongho; Hwang, Seho; Shin, Jehyun; Kim, Jongman

    2014-05-01

    The density log is a well logging tool that can continuously record bulk density of the formation. This is widely applied for a variety of fields such as the petroleum exploitation, mineral exploration, and geotechnical survey and so on. The density log is normally applied to open holes. But there are frequently difficult conditions such as cased boreholes, the variation of borehole diameter, the borehole fluid salinity, and the stand-off and so on. So we need a density correction curves for the various borehole conditions. The primary calibration curve by manufacturer is used for the formation density calculation. In case of density log used for the oil industry, the calibration curves for various borehole environments are applied to the density correction, but commonly used slim-hole density logging sonde normally have a calibration curve for the variation of borehole diameter. In order to correct the various borehole environmental conditions, it is necessary to make the primary calibration curve of density sonde using numerical modeling. Numerical modeling serves as a low-cost substitute for experimental test pits. We have performed numerical modeling using the MCNP based on Monte-Carlo methods can record average behaviors of radiation particles. In this study, the work for matching the primary calibration curve of FDGS (Formation Density Gamma Sonde) for slime borehole with a 100 mCi 137 Cs gamma source was performed. On the basis of this work, correction curves in various borehole environments were produced.

  11. Fitting Richards' curve to data of diverse origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Sargeant, A.B.; Allen, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Published techniques for fitting data to nonlinear growth curves are briefly reviewed, most techniques require knowledge of the shape of the curve. A flexible growth curve developed by Richards (1959) is discussed as an alternative when the shape is unknown. The shape of this curve is governed by a specific parameter which can be estimated from the data. We describe in detail the fitting of a diverse set of longitudinal and cross-sectional data to Richards' growth curve for the purpose of determining the age of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) pups on the basis of right hind foot length. The fitted curve is found suitable for pups less than approximately 80 days old. The curve is extrapolated to pre-natal growth and shown to be appropriate only for about 10 days prior to birth.

  12. Exploring Alternative Characteristic Curve Approaches to Linking Parameter Estimates from the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Bao, Han; Huang, Chun-Wei; Gagne, Phill

    Characteristic curve approaches for linking parameters from the generalized partial credit model were examined for cases in which common (anchor) items are calibrated separately in two groups. Three of these approaches are simple extensions of the test characteristic curve (TCC), item characteristic curve (ICC), and operating characteristic curve…

  13. Revised Landsat-5 TM Radiometrie Calibration Procedures and Postcalibration Dynamic Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.

    2003-01-01

    Effective May 5, 2003, Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Data Center (EDC) will be radiometrically calibrated using a new procedure and revised calibration parameters. This change will improve absolute calibration accuracy, consistency over time, and consistency with Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data. Users will need to use new parameters to convert the calibrated data products to radiance. The new procedure for the reflective bands (1-5,7) is based on a lifetime radiometric calibration curve for the instrument derived from the instrument's internal calibrator, cross-calibration with the ETM+, and vicarious measurements. The thermal band will continue to be calibrated using the internal calibrator. Further updates to improve the relative detector-to-detector calibration and thermal band calibration are being investigated, as is the calibration of the Landsat-4 (L4) TM.

  14. Comparison of different camera calibration approaches for underwater applications.

    PubMed

    Silvatti, Amanda Piaia; Dias, Fabio Augusto Salve; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three camera calibration approaches applied to underwater applications: (1) static control points with nonlinear DLT; (2) moving wand with nonlinear camera model and bundle adjustment; (3) moving plate with nonlinear camera model. The DVideo kinematic analysis system was used for underwater data acquisition. The system consisted of two gen-locked Basler cameras working at 100 Hz, with wide angle lenses that were enclosed in housings. The accuracy of the methods was compared in a dynamic rigid bar test (acquisition volume-4.5×1×1.5 m(3)). The mean absolute errors were 6.19 mm for the nonlinear DLT, 1.16 mm for the wand calibration, 1.20 mm for the 2D plate calibration using 8 control points and 0.73 mm for the 2D plane calibration using 16 control points. The results of the wand and 2D plate camera calibration methods were less associated to the rigid body position in the working volume and provided better accuracy than the nonlinear DLT. Wand and 2D plate camera calibration methods presented similar and highly accurate results, being alternatives for underwater 3D motion analysis. PMID:22284990

  15. A dynamic calibration method for the pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhuoran; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Pressure transducer is widely used in the field of industry. A calibrated pressure transducer can increase the performance of precision instruments in the closed mechanical relationship. Calibration is the key to ensure the pressure transducer with a high precision and dynamic characteristic. Unfortunately, the current calibration method can usually be used in the laboratory with a good condition and only one pressure transducer can be calibrated at each time. Therefore the calibration efficiency is hard to meet the requirement of modern industry with high efficiency. A dynamic and fast calibration technology with a calibration device and a corresponding data processing method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the pressure transducer to be calibrated is placed in the small cavity chamber. The calibration process only contains a single loop. The outputs of each calibrated transducer are recorded automatically by the control terminal. Secondly, LabView programming is used for the information acquisition and data processing. The performance of the repeatability and nonlinear indicators can be figured out directly. At last the pressure transducers are calibrated simultaneously in the experiment to verify the suggested calibration technology. The experimental result shows this method can be used to calibrate the pressure transducer in the practical engineering measurement.

  16. System and Method for Determining Gas Optical Density Changes in a Non-Linear Measurement Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor); Rana, Mauro (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Each of two sensors, positioned to simultaneously detect electromagnetic radiation absorption along a path, is calibrated to define a unique response curve associated therewith that relates a change in voltage output for each sensor to a change in optical density. A ratio-of-responses curve is defined by a ratio of the response curve associated with the first sensor to the response curve associated with the second sensor. A ratio of sensor output changes is generated using outputs from the sensors. An operating point on the ratio-of-responses curve is established using the ratio of sensor output changes. The established operating point is indicative of an optical density. When the operating point is in the non-linear response region of at least one of the sensors, the operating point and optical density corresponding thereto can be used to establish an actual response of at least one of the sensors whereby the actual sensor output can be used in determining changes in the optical density.

  17. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  18. Improving self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, Torsten A.; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  19. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  20. Implicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an implicit algorithm for spacecraft onboard instrument calibration, particularly to onboard gyro calibration. This work is an extension of previous work that was done where an explicit gyro calibration algorithm was applied to the AQUA spacecraft gyros. The algorithm presented in this paper was tested using simulated data and real data that were downloaded from the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft. The calibration tests gave very good results. A comparison between the use of the implicit calibration algorithm used here with the explicit algorithm used for AQUA spacecraft indicates that both provide an excellent estimation of the gyro calibration parameters with similar accuracies.

  1. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Steel with Multi-Line Internal Standard Calibration Method Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Congyuan; Du, Xuewei; An, Ning; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Shengbo; Wang, Qiuping

    2016-04-01

    A multi-line internal standard calibration method is proposed for the quantitative analysis of carbon steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A procedure based on the method was adopted to select the best calibration curves and the corresponding emission lines pairs automatically. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments with carbon steel samples were performed, and C, Cr, and Mn were analyzed via the proposed method. Calibration curves of these elements were constructed via a traditional single line internal standard calibration method and a multi-line internal standard calibration method. The calibration curves obtained were evaluated with the determination coefficient, the root mean square error of cross-validation, and the average relative error of cross-validation. All of the parameters were improved significantly with the proposed method. The results show that accurate and stable calibration curves can be obtained efficiently via the multi-line internal standard calibration method. PMID:26872822

  3. Calibration of thermocouple psychrometers and moisture measurements in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, Łukasz; Sobczuk, Henryk; Połednik, Bernard; Guz, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents in situ method of peltier psychrometric sensors calibration which allow to determine water potential. Water potential can be easily recalculated into moisture content of the porous material. In order to obtain correct results of water potential, each probe should be calibrated. NaCl salt solutions with molar concentration of 0.4M, 0.7M, 1.0M and 1.4M, were used for calibration which enabled to obtain osmotic potential in range: -1791 kPa to -6487 kPa. Traditionally, the value of voltage generated on thermocouples during wet-bulb temperature depression is calculated in order to determine the calibration function for psychrometric in situ sensors. In the new method of calibration, the field under psychrometric curve along with peltier cooling current and duration was taken into consideration. During calibration, different cooling currents were applied for each salt solution, i.e. 3, 5, 8 mA respectively, as well as different cooling duration for each current (from 2 to 100 sec with 2 sec step). Afterwards, the shape of each psychrometric curve was thoroughly examined and a value of field under psychrometric curve was computed. Results of experiment indicate that there is a robust correlation between field under psychrometric curve and water potential. Calibrations formulas were designated on the basis of these features.

  4. Calibration of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for fluctuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H. D.; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Holly, D. J.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.

    2008-10-15

    Detailed calibrations of the Madison Symmetric Torus polychromator Thomson scattering system have been made suitable for electron temperature fluctuation measurements. All calibrations have taken place focusing on accuracy, ease of use and repeatability, and in situ measurements wherever possible. Novel calibration processes have been made possible with an insertable integrating sphere (ISIS), using an avalanche photodiode (APD) as a reference detector and optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Discussed are a novel in situ spatial calibration with the use of the ISIS, the use of an APD as a reference detector to streamline the APD calibration process, a standard dc spectral calibration, and in situ pulsed spectral calibration made possible with a combination of an OPO as a light source, the ISIS, and an APD used as a reference detector. In addition a relative quantum efficiency curve for the APDs is obtained to aid in uncertainty analysis.

  5. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Lysy, Martin; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  6. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Lysy, Martin; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem. PMID:27475563

  7. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  8. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  9. Assessment of opacimeter calibration according to International Standard Organization 10155.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the calibration method for opacimeters issued by the International Standard Organization (ISO) 10155 with the manual reference method for determination of dust content in stack gases. ISO 10155 requires at least nine operational measurements, corresponding to three operational measurements per each dust emission range within the stack. The procedure is assessed by comparison with previous calibration methods for opacimeters using only two operational measurements from a set of measurements made at stacks from pulp mills. The results show that even if the international standard for opacimeter calibration requires that the calibration curve is to be obtained using 3 x 3 points, a calibration curve derived using 3 points could be, at times, acceptable in statistical terms, provided that the amplitude of individual measurements is low. PMID:11218423

  10. Uncertainty Analysis of Inertial Model Attitude Sensor Calibration and Application with a Recommended New Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Tcheng, Ping

    1999-01-01

    Statistical tools, previously developed for nonlinear least-squares estimation of multivariate sensor calibration parameters and the associated calibration uncertainty analysis, have been applied to single- and multiple-axis inertial model attitude sensors used in wind tunnel testing to measure angle of attack and roll angle. The analysis provides confidence and prediction intervals of calibrated sensor measurement uncertainty as functions of applied input pitch and roll angles. A comparative performance study of various experimental designs for inertial sensor calibration is presented along with corroborating experimental data. The importance of replicated calibrations over extended time periods has been emphasized; replication provides independent estimates of calibration precision and bias uncertainties, statistical tests for calibration or modeling bias uncertainty, and statistical tests for sensor parameter drift over time. A set of recommendations for a new standardized model attitude sensor calibration method and usage procedures is included. The statistical information provided by these procedures is necessary for the uncertainty analysis of aerospace test results now required by users of industrial wind tunnel test facilities.

  11. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  12. Calibrating Images from the MINERVA Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes Colón, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) consists of an array of robotic telescopes located on Mount Hopkins, Arizona with the purpose of performing transit photometry and spectroscopy to find Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars. In order to make photometric observations, it is necessary to perform calibrations on the CCD cameras of the telescopes to take into account possible instrument error on the data. In this project, we developed a pipeline that takes optical images, calibrates them using sky flats, darks, and biases to generate a transit light curve.

  13. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  14. Fast calibration of an infrared vidicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freude, W.

    1988-02-01

    Infrared vidicon tubes of the type N 214 from Hamamatsu have widespread use for various measurements in the field of optical communication, in spite of their severe drawbacks such as poor stability and low accuracy. Usually, they interface with a desktop computer as a controller, so that the influences of dark current, shading, and nonlinearity may be corrected. With a specially designed computer-controlled lamp and an optimized algorithm, it is possible to calibrate the vidicon very fast. Dark current, shading, and nonlinearities result in errors less than 9% and are mainly determined by the strong thermal drift of the tube. Because of the least-squares-fitting technique, the calibration is very noise insensitive.

  15. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  16. Environment Dependence of Interstellar Extinction Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1993-07-01

    The IUE interstellar extinction curves published by Aiello et al. (1988) are decomposed into a bump, linear rise and FUV non-linear rise, in the parameterization scheme of Fitzpatrick & Massa (1990). The parameters of the 115 extinction curves are given. The lines of sight are characterized from the IRAS Skyflux and Point Source Catalogue data. Mean extinction curves for each of the environments are given. The following environment specific behaviour has been found. We confirm that the linear rise is systematically less in dense media, corresponding to an accretion of their carriers on big grains in such environments. The bump is not weakened in dense media, but is sensitive to the presence of strong UV radiation fields. In HII regions we note abnormal behaviour of the bump width and a correlation of bump position and bump width. This argues against a removal of the bump carrier in HII regions by sticking to big grains. No environment specific behaviour for the FUV non-linear rise was noted except for a weak dependence on E(B-V)/d, notably in HII regions.

  17. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  18. New Light Curves and Orbital Solution for AM Leonis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Mary E.; Osborn, Wayne; Terrell, Dirk

    2004-04-01

    New UBVRI photometry has been obtained for the W UMa eclipsing system AM Leonis. The data have been used to derive nine times of minimum and to construct light curves. The minimum timings show that the system recently had a significant period increase. Modeling of the light curves shows AM Leo to be an overcontact system with a mass ratio of 2.51. Both Rucinski & Duerbeck's absolute magnitude calibration for W UMa stars applied to our photometry and the radial velocity curve combined with our derived parameters indicate a distance near 125 pc, larger than the 77 pc from the Hipparcos parallax.

  19. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  20. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  1. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  2. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  3. Why subduction zones are curved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Bendick, R.; Liang, Haiyi

    2010-12-01

    We give an explanation for the polarity, localization, shape, size, and initiation of subduction zones on Earth. By considering a soft, thin, curved lithospheric cap with either elastic or viscous rheology supported by a thick, nearly incompressible mantle, we find two different characteristic subduction geometries arise depending on boundary conditions: (1) plate boundaries where subduction results primarily from the gravitational body force (free subduction) have characteristic plate lengths and form arc-shaped dimpled segments resulting from the competition between bending and stretching in edge buckling modes of thin spherical shells, and (2) subduction zones due to localized applied loads that push one slab of thin, positively buoyant lithosphere beneath an overriding plate (forced subduction) form localized straight segments, consistent with the deformation of indented spherical shells. Both types of subduction are nonlinear subcritical instabilities, so small perturbations in the mechanical properties of the lithosphere have pronounced effects on subduction initiation and evolution. Yet in both cases, geometric relationships determined by the shape of the Earth itself play the most critical role in controlling the basic morphology and characteristic length scales of subduction zones.

  4. Quantum fields in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollands, Stefan; Wald, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    We review the theory of quantum fields propagating in an arbitrary, classical, globally hyperbolic spacetime. Our review emphasizes the conceptual issues arising in the formulation of the theory and presents known results in a mathematically precise way. Particular attention is paid to the distributional nature of quantum fields, to their local and covariant character, and to microlocal spectrum conditions satisfied by physically reasonable states. We review the Unruh and Hawking effects for free fields, as well as the behavior of free fields in deSitter spacetime and FLRW spacetimes with an exponential phase of expansion. We review how nonlinear observables of a free field, such as the stress-energy tensor, are defined, as well as time-ordered-products. The "renormalization ambiguities" involved in the definition of time-ordered products are fully characterized. Interacting fields are then perturbatively constructed. Our main focus is on the theory of a scalar field, but a brief discussion of gauge fields is included. We conclude with a brief discussion of a possible approach towards a nonperturbative formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime and some remarks on the formulation of quantum gravity.

  5. Revised landsat-5 thematic mapper radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barsi, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective April 2, 2007, the radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) data that are processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) will be updated. The lifetime gain model that was implemented on May 5, 2003, for the reflective bands (1-5, 7) will be replaced by a new lifetime radiometric-calibration curve that is derived from the instrument's response to pseudoinvariant desert sites and from cross calibration with the Landsat-7 (L7) Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+). Although this calibration update applies to all archived and future L5 TM data, the principal improvements in the calibration are for the data acquired during the first eight years of the mission (1984-1991), where the changes in the instrument-gain values are as much as 15%. The radiometric scaling coefficients for bands 1 and 2 for approximately the first eight years of the mission have also been changed. Users will need to apply these new coefficients to convert the calibrated data product digital numbers to radiance. The scaling coefficients for the other bands have not changed. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  6. Nonlinear waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SjöBerg, Daniel

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a cylindrical waveguide with an arbitrary cross section filled with a nonlinear material. The electromagnetic field is expanded in the usual eigenmodes of the waveguide, and the coupling between the modes is quantified. We derive the wave equations governing each mode with special emphasis on the situation with a dominant TE mode. The result is a strictly hyperbolic system of nonlinear partial differential equations for the dominating mode, whereas the minor modes satisfy hyperbolic systems of linear, nonstationary, and partial differential equations. A growth estimate is given for the minor modes.

  7. CALIBRATION OF PHOTOELASTIC MODULATORS IN THE VACUUM UV.

    SciTech Connect

    OAKBERG, T.C.; TRUNK, J.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2000-02-15

    Measurements of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and vacuum UV have used photoelastic modulators (PEMs) for high sensitivity (to about 10{sup -6}). While a simple technique for wavelength calibration of the PEMs has been used with good results, several features of these calibration curves have not been understood. The authors have calibrated a calcium fluoride PEM and a lithium fluoride PEM using the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a light source. These experiments showed calibration graphs that are linear bit do not pass through the graph origin. A second ''multiple pass'' experiment with laser light of a single wavelength, performed on the calcium fluoride PEM, demonstrates the linearity of the PEM electronics. This implies that the calibration behavior results from intrinsic physical properties of the PEM optical element material. An algorithm for generating calibration curves for calcium fluoride and lithium fluoride PEMs has been developed. The calibration curves for circular dichroism measurement for the two PEMs investigated in this study are given as examples.

  8. Comparison of radiotherapy dosimetry for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on electron density calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartutik, K.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate calculation of dose distribution affected by inhomogeneity tissue is required in radiotherapy planning. This study was performed to determine the ratio between radiotherapy planning using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on a calibrated curve of CT-number in the lung for different target's shape in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and spinal cord for SBRT. Calibration curves of CT-number were generated under measurement basis and introduced into TPS, then planning was performed for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT with 7, and 15 radiation fields. Afterwards, planning evaluation was performed by comparing the DVH curve, HI, and CI. 3D-CRT and IMRT produced the lowest HI at calibration curve of CIRS 002LFC with the value 0.24 and 10. Whereas SBRT produced the lowest HI on a linear calibration curve with a value of 0.361. The highest CI in IMRT and SBRT technique achieved using a linear calibration curve was 0.97 and 1.77 respectively. For 3D-CRT, the highest CI was obtained by using calibration curve of CIRS 062M with the value of 0.45. From the results of CI and HI, it is concluded that the calibration curve of CT-number does not significantly differ with Schneider's calibrated curve, and inverse planning gives a better result than forward planning.

  9. Relativistic electron in curved magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S.

    1985-01-01

    Making use of the perturbation method based on the nonlinear differential equation theory, the author investigates the classical motion of a relativistic electron in a class of curved magnetic fields which may be written as B=B(O,B sub phi, O) in cylindrical coordinates (R. phi, Z). Under general astrophysical conditions the author derives the analytical expressions of the motion orbit, pitch angle, etc., of the electron in their dependence upon parameters characterizing the magnetic field and electron. The effects of non-zero curvature of magnetic field lines on the motion of electrons and applicabilities of these results to astrophysics are also discussed.

  10. Factorization with genus 2 curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosset, Romain

    2010-04-01

    The elliptic curve method (ECM) is one of the best factorization methods available. It is possible to use hyperelliptic curves instead of elliptic curves but it is in theory slower. We use special hyperelliptic curves and Kummer surfaces to reduce the complexity of the algorithm. Our implementation GMP-HECM is faster than GMP-ECM for factoring large numbers.

  11. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  12. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  13. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  14. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  15. Spinal curves and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    Scoliosis, an abnormal side-to-side curve of the spine with associated vertebral rotation, affects as many as 4% of all adolescents. Several different categories of scoliosis exist, and treatment can range from observation and follow-up to bracing and surgical correction. This article discusses special imaging series for scoliosis and emphasizes the need for proper radiation protection techniques for patients with scoliosis, most of whom are girls in their early to mid-teens. PMID:17848532

  16. The Stephan Curve revisited.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William H

    2013-01-01

    The Stephan Curve has played a dominant role in caries research over the past several decades. What is so remarkable about the Stephan Curve is the plethora of interactions it illustrates and yet acid production remains the dominant focus. Using sophisticated technology, it is possible to measure pH changes in plaque; however, these observations may carry a false sense of accuracy. Recent observations have shown that there may be multiple pH values within the plaque matrix, thus emphasizing the importance of the milieu within which acid is formed. Although acid production is indeed the immediate proximate cause of tooth dissolution, the influence of alkali production within plaque has received relative scant attention. Excessive reliance on Stephan Curve leads to describing foods as "safe" if they do not lower the pH below the so-called "critical pH" at which point it is postulated enamel dissolves. Acid production is just one of many biological processes that occur within plaque when exposed to sugar. Exploration of methods to enhance alkali production could produce rich research dividends. PMID:23224410

  17. Symmetries for Galileons and DBI scalars on curved space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Trodden, Mark

    2011-07-08

    We introduced a general class of four-dimensional effective field theories which include curved space Galileons and DBI theories possessing nonlinear shift-like symmetries. These effective theories arise from purely gravitational actions and may prove relevant to the cosmology of both the early and late universe.

  18. LWIR polarimeter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumer, Robert V.; Miller, Miranda A.; Howe, James D.; Stevens, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Performance reported efforts to calibrate a MWIR imaging polarimeter met with moderate success. Recent efforts to calibrate a LWIR sensor using a different technique have been much more fruitful. For our sensor, which is based on a rotating retarder, we have improved system calibration substantially be including nonuniformity correction at all measurement positions of the retarder in our polarization data analysis. This technique can account for effects such as spurious optical reflections within a camera system that had been masquerading as false polarization in our previous data analysis methodology. Our techniques will be described and our calibration results will be quantified. Data from field-testing will be presented.

