Sample records for california gas company

  1. 76 FR 67177 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...EL12-5-000] Pacific Gas and Electric Company; California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take...Complainant) file a complaint against the California Independent System Operator Corporation (Respondent),...

  2. Utilization requirements. A southern California Gas Company project SAGE report: Utilization requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Schoen, R.; Hirshberg, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    Utilization requirements are given and comparisons made of two phase III SAGE (solar assisted gas energy) installations in California: (1) a retrofit installation in an existing apartment building in El Toro, and (2) an installation in a new apartment building in Upland. Such testing in the field revealed the requirements to be met if SAGE-type installations are to become commercially practical on a widespread basis in electric and gas energy usage.

  3. 76 FR 21735 - Solutions for Utilities, Inc.v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ...against Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern...SCE), San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E), and...regarding interconnection to the electric grid; price to be paid to renewable generators; and non-price...

  4. 75 FR 42432 - Northern Natural Gas Company, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ...Company, Florida Gas Transmission...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company...Matagorda Offshore Pipeline System Abandonment Project and Request...Matagorda Offshore Pipeline System Abandonment Project (Project...Northern Natural Gas Company,...

  5. 75 FR 73071 - Northern Natural Gas Company, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ...Company, Florida Gas Transmission...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company...Matagorda Offshore Pipeline System Abandonment Project November...Matagorda Offshore Pipeline System Abandonment Project proposed...Northern Natural Gas Company,...

  6. Accepted for publication in a special issue of Energy and Buildings. This research effort was funded by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) through the California Institute

    E-print Network

    LBNL-49018 DA-438 Accepted for publication in a special issue of Energy and Buildings. This research effort was funded by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) through the California Institute the endorsement or agreement of any CIEE sponsor. Pacific Gas & Electric Company's funding is provided

  7. Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

  8. Natural gas annual 1992: Supplement: Company profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The data for the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement : Company Profiles are taken from Form EIA-176, (open quotes) Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition (close quotes). Other sources include industry literature and corporate annual reports to shareholders. The companies appearing in this report are major interstate natural gas pipeline companies, large distribution companies, or combination companies with both pipeline and distribution operations. The report contains profiles of 45 corporate families. The profiles describe briefly each company, where it operates, and any important issues that the company faces. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the 45 large companies profiled.

  9. 78 FR 30915 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Nevada Irrigation District; Notice of Availability of the Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ...Project No. 2310-193-California; Project No. 2266-102-California] Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Nevada Irrigation District; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Drum-Spaulding and Yuba-Bear...

  10. 76 FR 40721 - Southern California Edison Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ...Commission [Docket No. EL11-48-000] Southern California Edison Company; Notice of...Commission), 18 CFR 385.207 (2011), Southern California Edison Company filed a petition...specific provisions of FERC's Order 2003 et. seq. requirement to annually...

  11. 170. Credit SHS. Northern California Power Company substation, Bully Hill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    170. Credit SHS. Northern California Power Company substation, Bully Hill Mine area. Note lack of vegetation, caused by nearby copper smelting works. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  12. 17 CFR 250.7 - Companies deemed not to be electric or gas utility companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... false Companies deemed not to be electric or gas utility companies. 250.7...250.7 Companies deemed not to be electric or gas utility companies. (a...businesses other than the business of an electric or gas utility company, shall not...

  13. Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-18

    This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. 75 FR 62517 - California Water Service Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...13802-000] California Water Service Company; Notice of...Applicant: California Water Service Company. e. Name of Project: Palos Verdes Energy Recovery Project....

  15. 40. Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, Los Angeles, California, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, Los Angeles, California, dated July 1937. (Microfiched drawings located at the Denver Service Center, #113/41906-set of 2) IMPROVEMENTS IN SEWAGE TREATMENT AND FILTER CHAMBER. - Water Reclamation Plant, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  16. Appendix C: UC San Diego Start-Up Companies Located in California Region Total

    E-print Network

    Wang, Deli

    Appendix C: UC San Diego Start-Up Companies Located in California Region Total Company Name City,393 Page 1 of 2 #12;Appendix C: UC San Diego Start-Up Companies Located in California Region Total Company, Inc. Burlingame $571,000 5 1999 Askjeeves.com Oakland $1,200,000 10 1999 Hispanic Scholarship Fund San

  17. 3. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE LOOKING WEST. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  18. 2. VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE, LOOKING EAST. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  19. 1. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE, LOOKING NORTH. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  20. 7. VIEW OF INTERIOR WALL OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF INTERIOR WALL OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2. HOUSE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  1. 6. VIEW OF INTERIOR WALL OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF INTERIOR WALL OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE, LOOKING NORTH. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  2. 4. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2 HOUSE LOOKING SOUTH. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  3. 8. VIEW OF INTERIOR WALL OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF INTERIOR WALL OF SARATOGA GAS LIGHT COMPANY GASHOLDER NO. 2. HOUSE, LOOKING EAST. - Saratoga Gas Light Company, Gasholder No. 2, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Substation Facility, intersection of Excelsior & East Avenues, Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, NY

  4. 78 FR 37213 - Southern Union Company, d/b/a Missouri Gas Energy; Laclede Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...Southern Union Company, d/b/a Missouri Gas Energy; Laclede...Southern Union Company, d/b/a Missouri Gas Energy (MGE Southern...Southern Union pursuant to section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act...certificate to transport gas on a no-fee exchange basis...

  5. 76 FR 7186 - TGP Development Company, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ...EL11-17-000] TGP Development Company, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint February...2006), filed a complaint against the California Independent System Operator Corporation (CAISO or...

  6. Performance of the Southern California Edison Company Stirling dish

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C.W. [Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (United States); Stone, K.W. [Mako Enterprises, Huntington Beach, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) and United Stirling AB of Sweden (USAB) formed a joint venture in 1982 to develop and produce a Stirling dish solar generating system. In this report, the six year development and testing program continued by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) is described. Each Stirling dish module consists of a sun tracking dish concentrator developed by the MDAC and a Stirling engine driven power conversion unit (PCU) developed by USAB. The Stirling dish system demonstrated twice the peak and daily solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of any other system then under development. This system continues to set the performance standard for solar to electric systems being developed in the early 1990`s. Test data are presented and used to estimate the performance of a commercial system.

  7. 75 FR 82378 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and the Commission...abandon by sale to Tauber Pipeline L.L.C. (Tauber...General Counsel, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana...requesting approval for abandonment by sale to Tauber...

  8. 77 FR 33213 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC (Transco...000 horsepower high speed electric motors and associated...document. For assistance, contact FERC at FERCOnlineSupport...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC,...

  9. 77 FR 70424 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ...Applicant: Pacific Gas and Electric Company. e. Name of Project...Coordinator, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 245 Market Street...of Request: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (licensee) is proposing...design of an unconstructed fish barrier structure in...

  10. 78 FR 77444 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Stingray Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ...Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Stingray Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of...Downers Grove, Illinois 60515-7918 and Stingray Pipeline Company, L.L.C. (Stingray), 110 Louisiana Street, Suite 3300,...

  11. 7. Claremont Gas Light Company/Gas Works, Monadnock Mills. The iron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Claremont Gas Light Company/Gas Works, Monadnock Mills. The iron gas holder is still in place inside the remains of the exterior brick walls. - Monadnock Mills, 15 Water Street, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  12. 78 FR 48203 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit 3, Notice of Public Meeting on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit 3, Notice of...discuss and accept public comments on the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP), Unit 3 License...miles southwest of the city of Eureka, Humboldt County, California and consists of...

  13. 76 FR 72675 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status, Valero Refining Company-California, (Oil Refinery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ...Refining Company-- California, (Oil Refinery), Benicia, CA Pursuant to its authority...42) products consumed as fuel for the refinery shall be subject to the applicable duty...19 CFR 146.42) may be elected on refinery inputs covered under HTSUS...

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-029-1675, J. R. Simplot Company, Helm, California

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    Following a request from a Chemical Workers Union representative concerning excessive dust exposures at the J.R. Simplot Company, Helm, California, total nuisance dust air concentrations were measured during fertilizer, ammonium sulfate and ammonium phosphate, bagging and bulk loading.

  15. CALIFORNIA STATEWIDE RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE

    E-print Network

    CalGas) Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as the result), Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). KEMA

  16. 76 FR 7903 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Trackage Rights Exemption-California Northern Railroad Co.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ...Board [Docket No. FD 35462] Union Pacific Railroad Company...overhead trackage rights to Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP...conditions imposed in Norfolk and Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease & Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C....

  17. BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    CHRISTOPHER CLAY San Diego Gas & Electric Company LISA-MARIE SALVACION 101 Ash Street Division of Ratepayer., PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY (U 39-M), SAN DIEGO GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY (U 902- E), SOUTHERN. SHIGEKAWA SHIRLEY A. WOO JANET S. COMBS Pacific Gas and Electric Company Southern California Edison Company

  18. 78 FR 72668 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ...CP14-21-000] Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...November 15, 2013, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...pursuant to section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for the Pompano Compressor Station 21.5 Project....

  19. 75 FR 36376 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ...June 8, 2010, Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC...7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), an application...000 for the proposed abandonment. This filing is available...Vice President, Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America,...

  20. 76 FR 27312 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ...CP11-31-000] Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC...proposed by Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC...operate certain natural gas pipeline facilities on its existing...aboveground facilities; and Abandonment of certain...

  1. 76 FR 44903 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...30, 2011, Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC (Transco...regulations under the Natural Gas Act (NGA). Transco seeks...metering facilities, suction and discharge piping, and other appurtenances...Miksovsky, Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC,...

  2. 75 FR 61463 - The Narragansett Electric Company; Arcadia Gas Storage, LLC; Salt Plains Storage, LLC; Jefferson...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ...Consolidated)] The Narragansett Electric Company; Arcadia Gas Storage, LLC; Salt Plains Storage, LLC; Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; The Brooklyn Union Gas Company; Arkansas Ok Gas...

  3. 76 FR 10329 - Foreign-Trade Zone 3-San Francisco, California; Application for Subzone; Valero Refining Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ...Refining Company--California (Oil Refinery), Benicia, California An application...Solano County: Site 1 (510 acres) main refinery complex, located at 3400 East 2nd Street...farm, located southeast of the main refinery complex, Benicia; Site 3...

  4. 76 FR 67759 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ...Unocal Corporation Union Oil Company of California Pure...Company Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Company LP Burlington Resources...Exploration Company Inexeco Oil Company Group VI Eni Petroleum...LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc Eni BB Petroleum...

  5. 77 FR 64826 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ...Unocal Corporation Union Oil Company of California Pure...Company Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Company LP Burlington Resources...Exploration Company Inexeco Oil Company Group VI. Eni...LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc Eni BB Petroleum...

  6. Review of statistics of interstate natural gas pipeline companies

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1982-06-01

    This report presents the results of a review of the EIA publication Statistics of Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Companies, DOE/EIA-0145. This review was conducted for the Development, Collection, Processing and Maintenance Branch of the Natural Gas Division. It was intended to review the format, distribution and production costs of the annual publication. The primary focus was examining alternative approaches for reducing the volume and complexity of the data contained in the report. Statistics of Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Companies presents a tremendous amount of financial and operating detail on interstate pipeline companies subject to the Natural Gas Act. The report consists of more than 250 pages of tabular data with considerable amounts of overlap and redundancy among tables. Along with the obvious options of keeping the report in its current form or eliminating it entirely EIA has the option of condensing and streamlining the report. Primarily this would involve eliminating the appendices with their company level data and/or consolidating some of the 28 composite tables and placing them in a more manageable form. This would also help place a focus on the report which with its numerous, redundant and overlapping tables the current version lacks. Along with the consolidation and streamlining effort EIA could make the detailed information available upon request and at a charge. However, prior to any major revision the user community should be polled to determine how the report is currently used. (DMC)

  7. 78 FR 25069 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ...Commission [ Project No. 516-474] South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice...March 19, 2013. d. Applicant: South Carolina Electric & Gas Company. e. Name...Richland, and Saluda counties, South Carolina. The proposed action would...

  8. 75 FR 63166 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project Operation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ...Commission [Project No. 516-459] South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice...6, 2010. On August 28, 2008 South Carolina Electric & Gas Company, licensee...Saluda, and Newberry counties, South Carolina. The license for Project...

  9. 75 FR 9619 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station; Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ...50-395; NRC-2010-0077] South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Virgil...License No. NPF-12, issued to South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (SCE...located in Fairfield County, South Carolina. In accordance with the...

  10. 76 FR 53672 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ...Commission [Project No. 516-470] South Carolina Electric & Gas Company; Notice...August 9, 2011. d. Applicant: South Carolina Electric & Gas Company. e. Name...Richland, and Saluda counties, South Carolina. The proposed action would...

  11. 75 FR 62519 - Rocky Mountain Natural Gas LLC; KeySpan Gas East Corporation; ECOP Gas Company, LLC; MGTC, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...PR10-131-000; PR10-132-000; PR10-133-000; PR10-134-000; PR10-135-000; PR10-136-000 (Not Consolidated)] Rocky Mountain Natural Gas LLC; KeySpan Gas East Corporation; ECOP Gas Company, LLC; MGTC, Inc; Hill-Lake Gas Storage,...

  12. 2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-print Network

    2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued August 2011 DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2010 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  13. 2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS

    E-print Network

    2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued April 2013 OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2012 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

  14. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  15. 76 FR 18751 - National Fuel Gas Supply Corporation; Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ...Corporation (National Fuel) and Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (TGP). National...entitled ``An Interstate Natural Gas Facility On My Land? What Do I Need...dekatherms per day of firm Marcellus Shale natural gas transportation service to...

  16. Natural gas: Governments and oil companies in the Third World

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.; Hurst, C.; Mabro, R.

    1988-01-01

    It is asserted that oil companies claim to be generally receptive to gas development proposals; however, the lack of potential markets for gas, problems of foreign exchange convertibility, and lack of a legal framework often hinders their engagement. Governments, on the other hand, need to secure domestic energy supply and, if possible, gain some export earnings or royalties. An extensive discussion on the principles of pricing and fiscal regimes, potential points of disagreement is provided. A course of action is outlined from the managerial point of view to circumvent the most common pitfalls in planning and financing a gas project. Eight very detailed case studies are presented for Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Tunisia and Thailand.

  17. 78 FR 30918 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ...one (1.0) Bcf of cushion gas to working gas will be achieved by stimulation...wells to improve their withdrawal capacity. The stimulation will be conducted...Newsome, Vice President, Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC,...

  18. 76 FR 29745 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ...2011 Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC...section 7 of the Natural Gas Act, the prior notice...existing 10-inch natural gas pipeline located in St. Charles...the total cost of the abandonment is estimated to be...

  19. OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California

    E-print Network

    to arrive and settle, the number of oil seeps they discovered in California naturally increased. In Northern California, people were interested in the oil seeps in Humboldt, Colusa, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties the route used the seeps, pausing to lubricate their wagon wheels with oil. Interest in oil seeps became

  20. 75 FR 28554 - Foreign-Trade Zone 50 Long Beach, California, Application for Subzone, Louisville Bedding Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ...Louisville Bedding Company (Household Bedding Products), Ontario, California...is used to manufacture household bedding products, including mattress pads...domestic market, the finished household bedding products would be entered for...

  1. 76 FR 20653 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...CP11-145-000] Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...on March 24, 2011, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and part 157 of...tie-ins of the suction and discharge piping; and to install...

  2. 77 FR 26539 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Supplemental Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ...El Paso Natural Gas Company; Supplemental...proposed by El Paso Natural Gas Company (EPNG...certain meter, compressor, and lateral facilities...Project develops. On natural gas facility projects...storage yards, compressor stations,...

  3. 76 FR 76707 - El Paso Natural Gas Company: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...CP12-6-000] El Paso Natural Gas Company: Notice...certain meter, compressor and lateral facilities by El Paso Natural Gas Company (EPNG...develops. On natural gas facility projects...storage yards, compressor stations,...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

  8. 76 FR 73618 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...Project) proposed by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (TGP) in the above-referenced...construct and operate certain pipeline and compressor facilities in...Jersey in order to expand the natural gas delivery capacity to the northeast region of...

  9. 76 FR 41235 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ...that on June 28, 2011, El Paso Natural Gas Company (El Paso), P.O. Box...157 and section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act, to abandon, by removal...previously abandoned, in place, Benson Compressor Station (Benson Station)...

  10. 77 FR 37669 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ...regulations under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) as amended...040-horsepower (HP) compressor units at Natural's Compressor Station...to replace the two compressor units with new ones...Products and Services, Natural Gas Pipeline Company...

  11. 75 FR 13535 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ...notice that on March 12, 2010, Northern Natural Gas Company (Northern), 1111 South 103rd...Regulatory Commission's regulations under the Natural Gas Act for authorization to abandon a compressor station and appurtenant facilities,...

  12. 78 FR 23553 - Trunkline Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...CP12-491-000] Trunkline Gas Company, LLC; Notice...Proposed Trunkline Mainline Abandonment Project The staff of...the Trunkline Mainline Abandonment Project (Project), proposed by Trunkline Gas Company, LLC (Trunkline...100-1 and 100-2 looped pipeline systems and...

  13. 78 FR 56944 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ...NRC-2011-0115] Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent...amendment request submitted by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), on September 8...the Blue Lake Rancheria), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the...

  14. 75 FR 66781 - Habitat Conservation Plan for Pacific Gas & Electric Company's Operation, Maintenance, and Minor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service...Plan for Pacific Gas & Electric Company's Operation...Regions, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service...SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...application from Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E)...

  15. 75 FR 52937 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ...Docket Nos. CP10-481-000; PF09-14-000] Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of...2010. Take notice that on August 6, 2010, Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC (Turtle Bayou), One Office Park Circle, Suite...

  16. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Stadler; Chris Marnay; Goncalo Cardoso; Olivier Megel; Afzal Siddiqui; Judy Lai

    2009-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads

  17. 75 FR 80483 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in Docket...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone (713...johnston@elpaso.com; to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas, 77002, phone...

  18. 75 FR 74705 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed an application...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone: (713...rocan@elpaso.com, or Thomas Joyce, Manager, Rates and...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone:...

  19. 75 FR 53281 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ...concerning this application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee...Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002 or by calling 713-420-3299...Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, or by calling...

  20. 75 FR 18190 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in the...application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by...

  1. 75 FR 9197 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in the...application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by...

  2. 76 FR 19338 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed an application...application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by...

  3. 75 FR 38801 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in the...application may be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by...

  4. 76 FR 22093 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed with...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone: (713...rocan@elpaso.com, or Thomas Joyce, Manager, Rates and...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone:...

  5. 75 FR 27332 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, or by calling...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, or by calling...kalisek@elpaso.com, or to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, or by...

  6. 77 FR 38793 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ...No. CP12-469-000] Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare...abandonment of facilities by Northern Natural Gas Company (Northern) in Ochiltree...Texas, to Northern's Spearman Compressor Station in Spearman,...

  7. 77 FR 27048 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...CP12-106-000] Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C...Proposed Line 524j-200 Abandonment Project and Request...the Line 524J-200 Abandonment Project involving abandonment of facilities by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company,...

  8. 75 FR 74704 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ...Commission [Project No. 1894-203] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Notice...October 7, 2010. d. Applicant: South Carolina Electric and Gas Company. e...Fairfield and Newberry Counties, South Carolina. g. Filed Pursuant to:...

  9. 75 FR 8756 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ...50-395; NRC-2010-0067] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Virgil...License No. NPF-12, issued to South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (SCE...located in Fairfield County, South Carolina. In accordance with 10 CFR...

  10. 76 FR 12998 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ...COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0441] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority (Santee...Combined License On March 27, 2008, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company...

  11. 76 FR 16456 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0441] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority (Santee...Combined License On March 27, 2008, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company...

  12. 76 FR 14436 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ...COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0441] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority (Santee...Combined License On March 27, 2008, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company...

  13. 76 FR 11522 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ...COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0441] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE&G) and the South Carolina Public Service Authority (Santee...Combined License On March 27, 2008, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company...

  14. 17 CFR 250.7 - Companies deemed not to be electric or gas utility companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...specified in paragraph (d)(1) of this section shall file, or join in the filing of, a certificate on a form prescribed by the...company or any part thereof. Any such company shall file, or join in the filing of, the certificates specified in...

  15. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  16. California Student Get Away Special Payload GAS-450

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Glen; Burke, Edmund; Waldman, Marty

    1993-01-01

    The California Student Get Away Special Payload GAS-450, recently went into orbit on the STS-57 Mission, Space Shuttle, Endeavour, 21 June 1993, 6:14 AM and landed on the 29 June 1993 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Fifty students from 13 California Central Coast Schools and one in San Francisco designed and built 13 active experiments (6 modules) for this mission. Preliminary analysis of our completely reusable payload bus system indicated that the structure, power system, microprocessor, and sensor systems in each experiment module worked flawlessly. The experiments themselves performed exceptionally well with a 60 percent success ratio. The students are thoroughly documenting their own experiments and results via a standard research paper guideline generated by the GAS-450 technical staff. Lessons learned (program management and technical) are documented at the end of the paper. If any other organization needs payload/experiment development or NASA documentation assistance, then please contact us. We can help make your idea a space tested reality. Three years of intense effort culminated on 3 February 1993, the GSFC field operations team at Kennedy Space Center performed the final pressure decay and electrical tests upon the fully integrated GAS-450 flight canister. Subsequently, the payload was integrated with its parent GAS Bridge Assembly in mid-February and the bridge was transferred to the KSC orbiter team in late February 1993. The STS-57 mission originally scheduled to launch on the 29 April 1993 slipped until 21 June 1993. Our Payload shared the cargo bay with ten other GAS Canisters, the EUREKA experiment, the SHOOT experiment, and the SPACEHAB-1 module. The SIL technical staff retrieved the GAS-450 payload after flight from the NASA Spin Test Facility at KSC and shipped it back to California on the 22 July 1993 for student analysis at Allan Hancock College this summer.

  17. 75 FR 29404 - Contract Reporting Requirements of Intrastate Natural Gas Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...Contract Reporting Requirements of Intrastate Natural Gas Companies May 20, 2010. AGENCY...contract reporting requirements for those natural gas pipelines that fall under the Commission's...jurisdiction pursuant to section 311 of the Natural Gas Policy Act or section 1(c) of...

  18. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

  19. 76 FR 48853 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...Company of America LLC (Natural), 3250 Lacey Road, Suite...Commission's Regulations under the Natural Gas Act (NGA), as amended...250 horsepower horizontal compressor units (Units 9 and 10) at Natural's Compressor Station...

  20. 78 FR 67350 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...Company of America LLC (Natural), at 3250 Lacey Road...Section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part...pipeline lateral and compressor facilities located in...Texas. Specifically, Natural proposes to...

  1. 75 FR 9202 - Pacific Gas & Electric Company; Notice of Availability of Final Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...prepared a Final Environmental Assessment (FEA) regarding Pacific Gas & Electric Company's...Creek, in the San Joaquin River Basin. The FEA analyzes the environmental effects of the...minimize any environmental effects. The FEA concludes that the proposed seismic...

  2. 78 FR 42516 - Nevada Irrigation District; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Public Meetings Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...Commission [Project No. 2266-102; Project No. 2310-193; Project No. 14530-000; Project No. 14531-000] Nevada Irrigation District; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Public Meetings Soliciting Comments on the Draft Environmental Impact...

  3. 76 FR 45253 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ...Tennessee Gas), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed an application pursuant...the application should be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee...Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone at...

  4. 75 FR 30021 - South Carolina Electric & Gas Company Saluda Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Restricted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 516-459-South Carolina] South Carolina Electric & Gas Company Saluda Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a...

  5. 75 FR 73065 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ...Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in Docket No. CP11-22-000...application should be directed to Mr. Thomas Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee...Pipeline Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, phone (713)...

  6. 75 FR 63462 - Central New York Oil and Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ...550,000 dekatherms of natural gas per day, and would have a maximum...infrastructure to receive natural gas produced from Marcellus Shale production areas for delivery to...interstate pipeline systems of Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (TGP),...

  7. Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Harunuzzaman; M. Islam

    1994-01-01

    According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for

  8. Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between the California Air Resources Board and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.H.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The activities were performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) between June 1995 and December 1997. Work under this agreement was concentrated in two task areas as defined in the California Air Resources Board`s contract number 94-908 having an approval date of June 9, 1995: Task 1--EV and HEV Vehicle Testing and Assessment and Task 4--Advanced Battery Testing.

  9. 78 FR 12049 - The East Ohio Gas Company d/b/a Dominion East Ohio; Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...The East Ohio Gas Company d/b/a Dominion East Ohio; Dominion...The East Ohio Gas Company d/b/a Dominion East Ohio (``DEO...necessity pursuant to Section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act...Requesting approval of a lease pursuant to which...

  10. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  11. Subsurface gas offshore of northern California and its link to submarine geomorphology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet W Yun; Daniel L Orange; Michael E Field

    1999-01-01

    The northern California continental margin contains evidence of abundant subsurface gas and numerous seafloor features that suggest a causative link between gas expulsion and geomorphology. Analyses of seismic reflection, sidescan sonar, and high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data show that the occurrence of subbottom gas and the migration processes beneath the shelf differ from those beneath the slope. Subsurface gas, inferred from

  12. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2013-10-10

    A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

  13. Ecology of Oil/Gas Platforms Offshore California

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Cowen, R.K.; Kauwling, R.J.; Mitchell, C.T.

    1987-02-01

    The report summarizes the ecology of fishes and attached epifauna that associate with offshore oil and gas platforms of California and an evaluation of actual and potential use of the platforms for mariculture. The attached invertebrate biota in the upper 35 m of the water column is dominated by bay (Mytilus edulis) or California (M. californianus) mussels, depending upon location and/or age of the structure, with other mollusks, barnacles and polychaetes being of secondary importance. The attached community may take up to five years to fully develop. The fish fauna at shallow (less than 45 m of water), nearshore platforms is dominated by surfperches and rockfishes; major species in this assemblage are about equally divided between those with relatively large mouths (which consume large organisms such as crabs and small fish) and those with relatively small mouths (which graze on small epifauna and planktonic organisms). The fish fauna may take two years to attain a relatively stable community structure. The fish fauna at nearshore platforms is similar to that at natural reefs and oil islands in the area, but is more diverse among common species. As opposed to these other structures, platforms lack fish which associated with algae.

  14. 75 FR 52935 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ...proposes: (1) To construct and operate the Spruce Hill Air Blending Project facilities...pursuant to section 4 of the NGA, the New Spruce Hill Gas Quality Control Surcharge for...constructed adjacent to CIG's existing Spruce Hill Meter Station. CIG estimates...

  15. DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME II. APPENDICES D-F

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume (Volume II) contains a discussion of the analytical and sampling methods, quality assurance, and the ra...

