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1

Study of the 1991 unaccounted-for gas volume at the Southern California Gas Company. Final report, January 1991-December 1992. Volume 2. Accounting  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study of unaccounted-for gas (UAF), performed by the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), volume II of the six-volume set presents the results of the accounting portion, including sections on accounting adjustments and company-use gas. It identifies enhancements to accounting practices that make records more accurately reflect the physical activity occurring in the system. The result is an accounting record of gas volumes received and delivered which have been adjusted for the enhancements, and exclude accounting estimates and prior period adjustments.

Meshkati, S.; Groot, J.; Law, E.; Rudshagen, C.; Yevchak, S.

1993-04-01

2

Utilization requirements. A southern California Gas Company project SAGE report: Utilization requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Utilization requirements are given and comparisons made of two phase III SAGE (solar assisted gas energy) installations in California: (1) a retrofit installation in an existing apartment building in El Toro, and (2) an installation in a new apartment building in Upland. Such testing in the field revealed the requirements to be met if SAGE-type installations are to become commercially practical on a widespread basis in electric and gas energy usage.

Barbieri, R. H.; Schoen, R.; Hirshberg, A. S.

1978-01-01

3

Natural gas annual 1993 supplement: Company profiles  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1993 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of 45 selected companies in the natural gas industry. The purpose of this report is to show the movement of natural gas through the various States served by the companies profiled. The companies in this report are interstate pipeline companies or local distribution companies (LDC`s). Interstate pipeline companies acquire gas supplies from company owned production, purchases from producers, and receipts for transportation for account of others. Pipeline systems, service area maps, company supply and disposition data are presented.

Not Available

1995-02-01

4

Canada-California gas export dispute becomes thornier  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Canada's National Energy Board has reserved decision on whether it will subpoena California executives and regulatory officials in a natural gas export dispute. NEB is holding hearings in Calgary on the fight between California regulators and Alberta gas producers over contracts and pipeline access covering as much as $1 billion in gas sales. California Public Utilities Commission has ordered the Alberta-California pipeline system operated by a unit of Pacific Gas and Electric Co. be opened to all shippers in November. Alberta producers selling to PG and E unit Alberta and Southern Gas Ltd., Calgary, say this would violate long term contracts allocating them 75% of pipeline capacity. A and S was granted an extended license in 1988 by the NEB to export 1.1 bcfd of gas to 2010, and the Canadian Petroleum Association asked NEB to review the company's license, triggering the hearings.

Not Available

1992-03-09

5

76 FR 66709 - Trunkline Gas Company, LLC, Sea Robin Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CP12-5-000] Trunkline Gas Company, LLC, Sea Robin Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Application...Trunkline Gas Company, LLC (Trunkline) and Sea Robin Pipeline Company, LLC (Sea Robin), together referred to as Applicants, both...

2011-10-27

6

77 FR 11529 - Louisville Gas and Electric Company; Kentucky Utilities Company; Notice of Petition for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL12-27-000] Louisville Gas and Electric Company; Kentucky Utilities Company; Notice...Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207, Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities...

2012-02-27

7

78 FR 72672 - Owensboro Municipal Utilities v. Louisville Gas and Electric Company, Kentucky Utilities Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...EL13-79-000] Owensboro Municipal Utilities v. Louisville Gas and Electric Company, Kentucky Utilities Company; Notice of Filing Take notice that on November 22, 2013, Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities...

2013-12-03

8

OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California  

E-print Network

OIL & GAS HISTORY 1 History in California 4 Superior figures refer to references at the end of the essay. OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION California oil was always a valued commodity. When the Spanish explorers landed in California in the 1500s, they found Indians gathering asphaltum (very thick oil) from natural

9

Gas supplies of interstate/natural gas pipeline companies 1989  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on the interstate pipeline companies' supply of natural gas during calendar year 1989, for use by the FERC for regulatory purposes. It also provides information to other Government agencies, the natural gas industry, as well as policy makers, analysts, and consumers interested in current levels of interstate supplies of natural gas and trends over recent years. 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-18

10

78 FR 39718 - Trunkline Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CP13-505-000] Trunkline Gas Company, LLC; Notice...19, 2013, Trunkline Gas Company, LLC. (Trunkline...section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) requesting...requested by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC. in order to...

2013-07-02

11

78 FR 64196 - Foreign-Trade Zone 3-San Francisco, California; Application for Subzone; Phillips 66 Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Francisco, California; Application for Subzone; Phillips 66 Company; Rodeo, California An application has been...requesting subzone status for the facility of Phillips 66 Company (Phillips 66), located in Rodeo, California. The...

2013-10-28

12

California's new mandatory greenhouse gas reporting regulation  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in early 2009, approximately 1000 California businesses will begin reporting their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based on the requirements of a new regulation adopted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in December 2007. California's mandatory GHG reporting regulation is the first rule adopted as a requirement of the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006, passed by the California Legislature as Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32; Nunez, Chapter 488, Statutes of 2006) and signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in September 2006. The regulation is the first of its kind in the United States to require facilities to report annual GHG emissions. In general, all facilities subject to reporting are required to report their on-site stationary source combustion emissions of CO{sub 2}, nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Some industrial sectors, such as cement producers and oil refineries, also must report their process emissions, which occur from chemical or other noncombustion activities. Fugitive emissions from facilities are required to be reported when specified in the regulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) use is prevalent in electricity facilities and must be reported. CO{sub 2} emissions from biomass-derived fuels must be separately identified during reporting, and reporters must also provide their consumption of purchased or acquired electricity and thermal energy; these requirements will assist facilities in evaluating changes in their fossil fuel carbon footprints. 1 tab.

Patrick Gaffney; Doug Thompson; Richard Bode [California Air Resources Board, CA (United States)

2008-11-15

13

78 FR 45922 - Owensboro Municipal Utilities v. Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. EL13-79-000] Owensboro Municipal Utilities v. Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company...Utilities (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities...

2013-07-30

14

18 CFR 260.1 - FERC Form No. 2, Annual report for Major natural gas companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...No. 2, Annual report for Major natural gas companies. 260.1 Section 260.1...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES...No. 2, Annual report for Major natural gas companies. (a) Prescription....

2010-04-01

15

78 FR 72668 - Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...No. CP14-21-000] Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...November 15, 2013, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) for the Pompano Compressor Station 21.5 Project....

2013-12-03

16

Geology of Tompkins Hill gas field, Humboldt County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Tompkins Hill gas field, located in Humboldt County, California, is the only producing field in the Eel River basin. The field is an anticlinal flexure on the north limb of the Eel River syncline in the central onshore portion of the basin. The Tompkins Hill anticline is doubly plunging and trends east-west. Stratigraphic units present in the field include the Yager, Eel River, and Rio Dell Formations and Scotia Bluffs Sandstone. The Yager occurs below a major unconformity, and forms economic basement. Strata overlying the Eel River, Rio Dell, and Scotia Bluffs represent a progradational basin-fill sequence, including submarine fan, slope, shelf, and littoral deposits. The primary productive interval in the field is within the middle of the Rio Dell and consists of interbedded fine sandstone and mudrock. Portions of the Eel River and upper Rio Dell Formations are also productive. The Tompkins Hill gas field was discovered by the Texas Company in 1937 with the drilling of Eureka 2 in Sec. 22, T3N, R1W. The play was probably based on outcrop mapping and the presence of gas seeps in the area. The primary trapping mechanism in the field is structural, although stratigraphy may have been a factor in constraining gas. To date, 39 producing wells have been drilled and 87.4 bcf of gas, consisting of 98% methane, has been produced. Very minor amounts of condensate are also produced. The source rocks for the gas are uncertain, but both the Yager Formation and strata of the lower Wildcat Group may have contributed.

Parker, J.

1988-03-01

17

76 FR 35202 - Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc.; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. CP11-495-000] Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc.; Notice of Application On June 3, 2011, Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc. (Piedmont) filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

2011-06-16

18

75 FR 31430 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CP10-441-000] Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of...2010, Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC (Transco...one 16-inch tap assembly, flow and pressure control facility...Patel, Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC, Post...

2010-06-03

19

75 FR 74704 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Applicant: South Carolina Electric and Gas Company. e. Name...Argentieri, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Mail Code...Applicant, South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, is seeking...the withdrawal from, and discharge to, the Project's...

2010-12-01

20

78 FR 14531 - Louisville Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund Effective Date  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Commission [Docket No. EL13-46-000] Louisville Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Initiation...reasonableness of the proposed tariff revisions by Louisville Gas and Electric Company. Louisville Gas and Electric Company, 142 FERC ]...

2013-03-06

21

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

2011-07-01

22

CSEM WP 166 California's Greenhouse Gas Policies  

E-print Network

drawn attention to California's efforts to combat climate change. California assembly bill 32 (AB 32 to 1990 levels by 2020. While the details of implementing AB 32 are still being worked out, market mechanisms such as cap-and- trade are being seriously considered. At the same time, several other policies

Kammen, Daniel M.

23

76 FR 18751 - National Fuel Gas Supply Corporation; Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Corporation (National Fuel) and Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (TGP). National...entitled ``An Interstate Natural Gas Facility On My Land? What Do I Need...dekatherms per day of firm Marcellus Shale natural gas transportation service to...

2011-04-05

24

33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

2010-07-01

25

33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

2013-07-01

26

33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

2012-07-01

27

33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

2011-07-01

28

33 CFR 165.1151 - Security Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. 165.1151 Section 165.1151 Navigation and Navigable...Zones; liquefied hazardous gas tank vessels, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Liquefied Hazardous...

2014-07-01

29

[Back pain at the French National Electricity and Gas Company].  

PubMed

Frequency and severity of sickness absence due to back pain were studied among workers in the French National Electric and Gas Company. The results showed that the prevalence of back pain was less than 10% a year but the annual duration of absence that it involved was relatively important: 30 days in the average per disabled person. In a second part, the prevalence was studied according to individual and occupational variables. Differences according to occupational category are very important: between the occupations the most prone to absence, those of "switchboard operator", "mechanics driver" and "warehouseman" and the ones least exposed "managerial staff" and "skilled technician and upper management", the ratio for the prevalences was 10. PMID:2138804

Chevalier, A; Lambrozo, J; Marboutin, J P

1990-01-01

30

18 CFR 260.9 - Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions and damage to facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service interruptions...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES) § 260.9 Reports by natural gas pipeline companies on service...

2010-04-01

31

18 CFR 260.2 - FERC Form No. 2-A, Annual report for Nonmajor natural gas companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2-A, Annual report for Nonmajor natural gas companies. 260.2 Section 260.2...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES...2-A, Annual report for Nonmajor natural gas companies. (a) Prescription....

2010-04-01

32

77 FR 53885 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC...under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and...transportation services. The project is estimated to cost approximately...CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company,...

2012-09-04

33

Invisible CO2 gas killing trees at Mammoth Mountain, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1980, scientists have monitored geologic unrest in Long Valley Caldera and at adjacent Mammoth Mountain, California. After a persistent swarm of earthquakes beneath Mammoth Mountain in 1989, earth scientists discovered that large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas were seeping from beneath this volcano. This gas is killing trees on the mountain and also can be a danger to people. The USGS continues to study the CO2 emissions to help protect the public from this invisible potential hazard.

Sorey, Michael L.; Farrar, Christopher D.; Evans, William C.; Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Hendley, James W., II; Stauffer, Peter H.

1996-01-01

34

78 FR 2380 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Greenfield pipeline facilities; a new compressor station with two 10,915 horsepower (ISO) gas turbine-driven compressor; and the construction or modification...Corp., Inc. and Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc. Transco estimates...

2013-01-11

35

77 FR 7211 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRC-2011-0110] Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Independent Spent...No. SNM-2511 to the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) for the Diablo Canyon...States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Luis Obispo Mothers for...

2012-02-10

36

75 FR 52937 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket Nos. CP10-481-000; PF09-14-000] Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of...2010. Take notice that on August 6, 2010, Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC (Turtle Bayou), One Office Park Circle, Suite...

2010-08-30

37

Estimated oil and gas reserves, Southern California outer continental shelf  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Outer Continental Shelf off Southern California are estimated to be 968 million barrels of oil and 1,851 billion cubic feet of gas as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are attributed to 14 fields. Original recoverable reserves from these fields are estimated at 1,217 million barrels of oil and 1,983 billion cubic feet of gas. The estimates for both the remaining and the original recoverable reserves of oil and gas are higher than the corresponding estimates for December 31, 1981. Reserve estimates for 12 fields were based on volumetric reservoir studies. Decline-curve and volumetric analyses were used for the remaining two fields. Six fields were on production at year's end and a gas field is scheduled to commence production in 1983. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil, condensate, and gas-plant liquids.

Ballantyne, R.S.

1983-01-01

38

Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

1995-07-01

39

75 FR 38093 - ConocoPhillips Alaska Natural Gas Corporation and Marathon Oil Company; Application for Blanket...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...ConocoPhillips Alaska Natural Gas Corporation and Marathon Oil Company; Application for Blanket Authorization...ConocoPhillips Alaska Natural Gas Corporation (CPANGC) and Marathon Oil Company (Marathon) (collectively Applicants), requesting...

2010-07-01

40

Measurement of radon gas on major faults in California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Abundant data have been gathered through measurements of radon gas emission in the soil on several major active faults, such as San Andreas and Calaveras, in California, U.S.A.. They show radon emissions and their spatial variations at the unlocked, locked, and creeping sections of faults with different tectonic movements. The characteristics of these variations and the role of fault gases in the research on earthquake prediction are discussed in this paper. ?? 1994 Acta Seismologica Sinica.

Zhang, W.; King, C.-Y.

1994-01-01

41

Invisible CO2 gas killing trees at Mammoth Mountain, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1980, scientists have monitored geologic unrest in Long Valley Caldera and at adjacent Mammoth Mountain, California. After a persistent swarm of earthquakes beneath Mammoth Mountain in 1989, geologists discovered that large volumes of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) gas were seeping from beneath this volcano. This gas is killing trees on the mountain and also can be a danger to people. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues to study the CO2 emissions to help protect the public from this invisible potential hazard.

Sorey, Michael L.; Farrar, Christopher D.; Gerlach, Terrance M.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Evans, William C.; Colvard, Elizabeth M.; Hill, David P.; Bailey, Roy A.; Rogie, John D.; Hendley, James W., II; Stauffer, Peter H.

2000-01-01

42

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01

43

76 FR 25685 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...2784-004] Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Notice of Application...Applicant: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E). e. Name...Project Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 5555 Florin Perkins...Project consists of a single circuit, 3-phase,...

2011-05-05

44

Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July 2005  

E-print Network

Defra July 2005 Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Annexes updated July Emissions Inventory for 2003 and the UK Greenhouse Gas Inventory for 2003 developed by Netcen (2005), Digest on the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory for 2003 and the UK Greenhouse Gas Inventory for 2003 developed

45

75 FR 54618 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. EL10-84-000] CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company...18 CFR 385.206, (2010), CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (Complainant) filed a complaint...

2010-09-08

46

75 FR 66744 - Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Docket No. EL10-84-001] Californians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (CARE) v. Pacific Gas and Electric Company...385.212 and 18 CFR 385.215, CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc. (Complainant) filed an amendment to...

2010-10-29

47

Faculty of MANAGEMENT Alberta Oil & Gas Company1  

E-print Network

parcels of land in the Waptaman field. (Waptaman is the name of the underground geologic structure is commonly covered by a patchwork of several parcels of land. Energy companies purchase mineral rights includes significant expenses associated with geophysical surveying, and drilling an exploration well

Nakayama, Marvin K.

48

75 FR 63462 - Central New York Oil and Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...550,000 dekatherms of natural gas per day, and would have a maximum...infrastructure to receive natural gas produced from Marcellus Shale production areas for delivery to...interstate pipeline systems of Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (TGP),...

2010-10-15

49

78 FR 26354 - Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...gas facilities by Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company, LLC (Transco), in the Commission's...Rockaway Project, a 3.2-mile-long pipeline in Queens and Kings Counties, New York...S. Army Corps of Engineers, National Marine Fisheries Service, and New York...

2013-05-06

50

Gas hydrates beneath continental slope off northern California  

SciTech Connect

The continental slope and plateau off northern California are underlain by a well-defined and extensive acoustic reflector that crosses other reflectors and mimics the surface of the sea floor. This bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) lies at an average subsurface depth of 250 m and is laterally continuous beneath the Klamath Plateau (water depths of 800-1200 m) off northernmost California. Limited data show that it extends northward into offshore Oregon and seaward at least to the base of the slope (3000 m water depth). The BSR has been mapped along the continental margin for a distance of over 130 km and underlies an area of at least 3000 km/sup 2/. The water depths and sediment depths of the BSR, as well as its pervasiveness, all suggest that it represents the base of a natural-gas hydrate. Using standard phase-boundary diagrams for hydrate stability, the authors estimate that the geothermal gradient in this area is about 50/sup 0//km. Such a gradient is higher than found along most subduction margins, possibly because the subducting oceanic crust in this region is young. This acoustically inferred gas hydrate is the first mapped along the western US conterminous continental margin.

Field, M.E.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

1985-02-01

51

Characterization of industrial waste from a natural gas distribution company and management strategies: a case study of the East Azerbaijan Gas Company (Iran).  

PubMed

Although a fundamental prerequisite for the successful implementation of any waste management plan is the availability of sufficient and accurate data, there are few available studies regarding the characterization and management of gas distribution company waste (GDCW). This study aimed to characterize the industrial waste generated by the East Azerbaijan Gas Distribution Company (EAGDC) and to present environmental management strategies. The EAGDC serves 57 cities and 821 villages with a total population of more than 2.5 million as well as numerous industrial units. The methodology of this study was based on a checklist of data collected from each zone of the company, site visits (observation), and quantity and quality analysis according to the formal data available from different zones. The results indicate that more than 35 different kinds of industrial solid waste are generated in different industrial installations. The most important types of generated waste include empty barrels (including mercaptans, diesel fuel, deionized waters and oil), faulty gas meters and regulators, a variety of industrial oils, sleeves, filter elements and faulty pipes, valves and fittings. The results indicated that, currently, GDCW is generally handled and disposed of with domestic waste, deposited in companies' installation yards and stores or, sometimes, recycled through non-scientific approaches that can create health risks to the public and the environment, even though most of the GDCW was determined to be recyclable or reusable materials. This study concludes that gas distribution companies must pay more attention to source reduction, recycling and reusing of waste to preserve natural resources, landfill space and the environment. PMID:22683949

Taghipour, Hassan; Aslhashemi, Ahmad; Assadi, Mohammad; Khodaei, Firoz; Mardangahi, Baharak; Mosaferi, Mohammad; Roshani, Babak

2012-10-01

52

US lessons for energy industry restructuring: based on natural gas and California electricity incidences  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the regulation and deregulation processes, the US experienced, besides temporary price spikes, several unhappy incidences; natural gas shortage in mid-1970s, gas bubble in 1980s, California power crisis, and high natural gas price in 2000–2001. This paper focuses on the US natural gas and California electricity industries, especially on the above-mentioned four incidences. Through analyzing their causes and effects, this

Won-Woo Lee

2004-01-01

53

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15

54

75 FR 73065 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...amend its authorization under NGA section 3 and Presidential Permits to allow it to import and export natural gas from...facilities. Specifically, Tennessee proposes that its Presidential Permits be amended and reissued, and authorizations...

2010-11-29

55

CEC-400-2013-002-CMF CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

Office Manager High Performance Buildings Office Project Managers: Maziar Shirakh, P.E. High Performance Standards revision and the supporting documents were conceptualized, evaluated and justified through, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison Company, San Diego Gas and Electric Company

56

Ecology of Oil/Gas Platforms Offshore California  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes the ecology of fishes and attached epifauna that associate with offshore oil and gas platforms of California and an evaluation of actual and potential use of the platforms for mariculture. The attached invertebrate biota in the upper 35 m of the water column is dominated by bay (Mytilus edulis) or California (M. californianus) mussels, depending upon location and/or age of the structure, with other mollusks, barnacles and polychaetes being of secondary importance. The attached community may take up to five years to fully develop. The fish fauna at shallow (less than 45 m of water), nearshore platforms is dominated by surfperches and rockfishes; major species in this assemblage are about equally divided between those with relatively large mouths (which consume large organisms such as crabs and small fish) and those with relatively small mouths (which graze on small epifauna and planktonic organisms). The fish fauna may take two years to attain a relatively stable community structure. The fish fauna at nearshore platforms is similar to that at natural reefs and oil islands in the area, but is more diverse among common species. As opposed to these other structures, platforms lack fish which associated with algae.

Allen, M.J.; Cowen, R.K.; Kauwling, R.J.; Mitchell, C.T.

1987-02-01

57

Oil prices and accounting profits of oil and gas companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the relationship between commodity prices of crude oil, capital structure, firm size and accounting measures of firm performance using a sample of oil and gas firms from 1990 to 2008. We employ estimates based on panel least squares, a fixed effects model and a random effects model. We also use generalized method of moments (GMM) estimators by

Ajit Dayanandan; Han Donker

2011-01-01

58

75 FR 52935 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...proposes: (1) To construct and operate the Spruce Hill Air Blending Project facilities...pursuant to section 4 of the NGA, the New Spruce Hill Gas Quality Control Surcharge for...constructed adjacent to CIG's existing Spruce Hill Meter Station. CIG estimates...

2010-08-30

59

Submarine landslides associated with shallow seafloor gas and gas hydrates off northern California  

SciTech Connect

The continental margin off California north of Cape Mendocino contains more landslides than any other region along the west coast of the US Factors contributing to the abundance of landslides are high levels of seismicity (historically one event of M6 or greater per decade), tectonic uplift and deformation, and large quantities (20 to 30 {times} 10{sup 6} tons) of fluvial sediment delivered to the margin each year. More recently, interstitial gas derived from biogenic and possible thermogenic sources, and from degraded gas hydrates, has been recognized as another potentially important factor in causing some of the slides. One of the more prominent slides is the Humboldt slide zone, west of Eureka on a 4{degree} slope at water depths of 250 to 500 m. The slide zone consists of large back-rotated blocks that failed in a retrogressive manner. The evidence for shallow gas is abundant. Acoustic masking and enhancement of reflectors below the slide are evident on high resolution records. Hundreds of pock marks up to 25 m in diameter are scattered throughout the area. Shallow cores indicate elevated levels (>10,000 mL/L) of methane gas in the upper 2 m of sediment. Similarly, the presence of gas hydrates is well documented. Initially inferred on the basis of a bottom simulating reflector (BSR), samples of gas hydrates have recently been obtained from the upper 1 m of the sea floor. Gas in bubble phase can markedly increase the pore fluid pressure and thereby decrease the effective stress of seafloor sediment and ultimately lead to failure. Gas hydrates contain enormous quantities of gas, and thus their presence, along with the abundant evidence of free gas, in the failure zone indicates a possible link between the gas hydrates and the slides.

Field, M.E. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-06-01

60

75 FR 61461 - Central New York Oil and Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...electric-driven 15,300-hp centrifugal compressor; Two 30-inch-diameter natural gas pipelines, each about 820 feet long, connecting the NS2 Compressor Station with Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company's (TGP)...

2010-10-05

61

Gas-to-coal switch gets mixed reviews. [Survey of several companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical companies that consider following Celanese's example of shifting from natural gas to coal for their boilers find there is not always a clear advantage in spite of dwindling supplies of natural gas. Obstacles to the shift include the high costs of plant conversion and anti-pollution devices. DuPont has plans to install dual-capacity boilers that can handle alternate fuels, make

Minerbrook

1976-01-01

62

Simulation analysis of inbound call center of a city-gas company  

Microsoft Academic Search

An inbound call center of a city-gas company was simulated to examine the proper target of the service level procedures were proposed to find the optimal number of agents, considering their skills and the scheduling of the agents to meet the frequency of customer calls. First, integer programming was adopted to obtain an initial feasible solution. Second, a special-purpose system

Soemon Takakuwa; T. Okada

2005-01-01

63

DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME II. APPENDICES D-F  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume (Volume II) contains a discussion of the analytical and sampling methods, quality assurance, and the ra...

64

DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME III. APPENDICES G-J  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume (Volume III) contains raw data gathered by Kenvirons, calculations, and computerized reduced data submi...

65

77 FR 34380 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket...CP12-467-000] CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company...May 22, 2012, CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company...NGA) as amended, to replace compression facilities at the Ruston...

2012-06-11

66

75 FR 8756 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...NRC-2010-0067] South Carolina Electric and Gas Company, Virgil C. Summer Nuclear...NPF-12, issued to South Carolina Electric & Gas Company (SCE&G, the licensee...No changes to the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit are...

2010-02-25

67

Northridge, California earthquake of January 17, 1994: Performance of gas transmission pipelines. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

On January 17, 1994 at 4:31 a.m., a magnitude 6.6 earthquake struck the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Epicentered in the San Fernando Valley town of Northridge, California, the earthquake caused serious damage to buildings and sections of elevated freeways; ignited at least one hundred fires as it ruptured gas pipelines; and disrupted water supply systems. This reconnaissance report provides a performance analysis of gas transmission lines, both during this earthquake and during previous earthquakes, in Southern California.

O'Rourke, T.D.; Palmer, M.C.