  19. The Science of Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  20. Energy calibration via correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be less than ~ 0.1 keV. Energy calibration via correlation can be applied to any kind of calibration spectra and shows a robust behavior at low counting statistics. It enables a fast and accurate calibration that can be used to monitor the spectroscopic properties of a detector system in near realtime.

  1. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Keyes, C.; Kaiser, M.

    2007-12-01

    The COS calibration pipeline (CALCOS) includes three main components: basic calibration, wavelength calibration, and spectral extraction. Calibration of modes using the far ultraviolet (FUV) and near ultraviolet (NUV) detectors share a common structure, although the individual reference files differ and there are some additional steps for the FUV channel. The pipeline is designed to calibrate data acquired in either ACCUM or time-tag mode. The basic calibration includes pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. Wavelength calibration can be done either by using separate lamp exposures or by taking several short lamp exposures concurrently with a science exposure. For time-tag data, the latter mode ("tagflash") will allow better correction of potential drift of the spectrum on the detector. One-dimensional spectra will be extracted and saved in a FITS binary table. Separate columns will be used for the flux-calibrated spectrum, error estimate, and the associated wavelengths. CALCOS is written in Python, with some functions in C. It is similar in style to other HST pipeline code in that it uses an association table to specify which files to be included, and the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to use are specified by header keywords. Currently, in conjunction with the Instrument Definition Team (led by J. Green), the ground-based reference files are being refined, delivered, and tested with the pipeline.

  2. Laser interferometer calibration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolmi, R. W.; Krupski, S. J.

    1981-10-01

    The laser interferometer is a versatile tool, used for calibration over both long and short distances. It is considered traceable to the National Bureau of Standards. The system developed under this project was to be capable of providing for the calibration of many types of small linear measurement devices. The logistics of the original concept of one location for calibration of all mics, calipers, etc. at a large manufacturing facility proved unworkable. The equipment was instead used for the calibration of the large machines used to manufacture cannon tubes.

  3. Curved mesh generation and mesh refinement using Lagrangian solid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, P.-O.; Peraire, J.

    2008-12-31

    We propose a method for generating well-shaped curved unstructured meshes using a nonlinear elasticity analogy. The geometry of the domain to be meshed is represented as an elastic solid. The undeformed geometry is the initial mesh of linear triangular or tetrahedral elements. The external loading results from prescribing a boundary displacement to be that of the curved geometry, and the final configuration is determined by solving for the equilibrium configuration. The deformations are represented using piecewise polynomials within each element of the original mesh. When the mesh is sufficiently fine to resolve the solid deformation, this method guarantees non-intersecting elements even for highly distorted or anisotropic initial meshes. We describe the method and the solution procedures, and we show a number of examples of two and three dimensional simplex meshes with curved boundaries. We also demonstrate how to use the technique for local refinement of non-curved meshes in the presence of curved boundaries.

  4. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, David; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-31

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β{sub 11} is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β{sub 11}{sup 7075}/β{sub 11}{sup 2024} measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  5. Measurement and fitting techniques for the assessment of material nonlinearity using nonlinear Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torello, David; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-01

    This research considers the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and the nonlinearity of generating sources on measurements of nonlinear ultrasonic Rayleigh wave propagation. A new theoretical framework for correcting measurements made with air-coupled and contact piezoelectric receivers for the aforementioned effects is provided based on analytical models and experimental considerations. A method for extracting the nonlinearity parameter β11 is proposed based on a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm that is tailored for Rayleigh wave measurements. Quantitative experiments are conducted to confirm the predictions for the nonlinearity of the piezoelectric source and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the curve-fitting procedure. These experiments are conducted on aluminum 2024 and 7075 specimens and a β117075/β112024 measure of 1.363 agrees well with previous literature and earlier work.

  6. Near-Infrared Camera Calibration for Optical Surgical Navigation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Yang, Rongqian; Lin, Qinyong; Liu, Sujuan; Chen, Huazhou; Ou, Shanxing; Huang, Wenhua; Zhou, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared optical tracking devices, which are important components of surgical navigation systems, need to be calibrated for effective tracking. The calibration results has a direct influence on the tracking accuracy of an entire system. Therefore, the study of calibration techniques is of theoretical significance and practical value. In the present work, a systematic calibration method based on movable plates is established, which analyzes existing calibration theories and implements methods using calibration reference objects. First, the distortion model of near-infrared cameras (NICs) is analyzed in the implementation of this method. Second, the calibration images from different positions and orientations are used to establish the required linear equations. The initial values of the NIC parameters are calculated with the direct linear transformation method. Finally, the accurate internal and external parameters of the NICs are obtained by conducting nonlinear optimization. Analysis results show that the relative errors of the left and right NICs in the tracking system are 0.244 and 0.282 % for the focal lengths and 0.735 and 1.111 % for the principal points, respectively. The image residuals of the left and right image sets are both less than 0.01 pixel. The standard error of the calibration result is lower than 1, and the measurement error of the tracking system is less than 0.3 mm. The experimental data show that the proposed method of calibrating NICs is effective and can generate favorable calibration results. PMID:26728393

  7. Fast Field Calibration of MIMU Based on the Powell Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Chen, Wanwan; Li, Bin; You, Zheng; Chen, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    The calibration of micro inertial measurement units is important in ensuring the precision of navigation systems, which are equipped with microelectromechanical system sensors that suffer from various errors. However, traditional calibration methods cannot meet the demand for fast field calibration. This paper presents a fast field calibration method based on the Powell algorithm. As the key points of this calibration, the norm of the accelerometer measurement vector is equal to the gravity magnitude, and the norm of the gyro measurement vector is equal to the rotational velocity inputs. To resolve the error parameters by judging the convergence of the nonlinear equations, the Powell algorithm is applied by establishing a mathematical error model of the novel calibration. All parameters can then be obtained in this manner. A comparison of the proposed method with the traditional calibration method through navigation tests shows the classic performance of the proposed calibration method. The proposed calibration method also saves more time compared with the traditional calibration method. PMID:25177801

  8. Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve belonging to the Bertrand curves pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyurt, Süleyman; Altun, Yasin; Cevahir, Ceyda

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve which drawn by the unit Darboux vector of the Bertrand partner curve. Some results have been obtained. These results were expressed as the depends Bertrand curve.

  9. Nonlinear Acoustical Assessment of Precipitate Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to show that measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter in heat treatable alloys as a function of heat treatment time can provide quantitative information about the kinetics of precipitate nucleation and growth in such alloys. Generally, information on the kinetics of phase transformations is obtained from time-sequenced electron microscopical examination and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The present nonlinear acoustical assessment of precipitation kinetics is based on the development of a multiparameter analytical model of the effects on the nonlinearity parameter of precipitate nucleation and growth in the alloy system. A nonlinear curve fit of the model equation to the experimental data is then used to extract the kinetic parameters related to the nucleation and growth of the targeted precipitate. The analytical model and curve fit is applied to the assessment of S' precipitation in aluminum alloy 2024 during artificial aging from the T4 to the T6 temper.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of axially moving plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics for forced motions of an axially moving plate is numerically investigated using Von Kármán plate theory and retaining in-plane displacements and inertia. The equations of motion are obtained via an energy method based on Lagrange equations. This yields a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations with coupled terms. The equations are transformed into a set of first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations and are solved via the pseudo-arclength continuation technique. The near-resonance nonlinear dynamics is examined via plotting the frequency-response curves of the system. Results are shown through frequency-response curves, time histories, and phase-plane diagrams. The effect of system parameters, such as the axial speed and the pretension, on the resonant responses is also highlighted.

  11. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  12. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  13. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  14. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  15. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  16. Carbon Resistor Pressure Gauge Calibration at Stresses Up to 1 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Niles, A M; Greenwood, D W; Cunningham, B; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2002-03-05

    Calibration of the 470-Ohm carbon resistor gauge is desired in the low stress region up to 1 GPa. A split-Hopkinson pressure bar, drop tower apparatus, gas pressure chamber, and gas gun have been used to perform the calibration experiments. The gauge behavior at elevated temperature was also investigated by heating the resistors to 200 C at atmospheric pressure while observing the resistance change. The motivation for this calibration work arises from the desire to increase the number of data points in the low stress regime to better establish the accuracy and precision of the gauge. Details of the various calibration arrangements and the results are discussed and compared to calibration curves fit to previously published calibration data. It was found that in most cases, the data from this work fit the calibration curves fit to previously published data rather well.

  17. Curve Number estimation from rainfall-runoff data in the Brazilian Cerrado Biome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, P. S.; Nearing, M.; Rodrigues, D. B.; Panachuki, E.; Wendland, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Brazilian Cerrado (Savanna) is considered one of the most important biomes for Brazilian water resources; meanwhile, it is experiencing major losses of its natural landscapes due to the pressures of food and energy production, which has caused changes in hydrological processes. To evaluate these changes hydrologic models have been used. The Curve Number (SCS-CN) method has been widely employed to estimate direct runoff from a given rainfall event, however, there are some uncertainties for estimating this parameter, particularly for use in areas with native vegetation. The objectives of this study were to measure natural rainfall-driven rates of runoff under native Cerrado vegetation and under the main crops found in this biome, and derive associated CN values from five methods. We used six plots of 5 x 20 m (100 m2) in size, with three replications of undisturbed Cerrado and three under bare soil (Ortic Quartzarenic Neosol, hydrological soil class A) and 10 plots of 3.5 x 22.15 m (77.5 m2), with two replications for pasture, soy, millet, sugarcane and bare soil (Dystrophic Red Argisol, hydrological soil class B). Plots were monitored between October 2011 and April 2013. The five methods used to obtain CN values were median, geometric mean, arithmetic mean, nonlinear, least squares fit, and standard asymptotic fit. We found reasonable results for CN calibration for the undisturbed Cerrado only by using the nonlinear least squares fit. CN obtained from the standard table values was not adequate to estimate runoff for this condition. The standard table and the five CN methods presented satisfactory results for the other land covers studied. From our results we can suggest the best CN values for each land cover: Cerrado 49.8 (47.9-51.1), bare soil class-A 83.9 (74.4-93.4), bare soil class-B 88.3 (81.7-94.8), pasture 73.7 (62.9-84.5), soy 83.5 (80.6-86.4), millet 73.9 (67.4-80.4) and sugarcane 83.9 (80.6-87.3). These CN values and ranges provide guidance for

  18. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.

  19. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  20. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  1. Vanishing feature constraints calibration method for binocular vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenzhong; Liu, Xiaokun

    2015-07-27

    Based on analyzing the measurement model of binocular vision sensor, we proposed a new flexible calibration method for binocular vision sensor using a planar target with several parallel lines. It only requires the sensor to observe the planar target at a few (at least two) different orientations. Relying on vanishing feature constraints and spacing constraints of parallel lines, linear method and nonlinear optimization are combined to estimate the structure parameters of binocular vision sensor. Linear method achieves the separation of the rotation matrix and translation vector which reduces the complexity of computation; Nonlinear algorithm ensures the calibration results for the global optimization. Towards the factors that affect the accuracy of the calibration, theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out respectively consequence in qualitative analysis and quantitative result. Real data shows that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method is about 0.040mm with the working distance of 800mm and the view field of 300 × 300mm. The comparison with Bougust toolbox and the method based on known length indicates that the proposed calibration method is precise and is efficient and convenient as its simple calculation and easy operation, especially for onsite calibration and self-calibration. PMID:26367553

  2. Phase response curves elucidating the dynamics of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Granada, A; Hennig, R M; Ronacher, B; Kramer, A; Herzel, H

    2009-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) are widely used in circadian clocks, neuroscience, and heart physiology. They quantify the response of an oscillator to pulse-like perturbations. Phase response curves provide valuable information on the properties of oscillators and their synchronization. This chapter discusses biological self-sustained oscillators (circadian clock, physiological rhythms, etc.) in the context of nonlinear dynamics theory. Coupled oscillators can synchronize with different frequency ratios, can generate toroidal dynamics (superposition of independent frequencies), and may lead to deterministic chaos. These nonlinear phenomena can be analyzed with the aid of a phase transition curve, which is intimately related to the phase response curve. For illustration purposes, this chapter discusses a model of circadian oscillations based on a delayed negative feedback. In a second part, the chapter provides a step-by-step recipe to measure phase response curves. It discusses specifications of this recipe for circadian rhythms, heart rhythms, neuronal spikes, central pattern generators, and insect communication. Finally, it stresses the predictive power of measured phase response curves. PRCs can be used to quantify the coupling strength of oscillations, to classify oscillator types, and to predict the complex dynamics of periodically driven oscillations. PMID:19216921

  3. The biology behind lichenometric dating curves.

    PubMed

    Loso, Michael G; Doak, Daniel F

    2006-03-01

    Lichenometry is used to date late-Holocene terminal moraines that record glacier fluctuations. Traditionally, it relies upon dating curves that relate diameters of the largest lichens in a population to surface ages. Although widely used, the technique remains controversial, in part because lichen biology is poorly understood. We use size-frequency distributions of lichens growing on well-dated surfaces to fit demographic models for Rhizocarpon geographicum and Pseudophebe pubescens, two species commonly used for lichenometry. We show that both species suffer from substantial mortality of 2-3% per year, and grow slowest when young-trends that explain a long-standing contradiction between the literatures of lichenometry and lichen biology. Lichenometrists interpret the shape of typical dating curves to indicate a period of rapid juvenile "great growth," contrary to the growth patterns expected by biologists. With a simulation, we show how the "great growth" pattern can be explained by mortality alone, which ensures that early colonists are rarely found on the oldest surfaces. The consistency of our model predictions with biological theory and observations, and with dozens of lichenometric calibration curves from around the world, suggests opportunities to assess quantitatively the accuracy and utility of this common dating technique. PMID:16237538

  4. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  5. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  6. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Kaiser, M. E.; Keyes, C. D.; Ake, T. B.; Aloisi, A.; Friedman, S. D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Shaw, B.; Sahnow, D. J.; Penton, S. V.; Froning, C. S.; Beland, S.; Osterman, S.; Green, J.; COS/STIS STScI Team; IDT, COS

    2008-05-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, (Green, J, et al., 2000, Proc SPIE, 4013) will be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. This will be the most sensitive ultraviolet spectrograph ever flown aboard HST. The program (CALCOS) for pipeline calibration of HST/COS data has been developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute. As with other HST pipelines, CALCOS uses an association table to list the data files to be included, and it employs header keywords to specify the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to be used. COS includes both a cross delay line detector for the far ultraviolet (FUV) and a MAMA detector for the near ultraviolet (NUV). CALCOS uses a common structure for both channels, but the specific calibration steps differ. The calibration steps include pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. A 1-D spectrum will be extracted and flux calibrated. Data will normally be taken in TIME-TAG mode, recording the time and location of each detected photon, although ACCUM mode will also be supported. The wavelength calibration uses an on-board spectral line lamp. To enable precise wavelength calibration, default operations will simultaneously record the science target and lamp spectrum by executing brief (tag-flash) lamp exposures at least once per external target exposure.

  7. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  8. A simplified approach to calibrating [sup 14]C dates

    SciTech Connect

    Talma, A.S.; Vogel, J.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors propose a simplified approach to the calibration of radiocarbon dates. They use splines through the tree-ring data as calibration curves, thereby eliminating a large part of the statistical scatter of the actual data points. To express the age range, they transform the [plus minus]1 [sigma] and [plus minus]2 [sigma] values of the BP age to calendar dates and interpret them as the 68% and 95% confidence intervals. This approach by-passes the conceptual problems of the transfer of individual probability values from the radiocarbon to the calendar age. They have adapted software to make this calibration possible.

  9. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  10. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.

  11. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  12. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  13. Multiple pixel-scale soil water retention curves quantified by neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Perfect, E.; Cheng, C. L.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lee, J.; Horita, J.; Warren, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    The soil water retention function is needed for modeling multiphase flow in porous media. Traditional techniques for measuring the soil water retention function, such as the hanging water column or pressure cell methods, yield average water retention data which have to be modeled using inverse procedures to extract relevant point parameters. In this study, we have developed a technique for directly measuring multiple point (pixel-scale) water retention curves for a repacked sand material using 2-D neutron radiography. Neutron radiographic images were obtained under quasi-equilibrium conditions at nine imposed basal matric potentials during monotonic drying of Flint sand at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide (CG) 1D beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. All of the images were normalized with respect to an image of the oven dry sand column. Volumetric water contents were computed on a pixel by pixel basis using an empirical calibration equation after taking into account beam hardening and geometric corrections. Corresponding matric potentials were calculated from the imposed basal matric potential and pixel elevations. Volumetric water content and matric potential data pairs corresponding to 120 selected pixels were used to construct 120 point water retention curves. Each curve was fitted to the Brooks and Corey equation using segmented non-linear regression in SAS. A 98.5% convergence rate was achieved resulting in 115 estimates of the four Brooks and Corey parameters. A single Brooks and Corey point water retention function was constructed for Flint sand using the median values of these parameter estimates. This curve corresponded closely with the point Brooks and Corey function inversely extracted from the average water retention data using TrueCell. Forward numerical simulations performed using HYDRUS 1-D showed that the cumulative outflows predicted using the point Brooks and Corey functions from both the direct (neutron radiography) and

  14. Biological analysis of Jeffrey nanofluid in a curved channel with heat dissipation.

    PubMed

    Maraj, E N; Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a curved channel. The governing equations of Jeffrey nanofluid model for curved channel are derived including the effects of curvature. The highly nonlinear partial differential equations are simplified by using the long wave length and low Reynolds number assumptions. The reduced nonlinear partial differential equations are solved analytically with the help of homotopy perturbation method. The expression for pressure rise is computed through numerical integration. The physical features of pertinent parameters have been discussed by plotting the graphs of pressure rise, velocity, temperature, nanoparticle volume fraction and stream functions. It is observed that the curve-ness of the channel decreases the pressure rise in the peristaltic pumping region. Moreover, curve-ness of the channel effects the fluid flow by decreasing the fluid velocity near inner wall and increasing the velocity near the outer wall of the channel. PMID:25122841

  15. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Ahlers, H.H. Liu

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  16. WFPC2 Pipeline Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Chris

    2004-03-01

    This document contains a listing of all WFPC2 reference files, grouped by type, that are presently available in the Calibration Data Base (CDB) System, and a summary of how they are used in the calibration of WFPC2 data. A summary memo is kept on STEIS and kept up to date as the reference files change. That memo is intended to inform observers as to the quality of the calibration applied to their data by the PODPS pipeline processing and to provide an aid in selecting appropriate reference files for the re-calibration of WFPC2 observations. The datafiles may be requested by name from the STScI in the same fashion as any other nonproprietary data products.

  17. SRAM Detector Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, G. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Beuhler, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Custom proton sensitive SRAM chips are being flown on the BMDO Clementine missions and Space Technology Research Vehicle experiments. This paper describes the calibration procedure for the SRAM proton detectors and their response to the space environment.

  18. Roundness calibration standard

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  19. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  20. Closed time like curves enable perfect state distinguishability

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, James William; Wilde, Mark M; Brun, Todd A

    2008-01-01

    The causal self-consistency condition for closed timelike curves can give rise to nonlinear interactions on chronology-respecting qubits. We demonstrate that particular unitary interactions between closed timelike curve qubits and chronology-respecting qubits allow perfect distinguishability of nonorthogonal states, and provide a constructive proof for an arbitrary number of nonorthogonal states. This has a number of highly significant consequences. For example, an adversary with access to closed timelike curves can break the B92, BB84, and SARG04 quantum key distribution protocols, or any prepare-and-measure quantum key distribution scheme. Our result also implies that a party with access to closed timelike curves can violate the Holevo bound by accessing more than log(N) bits of information from an N-dimensional quantum state. In principle, he can transmit an arbitrarily large amount of classical information with a quantum system of fixed size. We discuss the implications of this for quantum cloning.

  1. Experiments with conjugate gradient algorithms for homotopy curve tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irani, Kashmira M.; Ribbens, Calvin J.; Watson, Layne T.; Kamat, Manohar P.; Walker, Homer F.

    1991-01-01

    There are algorithms for finding zeros or fixed points of nonlinear systems of equations that are globally convergent for almost all starting points, i.e., with probability one. The essence of all such algorithms is the construction of an appropriate homotopy map and then tracking some smooth curve in the zero set of this homotopy map. HOMPACK is a mathematical software package implementing globally convergent homotopy algorithms with three different techniques for tracking a homotopy zero curve, and has separate routines for dense and sparse Jacobian matrices. The HOMPACK algorithms for sparse Jacobian matrices use a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm for the computation of the kernel of the homotopy Jacobian matrix, a required linear algebra step for homotopy curve tracking. Here, variants of the conjugate gradient algorithm are implemented in the context of homotopy curve tracking and compared with Craig's preconditioned conjugate gradient method used in HOMPACK. The test problems used include actual large scale, sparse structural mechanics problems.

  2. HAWC Timing Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley-Hoskins, Nathan; Huentemeyer, Petra; Matthews, John; Dingus, Brenda; HAWC Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Experiment is a second-generation high sensitivity gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector that builds on the experience and technology of the Milagro observatory. HAWC utilizes the water Cherenkov technique to measure extensive air showers. Instead of a pond filled with water (as in Milagro), an array of closely packed water tanks with 3 PMTs each is used. The cosmic ray's direction will be reconstructed using the times when the PMTs in each tank are triggered. Therefore, the timing calibration will be crucial for reaching an angular resolution as low as 0.1 degrees. We propose to use a laser calibration system, patterned after the calibration system in Milagro. The HAWC optical calibration system uses less than 1 ns laser light pulses, directed into two optical fiber networks. Each network will use optical fan-outs and switches to direct light to specific tanks. The first network is used to measure the light transit time out to each pair of tanks, and the second network sends light to each tank, calibrating each tank's 3 PMTs. Time slewing corrections will be made using neutral density filters to control the light intensity over 4 orders of magnitude. This system is envisioned to run both continuously at a low rate, or at a high rate with many intensity levels. In this presentation, we present the design of the calibration system and first measurements of its performance.