  16. DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME III. APPENDICES G-J

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume (Volume III) contains raw data gathered by Kenvirons, calculations, and computerized reduced data submi...

  17. 77 FR 20617 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ...Paso Natural Gas Company (El Paso), P.O. Box 1087, Colorado...construct a new border crossing (Norte Crossing) at the International...United States and Mexico in El Paso County, Texas, all as more...open to public inspection. The Norte Crossing will consist of...

  18. How the Simplification of Work Can Degrade Safety: A Gas Company Case Study

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    How the Simplification of Work Can Degrade Safety: A Gas Company Case Study Hortense Blazsin money, particularly through economies of scale and employee specialization. On the other hand is to better understand the effects of the rationalisation on organizational reliability and performance

  19. 76 FR 70721 - Contract Reporting Requirements of Intrastate Natural Gas Companies; Notice of Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ...Reporting Requirements of Intrastate Natural Gas Companies; Notice of Availability of Form 549D Quarterly Reports for Q1 and Q2 2011 The Commission is making available to the public the Form No. 549D--Quarterly Transportation & Storage Reports for...

  20. 77 FR 29629 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ...CP12-96-000] El Paso Natural Gas Company...for the Proposed Norte Crossing Project...environmental impacts of the Norte Crossing Project...facilities by El Paso Natural Gas Company...and Mexico in El Paso County, Texas. The Norte Crossing...

  1. Estimating Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions in 2050 from New Buildings in California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Beardsley; J. H. Thorne; J. F. Quinn

    2009-01-01

    A major contributor to global warming is Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with carbon dioxide (CO2) as the lead constituent. While the United States has failed to take a leadership role in worldwide efforts to reduce global warming, California has implemented some of the strictest reduction goals in the country. Recent legislation in California requires significant GHG emission reductions in the

  2. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatementwaste heat (and CO 2 rich exhaust) for greenhouses, cheeseheat and power California Public Utilities Commission United States Energy Information Administration greenhouse

  3. 78 FR 51724 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ...9900-20-OAR] California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation; Request for Waiver...the control of emissions from new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines subject to...

  4. 77 FR 10598 - BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera...current and accurate information concerning the securities of BIOTECH Holdings Ltd. because it has not filed any annual...

  5. 75 FR 15429 - San Diego Gas & Electric Co.; California Independent System Operator; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ...Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EL00-95-229; EL00-98-214] San Diego Gas & Electric Co.; California Independent System Operator; Notice of Filing March 22, 2010. Take notice that on July 20, 2009, Avista Energy, Inc....

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Distributed Localization of Ultrasonic Sources of Gas Leak

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Distributed Localization of Ultrasonic Sources of Gas Leak.2 Testing with a nitrogen leak source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 6.3 Decentralized vs.2 The ultrasonic localization system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.1 Sensor board with a mounted

  7. Electricity Shortage in California

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Missner, Emily D.

    Much to the dismay of Californians, two large utility companies, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and Southern California Edison Company, have been granted consumer rate increases for the price of electricity. This rate hike will affect over ten million California residents who have already endured more than 30 power alerts since June including threats of state-wide rolling blackouts. The deregulation of power prices in California has led to soaring wholesale costs for electricity and frozen customer prices, creating $8 million in combined losses for these two companies. The price for power in the West skyrocketed to $1,400 per megawatt hour, as compared to $35 per megawatt hour at this time last year. Meanwhile, US Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson extended an emergency order which forces marketers and generators with access power to provide electricity to California. Richardson blamed the power shortage on the booming technology industry which has caused electricity use in California to rise thirteen percent and energy use throughout the US to increase by fourteen percent in the past year. Although the consumer price increases have not been determined, Pacific Gas and Electric Co. has suggested a seventeen percent increase, which would raise the average monthly electricity bill in California from $54 to $63.

  8. Helium soil-gas variations associated with recent central California earthquakes: precursor or coincidence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Decreases in the helium concentration of soil-gas have been observed to precede six of eight recent central California earthquakes. Ten monitoring stations were established near Hollister, California and along the San Andreas Fault to permit gas collection. The data showed decreases occurring a few weeks before the earthquakes and concentratiosn returned to prequake levels either shortly before or after the earthquakes.-Author

  9. 78 FR 27430 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ...Unocal Corporation Union Oil Company of California...Eni Petroleum US LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc. Eni BB Petroleum...A. Group VI. Shell Oil Company Shell Offshore...LP Shell Frontier Oil & Gas Inc. SOI Finance...

  10. 78 FR 64243 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ...Unocal Corporation Union Oil Company of California...Eni Petroleum US LLC Eni Oil US LLC Eni Marketing Inc. Eni BB Petroleum...Inc. Group VII Shell Oil Company Shell Offshore...LP Shell Frontier Oil & Gas Inc. SOI Finance...

  11. Features of the marketing strategy of oil and gas companies in exploration drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, I.; Malanina, V.; Kamynina, L.

    2014-08-01

    The implementation of national and regional programs for the development of new oil and gas provinces of Eastern Siberia poses the challenge of increasing geological exploration. The current drilling service companies' market structure, as well as the strategic task of search and exploration effectiveness requires qualitatively new approaches for choosing a contractor. The proposed strategy to select a contractor based on comprehensive analysis of certain groups of industrial, financial, infrastructural criteria allows not only to optimize the costs of exploration activities, but also to minimize preventively the risks of a poor geological exploration. The authors' SWOT- analysis of the marketing strategy of "Gazprom neft" for choosing a contractor outlined the problem of imperfection of the Russian legislation in the sphere of activities of service companies in the oil and gas sector.

  12. Reconsidering California Transport Policies: Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Uncertain Future

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Keefe, Ryan

    2012-02-24

    Over the past decade, the state of California has set aggressive greenhouse gas emissions targets across all sectors of the economy. The first major target occurs in 2020, when the state hopes to have reduced statewide greenhouse gas emission from their current levels to 1990 levels. This 320-page paper from RAND researcher Ryan Keefe takes a critical look at the policies adopted by California in its attempt to achieve these long-term goals. Visitors can look over the complete document if they are so inclined, but there is a brief summary available as well. The paper provides a history of climate policy in California, sections on policy options for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles, and new methods for evaluating California's light-duty transportation policies. Finally, the paper also includes a wealth of graphs, charts, and technical appendices.

  13. 75 FR 9404 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ...Commission [Docket No. PF09-14-000] Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Amended...Environmental Assessment for the Planned Turtle Bayou Natural Gas Storage Project and...discuss the environmental impacts of the Turtle Bayou Natural Gas Storage Project...

  14. 78 FR 18329 - Gulf South Pipeline Company, LP; Petal Gas Storage, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ...Pipeline Company, LP (Gulf South), 9 Greenway Plaza, Suite 2800, Houston, Texas...Gas Storage, L.L.C. (Petal), 9 Greenway Plaza, Suite 2800, Houston, Texas...Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, LP, 9 Greenway Plaza, Houston, Texas 77046, by...

  15. 75 FR 12580 - Southern California Edison Company, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Units 2 and 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ...Edison Company, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Units...Significant Impact The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC...operation of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Units...No changes to the National Pollution Discharge Elimination...

  16. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Southern California Outer Continental Shelf, December 31, 1979

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kalil

    1980-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil and gas in the Outer Continental Shelf off Southern California are estimated at approximately 730 million barrels of oil and about 1750 billion cubic feet of gas, as of December 31, 1979. Only two of the 13 known fields are on production at the present time and none is completely developed. Original recoverable reserves of

  17. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 2. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Solano County project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the wind turbine's first rotation. This technical report presents the experiences of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) with its wind turbine installation at Solano County, California. All documents and reports pertaining to PG and E's experience with wind energy at Solano County were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. The chronology of steps taken by PG and E in implementing the Solano wind turbine experience and some of the lessons learned are included in the report. In each section, important activities, critical assumptions, and interesting insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  18. Annotated bibliography: Fisheries Species and Oil\\/Gas Platforms, offshore California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Allen; R. K. Cowen; L. A. de Wit; T. J. Kauwling; M. S. Love

    1987-01-01

    The document (MMS OCS Study 86-0092) is essentially an appendix to two other MMS reports, the Ecology of Important Fisheries Species Offshore California (MMS OCS Study 86-0093) and the Ecology of Oil\\/Gas Platforms Offshore California (MMS OCS Study MMS 86-0094). The document consists of more than 950 annotated citations of the biology and fisheries of 32 fish and invertebrate species

  19. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

  20. Spatially explicit methane emissions from petroleum production and the natural gas system in California.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seongeun; Millstein, Dev; Fischer, Marc L

    2014-05-20

    We present a new, spatially resolved inventory of methane (CH4) emissions based on US-EPA emission factors and publically available activity data for 2010 California petroleum production and natural gas production, processing, transmission, and distribution. Compared to official California bottom-up inventories, our initial estimates are 3 to 7 times higher for the petroleum and natural gas production sectors but similar for the natural gas transmission and distribution sectors. Evidence from published "top-down" atmospheric measurement campaigns within Southern California supports our initial emission estimates from production and processing but indicates emission estimates from transmission and distribution are low by a factor of approximately 2. To provide emission maps with more accurate total emissions we scale the spatially resolved inventory by sector-specific results from a Southern California aircraft measurement campaign to all of California. Assuming uncertainties are determined by the uncertainties estimated in the top-down study, our estimated state total CH4 emissions are 541 ± 144 Gg yr(-1) (as compared with 210.7 Gg yr(-1) in California's current official inventory), where the majority of our reported uncertainty is derived from transmission and distribution. We note uncertainties relative to the mean for a given region are likely larger than that for the State total, emphasizing the need for additional measurements in undersampled regions. PMID:24758763

  1. Natural disasters and the gas pipeline system. Topical report, August 1994June 1995

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Atallah; S. Saxena; S. B. Martin; A. B. Willowby; R. Alger

    1996-01-01

    Episodic descriptions are provided of the effect of the Loma Prieta earthquake (1989) on the gas pipeline systems of Pacific Gas & Electric Company and the City of Palo Alto and of the Northridge earthquake (1994) on Southern California Gas` pipeline system. The emergency response plans and activities of South Carolina Electric & Gas Company during hurricane Hugo (1989) and

  2. 75 FR 7472 - Southern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ...Southern 2011/2012 Abandonment and Replacement Project, involving the abandonment and replacement...Southern Natural Gas Company (Southern...Interstate Natural Gas Facility On My Land...and modify certain pipeline facilities located...To adjust for the abandonment, Southern...

  3. Improving Grid Performance with Electric Vehicle Charging 2011San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved.

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    DC fast-chargers · 380 All-electric Car-2-Go fleet · 2,030 on EV rate (includes NEV) As of SeptemberImproving Grid Performance with Electric Vehicle Charging © 2011San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved. #12;EVs are Grid Assets © 2012 San Diego Gas & Electric

  4. Oil company brings photovoltaic solar power to the electric-utility industry in California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Smock

    1983-01-01

    Generous tax credits encouraged Arco Solar Inc. to bring photovoltaic power generation to California's electric utilities. While not yet cost-cpmpetitive, rapid technological development is improving the prospects for photovoltaic solar power. One breakthrough in the late 1970s dropped photovoltaic module prices from $20 a watt to $2.80 this year and a projected 40 cents by 1990. Arco sells power from

  5. A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilotin Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

    2006-04-28

    A geologic sequestration pilot in the Thornton gas field in Northern California, USA involves injection of up to 4000 tons of CO{sub 2} into a stacked gas and saline formation reservoir. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is leading the pilot test in collaboration with Rosetta Resources, Inc. and Calpine Corporation under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy and California Energy Commission's WESTCARB, Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The goals of the pilot include: (1) Demonstrate the feasibility of CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations representative of major geologic sinks in California; (2) Test the feasibility of Enhanced Gas Recovery associated with the early stages of a CO{sub 2} storage project in a depleting gas field; (3) Obtain site-specific information to improve capacity estimation, risk assessment, and performance prediction; (4) Demonstrate and test methods for monitoring CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations and storage/enhanced recovery projects in gas fields; and (5) Gain experience with regulatory permitting and public outreach associated with CO{sub 2} storage in California. Test design is currently underway and field work begins in August 2006.

  6. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: CANE RUN STATION, LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey of operational flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired utility boilers in the U.S. The FGD systems installed on Units 4, 5, and 6 at the Cane Run Station are described in terms of design and performance. The Cane Run No. 4 FGD sys...

  7. Oil and gas markets, companies, and technology in the 1990`s and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    During the late 1990`s and beyond, oil prices will be stagnant while costs increase, competition for markets and capital will be fierce, funds available for exploration and development will be limited, and environmental extremists will keep prospective areas off-limits. Higher taxes will limit growth in oil and gas demand and reapportion energy market shares. And a campaign to brand oil use as an ``addiction`` that must be cured will gather steam. But opportunities abound, too, even in the US High-quality properties are available throughout the US, independents can find and develop reserves cheaper than the majors, and new tools are available to reduce risks both in the field and in the market. Gas prices are firming and natural gas is often labeled the ``fuel of the future.`` To succeed in the petroleum industry of the 1990`s, all companies must accept change, be creative, and take initiative. To prosper, oil and gas producers and refiners and those who supply and serve the industry must face the new realities of the market. They cannot mark time until the return of 4,000 active rigs and $40/bbl oil. those days are never coming back. Never.

  8. Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Harunuzzaman, M.; Islam, M.

    1994-08-01

    According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for gas LDCs; and (2) to help PUCs respond to the EPAct directive. The study finds that it is appropriate for PUCs to pursue energy efficiency within the traditional regulatory framework of minimizing private costs of energy production and delivery; and PUCs should play a limited role in addressing environmental externalities. The study also finds that in promoting energy efficiency, PUCs should pursue policies that are incentive-based, procompetitive, and sensitive to rate impacts. The study evaluates a number of traditional and nontraditional ratemaking mechanisms on the basis of cost minimization, energy efficiency, competitiveness, and other criteria. The mechanisms evaluated include direct recovery of DSM expenses, lost revenue adjustments for DSM options, revenue decoupling mechanisms, sharing of DSM cost savings, performance-based rate of return for DSM, provision of DSM as a separate service, deregulation of DSM service, price caps, and deregulation of the noncore gas market. The study concludes with general recommendations for regulatory approaches and ratemaking mechanisms that PUCs may wish to consider in advancing IRP objectives.

  9. Regulating Greenhouse Gas 'Leakage': How California Can Evade the Impending Constitutional Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, Brian H.

    2006-06-15

    Federalist greenhouse gas regulation poses many constitutional pitfalls, and some fear that California's cap-and-trade and procurement cap proposals are vulnerable to constitutional challenge. An attack under the commerce clause seems to pose the biggest threat, but the author proposes an alternative that can eliminate this threat: market participation. (author)

  10. Regulating greenhouse gas 'leakage': how California can evade the impending constitutional attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Brian H. Potts

    2006-06-15

    Federalist greenhouse gas regulation poses many constitutional pitfalls, and some fear that California's cap-and-trade and procurement cap proposals are vulnerable to constitutional challenge. An attack under the commerce clause seems to pose the biggest threat, but the author proposes an alternative that can eliminate this threat: market participation.

  11. Review of performance-based ratemaking plans for US gas distribution companies

    SciTech Connect

    Comnes, G.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1994-11-01

    Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) is receiving increasing attention by energy utilities and their regulators. PBR is the industry term for forms of regulation that increase financial incentive for performance relative to traditional cost-of-service/rate-of-return (COS/ROR) regulation. In this report, PBR plans filed by US gas local distribution companies (LDCs) are described and reviewed. The rationale behind energy utility PBR is presented and discussed. Using nine plans that have been proposed by eight LDCs as a basis, a framework (typology) to facilitate understanding of gas utility PBR is presented. Plans are categorized according to the range of services covered by the PBR mechanism and the scope of the mechanism`s cost coverage within a service category. Pivotal design issues are identified and, based on the sample of plans, observations are made. Design issues covered include the length of time that the PBR is in effect (term); the relationship between PBR plans and status quo ratemaking; methods for formulating cost or rate indices, earnings sharing mechanisms, and service quality indices; and compatibility with gas utility DSM programs. The report summarizes observations that may be considered supportive of the rationale behind PBR. PBR is, however, not clearly superior to traditional regulation and few PBRs that are broad in scope have been adopted long enough to allow for a empirical analysis. Thus, the report concludes by identifying and describing commonly-cited pitfalls of PBR.

  12. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sullivan, John

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  13. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-14

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-339-1741, EMCO High Voltage Company, Sutter Creek, California

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    Possible exposure to several chemical substances during the fabrication of power-supply modules was investigated at the EMCO High Voltage Company, Sutter Creek, California, at the request of an employee. Environmental air samples were collected during the coating and developing process and during the epoxy potting operation. Samples were analyzed for chlorobenzene and xylenes; no overexposures were registered. No overexposure was observed to butyl-glycidyl-ether and no detectable levels of epichlorohydrin, cyclohexanone, 2-methoxyethanol, or 2-ethoxyethanol were found. During the pot soldering operation there was a potential for exposure to the fluxing agent, 3% hydrochloric-acid, and the operator had complained of throat and nose irritation. The author recommends that the fabrication operator wear protective gloves during coating and developing of copper boards. Gloves and goggles should be worn when weighing out the sodium-persulfate and when removing panels from the bench top etcher. Local exhaust ventilation with a movable duct should be used during the pot soldering operation.

  15. Industry-wide studies report of walk-through survey of Schilling, McCormick and Company, Incorporated, Salinas, California

    SciTech Connect

    Morawetz, J.; Steenland, K.

    1986-11-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted to determine the suitability of including Schilling, McCormick and Company, Salinas, California, in an industry-wide mortality and industrial hygiene study concerning workers with potential exposure to ethylene oxide. At this facility, spices are ground, milled, blended, mixed and filled for various customers. Et0 is used to treat unprocessed poppy seeds and Brazilian pepper as they arrive at the facility. Other spices are treated when necessary. A review of personal data on exposure levels showed that jobs where workers are exposed to 1 part per million or greater on the average include bottle dumper, receiving clerk, safety supervisor, forklift driver at warehouse, forklift driver at receiving, and Et0 chamber operator. Medical, industrial hygiene, and safety programs in effect at the facility were examined. The authors concluded that this facility meets the requirements for entry into the larger study; however, due to the limited number of person years (3000) at this facility compared to others in the study, and the cost of data collection and coding, the decision was made not to include this facility.

  16. DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME I. ACCEPTANCE TEST AND APPENDICES A-C

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume contains the process description and a discussion of the test results, operating history, and performan...

  17. Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle site operator program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Pacific Gas & Electric Company continues to expand an EV program that addresses the following: vehicle development and demonstration; vehicle technology assessment; infrastructure evaluation; participation in EV organizations; and meetings and events. This report highlights PG & E`s activities in each of these areas.

  18. 78 FR 49784 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit 3, Notice of Public Meeting on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ...50-133; NRC-2013-0187] Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit 3, Notice of Public Meeting on the...public meeting to discuss and accept public comments on the Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit 3, License Termination Plan....

  19. 77 FR 59607 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Planned SASABE Lateral...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ...Scoping Meetings for the Planned SASABE Lateral Project On October 18 and 20, 2012...Natural Gas Company's (El Paso) Sasabe Lateral Project (Project). The Project is a...Impact Statement for the Planned Sasabe Lateral Project and Request for Comments on...

  20. Annotated bibliography: Fisheries Species and Oil/Gas Platforms, offshore California

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Cowen, R.K.; de Wit, L.A.; Kauwling, T.J.; Love, M.S.

    1987-02-01

    The document (MMS OCS Study 86-0092) is essentially an appendix to two other MMS reports, the Ecology of Important Fisheries Species Offshore California (MMS OCS Study 86-0093) and the Ecology of Oil/Gas Platforms Offshore California (MMS OCS Study MMS 86-0094). The document consists of more than 950 annotated citations of the biology and fisheries of 32 fish and invertebrate species of commercial and recreational importance in the marine waters of California. In the hard-copies provided to MMS, the citations are arranged alphabetically by the senior authors last names. The bibliography has also been provided on floppy disks for use with the Sci-Mate Software System (produced and registered by the Institute for Scientific Information) on IBM-PC compatible computers. In this format and using the Sci-Mate Manager, the bibliography can be updated as desired, and searched, sorted and retrieved by author, date, species names, and various key words.

  1. 75 FR 76453 - Columbia Gulf Transmission Company and Southern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent to Prepare...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ...separates the offshore pipeline from the remainder of the onshore pipeline located in Cameron...appurtenances; and The gas transportation...for Construction Abandonment of the facilities...within the existing pipeline...

  2. 76 FR 55379 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed a prior...application should be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by telephone...Company, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, by...

  3. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  4. The True Cost of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Analysis of 1,000 Global Companies

    PubMed Central

    Ishinabe, Nagisa; Fujii, Hidemichi; Managi, Shunsuke

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidated the shadow price of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for 1,024 international companies worldwide that were surveyed from 15 industries in 37 major countries. Our results indicate that the shadow price of GHG at the firm level is much higher than indicated in previous studies. The higher shadow price was found in this study as a result of the use of Scope 3 GHG emissions data. The results of this research indicate that a firm would carry a high cost of GHG emissions if Scope 3 GHG emissions were the focus of the discussion of corporate social responsibility. In addition, such shadow prices were determined to differ substantially among countries, among sectors, and within sectors. Although a number of studies have calculated the shadow price of GHG emissions, these studies have employed country-level or industry-level data or a small sample of firm-level data in one country. This new data from a worldwide firm analysis of the shadow price of GHG emissions can play an important role in developing climate policy and promoting sustainable development. PMID:24265710

  5. The true cost of greenhouse gas emissions: analysis of 1,000 global companies.

    PubMed

    Ishinabe, Nagisa; Fujii, Hidemichi; Managi, Shunsuke

    2013-01-01

    This study elucidated the shadow price of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for 1,024 international companies worldwide that were surveyed from 15 industries in 37 major countries. Our results indicate that the shadow price of GHG at the firm level is much higher than indicated in previous studies. The higher shadow price was found in this study as a result of the use of Scope 3 GHG emissions data. The results of this research indicate that a firm would carry a high cost of GHG emissions if Scope 3 GHG emissions were the focus of the discussion of corporate social responsibility. In addition, such shadow prices were determined to differ substantially among countries, among sectors, and within sectors. Although a number of studies have calculated the shadow price of GHG emissions, these studies have employed country-level or industry-level data or a small sample of firm-level data in one country. This new data from a worldwide firm analysis of the shadow price of GHG emissions can play an important role in developing climate policy and promoting sustainable development. PMID:24265710

  6. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

  7. Public policy issues. A Southern California Gas Company project SAGE report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Hirsberg, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The use of solar energy to stretch our supplies of fossil fuels was investigated. Project SAGE (semi-automated ground environment) addresses itself to one application of this goal, solar assistance in central water heating systems for multifamily projects. Public policy issues that affect the rate of adoption of solar energy systems were investigated and policy actions were offered to accelerate the adoption of SAGE and other solar energy systems.

  8. 76 FR 19334 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ...located in Placer County, California, within...FERC Contact: Mary Greene, (202) 502-8865 or mary.greene@ferc.gov. j...operated by the Placer County Water Agency (PCWA...following revised Hydro Licensing Schedule....

  9. 76 FR 37105 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...located in Placer and Nevada counties, California. g. Filed Pursuant...386-5580. i. FERC Contact: Mary Greene, (202) 502-8865 or mary.greene@ferc.gov. j. Deadline...the following revised Hydro Licensing Schedule. Revisions to...

  10. 75 FR 10232 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License, Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ...Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On Battle Creek, the North Fork and South Fork Battle Creek in Shasta and Tehama Counties, California. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791a-825r h. Applicant Contact:...

  11. 75 FR 63167 - San Diego Gas and Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ...Services Into Markets Operated by the California Independent System Operator Corporation and the California Power...Investigation of Practices of the California Independent System Operator and the California Power Exchange Corporation;...

  12. 78 FR 49510 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ...Tennessee), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, filed in Docket No. CP13-526-000...this application should be directed to Thomas G. Joyce, Manager, Certificates, Tennessee...Company, LLC, 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002, or by calling...

  13. The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

    2006-05-31

    CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering

  14. Estimating Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions in 2050 from New Buildings in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, K.; Thorne, J. H.; Quinn, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    A major contributor to global warming is Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with carbon dioxide (CO2) as the lead constituent. While the United States has failed to take a leadership role in worldwide efforts to reduce global warming, California has implemented some of the strictest reduction goals in the country. Recent legislation in California requires significant GHG emission reductions in the coming decades to meet state-mandated targets. To better understand the relative contribution of urban growth to these emissions, we applied an Energy and GHG Impacts Calculator (referred to as “GHG Calculator”) to estimate GHG contributions for two statewide population growth scenarios for the year 2050. Implemented as part of the UPlan urban growth model, the GHG Calculator allows users to predict and compare GHG output from new development. In this paper, two scenarios, differing only in the spatial allocation of housing among zoning categories, are developed and tested for the year 2050 in California. The difference in total GHG emissions between these scenarios was less than 1%. Thus, while “smart growth” may be desirable for a variety of other reasons, the policy impact of the sprawl footprint per se on fixed-source GHG emissions is likely to be far less than effects from other factors, such as insulation and household energy efficiency. The GHG Calculator allows alternative emission-reducing measures to be tested, including modified energy mixes (e.g. a greater percent of renewable sources and lower carbon-based fuels) and conservation measures. The goal is to approximate 2050 emissions and determine what measures are needed to achieve the 2050 goal set by the Governor of California to help decrease the State’s overall contribution to global warming.

  15. 78 FR 33051 - Notification of Proposed Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas, Subzone 9F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ...authorized by the FTZ Board. Production under FTZ procedures could...components used in export production. On its domestic sales...natural gas, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, hydrocarbon gas mixtures...reduced on foreign status production equipment. The...

  16. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Farrar, C.D.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Hausback, B.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source (??13C = -4.5 to -5???, 3He/4He = 4.5 to 6.7 RA) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO2 discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m-2 d-1 at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO2 discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO2 flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30-50 t/d of CO2 are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO2 and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N2/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time.

  17. 76 FR 5368 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Greenhouse Gas Regulations; Within...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ...PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9260-4] California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control...SUMMARY: The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has notified...and is accepting written comment on California's request. DATES: EPA has...

  18. Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganji, A. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1992-07-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California`s and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

  19. 75 FR 10242 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ...docket. TGP requests authorization to expand its natural gas pipeline system in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in order to increase the natural gas delivery capacity to the northeast region of the United States...