1994-05-16

68

Electricity Shortage in California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Much to the dismay of Californians, two large utility companies, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and Southern California Edison Company, have been granted consumer rate increases for the price of electricity. This rate hike will affect over ten million California residents who have already endured more than 30 power alerts since June including threats of state-wide rolling blackouts. The deregulation of power prices in California has led to soaring wholesale costs for electricity and frozen customer prices, creating $8 million in combined losses for these two companies. The price for power in the West skyrocketed to $1,400 per megawatt hour, as compared to $35 per megawatt hour at this time last year. Meanwhile, US Department of Energy Secretary Bill Richardson extended an emergency order which forces marketers and generators with access power to provide electricity to California. Richardson blamed the power shortage on the booming technology industry which has caused electricity use in California to rise thirteen percent and energy use throughout the US to increase by fourteen percent in the past year. Although the consumer price increases have not been determined, Pacific Gas and Electric Co. has suggested a seventeen percent increase, which would raise the average monthly electricity bill in California from $54 to $63.

Missner, Emily D.

69

77 FR 38790 - Noble Americas Gas & Power Corp., LNG Development Company, LLC, LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Orders Granting Authority To Import and Export Natural Gas and Liquefied Natural Gas During May 2012 AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy...authority to import and export natural gas and liquefied natural gas. These Orders are summarized in the...

2012-06-29

70

62 FR 66355 - Viking Voyageur Gas Transmission Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Viking Gas Transmission Company compressor station sites; Associated...including 48 new mainline valves and four pig launchers and five...permanent access roads for access to compressor stations and valves; and Two new...

1997-12-18

71

FULL-SCALE DUAL ALKALI FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) DEMONSTRATION AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes the 1-year demonstration of the full-scale dual-alkali flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system at Louisville Gas and Electric Co.'s (LG/E's) Cane Run Unit 6. Systems performance is described in terms of performance guarantees and other parameters that were mon...

72

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)  

EIA Publications

In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

2005-01-01

73

2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS  

E-print Network

to significant figures; therefore, added figures may not agree with to- tals. 1 #12;2 Gas Net Gas Production DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2010 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

74

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilotin Northern California  

SciTech Connect

A geologic sequestration pilot in the Thornton gas field in Northern California, USA involves injection of up to 4000 tons of CO{sub 2} into a stacked gas and saline formation reservoir. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is leading the pilot test in collaboration with Rosetta Resources, Inc. and Calpine Corporation under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy and California Energy Commission's WESTCARB, Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The goals of the pilot include: (1) Demonstrate the feasibility of CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations representative of major geologic sinks in California; (2) Test the feasibility of Enhanced Gas Recovery associated with the early stages of a CO{sub 2} storage project in a depleting gas field; (3) Obtain site-specific information to improve capacity estimation, risk assessment, and performance prediction; (4) Demonstrate and test methods for monitoring CO{sub 2} storage in saline formations and storage/enhanced recovery projects in gas fields; and (5) Gain experience with regulatory permitting and public outreach associated with CO{sub 2} storage in California. Test design is currently underway and field work begins in August 2006.

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-04-28

75

SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: CANE RUN STATION, LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a survey of operational flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired utility boilers in the U.S. The FGD systems installed on Units 4, 5, and 6 at the Cane Run Station are described in terms of design and performance. The Cane Run No. 4 FGD sys...

76

Global Job Opportunities with a ``Super-Major'' Oil and Gas Company  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shell International Exploration and Production Company is one of the world's largest private employers of geoscientists with approximately 1500 geophysicists and geologists employed worldwide. The companies of the Royal Dutch/Shell Group together produce, process, and deliver energy to consumers. Operating across the globe, in more than 130 countries and with more than 100,000 staff, Shell companies are guided by values developed over more than a century of successful enterprise. Responsibilities and Career Path - As a processing or research Geophysicist, you will use proprietary methods to prepare 2D and 3D seismic data volumes for the direct detection of hydrocarbons, the delineation of reservoirs or to define the stratigraphic and structural framework of the subsurface. As an exploration or development Geophysicist, your business will be finding commercially viable oil and gas reserves by using 3D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation techniques. Your advanced geological models of the subsurface will drive drilling proposals, optimizing appraisal of hydrocarbon resources. As a production or surveillance geophysicist, your 4D seismic interpretations and geological models will drive drilling proposals and optimize the production and depletion of existing oil and gas accumulations. Up to seven steps in the technical career ladder are possible. Team leader and management candidates are chosen from Shell's technical workforce based on technical and business acumen demonstrated on the job. Projects - Geophysicists work as part of multi-disciplinary teams on projects that typically last from 18 to 36 months. Teams are responsible for projects that may vary from \\$1 million to hundreds of millions in scope. Accountability and responsibility varies according to individual experience level and team structure. Lifestyle - Geophysicists are mainly office-based, with business travel requirements rarely exceeding 2 weeks per event. In the U.S., Shell allows flexible daily office hours, and employees may choose an optional 9-hour work schedule that provides alternate Fridays off. Company pension and benefit programs are competitive with the best that industry has to offer. Degree requirements: Shell recruits Geophysicists for the global staff pool from approximately 20 universities in the U.S. Universities are chosen based on the curriculum of the school, the size of the student enrollment, and the regional location of the school. Geophysicists generally must have at least an MS degree to qualify for Shell employment. Electrical Engineers and Physicists who are recruited as seismic processors are required to have at least a BS degree. Recruiting targets vary annually based on company need.

Baranovic, M. J.

2001-12-01

77

Market structure and exhaustible resources: The case of natural gas and crude oil in California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a dataset of natural gas and crude oil production in the state of California, evidence shows overextraction incentives among market participants that shared a common pool. Due to these incentives the supply of gas and crude oil extraction tends to become more inelastic as the number of firms in the pool increases. Using an instrumental variables estimation of the supply function, the results show that the common pool externality caused an average overproduction rate of 11% and 4% over the 1977--2001 period, in natural gas and crude oil, respectively. These figures imply 1 year and 4 years of additional production for natural gas and crude oil, respectively.

Czastkiewicz, Carolina

78

Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues  

SciTech Connect

According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for gas LDCs; and (2) to help PUCs respond to the EPAct directive. The study finds that it is appropriate for PUCs to pursue energy efficiency within the traditional regulatory framework of minimizing private costs of energy production and delivery; and PUCs should play a limited role in addressing environmental externalities. The study also finds that in promoting energy efficiency, PUCs should pursue policies that are incentive-based, procompetitive, and sensitive to rate impacts. The study evaluates a number of traditional and nontraditional ratemaking mechanisms on the basis of cost minimization, energy efficiency, competitiveness, and other criteria. The mechanisms evaluated include direct recovery of DSM expenses, lost revenue adjustments for DSM options, revenue decoupling mechanisms, sharing of DSM cost savings, performance-based rate of return for DSM, provision of DSM as a separate service, deregulation of DSM service, price caps, and deregulation of the noncore gas market. The study concludes with general recommendations for regulatory approaches and ratemaking mechanisms that PUCs may wish to consider in advancing IRP objectives.

Harunuzzaman, M.; Islam, M.

1994-08-01

79

Oil and gas markets, companies, and technology in the 1990`s and beyond  

SciTech Connect

During the late 1990`s and beyond, oil prices will be stagnant while costs increase, competition for markets and capital will be fierce, funds available for exploration and development will be limited, and environmental extremists will keep prospective areas off-limits. Higher taxes will limit growth in oil and gas demand and reapportion energy market shares. And a campaign to brand oil use as an ``addiction`` that must be cured will gather steam. But opportunities abound, too, even in the US High-quality properties are available throughout the US, independents can find and develop reserves cheaper than the majors, and new tools are available to reduce risks both in the field and in the market. Gas prices are firming and natural gas is often labeled the ``fuel of the future.`` To succeed in the petroleum industry of the 1990`s, all companies must accept change, be creative, and take initiative. To prosper, oil and gas producers and refiners and those who supply and serve the industry must face the new realities of the market. They cannot mark time until the return of 4,000 active rigs and $40/bbl oil. those days are never coming back. Never.

Kennedy, J.L.

1995-08-01

80

Evaluation of flue gas desulfurization systems for thermally enhanced oil recovery operations in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pedco Environmental, Inc., is conducting a review of currently available flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology as it applies to thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) operations in California. The US Department of Energy contracted this review because TEOR steam production frequently utilizes fuel containing sulfur levels that produce significant sulfur dioxide (SOâ) emissions. The review performs 2 functions: (1) it will

D. R. Osterhout; A. N. Patkar; J. D. Tuttle

1979-01-01

81

2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS  

E-print Network

on February 24th . * Rounded to significant figures; therefore, added figures may not agree with to- tals. 1 OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2012 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

82

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Data Explorer

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

83

Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-14

84

Industry-wide studies report of walk-through survey of Schilling, McCormick and Company, Incorporated, Salinas, California  

SciTech Connect

A walk-through survey was conducted to determine the suitability of including Schilling, McCormick and Company, Salinas, California, in an industry-wide mortality and industrial hygiene study concerning workers with potential exposure to ethylene oxide. At this facility, spices are ground, milled, blended, mixed and filled for various customers. Et0 is used to treat unprocessed poppy seeds and Brazilian pepper as they arrive at the facility. Other spices are treated when necessary. A review of personal data on exposure levels showed that jobs where workers are exposed to 1 part per million or greater on the average include bottle dumper, receiving clerk, safety supervisor, forklift driver at warehouse, forklift driver at receiving, and Et0 chamber operator. Medical, industrial hygiene, and safety programs in effect at the facility were examined. The authors concluded that this facility meets the requirements for entry into the larger study; however, due to the limited number of person years (3000) at this facility compared to others in the study, and the cost of data collection and coding, the decision was made not to include this facility.

Morawetz, J.; Steenland, K.

1986-11-01

85

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-339-1741, EMCO High Voltage Company, Sutter Creek, California  

SciTech Connect

Possible exposure to several chemical substances during the fabrication of power-supply modules was investigated at the EMCO High Voltage Company, Sutter Creek, California, at the request of an employee. Environmental air samples were collected during the coating and developing process and during the epoxy potting operation. Samples were analyzed for chlorobenzene and xylenes; no overexposures were registered. No overexposure was observed to butyl-glycidyl-ether and no detectable levels of epichlorohydrin, cyclohexanone, 2-methoxyethanol, or 2-ethoxyethanol were found. During the pot soldering operation there was a potential for exposure to the fluxing agent, 3% hydrochloric-acid, and the operator had complained of throat and nose irritation. The author recommends that the fabrication operator wear protective gloves during coating and developing of copper boards. Gloves and goggles should be worn when weighing out the sodium-persulfate and when removing panels from the bench top etcher. Local exhaust ventilation with a movable duct should be used during the pot soldering operation.

Belanger, P.L.

1986-10-01

86

California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?  

E-print Network

physical limits on how much hydro power flows south from thethe Kyoto protocol, the hydro power in British Columbia andHydro Total WECC SB1368 Compliant Supply in WECC Gas Coal CA baseload demand Figure 2 Importing Clean Power

Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01

87

Using a microcomputer to locate gas traps in Meganos Gorge, California  

SciTech Connect

The Meganos Gorge is a sediment-filled submarine canyon within the Sacramento basin in California. Numerous gas fields have been discovered below the basal contacts of impervious clastic units and the canyon walls. Exploration methods within the Meganos Gorge have been oriented toward integrating seismic bright spots with subsurface mapping of the discordant contacts. In an effort to automate this process, a combination of off-the-shelf gridding and mapping software was used to delineate potential gas traps quickly. A test hole drilled into one of these prospects encountered approximately 6 bcf of gas at a depth of 4000 ft.

Reed, J.P.; Graham, J.D.

1986-08-01

88

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early

Lynn Price; Scott Murtishaw; Ernst Worrell

2003-01-01

89

Installation Practices of California HVAC Contractors: Implications for Residential Building Codes  

E-print Network

This report documents a study that was conducted by XENERGY. Inc. for the CEC and a consortium of California utilities. The utilities primarily involved in the study were Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E), Sacramento Municipal Utility...

George, S. S.; Koved, M. D.

1988-01-01

90

Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

1987-01-01

91

Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gas exchange coefficients have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and for saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40×10-12 mol/L to 4×10-12 mol/L for Mono Lake and from 20×10-12 mol/L to 1×10-12 mol/L for Crowley Lake over a period of 6 weeks. Wind speed records from anemometers on the shore of each lake enabled us to determine the relationship between the gas exchange coefficient k and wind speed u. The average wind speed and average exchange coefficient for the experiment were identical for the two lakes (uav=2.9 m/s, kav=2.5 cm/h), despite a large difference in size and chemical composition. From laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations it is estimated that for wind speeds observed over Mono Lake from July until December 1984 the exchange of CO2 occurred 2-½ times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of 14C produced by nuclear bomb tests.

Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.; Hamilton, Mike

1987-12-01

92

Improving Grid Performance with Electric Vehicle Charging 2011San Diego Gas & Electric Company. All copyright and trademark rights reserved.  

E-print Network

Improving Grid Performance with Electric Vehicle Charging © 2011San Diego Gas & Electric Company · Education SDG&E Goal ­ Grid Integrated Charging · More plug-in electric vehicles · More electric grid to a hairdryer) per PEV in the population · Instantaneous demand, 40 all-electric vehicles for one day (8

California at Davis, University of

93

Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle site operator program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Gas & Electric Company continues to expand an EV program that addresses the following: vehicle development and demonstration; vehicle technology assessment; infrastructure evaluation; participation in EV organizations; and meetings and events. This report highlights PG & E`s activities in each of these areas.

NONE

1997-10-01

94

DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME I. ACCEPTANCE TEST AND APPENDICES A-C  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume contains the process description and a discussion of the test results, operating history, and performan...

95

CEC4002012005CMF-REV2 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

Office Manager High Performance Buildings Office Project Managers: Maziar Shirakh, P.E. High Performance, evaluated and justified through the excellent work of Energy Commission staff and consultants working under contract to the Energy Commission, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison Company

96

Chlorine gas exposure at a metal recycling facility--California, 2010.  

PubMed

On June 8, 2010, chlorine gas was released from a ruptured, 1-ton, low-pressure tank being recycled at a California metal recycling facility. A total of 23 persons, including employees, customers, and workers at nearby businesses, were treated for the effects of the fumes at seven area hospitals. Chlorine is a corrosive, greenish-yellow gas that is heavier than air and can cause severe respiratory damage; it is used widely in water purification, sewage treatment, and disinfectant washes for foods. Following the incident, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and CDC collaborated with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) on an Assessment of Chemical Exposures (ACE) to determine 1) the circumstances surrounding those exposed during the chlorine gas release, 2) health effects associated with exposures, and 3) recommendations for preventing recurrences. This report describes the chlorine gas release in California and summarizes the results of the ACE investigation. Of 29 persons potentially exposed to chlorine gas, 27 were interviewed to collect information regarding their exposures. In addition, information regarding acute health effects and symptoms was abstracted from medical records. At the time of the chlorine gas release, 15 persons were outdoors, and 13 were exposed for >30 minutes before they were decontaminated. Twenty-three persons reported experiencing one or more upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms within 24 hours of exposure; six persons were hospitalized for 1-11 days. Based on these findings, CDPH issued a statewide alert to all recycling facilities on how to handle containers with potential hazardous waste. PMID:21775949

2011-07-22

97

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09

98

Fixitup Faucet Company's Overseas Move. 12th Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson asks 12th grade students to imagine that they are special assistants to the Undersecretary of Commerce for a foreign country who must answer a letter from a U.S. company planning to move its manufacturing operations overseas. The lesson also asks them to design a business brochure that will convince the company to come to their…

Harris, Judy; Jacobson, Edy

99

The True Cost of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Analysis of 1,000 Global Companies  

PubMed Central

This study elucidated the shadow price of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for 1,024 international companies worldwide that were surveyed from 15 industries in 37 major countries. Our results indicate that the shadow price of GHG at the firm level is much higher than indicated in previous studies. The higher shadow price was found in this study as a result of the use of Scope 3 GHG emissions data. The results of this research indicate that a firm would carry a high cost of GHG emissions if Scope 3 GHG emissions were the focus of the discussion of corporate social responsibility. In addition, such shadow prices were determined to differ substantially among countries, among sectors, and within sectors. Although a number of studies have calculated the shadow price of GHG emissions, these studies have employed country-level or industry-level data or a small sample of firm-level data in one country. This new data from a worldwide firm analysis of the shadow price of GHG emissions can play an important role in developing climate policy and promoting sustainable development. PMID:24265710

Ishinabe, Nagisa; Fujii, Hidemichi; Managi, Shunsuke

2013-01-01

100

The true cost of greenhouse gas emissions: analysis of 1,000 global companies.  

PubMed

This study elucidated the shadow price of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for 1,024 international companies worldwide that were surveyed from 15 industries in 37 major countries. Our results indicate that the shadow price of GHG at the firm level is much higher than indicated in previous studies. The higher shadow price was found in this study as a result of the use of Scope 3 GHG emissions data. The results of this research indicate that a firm would carry a high cost of GHG emissions if Scope 3 GHG emissions were the focus of the discussion of corporate social responsibility. In addition, such shadow prices were determined to differ substantially among countries, among sectors, and within sectors. Although a number of studies have calculated the shadow price of GHG emissions, these studies have employed country-level or industry-level data or a small sample of firm-level data in one country. This new data from a worldwide firm analysis of the shadow price of GHG emissions can play an important role in developing climate policy and promoting sustainable development. PMID:24265710

Ishinabe, Nagisa; Fujii, Hidemichi; Managi, Shunsuke

2013-01-01

101

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)  

E-print Network

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

Svensen, Henrik

102

75 FR 28554 - Foreign-Trade Zone 50 Long Beach, California, Application for Subzone, Louisville Bedding Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...California. The facility is used to manufacture household bedding products, including mattress pads and pillows (up to 10 million pillows and 2 million mattress pads annually) for the U.S. market and export. LBC is requesting authority to...

2010-05-21

103

76 FR 62397 - Kern River Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Mountain Pass Lateral Project The staff of the Federal...environmental assessment (EA) for the Mountain Pass Lateral Project proposed by Kern River...facility in California. The proposed Mountain Pass Lateral Project includes...

2011-10-07

104

Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Oil and Gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the oil and gas resource potential of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California. The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each Total Petroleum System defined in the province, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock type and maturation and hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined five total petroleum systems and ten assessment units within these systems. Undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively estimated for the ten assessment units. In addition, the potential was estimated for further growth of reserves in existing oil fields of the San Joaquin Basin.

Hosford Scheirer, Allegra, (Edited By)

2007-01-01

105

Estimating Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions in 2050 from New Buildings in California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major contributor to global warming is Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with carbon dioxide (CO2) as the lead constituent. While the United States has failed to take a leadership role in worldwide efforts to reduce global warming, California has implemented some of the strictest reduction goals in the country. Recent legislation in California requires significant GHG emission reductions in the coming decades to meet state-mandated targets. To better understand the relative contribution of urban growth to these emissions, we applied an Energy and GHG Impacts Calculator (referred to as “GHG Calculator”) to estimate GHG contributions for two statewide population growth scenarios for the year 2050. Implemented as part of the UPlan urban growth model, the GHG Calculator allows users to predict and compare GHG output from new development. In this paper, two scenarios, differing only in the spatial allocation of housing among zoning categories, are developed and tested for the year 2050 in California. The difference in total GHG emissions between these scenarios was less than 1%. Thus, while “smart growth” may be desirable for a variety of other reasons, the policy impact of the sprawl footprint per se on fixed-source GHG emissions is likely to be far less than effects from other factors, such as insulation and household energy efficiency. The GHG Calculator allows alternative emission-reducing measures to be tested, including modified energy mixes (e.g. a greater percent of renewable sources and lower carbon-based fuels) and conservation measures. The goal is to approximate 2050 emissions and determine what measures are needed to achieve the 2050 goal set by the Governor of California to help decrease the State’s overall contribution to global warming.

Beardsley, K.; Thorne, J. H.; Quinn, J. F.

2009-12-01

106

The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry  

SciTech Connect

CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering

Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

2006-05-31

107

76 FR 5368 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Greenhouse Gas Regulations; Within...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9260-4] California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control...SUMMARY: The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has notified...and is accepting written comment on California's request. DATES: EPA has...

2011-01-31

108

Development of the utilization of combustible gas produced in existing sanitary landfills: Effects of corrosion at the Mountain View, California landfill gas-recovery plant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Corrosion of equipment has occurred at the Mountain View, California Landfill Gas Recovery Plant. Corrosion is most severe on compressor valve seats and cages, tubes in the first and second stages of the interstage gas cooler, and first and second stage piping and liquid separators. Corrosion occurs because the raw landfill gas contains water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Some corrosion may also result from trace concentrations of organic acids present in the landfill gas. Corrosion of the third stage compressor, cooler, and piping does not occur because the gas is dehydrated immediately prior to the third stage. Controlling corrosion is necessary to maintain the mechanical integrity of the plant and to keep the cost of the gas competitive with natural gas. Attempts to reduce corrosion rates by injecting a chemical inhibitor have proved only partially successful. Recommendations for dealing with corrosion include earlier dehydration of the gas, selection of special alloys in critical locations, chemical inhibition, and regular plant inspections.

1982-10-01

109

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

PubMed Central

Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants, and they are typically used without venting range hoods. Objective: We quantified pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass-balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes in Southern California and the exposure concentrations experienced by individual occupants. We estimated nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for 1 week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs as well as NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of NO2 and CO were obtained from available databases. We inferred ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use from household characteristics. We also explored proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying by < 10%. Results: The simulation model estimated that—in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods—62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO2, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3,000, and 20 ppb for NO2, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Conclusions: Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards. Citation: Logue JM, Klepeis NE, Lobscheid AB, Singer BC. 2014. Pollutant exposures from natural gas cooking burners: a simulation-based assessment for Southern California. Environ Health Perspect 122:43–50;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306673 PMID:24192135

Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2013-01-01

110

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31

111

76 FR 62395 - Natural Gas Pipeline Company of America LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...new 3,550 horsepower (hp) gas fired compressor unit, abandon dual 6-inch...abandon in place two 2,800 hp gas fired compressor units at CS 310. (4) In...abandon in place three 2,800 hp gas fired compressor units at CS 311; and...

2011-10-07

112

CALIFORNIA REPORTING, LLC 52 Longwood Drive, San Rafael, California 94901 (415) 457-4417  

E-print Network

: Joey Barr, Pacific Gas & Electric Company Deborah Godfrey, CEC Chris Scott, CEC PUBLIC COMMENT Frank Di MS. GODFREY: Good morning -- or, excuse3 me, afternoon. I'm Deborah Godfrey with the4 California a copy of9 the actual guidelines, themselves?10 MR. BARR: I'll bring those around.11 MS. GODFREY: You do

113

77 FR 51792 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Company, L.L.C.; P.O. Box 1087, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80944 at (719) 520-4416 or by fax at (719) 520-4415. Pursuant to section 157.9 of the Commission's rules, 18 CFR 157.9, within 90 days of this Notice the Commission...

2012-08-27

114

77 FR 14776 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Amendment to Presidential Permit  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Company; Notice of Amendment to Presidential Permit Take notice that on February...CP12-74-000, to amend its Presidential Permit granted in Docket No. CP93-253-000...requests that its Samalayuca Presidential Permit for the existing...

2012-03-13

115

Seasonal variability of soil-gas radon concentration in central California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Radon concentrations in soil gas were measured by the track-etch method in 60 shallow holes, each 70 cm deep and supported by a capped plastic tube, along several major faults in central California during 1975-1985. This set of data was analyzed to investigate the seasonal variability of soil-gas radon concentration in an area which has various geological conditions but similar climate. The results show several different patterns of seasonal variations, but all of which can be largely attributed to the water-saturation and moisture-retention characteristics of the shallow part of the soil. During the rainy winter and spring seasons, radon tended to be confined underground by the water-saturated surface soil which had much reduced gas permeability, while during the sunny summer and autumn seasons, it exhaled more readily as the soil became drier and more permeable. At several sites located on creeping faults, the radon-variation patterns changed with time, possibly because of disturbance of site condition by fault movement. ?? 1994.

King, C.-Y.; Minissale, A.

1994-01-01

116

A summary of geologic hazards for proposed OCS oil and gas lease sale 68, southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A geophysical survey, consisting of about 6,880 line-km of multisensor, high-resolution, seismic reflection data, was run in 161 of the 221 tracts tentatively selected by the U.S. Department of the Interior for inclusion in the southern California Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sale 68. Geologic hazards identified in the study area for which stipulations are recommended are active faults, mass transport, steep slopes (>10?), and steep-walled submarine canyons. Geologic hazards whose effects can be mitigated through existing technology and design and are not considered cause for stipulation are shallow faults, buried and filled channels, shallow gas, gas-charged sediments, hydrocarbon seeps, and unstable fan deposits. The Minerals Management Service has recommended that a stipulation be applied to 83 tracts where there is evidence of existing or potential sea-floor instability over a significant portion of the tract. Further data acquisition and analysis on a more detail-ed grid will be required of lessees or operators before drilling will be permitted on leases issued as a result of the sale.

Burdick, Deborah J.; Richmond, William C.

1982-01-01

117

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 3 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit at Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the as found baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu and to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an SO{sub 2} limit of 1.8 lb/MBtu, the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with SO{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The system was designed to inject sorbent at a rate corresponding to a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 2.0. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air flow rate, and sorbent dispersion. Sorbent injection air flow is equal to 3% of the combustion air. The design includes modifications of the ESP, sootblowing, and ash handling systems.

NONE

1996-03-01

118

Indoor Radon Gas Management For Multi-Site Companies: How To Screen For Potentially High-Risk Sites By Studying The Local Geology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, ENSR presents an evaluation tool for Radon gas monitoring programs that companies with large portfolios of properties will find useful in reducing their efforts and expenditures. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers Radon gas the second cause of lung cancer and the first source of natural radiations affecting the human population. In Italy, Legal Decree No. 230 (0/17/95) is the laws that regulate gas Radon concentrations in work places. Hereunder we present the ENSR approach to executing preliminary geologic studies aimed at planning an instrumental monitoring program for companies.