  3. Invited Article: Deep Impact instrument calibration.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, Kenneth P; A'Hearn, Michael F; Baca, Michael; Delamere, Alan; Desnoyer, Mark; Farnham, Tony; Groussin, Olivier; Hampton, Donald; Ipatov, Sergei; Li, Jianyang; Lisse, Carey; Mastrodemos, Nickolaos; McLaughlin, Stephanie; Sunshine, Jessica; Thomas, Peter; Wellnitz, Dennis

    2008-09-01

    Calibration of NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft instruments allows reliable scientific interpretation of the images and spectra returned from comet Tempel 1. Calibrations of the four onboard remote sensing imaging instruments have been performed in the areas of geometric calibration, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and radiometric response. Error sources such as noise (random, coherent, encoding, data compression), detector readout artifacts, scattered light, and radiation interactions have been quantified. The point spread functions (PSFs) of the medium resolution instrument and its twin impactor targeting sensor are near the theoretical minimum [ approximately 1.7 pixels full width at half maximum (FWHM)]. However, the high resolution instrument camera was found to be out of focus with a PSF FWHM of approximately 9 pixels. The charge coupled device (CCD) read noise is approximately 1 DN. Electrical cross-talk between the CCD detector quadrants is correctable to <2 DN. The IR spectrometer response nonlinearity is correctable to approximately 1%. Spectrometer read noise is approximately 2 DN. The variation in zero-exposure signal level with time and spectrometer temperature is not fully characterized; currently corrections are good to approximately 10 DN at best. Wavelength mapping onto the detector is known within 1 pixel; spectral lines have a FWHM of approximately 2 pixels. About 1% of the IR detector pixels behave badly and remain uncalibrated. The spectrometer exhibits a faint ghost image from reflection off a beamsplitter. Instrument absolute radiometric calibration accuracies were determined generally to <10% using star imaging. Flat-field calibration reduces pixel-to-pixel response differences to approximately 0.5% for the cameras and <2% for the spectrometer. A standard calibration image processing pipeline is used to produce archival image files for analysis by researchers. PMID:19044397

  4. Existence of periodically invariant curves in 3-dimensional measure-preserving mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chong-Qing; Sun, Yi-Sui

    A class of three-dimensional measure-preserving mappings is characterized analytically, with a focus on families of periodically invariant curves. A normal form for the class of mappings is derived; a Hamiltonian system is simulated; and the normal form for maps near a normally elliptic invariant curve is examined. The persistence of periodically invariant curves in the presence of nonlinear perturbations is demonstrated for this normal form.

  5. Nonlinear transmittance of the 4-keto bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhanen, J.; Leppanen, V. P.; Jaaskelainen, T.; Parkkinen, J. P. S.; Parkkinen, S.

    1999-09-01

    The photocycle of the 4-keto bacteriorhodopsin is investigated. We constructed a multilevel theoretical model for the nonlinear transmittance properties of the material. Adjusting the relaxation parameters we are able to fit the theoretical intensity dependent transmittance curves into the experiments and to determine the photocycle from simple optical measurements.

  6. Birational maps that send biquadratic curves to biquadratic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John A. G.; Jogia, Danesh

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many papers have begun to consider so-called non-Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) birational maps of the plane. Compared to the QRT family of maps which preserve each biquadratic curve in a fibration of the plane, non-QRT maps send a biquadratic curve to another biquadratic curve belonging to the same fibration or to a biquadratic curve from a different fibration of the plane. In this communication, we give the general form of a birational map derived from a difference equation that sends a biquadratic curve to another. The necessary and sufficient condition for such a map to exist is that the discriminants of the two biquadratic curves are the same (and hence so are the j-invariants). The result allows existing examples in the literature to be better understood and allows some statements to be made concerning their generality.

  7. Fine Sun Sensor Field of View Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph E.; Hashmall, J.; Harman, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The fine Sun sensor (FSS) used on many spacecraft consists of two independent single-axis sensors, nominally mounted perpendicularly, that detect Sun angle across a typical field of view of +/- 32 degrees. The nonlinear function that maps the measured counts into an observed angle is called the transfer function. The FSS transfer function provided by the manufacturer consists of nine parameters for each of the two sensitive axes. An improved transfer function has been previously reported that achieves a significant accuracy improvement across the entire field of view. This new function expands the parameter set to 12 coefficients per axis and includes cross terms combining counts from both axes. To make best use of the FSS for spacecraft attitude determination, it must be calibrated after launch. We are interested in simplifying the postlaunch calibration procedure for estimating improvements to the 24 parameters in the transfer function. This paper discusses how to recombine the terms of the transfer function to reduce their redundancy without decreasing its accuracy and then presents an attitude dependent procedure for estimating the parameters. The end result is a calibration algorithm that is easier to use and does not sacrifice accuracy. Results of calibration using on-orbit data are presented.

  8. Lower extremity kinematics of athletics curve sprinting.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Heinrich, Kai; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Curve running requires the generation of centripetal force altering the movement pattern in comparison to the straight path run. The question arises which kinematic modulations emerge while bend sprinting at high velocities. It has been suggested that during curve sprints the legs fulfil different functions. A three-dimensional motion analysis (16 high-speed cameras) was conducted to compare the segmental kinematics of the lower extremity during the stance phases of linear and curve sprints (radius: 36.5 m) of six sprinters of national competitive level. Peak joint angles substantially differed in the frontal and transversal plane whereas sagittal plane kinematics remained unchanged. During the prolonged left stance phase (left: 107.5 ms, right: 95.7 ms, straight: 104.4 ms) the maximum values of ankle eversion (left: 12.7°, right: 2.6°, straight: 6.6°), hip adduction (left: 13.8°, right: 5.5°, straight: 8.8°) and hip external rotation (left: 21.6°, right: 12.9°, straight: 16.7°) were significantly higher. The inside leg seemed to stabilise the movement in the frontal plane (eversion-adduction strategy) whereas the outside leg provided and controlled the motion in the horizontal plane (rotation strategy). These results extend the principal understanding of the effects of curve sprinting on lower extremity kinematics. This helps to increase the understanding of nonlinear human bipedal locomotion, which in turn might lead to improvements in athletic performance and injury prevention. PMID:25495196

  9. Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, Harry J.

    2011-03-22

    A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

  10. Bandwidth increasing mechanism by introducing a curve fixture to the cantilever generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiqun; Liu, Congzhi; Ren, Bingyu; Zhu, Qiao; Hu, Guangdi; Yang, Weiqing

    2016-07-01

    A nonlinear wideband generator architecture by clamping the cantilever beam generator with a curve fixture is proposed. Devices with different nonlinear stiffness can be obtained by properly choosing the fixture curve according to the design requirements. Three available generator types are presented and discussed for polynomial curves. Experimental investigations show that the proposed mechanism effectively extends the operation bandwidth with good power performance. Especially, the simplicity and easy feasibility allow the mechanism to be widely applied for vibration generators in different scales and environments.

  11. LANDSAT-D flight segment operations manual. Appendix A: Coefficients/calibration data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, A.

    1982-01-01

    Telemetry calibration curves for the LANDSAT-4 subsystems are defined by nth order polynomial equations which convert telemetry counts to engineering units. The calibration curve coefficients for each telemetry point are controlled in the data base and are listed along with the unit section number where the sensor is located. Tables showing the coefficients may be obtained from the data base administrator. The tables show telemetry counts versus engineering units.

  12. Static Nonlinear Analysis In Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, Ali

    2008-07-08

    Push-over analysis is a simple and applied approach which can be used for estimation of demand responses influenced by earthquake stimulations. The analysis is non-linear static analysis of the structure affected under increasing lateral loads and specifying the displacement--load diagram or structure capacity curve, draw the curve the base shear values and lateral deflection on the roof level of the building will be used. However, for estimation of the real behavior of the structure against earthquake, the non-linear dynamic analysis approaches and various accelerographs should be applied. Of course it should be noted that this approach especially in relation with tall buildings is complex and time consuming. In the article, the different patterns of lateral loading in push-over analysis have been compared with non-linear dynamic analysis approach so that the results represented accordingly. The researches indicated the uniformly--distributed loading is closer to real status.

  13. Acoustic nonlinearity in fluorinert FC-43

    SciTech Connect

    Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N; Osterhoudt, Curtis F; Mombourquette, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    Fluorinert FC-43 nonlinearity was investigated using two approaches: (i) a finite amplitude method with harmonic production; and (ii) a nonlinear frequency mixing in the fluid with consequent beam profile measurement of the difference frequency. The finite amplitude method provides information on the coefficient of nonlinearity, {beta}, through the amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic, at a certain transmitter-receiver distance. A calibrated hydrophone was used as a receiver, in order to obtain direct pressure measurements of the acoustic waves in the fluid. The role of transmitter-receiver distance in {beta} determination is investigated. In the second approach, a single transducer is used to provide two high-frequency beams. The collinear high-frequency beams mix nonlinearly in the fluid resulting in a difference frequency beam and higher order harmonics of the primaries. The difference frequency beam profite is investigated at lengths beyond the mixing distance. The experimental data are compured with the KZK theory.

  14. A simple and flexible calibration method of non-overlapping camera rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Banglei; Shang, Yang; Yu, Qifeng; Lei, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2015-05-01

    A simple and flexible method for non-overlapping camera rig calibration that includes camera calibration and relative poses calibration is presented. The proposed algorithm gives the solutions of the cameras parameters and the relative poses simultaneously by using nonlinear optimization. Firstly, the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of each camera in the rig are estimated individually. Then, a linear solution derived from hand-eye calibration scheme is proposed to compute an initial estimate of the relative poses inside the camera rig. Finally, combined non-linear refinement of all parameters is performed, which optimizes the intrinsic parameters, the extrinsic parameters and relative poses of the coupled camera at the same time. We develop and test a novel approach for calibrating the parameters of non-overlapping camera rig using camera calibration and hand-eye calibration method. The method is designed inter alia for the purpose of deformation measurement using the calibrated rig. Compared the camera calibration with hand-eye calibration separately, our joint calibration is more convenient in practice application. Experimental data shows our algorithm is feasible and effective.

  15. 40 CFR 92.120 - NDIR analyzer calibration and checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of approximately 90 percent of full-scale chart deflection. (iii) Recheck the zero response. If it has changed more than 0.5 percent of full scale, repeat steps in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) and (c)(2)(ii..., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 percent of full-scale concentration. (v) Generate a calibration curve....

  16. 40 CFR 89.323 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as a data point. Compensation for known impurities in the zero gas can be made to the zero-data point. The calibration curve must fit the data points within 2 percent of point. (6) Optional. A new... of full scale or 2 percent of point, whichever is less, of the responses predicted by the...

  17. 40 CFR 89.323 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... as a data point. Compensation for known impurities in the zero gas can be made to the zero-data point. The calibration curve must fit the data points within 2 percent of point. (6) Optional. A new... of full scale or 2 percent of point, whichever is less, of the responses predicted by the...

  18. 40 CFR 89.323 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... as a data point. Compensation for known impurities in the zero gas can be made to the zero-data point. The calibration curve must fit the data points within 2 percent of point. (6) Optional. A new... of full scale or 2 percent of point, whichever is less, of the responses predicted by the...

  19. 40 CFR 91.321 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the form of equation (1) or (2). Include zero as a data point. Compensation for known impurities in the zero gas can be made to the zero-data point. The calibration curve must fit the data points within 2 percent of point or one percent of full scale, whichever is less. ER04OC96.010 y=concentration...

  20. 40 CFR 90.321 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the form of the following equation (1) or (2). Include zero as a data point. Compensation for known impurities in the zero gas can be made to the zero-data point. The calibration curve must fit the data points within two percent of point or one percent of full scale, whichever is less. ER03JY95.011 where:...

  1. 40 CFR 89.323 - NDIR analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... as a data point. Compensation for known impurities in the zero gas can be made to the zero-data point. The calibration curve must fit the data points within 2 percent of point. (6) Optional. A new... of full scale or 2 percent of point, whichever is less, of the responses predicted by the...

  2. Calibrated nanoscale dopant profiling using a scanning microwave microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H. P.; Hochleitner, M.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Humer, I.; Smoliner, J.; Fenner, M.; Moertelmaier, M.; Rankl, C.; Tanbakuchi, H.; Kienberger, F.; Imtiaz, A.; Wallis, T. M.; Kabos, P.; Kopanski, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    The scanning microwave microscope is used for calibrated capacitance spectroscopy and spatially resolved dopant profiling measurements. It consists of an atomic force microscope combined with a vector network analyzer operating between 1-20 GHz. On silicon semiconductor calibration samples with doping concentrations ranging from 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3}, calibrated capacitance-voltage curves as well as derivative dC/dV curves were acquired. The change of the capacitance and the dC/dV signal is directly related to the dopant concentration allowing for quantitative dopant profiling. The method was tested on various samples with known dopant concentration and the resolution of dopant profiling determined to 20% while the absolute accuracy is within an order of magnitude. Using a modeling approach the dopant profiling calibration curves were analyzed with respect to varying tip diameter and oxide thickness allowing for improvements of the calibration accuracy. Bipolar samples were investigated and nano-scale defect structures and p-n junction interfaces imaged showing potential applications for the study of semiconductor device performance and failure analysis.

  3. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  4. Modeling of Triangular Lattice Space Structures with Curved Battens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tzikang; Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for simulating an assembly process of lattice structures with curved battens were developed. The shape of the curved battens, the tension in the diagonals, and the compression in the battens were predicted for the assembled model. To be able to perform the assembly simulation, a cable-pulley element was implemented, and geometrically nonlinear finite element analyses were performed. Three types of finite element models were created from assembled lattice structures for studying the effects of design and modeling variations on the load carrying capability. Discrepancies in the predictions from these models were discussed. The effects of diagonal constraint failure were also studied.

  5. Calibration of the Forward-scattering Spectrometer Probe: Modeling Scattering from a Multimode Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Scattering calculations using a more detailed model of the multimode laser beam in the forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) were carried out by using a recently developed extension to Mie scattering theory. From this model, new calibration curves for the FSSP were calculated. The difference between the old calibration curves and the new ones is small for droplet diameters less than 10 micrometers, but the difference increases to approximately 10% at diameters of 50 micrometers. When using glass beads to calibrate the FSSP, calibration errors can be minimized, by using glass beads of many different diameters, over the entire range of the FSSP. If the FSSP is calibrated using one-diameter glass beads, then the new formalism is necessary to extrapolate the calibration over the entire range.

  6. Calibration of the forward-scattering spectrometer probe - Modeling scattering from a multimode laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Scattering calculations using a detailed model of the multimode laser beam in the forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) were carried out using a recently developed extension to Mie scattering theory. From this model, new calibration curves for the FSSP were calculated. The difference between the old calibration curves and the new ones is small for droplet diameters less than 10 microns, but the difference increases to approximately 10 percent at diameters of 50 microns. When using glass beads to calibrate the FSSP, calibration errors can be minimized by using glass beads of many different diameters, over the entire range of the FSSP. If the FSSP is calibrated using one-diameter glass beads, then the new formalism is necessary to extrapolate the calibration over the entire range.

  7. Calibration of radionuclide calibrators in Canadian hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Santry, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The major user of radioactive isotopes in Canada is the medical profession. Because of this a program has been initiated at the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) to assist the nuclear medicine community to determine more accurately, the rather large amounts of radioactive materials administered to patients either for therapeutic or medical diagnostics. Since radiation exposure to the human body has deleterious effects, it is important for the patient that the correct amount of radioactive material is administered to minimize the induction of a fatal cancer at a later time. Hospitals in many other countries have a legal requirement to have their instruments routinely calibrated and have previously entered into intercomparisons with other hospitals or their national standards laboratories. In Canada, hospitals and clinics can participate on a voluntary basis to have the proper operation of measuring devices (radionuclide calibrators in particular) examined through intercomparisons. The program looks primarily at laboratory performance. This includes not only the instrument's performance but the performance of the individual doing the procedure and the technical procedure or method employed. In an effort to provide personal assistance to those having problems, it is essential that the comparisons should be pertinent to the daily work of the laboratory and that the most capable technologist not be selected to carry out the assay.

  8. Energy calibration of the fly's eye detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the Fly's eye detector to evaluate the energy of EAS are discussed. The energy of extensive air showers (EAS) as seen by the Fly's Eye detector are obtained from track length integrals of observed shower development curves. The energy of the parent cosmic ray primary is estimated by applying corrections to account for undetected energy in the muon, neutrino and hadronic channels. Absolute values for E depend upon the measurement of shower sizes N sub e(x). The following items are necessary to convert apparent optical brightness into intrinsical optical brightness: (1) an assessment of those factors responsible for light production by the relativistic electrons in an EAS and the transmission of light thru the atmosphere, (2) calibration of the optical detection system, and (3) a knowledge of the trajectory of the shower.

  9. OPTIMUM FREQUENCY OF CALIBRATION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper develops an algorithm by which to compute the optimal frequency of calibration monitoring to minimize the total cost of analyzing a set of samples and the required calibration standards. Optimum calibration monitoring is needed because of the high cost and calibration d...

  10. Negative nonlinear damping of a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vibhor; Shevchuk, Olga; Blanter, Ya. M.; Steele, Gary A.

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigate the nonlinear response of a multilayer graphene resonator using a superconducting microwave cavity to detect its motion. The radiation pressure force is used to drive the mechanical resonator in an optomechanically induced transparency configuration. By varying the amplitudes of drive and probe tones, the mechanical resonator can be brought into a nonlinear limit. Using the calibration of the optomechanical coupling, we quantify the mechanical Duffing nonlinearity. By increasing the drive force, we observe a decrease in the mechanical dissipation rate at large amplitudes, suggesting a negative nonlinear damping mechanism in the graphene resonator. Increasing the optomechanical backaction further, we observe instabilities in the mechanical response.

  11. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  12. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  13. Synthetic RR Lyrae velocity curves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianxing Boston Univ., MA )

    1991-02-01

    An amplitude correlation between the pulsation velocity curves and visual light curves of ab-type RR Lyrae stars is derived from a large number of RR Lyrae that have high-precision radial-velocity and photometric data. Based on the determined AVp, AV ralation, a synthetic radial-velocity curve for a typical ab-type RR Lyrae star is constructed. This would be of particular use in determining the systemic velocities of RR Lyrae. 17 refs.

  14. Photorefractive surface nonlinearly chirped waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Pengfei; Feng, Tianrun; Wang, Sainan; Han, Rong; Hu, Zhijian; Zhang, Tianhao; Tian, Jianguo; Xu, Jingjun

    2016-05-01

    We report an alternate type of nonlinear waveguides, photorefractive surface nonlinearly chirped waveguide arrays, which can be directly induced by photorefractive surface waves in virtue of diffusion and drift nonlinearities. The amplitude of such nonlinearly chirped waveguide arrays has an apodized envelope owing to the diffusion nonlinearity. The refractive-index change of the apodized tails converges to a nonzero value which can be handily adjusted by an external electric field. Moreover, the chirp parameters such as amplitude, sign (positive or negative), and initial position can be conveniently adjusted by an external electric field, background illumination, incident beam, etc. Then the guided-wave properties of this type of waveguide arrays are analyzed by using the transfer matrix method. Owing to the flexible tail and the nonlinear chirp, the dispersion curves of the index-guided modes can be tailored by an external electric field and the dispersion curves of ordinary and extraordinary Bragg guided modes couple, intertwine, and anticross with each other. Meanwhile, there is a clear "competition" in the coupling hybrid mode near anticrossing.

  15. Nonlinear acoustic techniques for landmine detection.

    PubMed

    Korman, Murray S; Sabatier, James M

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the top surface vibration of a buried (inert) VS 2.2 anti-tank plastic landmine reveal significant resonances in the frequency range between 80 and 650 Hz. Resonances from measurements of the normal component of the acoustically induced soil surface particle velocity (due to sufficient acoustic-to-seismic coupling) have been used in detection schemes. Since the interface between the top plate and the soil responds nonlinearly to pressure fluctuations, characteristics of landmines, the soil, and the interface are rich in nonlinear physics and allow for a method of buried landmine detection not previously exploited. Tuning curve experiments (revealing "softening" and a back-bone curve linear in particle velocity amplitude versus frequency) help characterize the nonlinear resonant behavior of the soil-landmine oscillator. The results appear to exhibit the characteristics of nonlinear mesoscopic elastic behavior, which is explored. When two primary waves f1 and f2 drive the soil over the mine near resonance, a rich spectrum of nonlinearly generated tones is measured with a geophone on the surface over the buried landmine in agreement with Donskoy [SPIE Proc. 3392, 221-217 (1998); 3710, 239-246 (1999)]. In profiling, particular nonlinear tonals can improve the contrast ratio compared to using either primary tone in the spectrum. PMID:15658688

  16. A miniature remote deadweight calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Tcheng, Ping

    A miniature, computer-controlled, deadweight calibrator was developed to remotely calibrate a force transducer mounted in a cryogenic chamber. This simple mechanism allows automatic loading and unloading of deadweights placed onto a skin friction balance during calibrations. Equipment for the calibrator includes a specially designed set of five interlocking 200-milligram weights, a motorized lifting platform, and a controller box taking commands from a microcomputer on an IEEE interface. The computer is also used to record and reduce the calibration data and control other calibration parameters. The full-scale load for this device is 1,000 milligrams; however, the concept can be extended to accommodate other calibration ranges.

  17. The molecular branching ratio method for calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The intensity distribution of bands belonging to six molecular band systems is discussed with special emphasis on their usefulness for intensity calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet (1000A Lambda 3000A). The theory of molecular band intensities is outlined and the technique of measuring the spectral response curve is described. Several methods for establishing an absolute intensity calibration are discussed.