  20. 76 FR 62395 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ...CS 205), Natural proposes to construct...horsepower (hp) gas fired compressor unit, abandon...Illinois, Natural proposes to abandon...two 2,800 hp gas fired compressor units at CS 310...Illinois, Natural proposes to...

  1. 78 FR 62012 - Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-11

    ...to deliver natural gas from Transco's existing...compression at its existing Compressor Station 195 in York...three existing natural gas-fired reciprocating engines and appurtenant...compression at its existing Compressor Station 205 in...

  2. 77 FR 73647 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...36-inch-diameter natural gas transmission pipeline located along the east side...36-inch-diameter natural gas transmission pipeline to be located east of the...environmental effects of the abandonment, construction and...

  3. Gas Bubble Disease in the Brain of a Living California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

    PubMed Central

    Van Bonn, William; Dennison, Sophie; Cook, Peter; Fahlman, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A yearling California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) was admitted into rehabilitation with signs of cerebellar pathology. Diagnostic imaging that included radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated space-occupying lesions predominantly in the cerebellum that were filled partially by CSF-like fluid and partially by gas, and cerebral lesions that were fluid filled. Over a maximum period of 4?months, the brain lesions reduced in size and the gas resorbed and was replaced by CSF-like fluid. In humans, the cerebellum is known to be essential for automating practiced movement patterns (e.g., learning to touch-type), also known as procedural learning or the consolidation of “motor memory.” To test the animal in this study for motor memory deficits, an alternation task in a two-choice maze was utilized. The sea lion performed poorly similar to another case of pneumocerebellum previously reported, and contrary to data acquired from a group of sea lions with specific hippocampal injury. The learning deficits were attributed to the cerebellar injury. These data provide important insight both to the clinical presentation and behavioral observations of cerebellar injury in sea lions, as well as providing an initial model for long-term outcome following cerebellar injury. The specific etiology of the gas could not be determined. The live status of the patient with recovery suggests that the most likely etiologies for the gas are either de novo formation or air emboli secondary to trauma. A small air gun pellet was present within and was removed from soft tissues adjacent to the tympanic bulla. While no evidence to support the pellet striking bone was found, altered dive pattern associated with this human interaction may have provided the opportunity for gas bubble formation to occur. The similarity in distribution of the gas bubble related lesions in this case compared with another previously published case of pneumocerebellum suggests that preferential perfusion of the brain, and more specifically the cerebellum, may occur during diving events. PMID:23372553

  4. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  5. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants, and they are typically used without venting range hoods. Objective: We quantified pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass-balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes in Southern California and the exposure concentrations experienced by individual occupants. We estimated nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for 1 week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs as well as NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of NO2 and CO were obtained from available databases. We inferred ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use from household characteristics. We also explored proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying by < 10%. Results: The simulation model estimated that—in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods—62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO2, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3,000, and 20 ppb for NO2, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Conclusions: Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards. Citation: Logue JM, Klepeis NE, Lobscheid AB, Singer BC. 2014. Pollutant exposures from natural gas cooking burners: a simulation-based assessment for Southern California. Environ Health Perspect 122:43–50;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306673 PMID:24192135

  6. 75 FR 74028 - Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ...of the Natural Gas Act (NGA...and Baltimore Gas and Electric...miles of new pipeline looping facilities...Virginia and abandonment in place of approximately...of Mainline B pipeline in Fairfax County...regulations for the abandonment of these facilities...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line...

  7. 76 FR 77994 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ...private land in Placer and Nevada counties, California. The transmission...alternatives and concludes that licensing the project, with appropriate...comments. Please contact Mary Greene by telephone at (202) 502-8865 or by email at mary.greene@ferc.gov if you have...

  8. Implications of Meeting California’s Greenhouse Gas Emission Goals in the Electricity Sector in 2050 and at the same time generating the Electricity needed by the State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    The State of California has promulgated strict greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction requirements in Assembly Bill 32 (AB32). AB32 states that by 2020 California GHG emissions will be reduced to 1990 levels, which is 427 MMt-CO2e/yr. The State has also passed Executive Order EO S-3-05, signed by Gov. Schwarzenegger that looks further into the future of GHG reduction goals in California. This executive order states that GHG emissions will be reduced to 20 % of 1990 levels by 2050, or to 85 MMt-CO2 e/yr. While not a legal regulatory requirement, meeting this stricter goal with much larger GHG emission reductions and at the same time providing for California’s electricity needs, would be a huge challenge. This poster examines potential issues that could arise should the State pursue compliance with this executive order. In this poster two GHG emission trajectories for California are developed. The trajectories are projected GHG emissions by sector from present to 2050. One trajectory shows the business-as-usual scenario, while the second trajectory attains the desired GHG emission rates that would be in compliance with EO S-3-05. While projections for all sectors are made, the focus of the poster is on the electrical energy sector. Today’s electrical energy portfolio is examined, and the associated GHG emissions from this sector are calculated from carbon emission factors. An important finding is that the emission factors for renewable sources of energy, while small, are not exactly zero, so that as the use of renewable energy sources grow, so do the CO2 emissions. As will be shown in the poster, these emissions are not trivial when compared to the goals of EO S-3-05. Then a 2050 energy portfolio for California is developed. Such a portfolio is not unique, and the strategy behind the particular portfolio developed is presented. Once the portfolio has been developed, issues associated with its attainment are identified and discussed. An example is the need for carbon capture and storage at high percentages for natural gas fired power plants to remain a viable source of electrical energy production in California.

  9. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 3 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit at Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the as found baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu and to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an SO{sub 2} limit of 1.8 lb/MBtu, the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with SO{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The system was designed to inject sorbent at a rate corresponding to a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 2.0. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air flow rate, and sorbent dispersion. Sorbent injection air flow is equal to 3% of the combustion air. The design includes modifications of the ESP, sootblowing, and ash handling systems.

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor REVISED NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARDS (NOPA)

    E-print Network

    emerging multiple DG/CHP/CCHP technologies, including energy storage and fuel flexibility, in diversified,346.00 $437,500.00 Awardee 2 Southern California Gas Company Combined Heat and Power with Thermal Storage, 2012, the California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program released

  11. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  12. 76 FR 42725 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Southern California Edison Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ...Verde No. 2 Transmission Line Project, California AGENCY...Verde No. 2 Transmission Line Project located in southern...The Palm Springs Field Manager signed the ROD, which...500-kV transmission line extension originating...the Palm Springs Field Manager at the above listed...

  13. Sycamore Cogeneration Company Box 80598, Bakersfield, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess, Executive Director

    E-print Network

    in Kern County, California. The facility consists of four (4) 75 MW (nominal) natural-gas fired General of the combustion gas turbine units at Sycamore Cogeneration Company in an extended startup mode. The petition-certification petition to increase the NOx limits due to a higher volume air compressor required for the DLN hardware

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative water supply processes in southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2012-12-01

    Burgeoning population centers and declining hydrological resources have encouraged the development of alternative water treatment systems, including desalination and wastewater recycling. These processes currently provide potable water for millions of people and assist in satisfying agricultural and landscaping irrigation demands. There are a variety of alternative water production methods in place, and while they help to reduce the demands placed on aquifers, during their operation they are also significant sources of greenhouse gases. The environmental advantages of these alternative water production methods need to be carefully weighed against their energy footprints and greenhouse gas emissions profiles. This study measured the greenhouse gas emissions of a wastewater treatment and recycling facility in Orange County, California to get a more complete picture of the carbon footprint of the plant. We measured atmospheric emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O throughout the water recycling process and at various times of the day and week. This allowed us to assemble a thorough, cross-sectional profile of greenhouse gas emissions from the facility. We then compared the measured emissions of the treatment plant to the modeled emissions of desalination plants in order to assess the relative carbon footprints of the two water production methods. Other water supply alternatives, including regional water importation, were also included in the comparison in order to provide a more complete understanding of the potential greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, we assessed the significance of wastewater treatment as an urban greenhouse gas source when compared to other known emissions in the region. This research offers a valuable tool for sustainable urban and regional development by providing planners with a quantified comparison of the carbon footprints of several water production options.

  15. A summary of geologic hazards for proposed OCS oil and gas lease sale 68, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Deborah J.; Richmond, William C.

    1982-01-01

    A geophysical survey, consisting of about 6,880 line-km of multisensor, high-resolution, seismic reflection data, was run in 161 of the 221 tracts tentatively selected by the U.S. Department of the Interior for inclusion in the southern California Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sale 68. Geologic hazards identified in the study area for which stipulations are recommended are active faults, mass transport, steep slopes (>10?), and steep-walled submarine canyons. Geologic hazards whose effects can be mitigated through existing technology and design and are not considered cause for stipulation are shallow faults, buried and filled channels, shallow gas, gas-charged sediments, hydrocarbon seeps, and unstable fan deposits. The Minerals Management Service has recommended that a stipulation be applied to 83 tracts where there is evidence of existing or potential sea-floor instability over a significant portion of the tract. Further data acquisition and analysis on a more detail-ed grid will be required of lessees or operators before drilling will be permitted on leases issued as a result of the sale.

  16. Seasonal variability of soil-gas radon concentration in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.; Minissale, A.

    1994-01-01

    Radon concentrations in soil gas were measured by the track-etch method in 60 shallow holes, each 70 cm deep and supported by a capped plastic tube, along several major faults in central California during 1975-1985. This set of data was analyzed to investigate the seasonal variability of soil-gas radon concentration in an area which has various geological conditions but similar climate. The results show several different patterns of seasonal variations, but all of which can be largely attributed to the water-saturation and moisture-retention characteristics of the shallow part of the soil. During the rainy winter and spring seasons, radon tended to be confined underground by the water-saturated surface soil which had much reduced gas permeability, while during the sunny summer and autumn seasons, it exhaled more readily as the soil became drier and more permeable. At several sites located on creeping faults, the radon-variation patterns changed with time, possibly because of disturbance of site condition by fault movement. ?? 1994.

  17. The Potential for California Agricultural Crop Soils to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emma C. Suddick; Kate M. Scow; William R. Horwath; Louise E. Jackson; David R. Smart; Jeffery Mitchell; Johan Six

    2010-01-01

    Climate change predictions for California indicate that agriculture will need to substantially adapt to reduced water availability, changing crops, and changes in temperatures, in order to sustain the level and diversity of crop production in California. California legislators recently passed the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) that requires all industries to reduce the three major greenhouse

  18. Prediction of central California earthquakes from soil-gas helium fluctuations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The observations of short-term decreases in helium soil-gas concentrations along the San Andreas Fault in central California have been correlated with subsequent earthquake activity. The area of study is elliptical in shape with radii approximately 160??80 km, centered near San Benito, and with the major axis parallel to the Fault. For 83 percent of the M>4 earthquakes in this area a helium decrease preceded seismic activity by 1.5 to 6.5 weeks. There were several earthquakes without a decrease and several decreases without a corresponding earthquake. Owing to complex and unresolved interaction of many geophysical and geochemical parameters, no suitable model is yet developed to explain the observations. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  19. Comparative evaluation of the impacts of domestic gas and electric heat pump heating on air pollution in California

    SciTech Connect

    Ganji, A. (San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States). Div. of Engineering)

    1992-07-01

    Residential space and water heating accounts for approximately 12% of California's and 15% of the United States, energy consumption. most Of the residential heating is by direct use of natural gas. combustion of natural gas is a contributor to the overall air pollution,, especially CO and NO{sub x} in the urban areas. Another efficient method for domestic water and space heating is use of electric heat pumps, the most popular category of which uses air as its heat source. Electric heat pumps do not emit air pollutants at the point of use, but use electric power, which is a major contributor to air pollution at its point of generation from fossil fuels. It is the specific objective of this report to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency and source air pollutants of natural gas heaters and electric heat pumps used for domestic heating. Effect of replacing natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps on air pollutant emissions due to domestic heating in two urban areas and in California as a whole has also been evaluated. The analysis shows that with the present state of technology, electric heat pumps have higher heating efficiencies than natural gas heaters. Considering the current electricity generation mix in the US, electric heat pumps produce two to four times more NO{sub x}, much less CO, and comparable amount of CO{sub 2} per unit of useful heating energy compared to natural gas heaters. With California mix, electric heat pumps produce comparable NO{sub x} and much less CO and approximately 30% less CO{sub 2} per unit heat output. Replacement of natural gas heaters with electric heat pumps will slightly increase the overall NO{sub x}, and reduce CO and CO{sub 2} emissions in California. The effect of advanced technology power generation and heat pump heating has also been analyzed.

  20. Market entry mode and competency building of Western oil companies in the Russian up stream oil and gas industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Paul M.

    This dissertation investigated the market entry and competency building strategies within the context of the Russian oil and gas industry. The study was designed to be of interest to business practitioners and academics given the growing importance of fossil fuel in the energy balance of the global economy and the importance of Russia as a supplier and purchaser in the international market. The study's mixed methodology provides an understanding on the environmental factors that are postulated to impact foreign direct investment flow into Russia and the oil and gas sector. A case study of a fictitiously named Western-Russo oil company was conducted to provide a deep understanding of how capability is viewed by Russian and Western employees and the factors that influences the implementation of a successful competency development program. The case was centered on the development of a Well-Site supervisor group within a Western-Russian oil company. Findings of the study showed that there was no correlation between corruption and foreign direct investment inflow into the Russian economy. The findings also showed that both Russian and Western employees in the oil and gas industry are less focused on nontechnical competency development issues, that Western employees are more orientated towards the bottom-line than Russian employees, and that both groups see operational management as a core competency. In the area of financial management and technology application, there were significant differences in the viewpoint of both groups. Western employees saw a stronger need for financial management and less need for technology application when compared to their Russian counterparts. The results have implications for Western business contemplating entering the Russian oil and gas industry. Western firms need to understand the key drivers that will help them overcome the social and cultural barriers between Western and Russian employees. The role of the company leader is very critical. The vision, passion, and a sense of realism of the person responsible for the market entry strategy will have a significant impact of the future success of the entry.

  1. Simulating greenhouse gas budgets of four California cropping systems under conventional and alternative management.

    PubMed

    De Gryze, Steven; Wolf, Adam; Kaffka, Stephen R; Mitchell, Jeff; Rolston, Dennis E; Temple, Steven R; Lee, Juhwan; Six, Johan

    2010-10-01

    Despite the importance of agriculture in California's Central Valley, the potential of alternative management practices to reduce soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has been poorly studied in California. This study aims at (1) calibrating and validating DAYCENT, an ecosystem model, for conventional and alternative cropping systems in California's Central Valley, (2) estimating CO2, N2O, and CH4 soil fluxes from these systems, and (3) quantifying the uncertainty around model predictions induced by variability in the input data. The alternative practices considered were cover cropping, organic practices, and conservation tillage. These practices were compared with conventional agricultural management. The crops considered were beans, corn, cotton, safflower, sunflower, tomato, and wheat. Four field sites, for which at least five years of measured data were available, were used to calibrate and validate the DAYCENT model. The model was able to predict 86-94% of the measured variation in crop yields and 69-87% of the measured variation in soil organic carbon (SOC) contents. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that the predicted variability of SOC contents, crop yields, and N2O fluxes was generally smaller than the measured variability of these parameters, in particular for N2O fluxes. Conservation tillage had the smallest potential to reduce GHG emissions among the alternative practices evaluated, with a significant reduction of the net soil GHG fluxes in two of the three sites of 336 +/- 47 and 550 +/- 123 kg CO2-eq x ha(-1) x yr(-1) (mean +/- SE). Cover cropping had a larger potential, with net soil GHG flux reductions of 752 +/- 10, 1072 +/- 272, and 2201 +/- 82 kg CO2-eq x ha(-1) x yr(-1). Organic practices had the greatest potential for soil GHG flux reduction, with 4577 +/- 272 kg CO2-eq x ha(-1) x yr(-1). Annual differences in weather or management conditions contributed more to the variance in annual GHG emissions than soil variability did. We concluded that the DAYCENT model was successful at predicting GHG emissions of different alternative management systems in California, but that a sound error analysis must accompany the predictions to understand the risks and potentials of GHG mitigation through adoption of alternative practices. PMID:21049871

  2. 76 FR 28016 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ...application under section 7(b) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157.5 of...authorization to abandon in place a compressor unit, with appurtenances, at El...and is no longer needed to provide natural gas transportation service. The...

  3. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Volume 3, Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit. A GR-SI system was designed for Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The unit is rated at 117 MW(e) (net) and is front wall fired with a pulverized bituminous coal blend. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the ``as found`` baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu (420 mg/MJ), and to reduce emissions of S0{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an S0{sub 2} limit Of 1.8 lb/MBtu (770 mg/MJ), the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. The design natural gas input corresponds to 18% of the total heat input. Burnout (overfire) air is injected at a higher elevation to burn out fuel combustible matter at a normal excess air level of 18%. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with S0{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air flow rate, and sorbent dispersion. Sorbent injection air flow is equal to 3% of the combustion air. The design includes modifications of the ESP, sootblowing, and ash handling systems.

  4. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States)] Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States)] Farrar, C.D. [U.S. Geological Survey, Carnelian Bay, California (United States)] Hainsworth, L.J. [Chemistry Department, Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia (United States)] Hausback, B. [Geology Department, California State University, Sacramento

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N{sub 2}/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  5. 75 FR 38092 - The Dow Chemical Company; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application...SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy...Security and Supply, Office of Fossil Energy, Forrestal Building, Room...

  6. 76 FR 44324 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ...of 6-inch diameter pipeline and appurtenances that...three shippers for the abandonment. Tennessee further...gathering) following abandonment. Famcor assumes any...3\\ See Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co., 8 FPC 276...

  7. 75 FR 66744 - Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket...EL10-84-001] Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas...CFR 385.215, CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (Complainant)...

  8. 75 FR 54618 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket...EL10-84-000] CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas...2010), CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (Complainant)...

  9. 78 FR 71599 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ...4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject to ground disturbance...

  10. 77 FR 28870 - Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ...during normal course of business (Project). FGS does not request...constituents of this planned project and encourage them to...Summary of the Proposed Project FGS is seeking an amendment...the normal course of business, to redeliver gas...

  11. 78 FR 37214 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...natural gas pipeline (referred to as the Brunswick Lateral); A new 21,830-horsepower (hp) compressor station (Compressor Station 166); An interconnection and pressure regulating station at the joining of the SVL B and...

  12. The Relationship Between the Dust and Gas-Phase CO Across the California Molecular Cloud

    E-print Network

    Kong, S; Lada, E A; Román-Zúñiga, C; Bieging, J H; Lombardi, M; Forbrich, J; Alves, J F

    2015-01-01

    A deep, wide-field, near-infrared imaging survey was used to construct an extinction map of the southeastern part of the California Molecular Cloud (CMC) with $\\sim$ 0.5 arc min resolution. The same region was also surveyed in the $^{12}$CO(2-1), $^{13}$CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. Strong spatial variations in the abundances of $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O were found to be correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The $^{13}$CO to C$^{18}$O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C$^{18}$O by the ambient UV radiation field. The cloud averaged X-factor is found to be $$ $=$ 2.53 $\\times$ 10$^{20}$ ${\\rm cm}^{-2}~({\\rm K~km~s}^{-1})^{-1}$, somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find no single empirical value of the X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (T$_{\\rm k}$ $\\lesssim$ 15 ...

  13. Water and gas seepage at the Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Svensen, H.; Polteau, S.; Planke, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Davis-Schrimpf seep field (Salton Sea, California) represents an ideal site for investigating the activity of hydrothermal systems. At this site, dozens of seeps (gryphons-pools) constantly expel water, mud, gas, and petroleum-fluids. We have conducted a long term monitoring on water and gas geochemistry of fluids erupted as well as annual temperature records. The fluids geochemistry and the temperature vary significantly at closely spaced locations and the water content present in the seeps acts as a key factor. The water salinity varies between fresh (1-3 g/L) in the gryphons, to hypersaline brine (145 g/L) in the pools. The gas emitted by the main vents revealed a composition averagely dominated by C02 (up to 99%) with smaller contributions of CH4. The seep waters represent meteoric waters modified by surface evaporation, with little or no evidence for a deep hydrothermal component. Seep gases, on the other hand, have a deep metamorphic/mantle origin. Temperature monitoring shows that gryphons are dominated by hydrothermal input and the pools by diurnal variations in air temperature. More recently we have conducted a broad investigation of the flux of CO2 and CH4 on a 20x20m meters grid covering a surface of over 20,000 square meters. The survey area extends over the main focussed vents and the results show that a considerable amount of CO2 and is constantly seeping through microseepage. Locally CH4 also exhibits areas with strong microseepage mainly where higher temperatures and surface minerals precipitations occur. These data reveal how important is the effect of microseepage when calculating global budgets of CO2 emissions in hydrothermal fields.

  14. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-06-01

    Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

  15. Analyses of Gas, Steam and Water Samples Collected in and Around Lassen Volcanic National Park, California, 1975-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Bergfeld, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    This report contains physical and chemical data from gas, steam, and water samples collected between July 1975 and September 2002 from locations in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park, California. Data are compiled as tables in Excel spreadsheets and are organized by locale. Most data are keyed to 1 of 107 site codes that are shown on local- and regional-scale maps. Brief descriptions of terminology, sampling, and analytical methods are provided.

  16. 75 FR 39680 - Houston Pipe Line Company LP, Worsham-Steed Gas Storage, L.P., Energy Transfer Fuel, LP, Mid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ...PR10-50-000] Houston Pipe Line Company LP, Worsham-Steed Gas Storage, L.P., Energy Transfer Fuel, LP, Mid Continent Market Center, L.L.C., Oasis Pipeline, LP (Not Consolidated); Notice of Baseline Filings July 2, 2010. Take...

  17. Evidence of injury caused by gas bubbles in a live marine mammal: barotrauma in a California sea lion Zalophus californianus.

    PubMed

    Van Bonn, W; Montie, E; Dennison, S; Pussini, N; Cook, P; Greig, D; Barakos, J; Colegrove, K; Gulland, F

    2011-09-01

    A yearling male California sea lion Zalophus californianus with hypermetric ataxia and bilateral negative menace reflexes was brought to The Marine Mammal Center, Sausalito, California, U.S.A., in late 2009 for medical assessment and treatment. The clinical signs were due to multiple gas bubbles within the cerebellum. These lesions were intraparenchymal, multifocal to coalescing, spherical to ovoid, and varied from 0.5 to 2.4 cm diameter. The gas composed 21.3% of the total cerebellum volume. Three rib fractures were also noted during diagnostic evaluation and were presumed to be associated with the gas bubbles in the brain. The progression of clinical signs and lesion appearance were monitored with magnetic resonance imaging, cognitive function testing and computed tomography. Gas filled voids in the cerebellum were filled with fluid on follow up images. Clinical signs resolved and the sea lion was released with a satellite tag attached. Post release the animal travelled approximately 75 km north and 80 km south of the release site and the tag recorded dives of over 150 m depth. The animal re-stranded 25 d following release and died of a subacute bronchopneumonia and pleuritis. This is the first instance of clinical injury due to gas bubble formation described in a living pinniped and the first sea lion with quantifiable cerebellar damage to take part in spatial learning and memory testing. PMID:22013748

  18. A brief history of oil and gas exploration in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California: Chapter 3 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The Golden State got its nickname from the Sierra Nevada gold that lured so many miners and settlers to the West, but California has earned much more wealth from so-called “black gold” than from metallic gold. The San Joaquin Valley has been the principal source for most of the petroleum produced in the State during the past 145 years. In attempting to assess future additions to petroleum reserves in a mature province such as the San Joaquin Basin, it helps to be mindful of the history of resource development. In this chapter we present a brief overview of the long and colorful history of petroleum exploration and development in the San Joaquin Valley. This chapter relies heavily upon the work of William Rintoul, who wrote extensively on the history of oil and gas exploration in California and especially in the San Joaquin Valley. No report on the history of oil and gas exploration in the San Joaquin Valley would be possible without heavily referencing his publications. We also made use of publications by Susan Hodgson and a U.S. Geological Survey Web site, Natural Oil and Gas Seeps in California (http://seeps.wr.usgs.gov/seeps/index.html), for much of the material describing the use of petroleum by Native Americans in the San Joaquin Valley. Finally, we wish to acknowledge the contribution of Don Arnot, who manages the photograph collection at the West Kern Oil Museum in Taft, California. The collection consists of more than 10,000 photographs that have been scanned and preserved in digital form on CD-ROM. Many of the historical photographs used in this paper are from that collection. Finally, to clarify our terminology, we use the term “San Joaquin Valley” when we refer to the geographical or topographical feature and the term “San Joaquin Basin” when we refer to geological province and the rocks therein.

  19. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-11-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

  20. Designing economic and legal mechanism of land management in oil and gas companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibulnikova, M. R.; Pogharnitskaya, O. V.; Strelnikova, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of economic and legal relationship in the sphere of land management provided by Russian government. The gas pipeline construction serves as an example to analyze the problems connected with leasing of both federal and privately owned lands. Comparative analysis of costs made by Gazprom to lease the lands at the stage of construction has been conducted. It has been concluded that the government should regulate relationships within the land sector to harmonize the interests of the Federation and private landowners.

  1. Gas and aerosol carbon in California: comparison of measurements and model predictions in Pasadena and Bakersfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. R.; Carlton, A. G.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Beaver, M. R.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gilman, J. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Woody, M. C.; Pye, H. O. T.; Kelly, J. T.; Lewandowski, M.; Jaoui, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Brune, W. H.; Lin, Y.-H.; Rubitschun, C. L.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Co-located measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) organic carbon, elemental carbon, radiocarbon (14C), speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and OH radical during the CalNex field campaign provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model's representation of organic species from VOCs to particles. Episode averaged daily 23 h average 14C analysis indicate PM2.5 carbon at Pasadena and Bakersfield during the CalNex field campaign was evenly split between contemporary and fossil origin. CMAQ predicts a higher contemporary carbon fraction than indicated by the 14C analysis at both locations. The model underestimates measured PM2.5 organic carbon at both sites with very little (7% in Pasadena) of the modeled mass represented by secondary production, which contrasts with the ambient based SOC/OC fraction of 63% at Pasadena. Measurements and predictions of gas-phase anthropogenic species, such as toluene and xylenes, are generally within a factor of 2, but the corresponding secondary organic carbon (SOC) tracer (2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxo-pentanioc acid) is systematically underpredicted by more than a factor of 2. Monoterpene VOCs and SOCs are underestimated at both sites. Isoprene is underestimated at Pasadena and over predicted at Bakersfield and isoprene SOC mass is underestimated at both sites. Systematic model underestimates in SOC mass coupled with reasonable skill (typically within a factor of 2) in predicting hydroxyl radical and VOC gas phase precursors suggests error(s) in the parameterization of semi-volatile gases to form SOC. Yield values (?) applied to semi-volatile partitioning species were increased by a factor of 4 in CMAQ for a sensitivity simulation, taking in account recent findings of underestimated yields in chamber experiments due to gas wall losses. This sensitivity resulted in improved model performance for PM2.5 organic carbon at both field study locations and at routine monitoring network sites in California. Modeled percent secondary contribution (22% at Pasadena) becomes closer to ambient based estimates but is still too primary compared with ambient estimates at the CalNex sites.