Ruggeri, Rudi; Gigliuto, Andrea; Minnei, Tiziana; Savini, Raffaella

2008-08-01

119

Indoor Radon Gas Management For Multi-Site Companies: How To Screen For Potentially High-Risk Sites By Studying The Local Geology  

SciTech Connect

In this article, ENSR presents an evaluation tool for Radon gas monitoring programs that companies with large portfolios of properties will find useful in reducing their efforts and expenditures. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers Radon gas the second cause of lung cancer and the first source of natural radiations affecting the human population. In Italy, Legal Decree No. 230 (0/17/95) is the laws that regulate gas Radon concentrations in work places. Hereunder we present the ENSR approach to executing preliminary geologic studies aimed at planning an instrumental monitoring program for companies.

Ruggeri, Rudi; Gigliuto, Andrea; Minnei, Tiziana; Savini, Raffaella [ENSR Italia S.r.l., Via Francesco Ferrucci 17/A, 20145 Milano (Italy)

2008-08-07

120

78 FR 62012 - Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...authorization to expand its natural gas pipeline system in New York to provide...facilities along its existing pipeline system in Pennsylvania and...Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service; and City...of new 26-inch-diameter pipeline to deliver natural gas...

2013-10-11

121

Market entry mode and competency building of Western oil companies in the Russian up stream oil and gas industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation investigated the market entry and competency building strategies within the context of the Russian oil and gas industry. The study was designed to be of interest to business practitioners and academics given the growing importance of fossil fuel in the energy balance of the global economy and the importance of Russia as a supplier and purchaser in the international market. The study's mixed methodology provides an understanding on the environmental factors that are postulated to impact foreign direct investment flow into Russia and the oil and gas sector. A case study of a fictitiously named Western-Russo oil company was conducted to provide a deep understanding of how capability is viewed by Russian and Western employees and the factors that influences the implementation of a successful competency development program. The case was centered on the development of a Well-Site supervisor group within a Western-Russian oil company. Findings of the study showed that there was no correlation between corruption and foreign direct investment inflow into the Russian economy. The findings also showed that both Russian and Western employees in the oil and gas industry are less focused on nontechnical competency development issues, that Western employees are more orientated towards the bottom-line than Russian employees, and that both groups see operational management as a core competency. In the area of financial management and technology application, there were significant differences in the viewpoint of both groups. Western employees saw a stronger need for financial management and less need for technology application when compared to their Russian counterparts. The results have implications for Western business contemplating entering the Russian oil and gas industry. Western firms need to understand the key drivers that will help them overcome the social and cultural barriers between Western and Russian employees. The role of the company leader is very critical. The vision, passion, and a sense of realism of the person responsible for the market entry strategy will have a significant impact of the future success of the entry.

Stephenson, Paul M.

122

67 FR 15380 - Reliant Energy Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Assessment for the Proposed White River Compressor Station Project and Request for...environmental impacts of the White River Compressor Station. This project involves...construction and operation of a new compressor station by Reliant Energy Gas...

2002-04-01

123

75 FR 52526 - Central New York Oil and Gas Company LLC; Notice of Filing  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...construct and operate a new compression facility with 16,360 hp of gas-fired compression (M1-S) in Sullivan...hp of electric-powered compression in Bradford County, Pennsylvania...file with the Federal Energy Regulatory...

2010-08-26

124

Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N{sub 2}/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values indicate that the Mammoth Mountain gases are derived from sources separate from those that supply gas to the hydrothermal system within the Long Valley caldera. Various data suggest that the Mammoth Mountain gas reservoir is a large, low-temperature cap over an isolated hydrothermal system, that it predates the 1989 intrusion, and that it could remain a source of gas discharge for some time. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California (United States)] Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States)] Farrar, C.D. [U.S. Geological Survey, Carnelian Bay, California (United States)] Hainsworth, L.J. [Chemistry Department, Emory and Henry College, Emory, Virginia (United States)] Hausback, B. [Geology Department, California State University, Sacramento

1998-07-01

125

Optimizing Short-Term Natural Gas Supply Portfolio for Electric Utility Companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural gas fired power plants (NGFPP) are important electricity generation resources in the United States. Optimizing the natural gas supply portfolio, especially the short-term portfolio, is critical for the day-to-day operations and the financial performance of NGFPPs. Traditionally, such optimization problems are solved using cost-minimization-based frameworks. However, such frameworks are facing challenges due to the lack of consideration of associated

Hanjie Chen; Ross Baldick

2007-01-01

126

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

SciTech Connect

Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2014-06-01

127

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Volume 3, Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company  

SciTech Connect

Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit. A GR-SI system was designed for Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The unit is rated at 117 MW(e) (net) and is front wall fired with a pulverized bituminous coal blend. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the ``as found`` baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu (420 mg/MJ), and to reduce emissions of S0{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an S0{sub 2} limit Of 1.8 lb/MBtu (770 mg/MJ), the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. The design natural gas input corresponds to 18% of the total heat input. Burnout (overfire) air is injected at a higher elevation to burn out fuel combustible matter at a normal excess air level of 18%. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with S0{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air flow rate, and sorbent dispersion. Sorbent injection air flow is equal to 3% of the combustion air. The design includes modifications of the ESP, sootblowing, and ash handling systems.

NONE

1994-10-01

128

76 FR 28972 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a fifteen-year FT Service Agreement with Eastern Shore to provide additional natural gas transportation service of 4,070 dts/day under Eastern Shore's maximum FT Zone One Tariff Rate on file with the Commission. Eastern Shore will recover its...

2011-05-19

129

76 FR 20659 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...nine-and-a half-year FT Service Agreement with Eastern Shore to provide additional natural gas transportation service of 3,405 dts/day under Eastern Shore's maximum FT Zone One Tariff Rate on file with the Commission. The total estimate cost of the...

2011-04-13

130

Analyses of Gas, Steam and Water Samples Collected in and Around Lassen Volcanic National Park, California, 1975-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains physical and chemical data from gas, steam, and water samples collected between July 1975 and September 2002 from locations in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park, California. Data are compiled as tables in Excel spreadsheets and are organized by locale. Most data are keyed to 1 of 107 site codes that are shown on local- and regional-scale maps. Brief descriptions of terminology, sampling, and analytical methods are provided.

Janik, Cathy J.; Bergfeld, Deborah

2010-01-01

131

Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

1980-11-01

132

A brief history of oil and gas exploration in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California: Chapter 3 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Golden State got its nickname from the Sierra Nevada gold that lured so many miners and settlers to the West, but California has earned much more wealth from so-called “black gold” than from metallic gold. The San Joaquin Valley has been the principal source for most of the petroleum produced in the State during the past 145 years. In attempting to assess future additions to petroleum reserves in a mature province such as the San Joaquin Basin, it helps to be mindful of the history of resource development. In this chapter we present a brief overview of the long and colorful history of petroleum exploration and development in the San Joaquin Valley. This chapter relies heavily upon the work of William Rintoul, who wrote extensively on the history of oil and gas exploration in California and especially in the San Joaquin Valley. No report on the history of oil and gas exploration in the San Joaquin Valley would be possible without heavily referencing his publications. We also made use of publications by Susan Hodgson and a U.S. Geological Survey Web site, Natural Oil and Gas Seeps in California (http://seeps.wr.usgs.gov/seeps/index.html), for much of the material describing the use of petroleum by Native Americans in the San Joaquin Valley. Finally, we wish to acknowledge the contribution of Don Arnot, who manages the photograph collection at the West Kern Oil Museum in Taft, California. The collection consists of more than 10,000 photographs that have been scanned and preserved in digital form on CD-ROM. Many of the historical photographs used in this paper are from that collection. Finally, to clarify our terminology, we use the term “San Joaquin Valley” when we refer to the geographical or topographical feature and the term “San Joaquin Basin” when we refer to geological province and the rocks therein.

Takahashi, Kenneth I.; Gautier, Donald L.

2007-01-01

133

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

EIA Publications

The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

2006-01-01

134

[Comparative analysis of occupational health services practice of international companies of oil and gas industry and ILO Convention "Occupational Health Services"].  

PubMed

A comparative analysis of current work practices of occupational health services of international companies of Russian oil & gas industry and provisions of ILO Convention 161 and Recommendation 171 "Occupational Health Services" has been carried out. Proposals for improvement and harmonization of labor legislation related to this problem have been formulated. PMID:24000724

Gevorkian, É V; Spiridonov, V L; Shatokhin, A S; Ékgardt, E V; Avdokhin, A V; Iakovlev, A P

2013-01-01

135

Gas and aerosol carbon in California: comparison of measurements and model predictions in Pasadena and Bakersfield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Co-located measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) organic carbon, elemental carbon, radiocarbon (14C), speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and OH radical during the CalNex field campaign provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model's representation of organic species from VOCs to particles. Episode averaged daily 23 h average 14C analysis indicate PM2.5 carbon at Pasadena and Bakersfield during the CalNex field campaign was evenly split between contemporary and fossil origin. CMAQ predicts a higher contemporary carbon fraction than indicated by the 14C analysis at both locations. The model underestimates measured PM2.5 organic carbon at both sites with very little (7% in Pasadena) of the modeled mass represented by secondary production, which contrasts with the ambient based SOC/OC fraction of 63% at Pasadena. Measurements and predictions of gas-phase anthropogenic species, such as toluene and xylenes, are generally within a factor of 2, but the corresponding secondary organic carbon (SOC) tracer (2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxo-pentanioc acid) is systematically underpredicted by more than a factor of 2. Monoterpene VOCs and SOCs are underestimated at both sites. Isoprene is underestimated at Pasadena and over predicted at Bakersfield and isoprene SOC mass is underestimated at both sites. Systematic model underestimates in SOC mass coupled with reasonable skill (typically within a factor of 2) in predicting hydroxyl radical and VOC gas phase precursors suggests error(s) in the parameterization of semi-volatile gases to form SOC. Yield values (?) applied to semi-volatile partitioning species were increased by a factor of 4 in CMAQ for a sensitivity simulation, taking in account recent findings of underestimated yields in chamber experiments due to gas wall losses. This sensitivity resulted in improved model performance for PM2.5 organic carbon at both field study locations and at routine monitoring network sites in California. Modeled percent secondary contribution (22% at Pasadena) becomes closer to ambient based estimates but is still too primary compared with ambient estimates at the CalNex sites.

Baker, K. R.; Carlton, A. G.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Beaver, M. R.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gilman, J. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Woody, M. C.; Pye, H. O. T.; Kelly, J. T.; Lewandowski, M.; Jaoui, M.; Stevens, P. S.; Brune, W. H.; Lin, Y.-H.; Rubitschun, C. L.; Surratt, J. D.

2015-01-01

136

Feasibility of direct on-site conversion of landfill gas to electrical energy at Scholl Canyon landfill, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The technical and economic feasibility of direct onsite conversion of landfill gas into electrical energy for distribution through the municipal company's distribution grid is described. The various approaches are evaluated. Each system looked at the preliminary collection system layout, type of processing, and conversion equipment required, conversion efficiencies, total system costs, total energy output per input landfill gas, and overall economic comparisons between alternatives. This led to the selection of the internal combustion engine. The legal constraints on interdepartmental transfers of money and resources, city procedures for coordination between the public works department and public services, procedures for facility operation, and an environmental assessment of each alternative were investigated.

Lofy, R. J.

1981-06-01

137

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

SciTech Connect

Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. It is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.

Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

2009-10-01

138

Performance Evaluation of a Drilling Project in Oil and Gas Service Company in Indonesia by MACBETH Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Decision-making in a project is a complex undertaking. A project is a temporary organization that is surrounded by inherent uncertainties. Uncertainties that may occur in the project, among others, are the uncertainty of the time, cost, and quality. To overcome this complexity, we need a project performance evaluation. At one of the services the oil and gas in Indonesia, the performance evaluation has been done, but it is done separately and only few criteria are evaluated, so that the overall project performance is still not visible. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate the performance of the company's project with the MCDA (Multi Criteria Decision Analysis) approach using MACBETH (Measuring Attractiveness by a Categorical Based Evaluation Technique) method that can model the elements of the project into a supervisory level group to facilitate decision making by the project manager. These measurements will produce levels of monitoring classification of project element groups, i.e. absolute vigilance, strong attention, close surveillance, and normal monitoring of the project elements. This research finds that the criteria of Effectiveness, Efficiency, Time, Cost, and Complete Reports & Field Tickets require absolute vigilance so that the performance criteria can be increased.

Dachyar, M.; Rhezza Pratama, Novandra

2014-04-01

139

77 FR 30522 - Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc.; ALLETE, Inc.; Ameren Illinois Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Minnesota Corporation; Northern States Power Company, a Wisconsin Corporation; Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company; Otter Tail Power Company; Southern Illinois Power Cooperative; Southern Indiana Gas & Electric Company; Southern Minnesota...

2012-05-23

140

Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

2013-01-01

141

Executive Summary -- assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California, 2003: Chapter 1 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the oil and gas resource potential of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California (fig. 1.1). The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each Total Petroleum System defined in the province, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock type and maturation and hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined five total petroleum systems and ten assessment units within these systems. Undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively estimated for the ten assessment units (table 1.1). In addition, the potential was estimated for further growth of reserves in existing oil fields of the San Joaquin Basin.

Gautier, Donald L.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; French, Christopher D.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

2007-01-01

142

77 FR 17471 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...multi-cycle natural gas storage facilities in order to increase...PetroLogistics' existing natural gas storage, compression and pipeline...in service of one existing underground storage cavern to natural gas storage: Cavern 28,...

2012-03-26

143

Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

2003-12-01

144

70 FR 5998 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Compressor Station 325 Horsepower Replacement Project...Pipeline Company's (Tennessee) proposed Compressor Station 325 Horsepower Replacement Project...of the two existing turbines at its Compressor Station 325 [[Page 5999

2005-02-04

145

77 FR 48508 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Kinetica Energy Express, LLC; Notice of Applications and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Company, L.L.C.; Kinetica Energy Express, LLC; Notice of Applications...on July 26, 2012, Kinetica Energy Express, LLC (Kinetica...various diameter pipeline, compression facilities at three locations...Diane S. Dundee, Kinetica Energy Express, LLC, Lyric...

2012-08-14

146

GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) VERIFICATION GUIDELINE SERIES: ANR Pipeline Company PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS) VERSION 1.0  

EPA Science Inventory

The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR Pipeline Company, a subsidiary of Coastal Corporation, now El Paso Corporation. The PEMS predicts carbon doixide (CO2...

147

Cellulosic ethanol from municipal solid waste: a case study of the economic, energy, and greenhouse gas impacts in California.  

PubMed

As cellulosic ethanol technologies advance, states could use the organic content of municipal solid waste as a transportation fuel feedstock and simultaneously reduce externalities associated with waste disposal. We examine the major processes required to support a lignocellulosic (employing enzymatic hydrolysis) municipal solid waste-to-ethanol infrastructure computing cost, energy, and greenhouse gas effects for California. The infrastructure is compared against the Business As Usual case where the state continues to import most of its ethanol needs from the Midwest. Assuming between 60% and 90% practical yields for ethanol production, California could produce between 1.0 and 1.5 billion gallons per year of ethanol from 55% of the 40 million metric tonnes of waste currently sent to landfills annually. The classification of organic wastes and ethanol plant operation represent almost the entire system cost (between $3.5 and $4.5 billion annually) while distribution has negligible cost effects and savings from avoided landfilling is small. Fossil energy consumption from Business As Usual decreases between 82 and 130 PJ largely due to foregone gasoline consumption. The net greenhouse gas impacts are ultimately dependent on how well landfills control their emissions of decomposing organics. Based on the current landfill mix in the state, the cellulosic infrastructure would experience a slight gain in greenhouse gas emissions. However, net emissions can rise if organics diversion releases carbon that would otherwise be flared and sequestered. Emissions would be avoided if landfills are not capable of effectively controlling emissions during periods of active waste decay. There is currently considerable uncertainty surrounding the recovery efficiency of landfill emissions controls. In either case, burying lignin appears to be better than burning lignin because of its decay properties, energy and carbon content We estimate the breakeven price for lignocellulosic ethanol between $2.90 and $3.47/gal (mu = $3.13/gal). PMID:19708339

Chester, Mikhail; Martin, Elliot

2009-07-15

148

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary: The California Climate Action Registry, which was initially established in 2000 and began operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for recording annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The purpose of the Registry is to assist California businesses and organizations in their efforts to inventory and document emissions in order to establish a baseline and to document early actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease GHG emissions. The State of California has committed to use its ''best efforts'' to ensure that entities that establish GHG emissions baselines and register their emissions will receive ''appropriate consideration under any future international, federal, or state regulatory scheme relating to greenhouse gas emissions.'' Reporting of GHG emissions involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and indirect emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is consider ed to be an indirect GHG emission and is required to be included in the entity's report. Registry participants include businesses, non-profit organizations, municipalities, state agencies, and other entities. Participants are required to register the GHG emissions of all operations in California, and are encouraged to report nationwide. For the first three years of participation, the Registry only requires the reporting of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, although participants are encouraged to report the remaining five Kyoto Protocol GHGs (CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, and SF6). After three years, reporting of all six Kyoto GHG emissions is required. The enabling legislation for the Registry (SB 527) requires total GHG emissions to be registered and requires reporting of ''industry-specific metrics'' once such metrics have been adopted by the Registry. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) was asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) related to the Registry in three areas: (1) assessing the availability and usefulness of industry-specific metrics, (2) evaluating various methods for establishing baselines for calculating GHG emissions reductions related to specific actions taken by Registry participants, and (3) establishing methods for calculating electricity CO2 emission factors. The third area of research was completed in 2002 and is documented in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric Power Sector (Marnay et al., 2002). This report documents our findings related to the first areas of research. For the first area of research, the overall objective was to evaluate the metrics, such as emissions per economic unit or emissions per unit of production that can be used to report GHG emissions trends for potential Registry participants. This research began with an effort to identify methodologies, benchmarking programs, inventories, protocols, and registries that u se industry-specific metrics to track trends in energy use or GHG emissions in order to determine what types of metrics have already been developed. The next step in developing industry-specific metrics was to assess the availability of data needed to determine metric development priorities. Berkeley Lab also determined the relative importance of different potential Registry participant categories in order to asses s the availability of sectoral or industry-specific metrics and then identified industry-specific metrics in use around the world. While a plethora of metrics was identified, no one metric that adequately tracks trends in GHG emissions while maintaining confidentiality of data was identified. As a result of this review, Berkeley Lab recommends the development of a GHG intensity index as a new metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends.Such an index could provide an industry-specific metric for reporting and tracking GHG emissions trends to accurately reflect year to year changes while protecting proprietary data. This GHG intensity index changes

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-06-01

149

75 FR 64303 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...per day and would provide access to natural gas supplies in the Marcellus Shale supply area. The project would not, however...involve facilities necessary to produce natural gas from the Marcellus Shale. TGP has signed binding precedent...

2010-10-19

150

Demonstration of natural gas reburn for NO{sub x} emissions reduction at Ohio Edison Company`s cyclone-fired Niles Plant Unit Number 1  

SciTech Connect

Electric utility power plants account for about one-third of the NO{sub x} and two-thirds of the SO{sub 2} emissions in the US cyclone-fired boilers, while representing about 9% of the US coal-fired generating capacity, emit about 14% of the NO{sub x} produced by coal-fired utility boilers. Given this background, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Gas Research Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, and the Ohio Coal Development Office sponsored a program led by ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB-CE) to demonstrate reburning on a cyclone-fired boiler. Ohio Edison provided Unit No. 1 at their Niles Station for the reburn demonstration along with financial assistance. The Niles Unit No. 1 reburn system was started up in September 1990. This reburn program was the first full-scale reburn system demonstration in the US. This report describes work performed during the program. The work included a review of reburn technology, aerodynamic flow model testing of reburn system design concepts, design and construction of the reburn system, parametric performance testing, long-term load dispatch testing, and boiler tube wall thickness monitoring. The report also contains a description of the Niles No. 1 host unit, a discussion of conclusions and recommendations derived from the program, tabulation of data from parametric and long-term tests, and appendices which contain additional tabulated test results.

Borio, R.W.; Lewis, R.D.; Koucky, R.W. [ABB Power Plant Labs., Windsor, CT (United States)] [ABB Power Plant Labs., Windsor, CT (United States); Lookman, A.A. [Energy Systems Associates, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Energy Systems Associates, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Manos, M.G.; Corfman, D.W.; Waddingham, A.L. [Ohio Edison, Akron, OH (United States)] [Ohio Edison, Akron, OH (United States); Johnson, S.A. [Quinapoxet Engineering Solutions, Inc., Windham, NH (United States)] [Quinapoxet Engineering Solutions, Inc., Windham, NH (United States)

1996-04-01

151

78 FR 51724 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation...has notified EPA that it has adopted a tractor-trailer greenhouse gas emission regulation...box-type trailers and to new and in-use tractors that haul such trailers on...

2013-08-21

152

Alternative Fuel Vehicles: The Case of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicles in California Households  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles have been used internationally by fleets and households for decades. The use of CNG vehicles results in less petroleum consumption, and fewer air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions in most applications. In the United States, the adoption of CNG technology has been slowed by the availability of affordable gasoline and diesel fuel. This study addresses

BRIAN ANTHONY ABBANAT

2001-01-01

153

Deregulation of the California electric power industry: An analysis of electric and natural gas corporate mergers and their effect on the California electric power market  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deregulation of the electric utility industry in California is moving in a direction that places greater reliance on the market forces of competition. Investor owned utilities (IOU's) are using mergers and acquisitions to improve their ability to compete in this new environment. Two large mergers were proposed in 1996 that could affect the California market. The first is between Enron

James Dixon Hornbuckle

2000-01-01

154

77 FR 29629 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of this notice. This notice is being sent to the...landowner receiving this notice, a pipeline company representative may contact you about the acquisition...appendices referenced in this notice will not appear in the...analysis in the EA on the important environmental...

2012-05-18

155

Multiwall steel/coaxial gas pipeline laid offshore California to prevent corrosion  

SciTech Connect

ARCO Oil and Gas Co. recently installed a 20,000-ft submarine gas pipeline between seep containment structures in the Santa Barbara Channel and the Ellwood onshore facility. ARCO selected corrosion-resistant materials for the pipeline in view of an anticipated 9% to 11% carbon-dioxide content in the seep-gas stream. The major innovations were: Adapting a multiwall pipe material to standard installation procedures for submarine procedures for submarine pipelines. Featuring a fiberglass reinforced thermoset inner pipe which does not exhibit structural shape change under external pressure and allows the use of the cement as a second defense corrosion-control system. Development of a joining system to economically and efficiently connect multiwall pipe.

Fruck, B.; Patterson, D.R.

1983-08-01

156

Electric Vehicle Charging and the California Power Sector: Evaluating the Effect of Location and Time on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis explores the implications of the increased adoption of plug-in electric vehicles in California through its effect on the operation of the state's electric grid. The well-to-wheels emissions associated with driving an electric vehicle depend on the resource mix of the electricity grid used to charge the battery. We present a new least-cost dispatch model, EDGE-NET, for the California electricity grid consisting of interconnected sub-regions that encompass the six largest state utilities that can be used to evaluate the impact of growing electric vehicle demand on existing power grid infrastructure system and energy resources. This model considers spatiality and temporal dynamics of energy demand and supply when determining the regional impacts of additional charging profiles on the current electricity network. Model simulation runs for one year show generation and transmission congestion to be reasonable similar to historical data. Model simulation results show that average emissions and system costs associated with electricity generation vary significantly by time of day, season, and location. Marginal cost and emissions also exhibit seasonal and diurnal differences, but show less spatial variation. Sensitivity of demand analysis shows that the relative changes to average emissions and system costs respond asymmetrically to increases and decreases in electricity demand. These results depend on grid mix at the time and the marginal power plant type. In minimizing total system cost, the model will choose to dispatch the lowest-cost resource to meet additional vehicle demand, regardless of location, as long as transmission capacity is available. Location of electric vehicle charging has a small effect on the marginal greenhouse gas emissions associated with additional generation, due to electricity losses in the transmission grid. We use a geographically explicit, charging assessment model for California to develop and compare the effects of two charging profiles. Comparison of these two basic scenarios points to savings in greenhouse gas emissions savings and operational costs from delayed charging of electric vehicles. Vehicle charging simulations confirm that plug-in electric vehicles alone are unlikely to require additional generation or transmission infrastructure. EDGE-NET was successfully benchmarked against historical data for the present grid but additional work is required to expand the model for future scenario evaluation. We discuss how the model might be adapted for high penetrations of variable renewable energy resources, and the use of grid storage. Renewable resources such as wind and solar vary in California vary significantly by time-of-day, season, and location. However, combination of multiple resources from different geographic regions through transmission grid interconnection is expected to help mitigate the impacts of variability. EDGE-NET can evaluate interaction of supply and demand through the existing transmission infrastructure and can identify any critical network bottlenecks or areas for expansion. For this reason, EDGE-NET will be an important tool to evaluate energy policy scenarios.