  18. Objective calibration of regional climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellprat, O.; Kotlarski, S.; Lüthi, D.; SchäR, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate models are subject to high parametric uncertainty induced by poorly confined model parameters of parameterized physical processes. Uncertain model parameters are typically calibrated in order to increase the agreement of the model with available observations. The common practice is to adjust uncertain model parameters manually, often referred to as expert tuning, which lacks objectivity and transparency in the use of observations. These shortcomings often haze model inter-comparisons and hinder the implementation of new model parameterizations. Methods which would allow to systematically calibrate model parameters are unfortunately often not applicable to state-of-the-art climate models, due to computational constraints facing the high dimensionality and non-linearity of the problem. Here we present an approach to objectively calibrate a regional climate model, using reanalysis driven simulations and building upon a quadratic metamodel presented by Neelin et al. (2010) that serves as a computationally cheap surrogate of the model. Five model parameters originating from different parameterizations are selected for the optimization according to their influence on the model performance. The metamodel accurately estimates spatial averages of 2 m temperature, precipitation and total cloud cover, with an uncertainty of similar magnitude as the internal variability of the regional climate model. The non-linearities of the parameter perturbations are well captured, such that only a limited number of 20-50 simulations are needed to estimate optimal parameter settings. Parameter interactions are small, which allows to further reduce the number of simulations. In comparison to an ensemble of the same model which has undergone expert tuning, the calibration yields similar optimal model configurations, but leading to an additional reduction of the model error. The performance range captured is much wider than sampled with the expert-tuned ensemble and the presented

  19. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine; Allen, Arrington E.

    2013-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was completed in 2012 following the major modifications to the facility that included replacement of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. The calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT.

  20. Targetless Camera Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, L.; Mussio, L.; Remondino, F.; Scaioni, M.

    2011-09-01

    In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  1. Automatic beamline calibration procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Lee, M.J.; Zambre, Y.

    1992-03-01

    Recent experience with the SLC and SPEAR accelerators have led to a well-defined set of procedures for calibration of the beamline model using the orbit fitting program, RESOLVE. Difference orbit analysis is used to calibrate quadrupole strengths, BPM sensitivities, corrector strengths, focusing effects from insertion devices, and to determine the source of dispersion and coupling errors. Absolute orbit analysis is used to locate quadrupole misalignments, BPM offsets, or beam loss. For light source applications, the photon beam source coordinates can be found. The result is an accurate model of the accelerator which can be used for machine control. In this paper, automatable beamline calibration procedures are outlined and illustrated with recent examples. 5 refs.

  2. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  3. New Nonlinear Multigrid Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Dexuan

    1996-01-01

    The nonlinear multigrid is an efficient algorithm for solving the system of nonlinear equations arising from the numerical discretization of nonlinear elliptic boundary problems. In this paper, we present a new nonlinear multigrid analysis as an extension of the linear multigrid theory presented by Bramble. In particular, we prove the convergence of the nonlinear V-cycle method for a class of mildly nonlinear second order elliptic boundary value problems which do not have full elliptic regularity.

  4. State-variable analysis of non-linear circuits with a desk computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, E.

    1981-01-01

    State variable analysis was used to analyze the transient performance of non-linear circuits on a desk top computer. The non-linearities considered were not restricted to any circuit element. All that is required for analysis is the relationship defining each non-linearity be known in terms of points on a curve.

  5. Nonlinear optical propagation in a tandem structure comprising nonlinear absorption and scattering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kangpeng; Ju, Yongfeng; He, Jin; Zhang, Long E-mail: lzhang@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Jun E-mail: lzhang@siom.ac.cn; Chen, Yu; Blau, Werner J.

    2014-01-13

    Laser propagation in a tandem structure comprising carbon nanotubes and phthalocyanines is studied by Z-scan method. Due to the different mechanisms of the two materials, the laser beam can be attenuated with different absorptivities, by changing the sequence of light passing through each material. Numerical simulations considering the effect of path length and the change of nonlinear coefficient within each material are conducted for understanding the distribution of laser intensity in the tandem system and hence, fitting of the asymmetric Z-scan curves. The results are helpful for the design of nonlinear optical devices comprising multiple nonlinear materials and mechanisms.

  6. Calibration method for angular measurement of moiré patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fan; Bai, Jian; Wang, Kaiwei; Hou, Xiyun; Yao, Jiang

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a high-accuracy calibration method for angular measurement of deformed and curved Moiré patterns, based on template matching algorithm, is presented. We report a feasible and accurate method, based on Talbot interferometry and Moiré deflectometry, to measure long focal-length lenses. Theoretical analysis indicates that the precision of this method is mainly influenced by the angle of Moiré patterns. However, it's difficult to obtain high-accuracy angle of Moiré patterns, since the Moiré patterns derived from experiment are constantly deformed or curved. We demonstrate a method, based on template matching algorithm, to calibrate deformed and curved Moiré patterns, thus their angle can be calculated fast and accurately in sub-pixel domain. Numerical analysis and simulation prove that the method mentioned above demonstrates high precision and stability, and experiment results show that the accuracy of the long focal lengths measurement is improved obviously.

  7. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  8. Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estlin, Tara A.; Chien, Steve A.; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel M.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Schoolcraft, Josua B.; Oyake, Amalaye; Vaughs, Ashton G.; Torgerson, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Adaptive Optics System actively corrects for changing aberrations in light due to atmospheric turbulence. However, the underlying internal static error is unknown and uncorrected by this process. The dedicated wavefront sensor device necessarily lies along a different path than the science camera, and, therefore, doesn't measure the true errors along the path leading to the final detected imagery. This is a standard problem in adaptive optics (AO) called "non-common path error." The Autonomous Phase Retrieval Calibration (APRC) software suite performs automated sensing and correction iterations to calibrate the Palomar AO system to levels that were previously unreachable.

  9. Paschen Curve Observations at Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, Chip; Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven; Massarczyk, Ralph; Chu, Pinghan

    2015-10-01

    Paschen's Law states an equation giving the relationship between variables involved when forming an electrical arc between two conductive objects, otherwise known as the breakdown voltage. This equation for the breakdown voltage VB is as follows: VB =apd/ln (pd) + b where p is the pressure in Atmospheres (or Bar), d is the gap or distance between the two conductive objects, and both a and b are constants that depend on the composition of the gas. In our experiment, the Paschen curve for gases (such as nitrogen) at temperatures lower than -200 degrees Celsius will be measured. The Paschen curve for air at room temperature will also be measured in order to test and calibrate our system. The goal of this experiment is to test how accurately Paschen's Law can predict the breakdown voltage in these specific, cold conditions. This experiment is being performed to gather information for a possible future experiment, which might use high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in a similar cold environment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. This work is being supported by the DOE through the LANL LDRD program. Charles ``Chip'' Dugger, Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.

  10. Camera calibration based on the back projection process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Ma, Yueyang; Bu, Penghui

    2015-12-01

    Camera calibration plays a crucial role in 3D measurement tasks of machine vision. In typical calibration processes, camera parameters are iteratively optimized in the forward imaging process (FIP). However, the results can only guarantee the minimum of 2D projection errors on the image plane, but not the minimum of 3D reconstruction errors. In this paper, we propose a universal method for camera calibration, which uses the back projection process (BPP). In our method, a forward projection model is used to obtain initial intrinsic and extrinsic parameters with a popular planar checkerboard pattern. Then, the extracted image points are projected back into 3D space and compared with the ideal point coordinates. Finally, the estimation of the camera parameters is refined by a non-linear function minimization process. The proposed method can obtain a more accurate calibration result, which is more physically useful. Simulation and practical data are given to demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  11. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  12. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Resistive MHD equilibrium, even for small resistivity, differs greatly from ideal equilibrium, as do the dynamical consequences of its instabilities. The requirement, imposed by Faraday`s law, that time independent magnetic fields imply curl-free electric fields, greatly restricts the electric fields allowed inside a finite-resistivity plasma. If there is no flow and the implications of the Ohm`s law are taken into account (and they need not be, for ideal equilibria), the electric field must equal the resistivity times the current density. The vanishing of the divergence of the current density then provides a partial differential equation which, together with boundary conditions, uniquely determines the scalar potential, the electric field, and the current density, for any given resistivity profile. The situation parallels closely that of driven shear flows in hydrodynamics, in that while dissipative steady states are somewhat more complex than ideal ones, there are vastly fewer of them to consider. Seen in this light, the vast majority of ideal MHD equilibria are just irrelevant, incapable of being set up in the first place. The steady state whose stability thresholds and nonlinear behavior needs to be investigated ceases to be an arbitrary ad hoc exercise dependent upon the whim of the investigator, but is determined by boundary conditions and choice of resistivity profile.

  13. Calibration of a catchment scale cosmic-ray probe network: A comparison of three parameterization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatz, R.; Bogena, H. R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Huisman, J. A.; Qu, W.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the accuracy of soil water content determination from neutron flux measured by cosmic-ray probes under humid climate conditions. Ten cosmic-ray probes were set up in the Rur catchment located in western Germany, and calibrated by gravimetric soil sampling campaigns. Aboveground biomass was estimated at the sites to investigate the role of vegetation cover on the neutron flux and the calibration procedure. Three parameterization methods were used to generate site-specific neutron flux - soil water content calibration curves: (i) the N0-method, (ii) the hydrogen molar fraction method (hmf-method), and (iii) the COSMIC-method. At five locations, calibration measurements were repeated to evaluate site-specific calibration parameters obtained in two different sampling campaigns. At two locations, soil water content determined by cosmic-ray probes was evaluated with horizontally and vertically weighted soil water content measurements of two distributed in situ soil water content sensor networks. All three methods were successfully calibrated to determine field scale soil water content continuously at the ten sites. The hmf-method and the COSMIC-method had more similar calibration curves than the N0-method. The three methods performed similarly well in the validation and errors were within the uncertainty of neutron flux measurements despite observed differences in the calibration curves and variable model complexity. In addition, we found that the obtained calibration parameters NCOSMIC, N0 and NS showed a strong correlation with aboveground biomass.

  14. Digital-voltage curve generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1970-01-01

    Curve generator capable of producing precisely repeatable curve for any single-valued function of voltage versus time uses digital approach, implemented by means of clocked feedback shift register, large scale integrated circuit diode matrix comprising about 12,000 diodes, counter, and digital-to-analog converter.

  15. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  16. The Estimation of Branching Curves in the Presence of Subject-Specific Random Effects

    PubMed Central

    Elmi, Angelo; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Branching curves are a technique for modeling curves that change trajectory at a change (branching) point. Currently, the estimation framework is limited to independent data, and smoothing splines are used for estimation. This article aims to extend the branching curve framework to the longitudinal data setting where the branching point varies by subject. If the branching point is modeled as a random effect, then the longitudinal branching curve framework is a Semiparametric Nonlinear Mixed Effects Model. Given existing issues with using random effects within a smoothing spline, we express the model as a B-spline Based Semiparametric Nonlinear Mixed Effects Model. Simple, clever smoothness constraints are enforced on the B-splines at the change point. The method is applied to Women’s Health data where we model the shape of the labor curve (cervical dilation measured longitudinally) before and after treatment with oxytocin (a labor stimulant). PMID:25196299

  17. Effects of model sensitivity and nonlinearity on nonlinear regression of ground water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear regression is increasingly applied to the calibration of hydrologic models through the use of perturbation methods to compute the Jacobian or sensitivity matrix required by the Gauss-Newton optimization method. Sensitivities obtained by perturbation methods can be less accurate than those obtained by direct differentiation, however, and concern has arisen that the optimal parameter values and the associated parameter covariance matrix computed by perturbation could also be less accurate. Sensitivities computed by both perturbation and direct differentiation were applied in nonlinear regression calibration of seven ground water flow models. The two methods gave virtually identical optimum parameter values and covariances for the three models that were relatively linear and two of the models that were relatively nonlinear, but gave widely differing results for two other nonlinear models. The perturbation method performed better than direct differentiation in some regressions with the nonlinear models, apparently because approximate sensitivities computed for an interval yielded better search directions than did more accurately computed sensitivities for a point. The method selected to avoid overshooting minima on the error surface when updating parameter values with the Gauss-Newton procedure appears for nonlinear models to be more important than the method of sensitivity calculation in controlling regression convergence.

  18. p-Curve and p-Hacking in Observational Research

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Stephan B.; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The p-curve, the distribution of statistically significant p-values of published studies, has been used to make inferences on the proportion of true effects and on the presence of p-hacking in the published literature. We analyze the p-curve for observational research in the presence of p-hacking. We show by means of simulations that even with minimal omitted-variable bias (e.g., unaccounted confounding) p-curves based on true effects and p-curves based on null-effects with p-hacking cannot be reliably distinguished. We also demonstrate this problem using as practical example the evaluation of the effect of malaria prevalence on economic growth between 1960 and 1996. These findings call recent studies into question that use the p-curve to infer that most published research findings are based on true effects in the medical literature and in a wide range of disciplines. p-values in observational research may need to be empirically calibrated to be interpretable with respect to the commonly used significance threshold of 0.05. Violations of randomization in experimental studies may also result in situations where the use of p-curves is similarly unreliable. PMID:26886098

  19. p-Curve and p-Hacking in Observational Research.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Stephan B; Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-01-01

    The p-curve, the distribution of statistically significant p-values of published studies, has been used to make inferences on the proportion of true effects and on the presence of p-hacking in the published literature. We analyze the p-curve for observational research in the presence of p-hacking. We show by means of simulations that even with minimal omitted-variable bias (e.g., unaccounted confounding) p-curves based on true effects and p-curves based on null-effects with p-hacking cannot be reliably distinguished. We also demonstrate this problem using as practical example the evaluation of the effect of malaria prevalence on economic growth between 1960 and 1996. These findings call recent studies into question that use the p-curve to infer that most published research findings are based on true effects in the medical literature and in a wide range of disciplines. p-values in observational research may need to be empirically calibrated to be interpretable with respect to the commonly used significance threshold of 0.05. Violations of randomization in experimental studies may also result in situations where the use of p-curves is similarly unreliable. PMID:26886098

  20. The Lunar Phase Curve in the Near Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, A. R.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from an ongoing program to perform UV measurements (215.0 and 237.0 nm) of the Moon at varying solar phase angles to understand the lunar phase curve at ultraviolet wavelengths. We use new observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVS) aboard the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) combined with existing observations from the Galileo UVS. The lunar UV phase curve can be used to further understand the scattering properties of the lunar surface. The Moon's scattering properties at visible wavelengths are well understood; studying scattering properties at shorter wavelengths may provide insight into the roles of volume scattering vs. surface scattering and how weathering processes may affect scattering properties. The UV lunar phase curve can also be helpful for UV observers, as the Moon is often used as a UV calibration source, but the UV brightness variation with phase angle has not been well understood.

  1. The light curve of HD 200925

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuPuy, D. L.

    1981-02-01

    The light curve of the star HD 200925 is investigated based on an analysis of published photoelectric observations. A preliminary search of the data for periodicities using the Jurkevich period search method indicates a period of 0.267 days, although the observations reported by Bedolla and Pe a (1979) for the night of September 26-27, 1978 are systematically brighter by about 0.08 magnitudes than the other observations. A nonlinear least squares fit of the values of the period, approximate amplitude (0.4 magnitude) and phase angle of the periodicity (0.9 radian) derived to a sinusoid is shown to differ significantly from the data obtained on the nights of September 24-25, 25-26 and 27-28, 1978, although confirming the period of 0.2672 days. Data also suggest the presence of a secondary period of 0.36 days, which, however, may rather be due to the asymmetry of the observed light curve.

  2. SAR calibration: A technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Politis, D. T.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Various potential applications of amplitude-calibrated SAR systems are briefly described, along with an estimate of calibration performance requirements. A review of the basic SAR calibration problem is given. For background purposes and to establish consistent definition of terms, various conventional SAR performance parameters are reviewed along with three additional parameters which are directly related to calibrated SAR systems. Techniques for calibrating a SAR are described. Included in the results presented are: calibration philosophy and procedures; review of the calibration signal generator technology development with results describing both the development of instrumentation and internal calibration measurements for two SAR systems; summary of analysis and measurements required to determine optimum retroreflector design and configuration for use as a reference for the absolute calibration of a SAR system; and summary of techniques for in-flight measurements of SAR antenna response.

  3. Primer on multivariate calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.V. )

    1994-08-01

    In analytical chemistry, calibration is the procedure that relates instrumental measurements to an analyte of interest. Typically, instrumental measurements are obtained from specimens in which the amount (or level) of the analyte has been determined by some independent and inherently accurate assay (e.g., wet chemistry). Together, the instrumental measurements and results from the independent assays are used to construct a model that relates the analyte level to the instrumental measurements. The advent of high-speed digital computers has greatly increased data acquisition and analysis capabilities and has provided the analytical chemist with opportunities to use many measurements - perhaps hundreds - for calibrating an instrument (e.g., absorbances at multiple wave-lengths). To take advantage of this technology, however, new methods (i.e., multivariate calibration methods) were needed for analyzing and modeling the experimental data. The purpose of this report is to introduce several evolving multivariate calibration methods and to present some important issues regarding their use. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  5. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  6. Calibration issues for MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelz, Andreas; Roth, Martin; Bauer, Svend; Gerssen, Joris; Hahn, Thomas; Weilbacher, Peter; Laux, Uwe; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; McDermid, Richard; Bacon, Roland

    2008-07-01

    The Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) is an integral-field spectrograph for the VLT for the next decade. Using an innovative field-splitting and slicing design, combined with an assembly of 24 spectrographs, MUSE will provide some 90,000 spectra in one exposure, which cover a simultaneous spectral range from 465 to 930nm. The design and manufacture of the Calibration Unit, the alignment tests of the Spectrograph and Detector sub-systems, and the development of the Data Reduction Software for MUSE are work-packages under the responsibility of the AIP, who is a partner in a European-wide consortium of 6 institutes and ESO, that is led by the Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon. MUSE will be operated and therefore has to be calibrated in a variety of modes, which include seeing-limited and AO-assisted operations, providing a wide and narrow-field-of-view. MUSE aims to obtain unprecedented ultra-deep 3D-spectroscopic exposures, involving integration times of the order of 80 hours at the VLT. To achieve the corresponding science goals, instrumental stability, accurate calibration and adequate data reduction tools are needed. The paper describes the status at PDR of the AIP related work-packages, in particular with respect to the spatial, spectral, image quality, and geometrical calibration and related data reduction aspects.

  7. Pseudo Linear Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    Previous high fidelity onboard attitude algorithms estimated only the spacecraft attitude and gyro bias. The desire to promote spacecraft and ground autonomy and improvements in onboard computing power has spurred development of more sophisticated calibration algorithms. Namely, there is a desire to provide for sensor calibration through calibration parameter estimation onboard the spacecraft as well as autonomous estimation on the ground. Gyro calibration is a particularly challenging area of research. There are a variety of gyro devices available for any prospective mission ranging from inexpensive low fidelity gyros with potentially unstable scale factors to much more expensive extremely stable high fidelity units. Much research has been devoted to designing dedicated estimators such as particular Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) algorithms or Square Root Information Filters. This paper builds upon previous attitude, rate, and specialized gyro parameter estimation work performed with Pseudo Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). The PSELIKA advantage is the use of the standard linear Kalman Filter algorithm. A PSELIKA algorithm for an orthogonal gyro set which includes estimates of attitude, rate, gyro misalignments, gyro scale factors, and gyro bias is developed and tested using simulated and flight data. The measurements PSELIKA uses include gyro and quaternion tracker data.

  8. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  9. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  10. Commodity-Free Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Commodity-free calibration is a reaction rate calibration technique that does not require the addition of any commodities. This technique is a specific form of the reaction rate technique, where all of the necessary reactants, other than the sample being analyzed, are either inherent in the analyzing system or specifically added or provided to the system for a reason other than calibration. After introduction, the component of interest is exposed to other reactants or flow paths already present in the system. The instrument detector records one of the following to determine the rate of reaction: the increase in the response of the reaction product, a decrease in the signal of the analyte response, or a decrease in the signal from the inherent reactant. With this data, the initial concentration of the analyte is calculated. This type of system can analyze and calibrate simultaneously, reduce the risk of false positives and exposure to toxic vapors, and improve accuracy. Moreover, having an excess of the reactant already present in the system eliminates the need to add commodities, which further reduces cost, logistic problems, and potential contamination. Also, the calculations involved can be simplified by comparison to those of the reaction rate technique. We conducted tests with hypergols as an initial investigation into the feasiblility of the technique.

  11. Thermistor mount efficiency calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Thermistor mount efficiency calibration is accomplished by use of the power equation concept and by complex signal-ratio measurements. A comparison of thermistor mounts at microwave frequencies is made by mixing the reference and the reflected signals to produce a frequency at which the amplitude and phase difference may be readily measured.

  12. LOFAR Facet Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; Sabater, J.; Heald, G.; Sridhar, S. S.; Dijkema, T. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rudnick, L.; Sarazin, C. L.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Ensslin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    LOFAR, the Low-Frequency Array, is a powerful new radio telescope operating between 10 and 240 MHz. LOFAR allows detailed sensitive high-resolution studies of the low-frequency radio sky. At the same time LOFAR also provides excellent short baseline coverage to map diffuse extended emission. However, producing high-quality deep images is challenging due to the presence of direction-dependent calibration errors, caused by imperfect knowledge of the station beam shapes and the ionosphere. Furthermore, the large data volume and presence of station clock errors present additional difficulties. In this paper we present a new calibration scheme, which we name facet calibration, to obtain deep high-resolution LOFAR High Band Antenna images using the Dutch part of the array. This scheme solves and corrects the direction-dependent errors in a number of facets that cover the observed field of view. Facet calibration provides close to thermal noise limited images for a typical 8 hr observing run at ∼ 5\\prime\\prime resolution, meeting the specifications of the LOFAR Tier-1 northern survey.

  13. Calibration Of Oxygen Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalenski, M. A.; Rowe, E. L.; Mcphee, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Readings corrected for temperature, pressure, and humidity of air. Program for handheld computer developed to ensure accuracy of oxygen monitors in National Transonic Facility, where liquid nitrogen stored. Calibration values, determined daily, based on entries of data on barometric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity. Output provided directly in millivolts.

  14. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  15. Germanium resistance thermometer calibration at superfluid helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    The rapid increase in resistance of high purity semi-conducting germanium with decreasing temperature in the superfluid helium range of temperatures makes this material highly adaptable as a very sensitive thermometer. Also, a germanium thermometer exhibits a highly reproducible resistance versus temperature characteristic curve upon cycling between liquid helium temperatures and room temperature. These two factors combine to make germanium thermometers ideally suited for measuring temperatures in many cryogenic studies at superfluid helium temperatures. One disadvantage, however, is the relatively high cost of calibrated germanium thermometers. In space helium cryogenic systems, many such thermometers are often required, leading to a high cost for calibrated thermometers. The construction of a thermometer calibration cryostat and probe which will allow for calibrating six germanium thermometers at one time, thus effecting substantial savings in the purchase of thermometers is considered.