  2. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    EIA Publications

    2006-01-01

    The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

  3. AA Data Company Above the Limit Inc.

    E-print Network

    Instruments Toro Company Toyota Union Pacific Railroad Unisys Verizon Walt Disney Imagineering XeroxRegional Companies AA Data Company Above the Limit Inc. Acorn Technology Adamson Analytical Labo Portland Ce- ment Company Campbell Concrete of California Centrum Labs Cadence Design Systems Cryoquip

  4. COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL Air Carrier Operations and Dispatch

    E-print Network

    COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL Air Carrier Operations and Dispatch George Mason University 18 October 2010 #12;COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL 2 My history . . . 1970- BA 1974- RWin California 1981- RC, moved CONFIDENTIAL 3 1974 - 2010 #12;COMPANY CONFIDENTIAL 4 Tough life at Metron Aviation . . . #12;COMPANY

  5. 33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Areas and Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard...liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro...gas, liquefied natural gas, or similar liquefied gas products. (b) Location. The following areas are security...

  6. Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2009-10-01

    Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. It is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.

  7. Soil-gas Radon Emanation in Active Hydrothermal Areas at Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T.; Ararso, I.; Yanez, F.; Swamy, V.; Brandon, J.; Bartelt, E.; Cuff, K. E.

    2004-12-01

    Located along the Southern Cascade Range in Northern California, the Lassen Volcanic Center is one of the youngest major Cascade volcanoes. Aside from Mount Saint Helens, Lassen is the only Cascade volcano to erupt in the 20th century. In an effort to assess outgassing in and around Lassen, and to provide information that will contribute to a better understanding of its hydrothermal system, we have conducted detailed soil-gas radon emanation surveys in several active hydrothermal areas, which possess bubbling mud pots, steaming fumaroles, and boiling hot springs. Dozens of measurements have been made in each of these areas, which are then used to create maps that indicate areas of high outgassing. These maps are then employed to assess the degree to which volcanic and other gases are currently being emitted at Lassen, as well as to investigate patterns associated with these emissions. The mean of measurements made in a specific survey area is considered to represent the average radon flux in that area. Individual values exceeding the mean plus one standard deviation are considered to represent anomalously high emanation, while values less than the mean minus one standard deviation represent anomalously low emanation. Based on preliminary analysis of data collected so far, significant outgassing occurs along well-defined, northwest-southeast trending elongate zones in several areas. Values obtained in these zones are as much as three times background radon flux. These zones are believed to contain fractures that act as pathways for migrating gases. The results of studies conducted thus far indicate that further emanation surveys will generate very useful information.

  8. Landscape-level variation in greenhouse gas emissions in vineyards of central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbeco, M.; Steenwerth, K. L.; Jackson, L. E.; Higgins, C.; Yu, O.; Greenhut, R. F.; O'Geen, T.

    2011-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils can differ greatly across the landscape depending on soil type, landscape formation and management, making the implementation of mitigation practices challenging. In our study, we evaluated the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions from vineyard soils across a broad landscape in the Lodi Wine-grape District representing three soil types of different geologic history and under varying conventional management systems in the Central Valley of California. Soils of the District vary in space as a result of the depositional history of the parent materials from which the soils formed and subsequent weathering. The nature of the deposition of these materials has resulted in systematic patterns of soils in space. We sampled the following soils from this soil sequence over the larger landscape: 1) Slightly weathered granitic alluvium with low clay content located on the southern side of the district; 2) Intermediately weathered soils derived from granitic alluvium with high clay content located on the northern side of the district; and, 3) Highly weathered soils derived from metavolcanic and metasedimentary alluvium with intermediate clay content and rocky soils located on the eastern side of the district. The climate is Mediterranean with cool, moist winters and hot, dry summers. Initial results indicated that under wet conditions, the soils had similar carbon dioxide emissions with little variation between management or landscape formation. However, carbon dioxide emissions were typically higher in the alley than in the vine row. Nitrous oxide emissions were more variable in the higher clay soils as compared to sandier soils (0-180 g N/ha/day and 0-20 g N/ha/day, respectively). Nitrous oxide emissions were similar from the soil in the alley and vine row. We expect to see similar variability for carbon dioxide emissions under drier conditions later in the summer, but predict that it will differ by landscape position during pulse events (i.e., precipitation, irrigation, tillage) and that the magnitude of the differences will lessen with increased soil moisture and cooler temperatures in the winter. Though management such as tilling and irrigation can cause pulses of greenhouse gases from vineyard soils, our initial findings suggest that on a landscape level over longer time periods, differences between the soils and geologic history may be a better predictor of greenhouse gas emissions than management alone.

  9. Performance Evaluation of a Drilling Project in Oil and Gas Service Company in Indonesia by MACBETH Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachyar, M.; Rhezza Pratama, Novandra

    2014-04-01

    Decision-making in a project is a complex undertaking. A project is a temporary organization that is surrounded by inherent uncertainties. Uncertainties that may occur in the project, among others, are the uncertainty of the time, cost, and quality. To overcome this complexity, we need a project performance evaluation. At one of the services the oil and gas in Indonesia, the performance evaluation has been done, but it is done separately and only few criteria are evaluated, so that the overall project performance is still not visible. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate the performance of the company's project with the MCDA (Multi Criteria Decision Analysis) approach using MACBETH (Measuring Attractiveness by a Categorical Based Evaluation Technique) method that can model the elements of the project into a supervisory level group to facilitate decision making by the project manager. These measurements will produce levels of monitoring classification of project element groups, i.e. absolute vigilance, strong attention, close surveillance, and normal monitoring of the project elements. This research finds that the criteria of Effectiveness, Efficiency, Time, Cost, and Complete Reports & Field Tickets require absolute vigilance so that the performance criteria can be increased.

  10. 77 FR 53254 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption; BNSF Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ...rights were originally granted in Union Pacific Railroad Company...conditions imposed in Norfolk & Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease & Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C. 653...Davies, General Attorney, Union Pacific Railroad Company,...

  11. 78 FR 63564 - BNSF Railway Company-Trackage Rights Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...Trackage Rights Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company Pursuant...trackage rights agreement, Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP...conditions imposed in Norfolk & Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease & Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C....

  12. 78 FR 32709 - BNSF Railway Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...Trackage Rights Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP...conditions imposed in Norfolk and Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease and Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C....

  13. Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range

    SciTech Connect

    Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

    2011-07-01

    As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

  14. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

  15. Executive Summary -- assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California, 2003: Chapter 1 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, Donald L.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; French, Christopher D.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the oil and gas resource potential of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California (fig. 1.1). The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each Total Petroleum System defined in the province, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock type and maturation and hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined five total petroleum systems and ten assessment units within these systems. Undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively estimated for the ten assessment units (table 1.1). In addition, the potential was estimated for further growth of reserves in existing oil fields of the San Joaquin Basin.

  16. Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Jacobson; P. D. Moskowitz; J. O. Garrett; R. Tyler

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from

  17. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Project Brochures

    E-print Network

    Edison. Karl Brown, University of California. Steve Gates, PE, Consultant. Ken Gillespie, Pacific Gas Laboratory. Henry Lau, Southern California Edison. Richard Lord, Carrier Corporation. Douglas Mahone, Heschong Mahone Group. Dr. Mark Modera, Aeroseal Inc. Andy Rhoades, Thomas Properties Group. Stephen

  18. 76 FR 25685 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...Procedural Schedule for Licensing and Deadline for...Placer and Nevada counties, California. g...FERC Contact: Mary Greene, (202) 502-8865 or mary.greene@ferc.gov. j...to the following Licensing Schedule....

  19. Final environmental impact report. Part I. Pacific Gas and Electric Company Geysers Unit 16, Geothermal Power Plant, Lake County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The environmental analysis includes the following: geology, soils, hydrology, water quality, vegetation, wildlife, air resources, health and safety, noise, waste management, cultural resources, land use, aesthetics, socioeconomics, public services, transportation, and energy and material resources. Also included are: the project description, a summary of environmental consequences, and alternatives to the proposed action. (MHR)

  20. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) VERIFICATION GUIDELINE SERIES: ANR Pipeline Company PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS) VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR Pipeline Company, a subsidiary of Coastal Corporation, now El Paso Corporation. The PEMS predicts carbon doixide (CO2...

  1. 76 FR 13174 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ...Electric Company. e. Name of Project: French Meadows Transmission Line Project. f. Location: The French Meadows Transmission Line Project is located...line extending 13.27 miles from PCWA's French Meadows powerhouse switchyard to...

  2. 76 FR 13175 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ...requirement, pursuant to Article 403 of the Hat Creek Hydroelectric Project. b: Project...Electric Company. e: Name of Project: Hat Creek Hydroelectric Project (P-2661). f: Location: The Hat Creek Hydroelectric Project is located...

  3. Soil-gas Radon Emanation in Active Hydrothermal Areas at Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Chan; I. Ararso; F. Yanez; V. Swamy; J. Brandon; E. Bartelt; K. E. Cuff

    2004-01-01

    Located along the Southern Cascade Range in Northern California, the Lassen Volcanic Center is one of the youngest major Cascade volcanoes. Aside from Mount Saint Helens, Lassen is the only Cascade volcano to erupt in the 20th century. In an effort to assess outgassing in and around Lassen, and to provide information that will contribute to a better understanding of

  4. Cellulosic ethanol from municipal solid waste: a case study of the economic, energy, and greenhouse gas impacts in California.

    PubMed

    Chester, Mikhail; Martin, Elliot

    2009-07-15

    As cellulosic ethanol technologies advance, states could use the organic content of municipal solid waste as a transportation fuel feedstock and simultaneously reduce externalities associated with waste disposal. We examine the major processes required to support a lignocellulosic (employing enzymatic hydrolysis) municipal solid waste-to-ethanol infrastructure computing cost, energy, and greenhouse gas effects for California. The infrastructure is compared against the Business As Usual case where the state continues to import most of its ethanol needs from the Midwest. Assuming between 60% and 90% practical yields for ethanol production, California could produce between 1.0 and 1.5 billion gallons per year of ethanol from 55% of the 40 million metric tonnes of waste currently sent to landfills annually. The classification of organic wastes and ethanol plant operation represent almost the entire system cost (between $3.5 and $4.5 billion annually) while distribution has negligible cost effects and savings from avoided landfilling is small. Fossil energy consumption from Business As Usual decreases between 82 and 130 PJ largely due to foregone gasoline consumption. The net greenhouse gas impacts are ultimately dependent on how well landfills control their emissions of decomposing organics. Based on the current landfill mix in the state, the cellulosic infrastructure would experience a slight gain in greenhouse gas emissions. However, net emissions can rise if organics diversion releases carbon that would otherwise be flared and sequestered. Emissions would be avoided if landfills are not capable of effectively controlling emissions during periods of active waste decay. There is currently considerable uncertainty surrounding the recovery efficiency of landfill emissions controls. In either case, burying lignin appears to be better than burning lignin because of its decay properties, energy and carbon content We estimate the breakeven price for lignocellulosic ethanol between $2.90 and $3.47/gal (mu = $3.13/gal). PMID:19708339

  5. Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

    2003-06-01

    Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

  6. Advanced stimulation technology deployment program, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company, Eagle Gas Sands, Cedar Creek Anticline, Southeastern Montana. Topical report, August-December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Green, T.W.; Zander, D.M.; Bessler, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    In 1996, Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company (WBI) implemented an AST pilot program to improve production from wells completed in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline in southeastern Montana. Extensive pre- and post-fracture Absolute Open Flow Testing was used to evaluate the benefits of stimulation. Additional, gas production doubled when compared to direct offsets completed in previous years. This report summarizes the documentation of AST methodologies applied by WBI to an infill drilling program in the Eagle formation along the Cedar Creek Anticline.

  7. 75 FR 23757 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ...16-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline and other associated facilities...the opportunity to receive natural gas supplies, with a capacity of 40,000 dekatherms per...Eastern Transmission, LP's pipeline system. The Mainline...

  8. 77 FR 17471 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...adjacent to PetroLogistics' existing natural gas storage, compression and pipeline...existing underground storage cavern to natural gas storage: Cavern 28, currently...brine service; Addition of two compressor units totaling 27,000...

  9. 77 FR 34380 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) as...Ruston Storage Compressor Station located...Ruston Storage Compressor Station (Ruston...Worthington MLV-14 reciprocating compressor unit which was...enclosure, fuel gas metering...

  10. 75 FR 64303 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ...per day and would provide access to natural gas supplies in the Marcellus Shale supply area. The project would not, however...involve facilities necessary to produce natural gas from the Marcellus Shale. TGP has signed binding precedent...

  11. 76 FR 36910 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power [[Page 36911

  12. 76 FR 34692 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC,...

  13. 76 FR 36914 - Astoria Generating Company, L.P., NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC, Oswego...NRG Power Marketing LLC, Arthur Kill Power LLC, Astoria Gas Turbine Power LLC, Dunkirk Power LLC, Huntley Power LLC,...

  14. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...than liquefied natural gas facilities caused by a hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity that results...liquefied natural gas facilities by reason other than hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity, the...

  15. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...than liquefied natural gas facilities caused by a hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity that results...liquefied natural gas facilities by reason other than hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity, the...

  16. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...than liquefied natural gas facilities caused by a hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity that results...liquefied natural gas facilities by reason other than hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity, the...

  17. 18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...than liquefied natural gas facilities caused by a hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity that results...liquefied natural gas facilities by reason other than hurricane, earthquake or other natural disaster or terrorist activity, the...

  18. 77 FR 58122 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ...Interstate Natural Gas Facility On My Land...per day) and over time, may become capable...per day of natural gas from a new natural...develops. On natural gas facility projects...species. Several residences along the pipeline...reduce the amount of time you spend...

  19. Demonstration of natural gas reburn for NO{sub x} emissions reduction at Ohio Edison Company`s cyclone-fired Niles Plant Unit Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Borio, R.W.; Lewis, R.D.; Koucky, R.W. [ABB Power Plant Labs., Windsor, CT (United States)] [ABB Power Plant Labs., Windsor, CT (United States); Lookman, A.A. [Energy Systems Associates, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Energy Systems Associates, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Manos, M.G.; Corfman, D.W.; Waddingham, A.L. [Ohio Edison, Akron, OH (United States)] [Ohio Edison, Akron, OH (United States); Johnson, S.A. [Quinapoxet Engineering Solutions, Inc., Windham, NH (United States)] [Quinapoxet Engineering Solutions, Inc., Windham, NH (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Electric utility power plants account for about one-third of the NO{sub x} and two-thirds of the SO{sub 2} emissions in the US cyclone-fired boilers, while representing about 9% of the US coal-fired generating capacity, emit about 14% of the NO{sub x} produced by coal-fired utility boilers. Given this background, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Gas Research Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, and the Ohio Coal Development Office sponsored a program led by ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) to demonstrate reburning on a cyclone-fired boiler. Ohio Edison provided Unit No. 1 at their Niles Station for the reburn demonstration along with financial assistance. The Niles Unit No. 1 reburn system was started up in September 1990. This reburn program was the first full-scale reburn system demonstration in the US. This report describes work performed during the program. The work included a review of reburn technology, aerodynamic flow model testing of reburn system design concepts, design and construction of the reburn system, parametric performance testing, long-term load dispatch testing, and boiler tube wall thickness monitoring. The report also contains a description of the Niles No. 1 host unit, a discussion of conclusions and recommendations derived from the program, tabulation of data from parametric and long-term tests, and appendices which contain additional tabulated test results.

  20. 77 FR 17479 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ...Market Street, San Francisco, California 94105-1579: 1. CU Bancorp, Encino, California to become a bank holding company by acquiring 100 percent of California United Bank, also of Encino. CU Bancorp also has applied to acquire Premier Commercial...

  1. Natural gas pipeline technology overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-11-01

    The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced borates in 2013, and most of the

    E-print Network

    in the United States were manufactured domestically. To avoid disclosing company proprietary data, U.S. boron detergents and soaps toward glass and ceramics. Because China has low-grade boron reserves and demand

  3. 75 FR 71106 - San Jose Water Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ...No. 13799-000] San Jose Water Company; Notice...2010. d. Applicant: San Jose Water Company. e. Name...in Santa Clara County, California. g. Filed Pursuant to...Contact: Thomas Gee, San Jose Water Company, 1265...

  4. NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Apte, Michael G.; Black, Douglas R.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Lucas, Donald; Lunden, Melissa M.; Mirer, Anna G.; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of liquefied natural gas on pollutant emissions was evaluated experimentally with used and new appliances in the laboratory and with appliances installed in residences, targeting information gaps from previous studies. Burner selection targeted available technologies that are projected to comprise the majority of installed appliances over the next decade. Experiments were conducted on 13 cooktop sets, 12 ovens, 5 broiler burners, 5 storage water heaters, 4 forced air furnaces, 1 wall furnace, and 6 tankless water heaters. Air-free concentrations and fuel-based emission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, and the number of (predominantly ultrafine) particles over complete burns?including transient effects (device warm-up and intermittent firing of burners) following ignition--and during more stable end-of-burn conditions. Formaldehyde was measured over multi-burn cycles. The baseline fuel was Northern California line gas with Wobbe number (a measure of fuel energy delivery rate) of 1320-1340; test fuels had Wobbe numbers of roughly 1390 and 1420, and in some cases 1360. No ignition or operational problems were observed during test fuel use. Baseline emissions varied widely across and within burner groups and with burner operational mode. Statistically significant emissions changes were observed for some pollutants on some burners.

  5. Evaluating options for balancing the water-electricity nexus in California: Part 2--greenhouse gas and renewable energy utilization impacts.

    PubMed

    Tarroja, Brian; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sobhani, Reza; Feldman, David; Jiang, Sunny; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-11-01

    A study was conducted to compare the technical potential and effectiveness of different water supply options for securing water availability in a large-scale, interconnected water supply system under historical and climate-change augmented inflow and demand conditions. Part 2 of the study focused on determining the greenhouse gas and renewable energy utilization impacts of different pathways to stabilize major surface reservoir levels. Using a detailed electric grid model and taking into account impacts on the operation of the water supply infrastructure, the greenhouse gas emissions and effect on overall grid renewable penetration level was calculated for each water supply option portfolio that successfully secured water availability from Part 1. The effects on the energy signature of water supply infrastructure were found to be just as important as that of the fundamental processes for each option. Under historical (baseline) conditions, many option portfolios were capable of securing surface reservoir levels with a net neutral or negative effect on emissions and a benefit for renewable energy utilization. Under climate change augmented conditions, however, careful selection of the water supply option portfolio was required to prevent imposing major emissions increases for the system. Overall, this analysis provided quantitative insight into the tradeoffs associated with choosing different pathways for securing California's water supply. PMID:25087186

  6. 77 FR 31001 - Southern Natural Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ...will continue to provide safe reliable natural gas supplies to the eastern Alabama region...approximately 19.5 miles of 24- inch-diameter natural gas pipeline, beginning at the DeArmanville Compressor Station milepost (MP) 380.7,...

  7. 78 FR 33401 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ...transferred to a distribution affiliate (Line BT-14) and the other would be abandoned...12-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline (Line BT-39) extending from an interconnect north...4-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline (Line BT- 40) lateral extending from a tap on...

  8. Gas and Isotope Geochemistry of 81 Steam Samples from Wells in The Geysers Geothermal Field, Sonoma and Lake Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Janik, Cathy J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Johnson, Linda S.

    1999-01-01

    The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, with about 2000-MW electrical capacity, is the largest geothermal field in the world. Despite its importance as a resource and as an example of a vapor-dominated reservoir, very few complete geochemical analyses of the steam have been published (Allen and Day, 1927; Truesdell and others, 1987). This report presents data from 90 steam, gas, and condensate samples from wells in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California. Samples were collected between 1978 and 1991. Well attributes include sampling date, well name, location, total depth, and the wellhead temperature and pressure at which the sample was collected. Geochemical characteristics include the steam/gas ratio, composition of noncondensable gas (relative proportions of CO2, H2S, He, H2, O2, Ar, N2, CH4, and NH3), and isotopic values for deltaD and delta18O of H2O, delta13C of CO2, and delta34S of H2S. The compilation includes 81 analyses from 74 different production wells, 9 isotopic analyses of steam condensate pumped into injection wells, and 5 complete geochemical analyses on gases from surface fumaroles and bubbling pools. Most samples were collected as saturated steam and plot along the liquid-water/steam boiling curve. Steam-togas ratios are highest in the southeastern part of the geothermal field and lowest in the northwest, consistent with other studies. Wells in the Northwest Geysers are also enriched in N2/Ar, CO2 and CH4, deltaD, and delta18O. Well discharges from the Southeast Geysers are high in steam/gas and have isotopic compositions and N2/Ar ratios consistent with recharge by local meteoric waters. Samples from the Central Geysers show characteristics found in both the Southeast and Northwest Geysers. Gas and steam characteristics of well discharges from the Northwest Geysers are consistent with input of components from a high-temperature reservoir containing carbonrich gases derived from the host Franciscan rocks. Throughout the geothermal field, the carbon-isotopic composition of CO2 is consistent with derivation of carbon from Franciscan metasedimentary rocks. NH3 concentrations are high in most Geysers well fluids, and are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than would be expected in a the gas phase exhibiting homogeneous equilibrium at normal reservoir temperatures and pressures. Evidently, NH3 is flushed from the Franciscan host rocks at a rate that exceeds the reaction rate for NH3 breakdown. Many wells show clear influence by fluids from reinjection wells where steam condensate has been pumped back into the geothermal reservoir. Six wells were resampled over the time period of this study. One of these six wells was strongly affected by a nearby injection well. Three of the six resampled wells showed some signs of decreasing liquid/ steam within the geothermal reservoir, consistent with 'drying out' of the reservoir due to steam withdrawal. However, two wells exhibited little change. Analyses of gases from five surface manifestations (fumaroles and bubbling pools) are roughly similar to the deeper geothermal samples in both chemical and isotopic composition, but are lower in soluble gases that dissolve in groundwater during transit toward the surface.

  9. Electric Vehicle Charging and the California Power Sector: Evaluating the Effect of Location and Time on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohnen, Julia Meagher

    This thesis explores the implications of the increased adoption of plug-in electric vehicles in California through its effect on the operation of the state's electric grid. The well-to-wheels emissions associated with driving an electric vehicle depend on the resource mix of the electricity grid used to charge the battery. We present a new least-cost dispatch model, EDGE-NET, for the California electricity grid consisting of interconnected sub-regions that encompass the six largest state utilities that can be used to evaluate the impact of growing electric vehicle demand on existing power grid infrastructure system and energy resources. This model considers spatiality and temporal dynamics of energy demand and supply when determining the regional impacts of additional charging profiles on the current electricity network. Model simulation runs for one year show generation and transmission congestion to be reasonable similar to historical data. Model simulation results show that average emissions and system costs associated with electricity generation vary significantly by time of day, season, and location. Marginal cost and emissions also exhibit seasonal and diurnal differences, but show less spatial variation. Sensitivity of demand analysis shows that the relative changes to average emissions and system costs respond asymmetrically to increases and decreases in electricity demand. These results depend on grid mix at the time and the marginal power plant type. In minimizing total system cost, the model will choose to dispatch the lowest-cost resource to meet additional vehicle demand, regardless of location, as long as transmission capacity is available. Location of electric vehicle charging has a small effect on the marginal greenhouse gas emissions associated with additional generation, due to electricity losses in the transmission grid. We use a geographically explicit, charging assessment model for California to develop and compare the effects of two charging profiles. Comparison of these two basic scenarios points to savings in greenhouse gas emissions savings and operational costs from delayed charging of electric vehicles. Vehicle charging simulations confirm that plug-in electric vehicles alone are unlikely to require additional generation or transmission infrastructure. EDGE-NET was successfully benchmarked against historical data for the present grid but additional work is required to expand the model for future scenario evaluation. We discuss how the model might be adapted for high penetrations of variable renewable energy resources, and the use of grid storage. Renewable resources such as wind and solar vary in California vary significantly by time-of-day, season, and location. However, combination of multiple resources from different geographic regions through transmission grid interconnection is expected to help mitigate the impacts of variability. EDGE-NET can evaluate interaction of supply and demand through the existing transmission infrastructure and can identify any critical network bottlenecks or areas for expansion. For this reason, EDGE-NET will be an important tool to evaluate energy policy scenarios.

  10. California Climate Change Portal

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Global warming and climate change have been a top priority for a number of international organizations, and in recent years, a number of states have also become profoundly concerned about these transformations. Not surprisingly, the state of California has been interested in these subjects for some time, and this website is an initiative of the various agencies working in this area of research. On this site, visitors can learn about various initiatives sponsored by different agencies within the state and also peruse a list of FAQâ??s on the subject. First-time visitors will want to start at the â??Backgroundâ? section; they may then proceed to the â??Policy & Programâ? area, where they can learn what the state is doing to combat this situation. Some of these programs include a voluntary greenhouse gas emission registry for California companies and a research program to spur environmentally-friendly energy alternatives. Finally, the site also includes a very nice glossary of terms used in discussing global climate change.

  11. 75 FR 38093 - ConocoPhillips Alaska Natural Gas Corporation and Marathon Oil Company; Application for Blanket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...Natural Gas AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application...SUMMARY: The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy...Security and Supply, Office of Fossil Energy, Forrestal Building, Room...

  12. 78 FR 14784 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Garner Lng Offloading Facilities and Utilization Project...impacts of the Garner liquefied natural gas (LNG) Offloading Facilities and Utilization...involving construction and operation of LNG offloading facilities by Northern...

  13. 75 FR 61461 - Central New York Oil and Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ...Pennsylvania (the NS2 Compressor Station) with an electric-driven...300-hp centrifugal compressor; Two 30-inch-diameter natural gas pipelines, each about...long, connecting the NS2 Compressor Station with...

  14. 78 FR 2991 - Southern Natural Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ...under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) as amended, to relocate one of its existing 10,350 horsepower compressor units from its Lacombe Compressor Station in St. Tammany Parish Louisiana downstream to its Enterprise Compressor Station in Clarke County...