Sohnen, Julia Meagher

157

Gas and Isotope Geochemistry of 81 Steam Samples from Wells in The Geysers Geothermal Field, Sonoma and Lake Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, with about 2000-MW electrical capacity, is the largest geothermal field in the world. Despite its importance as a resource and as an example of a vapor-dominated reservoir, very few complete geochemical analyses of the steam have been published (Allen and Day, 1927; Truesdell and others, 1987). This report presents data from 90 steam, gas, and condensate samples from wells in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California. Samples were collected between 1978 and 1991. Well attributes include sampling date, well name, location, total depth, and the wellhead temperature and pressure at which the sample was collected. Geochemical characteristics include the steam/gas ratio, composition of noncondensable gas (relative proportions of CO2, H2S, He, H2, O2, Ar, N2, CH4, and NH3), and isotopic values for deltaD and delta18O of H2O, delta13C of CO2, and delta34S of H2S. The compilation includes 81 analyses from 74 different production wells, 9 isotopic analyses of steam condensate pumped into injection wells, and 5 complete geochemical analyses on gases from surface fumaroles and bubbling pools. Most samples were collected as saturated steam and plot along the liquid-water/steam boiling curve. Steam-togas ratios are highest in the southeastern part of the geothermal field and lowest in the northwest, consistent with other studies. Wells in the Northwest Geysers are also enriched in N2/Ar, CO2 and CH4, deltaD, and delta18O. Well discharges from the Southeast Geysers are high in steam/gas and have isotopic compositions and N2/Ar ratios consistent with recharge by local meteoric waters. Samples from the Central Geysers show characteristics found in both the Southeast and Northwest Geysers. Gas and steam characteristics of well discharges from the Northwest Geysers are consistent with input of components from a high-temperature reservoir containing carbonrich gases derived from the host Franciscan rocks. Throughout the geothermal field, the carbon-isotopic composition of CO2 is consistent with derivation of carbon from Franciscan metasedimentary rocks. NH3 concentrations are high in most Geysers well fluids, and are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than would be expected in a the gas phase exhibiting homogeneous equilibrium at normal reservoir temperatures and pressures. Evidently, NH3 is flushed from the Franciscan host rocks at a rate that exceeds the reaction rate for NH3 breakdown. Many wells show clear influence by fluids from reinjection wells where steam condensate has been pumped back into the geothermal reservoir. Six wells were resampled over the time period of this study. One of these six wells was strongly affected by a nearby injection well. Three of the six resampled wells showed some signs of decreasing liquid/ steam within the geothermal reservoir, consistent with 'drying out' of the reservoir due to steam withdrawal. However, two wells exhibited little change. Analyses of gases from five surface manifestations (fumaroles and bubbling pools) are roughly similar to the deeper geothermal samples in both chemical and isotopic composition, but are lower in soluble gases that dissolve in groundwater during transit toward the surface.

Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Janik, Cathy J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Johnson, Linda S.

1999-01-01

158

Seasonal greenhouse gas emissions (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide) from engineered landfills: daily, intermediate, and final California cover soils.  

PubMed

Compared with natural ecosystems and managed agricultural systems, engineered landfills represent a highly managed soil system for which there has been no systematic quantification of emissions from coexisting daily, intermediate, and final cover materials. We quantified the seasonal variability of CH, CO, and NO emissions from fresh refuse (no cover) and daily, intermediate, and final cover materials at northern and southern California landfill sites with engineered gas extraction systems. Fresh refuse fluxes (g m d [± SD]) averaged CH 0.053 (± 0.03), CO 135 (± 117), and NO 0.063 (± 0.059). Average CH emissions across all cover types and wet/dry seasons ranged over more than four orders of magnitude (<0.01-100 g m d) with most cover types, including both final covers, averaging <0.1 g m d with 10 to 40% of surface areas characterized by negative fluxes (uptake of atmospheric CH). The northern California intermediate cover (50 cm) had the highest CH fluxes. For both the intermediate (50-100 cm) and final (>200 cm) cover materials, below which methanogenesis was well established, the variability in gaseous fluxes was attributable to cover thickness, texture, density, and seasonally variable soil moisture and temperature at suboptimal conditions for CH oxidation. Thin daily covers (30 cm local soil) and fresh refuse generally had the highest CO and NO fluxes, indicating rapid onset of aerobic and semi-aerobic processes in recently buried refuse, with rates similar to soil ecosystems and windrow composting of organic waste. This study has emphasized the need for more systematic field quantification of seasonal emissions from multiple types of engineered covers. PMID:21546687

Bogner, Jean E; Spokas, Kurt A; Chanton, Jeffrey P

2011-01-01

159

California Energy Commission COMMISSION REPORT  

E-print Network

FOR THE ALTERNATIVE AND RENEWABLE FUEL AND VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM MAY 2013 CEC6002012008CMF CALIFORNIA of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas emissions, reduce California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural gas, biomethane

160

Natural gas pipeline technology overview.  

SciTech Connect

The United States relies on natural gas for one-quarter of its energy needs. In 2001 alone, the nation consumed 21.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. A large portion of natural gas pipeline capacity within the United States is directed from major production areas in Texas and Louisiana, Wyoming, and other states to markets in the western, eastern, and midwestern regions of the country. In the past 10 years, increasing levels of gas from Canada have also been brought into these markets (EIA 2007). The United States has several major natural gas production basins and an extensive natural gas pipeline network, with almost 95% of U.S. natural gas imports coming from Canada. At present, the gas pipeline infrastructure is more developed between Canada and the United States than between Mexico and the United States. Gas flows from Canada to the United States through several major pipelines feeding U.S. markets in the Midwest, Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and California. Some key examples are the Alliance Pipeline, the Northern Border Pipeline, the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, the TransCanada Pipeline System, and Westcoast Energy pipelines. Major connections join Texas and northeastern Mexico, with additional connections to Arizona and between California and Baja California, Mexico (INGAA 2007). Of the natural gas consumed in the United States, 85% is produced domestically. Figure 1.1-1 shows the complex North American natural gas network. The pipeline transmission system--the 'interstate highway' for natural gas--consists of 180,000 miles of high-strength steel pipe varying in diameter, normally between 30 and 36 inches in diameter. The primary function of the transmission pipeline company is to move huge amounts of natural gas thousands of miles from producing regions to local natural gas utility delivery points. These delivery points, called 'city gate stations', are usually owned by distribution companies, although some are owned by transmission companies. Compressor stations at required distances boost the pressure that is lost through friction as the gas moves through the steel pipes (EPA 2000). The natural gas system is generally described in terms of production, processing and purification, transmission and storage, and distribution (NaturalGas.org 2004b). Figure 1.1-2 shows a schematic of the system through transmission. This report focuses on the transmission pipeline, compressor stations, and city gates.

Folga, S. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

2007-11-01

161

72 FR 64208 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Ogden Compressor Replacement Project and Request for...the environmental impacts of the Ogden Compressor Replacement Project involving the abandonment of two compressor units by Northern Natural Gas...

2007-11-15

162

72 FR 62643 - El Paso Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Assessment for the Proposed Picacho Compressor Station Project and Request for Comments...environmental impacts of the Picacho Compressor Station Project involving construction...proposes to install three gas-fired compressor units totaling 8,290 horsepower...

2007-11-06

163

77 FR 71585 - Eastern Shore Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Assessment for the Proposed Daleville Compressor Station Upgrade Project and Request...environmental impacts of the Daleville Compressor Station Upgrade Project (Project...natural gas-fired reciprocating compressor engines at its existing Daleville...

2012-12-03

164

77 FR 68763 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket...Issues The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or...involving the modification of compression facilities by Tennessee Gas...

2012-11-16

165

78 FR 2991 - Southern Natural Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...under the Natural Gas Act (NGA) as amended, to relocate one of its existing 10,350 horsepower compressor units from its Lacombe Compressor Station in St. Tammany Parish Louisiana downstream to its Enterprise Compressor Station in Clarke County...

2013-01-15

166

78 FR 53749 - Gulf South Pipeline Company, LP, Petal Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Availability of the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...30-inch-diameter and 24-inch- diameter pipeline in Jasper, Forrest, Perry, Greene, George, and Jackson...and Petal Gas Storage transmission facilities in Jasper County, Mississippi (Jasper Compressor Station); One new 2,415-hp...

2013-08-30

167

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION APRIL 2012  

E-print Network

Awarded Funding Through the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas emissions and use of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include

168

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-print Network

, processing, pipelines, liquefied natural gas, LNG, regasification, maximum allowed operating pressure California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS In Support needs a complete understanding of the operation of energy markets, including electricity, natural gas

169

Comments on Potential Geologic and Seismic Hazards Affecting Proposed Liquefied Natural Gas Site in Santa Monica Bay, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In a letter to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) dated March 25, 2008, Representative Jane Harman (California 36th district) requested advice on geologic hazards that should be considered in the review of a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility off the California coast in Santa Monica Bay. In 2004, the USGS responded to a similar request from Representative Lois Capps, regarding two proposed LNG facilities offshore Ventura County, Calif., with a report summarizing potential geologic and seismic hazards (Ross and others, 2004). The proposed LNG Deepwater Port (DWP) facility includes single point moorings (SPMs) and 35 miles of underwater pipelines. The DWP submersible buoys, manifolds, and risers would be situated on the floor of the southern Santa Monica Basin, in 3,000 feet of water, about 23 miles offshore of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Twin 24-inch diameter pipelines would extend northeastward from the buoys across the basin floor, up the basin slope and across the continental shelf, skirting north around the Santa Monica submarine canyon. Figure 1 provides locations of the project and geologic features. Acronyms are defined in table 1. This facility is being proposed in a region of known geologic hazards that arise from both the potential for strong earthquakes and geologic processes related to sediment transport and accumulation in the offshore environment. The probability of a damaging earthquake (considered here as magnitude 6.5 or greater) in the next 30 years within about 30 miles (50 km) of the proposed pipeline ranges from 16% at the pipeline's offshore end to 48% where it nears land (Petersen, 2008). Earthquakes of this magnitude are capable of producing strong shaking, surface fault offsets, liquefaction phenomena, landslides, underwater turbidity currents and debris flow avalanches, and tsunamis. As part of the DWP license application for the Woodside Natural Gas proposal in Santa Monica Bay (known as the OceanWay Secure Energy Project), Fugro West, Inc., had already prepared a document discussing geologic hazards in the area, titled 'Exhibit B Topic Report 6 - Geological Resources' (Fugro West, Inc., 2007); hereafter, this will be called the 'Geological Resources document'. The USGS agreed to evaluate the information in the Geological Resources document regarding (1) proximity of active faults to the proposed project, (2) potential magnitude of seismic events from nearby faults, (3) thoroughness of the assessment of earthquake hazards in general, (4) potential hazards from ground rupture and strong shaking, (5) potential hazards from tsunamis, and (6) other geologic hazards including landslides and debris flows. Because two new earthquake probability reports were scheduled to be released in mid-April, 2008, by the USGS and the California Geological Survey (CGS), the USGS suggested a 6-month review period to enable a thorough incorporation of this new information. Twenty-seven scientists from the USGS and the CGS reviewed various sections of the Geological Resources document. This report outlines our major conclusions. The appendix is a longer list of comments by these reviewers, grouped by section of the Geological Resources document. Before discussing our reviews, we first provide a brief overview of geologic hazards in the proposed site area. This report is a snapshot in time and any future work in the area will need to take into account ongoing research efforts. For example, USGS scientists collected seismic reflection data in the spring of 2008 to study the structure and seismic potential of several faults in the area. Their interpretations (Conrad and others, 2008a and 2008b) are too preliminary to be included in this report, but their final results, along with other researchers' studies in the project area, should be considered in any future work on the Deepwater Port project.

Ross, Stephanie L.; Lee, Homa J.; Parsons, Tom E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Boore, David M.; Conrad, James E.; Edwards, Brian D.; Fisher, Michael A.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Geist, Eric L.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Hough, Susan E.; Kayen, Robert E.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Luco, Nicolas; McCrory, Patricia A.; McGann, Mary L.; Nathenson, Manuel; Nolan, Michael; Petersen, Mark D.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Powell, Charles L.; Ryan, Holly F.; Tinsley, John C.; Wills, Chris J.; Wong, Florence L.; Xu, Jingping

2008-01-01

170

AA Data Company Above the Limit Inc.  

E-print Network

- ratories Aman Environmental Construction Anteon Astro Seal Boral Material Technolo- gies Inc. California Corpora- tion Thermal Structures Trojan Battery Company URS Corporation U.S. Energy Systems Inc. United

171

Methanogenic calcite, 13C-depleted bivalve shells, and gas hydrate from a mud volcano offshore southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane and hydrogen sulfide vent from a cold seep above a shallowly buried methane hydrate in a mud volcano located 24 km offshore southern California in 800 m of water. Bivalves, authigenic calcite, and methane hydrate were recovered in a 2.1 m piston core. Aragonite shells of two bivalve species are unusually depleted in 13C (to -19‰ ?13C), the most 13C-depleted shells of marine macrofauna yet discovered. Carbon isotopes for both living and dead specimens indicate that they used, in part, carbon derived from anaerobically oxidized methane to construct their shells. The ?13C values are highly variable, but most are within the range -12‰ to -19‰. This variability may be diagnostic for identifying cold-seep hydrate systems in the geologic record. Authigenic calcite is abundant in the cores down to ˜1.5 m subbottom, the top of the methane hydrate. The calcite is depleted in 13C (?13C = -46‰ to -58‰), indicating that carbon produced by anaerobically oxidized methane is the main source of the calcite. Methane sources include a geologic hydrocarbon reservoir from Miocene source rocks, and biogenic and thermogenic degradation of organic matter in basin sediments. Oxygen isotopes indicate that most calcite formed out of isotopic equilibrium with ambient bottom water, under the influence of gas hydrate dissociation and strong methane flux. High metal content in the mud volcano sediment indicates leaching of basement rocks by fluid circulating along an underlying fault, which also allows for a high flux of fossil methane.

Hein, James R.; Normark, William R.; McIntyre, Brandie R.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Powell, Charles L., II

2006-02-01

172

Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

None

1998-07-01

173

75 FR 9404 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...construct and operate a new natural gas storage facility in a solution-mined salt dome in Liberty County, Texas. The Turtle Bayou...and Three sections of 18-inch-diameter water and brine pipeline totaling about 1.8 miles (1.6, 0.1,...

2010-03-02

174

Upper Campanian and lower Maestrichtian depositional systems and gas production, southern Sacramento basin, California  

SciTech Connect

Upper Campanian and lower Maestrichtian strata of the southern Sacramento basin include four west- and southwest-prograding submarine-fan/slope/delta systems. The Winters, Lathrop, Tracy, and Blewett formations consist of submarine-fan and related slope/basin-plain deposits that were fed by various deltaic complexes of the Starkey Formation. Four major basinwide transgressive shale units (Sacramento Shale, Sawtooth Shale, Ragged Valley Shale, and H and T Shale) help intrasystem correlations. The Winters, Tracy, and Blewett fans are small, radial, coalescing sand-rich systems that contain the following principal facies: (1) sandstone-filled inner fan channel deposits, (2) mudstone-dominated inner fan interchannel deposits, (3) middle-fan amalgamated suprafan-type sandstone-rich channel deposits, and (4) mudstone-dominated outer fan deposits. The Lathrop fans are larger, elongate, mixed-sediment systems that contain basin-plain, outer fan lobe, middle fan-channel, levee, interchannel, and inner fan channel facies. The Sierran-derived fluvio-deltaic Starkey Formation can be divided into six sand-rich deltaic cycles that can be subdivided on the basis of log signaturres and spatial distribution into prodelta, delta-front, lower delta-plain, and upper delta-plain/fluvial facies. More than 50 gas fields produce from these systems. Stratigraphic traps include updip pinchouts of submarine canyon/gullies and inner fan channels into slope shale, especially in the many overlapping and coalescing sand-rich systems. Lateral pinchouts of outer fan lobes and middle-fan suprafan-type bodies are also productive. Structural traps generally characterize production from deltaic deposits because of the more continuous nature of these bodies.

Moore, D.W.; Nilsen, T.H. (Applied Earth Technology, Inc., Redwood City, CA (USA))

1990-05-01

175

Allocation of petroleum feedstock: Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Sollers Point SNG Plant, Sollers Point, Baltimore County, Maryland. Final environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

An allocation of naphtha feedstock up to 2,186,000 barrels per year to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E) to operate its synthetic natural gas (SNG) facility is being considered. The allocation would enable BG and E to produce 10,800,000 mcf of SNG during a 180 day period. Operation of the plant at design capacity is expected to result in annual pollution emissions as follows: 626.4 tons of sulfur oxides, 168.5 tons of nitrogen oxides and 21.6 tons of particulate matter. Incremental emissions due to plant operations relative to existing emissions in Baltimore County are less than 1%. All Federal and State air quality standards should be met. Treated effluent is to be discharged into the Patapasco River where the environmental impacts are not expected to be significant. The SNG facility has been designed to be in compliance with all applicable Federal, State and local effluent standards. Water consumption requirements of 335,000 gallons per day are not expected to significantly tax the area's water resources. Sound generated by the SNG facility will be inaudible or imperceptible. All other operational impacts on land use, population, visual quality, roadways, community facilities and services and ecological systems were judged to be minimal. Environmental impacts resulting from various alternatives ranging from full allocation through denial of an allocation are discussed.

Not Available

1978-04-01

176

Methanogenic calcite, 13C-depleted bivalve shells, and gas hydrate from a mud volcano offshore southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Methane and hydrogen sulfide vent from a cold seep above a shallowly buried methane hydrate in a mud volcano located 24 km offshore southern California in?? 800 m of water. Bivalves, authigenic calcite, and methane hydrate were recovered in a 2.1 m piston core. Aragonite shells of two bivalve species are unusually depleted in 13C (to -91??? ??13C), the most 13C-depleted shells of marine macrofauna yet discovered. Carbon isotopes for both living and dead specimens indicate that they used, in part, carbon derived from anaerobically oxidized methane to construct their shells. The ??13C values are highly variable, but most are within the range -12??? to -91???. This variability may be diagnostic for identifying cold-seep-hydrate systems in the geologic record. Authigenic calcite is abundant in the cores down to ???1.5 m subbottom, the top of the methane hydrate. The calcite is depleted in 13C (??13C = -46??? to -58???), indicating that carbon produced by anaerobically oxidized methane is the main source of the calcite. Methane sources include a geologic hydrocarbon reservoir from Miocene source rocks, and biogenic and thermogenic degradation of organic matter in basin sediments. Oxygen isotopes indicate that most calcite formed out of isotopic equilibrium with ambient bottom water, under the influence of gas hydrate dissociation and strong methane flux. High metal content in the mud volcano sediment indicates leaching of basement rocks by fluid circulating along an underlying fault, which also allows for a high flux of fossil methane. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

Hein, J.R.; Normark, W.R.; McIntyre, B.R.; Lorenson, T.D.; Powell, C.L., II

2006-01-01

177

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01

178

21. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), H. B. Wesner, photographer, date unknown. 'VIEWS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCENERY. ARTESIAN WELLS, SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA. SUPPLYING THE GAGE CANAL OF RIVERSIDE.' - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

179

Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Pacific (Southern California) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, May 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration and development have been under way in the Pacific (Southern California) Region since 1966. During that time, there have been four Federal lease sales: in 1966, 1968, 1975 (Sale 35), and 1979 (Sale 48). Oil and gas production from three leases has been going on since 1968. It peaked in 1971 and now averages around 31,400 barrels of oil and 15.4 million cubic feet of gas per day. Discoveries on areas leased in the 1968 and 1975 sales have led to plans for eight new platforms to begin production in the early 1980's. Five platforms are in the eastern end of Santa Barbara Channel, one is in the western Channel, and two are in San Pedro Bay, south of Long Beach. Three rigs are doing exploratory drilling in the Region. The most recent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey of remaining reserves for all identified fields in the Southern California Region are 695 million barrels of oil and 1,575 billion cubic feet of gas (January 1979). The USGS has also made risked estimates of economically recoverable oil and gas resources for all the leased tracts in the Region (March 1980). These risked estimates of economically recoverable resources are 394 billion barrels of oil and 1,295 billion cubic feet of gas. The USGS estimates of undiscovered recoverable resources for the entire Southern California OCS Region (January 1980) are 3,200 million barrels of oil and 3,400 billion cubic feet of gas. Because of the long history of oil and gas production in Southern California from wells onshore and in State waters, there are many existing facilities for the transportation, processing, and refining of oil and gas. Some of the expected new OCS production can be accommodated in these facilities. Four new onshore projects will be required. Two of these are under construction: (1) a 9.6-km (6-mi) onshore oil pipeline (capacity: 60,000 bpd) between Carpinteria (Santa Barbara County) and the existing Mobil-Rincon separation and treatment facility (Ventura County), and (2) a small supply base and dock (upgrade of existing facility) and a 0.4-hectare (1-acre) crude oil distribution facility in Long Beach (Los Angeles County), connected to landfall by a 3-km (1.8-mi) onshore pipeline. The two other facilities are awaiting permit approval: (1) a gas treatment plant at Las Flores Canyon (Santa Barbara County) and (2) a separation and treatment plant at Mandalay Beach (Ventura County) with 4 km (2.5 mi) of onshore pipeline on the same right-of-way from landfall to the plant and from the plant to an existing gas transmission line.

Macpherson, George S.; Bernstein, Janis

1980-01-01

180

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-print Network

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT STATUS OF THE NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT5002010037 #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Leah Mohney Primary Author Project Manager Steve Williams Senior was prepared by staff of the California Energy Commission. It does not necessarily represent the views

181

Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in the Santa Maria Basin and surrounding areas, central California coast  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stratigraphic information from 694 oil and gas exploration wells from the onshore Santa Maria basin and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Santa Maria basin is located within the southwesternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges on the central California coast. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time.

Sweetkind, Donald S.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.

2010-01-01

182

STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS RESEARCH,  

E-print Network

STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION REPORT CALIFORNIA 854, Statutes of 1996), California's electric utility restructuring legislation. This law required Public Utilities Commission to impose a surcharge on all natural gas consumed in California to fund

183

GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

184

Development of water facilities in the Santa Ana River Basin, California, 1810-1968: a compilation of historical notes derived from many sources describing ditch and canal companies, diversions, and water rights  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report traces by text, maps, and photographs, the development of the water supply in the Santa Ana River basin from its beginning in 1810 or 1811 to 1968. The value of the report lies in the fact that interpretation of the hydrologic systems in the basin requires knowledge of the concurrent state of development of the water supply, because that development has progressively altered the local regimen of both surface water and ground water. Most of the information for the earlier years was extracted and condensed from an investigation made by W. H. Hall, California State Engineer during the years 1878-87. Hall's study described irrigation development in southern California from its beginning through 1888. Information for the years following 1888 was obtained from the archives of the numerous water companies and water agencies in the Santa Ana River basin and from the various depositories of courthouse, county, and municipal records. The history of water-resources development in the Santa Ana River basin begins with the introduction of irrigation in the area by the Spanish, who settled in southern California in the latter part, of the 18th century. The first irrigation diversion from the Santa Ana River was made in 1810 or 1811 by Jose Antonio Yorba and Juan Pablo Peralta. Irrigation remained a localized practice during the Mexican-Californian, or rancho, period following the separation of Mexico from Spain in 1821. Rancho grantees principally raised cattle, horses, and sheep and irrigated only small· plots of feed grain for their livestock and fruit crops for household use. The breakup of the ranchos through sales to Americans, who were migrating to California in ever-increasing numbers following the acquisition of California by the United States in 1848, marked the beginning of a rapid increase in water use and the beginning of widespread irrigation. Many water companies and water agencies were organized to divert the surface flow of the Santa Ana River and its tributaries for irrigation. The Santa Ana River had been a perennial stream, except in years of extreme drought, from its source in the mountains nearly to the Pacific Ocean. With the great increase in population and the accompanying use of water for irrigation, the river was no longer a perennial stream, and it was necessary to supplement the surface-water supply with ground water. Many wells were dug or drilled in the artesian areas of the upper basin; of those wells many originally flowed, but as ground-water pressures and levels declined, an increasing amount of pumping was required. Conservation measures were taken to store some of the surplus winter runoff for use during low runoff years and during summer periods of heavy demand. Conservation facilities included surface-storage reservoirs and water-spreading grounds or percolation basins for utilization of underground storage. The competition for water in the Santa Ana River basin has been accompanied by frequent litigation over water tights, and over the years these water rights have generally been established by court decree. Although the demand for water still increases, the water demand for agricultural use has declined since the mid-1940's in response to the rapid urbanization of agricultural areas. Since that date the continued expansion of communities has encroached significantly into the agricultural areas causing a decrease in water use for agriculture, a more than compensating increase in water use for municipal purposes, and a rapid change in the ownership of water rights. The urbanization of flood plains made floods potentially more damaging than they previously had been when the flood plains were used for agriculture. In recognition of this increased hazard, flood-control facilities such as reservoirs, debris basins, flood-conveyance channels, and levees have been constructed to reduce potential damage. Most of the construction has occurred since the devastating flood of March 1938. By the mid-1940's it was apparent that the local water supply--both surface and ground water--would be insuff

Scott, M.B.

1977-01-01

185

Upper Cretaceous Foraminifera from southern California and northwestern Baja California, Mexico  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA, MEXICO WILLIAM V. SUTER Esso Production Research Company, Houston, Texas The University of Kansas Paleontological Institute HAROLD NORMAN FISK MEMORIAL PAPERS Humble Oil & Refining Company THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS AUGUST 16, 1968 THE UNIVERSITY... OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS Serial Number 49—Protozoa, Article 7, Pages 1-141, Figures 1-9, Plates 1-24, Tables 1-15 UPPER CRETACEOUS FORAMINIFERA FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA AND NORTHWESTERN BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO WILLIAM V. SLITER Esso Production...