  16. Evolvable Cryogenics (ECRYO) Pressure Transducer Calibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Carlos E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings of recent activities conducted by Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) In-Space Propulsion Branch and MSFC's Metrology and Calibration Lab to assess the performance of current "state of the art" pressure transducers for use in long duration storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. A brief historical narrative in this paper describes the Evolvable Cryogenics program and the relevance of these activities to the program. This paper also provides a review of three separate test activities performed throughout this effort, including: (1) the calibration of several pressure transducer designs in a liquid nitrogen cryogenic environmental chamber, (2) the calibration of a pressure transducer in a liquid helium Dewar, and (3) the calibration of several pressure transducers at temperatures ranging from 20 to 70 degrees Kelvin (K) using a "cryostat" environmental chamber. These three separate test activities allowed for study of the sensors along a temperature range from 4 to 300 K. The combined data shows that both the slope and intercept of the sensor's calibration curve vary as a function of temperature. This homogeneous function is contrary to the linearly decreasing relationship assumed at the start of this investigation. Consequently, the data demonstrates the need for lookup tables to change the slope and intercept used by any data acquisition system. This ultimately would allow for more accurate pressure measurements at the desired temperature range. This paper concludes with a review of a request for information (RFI) survey conducted amongst different suppliers to determine the availability of current "state of the art" flight-qualified pressure transducers. The survey identifies requirements that are most difficult for the suppliers to meet, most notably the capability to validate the sensor's performance at temperatures below 70 K.

  17. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  18. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce photometrically calibrated maps from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best calibration accuracy over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated by comparing flux-density measurements of Uranus and Neptune with models of their atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the solar dipole. A component of this anisotropy is time-variable, owing to the orbital motion of the satellite in the solar system. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low-frequency noise removal. By comparing observations taken more than one year apart in the same configuration, we have identified apparent gain variations with time. These variations are induced by non-linearities in the read-out electronics chain. We have developed an effective correction to limit their effect on calibration. We present several methods to estimate the precision of the photometric calibration. We distinguish relative uncertainties (between detectors, or between frequencies) and absolute uncertainties. Absolute uncertainties lie in the range from 0.54% to 10% from 100 to 857 GHz. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps from the HFI timelines, based on the photometric calibration parameters, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also discuss the cross-calibration between HFI and the SPIRE instrument on board Herschel. Finally we summarize the basic characteristics of the set of HFI maps included in the 2013 Planck data release.

  19. Fragility curves of concrete bridges retrofitted by column jacketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Masanobu; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kushiyama, Shigeru; Yi, Jin-Hak

    2002-12-01

    The Northridge earthquake inflicted various levels of damage upon a large number of Caltrans’ bridges not retrofitted by column jacketing. In this respect, this study represents results of fragility curve development for two (2) sample bridges typical in southern California, strengthened for seismic retrofit by means of steel jacketing of bridge columns. Monte Carlo simulation is performed to study nonlinear dynamic responses of the bridges before and after column retrofit. Fragility curves in this study are represented by lognormal distribution functions with two parameters and developed as a function of PGA. The sixty (60) ground acceleration time histories for the Los Angeles area developed for the Federal Emergency Management Agcncy (FEMA) SAC (SEAOC-ATC-CUREe) steel project are used for the dynamic analysis of the bridges. The improvement in the fragility with steel jacketing is quantified by comparing fragility curves of the bridge before and after column retrofit. In this first attempt to formulate the problem of fragility enhancement, the quantification is made by comparing the median values of the fragility curves before and after the retrofit. Under the hypothesis that this quantification also applies to empirical fragility curves developed on the basis of Northridge earthquake damage, the enhanced version of the empirical curves is developed for the ensuing analysis to determine the enhancement of transportation network performance due to the retrofit.

  20. Tracking stochastic resonance curves using an assisted reference model.

    PubMed

    Calderón Ramírez, Mario; Rico Martínez, Ramiro; Ramírez Álvarez, Elizeth; Parmananda, P

    2015-06-01

    The optimal noise amplitude for Stochastic Resonance (SR) is located employing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) reference model with a nonlinear predictive capability. A modified Kalman Filter (KF) was coupled to this reference model in order to compensate for semi-quantitative forecast errors. Three manifestations of stochastic resonance, namely, Periodic Stochastic Resonance (PSR), Aperiodic Stochastic Resonance (ASR), and finally Coherence Resonance (CR) were considered. Using noise amplitude as the control parameter, for the case of PSR and ASR, the cross-correlation curve between the sub-threshold input signal and the system response is tracked. However, using the same parameter the Normalized Variance curve is tracked for the case of CR. The goal of the present work is to track these curves and converge to their respective extremal points. The ANN reference model strategy captures and subsequently predicts the nonlinear features of the model system while the KF compensates for the perturbations inherent to the superimposed noise. This technique, implemented in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, enabled us to track the resonance curves and eventually locate their optimal (extremal) values. This would yield the optimal value of noise for the three manifestations of the SR phenomena. PMID:26117101

  1. Tracking stochastic resonance curves using an assisted reference model

    SciTech Connect

    Calderón Ramírez, Mario; Rico Martínez, Ramiro; Parmananda, P.

    2015-06-15

    The optimal noise amplitude for Stochastic Resonance (SR) is located employing an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) reference model with a nonlinear predictive capability. A modified Kalman Filter (KF) was coupled to this reference model in order to compensate for semi-quantitative forecast errors. Three manifestations of stochastic resonance, namely, Periodic Stochastic Resonance (PSR), Aperiodic Stochastic Resonance (ASR), and finally Coherence Resonance (CR) were considered. Using noise amplitude as the control parameter, for the case of PSR and ASR, the cross-correlation curve between the sub-threshold input signal and the system response is tracked. However, using the same parameter the Normalized Variance curve is tracked for the case of CR. The goal of the present work is to track these curves and converge to their respective extremal points. The ANN reference model strategy captures and subsequently predicts the nonlinear features of the model system while the KF compensates for the perturbations inherent to the superimposed noise. This technique, implemented in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, enabled us to track the resonance curves and eventually locate their optimal (extremal) values. This would yield the optimal value of noise for the three manifestations of the SR phenomena.

  2. Shaping the learning curve: epigenetic dynamics in neural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bronfman, Zohar Z.; Ginsburg, Simona; Jablonka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of learning and neural plasticity is state-dependent acquisition dynamics reflected by the non-linear learning curve that links increase in learning with practice. Here we propose that the manner by which epigenetic states of individual cells change during learning contributes to the shape of the neural and behavioral learning curve. We base our suggestion on recent studies showing that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and RNA-mediated gene regulation are intimately involved in the establishment and maintenance of long-term neural plasticity, reflecting specific learning-histories and influencing future learning. Our model, which is the first to suggest a dynamic molecular account of the shape of the learning curve, leads to several testable predictions regarding the link between epigenetic dynamics at the promoter, gene-network, and neural-network levels. This perspective opens up new avenues for therapeutic interventions in neurological pathologies. PMID:25071483

  3. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  4. Calibration Technique for Polarization-Sensitive Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hung, W. H.; Winker, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive lidars have proven to be highly effective in discriminating between spherical and non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. These lidars use a linearly polarized laser and are equipped with a receiver that can separately measure the components of the return signal polarized parallel and perpendicular to the outgoing beam. In this work we describe a technique for calibrating polarization-sensitive lidars that was originally developed at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) and has been used continually over the past fifteen years. The procedure uses a rotatable half-wave plate inserted into the optical path of the lidar receiver to introduce controlled amounts of polarization cross-talk into a sequence of atmospheric backscatter measurements. Solving the resulting system of nonlinear equations generates the system calibration constants (gain ratio, G, and offset angle, theta) required for deriving calibrated measurements of depolarization ratio from the lidar signals. In addition, this procedure also determines the mean depolarization ratio within the region of the atmosphere that is analyzed. Simulations and error propagation studies show the method to be both reliable and well behaved. Operational details of the technique are illustrated using measurements obtained as part of Langley Research Center s participation in the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE).

  5. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects.

  6. Poiseuille flow in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Debus, J-D; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2016-04-01

    We investigate Poiseuille channel flow through intrinsically curved media, equipped with localized metric perturbations. To this end, we study the flux of a fluid driven through the curved channel in dependence of the spatial deformation, characterized by the parameters of the metric perturbations (amplitude, range, and density). We find that the flux depends only on a specific combination of parameters, which we identify as the average metric perturbation, and derive a universal flux law for the Poiseuille flow. For the purpose of this study, we have improved and validated our recently developed lattice Boltzmann model in curved space by considerably reducing discrete lattice effects. PMID:27176437

  7. Calibration of exposure dose for nanoscale plasmonic lithography with microsized far-field spot patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dandan; Park, Changhoon; Jung, Howon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the reliability of a plasmonic lithography system for nanoscale device fabrication, a rapid calibration process is essentially required. The calibration needs a time-consuming process using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure a number of nano-sized spot pattern widths recorded for the variation of the exposure dose. On the basis of the underlying mechanisms of a propagating field through a bowtie aperture, we conducted a theoretical study to derive a fitting equation to predict the widths of spot patterns in a near-field region compared with those in the far-field region. We obtained a calibration curve of the exposure dose to fit the width of spot pattern in the far-field region that is measureable using an optical microscope (OM). The validity of the rapid calibration process using an OM was verified by comparison between the calibration curves determined using AFM and OM, and the uncertainty between them was found to be 3.4%. The drift of the calibration curve was further explored to calculate the system stability of the plasmonic lithography technique, which was estimated to be  >93%. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the calibration curve is effective in the prediction of the exposure dose for nanoscale line patterning.

  8. Calibration improvements to electronically scanned pressure systems and preliminary statistical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.

    1996-01-01

    Orifice-to-orifice inconsistencies in data acquired with an electronically-scanned pressure system at the beginning of a wind tunnel experiment forced modifications to the standard, instrument calibration procedures. These modifications included a large increase in the number of calibration points which would allow a critical examination of the calibration curve-fit process, and a subsequent post-test reduction of the pressure data. Evaluation of these data has resulted in an improved functional representation of the pressure-voltage signature for electronically-scanned pressures sensors, which can reduce the errors due to calibration curve fit to under 0.10 percent of reading compared to the manufacturer specified 0.10 percent of full scale. Application of the improved calibration function allows a more rational selection of the calibration set-point pressures. These pressures should be adjusted to achieve a voltage output which matches the physical shape of the pressure-voltage signature of the sensor. This process is conducted in lieu of the more traditional approach where a calibration pressure is specified and the resulting sensor voltage is recorded. The fifteen calibrations acquired over the two-week duration of the wind tunnel test were further used to perform a preliminary, statistical assessment of the variation in the calibration process. The results allowed the estimation of the bias uncertainty for a single instrument calibration; and, they form the precursor for more extensive and more controlled studies in the laboratory.

  9. Multi-fidelity approach to dynamics model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Absi, Ghina N.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the use of structural dynamics computational models with multiple levels of fidelity in the calibration of system parameters. Different types of models may be available for the estimation of unmeasured system properties, with different levels of physics fidelity, mesh resolution and boundary condition assumptions. In order to infer these system properties, Bayesian calibration uses information from multiple sources (including experimental data and prior knowledge), and comprehensively quantifies the uncertainty in the calibration parameters. Estimating the posteriors is done using Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling, which requires a large number of computations, thus making the use of a high-fidelity model for calibration prohibitively expensive. On the other hand, use of a low-fidelity model could lead to significant error in calibration and prediction. Therefore, this paper develops an approach for model parameter calibration with a low-fidelity model corrected using higher fidelity simulations, and investigates the trade-off between accuracy and computational effort. The methodology is illustrated for a curved panel located in the vicinity of a hypersonic aircraft engine, subjected to acoustic loading. Two models (a frequency response analysis and a full time history analysis) are combined to calibrate the damping characteristics of the panel.

  10. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Illing, Sebastian; Kern, Christoph; Alvarez Nieves, Jose Manuel; Vogel, Leif; Zielcke, Johannes; Delgados Granados, Hugo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different, calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells). Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOVDOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (I-DOAS), are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The respective results are compared with measurements from an I-DOAS to verify the calibration curve over the spatial extent of the image. The results show that calibration cells, while working fine in some cases, can lead to an overestimation of the SO2 CD by up to 60% compared with CDs from the DOAS measurements. Besides these errors of calibration, radiative transfer effects (e.g. light dilution, multiple scattering) can significantly influence the results of both instrument types. The measurements presented in this work were taken at Popocatepetl, Mexico, between 1 March 2011 and 4 March 2011. Average SO2 emission rates between 4.00 and 14.34 kg s−1 were observed.

  11. Non-linearity measurements of solar cells with an LED-based combinatorial flux addition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadani, Behrang H.; Shore, Andrew; Roller, John; Yoon, Howard W.; Campanelli, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We present a light emitting diode (LED)-based system utilizing a combinatorial flux addition method to investigate the non-linear relationship in solar cells between the output current of the cell and the incident irradiance level. The magnitude of the light flux is controlled by the supplied currents to two LEDs (or two sets of them) in a combinatorial fashion. The signals measured from the cell are arranged within a related overdetermined linear system of equations derived from an appropriately chosen Nth degree polynomial representing the relationship between the measured signals and the incident fluxes. The flux values and the polynomial coefficients are then solved for by linear least squares to obtain the best fit. The technique can be applied to any solar cell, under either monochromatic or broadband spectrum. For the unscaled solution, no reference detectors or prior calibrations of the light flux are required. However, if at least one calibrated irradiance value is known, then the entire curve can be scaled to an appropriate spectral responsivity value. Using this technique, a large number of data points can be obtained in a relatively short time scale over a large signal range.

  12. Linking Parameters Estimated with the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model: A Comparison of the Accuracy of Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson Koenig, Judith; Roberts, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for linking item response theory (IRT) parameters are developed for attitude questionnaire responses calibrated with the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). One class of IRT linking methods derives the linking coefficients by comparing characteristic curves, and three of these methods---test characteristic curve (TCC), item…

  13. The Calibration Reference Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, P.; Miller, T.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a software architecture and implementation for using rules to determine which calibration files are appropriate for calibrating a given observation. This new system, the Calibration Reference Data System (CRDS), replaces what had been previously used for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) calibration pipelines, the Calibration Database System (CDBS). CRDS will be used for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) calibration pipelines, and is currently being used for HST calibration pipelines. CRDS can be easily generalized for use in similar applications that need a rules-based system for selecting the appropriate item for a given dataset; we give some examples of such generalizations that will likely be used for JWST. The core functionality of the Calibration Reference Data System is available under an Open Source license. CRDS is briefly contrasted with a sampling of other similar systems used at other observatories.

  14. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  15. Pipeline Calibration for STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Hulbert, S. J.; Lindler, D.; Busko, I.; Hsu, J.-C.; Baum, S.; McGrath, M.; Goudfrooij, P.; Shaw, R.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; Bohlin, R.

    The CALSTIS program for calibration of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph data in the OPUS pipeline differs in several significant ways from calibration for earlier HST instruments, such as the use of FITS format, computation of error estimates, and association of related exposures. Several steps are now done in the pipeline that previously had to be done off-line by the user, such as cosmic ray rejection and extraction of 1-D spectra. Although the program is linked with IRAF for image and table I/O, it is written in ANSI C rather than SPP, which should make the code more accessible. FITS extension I/O makes use of the new IRAF FITS kernel for images and the HEASARC FITSIO package for tables.

  16. Multivariate Regression with Calibration*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method named calibrated multivariate regression (CMR) for fitting high dimensional multivariate regression models. Compared to existing methods, CMR calibrates the regularization for each regression task with respect to its noise level so that it is simultaneously tuning insensitive and achieves an improved finite-sample performance. Computationally, we develop an efficient smoothed proximal gradient algorithm which has a worst-case iteration complexity O(1/ε), where ε is a pre-specified numerical accuracy. Theoretically, we prove that CMR achieves the optimal rate of convergence in parameter estimation. We illustrate the usefulness of CMR by thorough numerical simulations and show that CMR consistently outperforms other high dimensional multivariate regression methods. We also apply CMR on a brain activity prediction problem and find that CMR is as competitive as the handcrafted model created by human experts. PMID:25620861

  17. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  18. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  19. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  20. Parabolic curves in Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Pauley, Michael

    2010-05-15

    To interpolate a sequence of points in Euclidean space, parabolic splines can be used. These are curves which are piecewise quadratic. To interpolate between points in a (semi-)Riemannian manifold, we could look for curves such that the second covariant derivative of the velocity is zero. We call such curves Jupp and Kent quadratics or JK-quadratics because they are a special case of the cubic curves advocated by Jupp and Kent. When the manifold is a Lie group with bi-invariant metric, we can relate JK-quadratics to null Lie quadratics which arise from another interpolation problem. We solve JK-quadratics in the Lie groups SO(3) and SO(1,2) and in the sphere and hyperbolic plane, by relating them to the differential equation for a quantum harmonic oscillator00.

  1. A method for nonlinear exponential regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkin, B. G.

    1971-01-01

    A computer-oriented technique is presented for performing a nonlinear exponential regression analysis on decay-type experimental data. The technique involves the least squares procedure wherein the nonlinear problem is linearized by expansion in a Taylor series. A linear curve fitting procedure for determining the initial nominal estimates for the unknown exponential model parameters is included as an integral part of the technique. A correction matrix was derived and then applied to the nominal estimate to produce an improved set of model parameters. The solution cycle is repeated until some predetermined criterion is satisfied.

  2. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  3. Calibration of Germanium Resistance Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladner, D.; Urban, E.; Mason, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Largely completed thermometer-calibration cryostat and probe allows six germanium resistance thermometers to be calibrated at one time at superfluid-helium temperatures. In experiments involving several such thermometers, use of this calibration apparatus results in substantial cost savings. Cryostat maintains temperature less than 2.17 K through controlled evaporation and removal of liquid helium from Dewar. Probe holds thermometers to be calibrated and applies small amount of heat as needed to maintain precise temperature below 2.17 K.

  4. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  5. Calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorefice, Salvatore; Malengo, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    After a brief description of the different methods employed in periodic calibration of hydrometers used in most cases to measure the density of liquids in the range between 500 kg m-3 and 2000 kg m-3, particular emphasis is given to the multipoint procedure based on hydrostatic weighing, known as well as Cuckow's method. The features of the calibration apparatus and the procedure used at the INRiM (formerly IMGC-CNR) density laboratory have been considered to assess all relevant contributions involved in the calibration of different kinds of hydrometers. The uncertainty is strongly dependent on the kind of hydrometer; in particular, the results highlight the importance of the density of the reference buoyant liquid, the temperature of calibration and the skill of operator in the reading of the scale in the whole assessment of the uncertainty. It is also interesting to realize that for high-resolution hydrometers (division of 0.1 kg m-3), the uncertainty contribution of the density of the reference liquid is the main source of the total uncertainty, but its importance falls under about 50% for hydrometers with a division of 0.5 kg m-3 and becomes somewhat negligible for hydrometers with a division of 1 kg m-3, for which the reading uncertainty is the predominant part of the total uncertainty. At present the best INRiM result is obtained with commercially available hydrometers having a scale division of 0.1 kg m-3, for which the relative uncertainty is about 12 × 10-6.

  6. Program Calibrates Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okazaki, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    Program dramatically reduces personnel and time requirements for acceptance tests of hardware. Data-acquisition system reads output from Wheatstone full-bridge strain-gauge circuit and calculates strain by use of shunt calibration technique. Program nearly instantaneously tabulates and plots strain data against load-cell outputs. Modified to acquire strain data for other specimens wherever full-bridge strain-gauge circuits used. Written in HP BASIC.

  7. Calibration Facilities for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, T.S.

    2000-06-15

    The calibration facilities will be dynamic and will change to meet the needs of experiments. Small sources, such as the Manson Source should be available to everyone at any time. Carrying out experiments at Omega is providing ample opportunity for practice in pre-shot preparation. Hopefully, the needs that are demonstrated in these experiments will assure the development of (or keep in service) facilities at each of the laboratories that will be essential for in-house preparation for experiments at NIF.

  8. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  9. [Quality control dose calibrators].

    PubMed

    Montoza Aguado, M; Delgado García, A; Ramírez Navarro, A; Salgado García, C; Muros de Fuentes, M A; Ortega Lozano, S; Bellón Guardia, M E; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2004-01-01

    We have reviewed the legislation about the quality control of dose calibrator. The importance of verifying the correct work of these instruments, is fundamental in daily practice of radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine. The Spanish legislation establishes to include these controls as part of the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, and the program of quality assurance in nuclear medicine. We have reviewed guides and protocols from international eminent organizations, summarizing the recommended tests and periodicity of them. PMID:15625064

  10. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  11. Optical Calibration of SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneira, J.; Peeters, S.; Sinclair, J.

    2015-04-01

    SNO is being upgraded to SNO+, which has as its main goal the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. The upgrade is defined by filling with a novel scintillator mixture containing 130Te. With a lower energy threshold than SNO, SNO+ will be sensitive to other exciting new physics. Here we are describing new optical calibration system that meets new, more stringent radiopurity requirements has been developed.