  15. 77 FR 38616 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ...Approximately 11.0 miles of 16-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline looping \\1\\ of ESNG's existing mainline facilities from Blackbird Greenspring Road, north of Smyrna, Delaware, southward almost to Dover,...

  16. 78 FR 53749 - Gulf South Pipeline Company, LP, Petal Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Availability of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...30-inch-diameter and 24-inch- diameter pipeline in Jasper, Forrest, Perry, Greene, George, and Jackson...and Petal Gas Storage transmission facilities in Jasper County, Mississippi (Jasper Compressor Station); One new 2,415-hp...

  17. 78 FR 62009 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-11

    ...Delaware: Approximately 5.5 miles of 16-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline; one mainline valve assembly; and one metering and regulating facility. The FERC staff mailed copies of the EA to federal, state, and local government...

  18. 77 FR 56834 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ...pipeline; Approximately 0.1 mile of 10-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline; Two new mainline valves; and One pressure regulating station. The FERC staff mailed copies of the EA to federal, state, and local government...

  19. Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

  20. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, J.D. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Edwards, E.B. [ Ogle & Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States); Heck, R.G. [Ogle & Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  1. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, J.D. (CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Edwards, E.B. ( Ogle Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (Ogle Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  2. Studies of the effects of experimentally produced noise associated with oil and gas exploration and development on sea otters in California. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riedman

    1983-01-01

    During the winter 1983 tape-recorded industrial noises associated with offshore oil and gas operations were projected underwater at Soberanes Point, California. Seismic-exploration sounds were produced using a multiple air gun array (4000 cu. in) and a single air gun (100 cu. in) along a 10-15 km transect paralleling the coastline from Rocky Point to Yankee Point. The behavior, density, and

  3. Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for the CT-121 FGD (flue gas desulfurization) process: A project proposed by Southern Company Services, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    A Program Opportunity Notice (PON) was issued by the Department of Energy (DOE) in February 1988, soliciting proposals to demonstrate technologies capable of commercialization in the 1990s, that are more cost effective than current technologies and capable of achieving significant reductions in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and/or nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. One of the sixteen projects selected for funding proposed by Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS), is a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process that removes sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and particulates, produces a salable by-product gypsum and eliminates solid waste production. This process removes SO{sub 2} and particulate matter using a unique, limestone-based scrubber called the Jet Bubbling Reactor (JBR). The purpose of this ICCT project is to demonstrate the process on high-ash and high-sulfur, US coal using several design modifications that will reduce the estimated cost of the present CT-121 process applications by 23% for power plant retrofit applications and 50% for new power plant installations. This project will be performed at the Georgia Power Company's Plant Yates, Unit Number 1, located about 40 miles southwest of Atlanta. The plant is presently in commercial operation.

  4. Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Adriano; Svensen, Henrik; Etiope, Giuseppe; Onderdonk, Nathan; Banks, David

    2011-08-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible setting for investigating the interactions of biotic and abiogenic geochemical processes in sediment-hosted hydrothermal systems. We present new temperature data and the molecular and isotopic composition of fluids seeping at the Davis-Schrimpf seep field during 2003-2008. Additionally, we show the first flux data for CO 2 and CH 4 released throughout the field from focused vents and diffuse soil degassing. The emitted gases are dominated by CO 2 (~ 98%) and CH 4 (~ 1.5%). By combining ? 13C CO2 (as low as - 5.4‰) and ? 13C CH4 (- 32‰ to - 17.6‰) with 3He/ 4He (R/Ra > 6) and ?D CH4 values (- 216‰ to - 150‰), we suggest, in contrast to previous studies, that CO 2 may have a significant Sub-Continental Mantle source, with minimal crustal contamination, and CH 4 seems to be a mixture of high temperature pyrolitic (thermogenic) and abiogenic gas. Water seeps show that ?D and ? 18O increase proportionally with salinity (Total Dissolved Solids in g/L) ranging from 1-3 g/L (gryphons) to 145 g/L (hypersaline pools). In agreement with elemental analyses, the isotopic composition of the waters indicate a meteoric origin, modified by surface evaporation, with little or no evidence of deep fossil or magmatic components. Very high Cl/Br (> 3,000) measured at many seeping waters suggests that increased salinities result from dissolution of halite crusts near the seep sites. Gas flux measurements from 91 vents (pools and gryphons) give a conservative estimate of ~ 2,100 kg of CO 2 and 11.5 kg of CH 4 emitted per day. In addition soil degassing measured at 81 stations (20x20 m grid over 51,000 m 2) revealed that 7,310 kg/d CO 2 and 33 kg/d CH 4 are pervasively released to the atmosphere. These results emphasise that diffuse gas emission from soil can be dominant (~ 75%) even in hydrothermal systems with large and vigorous gas venting. Sediment-hosted hydrothermal systems may represent an intermediate class of geologic methane sources for the atmosphere, with emission factors lower than those of sedimentary seepage in petroleum basins but higher than those of traditional geothermal-volcanic systems; on a global scale they may significantly contribute to the atmospheric methane budget.

  5. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Market Connections Report

    E-print Network

    Edison. Karl Brown, University of California. Steve Gates, PE, Consultant. Ken Gillespie, Pacific Gas Laboratory. Henry Lau, Southern California Edison. Richard Lord, Carrier Corporation. Douglas Mahone, Heschong Mahone Group. Dr. Mark Modera, Aeroseal Inc. Andy Rhoades, Thomas Properties Group. Stephen

  6. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION APRIL 2012

    E-print Network

    Awarded Funding Through the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas emissions and use of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include

  7. Comments on Potential Geologic and Seismic Hazards Affecting Proposed Liquefied Natural Gas Site in Santa Monica Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Lee, Homa J.; Parsons, Tom E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Boore, David M.; Conrad, James E.; Edwards, Brian D.; Fisher, Michael A.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Geist, Eric L.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hough, Susan E.; Kayen, Robert E.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Luco, Nicolas; McCrory, Patricia A.; McGann, Mary L.; Nathenson, Manuel; Nolan, Michael; Petersen, Mark D.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Powell, Charles L.; Ryan, Holly F.; Tinsley, John C.; Wills, Chris J.; Wong, Florence L.; Xu, Jingping

    2008-01-01

    In a letter to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) dated March 25, 2008, Representative Jane Harman (California 36th district) requested advice on geologic hazards that should be considered in the review of a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility off the California coast in Santa Monica Bay. In 2004, the USGS responded to a similar request from Representative Lois Capps, regarding two proposed LNG facilities offshore Ventura County, Calif., with a report summarizing potential geologic and seismic hazards (Ross and others, 2004). The proposed LNG Deepwater Port (DWP) facility includes single point moorings (SPMs) and 35 miles of underwater pipelines. The DWP submersible buoys, manifolds, and risers would be situated on the floor of the southern Santa Monica Basin, in 3,000 feet of water, about 23 miles offshore of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Twin 24-inch diameter pipelines would extend northeastward from the buoys across the basin floor, up the basin slope and across the continental shelf, skirting north around the Santa Monica submarine canyon. Figure 1 provides locations of the project and geologic features. Acronyms are defined in table 1. This facility is being proposed in a region of known geologic hazards that arise from both the potential for strong earthquakes and geologic processes related to sediment transport and accumulation in the offshore environment. The probability of a damaging earthquake (considered here as magnitude 6.5 or greater) in the next 30 years within about 30 miles (50 km) of the proposed pipeline ranges from 16% at the pipeline's offshore end to 48% where it nears land (Petersen, 2008). Earthquakes of this magnitude are capable of producing strong shaking, surface fault offsets, liquefaction phenomena, landslides, underwater turbidity currents and debris flow avalanches, and tsunamis. As part of the DWP license application for the Woodside Natural Gas proposal in Santa Monica Bay (known as the OceanWay Secure Energy Project), Fugro West, Inc., had already prepared a document discussing geologic hazards in the area, titled 'Exhibit B Topic Report 6 - Geological Resources' (Fugro West, Inc., 2007); hereafter, this will be called the 'Geological Resources document'. The USGS agreed to evaluate the information in the Geological Resources document regarding (1) proximity of active faults to the proposed project, (2) potential magnitude of seismic events from nearby faults, (3) thoroughness of the assessment of earthquake hazards in general, (4) potential hazards from ground rupture and strong shaking, (5) potential hazards from tsunamis, and (6) other geologic hazards including landslides and debris flows. Because two new earthquake probability reports were scheduled to be released in mid-April, 2008, by the USGS and the California Geological Survey (CGS), the USGS suggested a 6-month review period to enable a thorough incorporation of this new information. Twenty-seven scientists from the USGS and the CGS reviewed various sections of the Geological Resources document. This report outlines our major conclusions. The appendix is a longer list of comments by these reviewers, grouped by section of the Geological Resources document. Before discussing our reviews, we first provide a brief overview of geologic hazards in the proposed site area. This report is a snapshot in time and any future work in the area will need to take into account ongoing research efforts. For example, USGS scientists collected seismic reflection data in the spring of 2008 to study the structure and seismic potential of several faults in the area. Their interpretations (Conrad and others, 2008a and 2008b) are too preliminary to be included in this report, but their final results, along with other researchers' studies in the project area, should be considered in any future work on the Deepwater Port project.

  8. Gas and Water Geochemistry of Seeps from the Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA) and the Implications for Seep Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Svensen, H.; Hammer, O.; Onderdonk, N.; Polteau, S.; Planke, S.

    2008-12-01

    Water, mud, gas, and petroleum-bearing seeps are part of the Salton Sea Geothermal System in Southern California. Seeps in the Davis-Schrimpf seep field (~120x120 m) show considerable variations in both temperature and water geochemistry. Here we have investigated the spatial variation in carbon isotope composition of the two main seep gases, CO2 and CH4. In addition, seep water isotope composition has been analyzed to determine the source of the water, and temperature monitoring has been done during a 90 day period from mid December 2006. Gas analyses results show a 10 variation in the ^13C of methane and a 2 variation in the ^13C of carbon dioxide. The water salinity varies between fresh (1-3 g/L) in the gryphons, to hypersaline brine (145 g/L) in the pools. In situ evaporation can explain the salinity variations, supported by ^18O and ^D data, where most water samples are enriched in ^18O and define an evaporation trend in the ^D-^18O space. We conclude that the seep waters represent meteoric waters modified by surface evaporation, with little or no evidence for a deep hydrothermal component. Seep gases, on the other hand, have a deep hydrothermal/metamorphic origin. Time series analyses of the temperature monitoring data shown fundamental differences between the gryphons and pools, where the former are dominated by hydrothermal input and the latter by diurnal variations in air temperature. Our results highlight the complex dynamics of the seep field, and demonstrate the importance of detailed studies, both in space and time, to understand even well constrained seep systems.

  9. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  10. High-global warming potential F-gas emissions in California: comparison of ambient-based versus inventory-based emission estimates, and implications of refined estimates.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Glenn; Zhan, Tao; Hsu, Ying-Kuang; Gupta, Pamela; Pederson, James; Croes, Bart; Blake, Donald R; Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Ashford, Paul; Vetter, Arnie; Saba, Sabine; Slim, Rayan; Palandre, Lionel; Clodic, Denis; Mathis, Pamela; Wagner, Mark; Forgie, Julia; Dwyer, Harry; Wolf, Katy

    2014-01-21

    To provide information for greenhouse gas reduction policies, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventories annual emissions of high-global-warming potential (GWP) fluorinated gases, the fastest growing sector of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Baseline 2008 F-gas emissions estimates for selected chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a) made with an inventory-based methodology were compared to emissions estimates made by ambient-based measurements. Significant discrepancies were found, with the inventory-based emissions methodology resulting in a systematic 42% under-estimation of CFC-12 emissions from older refrigeration equipment and older vehicles, and a systematic 114% overestimation of emissions for HFC-134a, a refrigerant substitute for phased-out CFCs. Initial, inventory-based estimates for all F-gas emissions had assumed that equipment is no longer in service once it reaches its average lifetime of use. Revised emission estimates using improved models for equipment age at end-of-life, inventories, and leak rates specific to California resulted in F-gas emissions estimates in closer agreement to ambient-based measurements. The discrepancies between inventory-based estimates and ambient-based measurements were reduced from -42% to -6% for CFC-12, and from +114% to +9% for HFC-134a. PMID:24328112

  11. 75 FR 40814 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ...16-inch-diameter natural gas pipeline; One meter station/pig \\1\\ launcher at the interconnect with Texas Eastern Transmission, LP, near...filings, document summaries, and direct links to the documents. Go to http://www.ferc.gov/esubscribenow.htm....

  12. 77 FR 48508 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Kinetica Energy Express, LLC; Notice of Applications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ...420-1605 or email tom_joyce@kindermorgan.com or to Ms. Shannon M. Miller, Rates and Regulatory Affairs, Tennessee Gas Pipeline...calling (713) 420-5535 or faxing (713) 420-1605 or email shannon_miller@kindermorgan.com. Any questions concerning...

  13. 75 FR 81602 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ...construction of the new Southwick Compressor Station 260A at 248 Feeding Hills Road...Northampton Lateral Line. The Compressor Station will consist of a 2,000-horsepower...gas. In order to connect the Compressor Station to the Northampton...

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY of major energy trends and issues facing California's electricity, natural gas, and transportation fuel sectors. It also provides policy recommendations to conserve resources; protect the environment; ensure

  15. Outlook for California`s electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S.E.

    1996-03-01

    This article describes how the Southern California Edison Company deals with revolutionary change as the state`s electricity industry reinvents itself. The topics of the article include how competition has make things better for SCEC`s employees, customers, and shareholders, and an outline of the principal features of the electric utility industry in California.

  16. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Vineyards by Soil Carbon and Water and its Policy Implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Smart; Emma Suddick; Travis Pritchard

    Summary The increase in atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases (GHG) are leading to changes in global climates. Such climatic alterations could seriously impact upon the agricultural practices of California and even diminish yields and production of California's specialty crops including the wine industry. The project has started to address and concentrate on the issues of uncertainty in the emissions

  17. 21. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), H. B. Wesner, photographer, date unknown. 'VIEWS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCENERY. ARTESIAN WELLS, SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA. SUPPLYING THE GAGE CANAL OF RIVERSIDE.' - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  18. El Paso Electric Company, et al., 100 FERC 61,188 (2002). UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    between El Paso Electric Company (El Paso Electric), the California Attorney General (Attorney General Company" (Stipulation).4 4. El Paso Electric, the Attorney General, and the California Board entered1 El Paso Electric Company, et al., 100 FERC ¶ 61,188 (2002). 2 Id. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

  19. GEYSERS POWER COMPANY, LLC 10350 Socrates Mine Road

    E-print Network

    GEYSERS POWER COMPANY, LLC 10350 Socrates Mine Road Middletown, CA 95461 707.431.6000 IDATE as the "Occidental (OXY) Geothermal Power Plant No. I), Docket 81-AFC-1 Submitted by Geysers Power Company, LLC Pursuant to Section 1769of the California Energy Commission (CEC) Siting Regulations, Geysers Power Company

  20. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-print Network

    California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT STATUS OF THE NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT5002010037 #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Leah Mohney Primary Author Project Manager Steve Williams Senior was prepared by staff of the California Energy Commission. It does not necessarily represent the views

  1. GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  2. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in the Santa Maria Basin and surrounding areas, central California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 694 oil and gas exploration wells from the onshore Santa Maria basin and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Santa Maria basin is located within the southwesternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges on the central California coast. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time.

  3. 77 FR 60742 - BNSF Railway Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...agreement dated August 10, 2012, Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP...conditions imposed in Norfolk & Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease & Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C. 653...Trackage Rights Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company,...

  4. California energy flow in 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Mui, N.

    1996-09-01

    California energy consumption increased in 1994 in keeping with a recovery from the previous mild recession years. Although unemployment remained above the national average, other indicators pointed to improved economic health. Increased energy use was registered principally in the residential/commercial and transportation end-use sectors. A cooler-than-usual winter and spring was reflected in increased consumption of natural gas, the principal space-heating fuel in the state. Because of low water levels behind state dams, utilities turned to natural gas for electrical generation and to increased imports from out-of- state sources to meet demand. Other factors, such as smaller output from geothermal, biomass, and cogenerators, contributed to the need for the large increase in electrical supply from these two sources. Nonetheless, petroleum dominated the supply side of the energy equation of the state in which transportation requirements comprise more than one-third of total energy demand. About half of the oil consumed derived from California production. Onshore production has been in slow decline; however, in 1994 the decrease was compensated for by increases from federal offshore fields. Until 1994 production had been limited by regulatory restrictions relating to the movement of the crude oil to onshore refineries. State natural gas production remained at 1993 levels. The increased demand was met by larger imports from Canada through the recent expansion of Pacific Transmission Company`s 804 mile pipeline. Deregulation of the state`s utilities moved ahead in 1994 when the California Public Utilities Commission issued its proposal on how to restructure the industry. Public hearings were conducted in which the chief issues were recovery of the utilities` capital investments, conflicts with the Public Utilities Policies Act, management of power transactions between new suppliers and former utility customers, and preservation of energy conservation programs currently sponsored by the utilities. The issues were not resolved at year-end, but the state`s public utilities began to take steps to improve their positions in a future competitive market by cutting costs, improving efficiencies operating plants, and enlarging their nonutility interests.

  5. Heat-pump-centered Integrated Community Energy Systems: systems development, Consolidated Natural Gas Service Company. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, N.R.; Donakowski, T.D.; Foster, R.B.; Sala, D.L.; Tison, R.R.; Whaley, T.P.; Yudow, B.D.; Swenson, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Heat-Actuated Heat Pump Centered Integrated Community Energy System (HAHP-ICES) utilizes a gas-fired, engine-driven, heat pump and commercial buildings, and offers several advantages over the more conventional equipment it is intended to supplant. The general non-site-specific application assumes a hypothetical community of one 59,000 ft/sup 2/ office building and five 24-unit, low-rise apartment buildings located in a region with a climate similar to Chicago. This community serves as a starting point - the base case - upon which various sensitivity analyses are performed and through which the performance characteristics of the HAHP are explored. The results of these analyses provided the selection criteria for the site-specific application of the HAHP-ICES concept to a real-world community. The site-specific community consists of 42 townhouses; five 120-unit, low-rise apartment buildings; five 104-unit high-rise apartment buildings; one 124,000 ft/sup 2/ office building; and a single 135,000 ft/sup 2/ retail building located in Monroeville, Pa. The base-case analyses confirmed that the HAHP-ICES has significant potentials for reducing the primary energy consumption and pollutant emissions associated with space conditioning when compared with a conventional system. Primary energy consumption was reduced by 30%, while emission reductions ranged from 39 to 77%. The results of the site-specific analysis indicate that reductions in energy consumption of between 15 and 22% are possible when a HAHP-ICES is selected as opposed to conventional HVAC equipment.

  6. Public health assessment for Ralph Gray Trucking Company (A/K/A Westminster Tract No. 2633), Westminster, Orange County, California, region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD981995947. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-18

    The Ralph D. Gray Trucking site consists of 73 homes in west Orange County, California. Records suggest that oil refinery wastes were originally deposited there in the 1930s and then were redeposited in three locations during housing development in the late 1950s. The buried oil refinery waste are located in the backyards of approximately 29 residences. Seeps of tar-like material have surfaced in some of the yards. Chemical analysis of the waste material has shown that it contains volatile aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes; polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo(a)pyrene, phenanthrene, and chrysene; thiophene derivatives, which include smelly, sulfur-containing compounds; some trace metals like arsenic and chromium; and high levels of sulfate. The preliminary public health assessment identifies two potential exposure pathways of health concern at the Ralph D. Gray Trucking site. Residents may be exposed to waste contaminants from eating vegetables or fruits grown in their yards. The most likely contaminants to assimilate into vegetation are the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, chromium, arsenic, and lead, but no actual chemical analyses have been conducted of any fruits and vegetables. Site residents, especially children, may incidentally/accidentally ingest or have skin contact with the waste material or with contaminated surface soil and thus be exposed to a number of contaminants.

  7. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-print Network

    Manager Michael Gravely Manager Energy Systems Research Office Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director research and development activities specific to natural gas. In 2004, the CPUC designated the Energy California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT THE NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT

  8. Platts top 250 global energy company rankings

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2006-11-15

    The third annual survey of global energy companies measures companies' financial performance using four metrics: asset worth, revenues, profits and return on invested capital. The following industry segments were analysed: coal and consumable fuel companies; diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers and storage and transfer companies. Integrated oil and gas companies (IOGs) captured nine out of the top ten spots while IPPS struggled in 2005 as the sector on a whole lost money. The exploration and production segment showed financial stability while gas utilities saw their financials climb. The Exxon Mobile Corp. continued its reign of the number one spot.

  9. Sequence stratigraphy of a Pliocene delta complex deposited in an active margin setting, Etchegoin and San Joaquin gas sands, San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.C. [California State Univ., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Prolific gas sands of the Pliocene Etchegoin and San Joaquin formations of the southern San Joaquin basin, California, are part of a 1300-m thick succession of deltaic sediments that record the final regression of the Pacific Ocean from a tectonically active, restricted basin associated with the California transform margin. Individual field studies, lacking a regional framework and based primarily on electric log data, correlate these gas sands to the extent that individual sands maintain the same stratigraphic level within the succession. However, a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, constructed from recent 3D-seismic data and detailed well log correlations on the Bakersfield Arch area of the basin, indicates that the Pliocene succession is part of a south/southwest prograding delta complex. Therefore, sands climb up-section in the landward direction and grade laterally from deep-water to shallow-water facies. Because lithofacies boundaries cross chronostratigraphic surfaces, previous interpretations of the reservoir architecture are inaccurate. This model increases predictability of reservoir facies by constraining lithofacies mapping and enables interpretation of the effects on deposition of the integrated and inter-related controls of tectonics, eustatic sea-level change, and sediment supply. With this understanding, a well-defined model of the stratal architecture of the Pliocene succession of the southern San Joaquin basin is now possible.

  10. Development of water facilities in the Santa Ana River Basin, California, 1810-1968: a compilation of historical notes derived from many sources describing ditch and canal companies, diversions, and water rights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    This report traces by text, maps, and photographs, the development of the water supply in the Santa Ana River basin from its beginning in 1810 or 1811 to 1968. The value of the report lies in the fact that interpretation of the hydrologic systems in the basin requires knowledge of the concurrent state of development of the water supply, because that development has progressively altered the local regimen of both surface water and ground water. Most of the information for the earlier years was extracted and condensed from an investigation made by W. H. Hall, California State Engineer during the years 1878-87. Hall's study described irrigation development in southern California from its beginning through 1888. Information for the years following 1888 was obtained from the archives of the numerous water companies and water agencies in the Santa Ana River basin and from the various depositories of courthouse, county, and municipal records. The history of water-resources development in the Santa Ana River basin begins with the introduction of irrigation in the area by the Spanish, who settled in southern California in the latter part, of the 18th century. The first irrigation diversion from the Santa Ana River was made in 1810 or 1811 by Jose Antonio Yorba and Juan Pablo Peralta. Irrigation remained a localized practice during the Mexican-Californian, or rancho, period following the separation of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Rancho grantees principally raised cattle, horses, and sheep and irrigated only small· plots of feed grain for their livestock and fruit crops for household use. The breakup of the ranchos through sales to Americans, who were migrating to California in ever-increasing numbers following the acquisition of California by the United States in 1848, marked the beginning of a rapid increase in water use and the beginning of widespread irrigation. Many water companies and water agencies were organized to divert the surface flow of the Santa Ana River and its tributaries for irrigation. The Santa Ana River had been a perennial stream, except in years of extreme drought, from its source in the mountains nearly to the Pacific Ocean. With the great increase in population and the accompanying use of water for irrigation, the river was no longer a perennial stream, and it was necessary to supplement the surface-water supply with ground water. Many wells were dug or drilled in the artesian areas of the upper basin; of those wells many originally flowed, but as ground-water pressures and levels declined, an increasing amount of pumping was required. Conservation measures were taken to store some of the surplus winter runoff for use during low runoff years and during summer periods of heavy demand. Conservation facilities included surface-storage reservoirs and water-spreading grounds or percolation basins for utilization of underground storage. The competition for water in the Santa Ana River basin has been accompanied by frequent litigation over water tights, and over the years these water rights have generally been established by court decree. Although the demand for water still increases, the water demand for agricultural use has declined since the mid-1940's in response to the rapid urbanization of agricultural areas. Since that date the continued expansion of communities has encroached significantly into the agricultural areas causing a decrease in water use for agriculture, a more than compensating increase in water use for municipal purposes, and a rapid change in the ownership of water rights. The urbanization of flood plains made floods potentially more damaging than they previously had been when the flood plains were used for agriculture. In recognition of this increased hazard, flood-control facilities such as reservoirs, debris basins, flood-conveyance channels, and levees have been constructed to reduce potential damage. Most of the construction has occurred since the devastating flood of March 1938. By the mid-1940's it was apparent that the local water supply--both surface and ground water--would be insuff

  11. Tsunami Preparedness in California (videos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filmed and edited by: Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. These videos about tsunami preparedness in California distinguish between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of each region. They offer guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. These videos were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E).

  12. Seasonal greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide) from engineered landfills: Daily, intermediate, and final California cover soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We quantified the seasonal variability of CH4, CO2, and N2O emissions from fresh refuse and daily, intermediate, and final cover materials at two California landfills. Fresh refuse fluxes (g m-2 d-1) averaged CH4 0.053[+/-0.03], CO2 135[+/-117], and N2O 0.063[+/-0.059]. Average CH4 emissions across ...