Sliter, W. V.

1968-08-16

186

California Cenozoic Biostratigraphy -- Paleogene: Chapter 4 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The time transgressive nature of the California benthic foraminiferal stages is in most cases the result of poor taxonomy, use of local species ranges, and a lack of understanding about the type sections. Correcting these problems allows the stages to be consistently applied and enhances their ability to identify coeval strata. Each stage is identified by the first and last appearances of selected cosmopolitan benthic foraminiferal species and of reliable local species. Although further study is needed, the stages correlate with the international time scale. The revised age interpretation of the stages suggests that the Cheneyian Stage is coeval with planktic zone P1 through P3, the Ynezian Stage is coeval with planktic zone P4, the Bulitian Stage is missing in most section but when present is coeval with zones P5 and P6a, the Penutian Stage is coeval with planktic zones P6b through early P9 (no younger than the overlap between P9 and CP11), the Ulatisian Stage is coeval with P9 (younger than CP11) through P11, the Narizian Stage is coeval with zones P12 through P15, and the Refugian Stage is coeval with zones P16 and P17.

McDougall, Kristin

2008-01-01

187

Vine Water Relations, Gas Exchange, and Vegetative Growth of Seventeen Vitis Species Grown under Irrigated and Nonirrigated Conditions in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

ADDITIONAL INDEX WORDS. grapevines, water potential, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, drought tolerance ABSTRACT. A comparison was made among 16 native North American Vitis species and Vitis vinifera L. ('Carignane') grown in the San Joaquin Valley of California with or without irrigation over 2 years. Predawn water potential (?PD), predawn leaf osmotic potential (??), midday leaf (?l), and stem water potential (?stem),

M. Padgett-Johnson; L. E. Williams; M. A. Walker

188

Natural gas industry directory  

SciTech Connect

This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

NONE

1999-11-01

189

75 FR 42432 - Northern Natural Gas Company, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...State and federal waters offshore Texas. These facilities would include about 86.9 miles of various diameter pipeline, a dehydration plant, and various interconnects located in Texas. The 86.9 miles of pipeline to be abandoned include about 60.3...

2010-07-21

190

75 FR 73071 - Northern Natural Gas Company, Southern Natural Gas Company, Florida Gas Transmission Company, LLC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...System (MOPS). The onshore facilities that would be abandoned in place include about 26.8 miles of pipeline, the Tivoli Dehydration Plant, and several interconnect. The offshore facilities would be abandoned include about 60.1 miles of pipeline...

2010-11-29

191

ACHIEVING ALL COST-EFFECTIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

for electricity, peak demand, and natural gas usage. Keywords Energy efficiency, energy savings, demand reduction, electricity consumption, natural gas consumption, electric peak demand reduction, energy efficiency potentialCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ACHIEVING ALL COST-EFFECTIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR CALIFORNIA

192

Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W., III; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

2008-01-01

193

Studies of the effects of experimentally produced noise associated with oil and gas exploration and development on sea otters in California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

During the winter 1983 tape-recorded industrial noises associated with offshore oil and gas operations were projected underwater at Soberanes Point, California. Seismic-exploration sounds were produced using a multiple air gun array (4000 cu. in) and a single air gun (100 cu. in) along a 10-15 km transect paralleling the coastline from Rocky Point to Yankee Point. The behavior, density, and distribution of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) within the vicinity of the sound projection area were not affected by the acoustic experiments. Foraging and diving behaviors of sea otters were normal and undisturbed. There were no movements of otters away from the sound source or out of the sound projection vicinity during either the winter or spring acoustic experiments.

Riedman, M.L.

1983-11-15

194

Gas  

MedlinePLUS

... swallow and the breakdown of undigested food by bacteria in the large intestine. Certain foods may cause gas. Foods that produce gas in one person may not cause gas in another. You can reduce the amount of gas you have by Drinking lots of water and non-fizzy drinks Eating more slowly so ...

195

Co-combustion of refuse derived fuel and coal in a cyclone furnace at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, C. P. Crane Station  

SciTech Connect

A co-combustion demonstration burn of coal and fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) was conducted by Teledyne National and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. This utility has two B and W cyclone furnaces capable of generating 400 MW. The facility is under a prohibition order to convert from No. 6 oil to coal; as a result, it was desirable to demonstrate that RDF, which has a low sulfur content, can be burned in combination with coals containing up to 2% sulfur, thus reducing overall sulfur emissions without deleterious effects. Each furnace consists of four cyclones capable of generating 1,360,000 pounds per hour steam. The tertiary air inlet of one of the cyclones was modified with an adapter to permit fluff RDF to be pneumatically blown into the cyclone. At the same time, coal was fed into the cyclone furnace through the normal coal feeding duct, where it entered the burning chamber tangentially and mixed with the RDF during the burning process. Secondary shredded fluff RDF was prepared by the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility. The RDF was discharged into a receiving station consisting of a belt conveyor discharging into a lump breaker, which in turn, fed the RDF into a pneumatic line through an air-lock feeder. A total of 2316 tons were burned at an average rate of 5.6 tons per hour. The average heat replacement by RDF for the cyclone was 25%, based on Btu input for a period of forty days. The range of RDF burned was from 3 to 10 tons per hour, or 7 to 63% heat replacement. The average analysis of the RDF (39 samples) for moisture, ash, heat (HHV) and sulfur content were 18.9%, 13.4%, 6296 Btu/lb and 0.26% respectively. RDF used in the test was secondary shredded through 1-1/2 inch grates producing the particle size distribution of from 2 inches to .187 inches. Findings to date after inspection of the boiler and superheater indicate satisfactory results with no deleterious effects from the RDF.

Not Available

1982-03-01

196

23. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, ca. 1917. VIEW OF FLUME NO. 3 OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL AND NEW 66' REINFORCED CONCRETE PIPELINE - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

197

Cal State Company--the Total IA Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

California State Engineering and Manufacturing Company was formed by the Department of Industrial Studies in order to provide direct experience with and knowledge of the industrial process for teachers finishing their degree requirements in Industrial Studies. (KP)

Doan, Cortland C.

1974-01-01

198

STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

the revised NOPA was posted, a project has changed its location for a Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuelingSTATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

199

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission DOCKETED /3-I"b-P-l PETITION OF AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION IN CALIFORNIA, ASIAN PACIFIC ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK, BRIGHTLINE DEFENSE PROJECT, CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ALLIANCE, CALIFORNIA SOLAR ENERGY

200

Age, distribution, and stratigraphic relationship of rock units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 5 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The San Joaquin Basin is a major petroleum province that forms the southern half of California’s Great Valley, a 700-km-long, asymmetrical basin that originated between a subduction zone to the west and the Sierra Nevada to the east. Sedimentary fill and tectonic structures of the San Joaquin Basin record the Mesozoic through Cenozoic geologic history of North America’s western margin. More than 25,000 feet (>7,500 meters) of sedimentary rocks overlie the basement surface and provide a nearly continuous record of sedimentation over the past ~100 m.y. Further, depositional geometries and fault structures document the tectonic evolution of the region from forearc setting to strike-slip basin to transpressional margin. Sedimentary architecture in the San Joaquin Basin is complicated because of these tectonic regimes and because of lateral changes in depositional environment and temporal changes in relative sea level. Few formations are widespread across the basin. Consequently, a careful analysis of sedimentary facies is required to unravel the basin’s depositional history on a regional scale. At least three high-quality organic source rocks formed in the San Joaquin Basin during periods of sea level transgression and anoxia. Generated on the basin’s west side, hydrocarbons migrated into nearly every facies type in the basin, from shelf and submarine fan sands to diatomite and shale to nonmarine coarse-grained rocks to schist. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed a geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources and future additions to reserves in the San Joaquin Valley of California (USGS San Joaquin Basin Province Assessment Team, this volume, chapter 1). Several research aims supported this assessment: identifying and mapping the petroleum systems, modeling the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, and defining the volumes of rock to be analyzed for additional resources. To better understand the three dimensional relationships between hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks, we compiled a database consisting of more than 13,000 well picks and of one-mile resolution seismic grids. Both the well picks and the seismic grids characterize the depths to the top of key stratigraphic units. This database formed the basis of subsequent numerical modeling efforts, including the construction of a three- dimensional geologic model (Hosford Scheirer, this volume, chapter 7) and simulation of the petroleum systems in space and time (Peters, Magoon, Lampe, and others, this volume, chapter 12). To accomplish this modeling, we synthesized the age, geographic distribution, lithology, and petroleum characteristics of hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks in the basin. The results of that synthesis are presented in this paper in the form of new stratigraphic correlation columns for the northern, central, and southern San Joaquin Valley (fig. 5.1; note that all figures are at the back of this report, following the References Cited). The stratigraphic relationships and ages published here draw heavily on published and unpublished studies of the San Joaquin Basin. The stratigraphy presented in each of the columns necessarily idealizes the subsurface geology over a relatively large area, instead of representing the specific geology at an individual well, oil and gas field, or outcrop. In this paper we present the background rationale for defining the geographic divisions of the basin (inset map, fig. 5.1), the paleontological time scales used for assigning absolute ages to rock units (figs. 5.2 and 5.3), and the supporting maps illustrating the geographic distribution of each rock type included in the stratigraphic column (figs. 5.4 through 5.64).

Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

2008-01-01

201

A comparison of undiscovered oil and gas resource estimates, Los Padres National Forest in the Ventura Basin Province, California  

SciTech Connect

Two recent assessments of the undiscovered oil and gas resources of Los Padres National Forest lands in the Ventura Basin Province using different methodologies and personnel show remarkable coincidence of estimated resources. The 1989 U.S. Geological Survey assessment was part of a National appraisal. In the Ventura Basin Province, two separate plays were assessed and a percentage of resources from these plays was allocated to Federal lands. By this allocation, the undiscovered oil and gas resources of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from <10-140 MMBO (means probability 60 MMBO, million barrels of oil) and 10-250 BCFG (mean probability 110 BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas). In 1993, the U.S. Forest Service completed an oil and gas assessment of the entire 1.8 million-acre Los Padres National Forest as part of a Reasonably Foreseeable Oil and Gas Development Scenario. In those areas of the forest considered to have high potential for the occurrence of oil and gas deposits, a deposit simulation model was used. This method is based on a fundamental reservoir engineering formula in the USGS computer program, FASPU (Fast Appraisal System for Petroleum-Universal). By this method, the undiscovered oil and gas resource of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from 0-182 MMBO (mean probability 56 MMBO) and 9-233 BCFG (mean probability 103 BCFG). An additional 6 MMBO (mean probability) is allocated to forest lands with medium potential within this province but not to any specific prospects. The remarkable coincidence of estimate resources resulting from such different assessment methods and personnel is noteworthy and appears to provide an increased measure of confidence in the estimates.

Bird, K.J.; Valin, Z.C. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bain, D.M. [Consultant, Daily City, CA (United States); Hopps, T.E. [Consultant, Santa Paula, CA (United States); Friehauf, J.S.F. [Forest Service, San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-04-01

202

California foraminiferal micropalaeontology KENNETH L. FINGER  

E-print Network

, Oil Company; ODP, Offshore Drilling Proj- ect; PG&E, Pacific Gas and Electric Company; PCJ, Petroleum offshore exploration was abandoned in the early 1990s, few foraminiferologists remained in the state. Today

Finger, Kenneth L.

203

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-print Network

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT THE NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT Mueller Fernando Pina Sarah Pittiglio Kiel Pratt Richard Sapudar Prab Sethi Linda Spiegel John Reed with Assembly Bill 1002 (Wright, Chapter 932, Statutes of 2000), which required the California Public Utilities

204

California Energy Commission STAFF DRAFT  

E-print Network

use of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program. This statute, amended by Assembly Bill 109

205

California Missions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Museum of Photography at the University of California-Riverside, (last mentioned in the May 30, 2000 Scout Report for Social Sciences) is a site worth visiting again and again; there is always something new to look at in a variety of areas: photography history, California lifestyle and culture, fine art photography, and photo journalism. The California Missions show includes over 100 historic views of the 21 California Missions, some dated as early as 1895.

206

Measurement of non-enteric emission fluxes of volatile fatty acids from a California dairy by solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dairies are a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in California's San Joaquin Valley; a region that experiences high ozone levels during summer. Short-chain carboxylic acids, or volatile fatty acids (VFAs), are believed to make up a large fraction of VOC emissions from these facilities, although there are few studies to substantiate this. In this work, a method using a flux chamber coupled to solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) fibers followed by analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed to quantify emissions of six VFAs (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid) from non-enteric sources. The technique was then used to quantify VFA fluxes from a small dairy located on the campus of California State University Fresno. Both animal feed and animal waste are found to be major sources of VFAs, with acetic acid contributing 70-90% of emissions from the sources tested. Measured total acid fluxes during spring (with an average temperature of 20 °C) were 1.84 ± 0.01, 1.06 ± 0.08, (1.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -2, (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -2 and (1.2 ± 0.5) × 10 -2 g m -2 h -1 from silage, total mixed rations, flushing lane, open lot and lagoon sources, respectively. VFA emissions from the sources tested total 390 ± 80 g h -1. The data indicate high fluxes of VFAs from dairy facilities, but differences in the design and operation of dairies in the San Joaquin Valley as well as seasonal variations mean that additional measurements must be made to accurately determine emissions inventories for the region.

Alanis, Phillip; Sorenson, Mark; Beene, Matt; Krauter, Charles; Shamp, Brian; Hasson, Alam S.

207

Greenhouse gas sources in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California derived from Positive Matrix Factorization of CalNex 2010 observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from sources in the southern San Joaquin valley is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law (California Global Warming Solutions Act 2006) implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The "bottom-up" emission factors for CH4 and N2O have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate "top-down" measurements to characterize emission rates from sources. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agriculture and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies, refineries and active oil fields which are known CH4 sources while agricultural soil management and vehicular combustion are known sources of N2O. In summer of 2010, GHG sources in the southern San Joaquin valley were investigated as part of the CalNex (California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) campaign. Measurements of GHG gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) and the combustion tracer CO were performed at the Bakersfield super-site over a period of six weeks using fast response lasers based on cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (LGR Inc. CA). Coincident measurements of hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) served as anthropogenic and biogenic tracers of the GHG sources at local and regional levels. We present the results of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis applied to the GHGs, CO, and 60 VOCs to define dominant source emission profiles. Seven source factors were identified and used to attribute the contribution of regional sources to enhancements above the background. Dairy operations were found to be the largest CH4 source in the region with approximately 80% of the regional emissions attributed to the 'dairy' factor. Factors dominated by 'vehicular combustion' and 'evaporative emissions' had negligible contributions to regional CH4 or N2O emissions. We identified an 'agricultural emissions' factor as the dominant regional source of N2O. Emission Factors of GHG enhancements with respect to specific source tracers are derived from the PMF analysis and compared to emission factors from prior source-specific and regional field studies (e.g. Shaw et al., 2007; Bon et al., 2006; CABERNET 2011) to gain a better understanding of GHG source contributions in the southern San Joaquin valley.

Guha, A.; Gentner, D. R.; Weber, R.; Baer, D. S.; Gardner, A.; Provencal, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

2012-12-01

208

California Energy Commission REVISED STAFF DRAFT  

E-print Network

FOR THE ALTERNATIVE AND RENEWABLE FUEL AND VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G The increased use of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas of biofuels within California. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural

209

Submicron aerosol composition at Trinidad Head, California, during ITCT 2K2: Its relationship with gas phase volatile organic  

E-print Network

with gas phase volatile organic carbon and assessment of instrument performance James D. Allan,1 Keith N the other used a temperature cycling system on its inlet. The reported loadings increased by a factor of 2. However, when influenced by land-based sources, vehicle emissions and increased ammonium loadings were

Cohen, Ronald C.

210

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-print Network

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT THE NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT Energy Research and Development Division Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director DISCLAIMER Staff members. i #12;ii #12;ABSTRACT Assembly Bill 1002 (Wright, Chapter 932, Statutes of 2000) authorizes

211

California Fires  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

... title:  Smoke from Station Fire Blankets Southern California     View Larger Image ... to the explosive growth of wildfires throughout southern California. The Station fire began August 26, 2009, in La Canada/Flintridge, ...

2014-05-15

212

California Dust  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

... dramatically when forced through narrow canyons and mountain passes. Due to Southern California's uneven terrain, the strength of ... from a small fire located near the southern flank of Palomar Mountain in Southern California. This image was acquired during Terra orbit ...

2014-05-15

213

California Fires  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Smoke Blankets Northern California     View Larger Image ... strikes sparked more than a thousand fires in northern California. This image was captured by the Multi-angle Imaging ... June 27, 2008 - Smoke from fires in northern California. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

2014-05-15

214

California Coast  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Southern California     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Southern California were acquired on March 14, 2000 during Terra orbit 1273. North is at ... available at JPL March 14, 2000 - Southern California with the Mojave Desert and surrounding area. project:  ...

2014-05-15

215

STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

STATE OF CALIFORNIA - NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION In the Matter of: ) Docket No. 92-AFC-1 C ) CROCKETT-Driven ) Natural Gas Compression Equipment On December 21, 2011, Crockett Cogeneration, a California Limited

216

CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCE REBATE PROGRAM INITIAL November 2009 CEC-400-2009-026-CMD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Program Manager Paula David Supervisor Appliance and Process Energy Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director

217

Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Air Pollutant Emission Reductions from Forest Fuel Treatment Projects in Placer County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Years of successful fire suppression activities have left forests unnaturally dense, overstocked, and with high hazardous fuel loads. Wildfires, particularly those of high severity, may dramatically reduce carbon stocks and convert forested lands from carbon sinks to decades-long carbon sources . Forest resource managers are currently pursuing fuels reduction and mitigation strategies to reduce wildfire risk and maintain carbon stocks. These projects include selective thinning and removal of trees and brush to return forest ecosystems to more natural stocking levels, resulting in a more fire-resilient forest that in theory would retain higher carry capacity for standing above ground carbon. Resource managers are exploring the possibility of supporting these local forest management projects by offering greenhouse gas (GHG) offsets to project developers that require GHG emissions mitigation. Using robust field data, this research project modeled three types of carbon benefits that could be realized from forest management: 1. Fuels treatments in the study area were shown to reduce the GHG and Criteria Air Pollutant emissions from wildfires by decreasing the probability, extent, and severity of fires and the corresponding loss in forest carbon stocks; 2. Biomass utilization from fuel treatment was shown to reduce GHG and Criteria Air Pollutant emissions over the duration of the fuels treatment project compared to fossil fuel energy. 3. Management and thinning of forests in order to stimulate growth, resulting in more rapid uptake of atmospheric carbon and approaching a carbon carrying capacity stored in a forest ecosystem under prevailing environmental conditions and natural disturbance regimes.

Saah, D. S.; Moritz, M.; Ganz, D. J.; Stine, P. A.; Moody, T.

2010-12-01

218

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30

219

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29

220

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01

221

Carbon Isotopic Signatures in Benthic Foraminifera Bio- and Tanathocenosis From Methane-Soaked Gas-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we report on recent results from an extensive ROV-based exploration along the NE transform margin of the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California to characterize patterns of carbon isotopic assimilation into the benthic foraminiferal tests along known gradients of present methane venting. Cores were retrieved from: a (i) vigorous methane venting site visible by a continuous emanation of gas bubbles from the seafloor at 1,582 m depth of water, (ii) beds of living calyptogenid clams, (iii) white bacterial mats, commonly found on exposed strata on the flanks of the basin, and (iv) background sites at the same depth in the neighboring slopes of Guaymas Basin. Rose bengal-stained and non-stained specimens of Uvigerina peregrina (Up), Planulina wullerstorfi (Pw), Globobulimina pacifica (Gp), and Bulimina mexicana (Bm) were hand-picked and their carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios were determined. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic values measured in several pore water samples extracted from sediments range between -2.9% to -35.85%. The most depleted values indicate that while some methane derived carbon has entered the authigenic DIC pool within the seafloor sediments during early diagenesis, there is no record of the assimilation of this carbon on the calcitic shells of living benthic foraminifera. Here we will further compare the carbon isotopic composition of stained (living) foraminifera shells and non-stained tests to show the patterns of carbon assimilation and early diagenetic imprint of both assamblages. These results question the extent to which strong carbon isotopic depletion signals in the geological record are features recorded by living foraminifera or the result of a posterior diagenetical imprint.

Herguera, J.; Perez, E.; Paull, C.; Ussler, B.; Peltzer, E.

2005-12-01

222

A FIRST LOOK AT THE AURIGA-CALIFORNIA GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD WITH HERSCHEL AND THE CSO: CENSUS OF THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS AND THE DENSE GAS  

SciTech Connect

We have mapped the Auriga/California molecular cloud with the Herschel PACS and SPIRE cameras and the Bolocam 1.1 mm camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory with the eventual goal of quantifying the star formation and cloud structure in this giant molecular cloud (GMC) that is comparable in size and mass to the Orion GMC, but which appears to be forming far fewer stars. We have tabulated 60 compact 70/160 {mu}m sources that are likely pre-main-sequence objects and correlated those with Spitzer and WISE mid-IR sources. At 1.1 mm, we find 18 cold, compact sources and discuss their properties. The most important result from this part of our study is that we find a modest number of additional compact young objects beyond those identified at shorter wavelengths with Spitzer. We also describe the dust column density and temperature structure derived from our photometric maps. The column density peaks at a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (N {sub H2}) and is distributed in a clear filamentary structure along which nearly all of the pre-main-sequence objects are found. We compare the young stellar object surface density to the gas column density and find a strong nonlinear correlation between them. The dust temperature in the densest parts of the filaments drops to {approx}10 K from values {approx}14-15 K in the low-density parts of the cloud. We also derive the cumulative mass fraction and probability density function of material in the cloud, which we compare with similar data on other star-forming clouds.

Harvey, Paul M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Fallscheer, Cassandra [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Ginsburg, Adam [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy PS315, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Andre, Philippe; Koenyves, Vera [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peterson, Dawn E., E-mail: pmh@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: Cassandra.Fallscheer@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: adam.ginsburg@colorado.edu, E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu, E-mail: pandre@cea.fr, E-mail: vera.konyves@cea.fr, E-mail: tbourke@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: James.DiFrancesco@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Brenda.Matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: dpeterson@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2013-02-20

223

Effects of High Carbon Dioxide Soil-Gas Concentrations and Emission Rates From Mammoth Mountain, California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High concentrations (90 vol %) of carbon dioxide (CO2) are present in shallow soils, and CO2 is emitted to the atmosphere at high rates (1,000 g/d/m2), in several locations around Mammoth Mountain. The CO2 emissions have been diffuse and at ambient temperature. CO2 in the soil has killed most of the coniferous forest in five areas totaling 35 ha around the north, west, and south sides of the mountain at altitudes between 2,600 and 3,000 m. Part of the CO2 has dissolved in ground water, causing acidic conditions and severely corroding steel casings in several wells. The high CO2 emission rates are implicated in the deaths of four people in the past eight years. During winter, a large quantity of CO2 is sequestered in the snow pack on parts of the mountain, posing potential dangers for winter recreation. One U.S. Forest Service campground has been closed and safety plans have been implemented by the local ski resort. Mammoth Mountain is a dormant Quaternary volcanic center, but overlies an area that has been affected by periods of magmatic unrest during the past two decades. Hypocenters of long-period earthquakes indicate that basaltic intrusions reach depths as shallow as 20 to 15 km, from which CO2 has exsolved during decompression and (or) crystallization of these intrusions. CO2 moves to the land surface along fracture zones associated with faults and possibly geologic contacts. The magmatic source of CO2 is confirmed by ¦Ä13C = -3 to -5 PDB, a lack of 14C, and 3He/4He = 4 to 5 R/RA. The present-day high CO2 soil-gas concentrations and emission rates were first documented in 1994; however, anecdotal information and low 14C in post-1989 tree rings suggest that an abrupt increase in both concentrations and emission rates probably began in 1990, following a 6-month period of seismic swarm activity beneath the mountain. Emissions in an area on the south flank of the mountain have been the focus of CO2 monitoring and have shown no indications of abatement between 1994 and 2005, during which estimates of the total CO2 efflux ranged from 90 to 150 MT/d. The variations can be partly attributed to the precision of the techniques and to minor differences in measurement protocols between researchers; variations in soil- moisture and atmospheric conditions alone can cause fluctuations in efflux of ± 10% over periods of hours to days.

Farrar, C. D.; Evans, W. C.

2006-12-01

224

18 CFR 2.67 - Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after January 1...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after... Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after...1969, 83 Stat. 487, 625, natural gas pipeline companies which have exercised...

2014-04-01

225

18 CFR 2.67 - Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after January 1...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after... Calculation of taxes for property of pipeline companies constructed or acquired after...1969, 83 Stat. 487, 625, natural gas pipeline companies which have exercised...