  12. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  13. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  14. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOEpatents

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  15. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  16. Measurement of the pressure-volume curve in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Fallica, Jonathan; Horton, Maureen R; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the mouse has become the primary animal model of a variety of lung diseases. In models of emphysema or fibrosis, the essential phenotypic changes are best assessed by measurement of the changes in lung elasticity. To best understand specific mechanisms underlying such pathologies in mice, it is essential to make functional measurements that can reflect the developing pathology. Although there are many ways to measure elasticity, the classical method is that of the total lung pressure-volume (PV) curve done over the whole range of lung volumes. This measurement has been made on adult lungs from nearly all mammalian species dating back almost 100 years, and such PV curves also played a major role in the discovery and understanding of the function of pulmonary surfactant in fetal lung development. Unfortunately, such total PV curves have not been widely reported in the mouse, despite the fact that they can provide useful information on the macroscopic effects of structural changes in the lung. Although partial PV curves measuring just the changes in lung volume are sometimes reported, without a measure of absolute volume, the nonlinear nature of the total PV curve makes these partial ones very difficult to interpret. In the present study, we describe a standardized way to measure the total PV curve. We have then tested the ability of these curves to detect changes in mouse lung structure in two common lung pathologies, emphysema and fibrosis. Results showed significant changes in several variables consistent with expected structural changes with these pathologies. This measurement of the lung PV curve in mice thus provides a straightforward means to monitor the progression of the pathophysiologic changes over time and the potential effect of therapeutic procedures. PMID:25651276

  17. Measurement of the Pressure-volume Curve in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Limjunyawong, Nathachit; Fallica, Jonathan; Horton, Maureen R.; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades the mouse has become the primary animal model of a variety of lung diseases. In models of emphysema or fibrosis, the essential phenotypic changes are best assessed by measurement of the changes in lung elasticity. To best understand specific mechanisms underlying such pathologies in mice, it is essential to make functional measurements that can reflect the developing pathology. Although there are many ways to measure elasticity, the classical method is that of the total lung pressure-volume (PV) curve done over the whole range of lung volumes. This measurement has been made on adult lungs from nearly all mammalian species dating back almost 100 years, and such PV curves also played a major role in the discovery and understanding of the function of pulmonary surfactant in fetal lung development. Unfortunately, such total PV curves have not been widely reported in the mouse, despite the fact that they can provide useful information on the macroscopic effects of structural changes in the lung. Although partial PV curves measuring just the changes in lung volume are sometimes reported, without a measure of absolute volume, the nonlinear nature of the total PV curve makes these partial ones very difficult to interpret. In the present study, we describe a standardized way to measure the total PV curve. We have then tested the ability of these curves to detect changes in mouse lung structure in two common lung pathologies, emphysema and fibrosis. Results showed significant changes in several variables consistent with expected structural changes with these pathologies. This measurement of the lung PV curve in mice thus provides a straightforward means to monitor the progression of the pathophysiologic changes over time and the potential effect of therapeutic procedures. PMID:25651276

  18. Dynamic Calibration of Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Sinusoidal calibration signal produced in 4- to 100-Hz range. Portable oscillating-pressure device measures dynamic characteristics of pressure transducers installed in models or aircraft at frequency and oscillating-pressure ranges encountered during unsteady-pressure-measurement tests. Calibration is over range of frequencies and amplitudes not available with commercial acoustic calibration devices.

  19. Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-04-17

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  20. Internet-Based Calibration of a Multifunction Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-12-19

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multijunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  1. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2004 and 2005 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pastor, Christine M.; Gonsalez, Jose C.; Curry, Monroe R., III

    2010-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel was completed in 2004 following the replacement of the inlet guide vanes upstream of the tunnel drive system and improvement to the facility total temperature instrumentation. This calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT. The 2004 test was also the first to use the 2-D RTD array, an improved total temperature calibration measurement platform.

  2. Radiance calibration of the High Altitude Observatory white-light coronagraph on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Macqueen, R. M.; Munro, R. H.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    The processing of over 35,000 photographs of the solar corona obtained by the white-light coronograph on Skylab is described. Calibration of the vast amount of data was complicated by temporal effects of radiation fog and latent image loss. These effects were compensated by imaging a calibration step wedge on each data frame. Absolute calibration of the wedge was accomplished through comparison with a set of previously calibrated glass opal filters. Analysis employed average characteristic curves derived from measurements of step wedges from many frames within a given camera half-load. The net absolute accuracy of a given radiance measurement is estimated to be 20%.

  3. Non-linear approach in visco-hyperelastic constitutive modelling of polyurethane nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlikowski, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The constitutive modelling of the polyurethane nanocomposite presented in the paper is done in the context of its possible application as one of the components of the intervertebral disc prosthesis. The constitutive study is a part of the researches aiming at creation of the new prosthetic device. The material is considered as incompressible, isotropic and visco-hyperelastic one. The focus of the work lies on the formulation of a constitutive equation for its further implementation in finite element analyses. The equation is formulated on the basis of uniaxial monotonic compression tests and relaxation tests performed at room temperature. The constants of the constitutive model are determined from the experimental data by means of the curve-fitting approach employing least-squares optimisation method. The constitutive modelling consisted of two steps. In the first one pure hyperelastic model was determined. The Mooney-Rivlin model proved to be the best one to describe hyperelastic behaviour of the material. In the second step non-linear visco-hyperelastic model was derived. Relaxation times, characteristic amplitudes and Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic constants were calibrated on the basis of strain-stress curves (hysteresis loops) obtained experimentally at three strain rates, i.e. and . The constitutive law is validated on the basis of relaxation test. The paper concludes with summary and plans for further investigations in the area.

  4. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  5. Nonlinear polariton effects in naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Resonant second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited emission (TPE) were studied in pure, strain-free crystals of naphthalene at frequencies near that of the (0,0) a-exciton in order to probe the relationship between the two signals and to investigate the effect of polariton states on second order nonlinearities in molecular crystals. The strong coupling of the 31473 cm/sup -1/ exciton in naphthalene to the photon field dictates the second-order nonlinear behavior of naphthalene crystals at frequencies near half-resonance. The dynamics of polaritons produced coherently via nonlinear interactions is shown to deviate in a controllable way from the dynamics of the one-photon polaritons produced in a linear experiment. The nature of the excitation remains principally that of an exciton. The necessity of using a strong coupling model to explain orientational dispersion and intensity and lineshape behavior is established. The experimental angular frequency dispersion of the SHG and TPE signals are fit to theoretical polariton dispersion curves. The orientation of the naphthalene optical indicatrix at 31475 cm/sup -1/ is shown to be very nearly the same as that reported for visible light. The temperature dependences of the SHG and TPE signal intensities are successfully predicted from the polariton fusion model by inclusion of temporal damping in the fusion rate expression. The shapes of the SHG and TPE profiles are compared to shapes predicted from the semi-classical theory.

  6. [VMTBB-Based Spectral Radiometric Calibration of NIR Fiber Coupled Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng; Liu, Li-ying; Liu, Xiao-xi; Li, Ye; Shi, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Guo-yu; Huan, Ke-wei

    2015-09-01

    The medium temperature black body (MTBB) is conventional high precision equipment used as spectral radiometric scale in infrared spectral region. However, in near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, there are few papers about spectral radiometric calibration by using MTBB, that is because NIR spectral region is the borderland of its effective spectral region. The main research of this paper is spectral radiometric calibration method by using MTBB in NIR spectral region. Accordingly, this paper is devoted mostly to a discussion of how the calibration precision could be affected by selecting different structural parameters of calibration model. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research and provide technical reference for improving the traceability in NIR spectral radiometric calibration. In this paper, a NIR fiber coupled spectrometer, whose wavelength range covers from 950 to 1700 nm, has been calibrated by a MTBB with adjustable temperature range from 50 to 1050 °C. Concentrating on calibration process, two key points have been discussed. For one thing, the geometric factors of radiation transfer model of the calibration systems have been compared between traditional structure and fiber direct-coupled structure. Because the fiber direct-coupled model is simple and effective, it has been selected instead of traditional model based on the radiation transfer between two coaxial discs. So, it is an advantaged radiation transfer model for radiometric calibration of fiber coupled spectrometer. For another thing, the relation between calibration accuracy and structural parameters of calibration model has been analyzed intensively. The root cause is scale feature of attribute of calibration data itself, which is the nonlinear structure in scales of spectral data. So, the high precision calibration needs nonlinear calibration model, and the uniform sampling for scale feature is also very important. Selecting sample is an inevitable problem when the

  7. Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vcelak, Jan

    2006-04-15

    The description of simple and fast calibration procedures used for double-probe triaxial fluxgate gradiometer is provided in this paper. The calibration procedure consists of three basic steps. In the first step both probes are calibrated independently in order to reach constant total field reading in every position. Both probes are numerically aligned in the second step in order that the gradient reading is zero in homogenous magnetic field. The third step consists of periodic drift calibration during measurement. The results and detailed description of each calibration step are presented and discussed in the paper. The gradiometer is finally verified during the detection of the metal object in the measuring grid.

  8. Calibration effects on orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madrid, G. A.; Winn, F. B.; Zielenbach, J. W.; Yip, K. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of charged particle and tropospheric calibrations on the orbit determination (OD) process are analyzed. The calibration process consisted of correcting the Doppler observables for the media effects. Calibrated and uncalibrated Doppler data sets were used to obtain OD results for past missions as well as Mariner Mars 1971. Comparisons of these Doppler reductions show the significance of the calibrations. For the MM'71 mission, the media calibrations proved themselves effective in diminishing the overall B-plane error and reducing the Doppler residual signatures.

  9. Primary calibration in acoustics metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacelar Milhomem, T. A.; Defilippo Soares, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    SI unit in acoustics is realized by the reciprocity calibrations of laboratory standard microphones in pressure field, free field and diffuse field. Calibrations in pressure field and in free field are already consolidated and the Inmetro already done them. Calibration in diffuse field is not yet consolidated, however, some national metrology institutes, including Inmetro, are conducting researches on this subject. This paper presents the reciprocity calibration, the results of Inmetro in recent key comparisons and the research that is being developed for the implementation of reciprocity calibration in diffuse field.

  10. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  11. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  12. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  13. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  14. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within .+-.0.05%, the entire system has an accuracy of a .+-.0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  15. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Alice T.

    1995-05-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within +/-0.05% the entire system has an accuracy of +/-0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  16. Nonlinear Optical Imaging for Sensitive Detection of Crystals in Bulk Amorphous Powders

    PubMed Central

    KESTUR, UMESH S.; WANAPUN, DUANGPORN; TOTH, SCOTT J.; WEGIEL, LINDSAY A.; SIMPSON, GARTH J.; TAYLOR, LYNNE S.

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of second-order nonlinear imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC) to quantify crystallinity in drug–polymer blends, including solid dispersions. Second harmonic generation (SHG) can potentially exhibit scaling with crystallinity between linear and quadratic depending on the nature of the source, and thus, it is important to determine the response of pharmaceutical powders. Physical mixtures containing different proportions of crystalline naproxen and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) were prepared by blending and a dispersion was produced by solvent evaporation. A custom-built SONICC instrument was used to characterize the SHG intensity as a function of the crystalline drug fraction in the various samples. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used as complementary methods known to exhibit linear scaling. SONICC was able to detect crystalline drug even in the presence of 99.9 wt % HPMCAS in the binary mixtures. The calibration curve revealed a linear dynamic range with a R2 value of 0.99 spanning the range from 0.1 to 100 wt % naproxen with a root mean square error of prediction of 2.7%. Using the calibration curve, the errors in the validation samples were in the range of 5%–10%. Analysis of a 75 wt % HPMCAS–naproxen solid dispersion with SONICC revealed the presence of crystallites at an earlier time point than could be detected with PXRD and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, results from the crystallization kinetics experiment using SONICC were in good agreement with Raman spectroscopy and PXRD. In conclusion, SONICC has been found to be a sensitive technique for detecting low levels (0.1% or lower) of crystallinity, even in the presence of large quantities of a polymer. PMID:22847843

  17. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  18. Investigation of factors affecting the calibration of strain gage based transducers ( Goodzeit gages'') for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, M.; Gilbertson, A.; Dougherty, M.

    1991-03-01

    These transducers are designed to measure stresses on SSC collared coils. They are individually calibrated with a bonded ten-stack of SSC inner coil cable by applying a known load and reading corresponding output from the gages. The transducer is supported by a notched backing plate'' that allows for bending of the gage beam during calibration or in use with an actual coil. Several factors affecting the calibration and use of the transducers are: the number of times a backing plate'' is used, the similarities or difficulties between bonded ten-stacks, and the differences between the ten-stacks and the coil they represent. The latter is probably the most important because a calibration curve is a model of how a transducer should react within a coil. If the model is wrong, the calibration curve is wrong. Information will be presented regarding differences in calibrations between Brookhaven National Labs (also calibrating these transducers) and Fermilab -- what caused these differences, the investigation into the differences between coils and ten-stacks and how they relate to transducer calibration, and some suggestions for future calibrations.

  19. Elasticity in Amorphous Solids: Nonlinear or Piecewise Linear?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Awadhesh K.; Procaccia, Itamar; Shor, Carmel A. B. Z.; Singh, Murari

    2016-02-01

    Quasistatic strain-controlled measurements of stress versus strain curves in macroscopic amorphous solids result in a nonlinear-looking curve that ends up either in mechanical collapse or in a steady state with fluctuations around a mean stress that remains constant with increasing strain. It is therefore very tempting to fit a nonlinear expansion of the stress in powers of the strain. We argue here that at low temperatures the meaning of such an expansion needs to be reconsidered. We point out the enormous difference between quenched and annealed averages of the stress versus strain curves and propose that a useful description of the mechanical response is given by a stress (or strain) -dependent shear modulus for which a theoretical evaluation exists. The elastic response is piecewise linear rather than nonlinear.

  20. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  1. Structured light camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbat, P.; Skarbek, W.; Tomaszewski, M.

    2013-03-01

    Structured light camera which is being designed with the joined effort of Institute of Radioelectronics and Institute of Optoelectronics (both being large units of the Warsaw University of Technology within the Faculty of Electronics and Information Technology) combines various hardware and software contemporary technologies. In hardware it is integration of a high speed stripe projector and a stripe camera together with a standard high definition video camera. In software it is supported by sophisticated calibration techniques which enable development of advanced application such as real time 3D viewer of moving objects with the free viewpoint or 3D modeller for still objects.

  2. Converting HAZUS capacity curves to seismic hazard-compatible building fragility functions: effect of hysteretic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryu, Hyeuk; Luco, Nicolas; Baker, Jack W.; Karaca, Erdem

    2008-01-01

    A methodology was recently proposed for the development of hazard-compatible building fragility models using parameters of capacity curves and damage state thresholds from HAZUS (Karaca and Luco, 2008). In the methodology, HAZUS curvilinear capacity curves were used to define nonlinear dynamic SDOF models that were subjected to the nonlinear time history analysis instead of the capacity spectrum method. In this study, we construct a multilinear capacity curve with negative stiffness after an ultimate (capping) point for the nonlinear time history analysis, as an alternative to the curvilinear model provided in HAZUS. As an illustration, here we propose parameter values of the multilinear capacity curve for a moderate-code low-rise steel moment resisting frame building (labeled S1L in HAZUS). To determine the final parameter values, we perform nonlinear time history analyses of SDOF systems with various parameter values and investigate their effects on resulting fragility functions through sensitivity analysis. The findings improve capacity curves and thereby fragility and/or vulnerability models for generic types of structures.

  3. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  4. Nonlinear vibration caused by fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foong, Chee-Hoe; Wiercigroch, Marian; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina; Deans, William F.

    2007-06-01

    The main aim of this work is to study the interactions between vibration and fatigue crack growth. In this paper, a detailed mathematical modelling of a newly designed fatigue-testing rig, description of the rig, experimental set-up and procedures, and sensor calibrations are presented. The test rig consists of two base-excited oscillators, one positioned above and the other below a single-edge-notched beam sample. The inertial forces of the oscillators act on the sample causing its bending and fatigue. Mathematically the fatigue crack sample is modelled as a discrete spring with piecewise nonlinear stiffness which is assumed to be constant when the crack closes and to decrease with crack length when it opens. The results from the modelling correlate well with the experimental tests.

  5. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves.

    PubMed

    Cabaret, J; Béquin, P; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-07-31

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters. PMID:26274421

  6. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaret, J.; Béquin, P.; Theocharis, G.; Andreev, V.; Gusev, V. E.; Tournat, V.

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found to be nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other types of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short-term memory, as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  7. Use of Radiometrically Calibrated Flat-Plate Calibrators in Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E.

    2015-08-01

    Most commonly used, low-temperature, infrared thermometers have large fields of view sizes that make them difficult to be calibrated with narrow aperture blackbodies. Flat-plate calibrators with large emitting surfaces have been proposed for calibrating these infrared thermometers. Because the emissivity of the flat plate is not unity, its radiance temperature is wavelength dependent. For calibration, the wavelength pass band of the device under test should match that of the reference infrared thermometer. If the device under test and reference radiometer have different pass bands, then it is possible to calculate the corresponding correction if the emissivity of the flat plate is known. For example, a correction of at is required when calibrating a infrared thermometer with a "" radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator. A method is described for using a radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator that covers both cases of match and mismatch working wavelength ranges of a reference infrared thermometer and infrared thermometers to be calibrated with the flat-plate calibrator. Also, an application example is included in this paper.

  8. A study of Lusitano mare lactation curve with Wood's model.

    PubMed

    Santos, A S; Silvestre, A M

    2008-02-01

    Milk yield and composition data from 7 nursing Lusitano mares (450 to 580 kg of body weight and 2 to 9 parities) were used in this study (5 measurements per mare for milk yield and 8 measurements for composition). Wood's lactation model was used to describe milk fat, protein, and lactose lactation curves. Mean values for the concentration of major milk components across the lactation period (180 d) were 5.9 g/kg of fat, 18.4 g/kg of protein, and 60.8 g/kg of lactose. Milk fat and protein (g/kg) decreased and lactose (g/kg) increased during the 180 d of lactation. Curves for milk protein and lactose yields (g) were similar in shape to the milk yield curve; protein yield peaked at 307 g on d 10 and lactose peaked at 816 g on d 45. The fat (g) curve was different in shape compared with milk, protein, and lactose yields. Total production of the major milk constituents throughout the 180 d of lactation was estimated to be 12.0, 36.1, and 124 kg for fat, protein, and lactose, respectively. The algebraic model fitted by a nonlinear regression procedure to the data resulted in reasonable prediction curves for milk yield (R(a)(2) of 0.89) and the major constituents (R(a)(2) ranged from 0.89 to 0.95). The lactation curves of major milk constituents in Lusitano mares were similar, both in shape and values, to those found in other horse breeds. The established curves facilitate the estimation of milk yield and variation of milk constituents at different stages of lactation for both nursing and dairy mares, providing important information relative to weaning time and foal supplementation. PMID:18218764

  9. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  10. Fitting curves to cyclic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, W.B.

    1955-01-01

    A common problem in hydrology is to fit a smooth curve to cyclic or periodic data, either to define the most probable values of the data or to test some principle that one wishes to demonstrate.  This study treats of those problems where the length or period of the cycle is know beforehand - as a day, year, or meander length for example.  Curve-fitting can be made by free-hand drawing, and where the data are closely aligned this method offers the simplest and most direct course.  However, there are many problems where the best fit is far from obvious, and analytical methods may be necessary.

  11. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  12. Procedures used in the calibration of AC calibrators

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.T.

    1991-02-01

    This report describes an automatic calibration system used in the calibration of all precision AC calibrators. The system includes an AC-DC Transfer Standard, a DC Voltage Standard, and a high-resolution digital multimeter, with an IBM-XT Personal Computer for data acquisition and analysis. Specialized instrumentation and measurement techniques make it possible to achieve high accuracy measurements with repeatability. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Self-calibrating common-path interferometry.

    PubMed

    Porras-Aguilar, Rosario; Falaggis, Konstantinos; Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative phase measuring technique is presented that estimates the object phase from a series of phase shifted interferograms that are obtained in a common-path configuration with unknown phase shifts. The derived random phase shifting algorithm for common-path interferometers is based on the Generalized Phase Contrast theory [pl. Opt.40(2), 268 (2001)10.1063/1.1404846], which accounts for the particular image formation and includes effects that are not present in two-beam interferometry. It is shown experimentally that this technique can be used within common-path configurations employing nonlinear liquid crystal materials as self-induced phase filters for quantitative phase imaging without the need of phase shift calibrations. The advantages of such liquid crystal elements compared to spatial light modulator based solutions are given by the cost-effectiveness, self-alignment, and the generation of diminutive dimensions of the phase filter size, giving unique performance advantages. PMID:25836191

  14. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  15. Self-calibration of Antenna Errors Using Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, P. J.; Cornwell, T. J.

    The thery of focal-plane correlation is reviewed and applied to the problem of the self-calibration and self-correction of a radio telescope with errors in its reflecting surface. Curves are presented which allow the estimation of focal-plane array size and integration time needed for telescopes with varying amounts of error. It is suggested that the technique may have application to the problem of the construction of large telescopes in space.

  16. Accurate flexural spring constant calibration of colloid probe cantilevers using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Richard S.; Osborn, William A.; Shaw, Gordon A.

    2015-06-01

    Calibration of the flexural spring constant for atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe cantilevers provides significant challenges. The presence of a large attached spherical added mass complicates many of the more common calibration techniques such as reference cantilever, Sader, and added mass. Even the most promising option, AFM thermal calibration, can encounter difficulties during the optical lever sensitivity measurement due to strong adhesion and friction between the sphere and a surface. This may cause buckling of the end of the cantilever and hysteresis in the approach-retract curves resulting in increased uncertainty in the calibration. Most recently, a laser Doppler vibrometry thermal method has been used to accurately calibrate the normal spring constant of a wide variety of tipped and tipless commercial cantilevers. This paper describes a variant of the technique, scanning laser Doppler vibrometry, optimized for colloid probe cantilevers and capable of spring constant calibration uncertainties near ±1%.

  17. Impact of data quality and quantity and the calibration procedure on crop growth model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Sabine J.; Werisch, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    , biomass partitioning, LAI, plant height, rooting depth and duration of growing period, as well as an (3) automated calibration using the AMALGAM optimization algorithm and Pareto front analysis based on the data listed in (2). Three different calibration strategies have been applied for the estimation of the parameters of the soil hydraulic property functions: (1) using pedotransfer functions based on soil texture data derived from soil sampling (2) using a laboratory evaporation method for the determination of pF-curves and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (HYPROP), and (3) inverse estimation by multiobjective optimization and Pareto front analysis using the AMALGAM algorithm based on time series of soil moisture in three soil depths. The results show that simulations of yield and soil water dynamics can simultaneously be improved if the data quantity used for calibration increases (from strategy 1 to 3). The study quantifies the impacts of different model calibration procedures and data input on the modeling results. Even though parameter estimation using an multiobjective optimization algorithm is computationally demanding, it enhances the accuracy of model predictions and thus the overall reliability of the modeling results. To estimate climate change impacts based on crop growth modeling, we suggest a proper model calibration based on the simultaneous estimation of soil hydraulic parameters, crop phenology, growth and yield-related parameters using comprehensive experimental data.