  13. 28. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1913. CONSTRUCTION OF CORE WALL AT MOCKINGBIRD DAM ON THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  14. 27. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1913. TIGHTENING JOINTS AND ADJUSTING PLATES ON STEEL FLUME AT MOCKINGBIRD DAM ON THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  15. 29. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1926. CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS AT OLIVEWOOD PUMPING STATION ON THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  16. 22. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer and date unknown. 'FLUME NO. 9, 'GAGE CANAL SYSTEM,' RIVERSIDE, CAL.' VIEW OF FLUME OVER TEQUESQUITE ARROYO. - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  17. 23. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1917. VIEW OF FLUME NO. 3 OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL AND NEW 66' REINFORCED CONCRETE PIPELINE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  18. 24. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1939. VIEW OF SAND PUMP HOUSE AT THE HEAD OF THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  19. 26. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1931. VIEW OF CONSTRUCTION OF GUNITE INVERT SIPHON REPLACING FLUME NO. 10 ON GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  20. Helium isotope and gas discharge variations associated with crustal unrest in Long Valley caldera, California, 1989-1992

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Sorey; W. C. Evans; C. D. Farrar; B. M. Kennedy; G. A. Suemnicht

    1993-01-01

    The onset of anomalous seismic activity in 1989 beneath Mammoth Mountain on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera, California, was followed within â¼4 months by a large increase in ³He\\/⁴He in vapor discharged from a fumarole on the north side of the mountain. The helium isotopic ratio at this vent rose to a maximum of 6.7 R{sub A}

  1. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W., III; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    Stage Development, Demonstration, and Product Launch of Cummins Westport ISX11.9 G natural gas engine $1&T Compressed Natural Gas Aerial Lift Trucks for California $6,499,200 $0 80.5% Finalist 44 Transpower ElecSTATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

  3. Co-combustion of refuse derived fuel and coal in a cyclone furnace at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, C. P. Crane Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    A co-combustion demonstration burn of coal and fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) was conducted by Teledyne National and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. This utility has two B and W cyclone furnaces capable of generating 400 MW. The facility is under a prohibition order to convert from No. 6 oil to coal; as a result, it was desirable to demonstrate that RDF, which has a low sulfur content, can be burned in combination with coals containing up to 2% sulfur, thus reducing overall sulfur emissions without deleterious effects. Each furnace consists of four cyclones capable of generating 1,360,000 pounds per hour steam. The tertiary air inlet of one of the cyclones was modified with an adapter to permit fluff RDF to be pneumatically blown into the cyclone. At the same time, coal was fed into the cyclone furnace through the normal coal feeding duct, where it entered the burning chamber tangentially and mixed with the RDF during the burning process. Secondary shredded fluff RDF was prepared by the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility. The RDF was discharged into a receiving station consisting of a belt conveyor discharging into a lump breaker, which in turn, fed the RDF into a pneumatic line through an air-lock feeder. A total of 2316 tons were burned at an average rate of 5.6 tons per hour. The average heat replacement by RDF for the cyclone was 25%, based on Btu input for a period of forty days. The range of RDF burned was from 3 to 10 tons per hour, or 7 to 63% heat replacement. The average analysis of the RDF (39 samples) for moisture, ash, heat (HHV) and sulfur content were 18.9%, 13.4%, 6296 Btu/lb and 0.26% respectively. RDF used in the test was secondary shredded through 1-1/2 inch grates producing the particle size distribution of from 2 inches to .187 inches. Findings to date after inspection of the boiler and superheater indicate satisfactory results with no deleterious effects from the RDF.

  4. Studies of the effects of experimentally produced noise associated with oil and gas exploration and development on sea otters in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Riedman, M.L.

    1983-11-15

    During the winter 1983 tape-recorded industrial noises associated with offshore oil and gas operations were projected underwater at Soberanes Point, California. Seismic-exploration sounds were produced using a multiple air gun array (4000 cu. in) and a single air gun (100 cu. in) along a 10-15 km transect paralleling the coastline from Rocky Point to Yankee Point. The behavior, density, and distribution of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) within the vicinity of the sound projection area were not affected by the acoustic experiments. Foraging and diving behaviors of sea otters were normal and undisturbed. There were no movements of otters away from the sound source or out of the sound projection vicinity during either the winter or spring acoustic experiments.

  5. California foraminiferal micropalaeontology KENNETH L. FINGER

    E-print Network

    Finger, Kenneth L.

    , Oil Company; ODP, Offshore Drilling Proj- ect; PG&E, Pacific Gas and Electric Company; PCJ, Petroleum offshore exploration was abandoned in the early 1990s, few foraminiferologists remained in the state. Today

  6. California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

    2010-04-14

    This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

  7. Platts top 250 global energy company rankings

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, T.; Leonard, M.

    2005-12-01

    Revenues and profits for many firms surged last year over previous years. The turnaround from last year's global survey is dramatic. Asset- and revenue-rich integrated oil and gas companies dominate the top rungs of the 2005 Platts Top 250 Global Energy Company Rankings. The following industry segments were analyzed: diversified utilities; exploration and production; electric utilities; gas utilities; integrated oil and gas companies; refining and marketing; independent power producers; coal and consumable fuel companies and storage and transfer companies; The total combined revenue for the coal and consumable fuels sector was $74.7 billion. Leaders in this sector were: Yanzhou Coal Mining Co., CONSOl Energy Inc., Peabody Energy Corp., PT Bumi Resources Tbk, Cameco Corp., and Arch Coal. 14 tabs.

  8. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston; Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-05-15

    Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.

  9. 78 FR 23551 - ANR Pipeline Company; Notice of Application for Abandonment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...CP13-124-000] ANR Pipeline Company; Notice of Application for Abandonment Take notice that on April 4, 2013, ANR Pipeline Company (ANR...under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) as amended...Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company...Administration, ANR Pipeline Company, 717...

  10. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (UC SHIP) August 1, 2012 Prudent Buyer Plan administrator. Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company performs all administrative services and Health Insurance Company does not assume any financial risk or obligation with respect to the funding

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN

    E-print Network

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE PLAN (UC SHIP) August 1, 2012 Prudent Buyer Plan risk or obligation with respect to claims. Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company (write to Anthem Blue Cross Life and Health Insurance Company, 21555 Oxnard Street, Woodland Hills, CA

  12. Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

    2008-01-01

    The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional relationships between hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks, we compiled a database consisting of more than 13,000 well picks and of one-mile resolution seismic grids. Both the well picks and the seismic grids characterize the depths to the top of key stratigraphic units. This database formed the basis of subsequent numerical modeling efforts, including the construction of a three- dimensional geologic model (Hosford Scheirer, this volume, chapter 7) and simulation of the petroleum systems in space and time (Peters, Magoon, Lampe, and others, this volume, chapter 12). To accomplish this modeling, we synthesized the age, geographic distribution, lithology, and petroleum characteristics of hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks in the basin. The results of that synthesis are presented in this paper in the form of new stratigraphic correlation columns for the northern, central, and southern San Joaquin Valley (fig. 5.1; note that all figures are at the back of this report, following the References Cited). The stratigraphic relationships and ages published here draw heavily on published and unpublished studies of the San Joaquin Basin. The stratigraphy presented in each of the columns necessarily idealizes the subsurface geology over a relatively large area, instead of representing the specific geology at an individual well, oil and gas field, or outcrop. In this paper we present the background rationale for defining the geographic divisions of the basin (inset map, fig. 5.1), the paleontological time scales used for assigning absolute ages to rock units (figs. 5.2 and 5.3), and the supporting maps illustrating the geographic distribution of each rock type included in the stratigraphic column (figs. 5.4 through 5.64).

  13. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission

    E-print Network

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission DOCKETED /3-I"b-P-l PETITION OF AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION IN CALIFORNIA, ASIAN PACIFIC ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK, BRIGHTLINE DEFENSE PROJECT, CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ALLIANCE, CALIFORNIA SOLAR ENERGY

  14. National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) Processing, Display, and Observation of Near-Bottom Currents Acquired by Oil and Gas Companies in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Crout

    2007-01-01

    Under a Notice to Lessees (NTL No. 2005-G05) issued by the Minerals Management Service in April 2005, oil companies operating in the northern Gulf of Mexico in waters deeper than 400 meters are required to collect current profile data to a depth of 1000 meters. These data provide estimates of strong ocean currents, which may affect extreme loads, structural failure,

  15. 76 FR 31957 - Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ...Basin Interstate Pipeline Company; Notice...Basin Interstate Pipeline Company (Williston...under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and...operation and abandonment of natural gas storage facilities...the interstate pipeline facilities...

  16. California Energy Commission STAFF DRAFT

    E-print Network

    use of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program. This statute, amended by Assembly Bill 109

  17. California Energy Commission COMMISSION REPORT

    E-print Network

    The increased use of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural measurable transition from the nearly exclusive use of petroleum fuels to a diverse portfolio of alternative

  18. Greenhouse gas sources in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California derived from Positive Matrix Factorization of CalNex 2010 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Gentner, D. R.; Weber, R.; Baer, D. S.; Gardner, A.; Provencal, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from sources in the southern San Joaquin valley is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law (California Global Warming Solutions Act 2006) implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The "bottom-up" emission factors for CH4 and N2O have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate "top-down" measurements to characterize emission rates from sources. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agriculture and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies, refineries and active oil fields which are known CH4 sources while agricultural soil management and vehicular combustion are known sources of N2O. In summer of 2010, GHG sources in the southern San Joaquin valley were investigated as part of the CalNex (California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) campaign. Measurements of GHG gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) and the combustion tracer CO were performed at the Bakersfield super-site over a period of six weeks using fast response lasers based on cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (LGR Inc. CA). Coincident measurements of hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) served as anthropogenic and biogenic tracers of the GHG sources at local and regional levels. We present the results of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis applied to the GHGs, CO, and 60 VOCs to define dominant source emission profiles. Seven source factors were identified and used to attribute the contribution of regional sources to enhancements above the background. Dairy operations were found to be the largest CH4 source in the region with approximately 80% of the regional emissions attributed to the 'dairy' factor. Factors dominated by 'vehicular combustion' and 'evaporative emissions' had negligible contributions to regional CH4 or N2O emissions. We identified an 'agricultural emissions' factor as the dominant regional source of N2O. Emission Factors of GHG enhancements with respect to specific source tracers are derived from the PMF analysis and compared to emission factors from prior source-specific and regional field studies (e.g. Shaw et al., 2007; Bon et al., 2006; CABERNET 2011) to gain a better understanding of GHG source contributions in the southern San Joaquin valley.

  19. California Energy Commission REVISED STAFF DRAFT

    E-print Network

    FOR THE ALTERNATIVE AND RENEWABLE FUEL AND VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G The increased use of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural

  20. Submicron aerosol composition at Trinidad Head, California, during ITCT 2K2: Its relationship with gas phase volatile organic

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    the Pacific marine boundary layer. One AMS was modified to allow the study of sea salt- based particles, while salt particles in the coarse mode and can be linked to the displacement of chloride. The organic-situ gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer-flame ionization detector and relationships were found between

  1. California Missions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The California Museum of Photography at the University of California-Riverside, (last mentioned in the May 30, 2000 Scout Report for Social Sciences) is a site worth visiting again and again; there is always something new to look at in a variety of areas: photography history, California lifestyle and culture, fine art photography, and photo journalism. The California Missions show includes over 100 historic views of the 21 California Missions, some dated as early as 1895.

  2. 78 FR 65762 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Trackage Rights Exemption-CSX Transportation, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ...Docket No. FD 35775] Union Pacific Railroad Company...overhead trackage rights to Union Pacific Railroad Company...connection with Grand Trunk Western Railroad Company (GTW...Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C...served on Jeremy Berman, Union Pacific Railroad...

  3. Fuel flexibility requirement concerns California officials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    1993-06-16

    The Department of Energy's proposed $700 million advanced gas turbine program would unfairly exclude states like California that have tied their energy future to natural gas. Because the program would require fuel flexibility, regions that rely on natural gas turbines would not qualify for funding. Instead of mandating flexibility DOE should fund a series of regional efforts, leaving fuel choice to the discretion of project sponsors. California is 1,000 miles from the nearest coal and has no desire to haul it all that distance when the state has access to abundant supplies of natural gas. As a result, California's turbine initiatives focus on steam reformers, which convert methane into a natural gas fuel. But if the turbines also must be capable of burning coal gas, the reformer would be unnecessary. And the reconfiguration needed to burn coal gas would seriously degrade the system's efficiency, even though California has no plans to burn coal gas.

  4. 75 FR 5075 - Coalinga Cogeneration Company, Kern River Cogeneration Company, Mid-Set Cogeneration Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ...Cogeneration Company, Sargent Canyon Cogeneration Company, Sycamore Cogeneration Company; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based...Cogeneration Company, Sargent Canyon Cogeneration Company, and Sycamore Cogeneration Company's application for market-based...

  5. 76 FR 7903 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-BNSF Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ...rights were originally granted in Union Pacific Railroad--Temporary...conditions imposed in Norfolk and Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease and Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C. 653...Davies, General Attorney, Union Pacific Railroad Company,...

  6. University of Washington Company Website Company Type

    E-print Network

    University of Washington Company Website Company Type Army Corps of Engineers www.usace.army.mil Public Works Cary Kopczynski & Company www.ckcps.com Structural Engineering Consulting CDM cdm://hnip.net Non-profit Harder Mechanical Contractors www.hardermech.com Mechanical Contractor Harriott Smith

  7. Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Compressed Air Management Program: A Performance Assessment Approach to Improving Industrial Compressed Air System Operation and Maintenance

    E-print Network

    Qualmann, R. L.; Zeller, W.; Baker, M.

    The Compressed Air Management Program (CAMP) provides Pacific Gas and Electric's (PG&E's) large industrial customers with measurement-based performance assessments of their compressed air systems. Under this program, the customer's system...

  8. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated...a State competent under the laws thereof to carry on the...

  9. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated...a State competent under the laws thereof to carry on the...

  10. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated...a State competent under the laws thereof to carry on the...

  11. 18 CFR 141.400 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 141.400...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription...utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies, designated...a State competent under the laws thereof to carry on the...

  12. Chemical and isotopic evidence of gas-influenced flow at a transform plate boundary: Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, J.B.; Orange, D.L.; Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions of pore fluids document upward flow through communities of vesicomyid clams in Monterey Bay, California. Within the clam communities, the sulfate reduction zone is only 10 cm thick, and Ca and Mg concentrations decrease to values as low as 2.2 mM and 34.5 mM, respectively, at depths less than 30 cm below the sediment-water interface. Less than 5 m outside the communities, the base of the sulfate reduction zone is deeper than the greatest penetration of the cores (-30 cm), and Ca and Mg exhibit only minor changes from seawater values. The sediment exhibits no significant variation in grain size, mineralogy, organic carbon, nitrogen, or carbonate content throughout the region. The composition of pore fluid within clam communities results from upward flow of altered fluid rather than different diagenetic reactions within and outside the communities. Isotopically light dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), with ??13C values ranging from -3.2 to -54.1???, could reflect carbon sources from either oxidized thermogenic methane and/or a mixture of oxidized microbial methane and solid organic carbon. The C1/(C2+C3) ratios (ranging from 34 to 1142) and the hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of methane (??D values of -109 to -156???; ??13C values of -30.6 to -86.6???) suggest that methane is primarily microbial but that a minor component could be thermally generated. Any thermogenic methane would have migrated from great depths, possibly >2 km. The presence of methane is likely to contribute to fluid flow by reducing the density of the fluids. Past fluid migration and venting are reflected by widespread carbonate mineralization at the sediment-water interface. This mineralization and the geographic distribution and proportions of microbial and thermogenic methane suggest that vent sites migrate when permeability is reduced during carbonate cementation. These results demonstrate that along with convergent and divergent plate boundaries, transform plate boundaries are characterized by fluid flow and that the flow may be widespread, occurring at sites away from fault zones.

  13. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

  14. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

  15. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

  16. Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL

    E-print Network

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    © Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL 1 © Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL 1 © Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL #12;© Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL 2 © Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL 2 Truck Performance Basics for TTX Jon Jeambey December 5, 2008

  17. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Southern California Fires     View Larger ... than 250,000 people. These two images show the Southern California coast from Los Angeles to San Diego from two of the nine cameras on ... date:  Oct 21, 2007 Images:  California Fires location:  United States ...

  18. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke Blankets Northern California     View Larger Image ... strikes sparked more than a thousand fires in northern California. This image was captured by the Multi-angle Imaging ... June 27, 2008 - Smoke from fires in northern California. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  19. California Coast

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Southern California     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Southern California were acquired on March 14, 2000 during Terra orbit 1273. North is at ... available at JPL March 14, 2000 - Southern California with the Mojave Desert and surrounding area. project:  ...

  20. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Advisory Committee Members for the

    E-print Network

    .) Tim Carmichael ­ California Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition Will Coleman ­ OnRamp Capital Peter Cooper ­ Recreational Boaters of California Simon Mui ­ Natural Resources Defense Council Joe Norbeck ­ University

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    Snacks $884,810 $884,810 $221,203 Awardee California Energy Commission PON-13-501 Notice of Proposal-Natural Gas) Proposed Awards Vegetable Snacks 5 Gas Technology Institute (GTI) High Efficient Indirect

  2. California meets the LNG terminal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William R. Ahern

    1980-01-01

    The proposal by California's gas utilities to build a liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal on the coast has generated five years of controversy, stalemates among agencies, and new state legislation, with no final decision yet in sight. Different perceptions of the public safety risks from LNG have played a major role in this controversy. Agencies and other parties have generally

  3. California Energy Commission COMMISSION REPORT

    E-print Network

    of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas emissions, reduce, propane, hydrogen, gasoline substitute fuels, diesel substitute fuels, and other emerging fuel types, and policies to reduce petroleum use, greenhouse gas emissions, and criteria emissions; increase alternative

  4. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY

    E-print Network

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCE REBATE PROGRAM INITIAL November 2009 CEC-400-2009-026-CMD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Program Manager Paula David Supervisor Appliance and Process Energy Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director

  5. A FIRST LOOK AT THE AURIGA-CALIFORNIA GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD WITH HERSCHEL AND THE CSO: CENSUS OF THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND THE DENSE GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Fallscheer, Cassandra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Andre, Philippe; Koenyves, Vera [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peterson, Dawn E., E-mail: pmh@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: Cassandra.Fallscheer@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: adam.ginsburg@colorado.edu, E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu, E-mail: pandre@cea.fr, E-mail: vera.konyves@cea.fr, E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: James.DiFrancesco@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Brenda.Matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: dpeterson@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We have mapped the Auriga/California molecular cloud with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE cameras and the Bolocam 1.1 mm camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with the eventual goal of quantifying the star formation and cloud structure in this giant molecular cloud (GMC) that is comparable in size and mass to the Orion GMC, but which appears to be forming far fewer stars. We have tabulated 60 compact 70/160 {mu}m sources that are likely pre-main-sequence objects and correlated those with Spitzer and WISE mid-IR sources. At 1.1 mm, we find 18 cold, compact sources and discuss their properties. The most important result from this part of our study is that we find a modest number of additional compact young objects beyond those identified at shorter wavelengths with Spitzer. We also describe the dust column density and temperature structure derived from our photometric maps. The column density peaks at a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (N {sub H2}) and is distributed in a clear filamentary structure along which nearly all of the pre-main-sequence objects are found. We compare the young stellar object surface density to the gas column density and find a strong nonlinear correlation between them. The dust temperature in the densest parts of the filaments drops to {approx}10 K from values {approx}14-15 K in the low-density parts of the cloud. We also derive the cumulative mass fraction and probability density function of material in the cloud, which we compare with similar data on other star-forming clouds.

  6. Carbon Isotopic Signatures in Benthic Foraminifera Bio- and Tanathocenosis From Methane-Soaked Gas-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herguera, J.; Perez, E.; Paull, C.; Ussler, B.; Peltzer, E.

    2005-12-01

    Here we report on recent results from an extensive ROV-based exploration along the NE transform margin of the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California to characterize patterns of carbon isotopic assimilation into the benthic foraminiferal tests along known gradients of present methane venting. Cores were retrieved from: a (i) vigorous methane venting site visible by a continuous emanation of gas bubbles from the seafloor at 1,582 m depth of water, (ii) beds of living calyptogenid clams, (iii) white bacterial mats, commonly found on exposed strata on the flanks of the basin, and (iv) background sites at the same depth in the neighboring slopes of Guaymas Basin. Rose bengal-stained and non-stained specimens of Uvigerina peregrina (Up), Planulina wullerstorfi (Pw), Globobulimina pacifica (Gp), and Bulimina mexicana (Bm) were hand-picked and their carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios were determined. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic values measured in several pore water samples extracted from sediments range between -2.9% to -35.85%. The most depleted values indicate that while some methane derived carbon has entered the authigenic DIC pool within the seafloor sediments during early diagenesis, there is no record of the assimilation of this carbon on the calcitic shells of living benthic foraminifera. Here we will further compare the carbon isotopic composition of stained (living) foraminifera shells and non-stained tests to show the patterns of carbon assimilation and early diagenetic imprint of both assamblages. These results question the extent to which strong carbon isotopic depletion signals in the geological record are features recorded by living foraminifera or the result of a posterior diagenetical imprint.

  7. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry-specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving the energy efficiency in chemical plants, with a focus on the situation in California.

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced boron minerals, mostly sodium

    E-print Network

    of the boron products consumed in the United States are manufactured domestically. To avoid disclosing company in 2010 was glass and ceramics, 78%; soaps, detergents, and bleaches, 4%; agriculture, 4%; enamels to shift slightly away from detergents and soaps towards glass and ceramics. Although borate consumption

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced borates in 2011, and most of the

    E-print Network

    products consumed in the United States were manufactured domestically. To avoid disclosing company in 2011 was glass and ceramics, 80%; soaps, detergents, and bleaches, 4%; agriculture, 4%; enamels in 2010. Demand for borates was expected to shift slightly away from detergents and soaps towards glass

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY SOLICITATION APPLICATION PACKAGE Buy Down Incentives for Natural Gas and Propane Vehicles PON-11, terms and conditions of this PON. As of May 2, 2013, there is $1,938,990 available for natural gas

  11. Effects of High Carbon Dioxide Soil-Gas Concentrations and Emission Rates From Mammoth Mountain, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, C. D.; Evans, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    High concentrations (90 vol %) of carbon dioxide (CO2) are present in shallow soils, and CO2 is emitted to the atmosphere at high rates (1,000 g/d/m2), in several locations around Mammoth Mountain. The CO2 emissions have been diffuse and at ambient temperature. CO2 in the soil has killed most of the coniferous forest in five areas totaling 35 ha around the north, west, and south sides of the mountain at altitudes between 2,600 and 3,000 m. Part of the CO2 has dissolved in ground water, causing acidic conditions and severely corroding steel casings in several wells. The high CO2 emission rates are implicated in the deaths of four people in the past eight years. During winter, a large quantity of CO2 is sequestered in the snow pack on parts of the mountain, posing potential dangers for winter recreation. One U.S. Forest Service campground has been closed and safety plans have been implemented by the local ski resort. Mammoth Mountain is a dormant Quaternary volcanic center, but overlies an area that has been affected by periods of magmatic unrest during the past two decades. Hypocenters of long-period earthquakes indicate that basaltic intrusions reach depths as shallow as 20 to 15 km, from which CO2 has exsolved during decompression and (or) crystallization of these intrusions. CO2 moves to the land surface along fracture zones associated with faults and possibly geologic contacts. The magmatic source of CO2 is confirmed by ¦Ä13C = -3 to -5 PDB, a lack of 14C, and 3He/4He = 4 to 5 R/RA. The present-day high CO2 soil-gas concentrations and emission rates were first documented in 1994; however, anecdotal information and low 14C in post-1989 tree rings suggest that an abrupt increase in both concentrations and emission rates probably began in 1990, following a 6-month period of seismic swarm activity beneath the mountain. Emissions in an area on the south flank of the mountain have been the focus of CO2 monitoring and have shown no indications of abatement between 1994 and 2005, during which estimates of the total CO2 efflux ranged from 90 to 150 MT/d. The variations can be partly attributed to the precision of the techniques and to minor differences in measurement protocols between researchers; variations in soil- moisture and atmospheric conditions alone can cause fluctuations in efflux of ± 10% over periods of hours to days.

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Society of California Pioneers Photo Album on Fire Houses Before 1906 BRODERICH ENGINE NO. 1 - Broderick Engine Company No. 1, Historic View, Sacramento & Kearny Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-print Network

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Future Full Committee . 51 Appendix D: California Council on Science andFuture - Powering California with Nuclear Energy. California Council on Science andFuture - The View to 2050, Summary Report. California Council on Science and

  14. 77 FR 55268 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-San Pedro Railroad Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ...Railroad Operating Company, LLC Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP...conditions imposed in Norfolk & Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease & Operate--California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C. 653...on Mack H. Shumate, Jr., Union Pacific Railroad Company,...

  15. 3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. John Hudspeth, architect, foot of Main Street, Alameda, California. Sheet 4. Plan no. 10,548. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot, elevations, and one inch to the foot, sections and details. April 30, 1945, last revised 6/19/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Boiler House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  16. STATION BUILDING. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STATION BUILDING. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. Plan, elevations, sections, details. Austin Willmott Earl, Consulting Engineer, 233 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. Drawing no. 504. Various scales. January 20, 1945, no revisions. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76, amendments 4 & 5. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Electrical Services & Switching Station, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  17. Plan for Management of Mineral Assess on Native Tribal Lands and for Formation of a Fully Integrated Natural Gas and Oil Exploration and Production Company

    SciTech Connect

    Blechner, Michael H.; Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    This report describes a plan for Native American tribes to assume responsibility for and operation of tribal mineral resources using the Osage Tribe as an example. Under this plan, the tribal council select and employ a qualified Director to assume responsibility for management of their mineral reservations. The procurement process should begin with an application for contracting to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Under this plan, the Director will develop strategies to increase income by money management and increasing exploitation of natural gas, oil, and other minerals.

  18. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-print Network

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    in Wind and Solar Power in California. Doctor of Philosophy,of power, in California at low levels of solar penetration.California Independent System Operator Combined cycle gas turbine Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Concentrating solar power

  19. Consumer Products Companies Company Website Headquarters

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    General Electric Company www.ge.com Fairfield, CT General Mills www.generalmills.com Minneapolis, MN Goya Marini Skin Research www.janmarini.com San Jose, CA Jarden Corporation www.jardencorp.com Rye, NY Jockey.deanfoods.com Dallas, TX Del Monte Foods Company www.delmonte.com San Francisco, CA Dell www.dell.com Round Rock, TX

  20. ACE American Insurance Company (A Stock Company)

    E-print Network

    Fraden, Seth

    ; 6. Health insurance information, worker's compensation, or automobile insurance informationACE American Insurance Company (A Stock Company) Philadelphia, PA (Herein called We, Us, Our if the Covered Person had an accident. "Covered Person" means the person insured under the applicable ACE policy

  1. ACE American Insurance Company (A Stock Company)

    E-print Network

    Martinez, Tony R.

    the doctor can be reached; 6. Health insurance information, worker's compensation, or automobile insuranceACE American Insurance Company (A Stock Company) Philadelphia, PA (Herein called We, Us, Our to recover from any of your responsible insurers any expenses we incurred. ATTENTION Medical Personnel

  2. 78 FR 25434 - Henwood Associates, Inc.; Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...August 10, 1981,\\1\\ has been transferred to Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company. The project is located on Salmon and Sardine Creeks in Sierra County, California. The transfer of an exemption does not require Commission...