2010-04-01

226

Neogene Gas Total Petroleum System -- Neogene Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit of the San Joaquin Basin Province: Chapter 22 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Neogene Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit (AU) of the Neogene Total Petroleum System consists of nonassociated gas accumulations in Pliocene marine and brackish-water sandstone located in the south and central San Joaquin Basin Province (Rudkin, 1968). Traps consist mainly of stratigraphic lenses in low-relief, elongate domes that trend northwest-southeast. Reservoir rocks typically occur as sands that pinch out at shallow depths (1,000 to 7,500 feet) within the Etchegoin and San Joaquin Formations. Map boundaries of the assessment unit are shown in figures 22.1 and 22.2; this assessment unit replaces the Pliocene Nonassociated Gas play 1001 (shown by purple line in fig. 22.1) considered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in its 1995 National Assessment (Beyer, 1996). The AU is drawn to include all existing fields containing nonassociated gas accumulations in the Pliocene to Pleistocene section, as was done in the 1995 assessment, but it was greatly expanded to include adjacent areas believed to contain similar source and reservoir rock relationships. Stratigraphically, the AU extends from the topographic surface to the base of the Etchegoin Formation (figs. 22.3 and 22.4). The boundaries of the AU explicitly exclude gas accumulations in Neogene rocks on the severely deformed west side of the basin and gas accumulations in underlying Miocene rocks; these resources, which primarily consist of a mixture of mostly thermogenic and some biogenic gas, are included in two other assessment units. Lillis and others (this volume, chapter 10) discuss the geochemical characteristics of biogenic gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province. Primary fields in the assessment unit are defined as those containing hydrocarbon resources greater than the USGS minimum threshold for assessment—3 billion cubic feet (BCF) of gas; secondary fields contain smaller volumes of gas but constitute a significant show of hydrocarbons. Although 12 fields meet the 3 BCF criterion for inclusion in the AU, only 5 fields were considered at the time of assessment.

Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

2009-01-01

227

Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry-specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving the energy efficiency in chemical plants, with a focus on the situation in California.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

2004-06-01

228

43. April 28, 1939 Oakland, California View of propellers and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

43. April 28, 1939 Oakland, California View of propellers and underside of hull on marine railway at the Moore Dry Dock Company. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter FIR, Puget Sound Area, Seattle, King County, WA

229

California Condor  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

California condors are one of the most endangered birds in North America. In the early 1990s, captive-bred condors were reintroduced into the wild in California. As of January 2010, about 190 condors now live in the wild and more reintroductions are being considered. To facilitate this, USGS researc...

2010-02-24

230

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-print Network

and water pumping sectors. Mark Ciminelli forecasted energy for transportation, communication and utilities, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, conservation, California Solar Initiative. #12

231

STATION BUILDING. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

STATION BUILDING. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. Plan, elevations, sections, details. Austin Willmott Earl, Consulting Engineer, 233 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. Drawing no. 504. Various scales. January 20, 1945, no revisions. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76, amendments 4 & 5. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Electrical Services & Switching Station, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

232

3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. John Hudspeth, architect, foot of Main Street, Alameda, California. Sheet 4. Plan no. 10,548. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot, elevations, and one inch to the foot, sections and details. April 30, 1945, last revised 6/19/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Boiler House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

233

Market Research Company Description  

E-print Network

Market Research Company Description: A company focused on developing web-based graphical development - Market research for enterprise and education adoption - Plan and execute a company-wide ping of industries. Short Project Name: New Target Market Research, Analysis, & Proposal Project Description

Dahl, David B.

234

10. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Southern California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Southern California Edison Company Corporate Offices, Rosemead, California). Photographer unknown, about 1908. CLUB HOUSE LOCATED AT THE SOUTHERN END OF THE MAIN PLANT 4 RESIDENTIAL STREET. THE CLUB HOUSE WAS REMOVED IN THE 1970s. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

235

GATE HOUSE FOR UNITED ENGINEERING CO., Alameda, California. Four elevations ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GATE HOUSE FOR UNITED ENGINEERING CO., Alameda, California. Four elevations and three sections. Alben Froberg, Architect, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 1. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot, elevations. Scale ~ inch to the foot, sections. July 31, 1941. pencil on tracing paper - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Gate House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

236

Project SAGE: Solar assisted gas energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plans are formulated to: improve solar assisted gas energy (SAGE) technical design and performance; reduce SAGE costs; refine SAGE market assessment; and identify policies to encourage the use of SAGE. Two SAGE water heating systems were installed and tested. One system was retrofit onto an existing apartment building; the other was installed in a new apartment building. Each installation required approximately 1000 square feet of collector area tilted to an angle of 37(0) from the horizontal, and each was designed to supply about 70 percent of the energy for heating water for approximately 32 to 40 units of a typical two-story apartment complex, in Southern California. Construction costs were compiled, and both installations were equipped with performance monitoring equipment. The operating and maintenance requirements of each installation was evaluated by gas company maintenance engineers. Market penetration was assessed by developing a computer simulation program using the technical and economic analysis from the installation experience.

1980-03-01

237

Measuring Tsunami Current Velocities on California’s North Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Northern California coast is particularly susceptible to tsunami damage. Thirty-one tsunamis have been recorded since 1933 when the first tide gauge was installed at Citizen’s Dock in Crescent City, California and four have caused damage. In November 2006, a magnitude 8.3 earthquake in the Kuril Islands generated a tsunami that caused over $20 million in damages and replacement costs to the Crescent City small boat basin. The 2006 tsunami did not flood any areas above the normal high tide; very strong currents produced as the tsunami surged in and out of the small boat basin caused all of the damage. The Harbor Master and commercial fishermen in the area estimated the peak currents near the mouth of the small boat basin at 12 to 15 knots or 6 to 8 m/sec. MOST numerical modeling of the 2006 currents in Crescent City gives peak velocities in the 2-3 m/sec range. We have initiated a pilot project to directly measure current velocities produced by moderate tsunamis such as the 2006 event. In spring of 2009 we acquired a Nortek Aquadopp 600 kHz acoustic 2-D current profiler through a donation from the Pacific Gas and Electric Company to measure currents in Humboldt Bay, located 100 km south of Crescent City. The manufacturer specifies the current meter can measure currents up to 10 m/sec. In a preliminary deployment at the Fairhaven dock inside Humboldt Bay in May 2009, we measured current velocities of 1.5 m/sec caused by the daily tidal fluctuation with a 1 minute sampling rate. Our primary goal is to model control and data telemetry of this current meter after NOAA’s tsunami-ready tide gages, in collaboration with NOAA personnel at PMEL and CO-OPS. We also intend to make available real-time current measurements online for the local maritime community. In this poster, we present preliminary results from the current meter and discuss deployment and telecommunication considerations. While some interference is present in the closest range bins, the system measures currents in the nearby navigational channel that compare favorably to NOAA tidal predictions at a nearby location. Once the deployment and telemetry issues have been resolved at the Humboldt Bay site, we will be deploying two additional instruments in Crescent City.

Crawford, G. B.; Dengler, L. A.; Montoya, J.

2009-12-01

238

STATE OF CALIFORNIA FAULT DETECTION AND DIAGNOSTICS (FDD) FOR PACKAGED DIRECT EXPANSION UNITS  

E-print Network

STATE OF CALIFORNIA FAULT DETECTION AND DIAGNOSTICS (FDD) FOR PACKAGED DIRECT EXPANSION UNITS CEC-MECH-12A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-12A NA7.5.11 Fault Signed: Position With Company (Title): #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA FAULT DETECTION AND DIAGNOSTICS (FDD

239

The Implementation of the California Community Colleges Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program, 2000-2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the sixth report on the status and progress of the Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP), submitted by the California Community Colleges. In California, familiarity with and use of computers is fundamental to economic success. California is home to many of the major companies involved in creating the future of the…

California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

240

Code of Regulations State of California  

E-print Network

. Natural Resources Division 2. Department of Conservation Chapter 2. Implementation of The California State of California Title 14. Natural Resources Division 2. Department of Conservation #12;#12;i TABLE, Regulation, and Conservation of Oil and Gas Resources (includes Subchapter 4. Statewide Geothermal

241

75 FR 24966 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Partners, L.P. Group V. ConocoPhillips Company, ConocoPhillips Alaska, Inc., ConocoPhillips Petroleum Company, Phillips Pt. Arguello Production Company, Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Company L.P., Burlington Resources Offshore Inc., The...

2010-05-06

242

California Wildflowers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Academy of Sciences's (CAS) Botany Department hosts this interesting and beautiful site on California's wildflowers. Spectacular color photographs of over 125 species of wildflowers serve as illustrations to this electronic field guide. Users may browse species by flower color (white through brown), common name (Alpine Lily to Yerba Mansa), latin name (Achillea millefolium to Zigadenus fremontii), or family name (Alismataceae through Violaceae). Additionally, floristic regions are provided in a color-coded map of California. For each species, the taxonomic identity (common, Latin, and family names), a description, photographs, and distribution information are provided. Educators and students of botany will find this site particularly useful; others will want to go see California in bloom.

243

Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

2007-12-18

244

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XXX September 20, 1936 · Number 9 GENERAL CATALOGUE #1936,037* UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES For sale by the STUDENTS of California 193637 The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor- mation

Grether, Gregory

245

Carbon Offsets in California: What Role for Earth Scientists in the Policy Process? (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This talk addresses the policy structure in California for developing and approving carbon offset protocols, which rely on findings from the environmental and earth sciences communities. In addition to providing an overview of the legal requirements of carbon offsets, we describe a series of case studies of how scientists can engage with policymakers. Based on those experiences, we suggest ways for the earth sciences community to become more involved in climate policy development. California's climate law, known as AB 32, requires that major sectors of the state's economy reduce their emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. As part of AB 32, the California Air Resources Board created a cap-and-trade market to ensure compliance with the statutory target. Under this system, regulated companies have to acquire tradable emissions permits (called 'compliance instruments') for the greenhouse gas emissions they release. The State allocates a certain number of allowances to regulated entities through a mixture of auctions and free transfers, with the total number equal to the overall emissions target; these allowances, along with approved offsets credits, are the compliance instruments that regulated entities are required to obtain by law. One of the key policy design issues in California's cap-and-trade market concerns the use of carbon offsets. Under AB 32, the Air Resources Board can issue offset credits to project developers who reduce emissions outside of the capped sectors (electricity, industry, and transportation)--or even outside of California--pursuant to approved offset protocols. Project developers then sell the credits to regulated companies in California. Essentially, offsets allow regulated entities in California to earn credit for emissions reductions that take place outside the scope of AB 32. Many regulated entities and economists are in favor of offsets because they view them as a source of low-cost compliance instruments. On the other hand, critics argue that some offset protocols award credits for activities that would have occurred anyway; by replacing a company's need to acquire an allowance in the carbon market, critics believe that poorly designed offset protocols increase greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, the effectiveness of the policy approach depends on the scientific integrity of the offset protocols. To date, California has approved offset protocols for emissions reductions in four applications: (1) forestry, (2) urban forestry, (3) livestock, and (4) destruction of ozone-depleting substances. In addition, the State is currently considering protocols that would address (5) methane emissions from mining and (6) greenhouse gas reductions from improved rice cultivation practices. These protocols rely heavily on findings from the environmental and earth sciences communities, especially when the protocol subject involves land use or land use change. Yet, due to budget constraints, the Air Resources Board is relying primarily on third-party protocol developers to design and propose the detailed structures under which offset credits will be issued. Despite the fact that any member of the public may participate in the governance regime that leads to protocol approvals, few scientists or scientific organizations provide input into the policy process. We use case studies from several of the California protocols to illustrate ways scientists can apply their skills to a crucial stage of climate policy development.

Cullenward, D.; Strong, A. L.

2013-12-01

246

18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

2013-04-01

247

18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

2012-04-01

248

18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

2014-04-01

249

18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

2011-04-01

250

18 CFR 367.3991 - Account 399.1, Asset retirement costs for service company property.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01...retirement costs for service company property. 367.3991 Section 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Chart of Accounts §...

2010-04-01

251

18 CFR 284.268 - Local distribution company emergency transportation rates.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...company emergency transportation rates. 284.268 Section 284.268...Gas Sale, Transportation, and Exchange Transactions § 284.268 Local...company emergency transportation rates. (a) Rate on file. A local...

2010-04-01

252

California Geothermal Energy Collaborative  

E-print Network

California Geothermal Energy Collaborative Geothermal Education and Outreach Guide of California Davis, and the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We specifically would like to thank support of the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We also thank Charlene Wardlow of Ormat for her

253

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-print Network

the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program Under Solicitation PON-12 inhaled, and a chief component of exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. #12-605 ­ Natural Gas Fueling Infrastructure #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Sarah Williams Primary

254

PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF PILOT PERFORMANCE-BASED  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF PILOT PERFORMANCE-BASED INCENTIVE PROGRAM. Preliminary Evaluation of Pilot Performance-Based Incentive Program. California Energy Commission. CEC-300 Company Southern California Edison Company Southern California Gas Company San Diego Regional Energy

255

STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY quality, injected into the natural gas pipeline system, and used to generate electricity at an offsite location. Senate Bill X1-2,2 signed into law in April 2011, establishes a preference for electricity

256

STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

the performance, fuel efficiency, and competitiveness of natural gas engines, based on existing gasoline of California Benefits of Dynamic Skip Fire (DSF) for Improved Natual Gas Engine Performance $600,000 $600) Combustion Technology for Natural Gas Engines to Achieve a Diesel-Like Performance and Fuel Economy While

257

Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?  

ScienceCinema

Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

Fischer, Marc

2013-05-29

258

A classification of carbon footprint methods used by companies  

E-print Network

The percent increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration in the atmosphere can be harmful to the environment. There is no single preferred method for measuring GHG output. How can a company classify and choose an appropriate ...

Andrews, Suzanne L. D. (Suzanne Lois Denise)

2009-01-01

259

Tobacco companies and products  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Tobacco companies have been restricted in what they can do to advertise their products. Some have been accused of soliciting children to begin smoking. Most tobacco companies are required to place some type of warning label on their packages warning smokers of the diseases that tobacco use can cause.

Adrian Pingstone (None; )

2008-03-19

260

Petroleum systems of the San Joaquin Basin Province -- geochemical characteristics of gas types: Chapter 10 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The San Joaquin Basin Province is a petroliferous basin filled with predominantly Late Cretaceous to Pliocene-aged sediments, with organic-rich marine rocks of Late Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene age providing the source of most of the oil and gas. Previous geochemical studies have focused on the origin of the oil in the province, but the origin of the natural gas has received little attention. To identify and characterize natural gas types in the San Joaquin Basin, 66 gas samples were analyzed and combined with analyses of 15 gas samples from previous studies. For the purpose of this resource assessment, each gas type was assigned to the most likely petroleum system. Three general gas types are identified on the basis of bulk and stable carbon isotopic composition—thermogenic dry (TD), thermogenic wet (TW) and biogenic (B). The thermogenic gas types are further subdivided on the basis of the ?13C values of methane and ethane and nitrogen content into TD-1, TD-2, TD-Mixed, TW-1, TW-2, and TW-Mixed. Gas types TD-1 and TD-Mixed, a mixture of biogenic and TD-1 gases, are produced from gas fields in the northern San Joaquin Basin. Type TD-1 gas most likely originated from the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation, a gas-prone source rock. The biogenic component of the TD-Mixed gas existed in the trap prior to the influx of thermogenic gas. For the assessment, these gas types were assigned to the Winters- Domengine Total Petroleum System, but subsequent to the assessment were reclassified as part of the Moreno-Nortonville gas system. Dry thermogenic gas produced from oil fields in the southern San Joaquin Basin (TD-2 gas) most likely originated from the oil-prone source rock of Miocene age. These samples have low wetness values due to migration fractionation or biodegradation. The thermogenic wet gas types (TW-1, TW-2, TW-Mixed) are predominantly associated gas produced from oil fields in the southern and central San Joaquin Basin. Type TW-1 gas most likely originates from source rocks within the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation or the Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935). Type TW-2 gas most likely originates from the Miocene Monterey Formation and equivalents. TW-Mixed gas is likely a mixture of biogenic and wet thermogenic gas (TW-1 or TW-2) derived from source rocks mentioned above. The thermogenic wet gas types are included in the corresponding Eocene or Miocene total petroleum systems. Type B gas is a dry, nonassociated gas produced from the Pliocene San Joaquin Formation in the central and southern San Joaquin Basin. This gas type most likely originated from Pliocene marine source rocks as a product of methanogenesis, and defines the Neogene Nonassociated Gas Total Petroleum System.

Lillis, Paul G.; Warden, Augusta; Claypool, George E.; Magoon, Leslie B.

2008-01-01

261

Comparing the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts  

E-print Network

Comparing the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts: A Summary Public Utilities Commission DWR California Department of Water Resources EEI Edison Electric Institute EOB California Electricity Oversight Board FERC Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ISO California

Kammen, Daniel M.

262

California Dreaming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After getting her master's degree from UCLA, Nancy Wills dreamed of starting a school-based guitar program so she could teach students to make music on the instrument she'd loved since she was a kid growing up outside of Yosemite, California. She had a strong belief that guitar was perfect for schools, ideal for individualized playing but also…

Olson, Cathy Applefeld

2011-01-01

263

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA . BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA THIRD SERIES , VOLUME XXVIII, NUMBER 9, NOVEMBER 1, 1934 GENERAL CATALOGUE 1934'35 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES FOR SALE of the University of Oalifornia 19sd·,86 The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor

Grether, Gregory

264

..NIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

..NIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XXXII September 20 STORE LOSANGELES Price,Twenty-fivecents #12;AdministrativeBulletins of the University of California 1938-S9 The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor- mation concerning

Grether, Gregory

265

VERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

VERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XXXI . - September 20, 1937 - Number 9 GENERAL CATALOGUE · 1937-36 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES For sale by the STUDENTS' COOPERATIVEBOOS STORE LOS ANGELES Price, Twenty-five cents #12;RSITY OF CAL-IFORNIA BULLETIN

Grether, Gregory

266

California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission  

E-print Network

Studios.com EBay Headquarters Location: San Jose, CA System Size: 650 kW Installer: SolarCity, installed May 2008California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report January 2009 #12;2 California Solar Initiative CPUC Staff Progress Report - January 2009 The California Public

267

Tobacco Companies, State Attorneys Reach Settlement  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week's In the News examines the November 16, 1998 $206 billion settlement reached between tobacco industry leaders and eight US states. The twelve resources discussed provide press releases, opinion, and background information on the economics of tobacco production and consumption in the US. Following increasing pressure from anti-tobacco activists at the state level, Philip Morris Incorporated, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation, and the Lorillard Tobacco Company settled pending lawsuits with New York, California, and Wisconsin, among other states. The agreement requires the companies to pay the potential medical costs of sick smokers based on a formula that factors state-by-state population, tobacco use, and previous Medicaid cost. The agreement also provides for a $1.5 billion anti-smoking campaign fund and bans billboard and transit ads in addition to "branded" merchandising -- the sale and distribution of items bearing tobacco brands' names or logos. Although these provisions give anti-smoking organizations much needed funding for educational resources, critics fear that the settlement protects the tobacco industry more than it hinders it. According to Gary Black, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., the settlement "removes the remaining threat of bankruptcy from the stocks and reduces the litigation discount that has plagued tobacco companies since 1994." With little risk of future lawsuits according to Black, "we're back to business as usual."

Waters, Megan.

1998-01-01

268

Historic overview of powerhouse, company houses, and company hotel, after ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Historic overview of powerhouse, company houses, and company hotel, after snowfall; looking west. (photographer unknown, ca. 1910.) - Nooksack Falls Hydroelectric Plant, Route 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

269

Middle Tertiary stratigraphic sequences of the San Joaquin Basin, California: Chapter 6 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An integrated database of outcrop studies, borehole logs, and seismic-reflection profiles is used to divide Eocene through Miocene strata of the central and southern San Joaquin Basin, California, into a framework of nine stratigraphic sequences. These third- and higher-order sequences (<3 m.y. duration) comprise the principal intervals for petroleum assessment for the basin, including key reservoir and source rock intervals. Important characteristics of each sequence are discussed, including distribution and stratigraphic relationships, sedimentary facies, regional correlation, and age relations. This higher-order stratigraphic packaging represents relatively short-term fluctuations in various forcing factors including climatic effects, changes in sediment supply, local and regional tectonism, and fluctuations in global eustatic sea level. These stratigraphic packages occur within the context of second-order stratigraphic megasequences, which mainly reflect long-term tectonic basin evolution. Despite more than a century of petroleum exploration in the San Joaquin Basin, many uncertainties remain regarding the age, correlation, and origin of the third- and higher-order sequences. Nevertheless, a sequence stratigraphic approach allows definition of key intervals based on genetic affinity rather than purely lithostratigraphic relationships, and thus is useful for reconstructing the multiphase history of this basin, as well as understanding its petroleum systems.

Johnson, Cari L.; Graham, Stephan A.

2007-01-01

270

78 FR 17763 - Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc., Maybrook Railroad Company, and Housatonic Transportation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc., Maybrook Railroad Company, and Housatonic Transportation Company--Intra-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc. (HRRC), Maybrook Railroad Company (MRC),...

2013-03-22

271

Petroleum systems used to determine the assessment units in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 8 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The figures and tables for each petroleum system and TPS are as follows: (1) the San Joaquin(?) petroleum system or the Neogene Nonassociated Gas TPS is a natural gas system in the southeast part of the province (figs. 8.3 through 8.8; table 8.5; this volume, chapter 22); (2) the Miocene TPS (this volume, chapters 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17) includes the McLure-Tulare(!) petroleum system north of the Bakersfield Arch (figs. 8.9 through 8.13; table 8.6), and the Antelope-Stevens(!) petroleum system south of the arch (figs. 8.14 through 8.18; table 8.7), and is summarized in figure 8.19; (3) the Eocene TPS (this volume, chapters 18 and 19) combines two petroleum systems, the Tumey-Temblor(.) covering much of the province (figs. 8.20 through 8.24; table 8.8) and the underlying Kreyenhagen-Temblor(!) (figs. 8.25 through 8.29: table 8.9), and is summarized in figure 8.30; (4) the Eocene-Miocene Composite TPS, formed by combining the Miocene and Eocene TPS (this volume, chapter 20); and (5) the Moreno-Nortonville(.) is both a petroleum system and a TPS consisting mainly of natural gas in the northern part of the province (figs. 8.31 through 8.36: table 8.10; this volume, chapter 21). Oil samples with geochemistry from surface seeps and wells used to map these petroleum systems are listed in table 8.11. Finally, the volume of oil and gas expelled by each pod of active source rock was calculated and compared with the discovered hydrocarbons in each petroleum system (figs. 8.37 through 8.39; tables 8.12 and 8.13).

Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Peters, Kenneth E.

2009-01-01

272

77 FR 14010 - Rocky Ridge Wind Project, LLC, Blackwell Wind, LLC, CPV Cimarron Renewable Energy Company, LLC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Blackwell Wind, LLC, CPV Cimarron Renewable Energy Company, LLC, Minco Wind Interconnection Services, LLC, Shiloh III Lessee, LLC, California Ridge Wind Energy LLC, Perrin Ranch Wind, LLC, Erie Wind, LLC: Notice of...

2012-03-08

273

STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

Cogeneration Company (MSCC) filed a petition with the California Energy Commission requesting to modify recommend an ammonia slip limit of 5 ppm and MSCC included with the petition a manufacturer's performance on environmental quality, public health and safety. The review process includes an evaluation of the consistency

274

California Institute for Energy Efficiency: 1993 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, a statewide partnership of California`s six largest electric and gas utilities, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Energy Commission, the University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) led to the creation of the California Institute for energy Efficiency. CIEE was specifically established to respond to California`s energy and environmental needs by developing new, energy-efficient technologies for buildings, industry, and transportation using the scientific and technological capabilities of the state`s universities, colleges, and university-affiliated laboratories. This 1993 Annual Report highlights the accomplishments of CIEE`s research and development program, which includes 11 major multiyear projects in the fields of Building Energy Efficiency and Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency as well as 21 ongoing exploratory projects. This report contains research highlights from seven of these programs.

NONE

1993-12-31

275

California's Energy Future  

E-print Network

#12;California's Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California December 2011 Christopher to a contract between the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Council on Science andTechnology (CCST). It does not represent the views of the CEC, its employees, or the State of California. The CEC

California at Davis, University of

276

California's Energy Future  

E-print Network

#12;California's Energy Future ­ The Potential for Biofuels May 2013 Heather Youngs and Christopher the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Council on Science andTechnology (CCST). It does not represent the views of the CEC, its employees, or the State of California. The CEC, the State of California

California at Davis, University of

277

HARVARD ESPRESSO COMPANY  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

HARVARD ESPRESSO COMPANY brings you a fine selection of gourmet coffees from around the world roasted to perfection by the Torrefazione Coloiera of Vancouver, BC. While you are drinking your brew, check out the artists of the month.

278

The Virtual Oil Company  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of continuing declines in upstream activity levels over the next fifteen years, the Virtual Oil Company model articulates a vision of fewer, leaner, but financially stronger firms that concentrate only on their core competencies, and through well-structured partnering arrangements, outsource the rest. Freed from the {open_quotes}clutter{close_quotes}, these leading companies will be in better position to focus on those opportunities that offer the potential for renewed reserve and revenue growth.

Garibaldi, C.A.; Haney, R.M.; Ross, C.E.

1995-12-31

279

The virtual oil company  

SciTech Connect

In anticipation of continuing declines in upstream activity levels over the next 15 years, the virtual oil company model articulates a vision of fewer, leaner, but financially stronger firms that concentrate only on their core competencies and outsource the rest through well-structured partnering arrangements. Freed from the ``clutter,`` these leading companies will be in better position to focus on those opportunities that offer the potential for renewed reserve and revenue growth.