  18. Supply Curves of Conserved Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan Kevin

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

  19. Interpolation and Polynomial Curve Fitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2014-01-01

    Two points determine a line. Three noncollinear points determine a quadratic function. Four points that do not lie on a lower-degree polynomial curve determine a cubic function. In general, n + 1 points uniquely determine a polynomial of degree n, presuming that they do not fall onto a polynomial of lower degree. The process of finding such a…

  20. Geomorphological origin of recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Marani, Marco

    2010-12-01

    We identify a previously undetected link between the river network morphology and key recession curves properties through a conceptual-physical model of the drainage process of the riparian unconfined aquifer. We show that the power-law exponent, α, of -dQ/dt vs. Q curves is related to the power-law exponent of N(l) vs. G(l) curves (which we show to be connected to Hack's law), where l is the downstream distance from the channel heads, N(l) is the number of channel reaches exactly located at a distance l from their channel head, and G(l) is the total length of the network located at a distance greater or equal to l from channel heads. Using Digital Terrain Models and daily discharge observations from 67 US basins we find that geomorphologic α estimates match well the values obtained from recession curves analyses. Finally, we argue that the link between recession flows and network morphology points to an important role of low-flow discharges in shaping the channel network.

  1. CURVES, VERTICES, KNOTS AND SUCH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE SUCH CONCEPTS AS (1) SIMPLE CLOSED CURVES, (2) NETWORKS, (3) MAP…

  2. Calibration of a visible polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibney, Mark

    2012-06-01

    The calibration of a visible polarimeter is discussed. Calibration coefficients that provide a complete linear characterization of a polarimeter are represented in this paper by the analyzer vector, where sensor response in counts is given by the dot product of the analyzer vector and the incoming Stokes vector. Using the analyzer vector to represent the effect of the sensor on the incoming Stokes vector, we can include elements of the calibration Stokes vector in the fit used to estimate the analyzer vectors/calibration coefficients. This technique allows us to alleviate some of the strict requirements usually levied on the source used to generate the calibration Stokes vectors, such as source temporal stability. Data will be shown that validate the resultant analyzer vectors/calibration coefficients, using a novel technique with a tilted glass plate. A discussion of how these techniques are applied to IR sensors will also be touched on.

  3. NASA Metrology and Calibration, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The proceedings of the fourth annual NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop are presented. This workshop covered (1) review and assessment of NASA metrology and calibration activities by NASA Headquarters, (2) results of audits by the Office of Inspector General, (3) review of a proposed NASA Equipment Management System, (4) current and planned field center activities, (5) National Bureau of Standards (NBS) calibration services for NASA, (6) review of NBS's Precision Measurement and Test Equipment Project activities, (7) NASA instrument loan pool operations at two centers, (8) mobile cart calibration systems at two centers, (9) calibration intervals and decals, (10) NASA Calibration Capabilities Catalog, and (11) development of plans and objectives for FY 1981. Several papers in this proceedings are slide presentations only.

  4. Concept of ASTER calibration requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, A.

    1992-01-01

    The document of ASTER Calibration Requirement specifies the following items related to spectral and radiometric characteristics of the ASTER instrument: (1) characteristics whose knowledge is specified, (2) requirement for knowledge of the characteristics, (3) methodology for characteristics evaluation, and (4) supplementary information and data related with characteristics evaluation. This document is applicable to the document of the ASTER Instrument Specification on Observational Performances, and will be a part of the ASTER Calibration Plan. ASTER Calibration Requirement is scheduled to establish the concept and framework by March 1992 when the 5th Calibration and Data Validation Panel Meeting is held, and to determine details including requirement values and evaluation methodologies by October 1992 around which the Calibration Peer Review may be held. The ASTER Calibration Plan is planned to finish by the same time.

  5. Automatic calibration and correction for intelligent measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Gao; Yang, Shunian; Li, Zhu

    1993-09-01

    A microprocessor-controlled measuring system model is described in this paper . This system which consists of a sliding guide with a linear motion slide plate a linear inductosyn the signal processing circuit and the microprocessor system can be used on some machine tools such as the lathe the milling machine the drilling machine etc. to take measurements of the absolute displacement of slide plates in process. In order to maintain the expectant accuracy in measurement over a long time it is necessary for the measuring system to be calibrated and corrected periodically . The mathematical models used to approximate the error curve are developed. By utilizing the computing ability of microprocessor the automatic calibration and correction for intelligent instruments can be realized conveniently and an expectant accuracy can be maintained in the period between two successive auto-calibrations.

  6. Calibration and use of a rugged new piezoresistive pressure transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, R.A.; Charest, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    A new 50-ohm piezoresistive pressure gauge has been developed and calibrated in the range 0 to 4.0 GPa. This ``pinducer`` consists of one half of 100 ohm, one quarter watt, carbon composition resistor mounted coaxially at the end of a small brass tube. Three techniques have been used to calibrate this new gauge. Good agreement is found between all calibration data, and a smooth curve is fit through all resistance change versus pressure data up to 1.5 GPa. The gauges exhibit rise times of about 0.5 {mu}s. They offer advantages in raggedness, cost, and flexibility of application. The pinducer can be successfully used in divergent flows, harsh environments, and positions where lead protection would be impossible with thin-film gauges. A unique application is demonstrated.

  7. Effects on Scale Linking of Different Definitions of Criterion Functions for the IRT Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon; Kolen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under item response theory, the characteristic curve methods (Haebara and Stocking-Lord methods) are used to link two ability scales from separate calibrations. The linking methods use their respective criterion functions that can be defined differently according to the symmetry- and distribution-related schemes. The symmetry-related scheme…

  8. Rock magnetic properties of dusty olivine: comparison and calibration of non-heating paleointensity methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappe, S. L.; Harrison, R. J.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The mechanism of chondrule formation is an important outstanding question in cosmochemistry. Magnetic signals recorded by Fe-Ni nanoparticles in chondrules could carry clues to their origin. Recently, research in this area has focused on 'dusty olivine' in ordinary chondrites as potential carriers of pre-accretionary remanence. Dusty olivine is characterised by the presence of sub-micron Fe-Ni inclusions within the olivine host. These metal particles form via subsolidus reduction of the olivine during chondrule formation and are thought to be protected from subsequent chemical and thermal alteration by the host olivine. Three sets of synthetic dusty olivines have been produced, using natural olivine (average Ni-content of 0.3 wt%), synthetic Ni-containing olivine (0.1wt% Ni) and synthetic Ni-free olivine as starting materials. The starting materials were ground to powders, packed into a 8-27 mm3 graphite crucible, heated up to 1350°C under a pure CO gas flow and kept at this temperature for 10 minutes. After this the samples were held in fixed orientation and quenched into water in a range of known magnetic fields from 0.2 mT to 1.5 mT. We present a comparison of all non-heating methods commonly used for paleointensity determination of extraterrestrial material. All samples showed uni-directional, single-component demagnetization behaviour. Saturation REM ratio (NRM/SIRM) and REMc ratio show non-linear behaviour as function of applied field and a saturation value < 1. Using the REM' method the samples showed approximately constant REM' between 100 and 150 mT AF-field. Plotting the average values for this field range again shows non-linear behaviour and a saturation value < 1. Another approach we examined to obtain calibration curves for paleointensity determination is based on ARM measurents. We also present an analysis of a new FORC-based method of paleointensity determination applied to metallic Fe-bearing samples [1, 2]. The method uses a first-order reversal

  9. A dose-response curve for biodosimetry from a 6 MV electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Pinto, M M P; Cadena, M; Santos, N; Fernandes, T S; Borges, E; Amaral, A

    2015-10-01

    Biological dosimetry (biodosimetry) is based on the investigation of radiation-induced biological effects (biomarkers), mainly dicentric chromosomes, in order to correlate them with radiation dose. To interpret the dicentric score in terms of absorbed dose, a calibration curve is needed. Each curve should be constructed with respect to basic physical parameters, such as the type of ionizing radiation characterized by low or high linear energy transfer (LET) and dose rate. This study was designed to obtain dose calibration curves by scoring of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with a 6 MV electron linear accelerator (Mevatron M, Siemens, USA). Two software programs, CABAS (Chromosomal Aberration Calculation Software) and Dose Estimate, were used to generate the curve. The two software programs are discussed; the results obtained were compared with each other and with other published low LET radiation curves. Both software programs resulted in identical linear and quadratic terms for the curve presented here, which was in good agreement with published curves for similar radiation quality and dose rates. PMID:26445334

  10. Calibration analysis of zeolites by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horňáčková, M.; Grolmusová, Z.; Horňáček, M.; Rakovský, J.; Hudec, P.; Veis, P.

    2012-08-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy was used for calibration analysis of different types of microporous crystalline aluminosilicates with exactly ordered structure — zeolites. The LIBS plasma was generated using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at the wavelength of 532 nm and providing laser pulses of 4 ns duration. Plasma emission was analysed by echelle type emission spectrometer, providing wide spectral range 200-950 nm. The spectrometer was equipped with intensified CCD camera providing rapid spectral acquisition (gating time from 5 ns). The optimum experimental conditions (time delay, gate width and laser pulse energy) have been determined for reliable use of LIBS for quantitative analysis. Samples of different molar ratios of Si/Al were used to create the calibration curves. Calibration curves for different types of zeolites (mordenite, type Y and ZSM-5) were constructed. Molar ratios of Si/Al for samples used for calibration were determined by classical wet chemical analysis and were in the range 5.3-51.8 for mordenite, 2.3-12.8 for type Y and 14-600 for ZSM-5. Zeolites with these molar ratios of Si/Al are usually used as catalysts in alkylation reactions. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is a suitable method for analysis of molar ratio Si/Al in zeolites, because it is simple, fast, and does not require sample preparation compared with classical wet chemical analysis which are time consuming, require difficult sample preparation and manipulation with strong acids and bases.

  11. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  12. Calorimeters for pulsed lasers: calibration.

    PubMed

    Thacher, P D

    1976-07-01

    A calibration technique is developed and tested in which a calorimeter used for single-shot laser pulse energy measurements is calibrated with reference to a cw power standard using a chopped cw laser beam. A pulsed laser is required only to obtain the relative time response of the calorimeter to a pulse. With precautions as to beam alignment and wavelength, the principal error of the technique is that of the cw standard. Calibration of two thermopiles with cone receivers showed -2.5% and -3.5% agreement with previous calibrations made by the National Bureau of Standards. PMID:20165270

  13. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  14. Estimation of suspended-sediment rating curves and mean suspended-sediment loads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    A simulation study was done to evaluate: (1) the accuracy and precision of parameter estimates for the bias-corrected, transformed-linear and non-linear models obtained by the method of least squares; (2) the accuracy of mean suspended-sediment loads calculated by the flow-duration, rating-curve method using model parameters obtained by the alternative methods. Parameter estimates obtained by least squares for the bias-corrected, transformed-linear model were considerably more precise than those obtained for the non-linear or weighted non-linear model. The accuracy of parameter estimates obtained for the biascorrected, transformed-linear and weighted non-linear model was similar and was much greater than the accuracy obtained by non-linear least squares. The improved parameter estimates obtained by the biascorrected, transformed-linear or weighted non-linear model yield estimates of mean suspended-sediment load calculated by the flow-duration, rating-curve method that are more accurate and precise than those obtained for the non-linear model.

  15. RX130 Robot Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugal, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In order to create precision magnets for an experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a new reverse engineering method has been proposed that uses the magnetic scalar potential to solve for the currents necessary to produce the desired field. To make the magnet it is proposed to use a copper coated G10 form, upon which a drill, mounted on a robotic arm, will carve wires. The accuracy required in the manufacturing of the wires exceeds nominal robot capabilities. However, due to the rigidity as well as the precision servo motor and harmonic gear drivers, there are robots capable of meeting this requirement with proper calibration. Improving the accuracy of an RX130 to be within 35 microns (the accuracy necessary of the wires) is the goal of this project. Using feedback from a displacement sensor, or camera and inverse kinematics it is possible to achieve this accuracy.

  16. LBA Calibrator Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Chris; Petrov, Leonid; Bertarini, Alessandra

    2009-07-01

    The Australian LBA (Long Baseline Array) has been used to observe a list of candidate flat spectrum radio sources with declination < -50° to determine their position with milliarcsec accuracy and determine their suitability as calibrators for phase referencing observations and as target for astrometry and geodesy observations. Currently more than 316 new millisecond positions have been determined with a final goal of around 1000 astrometric positions for a high density phase reference grid. The candidate list is based on the AT20G survey, an all-sky 20 GHz survey using an 8 GHz analog correlator for the ATCA. So far a detection rate of candidate source of 97% has been achieved.

  17. Quality Management and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    Good specification of a product’s performance requires adequate characterization of relevant properties. Particulate products are usually characterized by some PSD, shape or porosity parameter(s). For proper characterization, adequate sampling, dispersion, and measurement procedures should be available or developed and skilful personnel should use appropriate, well-calibrated/qualified equipment. The characterization should be executed, in agreement with customers, in a wellorganized laboratory. All related aspects should be laid down in a quality handbook. The laboratory should provide proof for its capability to perform the characterization of stated products and/or reference materials within stated confidence limits. This can be done either by internal validation and audits or by external GLP accreditation.

  18. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  19. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  20. Automatic flowmeter calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating the accuracy of a flowmeter is described. The system includes a calculator capable of performing mathematical functions responsive to receiving data signals and function command signals. A prover cylinder is provided for measuring the temperature, pressure, and time required for accumulating a predetermined volume of fluid. Along with these signals, signals representing the temperature and pressure of the fluid going into the meter are fed to a plurality of data registers. Under control of a progress controller, the data registers are read out and the information is fed through a data select circuit to the calculator. Command signals are also produced by a function select circuit and are fed to the calculator set indicating the desired function to be performed. The reading is then compared with the reading produced by the flowmeter.

  1. Inspection system calibration methods

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2004-12-28

    An inspection system calibration method includes producing two sideband signals of a first wavefront; interfering the two sideband signals in a photorefractive material, producing an output signal therefrom having a frequency and a magnitude; and producing a phase modulated operational signal having a frequency different from the output signal frequency, a magnitude, and a phase modulation amplitude. The method includes determining a ratio of the operational signal magnitude to the output signal magnitude, determining a ratio of a 1st order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude to a 0th order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude, and comparing the magnitude ratio to the Bessel function ratio.

  2. TOD to TTP calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Vos, Wouter K.; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Fanning, Jonathan D.

    2011-05-01

    The TTP (Targeting Task Performance) metric, developed at NVESD, is the current standard US Army model to predict EO/IR Target Acquisition performance. This model however does not have a corresponding lab or field test to empirically assess the performance of a camera system. The TOD (Triangle Orientation Discrimination) method, developed at TNO in The Netherlands, provides such a measurement. In this study, we make a direct comparison between TOD performance for a range of sensors and the extensive historical US observer performance database built to develop and calibrate the TTP metric. The US perception data were collected doing an identification task by military personnel on a standard 12 target, 12 aspect tactical vehicle image set that was processed through simulated sensors for which the most fundamental sensor parameters such as blur, sampling, spatial and temporal noise were varied. In the present study, we measured TOD sensor performance using exactly the same sensors processing a set of TOD triangle test patterns. The study shows that good overall agreement is obtained when the ratio between target characteristic size and TOD test pattern size at threshold equals 6.3. Note that this number is purely based on empirical data without any intermediate modeling. The calibration of the TOD to the TTP is highly beneficial to the sensor modeling and testing community for a variety of reasons. These include: i) a connection between requirement specification and acceptance testing, and ii) a very efficient method to quickly validate or extend the TTP range prediction model to new systems and tasks.

  3. Quantifying and Reducing Curve-Fitting Uncertainty in Isc

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mark; Duck, Benjamin; Emery, Keith

    2015-06-14

    Current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements of photovoltaic (PV) devices are used to determine performance parameters and to establish traceable calibration chains. Measurement standards specify localized curve fitting methods, e.g., straight-line interpolation/extrapolation of the I-V curve points near short-circuit current, Isc. By considering such fits as statistical linear regressions, uncertainties in the performance parameters are readily quantified. However, the legitimacy of such a computed uncertainty requires that the model be a valid (local) representation of the I-V curve and that the noise be sufficiently well characterized. Using more data points often has the advantage of lowering the uncertainty. However, more data points can make the uncertainty in the fit arbitrarily small, and this fit uncertainty misses the dominant residual uncertainty due to so-called model discrepancy. Using objective Bayesian linear regression for straight-line fits for Isc, we investigate an evidence-based method to automatically choose data windows of I-V points with reduced model discrepancy. We also investigate noise effects. Uncertainties, aligned with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM), are quantified throughout.

  4. Quantifying and Reducing Curve-Fitting Uncertainty in Isc: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mark; Duck, Benjamin; Emery, Keith

    2015-09-28

    Current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements of photovoltaic (PV) devices are used to determine performance parameters and to establish traceable calibration chains. Measurement standards specify localized curve fitting methods, e.g., straight-line interpolation/extrapolation of the I-V curve points near short-circuit current, Isc. By considering such fits as statistical linear regressions, uncertainties in the performance parameters are readily quantified. However, the legitimacy of such a computed uncertainty requires that the model be a valid (local) representation of the I-V curve and that the noise be sufficiently well characterized. Using more data points often has the advantage of lowering the uncertainty. However, more data points can make the uncertainty in the fit arbitrarily small, and this fit uncertainty misses the dominant residual uncertainty due to so-called model discrepancy. Using objective Bayesian linear regression for straight-line fits for Isc, we investigate an evidence-based method to automatically choose data windows of I-V points with reduced model discrepancy. We also investigate noise effects. Uncertainties, aligned with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM), are quantified throughout.

  5. BXS Re-calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; ,

    2010-11-24

    Early in the commissioning it was noticed by Cecile Limborg that the calibration of the BXS spectrometer magnet seemed to be different from the strength of the BX01/BX02 magnets. First the BX01/BX02 currents were adjusted to 135 MeV and the beam energy was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit flat. Then BX01/BX02 magnets were switched off and BXS was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit in the spectrometer line flat, without changing the energy of the beam. The result was that about 140-141 MeV were required on the BXS magnet. This measurement was repeated several times by others with the same results. It was not clear what was causing the error: magnet strength or layout. A position error of about 19 mm of the BXS magnet could explain the difference. Because there was a significant misalignment of the vacuum chamber in the BXS line, the alignment of the whole spectrometer line was checked. The vacuum chamber was corrected, but the magnets were found to be in the proper alignment. So we were left with one (or conceivably two) magnet calibration errors. Because BXS is a wedged shaped magnet, the bend angle depends on the horizontal position of the incoming beam. As mentioned, an offset of the beam position of 19 mm would increase or decrease the bend angle roughly by the ratio of 135/141. The figure of 19 mm is special and caused a considerable confusion during the design and measurement of the BXS magnet. This is best illustrated in Figure 1 which was taken out of the BXS Traveler document. The distance between the horizontal midplanes of the poles and the apex of the beam path was chosen to be 19 mm so the beam is close to the good field region throughout its entire path. Thus it seemed possible that there was an error that resulted in the beam not being on this trajectory, or conversely, that the magnetic measurements were done on the wrong trajectory and the magnet was then mis-calibrated. Mechanical measurements of the vacuum chamber made in the tunnel

  6. CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR A CROP YIELD LOSS FUNCTION IN NONLINEAR REGRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying the relationship between chronic pollutant exposure and the ensuing biological response requires consideration of nonlinear functions that are flexible enough to generate a wide range of response curves. he linear approximation (i.e., Wald's) interval estimates for oz...

  7. OPTEC: A Cubesat for Solar Cell Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey; Hepp, Aloysius; Arutyunov, Dennis; White, Kelsey; Witsberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new type of small spacecraft, the cubesat, has introduced a new concept for extremely small, low-cost missions into space. Cubesats are designed to be launched as secondary payloads on other missions, and are made up of unit elements (U) of size 10 cm by 10 cm by 10 cm, with a nominal mass of no more than 1.33 kg per U. We have designed a cubesat, OPTEC (Orbital Photovoltaic Testbed Cubesat) as a low-cost testbed to demonstrate, calibrate, and test solar cell technologies in space. Size of the cubesat is 2U (10x10x20cm, and the mass 2.66 kg. The cubesat deploys from the International Space Station into Low Earth Orbit at an altitude of about 420 km. Up to two 4x8cm test solar panels can be flown, with full I-V curves and temperature measurements taken.

  8. Comparison of Two Algebraic Methods for Curve/curve Intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demontaudouin, Y.; Tiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Most geometric modeling systems use either polynomial or rational functions to represent geometry. In such systems most computational problems can be formulated as systems of polynomials in one or more variables. Classical elimination theory can be used to solve such systems. Here Cayley's method of elimination is summarized and it is shown how it can best be used to solve the curve/curve intersection problem. Cayley's method was found to be a more straightforward approach. Furthermore, it is computationally simpler, since the elements of the Cayley matrix are one variable instead of two variable polynomials. Researchers implemented and tested both methods and found Cayley's to be more efficient. Six pairs of curves, representing mixtures of lines, circles, and cubic arcs were used. Several examples had multiple intersection points. For all six cases Cayley's required less CPU time than the other method. The average time ratio of method 1 to method 2 was 3.13:1, the least difference was 2.33:1, and the most dramatic was 6.25:1. Both of the above methods can be extended to solve the surface/surface intersection problem.

  9. A proposed standard method for polarimetric calibration and calibration verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persons, Christopher M.; Jones, Michael W.; Farlow, Craig A.; Morell, L. Denise; Gulley, Michael G.; Spradley, Kevin D.

    2007-09-01

    Accurate calibration of polarimetric sensors is critical to reducing and analyzing phenomenology data, producing uniform polarimetric imagery for deployable sensors, and ensuring predictable performance of polarimetric algorithms. It is desirable to develop a standard calibration method, including verification reporting, in order to increase credibility with customers and foster communication and understanding within the polarimetric community. This paper seeks to facilitate discussions within the community on arriving at such standards. Both the calibration and verification methods presented here are performed easily with common polarimetric equipment, and are applicable to visible and infrared systems with either partial Stokes or full Stokes sensitivity. The calibration procedure has been used on infrared and visible polarimetric imagers over a six year period, and resulting imagery has been presented previously at conferences and workshops. The proposed calibration method involves the familiar calculation of the polarimetric data reduction matrix by measuring the polarimeter's response to a set of input Stokes vectors. With this method, however, linear combinations of Stokes vectors are used to generate highly accurate input states. This allows the direct measurement of all system effects, in contrast with fitting modeled calibration parameters to measured data. This direct measurement of the data reduction matrix allows higher order effects that are difficult to model to be discovered and corrected for in calibration. This paper begins with a detailed tutorial on the proposed calibration and verification reporting methods. Example results are then presented for a LWIR rotating half-wave retarder polarimeter.