  3. 76 FR 1149 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ...California] Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability...Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project...1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...47897]), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed...Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric...

  4. 77 FR 5505 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ...California] Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability...Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project...1969 and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...47897]), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed...Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric...

  5. California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission

    E-print Network

    California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report July 2008 #12;California Solar Initiative, CPUC Staff Progress Report, July 2008: Zerull Location: San Rafael, CA System size: 14 kW Funded by the California Solar Initiative

  6. Transcription Pharmaceutical Company

    E-print Network

    Oliva, Aude

    Transcription Pharmacy CDC Pharmaceutical Company Pharmacy Benefits Manager Analytics ICU thedatamap.org #12;Transcription Pharmacy CDC Pharmaceutical Company Pharmacy Benefits Manager Analytics Management Researcher Consulting Physician Health IT Other Government Federal Trade Commission You

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    -Driven ) Natural Gas Compression Equipment On December 21, 2011, Crockett Cogeneration, a California Limited to modify the Crockett Cogeneration Project by installing electric motor-driven natural gas compression that serves the project, necessitating the installation of gas compressors in order to provide suf'ficient gas

  8. GATE HOUSE FOR UNITED ENGINEERING CO., Alameda, California. Four elevations ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GATE HOUSE FOR UNITED ENGINEERING CO., Alameda, California. Four elevations and three sections. Alben Froberg, Architect, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 1. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot, elevations. Scale ~ inch to the foot, sections. July 31, 1941. pencil on tracing paper - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Gate House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  9. Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Benenson; B. Greene; E. Kahn; B. Krieg; I. Lasater; R. Ritschard; H. Ruderman; J. Sathaye; R. Sextro; W. Siri; L. Vincent

    2010-01-01

    At the end of the driest year on record, California faces water shortages whose impacts will be felt with progressive severity through the summer and fall of 1977. Electric power is not entirely exempt from these impacts and could, if severly affected, compound the direct distresses of the drought. Each of the major California electric utility companies has forecasted the

  10. Tempest gas turbine extends EGT product line

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chellini

    1995-01-01

    With the introduction of the 7.8 MW (mechanical output) Tempest gas turbine, ECT has extended the company`s line of its small industrial turbines. The new Tempest machine, featuring a 7.5 MW electric output and a 33% thermal efficiency, ranks above the company`s single-shaft Typhoon gas turbine, rated 3.2 and 4.9 MW, and the 6.3 MW Tornado gas turbine. All three

  11. The Implementation of the California Community Colleges Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This is the sixth report on the status and progress of the Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP), submitted by the California Community Colleges. In California, familiarity with and use of computers is fundamental to economic success. California is home to many of the major companies involved in creating the future of the…

  12. 76 FR 79669 - ANR Pipeline Company; Notice of Application for Abandonment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...CP12-24-000] ANR Pipeline Company; Notice of Application for Abandonment Take notice that...December 5, 2011, ANR Pipeline Company (ANR...of the Natural Gas Act seeking authority...miles of 20-inch pipeline extending from...

  13. 18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

  14. 18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

  15. 18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

  16. 18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

  17. 18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

  18. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    SciTech Connect

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a ���¢��������real-world���¢������� retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation���¢��������s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling stations with a focus on safe, convenient, fast-fills. These potential areas were then compared to and overlaid with suitable sites from various energy companies and other potential station operators. Work continues to match vehicle needs with suitable fueling station locations. Once a specific site was identified, the necessary agreements could be completed with the station operator and expected station users. Detailed work could then begin on the site drawings, permits, safety procedures and training needs. Permanent stations were successfully installed in Irvine (delivered liquid hydrogen), Torrance (delivered pipeline hydrogen) and Fountain Valley (renewable hydrogen from anaerobic digester gas). Mobile fueling stations were also deployed to meet short-term fueling needs in Long Beach and Placerville. Once these stations were brought online, infrastructure data was collected and reported to DOE using Air Products���¢�������� Enterprise Remote Access Monitoring system. Feedback from station operators was incorporated to improve the station user���¢��������s fueling experience.

  19. California Snowpack

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Provided by the California Cooperative Snow Surveys in conjunction with the California Department of Water Resources, this site contains an interactive map and links for selecting riverbasins for which data are supplied. Within each riverbasin area, current data are available by station name. Users may obtain snow, water content, rain, and temperature readings in plot or table form.

  20. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke from Station Fire Blankets Southern California     ... growth of wildfires throughout southern California. The Station fire began August 26, 2009, in La Canada/Flintridge, not far from ... (152 miles) wide. Several pyrocumulus clouds, created by the Station fire, are visible above the smoke plumes rising from the San Gabriel ...

  1. California Condor

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    California condors are one of the most endangered birds in North America. In the early 1990s, captive-bred condors were reintroduced into the wild in California. As of January 2010, about 190 condors now live in the wild and more reintroductions are being considered. To facilitate this, USGS researc...

  2. Carbon Offsets in California: What Role for Earth Scientists in the Policy Process? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullenward, D.; Strong, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    This talk addresses the policy structure in California for developing and approving carbon offset protocols, which rely on findings from the environmental and earth sciences communities. In addition to providing an overview of the legal requirements of carbon offsets, we describe a series of case studies of how scientists can engage with policymakers. Based on those experiences, we suggest ways for the earth sciences community to become more involved in climate policy development. California's climate law, known as AB 32, requires that major sectors of the state's economy reduce their emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. As part of AB 32, the California Air Resources Board created a cap-and-trade market to ensure compliance with the statutory target. Under this system, regulated companies have to acquire tradable emissions permits (called 'compliance instruments') for the greenhouse gas emissions they release. The State allocates a certain number of allowances to regulated entities through a mixture of auctions and free transfers, with the total number equal to the overall emissions target; these allowances, along with approved offsets credits, are the compliance instruments that regulated entities are required to obtain by law. One of the key policy design issues in California's cap-and-trade market concerns the use of carbon offsets. Under AB 32, the Air Resources Board can issue offset credits to project developers who reduce emissions outside of the capped sectors (electricity, industry, and transportation)--or even outside of California--pursuant to approved offset protocols. Project developers then sell the credits to regulated companies in California. Essentially, offsets allow regulated entities in California to earn credit for emissions reductions that take place outside the scope of AB 32. Many regulated entities and economists are in favor of offsets because they view them as a source of low-cost compliance instruments. On the other hand, critics argue that some offset protocols award credits for activities that would have occurred anyway; by replacing a company's need to acquire an allowance in the carbon market, critics believe that poorly designed offset protocols increase greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, the effectiveness of the policy approach depends on the scientific integrity of the offset protocols. To date, California has approved offset protocols for emissions reductions in four applications: (1) forestry, (2) urban forestry, (3) livestock, and (4) destruction of ozone-depleting substances. In addition, the State is currently considering protocols that would address (5) methane emissions from mining and (6) greenhouse gas reductions from improved rice cultivation practices. These protocols rely heavily on findings from the environmental and earth sciences communities, especially when the protocol subject involves land use or land use change. Yet, due to budget constraints, the Air Resources Board is relying primarily on third-party protocol developers to design and propose the detailed structures under which offset credits will be issued. Despite the fact that any member of the public may participate in the governance regime that leads to protocol approvals, few scientists or scientific organizations provide input into the policy process. We use case studies from several of the California protocols to illustrate ways scientists can apply their skills to a crucial stage of climate policy development.

  3. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSUMER POWER AND

    E-print Network

    and that investments in the more efficient use of energy and new electricity and natural gas infrastructureAdopted 1 STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSUMER POWER AND CONSERVATION FINANCING AUTHORITY ENERGYRESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION ENERGY ACTION PLAN California is a diverse

  5. 78 FR 65040 - BNSF Railway Company, CBEC Railway Inc., Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd., and Union Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...Railroad, Ltd. (IAIS), and Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP...conditions imposed in Norfolk and Western Railway--Trackage Rights...Lease and Operate-California Western Railroad, 360 I.C.C. 653...and Jeremy M. Berman, Union Pacific Railroad Company,...

  6. California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission

    E-print Network

    ..,. "'- '-- "''-"'" CON-lOA:l4 California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission ~ Conservation Division Regulations for Appliance Efficiency Standards Relating to Gas Appliance Intermittent Space Heaters Water Heaters and Plumbing Fittings Amended December 22, 1977 #12;'- TABLJ

  7. California Center for Sustainable Communities at UCLA

    E-print Network

    intended to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are implemented as single programs in sustainable communities' research. Smart Corner in downtown San Diego Anticipated Benefits for California When

  8. 25. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, March 1954. VIEW OF THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL, CONCRETE 'COVERING COMPLETED & BACKFILLED TO WATERMAN AVENUE...CURVING TOWARD NO. 1 TUNNEL' - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  9. Direct participation of electrical loads in the California independent system operator markets during the Summer of 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Khavkin, Mark; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-04-01

    California's restructured electricity markets opened on 1 April 1998. The former investor-owned utilities were functionally divided into generation, transmission, and distribution activities, all of their gas-fired generating capacity was divested, and the retail market was opened to competition. To ensure that small customers shared in the expected benefit of lower prices, the enabling legislation mandated a 10% rate cut for all customers, which was implemented in a simplistic way that fossilized 1996 tariff structures. Rising fuel and environmental compliance costs, together with a reduced ability to import electricity, numerous plant outages, and exercise of market power by generators drove up wholesale electricity prices steeply in 2000, while retail tariffs remained unchanged. One of the distribution/supply companies entered bankruptcy in April 2001, and another was insolvent. During this period, two sets of interruptible load programs were in place, longstanding ones organized as special tariffs by the distribution/supply companies and hastily established ones run directly by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). The distribution/supply company programs were effective at reducing load during the summer of 2000, but because of the high frequency of outages required by a system on the brink of failure, customer response declined and many left the tariff. The CAISO programs failed to attract enough participation to make a significant difference to the California supply demand imbalance. The poor performance of direct load participation in California's markets reinforces the argument for accurate pricing of electricity as a stimulus to energy efficiency investment and as a constraint on market volatility.

  10. 75 FR 19963 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Florida Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ...and Regulation (M&R) (Grand Bay M&R Station) with pig launcher in Grand Bay, Alabama (MP 8.8); One new Over Pressure...filings, document summaries and direct links to the documents. Go to http://www.ferc.gov/esubscribenow.htm....

  11. Carbon Isotopic Signatures in Living Benthic Foraminifera from Methane-Soaked Gas-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herguera, J.; Perez, E.; Paull, C.; Ussler, B.; Peltzer, E.; Brewer, P.; Cortina, A.

    2004-12-01

    There is an ongoing discussion on the role of methane outgassing from costal basins to explain the rapid warmings in the Northern Hemisphere during the last Glacial cycle. The recurring anomalous depletions in the benthic foraminifera carbon isotopic composition, observed in a few high resolution cores in carbon rich coastal basins, has been interpreted as an indication of the assimilation of methane derived carbon by these organisms. The magnitude and timing of these depletions, coincident with rapid warmings in the Northern hemisphere, have been interpreted in terms of large methane releases from these carbon loaden sediments into the atmosphere. However, it is still poorly known whether benthic foraminifera do in fact assimilate methane derived carbon and if at all the observed carbon isotopic depletions are related to periods of methane release. Here we report on some recent results from an extensive ROV-based exploration along the NE transform margin of the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California with the objective of characterizing the patterns of carbon isotopic assimilation into the benthic foraminiferal tests along known gradients of present methane venting. Cores were retrieved from beds of living calyptogenid clams, tubeworms, and white bacterial mats, commonly found on exposed strata on the flanks of the basin; from a methane venting site visible by a continuous emanation of gas bubbles from the seafloor in 1,582 m of water; and from background sites at the same depth in Guaymas Basin. Rose bengal-stained specimens of Uvigerina peregrina (Up), Planulina wüllerstorfi (Pw), Globobulimina pacifica (Gp), and Bulimina mexicana (Bm) were hand-picked and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined in 117 samples. The mean carbon isotopic values (relative to PDB) in any group of these benthic foraminifera are not distinctly lighter than expected for these sites (-1.14% Up, -0.28% Pw, -1.71% Gp, and -0.5% Bm). Their range of values are small (1.26% Up, 1.14% Pw, 2.17% Gp, and 0.81% Bm) and can be fully explained in terms of the pore water carbon isotopic composition, that results from the oxidation of organic carbon in the upper few cm of the sediment column further mirrored in the strong sulphate reduction gradients with depth. DIC isotopic composition measured in several pore water sample range from -2.9% to -35.85%. The most depleted values indicate that while some methane derived carbon has entered the authigenic DIC pool within the seafloor sediments, there is no record of the assimilation of this carbon on the calcitic shells of living benthic foraminifera. These results question the extent to which strong carbon isotopic depletion signals in the geological record are features recorded by living foraminifera or the result of a posterior diagenetical imprint.

  12. California Wildflowers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The California Academy of Sciences's (CAS) Botany Department hosts this interesting and beautiful site on California's wildflowers. Spectacular color photographs of over 125 species of wildflowers serve as illustrations to this electronic field guide. Users may browse species by flower color (white through brown), common name (Alpine Lily to Yerba Mansa), latin name (Achillea millefolium to Zigadenus fremontii), or family name (Alismataceae through Violaceae). Additionally, floristic regions are provided in a color-coded map of California. For each species, the taxonomic identity (common, Latin, and family names), a description, photographs, and distribution information are provided. Educators and students of botany will find this site particularly useful; others will want to go see California in bloom.

  13. Transforming California

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Thomas McGuire

    2001-01-01

    Transforming California is a PowerPoint presentation of digital images (60.7 Mb) exploring the landforms found along the San Andreas Fault. Designed for classroom use, this slideshow provides a complementing narrative for each slide.

  14. CALIFORNIA COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    ............................................................................................................. 12 Low Carbon Fuel Standard Contributing Authors Special Projects Office Fuels and Transportation Division California Energy Commission..................................................................................................................................... 22 CHAPTER 3: LAND USE AND TRANSPORTATION PLANNING OPPORTUNITIES TO REDUCE ENERGY DEMAND

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XXX September 20, 1936 · Number 9 GENERAL CATALOGUE #1936,037* UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES For sale by the STUDENTS of California 193637 The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor- mation

  16. California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use

    E-print Network

    Commission New Partners for Smart GrowthNew Partners for Smart Growth Washington, DCWashington, DC February 8 Executive Order SExecutive Order S--33--0505 June 1, 2005 CA will reduce Greenhouse Gases to: 2000 levels% Reduction ~341 MMTCO2E #12;California Energy Commission CA Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2004 Commercial 3

  17. Gas pipelines go electric

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1996-12-01

    The deregulation of the nation`s utilities has presented the natural-gas industry with the opportunity to transport product farther to reach new markets while it`s forcing adherence to tighter environmental restrictions. Gas-pipeline companies and electric utilities are meeting this challenge by installing electric compressors instead of gas turbines or reciprocating engines at compressor stations.

  18. The Potential of Wind Power and Energy Storage in California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana Schwyzer

    A great deal of new electricity generating capacity will be needed in California over the next few decades. Given California's Renewable Portfolio Standard and greenhouse gas reduction goals, a significant fraction of this capacity is likely to be renewable; and among renewables, wind energy is particularly promising. Other likely types of capacity additions are natural gas and coal. Unlike these

  19. 75 FR 70096 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CT7-9C and -9C3 Turboprop Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CT7-9C...number (S/N) gas generator turbine (GGT) shafts...AD, contact General Electric Company, GE-Aviation...2010-23-20 General Electric Company (GE): Amendment...turboprop engines with gas generator turbine (GGT)...

  20. 75 FR 43099 - Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CT7-9C and -9C3 Turboprop Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ...Directives; General Electric Company (GE) CT7-9C...number (S/ N) gas generator turbine (GGT) shafts...493-2251. Contact General Electric Company, GE-Aviation...directive: General Electric Company (GE): Docket...turboprop engines with gas generator turbine (GGT)...

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY-2013-006 Docket No. 13-IEP-1K Electricity resource planners use estimated burner tip prices when making long developed an approach to converting annual natural gas price forecasts to monthly burner tip price estimates

  2. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    of new, California-based biofuel production facilities that can sustainably produce low carbon transportation fuels. The intent of this competitive solicitation is to encourage production of alternative and renewable transportation fuels in California that can significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

  3. General Electric Trading Company

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne Hvala; Anne C Perry; Jean J Boddewyn

    1990-01-01

    The General Electric Trading Company (GETC) was launched in 1982 as a potential American sogoshosha through its double mission of: (1) exporting both its own and other companies' products, and (2) countertrading. However, an unfavorable international environment and a new corporate strategy under Chairman Jack Welch led to the abandonment of GETC's exporting task and to the downscaling of its

  4. The Networking Company

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Ritter

    1999-01-01

    Past research has consistently shown that companies have business and nonbusiness, formal and informal relationships with other actors. With focus on product and process development activities, empirical studies have shown the importance of collaboration with, for example, customers, suppliers, research institutions, and competitors. Research also has highlighted that a company's various relationships are interconnected with each other. But why and

  5. Marketing Plan Company Description

    E-print Network

    Dahl, David B.

    Marketing Swat Team Project Description and Deliverables: The team will Identify the best online vehicles online marketing plan - executable recommendations - 5 key blogger / Youtuber co-marketing relationshipsMarketing Plan Company Description: Consumer company that provides a product to helps boost

  6. Strategy Development Company Description

    E-print Network

    Dahl, David B.

    that identifies key target markets, and outlines the strategic and tactical approach for launching the products · Forecast (3 years) · Revenue (3 years) B3. MEASURES C. STRATEGY C1. TARGET MARKET C2. POSITIONING STRATEGY. Company Description: A privately-held manufacturer of clever problem-solving products. The company markets

  7. Tobacco companies and products

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Adrian Pingstone (None; )

    2008-03-19

    Tobacco companies have been restricted in what they can do to advertise their products. Some have been accused of soliciting children to begin smoking. Most tobacco companies are required to place some type of warning label on their packages warning smokers of the diseases that tobacco use can cause.

  8. Internship List Company: Gordmans

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Hospitality Intern Location: Fargo, ND Degree: Management Website: https://rn21.ultipro.com/tmi1000/JobInternship List Company: Gordmans Position: Store Intern Location: Fargo, ND Degree: Management Website: http://careerlink.com/job/view/3153/006607 Company: Verizon Wireless Position: Retail/Management

  9. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    ScienceCinema

    Fischer, Marc

    2013-05-29

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  10. 77 FR 14010 - Rocky Ridge Wind Project, LLC, Blackwell Wind, LLC, CPV Cimarron Renewable Energy Company, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ...Blackwell Wind, LLC, CPV Cimarron Renewable Energy Company, LLC, Minco Wind Interconnection Services, LLC, Shiloh III Lessee, LLC, California Ridge Wind Energy LLC, Perrin Ranch Wind, LLC, Erie Wind, LLC: Notice of...

  11. The mortality of companies.

    PubMed

    Daepp, Madeleine I G; Hamilton, Marcus J; West, Geoffrey B; Bettencourt, Luís M A

    2015-05-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  12. Tobacco Companies, State Attorneys Reach Settlement

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Waters, Megan.

    1998-01-01

    This week's In the News examines the November 16, 1998 $206 billion settlement reached between tobacco industry leaders and eight US states. The twelve resources discussed provide press releases, opinion, and background information on the economics of tobacco production and consumption in the US. Following increasing pressure from anti-tobacco activists at the state level, Philip Morris Incorporated, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, and the Lorillard Tobacco Company settled pending lawsuits with New York, California, and Wisconsin, among other states. The agreement requires the companies to pay the potential medical costs of sick smokers based on a formula that factors state-by-state population, tobacco use, and previous Medicaid cost. The agreement also provides for a $1.5 billion anti-smoking campaign fund and bans billboard and transit ads in addition to "branded" merchandising -- the sale and distribution of items bearing tobacco brands' names or logos. Although these provisions give anti-smoking organizations much needed funding for educational resources, critics fear that the settlement protects the tobacco industry more than it hinders it. According to Gary Black, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., the settlement "removes the remaining threat of bankruptcy from the stocks and reduces the litigation discount that has plagued tobacco companies since 1994." With little risk of future lawsuits according to Black, "we're back to business as usual."

  13. Worldwide gas processing

    SciTech Connect

    Radler, M.

    1998-06-08

    Tables are presented on capacity and production in natural gas processing plants by country (by province or by state when appropriate), and by company within each country. Production figures are presented separately for ethane, propane, isobutane, butane, LP-gas mixtures, raw NGL mixtures, debutanized natural gasoline, an other. Another table gives world sulfur production by company within each country. The sulfur production table gives the source of the sulfur, type of process used, and figures for design capacity and production.

  14. Reducing a Companies Carbon Footprint through Energy Saving Best Practices at a Dairy Manufacturing Facility

    E-print Network

    Kortan, Michael J.

    2010-12-17

    the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard (GHG Protocol) to insure that we have a uniform way to identify, track, and compare company’s carbon footprints. The GHG Protocol only considers the GHG emission in which the company has control over...

  15. 76 FR 64343 - Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ...Williston Basin Interstate Pipeline Company (Williston...under the Natural Gas Act for authorization...abandon certain natural gas transmission facilities...end and abandon the pipeline in-place and asserts that the abandonment of the pipeline...

  16. ..NIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    ..NIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XXXII September 20 STORE LOSANGELES Price,Twenty-fivecents #12;AdministrativeBulletins of the University of California 1938-S9 The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor- mation concerning

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA . BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA THIRD SERIES , VOLUME XXVIII, NUMBER 9, NOVEMBER 1, 1934 GENERAL CATALOGUE 1934'35 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES FOR SALE of the University of Oalifornia 19sd·,86 The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor

  18. VERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Grether, Gregory

    VERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XXXI . - September 20, 1937 - Number 9 GENERAL CATALOGUE · 1937-36 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES For sale by the STUDENTS' COOPERATIVEBOOS STORE LOS ANGELES Price, Twenty-five cents #12;RSITY OF CAL-IFORNIA BULLETIN

  19. California Dreaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After getting her master's degree from UCLA, Nancy Wills dreamed of starting a school-based guitar program so she could teach students to make music on the instrument she'd loved since she was a kid growing up outside of Yosemite, California. She had a strong belief that guitar was perfect for schools, ideal for individualized playing but also…

  20. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wildfires Rage in Southern California     ... Image Large plumes of smoke rising from devastating wildfires burning near Los Angeles and San Diego on Sunday, October 26, 2003, ... at JPL October 26, 2003 - Smoke from wildfires near Los Angeles and San Diego. project:  MISR ...

  1. California Upwelling

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Earth Science Picture of the Day

    This Earth Science Picture of the Day shows a SeaWIFS color-coded image of a cold water upwelling along the California coast. The annotated image also explains the physics of upwellings and how they contribute to nutrient cycling and phytoplankton growth.

  2. California Institute for Energy Efficiency: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In 1988, a statewide partnership of California`s six largest electric and gas utilities, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Energy Commission, the University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) led to the creation of the California Institute for energy Efficiency. CIEE was specifically established to respond to California`s energy and environmental needs by developing new, energy-efficient technologies for buildings, industry, and transportation using the scientific and technological capabilities of the state`s universities, colleges, and university-affiliated laboratories. This 1993 Annual Report highlights the accomplishments of CIEE`s research and development program, which includes 11 major multiyear projects in the fields of Building Energy Efficiency and Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency as well as 21 ongoing exploratory projects. This report contains research highlights from seven of these programs.

  3. California Energy Commission: Ocean Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This California Energy Commission website discusses how electrical power can be generated from tidal power, wave power, ocean thermal energy conversion, ocean currents, ocean winds, salinity gradients, and other ocean phenomena. Users can learn how different areas of the ocean vary in their potential energy production. The site presents the history of ocean energy production and the issues associated with permitting an ocean wave-energy conversion facility. Users can find links to ocean energy education and to companies and research groups involved with ocean energy development.

  4. ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA ITER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Tecbnology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evalua...

  5. ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evalua...

  6. ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evaluat...

  7. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

  8. Competitive ancillary service procurement in California

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Khavkin, Mark

    2000-01-01

    California has undertaken a major restructuring of its electricity utility sector. Most electricity is now sold in open markets operated by the PX and other entities. Bilateral contracting among some market participants is also permitted. A group of independent generating companies bids into these markets together with out of state resources. In addition to these markets, CAISO operates markets for both imbalance energy and AS, a quite unusual feature of the California system. These markets were initially quite chaotic and were rife with market power problems. However, various reforms have now created a system that functions well. During the restructuring process, special provisions were made to protect public purpose programs, including renewable generation.