Garibaldi, C.A.; Haney, R.M.; Ross, C.E. [Arthur D Little, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01

280

Petroleum systems of the San Joaquin Basin Province, California -- geochemical characteristics of oil types: Chapter 9 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

New analyses of 120 oil samples combined with 139 previously published oil analyses were used to characterize and map the distribution of oil types in the San Joaquin Basin, California. The results show that there are at least four oil types designated MM, ET, EK, and CM. Most of the oil from the basin has low to moderate sulfur content (less than 1 weight percent sulfur), although a few unaltered MM oils have as much as 1.2 weight percent sulfur. Reevaluation of source rock data from the literature indicate that the EK oil type is derived from the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, and the MM oil type is derived, in part, from the Miocene to Pliocene Monterey Formation and its equivalent units. The ET oil type is tentatively correlated to the Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935). Previous studies suggest that the CM oil type is derived from the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation. Maps of the distribution of the oil types show that the MM oil type is restricted to the southern third of the San Joaquin Basin Province. The composition of MM oils along the southern and eastern margins of the basin reflects the increased contribution of terrigenous organic matter to the marine basin near the Miocene paleoshoreline. EK oils are widely distributed along the western half of the basin, and ET oils are present in the central and west-central areas of the basin. The CM oil type has only been found in the Coalinga area in southwestern Fresno County. The oil type maps provide the basis for petroleum system maps that incorporate source rock distribution and burial history, migration pathways, and geologic relationships between hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks. These petroleum system maps were used for the 2003 U.S. Geological Survey resource assessment of the San Joaquin Basin Province.

Lillis, Paul G.; Magoon, Leslie B.

2007-01-01

281

California Shipwrecks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This new site from the California State Lands Commission offers a nice collection of resources for actual or armchair underwater archaeologists. The core of the site is a database of over 1500 California shipwrecks, searchable by keyword in twelve fields. Search returns include ship's name, type, years built and sunk, cause, owner, captain, length, beam, tonnage, engine, and county. The other major feature at the site is an exhibition on the wreck and recovery of the Brother Jonathan. The exhibit includes the story of the ship and its specifications, a passenger list, a photo exhibit of artifacts and video of the wreck, and some comments on the significance of the archaeological remains. Other sections of the site include brief articles on the sinking of eight ships, video and audio clips, and links to related sites.

282

California Energy Commission: Ocean Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This California Energy Commission website discusses how electrical power can be generated from tidal power, wave power, ocean thermal energy conversion, ocean currents, ocean winds, salinity gradients, and other ocean phenomena. Users can learn how different areas of the ocean vary in their potential energy production. The site presents the history of ocean energy production and the issues associated with permitting an ocean wave-energy conversion facility. Users can find links to ocean energy education and to companies and research groups involved with ocean energy development.

283

Various roles among producers of natural gas. Occasional pub  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature was reviewed to clarify the role of different types of companies in finding and producing gas. The paper addresses the types of gas producers and their distributions; the roles of different types of companies in finding new oil and new gas; the influence of downstream investment in oil refining, distribution and marketing on producing company activities; the relative significance

1985-01-01

284

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01

285

Reducing a Companies Carbon Footprint through Energy Saving Best Practices at a Dairy Manufacturing Facility  

E-print Network

the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard (GHG Protocol) to insure that we have a uniform way to identify, track, and compare company’s carbon footprints. The GHG Protocol only considers the GHG emission in which the company has control over...

Kortan, Michael J.

2010-12-17

286

78 FR 14531 - ANR Storage Company; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...2013, ANR Storage Company (ANR Storage), 717 Texas Street, Suite 2400...Natural Gas Act (NGA). ANR Storage seeks authorization to increase...and working gas inventory at its Cold Springs 31 storage field in Kalkaska County,...

2013-03-06

287

California: San Francisco Bay  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Northern California and San Francisco Bay     ... 17, 2000 (MISR) and August 25, 1997 (AirMISR) - Northern California and the San Francisco Bay. project:  MISR ... date:  Aug 17, 2000 Images:  California San Francisco Bay location:  United States ...

2014-05-15

288

CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INVESTMENT PLAN FOR THE ALTERNATIVE AND RENEWABLE FUEL was prepared by the California Energy Commission's Transportation Committee as part of the Alternative-2009-008-CTD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

289

Southern Company`s standby generator program  

SciTech Connect

Alabama Power Company (APCO) continues to look for ways to improve customer satisfaction and enact demand-side management programs. The decision was made to evaluate the availability of customer-owned generators in order to meet these objectives. The idea was to utilize customer-owed standby generators (SG) as we would a peaking plant and to pay the customer credits based on the cost of the construction of peaking capacity plants. It was felt that if APCO could utilize this capacity to offset the construction of peaking capacity, then these costs would be passed on to our customers.

Swartz, S.

1995-12-01

290

A four-dimensional petroleum systems model for the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 12 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A calibrated numerical model depicts the geometry and three-dimensional (3-D) evolution of petroleum systems through time (4-D) in a 249 x 309 km (155 x 192 mi) area covering all of the San Joaquin Basin Province of California. Model input includes 3-D structural and stratigraphic data for key horizons and maps of unit thickness, lithology, paleobathymetry, heat flow, original total organic carbon, and original Rock-Eval pyrolysis hydrogen index for each source rock. The four principal petroleum source rocks in the basin are the Miocene Antelope shale of Graham and Williams (1985; hereafter referred to as Antelope shale), the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, the Eocene Tumey formation of Atwill (1935; hereafter referred to as Tumey formation), and the Cretaceous to Paleocene Moreno Formation. Due to limited Rock-Eval/total organic carbon data, the Tumey formation was modeled using constant values of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index. Maps of original total organic carbon and original hydrogen index were created for the other three source rocks. The Antelope shale was modeled using Type IIS kerogen kinetics, whereas Type II kinetics were used for the other source rocks. Four-dimensional modeling and geologic field evidence indicate that maximum burial of the three principal Cenozoic source rocks occurred in latest Pliocene to Holocene time. For example, a 1-D extraction of burial history from the 4-D model in the Tejon depocenter shows that the bottom of the Antelope shale source rock began expulsion (10 percent transformation ratio) about 4.6 Ma and reached peak expulsion (50 percent transformation ratio) about 3.6 Ma. Except on the west flank of the basin, where steep dips in outcrop and seismic data indicate substantial uplift, little or no section has been eroded. Most petroleum migration occurred during late Cenozoic time in distinct stratigraphic intervals along east-west pathways from pods of active petroleum source rock in the Tejon and Buttonwillow depocenters to updip sandstone reservoirs. Satisfactory runs of the model required about 18 hours of computation time for each simulation using parallel processing on a Linux-based cluster.

Peters, Kenneth E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lampe, Carolyn; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Lillis, Paul G.; Gautier, Donald L.

2008-01-01

291

The superefficient company.  

PubMed

Most companies do a great job promoting efficiency within their own walls, streamlining internal processes wherever possible. But they have less success coordinating cross-company business interactions. When data pass between companies, inconsistencies, errors, and misunderstandings routinely arise, leading to wasted work--for instance, the same sales, order entry, and customer data may be entered repeatedly into different systems. Typically, scores of employees at each company manage these cumbersome interactions. The costs of such inefficiencies are very real and very large. In this article, Michael Hammer outlines the activities and goals used in streamlining cross-company processes. He breaks down the approach into four stages: scoping--identifying the business process for redesign and selecting a partner; organizing--establishing a joint committee to oversee the redesign and convening a design team to implement it; redesigning--taking apart and reassembling the process, with performance goals in mind; and implementing--rolling out the new process and communicating it across the collaborating companies. The author describes how several companies have streamlined their supply-chain and product development processes. Plastics compounder Geon integrated its forecasting and fulfillment processes with those of its main supplier after watching inventories, working capital, and shipping times creep up. General Mills coordinated the delivery of its yogurt with Land O'Lakes; butter and yogurt travel cost effectively in the same trucks to the same stores. Hammer says this new kind of collaboration promises to change the traditional vocabulary of corporate relationships. What if you and I sell different products to the same customer? We're not competitors, but what are we? In the past, we didn't care. Now, we should, the author says. PMID:11550633

Hammer, M

2001-09-01

292

Arnold Schwarzenegger THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: California Air Resources Board Planning and Technical Support Division California Air Resources Board California Environmental Protection

293

Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE  

E-print Network

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

294

ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA CAPSULE  

EPA Science Inventory

As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evalua...

295

ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA ITER  

EPA Science Inventory

As part of the Superfund Innovative Tecbnology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evalua...

296

ACTIVE AND SEMI-PASSIVE LIME TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA BULLETIN  

EPA Science Inventory

As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), in cooperation with EPA Region IX, the state of California, and the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) evaluat...

297

California's electricity crisis  

E-print Network

The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2001-01-01

298

Photocopy of drawing located at National Archives, San Bruno, California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing located at National Archives, San Bruno, California (Navy # 110-A-1 1 of 5. Scofiled Construction Company Mafre Island Office, Mare Island Cal. Details of skylight for pump house stone and concrete dry-dock for US Navy Yard Mare Island Cal, contract no. 257; September 2, 1908. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Pump House, California Avenue, east side between Dry Dock 1 & Dry Dock 2, near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

299

18 CFR 367.4116 - Account 411.6, Gains from disposition of service company plant.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT UNIFORM SYSTEM OF...TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT Income Statement...

2010-04-01

300

California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission  

E-print Network

Cover Photo Credits: Photographer: Andrew McKinney Name of Installer: Marin Solar System owner: Zerull Location: San Rafael, CA System size: 14 kW Funded by the California Solar Initiative California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report

301

18 CFR 260.300 - FERC Form No. 3-Q, Quarterly financial report of electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. 260.300 Section 260...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROVED FORMS, NATURAL GAS ACT STATEMENTS AND REPORTS (SCHEDULES...electric utilities, licensees, and natural gas companies. (a) Prescription....

2010-04-01

302

Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System—Northern Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit of the San Joaquin Basin Province: Chapter 21 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Northern Nonassociated Gas Assessment Unit (AU) of the Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System of the San Joaquin Basin Province consists of all nonassociated gas accumulations in Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene sandstones located north of township 15 South in the San Joaquin Valley. The northern San Joaquin Valley forms a northwest-southeast trending asymmetrical trough. It is filled with an alternating sequence of Cretaceous-aged sands and shales deposited on Franciscan Complex, ophiolitic, and Sierran basement. Eocene-aged strata unconformably overlie the thick Cretaceous section, and in turn are overlain unconformably by nonmarine Pliocene-Miocene sediments. Nonassociated gas accumulations have been discovered in the sands of the Panoche, Moreno, Kreyenhagen, andDomengine Formations and in the nonmarine Zilch formation of Loken (1959) (hereafter referred to as Zilch formation). Most hydrocarbon accumulations occur in low-relief, northwest-southeast trending anticlines formed chiefly by differential compaction of sediment and by northeast southwest directed compression during the Paleogene (Bartow, 1991) and in stratigraphic traps formed by pinch out of submarine fan sands against slope shales. To date, 176 billion cubic feet (BCF) of nonassociated recoverable gas has been found in fields within the assessment unit (table 21.1). A small amount of biogenic gas forms near the surface of the AU. Map boundaries of the assessment unit are shown in figures 21.1 and 21.2; in plan view, this assessment unit is identical to the Northern Area Nonassociated Gas play 1007 considered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in its 1995 National Assessment (Beyer, 1996). The AU is bounded on the east by the mapped limits of Cretaceous sandstone reservoir rocks and on the west by the east flank of the Diablo Range. The southern limit of the AU is the southernmost occurrence of nonassociated thermogenic-gas accumulations. The northern limit of the AU corresponds to the Stanislaus-San Joaquin county line, which also defines the northern boundary of the San Joaquin Basin Province. In the vertical dimension, the AU extends from the uppermost crystalline basement to the topographic surface (fig. 21.3), to allow for the possibility of down-section charge across fault surfaces and up-dip migration. The gas in this AU may be sourced from the Winters- Domengine(?) petroleum system, located in the Sacramento Valley north of the San Joaquin Valley, as defined by Magoon and others (1994a,b) (question mark notation derives from convention of Magoon and Dow, 1994, and indicates speculative genetic relationship between hydrocarbons and source rock). The Winters-Domengine Total Petroleum System defined for this assessment contains about 7.2 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of known, recoverable gas and includes the Rio Vista gas field, which alone accounts for 4 TCF of recoverable gas through 2002 (CDOGGR, 2003). Alternatively, the northern nonassociated gas may be sourced from the Moreno Formation within the San Joaquin Valley itself.

Hosford Scheirer, Allegra; Magoon, Leslie B.

2008-01-01

303

Company Town Shutdown.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Saltville, Virginia, is a former company town whose main employer, a soda ash plant, shut down on July 1, 1971. The closure of the chemical plant displaced 700 workers, and created a crisis that threatened not only the existence of the town, but of the entire region. In response, Virginia Highlands Community College (VHCC), in cooperation with the…

Turnage, Martha A.

304

The Timken Company  

Microsoft Academic Search

The acquisition of Torrington, Inc., from Ingersoll-Rand, Inc., required a strategy that met both the investment and financing objectives of the Timken Company. The case provides an excellent example of the principle that investment and financing decisions can be considered independently. Because of Timken's need to have a sequential financing strategy, the case illustrates the complexities of managing large investment

Kenneth Eades; Ali Erarac

305

Garden Variety Coffee Company  

E-print Network

Garden Variety Coffee Company Hiroba Nippon Got Fries? Icy's Subway Pitas, Wraps, Fruit Smoothies Residences Dairy Shell Mac's Backstreet KFC Super SamPit Coffee Church Church Pizza BoosterPanago Liquor-0001) - Fruit Smoothies, Sandwiches, Salads Safeway Pizza Hut Taco Time - Grocery Store - Pizza, Salads

Wismath, Stephen

306

Sunshine Power Company MEA  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level. In this open-ended problem, students must consider how to rank wind companies based on factors like windiness, noise levels, and power output. In teams, students determine their procedures and write letters back to the client.

Kerri Caudill

2012-08-03

307

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ANNOUNCEMENT  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA ANNOUNCEMENT b OF THE University of Californiaat Los Angeles FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR, 1927-28 SEPTEMBER, 1927 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA For Sale of this Announcement, see No. 3 below. For the Catalogue of Officers and Students, Section II, University of California

Grether, Gregory

308

NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

309

California's Water Energy Relationship  

E-print Network

1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

310

Historic overview of newly completed powerhouse, company houses, and company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Historic overview of newly completed powerhouse, company houses, and company hotel, after snowfall; looking west. (photographer unknown, ca. 1906 - Nooksack Falls Hydroelectric Plant, Route 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

311

Effectiveness of microseismic monitoring for optimizing hydraulic fracturing in California  

E-print Network

Hydraulic fracturing has fundamentally changed the oil and gas industry in the past 10 years. Bakersfield, California provides a unique case study because steam injection, a type of hydraulic fracturing, has been used there ...

Alampi, Ann M

2014-01-01

312

TABLE OF CONTENTS CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS  

E-print Network

.............................................................................................31 Section 115 -- Natural Gas Central Furnaces, Cooking Equipment, and Pool and Spa Heaters: Pilot#12;#12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Section 10 Section 10-102 -- Definitions

313

Natural gas transmission pricing and investment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US natural gas industry has been restructuring for the past twenty years, since phased wellhead gas price decontrol eras prescribed in the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. Today, natural gas production is completely deregulated, interstate pipelines are regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and local gas distribution companies are regulated by state and local utility commissions.

M. L. Barcella

1999-01-01

314

Growth of chromidia-forming vahlkampfiid amoebae from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California del Norte, Mexico and Eel Pond, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, U.S.A. under limited oxygen gas conditions.  

E-print Network

??Paratetramitus jugosus, a vahlkampfiid amoebomastigote, was isolated into monoprotist/monobacterial (Bacillus sp.), cultures from laminated microbial mats (Laguna Figueroa, Baja California Norte, Mexico) and muds (Eel… (more)

Santiago, Melishia I.

2011-01-01

315

Measurements of organic molecular markers in California using comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatograph High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOF-MS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding the sources and transformation processes of organic aerosol requires detailed speciation of organic compounds. Molecular markers specific to individual sources help determine the contribution of each source to organic aerosol emissions. In previous work using one-dimensional gas-chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC/MS), less than 10-20% of the organic fraction has been identified, with a large contribution of unresolved complex mixture (UCM). Two-dimensional gas-chromatograph is a novel technique which provides excellent resolution to separate compounds buried in this complex mixture. In addition to a volatility-based chromatographic separation, compounds are further separated on a second column based on their polarities. Here we report measurements of more than 200 resolved compounds observed on filters collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Pasadena, and during a large biomass burning event in the Los Angeles area (Station Fire). High volume filter samples are thermally desorbed in a Gerstel Thermal Desorption System (TDS2) and preconcentrated on a cooled inlet (CIS). The compounds are then analyzed by comprehensive 2-dimensional GC using a Zoex modulator, followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (Tofwerks). Compound identification is carried out by comparison of retention times with known standards, mass spectral library match, and identification of molecular fragments by exact mass. A wide range of compounds are observed: n-alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as acids, esters and ketones. While levoglucosan was observed in organic aerosol produced during the Station Fire, many other compounds revealed by two-dimensional GC (such as resin acids, lignin pyrolysis products) show elevated signals, suggesting that other molecular markers can provide additional information about aerosol formation processes during biomass burning events.

Chan, A. W.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Schilling, K. A.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Hersey, S. P.; Rubitschun, C. L.; Lin, Y. H.; Offenberg, J. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

2011-12-01

316

Northern California CO2 Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect

C6 Resources LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Shell Oil Company, worked with the US Department of Energy (DOE) under a Cooperative Agreement to develop the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project. The objective of the Project is to demonstrate the viability of using Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) to reduce existing greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources on a large-scale. The Project will capture more than 700,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, which is currently being vented to the atmosphere from the Shell Martinez Refinery in Contra Costa County. The CO2 will be compressed and dehydrated at the refinery and then transported via pipeline to a sequestration site in a rural area in neighboring Solano County. The CO2 will be sequestered into a deep saline formation (more than two miles underground) and will be monitored to assure secure, long-term containment. The pipeline will be designed to carry as much as 1,400,000 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, so additional capacity will be available to accommodate CO2 captured from other industrial sources. The Project is expected to begin operation in 2015. The Project has two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive design basis for the Project. The Cooperative Agreement with the DOE provided cost sharing for Phase 1 and the opportunity to apply for additional DOE cost sharing for Phase 2, comprising the design, construction and operation of the Project. Phase 1 has been completed. DOE co-funding is provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. As prescribed by ARRA, the Project will stimulate the local economy by creating manufacturing, transportation, construction, operations, and management jobs while addressing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at an accelerated pace. The Project, which will also assist in meeting the CO2 reduction requirements set forth in California?s Climate Change law, presents a major opportunity for both the environment as well as the region. C6 Resources is conducting the Project in collaboration with federally-funded research centers, such as Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Lawrence Livermore National Lab. C6 Resources and Shell have identified CCS as one of the critical pathways toward a worldwide goal of providing cleaner energy. C6 Resources, in conjunction with the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), has conducted an extensive and ongoing public outreach and CCS education program for local, regional and state-wide stakeholders. As part of a long term relationship, C6 Resources will continue to engage directly with community leaders and residents to ensure public input and transparency. This topical report summarizes the technical work from Phase 1 of the Project in the following areas: ? Surface Facility Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the preliminary engineering work performed for CO2 capture, CO2 compression and dehydration at the refinery, and surface facilities at the sequestration site ? Pipeline Preliminary Engineering: summarizes the pipeline routing study and preliminary engineering design ? Geologic Sequestration: summarizes the work to characterize, model and evaluate the sequestration site ? Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA): summarizes the MVA plan to assure long-term containment of the sequestered CO2

Hymes, Edward

2010-06-16

317

22. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 2. United Engineering Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

22. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 2. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. Plans, section, & detail. Alben Froberg, Architect, 3454 Harlan Street, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 2. Plan no. 10,525. Various scales. March 1, 1942, last revised 3/15/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Engineering Building, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

318

23. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 3. United Engineering Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. BUILDING NO. 22L, SHEET NO. 3. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities. Plans, section, & detail. Alben Froberg, Architect, 3454 Harlan Street, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 3. Plan no. 10,525. Various scales. March 1, 1943, last revised 3/15/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Engineering Building, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

319

A Monte Carlo simulation method for the assessment of undiscovered, conventional oil and gas: Chapter 26 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey has developed two Monte Carlo programs for assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources. EMCEE (for Energy Monte Carlo) and Emc2 (for Energy Monte Carlo program 2) are programs that calculate probabilistic estimates of undiscovered resources based on input distributions for numbers and sizes of undiscovered fields. Emc2 uses specific types of distributions for the input, whereas EMCEE allows greater flexibility of the input distribution types.

Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, T.R.

2007-01-01

320

California's Energy Future: The View to 2050  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this two year study funded by the California Energy Commission and S.D. Bechtel, a committee of individuals from major energy research institutions in California develops strategies to meet Executive Order S-3-05. Executive Order S-3-05 requires California to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 80% of 1990 levels by 2050. To accomplish this, CO2 levels will need to drop from 13 tons CO2e per capita (2005) to 1.6 tons CO2e per capita (2050) while the population continues to grow and energy use is expected to double. To offer a solution to this challenge, multiple “energy system portraits” are developed with combinations of nuclear, biomass, electricity, and fossil fuels with carbon capturing systems. It’s concluded by applying key aggressive strategies and investing in multiple technologies, implementations, research, development, and innovation, California can meet executive order S-3-05.

2013-08-14

321

Multilingualism in Companies: An Introduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This thematic collection of four papers explores a number of perspectives on companies in which multiple languages are used. The "organisational" perspective concerns the question of how the presence of or demand for multiple languages in the company is managed--how companies are guided by national and other policies in regard to the use…

Sherman, Tamah; Strubell, Miquel

2013-01-01

322

Company Annual Reports Online (CAROL)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Company Annual Reports Online (CAROL) is a free corporate service offering direct links to the annual reports of a variety of European companies. The reports are arranged in alphabetical order by company name or industry type for direct searches or browsing. In addition, recent articles and statistics on Investor Relations and the Internet are available from CAROL's The Marketplace index.

323

Arnold Schwarzenegger THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY APPENDIX C: CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY VOLUME 3: SUMMARY OF FIELD OPERATIONS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: California Air Resources Board PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT March

324

Arnold Schwarzenegger THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY APPENDIX B: CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY VOLUME 2: FIELD OPERATIONS PLAN Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: California Air Resources Board PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT March 2007 CEC

325

Arnold Schwarzenegger THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor THE CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY APPENDIX A: CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OZONE STUDY VOLUME 1: FIELD STUDY PLAN Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: California Air Resources Board PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT March 2007 CEC-500

326

Determination of pesticides associated with suspended sediments in the San Joaquin River, California, USA, using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An analytical method useful for the quantification of a range of pesticides and pesticide degradation products associated with suspended sediments was developed by testing a variety of extraction and cleanup schemes. The final extraction and cleanup methods chosen for use are suitable for the quantification of the listed pesticides using gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry and the removal of interfering coextractable organic material found in suspended sediments. Methylene chloride extraction followed by Florisil cleanup proved most effective for separation of coextractives from the pesticide analytes. Removal of elemental sulfur was accomplished with tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfite. The suitability of the method for the analysis of a variety of pesticides was evaluated, and the method detection limits (MDLs) were determined (0.1-6.0 ng/g dry weight of sediment) for 21 compounds. Recovery of pesticides dried onto natural sediments averaged 63%. Analysis of duplicate San Joaquin River suspended-sediment samples demonstrated the utility of the method for environmental samples with variability between replicate analyses lower than between environmental samples. Eight of 21 pesticides measured were observed at concentrations ranging from the MDL to more than 80 ng/g dry weight of sediment and exhibited significant temporal variability. Sediment-associated pesticides, therefore, may contribute to the transport of pesticides through aquatic systems and should be studied separately from dissolved pesticides.

Bergamaschi, B.A.; Baston, D.S.; Crepeau, K.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

1999-01-01

327

URBAN GROWTH IN CALIFORNIA Projecting Growth in California (2000  

E-print Network

URBAN GROWTH IN CALIFORNIA Projecting Growth in California (2000­ 2050) Under Six AlternativeSensitive Agriculture A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California, Davis JULY 2012 CEC

328

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption For Eligible California High School Graduates  

E-print Network

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption For Eligible California High School Graduates (The law at the California Community Colleges, the University of California, and the California State University (all public colleges and universities in California). · Requirements: o The student must have attended a high school

Ravikumar, B.

329

California sketches out ambitious climate roadmap  

SciTech Connect

The Global Warming Solutions Act, passed in 2006, requires a reduction of 10% from current levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) production by 2020. The details on how to achieve this reduction are left to the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The actions taken by CARB are summarized, and its recommended GHG reduction measures are tabulated.