  10. Variations on the Davenport Gyroscope Calibration Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welter, G.; Boia, J.; Gakenheimer, M.; Kimmer, E.; Channell, D.; Hallock, L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a number of variations on the Davenport algorithm for in-flight gyroscope recalibration, or first order initial calibration, specifically tailored for use with a minimum of satellite telemetry data. Central to one of the techniques described is the use of onboard integration of gyroscope data together with a detailed model of scheduled satellite slew profiles. Methods are presented for determining adjustments to either parameters for the standard linear model (i.e., a drift rate bias vector and/or a scale factor/alignment transformation matrix) or individual gyroscope scale parameters, both linear and nonlinear, in cases where the alignments are well known. The results of applying the methods in an analysis of the temporal evolution and nonlinear response of the gyroscopes installed on the Hubble Space Telescope following its first servicing mission are discussed. The two effects, when working coherently, have been found to result in slew errors of almost 1 arcsecond per degree. Procedures for selecting optimal operational gyroscope parameters subject to the constraint of using a linear model are discussed.

  11. Robust identification of backbone curves using control-based continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Barton, D. A. W.; Neild, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Control-based continuation is a recently developed approach for testing nonlinear dynamic systems in a controlled manner and exploring their dynamic features as system parameters are varied. In this paper, control-based continuation is adapted to follow the locus where system response and excitation are in quadrature, extracting the backbone curve of the underlying conservative system. The method is applied to a single-degree-of-freedom oscillator under base excitation, and the results are compared with the standard resonant-decay method.

  12. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  13. Calibrated breast density methods for full field digital mammography: A system for serial quality control and inter-system generalization

    PubMed Central

    Lu, B.; Smallwood, A. M.; Sellers, T. A.; Drukteinis, J. S.; Heine, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors are developing a system for calibrated breast density measurements using full field digital mammography (FFDM). Breast tissue equivalent (BTE) phantom images are used to establish baseline (BL) calibration curves at time zero. For a given FFDM unit, the full BL dataset is comprised of approximately 160 phantom images, acquired prior to calibrating prospective patient mammograms. BL curves are monitored serially to ensure they produce accurate calibration and require updating when calibration accuracy degrades beyond an acceptable tolerance, rather than acquiring full BL datasets repeatedly. BL updating is a special case of generalizing calibration datasets across FFDM units, referred to as cross-calibration. Serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration techniques were developed and evaluated. Methods: BL curves were established for three Hologic Selenia FFDM units at time zero. In addition, one set of serial phantom images, comprised of equal proportions of adipose and fibroglandular BTE materials (50/50 compositions) of a fixed height, was acquired biweekly and monitored with the cumulative sum (Cusum) technique. These 50/50 composition images were used to update the BL curves when the calibration accuracy degraded beyond a preset tolerance of ±4 standardized units. A second set of serial images, comprised of a wide-range of BTE compositions, was acquired biweekly to evaluate serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration techniques. Results: Calibration accuracy can degrade serially and is a function of acquisition technique and phantom height. The authors demonstrated that all heights could be monitored simultaneously while acquiring images of a 50/50 phantom with a fixed height for each acquisition technique biweekly, translating into approximately 16 image acquisitions biweekly per FFDM unit. The same serial images are sufficient for serial monitoring, BL updating, and cross-calibration. Serial calibration accuracy was

  14. A controlled experiment in ground water flow model calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; Cooley, R.L.; Pollock, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear regression was introduced to ground water modeling in the 1970s, but has been used very little to calibrate numerical models of complicated ground water systems. Apparently, nonlinear regression is thought by many to be incapable of addressing such complex problems. With what we believe to be the most complicated synthetic test case used for such a study, this work investigates using nonlinear regression in ground water model calibration. Results of the study fall into two categories. First, the study demonstrates how systematic use of a well designed nonlinear regression method can indicate the importance of different types of data and can lead to successive improvement of models and their parameterizations. Our method differs from previous methods presented in the ground water literature in that (1) weighting is more closely related to expected data errors than is usually the case; (2) defined diagnostic statistics allow for more effective evaluation of the available data, the model, and their interaction; and (3) prior information is used more cautiously. Second, our results challenge some commonly held beliefs about model calibration. For the test case considered, we show that (1) field measured values of hydraulic conductivity are not as directly applicable to models as their use in some geostatistical methods imply; (2) a unique model does not necessarily need to be identified to obtain accurate predictions; and (3) in the absence of obvious model bias, model error was normally distributed. The complexity of the test case involved implies that the methods used and conclusions drawn are likely to be powerful in practice.Nonlinear regression was introduced to ground water modeling in the 1970s, but has been used very little to calibrate numerical models of complicated ground water systems. Apparently, nonlinear regression is thought by many to be incapable of addressing such complex problems. With what we believe to be the most complicated synthetic

  15. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  16. Excitation and geometrically matched local encoding of curved slices.

    PubMed

    Weber, Hans; Gallichan, Daniel; Schultz, Gerrit; Cocosco, Chris A; Littin, Sebastian; Reichardt, Wilfried; Welz, Anna; Witschey, Walter; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the concept of excitation and geometrically matched local in-plane encoding of curved slices (ExLoc) is introduced. ExLoc is based on a set of locally near-orthogonal spatial encoding magnetic fields, thus maintaining a local rectangular shape of the individual voxels and avoiding potential problems arising due to highly irregular voxel shapes. Unlike existing methods for exciting curved slices based on multidimensional radiofrequency-pulses, excitation and geometrically matched local encoding of curved slices does not require long duration or computationally expensive radiofrequency-pulses. As each encoding field consists of a superposition of potentially arbitrary (spatially linear or nonlinear) magnetic field components, the resulting field shape can be adapted with high flexibility to the specific region of interest. For extended nonplanar structures, this results in improved relevant volume coverage for fewer excited slices and thus increased efficiency. In addition to the mathematical description for the generation of dedicated encoding fields and data reconstruction, a verification of the ExLoc concept in phantom experiments and examples for in vivo curved single and multislice imaging are presented. PMID:22711656

  17. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  18. End-user display calibration via support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastani, Behnam; Funt, Brian; Xiong, Weihua

    2006-01-01

    The technique of support vector regression (SVR) is applied to the color display calibration problem. Given a set of training data, SVR estimates a continuous-valued function encoding the fundamental interrelation between a given input and its corresponding output. This mapping can then be used to find an output value for a given input value not in the training data set. Here, SVR is applied directly to the display's non-linearized RGB digital input values to predict output CIELAB values. There are several different linear methods for calibrating different display technologies (GOG, Masking and Wyble). An advantage of using SVR for color calibration is that the end-user does not need to apply a different calibration model for each different display technology. We show that the same model can be used to calibrate CRT, LCD and DLP displays accurately. We also show that the accuracy of the model is comparable to that of the optimal linear transformation introduced by Funt et al.

  19. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  20. Optical conductivity of curved graphene.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A J; Frederico, T; Oliveira, O; de Paula, W; Santos, M C

    2014-05-01

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far- and mid-infrared frequencies for periodicities ∼100 nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthermore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type. PMID:24759188

  1. Flow Through Randomly Curved Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational study of the transport properties of campylotic (intrinsically curved) media. It is found that the relation between the flow through a campylotic media, consisting of randomly located curvature perturbations, and the average Ricci scalar of the system, exhibits two distinct functional expressions, depending on whether the typical spatial extent of the curvature perturbation lies above or below the critical value maximizing the overall scalar of curvature. Furthermore, the flow through such systems as a function of the number of curvature perturbations is found to present a sublinear behavior for large concentrations, due to the interference between curvature perturbations leading to an overall less curved space. We have also characterized the flux through such media as a function of the local Reynolds number and the scale of interaction between impurities. For the purpose of this study, we have also developed and validated a new lattice Boltzmann model. PMID:24173367

  2. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  3. Quantum walking in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Facchini, Stefano; Forets, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    A discrete-time quantum walk (QW) is essentially a unitary operator driving the evolution of a single particle on the lattice. Some QWs admit a continuum limit, leading to familiar PDEs (e.g., the Dirac equation). In this paper, we study the continuum limit of a wide class of QWs and show that it leads to an entire class of PDEs, encompassing the Hamiltonian form of the massive Dirac equation in (1+1) curved spacetime. Therefore, a certain QW, which we make explicit, provides us with a unitary discrete toy model of a test particle in curved spacetime, in spite of the fixed background lattice. Mathematically, we have introduced two novel ingredients for taking the continuum limit of a QW, but which apply to any quantum cellular automata: encoding and grouping.

  4. Camera Calibration with Radial Variance Component Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélykuti, B.; Kruck, E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Camera calibration plays a more and more important role in recent times. Beside real digital aerial survey cameras the photogrammetric market is dominated by a big number of non-metric digital cameras mounted on UAVs or other low-weight flying platforms. The in-flight calibration of those systems has a significant role to enhance the geometric accuracy of survey photos considerably. It is expected to have a better precision of photo measurements in the center of images then along the edges or in the corners. With statistical methods the accuracy of photo measurements in dependency of the distance of points from image center has been analyzed. This test provides a curve for the measurement precision as function of the photo radius. A high number of camera types have been tested with well penetrated point measurements in image space. The result of the tests led to a general consequence to show a functional connection between accuracy and radial distance and to give a method how to check and enhance the geometrical capability of the cameras in respect to these results.

  5. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Awadhi, J; Endo, E; Fryall, F; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Sweeney, J

    1999-07-23

    The Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research (KISR), the USGS and LLNL are collaborating to calibrate seismic wave propagation in Kuwait and surrounding regions of the northwest Arabian Gulf using data from the Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN). Our goals are to develop local and regional propagation models for locating and characterizing seismic events in Kuwait and portions of the Zagros mountains close to Kuwait. The KNSN consists of 7 short-period stations and one broadband (STS-2) station. Constraints on the local velocity structure may be derived from joint inversions for hypocenters of local events and the local velocity model, receiver functions from three-component observations of teleseisms, and surface wave phase velocity estimated from differential dispersion measurements made across the network aperture. Data are being collected to calibrate travel-time curves for the principal regional phases for events in the Zagros mountains. The available event observations span the distance range from approximately 2.5 degrees to almost 9 degrees. Additional constraints on structure across the deep sediments of the Arabian Gulf will be obtained from long-period waveform modeling.

  6. Gravitational-wave sensitivity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Cole, R. H.; Berry, C. P. L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several common conventions in use by the gravitational-wave community to describe the amplitude of sources and the sensitivity of detectors. These are frequently confused. We outline the merits of and differences between the various quantities used for parameterizing noise curves and characterizing gravitational-wave amplitudes. We conclude by producing plots that consistently compare different detectors. Similar figures can be generated on-line for general use at http://rhcole.com/apps/GWplotter.

  7. Phase Curves of Eccentric Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; de Wit, Julien; Laughlin, Gregory P.; Knutson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 15% of the known exoplanet population have significantly eccentric orbits (e > 0.25). Systems with planets on highly eccentric orbits provide natural laboratories to test theories of orbital evolution, tidal forcing, and atmospheric response. The two best studied eccentric exoplanets are HAT-P-2b (e~0.5) and HD 80606 b (e~0.9). Both of these eccentric planets have full or partial orbit phase curve observations taken with the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 micron channels of the Spitzer IRAC instrument. These phase-curve observations of HAT-P-2b and HD 80606 b have given us important insights into atmospheric radiative timescales, planetary rotation rates and orbital evolution, and planet-star tidal interactions. Here I will overview the key results from the Spitzer observational campaigns for HAT-P-2b and HD 80606 b and look toward the future of phase curve observations of eccentric exoplanets in the era of JWST.

  8. Growth curves for Laron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Laron, Z; Lilos, P; Klinger, B

    1993-01-01

    Growth curves for children with Laron syndrome were constructed on the basis of repeated measurements made throughout infancy, childhood, and puberty in 24 (10 boys, 14 girls) of the 41 patients with this syndrome investigated in our clinic. Growth retardation was already noted at birth, the birth length ranging from 42 to 46 cm in the 12/20 available measurements. The postnatal growth curves deviated sharply from the normal from infancy on. Both sexes showed no clear pubertal spurt. Girls completed their growth between the age of 16-19 years to a final mean (SD) height of 119 (8.5) cm whereas the boys continued growing beyond the age of 20 years, achieving a final height of 124 (8.5) cm. At all ages the upper to lower body segment ratio was more than 2 SD above the normal mean. These growth curves constitute a model not only for primary, hereditary insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency (Laron syndrome) but also for untreated secondary IGF-I deficiencies such as growth hormone gene deletion and idiopathic congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency. They should also be useful in the follow up of children with Laron syndrome treated with biosynthetic recombinant IGF-I. PMID:8333769

  9. ENVISAT-1 MWR: calibration targets and preflight calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Nigel C.; Bombaci, Ornella; L'Abbate, Michele; Ricketts, Marion

    1998-12-01

    ENVISAT Microwave Radiometer (MWR) is an instrument designed and developed as part of the Envisat-1 satellite scientific payload, with Alenia Aerospazio engaged in the phase C-D as instrument Prime Contractor, leading an industrial consortium of European and American companies. The Flight Model of the Instrument was delivered to ESA at the end of July 1997, after successful completion of design, test and calibration activities. An Engineering Model of the instrument was also developed and completed in March 1997. The MWR output products are of prime importance for wind/wave products of the Radar Altimeter (RA-2) Instrument, part of the Envisat-1 payload, providing correction of atmospheric propagation data. The products are also useful for direct evaluation of brightness temperature in order to characterize polar ice, land surface properties and sea surface temperature. In order to achieve the required accuracy and sensitivity performance, an in- flight two-point calibration concept is adopted, with hot and cold calibration reference points for each frequency channel. Periodically the measurements of earth scene radiation are interrupted to allow the measurement of an on-board calibration load and of the deep cold space. The overall ground calibration tasks were performed through an iterative sequence of measurement and relevant model corrections, with an extensive instrument calibration in a thermal-vacuum environment, to derive the final radiometer model coefficients and to verify its performance in the expected in-flight environment. To achieve the required instrument calibration accuracy, extremely accurate blackbody target sources were required, in order to simulate the Earth scene and the deep space (for cold calibration), as seen by the radiometer during its in-flight mission. The definition, development and characterization of such blackbody targets were key aspects to achieving the required stimulus accuracy for proper calibration of the instrument. These

  10. Calibration of the ARID robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L

    1992-01-01

    The author has formulated a new, general model for specifying the kinematic properties of serial manipulators. The new model kinematic parameters do not suffer discontinuities when nominally parallel adjacent axes deviate from exact parallelism. From this new theory the author develops a first-order, lumped-parameter, calibration-model for the ARID manipulator. Next, the author develops a calibration methodology for the ARID based on visual and acoustic sensing. A sensor platform, consisting of a camera and four sonars attached to the ARID end frame, performs calibration measurements. A calibration measurement consists of processing one visual frame of an accurately placed calibration image and recording four acoustic range measurements. A minimum of two measurement protocols determine the kinematics calibration-model of the ARID for a particular region: assuming the joint displacements are accurately measured, the calibration surface is planar, and the kinematic parameters do not vary rapidly in the region. No theoretical or practical limitations appear to contra-indicate the feasibility of the calibration method developed here.

  11. Photometric calibration of planetary photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The basic data and approach for calibrating photographic plates obtained with the 61 cm telescope at the Tortugas Mountain Station of New Mexico State University are summarized. Since this is the fundamental calibration of planetary data it is of use to all in-house users as well as other individuals who use the data.

  12. Calibration of a Horizontal Sundial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovsek, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how a horizontal sundial can be calibrated in a classroom without using the nontrivial equations of projective geometry. If one understands how a simple equatorial sundial works, one will also understand the procedure of calibrating a horizontal (or "garden," as it is also called) sundial.

  13. Cobalt source calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-12-03

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10{sup 5} rad/h to 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10{sup 6} to 9.27 x 10{sup 5}. This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10{sup 7} rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe{sup 2+} ions ionize to Fe{sup 3+}. When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate.

  14. Third order nonlinearity in pulsed laser deposited LiNbO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumuluri, Anil; Rapolu, Mounika; Rao, S. Venugopal; Raju, K. C. James

    2016-05-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) thin films were prepared using pulsed laser deposition technique. Structural properties of the same were examined from XRD and optical band gap of the thin films were measured from transmittance spectra recorded using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. Nonlinear optical properties of the thin films were recorded using Z-Scan technique. The films were exhibiting third order nonlinearity and their corresponding two photon absorption, nonlinear refractive index, real and imaginary part of nonlinear susceptibility were calculated from open aperture and closed aperture transmission curves. From these studies, it suggests that these films have potential applications in nonlinear optical devices.

  15. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  16. Local hadron calibration with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Paola; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2011-04-01

    The method of Local Hadron Calibration is used in ATLAS as one of the two major calibration schemes for the reconstruction of jets and missing transverse energy. The method starts from noise suppressed clusters and corrects them for non-compensation effects and for losses due to noise threshold and dead material. Jets are reconstructed using the calibrated clusters and are then corrected for out of cone effects. The performance of the corrections applied to the calorimeter clusters is tested with detailed GEANT4 information. Results obtained with this procedure are discussed both for single pion simulations and for di-jet simulations. The calibration scheme is validated on data, by comparing the calibrated cluster energy in data with Mote Carlo simulations. Preliminary results obtained with GeV collision data are presented. The agreement between data and Monte Carlo is within 5% for the final cluster scale.

  17. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  18. Finite element model calibration using frequency responses with damping equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, T. J. S.; Kammer, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Model calibration is a cornerstone of the finite element verification and validation procedure, in which the credibility of the model is substantiated by positive comparison with test data. The calibration problem, in which the minimum deviation between finite element model data and experimental data is searched for, is normally characterized as being a large scale optimization problem with many model parameters to solve for and with deviation metrics that are nonlinear in these parameters. The calibrated parameters need to be found by iterative procedures, starting from initial estimates. Sometimes these procedures get trapped in local deviation function minima and do not converge to the globally optimal calibration solution that is searched for. The reason for such traps is often the multi-modality of the problem which causes eigenmode crossover problems in the iterative variation of parameter settings. This work presents a calibration formulation which gives a smooth deviation metric with a large radius of convergence to the global minimum. A damping equalization method is suggested to avoid the mode correlation and mode pairing problems that need to be solved in many other model updating procedures. By this method, the modal damping of a test data model and the finite element model is set to be the same fraction of critical modal damping. Mode pairing for mapping of experimentally found damping to the finite element model is thus not needed. The method is combined with model reduction for efficiency and employs the Levenberg-Marquardt minimizer with randomized starts to achieve the calibration solution. The performance of the calibration procedure, including a study of parameter bias and variance under noisy data conditions, is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  19. X-ray Diffraction Crystal Calibration and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Haugh; Richard Stewart; Nathan Kugland

    2009-06-05

    National Security Technologies’ X-ray Laboratory is comprised of a multi-anode Manson type source and a Henke type source that incorporates a dual goniometer and XYZ translation stage. The first goniometer is used to isolate a particular spectral band. The Manson operates up to 10 kV and the Henke up to 20 kV. The Henke rotation stages and translation stages are automated. Procedures have been developed to characterize and calibrate various NIF diagnostics and their components. The diagnostics include X-ray cameras, gated imagers, streak cameras, and other X-ray imaging systems. Components that have been analyzed include filters, filter arrays, grazing incidence mirrors, and various crystals, both flat and curved. Recent efforts on the Henke system are aimed at characterizing and calibrating imaging crystals and curved crystals used as the major component of an X-ray spectrometer. The presentation will concentrate on these results. The work has been done at energies ranging from 3 keV to 16 keV. The major goal was to evaluate the performance quality of the crystal for its intended application. For the imaging crystals we measured the laser beam reflection offset from the X-ray beam and the reflectivity curves. For the curved spectrometer crystal, which was a natural crystal, resolving power was critical. It was first necessary to find sources of crystals that had sufficiently narrow reflectivity curves. It was then necessary to determine which crystals retained their resolving power after being thinned and glued to a curved substrate.

  20. Calibration of the modified Electrical Low-Pressure Impactor (ELPI) for use with pressurized pharmaceutical aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kotian, Reshma; Peart, Joanne; Bryner, Joan; Byron, Peter R

    2009-03-01

    The modified Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) is currently being used in several laboratories to determine inherent electrostatic charge of pharmaceutical aerosols as a function of their particle size. However, the ELPI appears to underestimate the aerodynamic particle size distributions (aPSDs) of pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), casting doubt upon the manufacturer's calibration. In the present study, four commercially available pMDIs with a range of aPSDs were used to recalibrate cutoff diameters (d50s) of the ELPI stages using a reference ACI. Particle size analyses were performed in a mensurated ACI and a calibrated modified ELPI (n = 5); stage coating was employed in both instruments. The ACI data were fitted to a lognormal cumulative distribution function by nonlinear regression analysis. Best estimates for mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) for each pMDI were obtained and used in combination with impaction results from the modified ELPI to determine new d50s for each of the ELPI stages by numerical methods. Ventolin HFA was employed to validate the new ELPI d50 values. The curve-fitting procedure produced excellent fits of the ACI data for all the calibration pMDIs, which were well modeled as mono-modal and lognormally distributed. The mean d50s obtained following recalibration of the modified ELPI were found to deviate increasingly from the manufacturer-supplied values as aerodynamic diameter decreased. Ventolin HFA's MMAD determined using the modified ELPI with the manufacturer-supplied d50s was 2.06 +/- 0.08 microm. The MMAD calculated using the recalibrated d50s was 2.63 +/- 0.09 microm, which was statistically indistinguishable (p = 0.0852) from that determined for Ventolin HFA using the ACI (2.73 +/- 0.09 microm). In the absence of a comprehensive recalibration of the ELPI using monodisperse aerosols, the mean d50s for stages 4-12 of ELPI reported offer a practical way of analyzing the a