  9. California's Energy Future

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    #12;California's Energy Future ­ The Potential for Biofuels May 2013 Heather Youngs and Christopher the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Council on Science andTechnology (CCST). It does not represent the views of the CEC, its employees, or the State of California. The CEC, the State of California

  10. California's Energy Future

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    #12;California's Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California December 2011 Christopher to a contract between the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Council on Science andTechnology (CCST). It does not represent the views of the CEC, its employees, or the State of California. The CEC

  11. Company and Industry Research guide

    E-print Network

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    these positions? What type of company ­ publicly traded, privately held, non-profit, etc.? Is the company partCompany and Industry Research guide career.uh.edu 713-743-5100 ucs@uh.edu #12;July 2013 University are going away, company buyouts, changing technology, along with other factors. In an age of downsizing

  12. The superefficient company.

    PubMed

    Hammer, M

    2001-09-01

    Most companies do a great job promoting efficiency within their own walls, streamlining internal processes wherever possible. But they have less success coordinating cross-company business interactions. When data pass between companies, inconsistencies, errors, and misunderstandings routinely arise, leading to wasted work--for instance, the same sales, order entry, and customer data may be entered repeatedly into different systems. Typically, scores of employees at each company manage these cumbersome interactions. The costs of such inefficiencies are very real and very large. In this article, Michael Hammer outlines the activities and goals used in streamlining cross-company processes. He breaks down the approach into four stages: scoping--identifying the business process for redesign and selecting a partner; organizing--establishing a joint committee to oversee the redesign and convening a design team to implement it; redesigning--taking apart and reassembling the process, with performance goals in mind; and implementing--rolling out the new process and communicating it across the collaborating companies. The author describes how several companies have streamlined their supply-chain and product development processes. Plastics compounder Geon integrated its forecasting and fulfillment processes with those of its main supplier after watching inventories, working capital, and shipping times creep up. General Mills coordinated the delivery of its yogurt with Land O'Lakes; butter and yogurt travel cost effectively in the same trucks to the same stores. Hammer says this new kind of collaboration promises to change the traditional vocabulary of corporate relationships. What if you and I sell different products to the same customer? We're not competitors, but what are we? In the past, we didn't care. Now, we should, the author says. PMID:11550633

  13. Tracing the subducted oceanic crust beneath the central California continental margin: Results from ocean bottom seismometers deployed during the 1986 Pacific Gas and Electric EDGE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Trehu, A. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (USA))

    1991-04-10

    Large aperture seismic data were collected on several ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed along a deep crustal seismic profile that was shot across the central California continental margin. The line of shots extends from the oceanic crust seaward of the Santa Lucia Escarpment to the California coast near Morro Bay and crosses the Santa Lucia Basin, Santa Lucia Bank, Santa Maria Basin, and Hosgri fault zone. The OBS data permits one to trace the subducted oceanic crust from seaward of the Santa Lucia Escarpment to beneath the central part of the Santa Maria Basin. Just seaward of the Santa Lucia Escarpment, the oceanic crust is subhorizontal and covered by a thin layer of low-velocity sediment. The velocity (4.5 km/s) and gradient (1.20-1.25 km/s/km) of the upper oceanic crust in this region are well determined and agree with earlier determinations of the crustal structure of the eastern Pacific. Beneath the Santa Lucia Escarpment and Santa Lucia Basin, the oceanic crust dips approximately 16{degrees} to the east. It is overlain by material with a velocity that increases from 4.8 to 6.4 km/s at a depth of 1.7-5.5 km below the seafloor beneath the Santa Lucia Basin. A low-velocity zone may be sandwiched between the subducted crust and this shallow high-velocity material, which the authors interpret to represent obducted oceanic crustal material. Beneath the eastern edge of Santa Lucia Basin, the dip of the subducted oceanic crust decreases to less that 2{degrees}. The configuration of the subducted crust in this region is consistent with imbrication of the subducted crust. Beneath the central Santa Maria Basin, the top of the subducted oceanic crust is at a depth of about 14-16 km and the Moho is at 19-21 km.

  14. A four-dimensional petroleum systems model for the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 12 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lampe, Carolyn; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Lillis, Paul G.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    A calibrated numerical model depicts the geometry and three-dimensional (3-D) evolution of petroleum systems through time (4-D) in a 249 x 309 km (155 x 192 mi) area covering all of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California. Model input includes 3-D structural and stratigraphic data for key horizons and maps of unit thickness, lithology, paleobathymetry, heat flow, original total organic carbon, and original Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen index for each source rock. The four principal petroleum source rocks in the basin are the Miocene Antelope shale of Graham and Williams (1985; hereafter referred to as Antelope shale), the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, the Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935; hereafter referred to as Tumey formation), and the Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation. Due to limited Rock-Eval/total organic carbon data, the Tumey formation was modeled using constant values of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index. Maps of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index were created for the other three source rocks. The Antelope shale was modeled using Type IIS kerogen kinetics, whereas Type II kinetics were used for the other source rocks. Four-dimensional modeling and geologic field evidence indicate that maximum burial of the three principal Cenozoic source rocks occurred in latest Pliocene to Holocene time. For example, a 1-D extraction of burial history from the 4-D model in the Tejon depocenter shows that the bottom of the Antelope shale source rock began expulsion (10 percent transformation ratio) about 4.6 Ma and reached peak expulsion (50 percent transformation ratio) about 3.6 Ma. Except on the west flank of the basin, where steep dips in outcrop and seismic data indicate substantial uplift, little or no section has been eroded. Most petroleum migration occurred during late Cenozoic time in distinct stratigraphic intervals along east-west pathways from pods of active petroleum source rock in the Tejon and Buttonwillow depocenters to updip sandstone reservoirs. Satisfactory runs of the model required about 18 hours of computation time for each simulation using parallel processing on a Linux-based cluster.

  15. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2007 Integrated Energy Policy Report; CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee Jackalyne Pfannenstiel Chairman DISCLAIMER This report was prepared by the California Energy Commission's Integrated Energy Policy Report

  16. California: San Francisco Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Northern California and San Francisco Bay     ... 17, 2000 (MISR) and August 25, 1997 (AirMISR) - Northern California and the San Francisco Bay. project:  MISR ... date:  Aug 17, 2000 Images:  California San Francisco Bay location:  United States ...

  17. CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR

    E-print Network

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INVESTMENT PLAN FOR THE ALTERNATIVE AND RENEWABLE FUEL was prepared by the California Energy Commission's Transportation Committee as part of the Alternative-2009-008-CTD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  18. California Energy Commission GUIDELINES

    E-print Network

    guidelines for solar energy system incentive programs in California. The Senate Bill 1 and commercial structures where solar energy systems are installed. Keywords: Senate Bill 1, SB 1California Energy Commission GUIDELINES GUIDELINES FOR CALIFORNIA'S SOLAR

  19. Arnold Schwarzenegger THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: California Air Resources Board Planning and Technical Support Division California Air Resources Board California Environmental Protection

  20. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-print Network

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  1. Company profile: Big changes revive independent`s profits

    SciTech Connect

    Tippee, B.

    1996-11-04

    In 4 years` time, American Exploration has changed from an aggressive acquirer and manager of producing properties for institutional investors into a geographically focused independent producer dedicated to making money by finding and producing oil and gas. Through its adaptations to unexpectedly stagnant oil prices, American Exploration reflects the type of top-to-bottom changes many independent producers have made to survive a brutal decade. It also demonstrates that an independent producer can prosper in the absence of ever-rising prices: the company reported net income of $3.9 million last year following a $54.8 million loss--much of it related to an accounting change--in 1994 and a string of losses before that. In an interview with Oil and Gas Journal, Andrews discussed his company`s transformation and financial turnaround, his new appreciation for the balance between capital and technology, and future directions of his company and industry.

  2. California's electricity crisis

    E-print Network

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

  3. Tracing the subducted oceanic crust beneath the Central California Continental Margin: Results from ocean bottom seismometers deployed during the 1986 Pacific Gas and Electric EDGE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TréHu, Anne

    1991-04-01

    Large aperture seismic data were collected on several ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed along a deep crustal seismic profile that was shot across the central California continental margin. The line of shots extends from the oceanic crust seaward of the Santa Lucia Escarpment to the California coast near Morro Bay and crosses the Santa Lucia Basin, Santa Lucia Bank, Santa Maria Basin, and Hosgri fault zone. The OBS data permit us to trace the subducted oceanic crust from seaward of the Santa Lucia Escarpment to beneath the central part of the Santa Maria Basin. A complementary study using onshore recordings of the same shots extends the crustal model onshore. Just seaward of the Santa Lucia Escarpment, the oceanic crust is subhorizontal and covered by a thin layer of low-velocity sediment. The velocity (4.5 km/s) and gradient (1.20-1.25 km/s/km) of the upper oceanic crust in this region are well determined and agree with earlier determinations of the crustal structure of the eastern Pacific. Beneath the Santa Lucia Escarpment and Santa Lucia Basin, the oceanic crust dips approximately 16° to the east. It is overlain by material with a velocity that increases from 4.8 to 6.4 km/s at a depth of 1.7-5.5 km below the seafloor beneath the Santa Lucia Basin. A low-velocity zone may be sandwiched between the subducted crust and this shallow high-velocity material, which we interpret to represent obducted oceanic crustal material. Beneath the eastern edge of Santa Lucia Basin, the dip of the subducted oceanic crust decreases to less than 2°. The configuration of the subducted crust in this region is consistent with imbrication of the subducted crust, as suggested by others based on common midpoint reflection data. Beneath the central Santa Maria Basin, the top of the subducted oceanic crust is at a depth of about 14-16 km and the Moho is at 19-21 km.

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    will allow Crockett to install electric motor-driven natural gas compression equipment weighing up to 65-AFC-1C) Staff Analysis of Proposed Modifications to Allow Installation of Electric Motor-Driven Natural Gas Compression Equipment On December 21, 2011, Crockett Cogeneration, a California Limited

  5. California planning ambitious comeback. [Petroleum exploration in California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-20

    California's offshore oil potential is great because of large fields already present and on-going exploratory operations. Several wildcat wells have been drilled in the Santa Maria Basin since the land sale in May 1981. Before 1983, there will be 10 drilling vessels to handle the increased exploratory drilling. One industry is capping a natural oil seep in exchange for approval to drill two exploratory wells in the Santa Barbara Channel. The oil and gas from the seep belongs to the state and will be piped ashore to storage facilities. At Molino, one of the most productive gas condensate fields is kept hidden. The wells are all on the seafloor and the gas condensate is piped by a seafloor gathering system to a geograpically hidden gas plant. Federal land sales are scheduled to begin in June 1982, and the state may offer some also. (JBF)

  6. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-03-12

    Electricity markets in the United States have witnessed unprecedented instability over the last few years, with substantial volatility in wholesale market prices, significant financial distress among major industry organizations, and unprecedented legal, regulatory and legislative activity. These events demonstrate the considerable risks that exist in the electricity industry. Recent industry instability also illustrates the need for thoughtful resource planning to balance the cost, reliability, and risk of the electricity supplied to end-use customers. In balancing different supply options, utilities, regulators, and other resource planners must consider the unique risk profiles of each generating source. This paper evaluates the relative risk profiles of renewable and natural gas generating plants. The risks that exist in the electricity industry depend in part on the technologies that are used to generate electricity. Natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plant additions in the United States. To some, this emphasis on a single fuel source signals the potential for increased risk. Renewable generation sources, on the other hand, are frequently cited as a potent source of socially beneficial risk reduction relative to natural gas-fired generation. Renewable generation is not risk free, however, and also imposes certain costs on the electricity sector. This paper specifically compares the allocation and mitigation of risks in long-term natural gas-fired electricity contracts with the allocation and mitigation of these same risks in long-term renewable energy contracts. This comparison highlights some of the key differences between renewable and natural gas generation that decision makers should consider when making electricity investment and contracting decisions. Our assessment is relevant in both regulated and restructured markets. In still-regulated markets, the audience for this report clearly includes regulators and the utilities they regulate. In restructured markets, the role of regulatory oversight of resource planning is more limited. Nonetheless, even in restructured markets, it is increasingly recognized that regulators have a critical role to play in directing the resource planning of providers of last resort--electric suppliers that provide service to those customers who choose not to switch to a competitive supplier. Our review of electricity contracts may also have educational value for those unfamiliar with the typical contents of these agreements. Details of our findings are provided in the body of the paper, but this summary is written to provide a concise alternative to reading the full report.

  7. 22. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 2. United Engineering Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 2. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. Plans, section, & detail. Alben Froberg, Architect, 3454 Harlan Street, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 2. Plan no. 10,525. Various scales. March 1, 1942, last revised 3/15/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Engineering Building, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  8. 23. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 3. United Engineering Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 3. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. Plans, section, & detail. Alben Froberg, Architect, 3454 Harlan Street, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 3. Plan no. 10,525. Various scales. March 1, 1943, last revised 3/15/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Engineering Building, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  9. Mechanical Engineer Company Description

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Mechanical Engineer Company Description Control Solutions Inc. is a small, dynamic, and rapidly. Position Description The Mechanical Engineer is responsible for all aspects associated with the mechanicalE Mechanism, when applicable. · Perform static, dynamic, vibration, thermal, and other engineering analysis

  10. The Statewide Benefits Of Net-Metering In California

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    on the costs and benefits of NEM to the Governor and Legislature. 4 Id. 5 California Solar Future: Growing Solar Power in a Sustainable Way, San Diego Gas & Electric. Summary ...Recent criticisms of the net renewable power development. #12;The Statewide Benefits of Net-Metering In California ISSUE BRIEF | February

  11. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-print Network

    . The facility consists of four 75-MW natural gas combustion turbines with unfired heat recovery steam generators, to amend the Energy Commission Decision for the Sycamore Cogeneration Power Project. Staff prepared Cogeneration Company power project is a 300-megawatt, natural gas- fired cogeneration power plant located

  12. Developing a New Field-Validated Methodology for Landfill Methane Emissions in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This project was initiated in the US by the California Energy Commission (CEC) in cooperation with the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) to develop improved methods for landfill methane emissions for the California greenhouse gas inventory. This 3-year project (2007-2010) is devel...

  13. The Impact of California's Global Warming Legislation on the Electric Utility Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, Seth

    2006-11-15

    California's greenhouse gas legislation would appear at first glance to be a significant benefit to the development of renewable energy resources both in California and in neighboring states. However, the difficulties that California has experienced in implementing its renewable portfolio standard, as well as its urgent need for additional generation, may limit the state's ability to significantly increase its reliance on renewable generation. (author)

  14. Kern River Cogeneration Company Box 80478, Bakers'field, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess, Executive Director

    E-print Network

    Kern River Cogeneration Company Box 80478, Bakers'field, CA 93380 (661) 615-4630 Neil E. Burgess Commission 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Re: Kern River Cogeneration Company (82-AFC-2C the operation of the combustion gas turbine units at Kern River Cogeneration Company in an extended startup mode

  15. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100 public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear

  16. Effectiveness of microseismic monitoring for optimizing hydraulic fracturing in California

    E-print Network

    Alampi, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has fundamentally changed the oil and gas industry in the past 10 years. Bakersfield, California provides a unique case study because steam injection, a type of hydraulic fracturing, has been used there ...

  17. Northern California CO2 Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hymes, Edward

    2010-06-16

    C6 Resources LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Oil Company, worked with the US Department of Energy (DOE) under a Cooperative Agreement to develop the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project. The objective of the Project is to demonstrate the viability of using Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) to reduce existing greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources on a large-scale. The Project will capture more than 700,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, which is currently being vented to the atmosphere from the Shell Martinez Refinery in Contra Costa County. The CO2 will be compressed and dehydrated at the refinery and then transported via pipeline to a sequestration site in a rural area in neighboring Solano County. The CO2 will be sequestered into a deep saline formation (more than two miles underground) and will be monitored to assure secure, long-term containment. The pipeline will be designed to carry as much as 1,400,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, so additional capacity will be available to accommodate CO2 captured from other industrial sources. The Project is expected to begin operation in 2015. The Project has two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive design basis for the Project. The Cooperative Agreement with the DOE provided cost sharing for Phase 1 and the opportunity to apply for additional DOE cost sharing for Phase 2, comprising the design, construction and operation of the Project. Phase 1 has been completed. DOE co-funding is provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. As prescribed by ARRA, the Project will stimulate the local economy by creating manufacturing, transportation, construction, operations, and management jobs while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at an accelerated pace. The Project, which will also assist in meeting the CO2 reduction requirements set forth in California?s Climate Change law, presents a major opportunity for both the environment as well as the region. C6 Resources is conducting the Project in collaboration with federally-funded research centers, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Lawrence Livermore National Lab. C6 Resources and Shell have identified CCS as one of the critical pathways toward a worldwide goal of providing cleaner energy. C6 Resources, in conjunction with the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), has conducted an extensive and ongoing public outreach and CCS education program for local, regional and state-wide stakeholders. As part of a long term relationship, C6 Resources will continue to engage directly with community leaders and residents to ensure public input and transparency. This topical report summarizes the technical work from Phase 1 of the Project in the following areas: ? Surface Facility Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the preliminary engineering work performed for CO2 capture, CO2 compression and dehydration at the refinery, and surface facilities at the sequestration site ? Pipeline Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the pipeline routing study and preliminary engineering design ? Geologic Sequestration: summarizes the work to characterize, model and evaluate the sequestration site ? Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA): summarizes the MVA plan to assure long-term containment of the sequestered CO2

  18. 75 FR 2134 - Northern Border Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ...local distribution company. Northern Border states that its project would provide CILCO with the natural gas pipeline capacity to meet the natural gas demand in its service territory. The Princeton Lateral Project would consist of the...

  19. 18 CFR 2.67 - Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after January 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property...Interpretations Under the Natural Gas Act § 2.67 Calculation of taxes for property...487, 625, natural gas pipeline companies...section to change from flow through...

  20. 18 CFR 2.67 - Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after January 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property...Interpretations Under the Natural Gas Act § 2.67 Calculation of taxes for property...487, 625, natural gas pipeline companies...section to change from flow through...

  1. 18 CFR 2.67 - Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after January 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property...Interpretations Under the Natural Gas Act § 2.67 Calculation of taxes for property...487, 625, natural gas pipeline companies...section to change from flow through...

  2. 18 CFR 2.67 - Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after January 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Calculation of taxes for property...Interpretations Under the Natural Gas Act § 2.67 Calculation of taxes for property...487, 625, natural gas pipeline companies...section to change from flow through...

  3. Multilingualism in Companies: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Tamah; Strubell, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    This thematic collection of four papers explores a number of perspectives on companies in which multiple languages are used. The "organisational" perspective concerns the question of how the presence of or demand for multiple languages in the company is managed--how companies are guided by national and other policies in regard to the use…

  4. The Dutch East India Company

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Li

    The Dutch East India Company, founded in 1602, was one of the first companies in the world and became the largest company in the world in that period. This case offers an historical perspective on the development of economical and financial institutions, which were both critical to, and laid the foundations for, the development of capitalism. The case compares the

  5. Company Annual Reports Online (CAROL)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Company Annual Reports Online (CAROL) is a free corporate service offering direct links to the annual reports of a variety of European companies. The reports are arranged in alphabetical order by company name or industry type for direct searches or browsing. In addition, recent articles and statistics on Investor Relations and the Internet are available from CAROL's The Marketplace index.

  6. A Monte Carlo simulation method for the assessment of undiscovered, conventional oil and gas: Chapter 26 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, T.R.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed two Monte Carlo programs for assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources. EMCEE (for Energy Monte Carlo) and Emc2 (for Energy Monte Carlo program 2) are programs that calculate probabilistic estimates of undiscovered resources based on input distributions for numbers and sizes of undiscovered fields. Emc2 uses specific types of distributions for the input, whereas EMCEE allows greater flexibility of the input distribution types.

  7. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-31

    The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

  8. Submicron aerosol composition at Trinidad Head, California, during ITCT 2K2: Its relationship with gas phase volatile organic carbon and assessment of instrument performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, James D.; Bower, Keith N.; Coe, Hugh; Boudries, Hacene; Jayne, John T.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Millet, Dylan B.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Weber, Rodney J.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2004-12-01

    Two Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometers (AMSs) were deployed at Trinidad Head on the north Californian coast during the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002 (ITCT 2K2) experiment, to study the physiochemical properties of submicron aerosol particles within the Pacific marine boundary layer. One AMS was modified to allow the study of sea salt-based particles, while the other used a temperature cycling system on its inlet. The reported loadings increased by a factor of 2 when the temperature approached the dew point, which is due to the inlet performance and has implications for other AMS experiments and applications. The processed data were compared with those of a particle into liquid sampler-ion chromatograph and showed that the ammonium, sulfate and organic fractions of the particles were consistently found within a single, normally acidic, accumulation mode at around 300-400 nm. However, when influenced by land-based sources, vehicle emissions and increased ammonium loadings were seen. The concentrations of nitrate in the accumulation mode were low, but it was also found within sea salt particles in the coarse mode and can be linked to the displacement of chloride. The organic fraction showed a high degree of chemical ageing and evidence of nitrogen-bearing organics was also observed. The particulate organic data were compared to the volatile organic carbon data derived from an in-situ gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer-flame ionization detector and relationships were found between the gas and particle phase chemicals in both the overall concentrations and the levels of oxidation.

  9. Measurements of organic molecular markers in California using comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatograph High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOF-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Schilling, K. A.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Hersey, S. P.; Rubitschun, C. L.; Lin, Y. H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the sources and transformation processes of organic aerosol requires detailed speciation of organic compounds. Molecular markers specific to individual sources help determine the contribution of each source to organic aerosol emissions. In previous work using one-dimensional gas-chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC/MS), less than 10-20% of the organic fraction has been identified, with a large contribution of unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Two-dimensional gas-chromatograph is a novel technique which provides excellent resolution to separate compounds buried in this complex mixture. In addition to a volatility-based chromatographic separation, compounds are further separated on a second column based on their polarities. Here we report measurements of more than 200 resolved compounds observed on filters collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Pasadena, and during a large biomass burning event in the Los Angeles area (Station Fire). High volume filter samples are thermally desorbed in a Gerstel Thermal Desorption System (TDS2) and preconcentrated on a cooled inlet (CIS). The compounds are then analyzed by comprehensive 2-dimensional GC using a Zoex modulator, followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (Tofwerks). Compound identification is carried out by comparison of retention times with known standards, mass spectral library match, and identification of molecular fragments by exact mass. A wide range of compounds are observed: n-alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as acids, esters and ketones. While levoglucosan was observed in organic aerosol produced during the Station Fire, many other compounds revealed by two-dimensional GC (such as resin acids, lignin pyrolysis products) show elevated signals, suggesting that other molecular markers can provide additional information about aerosol formation processes during biomass burning events.

  10. Company EM department tests and specs products

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, L.

    1983-03-14

    A three-member energy management team at the Carlson Co. of Minneapolis provided conservation information to 500 building managers that saved $7 million in energy costs over a five-year period. Energy-management equipment must have a three-year or less payback to be accepted. The Carlson Co. offers an optimal incentives/awards program as well as specifying products after testing. Managers receive information on Btu, electricity, and gas consumption trends as well as analyses of utility rates, employee training, and on-site surveys. Building designs must conform to company energy criteria. A 25% reduction in energy use from 1977 levels is the overall company goal. 1 figure. (DCK)

  11. California's Energy Future: The View to 2050

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-08-14

    In this two year study funded by the California Energy Commission and S.D. Bechtel, a committee of individuals from major energy research institutions in California develops strategies to meet Executive Order S-3-05. Executive Order S-3-05 requires California to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 80% of 1990 levels by 2050. To accomplish this, CO2 levels will need to drop from 13 tons CO2e per capita (2005) to 1.6 tons CO2e per capita (2050) while the population continues to grow and energy use is expected to double. To offer a solution to this challenge, multiple “energy system portraits” are developed with combinations of nuclear, biomass, electricity, and fossil fuels with carbon capturing systems. It’s concluded by applying key aggressive strategies and investing in multiple technologies, implementations, research, development, and innovation, California can meet executive order S-3-05.

  12. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.; Shafer, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the construction phase for the new Polk Power Station, Unit {number_sign}1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology for power generation. The unit will utilize oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle technology, to provide nominal net 26OMW of generation. As part of the environmental features of this process, the sulfur species in the coal will be recovered as a commercial grade sulfuric acid by-product. The sulfur will be removed from the synthesis gas utilizing a cold gas clean-up system (CGCU).

  13. Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station IGCC project

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D. [TECO Power Services Corp., Tampa, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the construction phase of its new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This unique project incorporates the use of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology for electric power production. The project is being partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), as part of the Clean Coal Technology Program. This will help to demonstrate this state-of-the-art technology, providing utilities with the ability to use a wide range of coals in an efficient, environmentally superior manner. During the summer of 1994, TEC began site development at the new Polk Power Station. Since that time, most of the Site work has been completed, and erection and installation of the power plant equipment is well underway. This is the first time that IGCC technology will be installed at a new unit at a greenfield site. This is a major endeavor for TEC in that Polk Unit No. 1 is a major addition to the existing generating capacity and it involves the demonstration of technology new to utility power generation. As a part of the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE, TEC will also be demonstrating the use of a new Hot Gas Clean-Up System which has a potential for greater IGCC efficiency.

  14. Building natural gas locomotives

    SciTech Connect

    O'Conner, L.

    1994-04-01

    This article describes a liquefied natural gas-fueled locomotive built by Morrison Knudsen which includes a Caterpillar 1200-horsepower V-16, a monofuel management system with double-wall super-insulated cryogenic tanks, and microprocessor-based controls. Efforts by railroad companies to reduce operating costs and meet future emissions standards have led engineers to look for innovative ways to design trains. In January, Morrison Knudsen Corp. of Boise, Idaho, powered its way into the locomotive manufacturing business when it introduced the natural gas-fueled MK1200G, to be used mostly around railroad company yards and on trips shorter than 50 miles.

  15. Determination of pesticides associated with suspended sediments in the San Joaquin River, California, USA, using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Baston, D.S.; Crepeau, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical method useful for the quantification of a range of pesticides and pesticide degradation products associated with suspended sediments was developed by testing a variety of extraction and cleanup schemes. The final extraction and cleanup methods chosen for use are suitable for the quantification of the listed pesticides using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and the removal of interfering coextractable organic material found in suspended sediments. Methylene chloride extraction followed by Florisil cleanup proved most effective for separation of coextractives from the pesticide analytes. Removal of elemental sulfur was accomplished with tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfite. The suitability of the method for the analysis of a variety of pesticides was evaluated, and the method detection limits (MDLs) were determined (0.1-6.0 ng/g dry weight of sediment) for 21 compounds. Recovery of pesticides dried onto natural sediments averaged 63%. Analysis of duplicate San Joaquin River suspended-sediment samples demonstrated the utility of the method for environmental samples with variability between replicate analyses lower than between environmental samples. Eight of 21 pesticides measured were observed at concentrations ranging from the MDL to more than 80 ng/g dry weight of sediment and exhibited significant temporal variability. Sediment-associated pesticides, therefore, may contribute to the transport of pesticides through aquatic systems and should be studied separately from dissolved pesticides.

  16. 18 CFR 366.21 - Accounts and records of holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT BOOKS AND RECORDS ...Federal Power Act and the Natural Gas Act § 366.21 Accounts...and licensees or for natural gas companies, as appropriate...chapter), or the Securities and Exchange Commission's record...

  17. 18 CFR 366.21 - Accounts and records of holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT BOOKS AND RECORDS ...Federal Power Act and the Natural Gas Act § 366.21 Accounts...and licensees or for natural gas companies, as appropriate...chapter), or the Securities and Exchange Commission's record...

  18. 18 CFR 366.21 - Accounts and records of holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT BOOKS AND RECORDS ...Federal Power Act and the Natural Gas Act § 366.21 Accounts...and licensees or for natural gas companies, as appropriate...chapter), or the Securities and Exchange Commission's record...

  19. 18 CFR 366.21 - Accounts and records of holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT BOOKS AND RECORDS ...Federal Power Act and the Natural Gas Act § 366.21 Accounts...and licensees or for natural gas companies, as appropriate...chapter), or the Securities and Exchange Commission's record...

  20. 18 CFR 366.21 - Accounts and records of holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT BOOKS AND RECORDS ...Federal Power Act and the Natural Gas Act § 366.21 Accounts...and licensees or for natural gas companies, as appropriate...chapter), or the Securities and Exchange Commission's record...