NONE

2008-07-15

330

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION  

E-print Network

1 STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION In the Matter of ) ____________________________________) Order No. 10-1201-20 I. AUTHORITY AND PURPOSE Pursuant to Pub. Resources Code, § 25210 and Cal. Code, as well as the natural gas projects before the Commission in 2009 and 2010. The Committee

331

California Energy Commission LEAD COMMISSIONER REPORT  

E-print Network

FOR THE ALTERNATIVE AND RENEWABLE FUEL AND VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM APRIL 2013 CEC6002012008LCF CALIFORNIA. Alternative and renewable transportation fuels include electricity, natural gas, biomethane, propane measurable transition from the nearly exclusive use of petroleum fuels to a diverse portfolio of alternative

332

An integrated 3-D seismic facies analysis of productive Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Formations of the Willows-Beehive Bend Gas Field, Sacramento Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

An integrated seismic facies analysis of the Willows-Beehive Bend gas field, using three-dimensional seismic data has led to improved identification of reservoir facies, depositional environments, and reservoir parameters. These three-dimensional data were interpreted together with cores, time-based wireline logs, synthetic seismograms, and six regional two-dimensional seismic lines. The three productive formations studied include (1) the Eocene Princeton Gorge fill, which represents a submarine canyon fill; (2) the Upper Cretaceous Kione Formation, which is composed of shelf and deltaic facies; and (3) the mud-rich Upper Cretaceous Forbes Formation, which represents deep water slope and submarine-fan facies. The Princeton Gorge fill consists of an upper shale-dominated facies and a lower sand-rich channel-dominated facies. These channel fills are sinuous, 0.4-0.8 km wide, trend north to south, and have the best reservoir quality of the field. Two facies are recognized in the Kione Formation: a sand-rich deltafront facies and a mud-rich prodelta facies. The delta-front facies shows west to east progradation across the survey area and has good reservoir quality. The prodelta deposits are transitional into the prograding shale-dominated slope deposits of the upper Forbes Formation. This slope facies contains shale-rich submarine-canyon and gully fills that trend northwest to southeast are 0.8-1.6 km wide, and locally contain sinuous sandy channel fills. The middle Forbes Formation consists of two turbidite facies: middle submarine-fan channel/levee complexes and lower fan depositional lobes. The channel/level complexes are sinuous, trend north to south, and are approximately 0.8-2.4 km wide, whereas the depositional lobes are 3-4 km in diameter.

Gabay, S.H.; Link, M.H.; Damuth, J.E.; Kalkomey, C.T. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (USA))

1990-05-01

333

Tests to produce and recover carbon dioxide by burning coal in oxygen and recycled flue gas: Black Hills Power and Light Company Customer Service Center Boiler No. 2, Rapid City, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted using a modified stoker-fired boiler (2.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h) instrumented to examine the feasibility of producing and recovering carbon dioxide by burning coal in oxygen and recycled flue gas in a utility environment. The tests demonstrated that the boiler can be operated in the oxygen-blown/flue-gas-recirculation mode without any noticeable effects on coal combustion, heat delivery to the water, or the coal-feed or ash-handling systems. Pretest calculations showed that a feasible set of operating parameters for a carbon-dioxide-producing combustor system tightly sealed against air infiltration and containing no more than about 5% O/sub 2/ (dry basis) at the furnace exit would be a flue-gas recycling ratio between 0.6 and 0.7 and an oxygen feed rate of 1.17 g-moles per g-atom of carbon, yielding an exhaust gas composition (wet basis) of approximately 46.9% CO/sub 2/, 50.6% H/sub 2/O, and 2.5% O/sub 2/. This composition corresponds to a product gas containing 95% CO/sub 2/ and 5% O/sub 2/ (dry basis). However, because air leaked into the test combustor and the flue-gas handling system, the highest carbon dioxide concentration achieved in the exhaust gas was 48.5% (dry basis). Major sources of inleakage were the furnace brickwork, the gas-handling system, and the coal-feed and ash-extraction systems. 40 figs.

Kumar, R.; Fuller, T.; Kocourek, R.; Teats, G.; Young, J.; Myles, K.; Wolsky, A.

1987-12-01

334

Company profile: Spider stories.  

PubMed

SpiderBiotech is a biotech company that has carried out extensive research and development on peptide-based anti-infectives, with five people involved in R&D activities and a strong network of industrial and academic partners experienced in the field of anti-infectives. SpiderBiotech has also created a proprietary library of bioactive peptides and lipopeptides (both linear and dendrimeric) active against bacterial and viral infections. At the moment they have two ongoing projects: the most advanced is focused on the development of a panel of peptide based antibiotics. The second project is related to novel antiviral drugs to treat acyclovir resistant Herpes virus infections. PMID:18504017

Giuliani, Andrea

2008-06-01

335

California: Diamond Valley  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

... article title:  Watching the Creation of Southern California's Largest Reservoir     ... reservoir with water from the Colorado River and Northern California. Water appears darker than the surrounding land. The image at the ...

2014-05-15

336

California: Emigrant Gap  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Emigrant Gap Fire, California     View Larger Image ... smoke plumes from wildfires burning throughout Northern California on August 13, 2001. The overview image represents an area of 336 ...

2014-05-15

337

California's Green Economy  

E-print Network

California's Green Economy California Green Workforce Coalition July 9, 2010 Bonnie Graybill Employment Development Department Labor Market Information Division #12;Understanding the Green Economy What's green economy Demand leads to pressure for additional supply of products and services Survey covers

338

Postdoctoral California Institute  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Scholar's Handbook California Institute of Technology #12;This handbook summarizes;October 2002 iii Table of Contents CHAPTER 1. The California Institute of Technology The History Benefits .......................................................................... 5 Institute facilities

Faraon, Andrei

339

California Workforce: California Faces a Skills Gap  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

California's education system is not keeping up with the changing demands of the state's economy--soon, California will face a shortage of skilled workers. Projections to 2025 suggest that the economy will continue to need more and more highly educated workers, but that the state will not be able to meet that demand. If current trends persist,…

Public Policy Institute of California, 2011

2011-01-01

340

CIRCULAROF INFORMATION UNIVERSITYOF CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

CIRCULAROF INFORMATION UNIVERSITYOF CALIFORNIA AT LOSANGELES . SEPTEMBER, 1932 UNIVERSITYOF CALIFORNIAPRESS BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA. . ForSaleby theStudents'CooperativeBook Store 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles Price Five Cents #12;AdministrativeBulletins of the University of California ..1932- 33. No.4

Grether, Gregory

341

Endangered California Condor  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

An endangered California condor flies over the Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuge, California. USGS scientists are helping managers understand how California condors use their habitat, gaining valuable information that will help inform not only which potential energy development sites are likely ...

342

California Educational Research Association  

E-print Network

, California Department of Education "Transitioning to the Future: Common Core State Standards, New AssessmentsCalifornia Educational Research Association 90th Annual Conference December 1­2, 2011 Disneyland, and ESEA Reauthorization" #12;California Educational Research Association Disneyland® South Ballroom

Rose, Michael R.

343

Aeromagnetic survey map of the central California Coast Ranges  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This aeromagnetic survey was flown as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and is intended to promote further understanding of the geology and structure in the central California Coast Ranges by serving as a basis for geophysical interpretations and by supporting geological mapping, mineral and water resource investigations, and other topical studies. Local spatial variations in the Earth's magnetic field (evident as anomalies on aeromagnetic maps) reflect the distribution of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite, in the underlying rocks. In many cases the volume content of magnetic minerals can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in the amount of magnetic minerals can commonly mark lithologic or structural boundaries. Bodies of serpentinite and other mafic and ultramafic rocks tend to produce the most intense magnetic anomalies, but such generalizations must be applied with caution because rocks with more felsic compositions, such as the porphyritic granodiorite-granite of the La Panza Range, and even some sedimentary units, also can cause measurable magnetic anomalies.

Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Moussaoui, K.

2009-01-01

344

Memorandum: The Legal Implications of University Investments in Companies Doing Business in South Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Legal issues important in considering divestment of securities held in South African-related companies are considered. The University of California's considerations are reviewed as applied to retirement, endowment, and miscellaneous funds with unexpended balances for current or plant purposes and reserves for revenue bond debt retirement. (MSE)

Reidhaar, Donald L.

1980-01-01

345

2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company All rights reserved DOI: 10.1002/say.20078  

E-print Network

© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company · All rights reserved DOI: 10.1002/say.20078 Access for student affairs at California State University, Fullerton, shares advice for becoming a successful change agent for your unit. Page 12 Writing SerieS Mental HealtH Help students cope with stress By Claudine Mc

Napier, Terrence

346

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31

347

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Presidential Permit Applications for Baja California Power, Inc. and Sempra Energy Resources  

SciTech Connect

In separate actions, Sempra Energy Resources (SER) and Baja California Power, Inc. (BCP) have applied to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for Presidential permits pursuant to Executive Order (EO) No. 10485, as amended by EO 12038, and 10 CFR Section 205.320 et seq. (2000), to construct, operate, maintain, and connect electric power transmission facilities crossing the international border between the Us and Mexico. SER and BCP each propose constructing separate new double-circuit, 230,000 volt (230 kV) transmission lines extending about six miles south from the Imperial Valley Substation (IV Substation), owned and operated by San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG and E), to the US/Mexico international border. In each case, the objective is to connect the proposed transmission lines to natural gas fueled electric generating plants being constructed in Mexico for the purpose of importing electrical power into the US onto the southern California electrical grid. The proposed transmission lines would traverse about six miles of federal land administered by the US Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

N /A

2001-12-05

348

California rides the tiger  

SciTech Connect

Revolutions rarely succeed without a struggle. At the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), the move to restructure the state`s electric utility industry is no exception. The stakes are enormous. For starters, annual revenues at the state`s investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) exceed $18 billion, making up 2 percent of California`s gross state product. Competitively priced electricity is vital to California`s $800-billion-a-year economy, one would think. And with its sweeping restructing plan, the CPUC has found itself riding a tiger, hoping it won`t get swallowed whole in the process.

Garner, W.L.

1995-01-01

349

Sonoma State Hospital, Eldridge, California, geothermal-heating system: conceptual design and economic feasibility report  

SciTech Connect

The Sonoma State Mental Hospital, located in Eldridge, California, is presently equipped with a central gas-fired steam system that meets the space heating, domestic hot water, and other heating needs of the hospital. This system is a major consumer of natural gas - estimated at 259,994,000 cubic feet per year under average conditions. At the 1981 unit gas rate of $0.4608 per therm, an average of $1,258,000 per year is required to operate the steam heating system. The hospital is located in an area with considerable geothermal resources as evidenced by a number of nearby hot springs resorts. A private developer is currently investigating the feasibility of utilizing geothermally heated steam to generate electricity for sale to the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The developer has proposed to sell the byproduct condensed steam to the hospital, which would use the heat energy remaining in the condensate for its own heating needs and thereby reduce the fossil fuel energy demand of the existing steam heating system. The geothermal heating system developed is capable of displacing an estimated 70 percent of the existing natural gas consumption of the steam heating system. Construction of the geothermal fluid distribution and collection system and the retrofits required within the buildings are estimated to cost $1,777,000. Annual expenses (operation and maintenance, insurance, and geothermal fluid purchase) have been estimated to be $40,380 per year in 1981 dollars. The proposed geothermal heating system could then be completely paid for in 32 months by the savings in natural gas purchases that would result.

Not Available

1982-02-01

350

UK gas supply problems  

SciTech Connect

The hope that Southern North Sea gas could solve some of British Gas Corp.'s seasonal demand problems likely has been killed by the new supplementary petroleum duty imposed on both oil and gas. Further, the already existing petroleum Revenue Tax (PRT) coupled with rig shortages and financing woes on the gas gathering system probably will mean the Norwegian Statfjord gas will go to Norway. Despite protests from the industry, one of the few remaining in the UK, this latest imposition will apply to all new gas contracts between the oil companies and the monopolistic buyer, the British Gas Corp. The only exemption is for gas supplied under contracts signed before the end of June, 1975. These exempt supplies, which also are free from PRT, are currently priced at only approx. 4 p ($.09) a therm. A new tax, low prices, and a lack of jackup rigs do not auger well for a southern sector revival.

Not Available

1981-05-01

351

Building natural gas locomotives  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a liquefied natural gas-fueled locomotive built by Morrison Knudsen which includes a Caterpillar 1200-horsepower V-16, a monofuel management system with double-wall super-insulated cryogenic tanks, and microprocessor-based controls. Efforts by railroad companies to reduce operating costs and meet future emissions standards have led engineers to look for innovative ways to design trains. In January, Morrison Knudsen Corp. of Boise, Idaho, powered its way into the locomotive manufacturing business when it introduced the natural gas-fueled MK1200G, to be used mostly around railroad company yards and on trips shorter than 50 miles.

O'Conner, L.

1994-04-01

352

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company  

E-print Network

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company 900 SW Fifth Avenue Portland, Oregon 97204-1282 (503) 321-7000 CERTIFICATE: GROUP ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND DISMEMBERMENT INSURANCE Policyholder will be insured as provided by the terms of the Group Policy. If your coverage is changed by an amendment

Oklahoma, University of

353

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company  

E-print Network

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company 900 SW Fifth Avenue Portland, Oregon 97204-1282 (503) 321-7000 CERTIFICATE: GROUP ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND DISMEMBERMENT INSURANCE Policyholder has been issued to the Policyholder. We certify that you will be insured as provided by the terms

Oklahoma, University of

354

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company  

E-print Network

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company 900 SW Fifth Avenue Portland, Oregon 97204-1282 (503) 321-7000 CERTIFICATE GROUP LIFE INSURANCE Policyholder: State of Oklahoma ex rel A Group Policy has been issued to the Policyholder. We certify that you will be insured as provided

Oklahoma, University of

355

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company  

E-print Network

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company 900 SW Fifth Avenue Portland, Oregon 97204-1282 (503) 321-7000 CERTIFICATE GROUP LONG TERM DISABILITY INSURANCE Policyholder: University to the Policyholder. We certify that you will be insured as provided by the terms of your Employer's coverage under

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

356

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company  

E-print Network

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY A Stock Life Insurance Company 900 SW Fifth Avenue Portland, Oregon 97204-1282 (503) 321-7000 CERTIFICATE GROUP SHORT TERM DISABILITY INSURANCE Policyholder: University to the Policyholder. We certify that you will be insured as provided by the terms of your Employer's coverage under

Meyers, Steven D.

357

lVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

lVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BULLETIN LISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Third Series · Volume XXIX , Number 7 · October 1, 1935 GENERAL CATALOGUE ·193536. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES For sale of the University of California lass-se The administrative bulletins of the University of California present infor

Grether, Gregory

358

University of California Energy Institute The California Electricity Market  

E-print Network

University of California Energy Institute The California Electricity Market: What a long strange trip it's been #12;University of California Energy Institute Market Organization in California · ISO of California Energy Institute Transmission Pricing Models · Fixed cost pricing models (cost recovery

California at Berkeley. University of

359

Total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of a company`s activities  

SciTech Connect

Energy reduction targets are widely used in Industry to control costs and to meet commitments to environmental improvement. Do these targets promote sub-optimisation reducing energy usage but having little effect upon the total of greenhouse gas emissions? Are there alternatives strategies which might cost less or have greater environmental benefits? To answer these questions for one company, the Total Equivalent Warming Impacts of ICI`s activities, arising from the energy related emissions of carbon dioxide and emissions of other greenhouse gases, are currently being examined. Examples of how TEWI varies with the scale of activity, from an individual site to a Company internationally, are discussed here. The examples are from the chemical industry but have relevance to any enterprise which uses energy and vents materials into the atmosphere. The UN Framework Convection on Climate Change is intended to minimise global climate change Achieving this aim, however, will be a national responsibility and it is national legislation which will affect companies. The way in which company-wide TEWI are affected by constraining the calculation to national boundaries are examined.

McCulloch, A. [ICI Chemicals & Polymers Ltd., Runcorn (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31

360

18 CFR 367.50 - Service company property to be recorded at cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01...2011-04-01 false Service company property to be recorded at cost. ...Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.50...

2011-04-01

361

18 CFR 367.53 - Service company property purchased or sold.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01...2014-04-01 false Service company property purchased or sold. 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.53...

2014-04-01

362

18 CFR 367.53 - Service company property purchased or sold.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01...2010-04-01 false Service company property purchased or sold. 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.53...

2010-04-01

363

18 CFR 367.53 - Service company property purchased or sold.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01...2012-04-01 false Service company property purchased or sold. 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.53...

2012-04-01

364

18 CFR 367.53 - Service company property purchased or sold.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01...2011-04-01 false Service company property purchased or sold. 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.53...

2011-04-01

365

18 CFR 367.50 - Service company property to be recorded at cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01...2013-04-01 false Service company property to be recorded at cost. ...Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.50...

2013-04-01

366

18 CFR 367.50 - Service company property to be recorded at cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01...2012-04-01 false Service company property to be recorded at cost. ...Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.50...

2012-04-01

367

18 CFR 367.50 - Service company property to be recorded at cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01...2014-04-01 false Service company property to be recorded at cost. ...Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.50...

2014-04-01

368

18 CFR 367.53 - Service company property purchased or sold.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01...2013-04-01 false Service company property purchased or sold. 367... Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.53...

2013-04-01

369

18 CFR 367.50 - Service company property to be recorded at cost.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01...2010-04-01 false Service company property to be recorded at cost. ...Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...NATURAL GAS ACT Service Company Property Instructions § 367.50...

2010-04-01

370

18 CFR 284.224 - Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-04-01 false Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies...RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL...Blanket Certificates Authorizing Certain Transportation by Interstate Pipelines on...

2013-04-01

371

18 CFR 284.224 - Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies...RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL...Blanket Certificates Authorizing Certain Transportation by Interstate Pipelines on...

2012-04-01

372

18 CFR 284.224 - Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies...RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL...Blanket Certificates Authorizing Certain Transportation by Interstate Pipelines on...

2010-04-01

373

18 CFR 284.224 - Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies...RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL...Blanket Certificates Authorizing Certain Transportation by Interstate Pipelines on...

2011-04-01

374

18 CFR 284.224 - Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-04-01 false Certain transportation and sales by local distribution companies...RELATED AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL...Blanket Certificates Authorizing Certain Transportation by Interstate Pipelines on...

2014-04-01

375

Real Estate Development Company Description  

E-print Network

Real Estate Development Company Description: The largest specialty family footwear retailer America, the Caribbean and South America. Short Project Name: Competitive Analysis - Real Estate Positions to assist them in making recommendations for how our company should develop its real estate strategy

Dahl, David B.

376

Survival skills in downsizing company  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unfortunately, many of us will be in companies that are downsizing at some point in our careers. Often such reductions in staff at companies create a work environment that is less than optimal. However, the guidelines discussed by the author are intended to help you in maintaining gainful employment during the process. These guidelines deal with downsizing situations where the

K. W. Tracy

2003-01-01

377

HR/Organizational Company Description  

E-print Network

HR/Organizational Company Description: One of the world's leading companies in the field of health, but foster a culture and environment so the millennial generation can succeed. Key Deliverables 1. Analyze adapt our current culture to fit the needs of the new generation of the workforce, or a way to implement

Dahl, David B.

378

Commercializing solar for industry in California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The State of California has begun a commercialization program for increasing the rate of solar applications in industry. The components of this program include low interest loans, tax credits, revenue bonds and educational efforts. Many California industries appear to be likely candidates for solar systems, but as yet only a few companies have elected to install them. The various barriers to solar use by industry are primarily perceptual and financial. The emphasis of the state program for commercialization is turning increasingly towards educational seminars for industry groups and development of creative financial tools and arrangements. There are a few remaining legislative changes at state and federal levels, primarily involving leasing and tax laws which, if enacted, would overcome all of the remaining financial barriers to widespread adoption of solar applications by industry.

Yudelson, J.

1980-10-01

379

STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION  

E-print Network

encouraged states to develop SEP strategies that align with the following national goals: increasing jobs technologies, promoting economic vitality through an increase in "green jobs," and reducing green house gas Adoption of Changes to State Energy Program Guidelines The California Energy Commission will hold

380

Emissions of organic carbon and methane from petroleum and dairy operations in California?s San Joaquin Valley  

EPA Science Inventory

Petroleum and dairy operations are prominent sources of gas-phase organic compounds in California's San Joaquin Valley. It is essential to understand the emissions and air quality impacts of these relatively understudied sources, especially for oil/gas operations in light of incr...

381

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT State of California The Resources Agency California Department of Water Resources  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT AN UPDATE 2008 State of California · The Resources Agency · California Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT, AN UPDATE April 2008 DEPARTME NT OF WATER R ESOURCES ST for Resources The Resources Agency Lester A. Snow Director Department of Water Resources #12;CALIFORNIA DROUGHT

382

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption Request For Eligible California High School Graduates  

E-print Network

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption Request For Eligible California High School Graduates Note, proof of high school attendance in California). Contact the California Community College, University, am applying for a California Nonresident Tuition Exemption for eligible California high school

383

78 FR 35360 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Terminations-American Economy Insurance Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Terminations-- American Economy Insurance Company (NAIC 19690); American States Insurance Company (NAIC 19704); General Insurance Company of...

2013-06-12

384

California Hatchery Review Report Prepared by the  

E-print Network

#12; California Hatchery Review Report Prepared by the California Hatchery Scientific Review Group June 2012 #12; Document Citation: California Hatchery Scientific Review Group (California HSRG). 2012. California Hatchery Review Report. Prepared

385

U.S. Geological Survey input-data form and operational procedure for the assessment of conventional petroleum accumulations: Chapter 25 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey model for undiscovered conventional accumulations is designed to aid in the assessment of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids (collectively called petroleum) resources. Conventional accumulations may be described in terms of discrete fields or pools localized in structural and stratigraphic traps by the buoyancy of oil or natural gas in water. Conventional accumulations are commonly bounded by a down-dip water contact. The assessment model requires estimates of the number and sizes of undiscovered conventional accumulations. Technically recoverable petroleum resources from undiscovered conventional accumulations are calculated by statistically combining probability distributions of the estimated number and sizes of undiscovered accumulations, along with associated risks and coproduct ratios. Probabilistic estimates of petroleum resources are given for oil in oil accumulations, gas (associated/dissolved) in oil accumulations, natural gas liquids in oil accumulations, gas (nonassociated) in gas accumulations, and total liquids (oil and natural gas liquids) in gas accumulations.

Klett, T.R.; Schmoker, James W.; Charpentier, Ronald R.

2007-01-01

386

Eastern Kodak Company  

SciTech Connect

Lighting consumes more than 20% of electricity generated in the United States. Solid state lighting relies upon either inorganic or organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). OLED devices because of their thinness, fast response, excellent color, and efficiency could become the technology of choice for future lighting applications, provided progress is made to increase power efficiency and device lifetime and to develop cost-effective manufacturing processes. As a first step in this process, Eastman Kodak Company has demonstrated an OLED device architecture having an efficacy over 50 lm/W that exceeds the specifications of DOE Energy Star Program Requirements for Solid State Lighting. The project included work designed to optimize an OLED device, based on a stacked-OLED structure, with performance parameters of: low voltage; improved light extraction efficiency; improved internal quantum efficiency; and acceptable lifetime. The stated goal for the end of the project was delivery of an OLED device architecture, suitable for development into successful commercial products, having over 50 lum/W power efficiency and 10,000 hours lifetime at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. During the project, Kodak developed and tested a tandem hybrid IES device made with a fluorescent blue emitter, a phosphorescent yellow emitter, and a phosphorescent red emitter in a stacked structure. The challenge was to find low voltage materials that do not absorb excessive amounts of emitted light when the extraction enhancement structure is applied. Because an extraction enhancement structure forces the emitted light to travel several times through the OLED layers before it is emitted, it exacerbates the absorption loss. A variety of ETL and HTL materials was investigated for application in the low voltage SSL device structure. Several of the materials were found to successfully yield low operating device voltages without incurring excessive absorption loss when the extraction enhancement structure was applied. An internal extraction layer comprises two essential components: a light extraction element (LEE) that does the actual extraction of emitted light and a light coupling layer (LCL) that allows the emitted light to interact with the extraction element. Modeling results show that the optical index of the LCL needs to be high, preferably higher than that of the organic layers with an n value of {approx}1.8. In addition, since the OLED structure needs to be built on top of it the LCL needs to be physically and chemically benign. As the project concluded, our focus was on the tandem hybrid device, which proved to be the more efficient architecture. Cost-efficient device fabrication will provide the next challenges with this device architecture in order to allow this architecture to be commercialized.

Y.S. Tyan

2009-06-30

387

The valuation of construction companies  

E-print Network

The main objective of this thesis is to study the valuation of construction companies in mergers and acquisitions. The thesis is divided into three main parts; Mergers and Acquisitions, Valuation, and a Case Study. Mergers ...

Sassine, Edmond, 1980-

2004-01-01

388

California's English Learner Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

English Learner (EL) students in California's schools are numerous and diverse, and they lag behind their native-English-speaking peers. Closing the achievement gap for EL students has been a long-standing goal for California educators, and there are some signs of success. Now that EL funding and curriculum issues are receiving a fresh level of…

Hill, Laura E.

2012-01-01

389

College Readiness in California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College readiness is measured by the number and percentage of 12th grade graduates who complete all the courses required for entrance to the University of California (UC) and/or California State University (CSU) with a grade of "C" or better. Course completion represents only a portion of the entrance requirements for UC or CSU; not all students…

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 2011

2011-01-01

390

How California Ranks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public education supports California's economic growth and creates opportunities for the state's youth. Given that, it is important for Californians to understand how much the state is investing in its schools and how that money is being spent. Comparing California with the nation and other similar states can provide a useful perspective in…

EdSource, 2010

2010-01-01

391

California Energy Commission GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

, this document presents guidelines for solar energy system incentive programs in California. Senate Bill 1 incentives: · Highquality solar energy systems with maximum system performance to promote the highest energy systems are installed. Keywords: Senate Bill 1, SB 1, Million Solar Roofs Initiative, California

392

California: Library Information Technologies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes six information technology projects in California libraries, including Internet access in public libraries; digital library developments at the University of California, Berkeley; the World Wide Web home page for the state library; Pacific Bell's role in statewide connectivity; state government initiatives; and services of the state…

Will, Barbara, Ed.

1996-01-01

393

Solar hot water demonstration project at Red Star Industrial Laundry, Fresno, California  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report of the Solar Hot Water System located at the Red Star Industrial Laundry, 3333 Sabre Avenue, Fresno, California, is presented. The system was designed as an integrated wastewater heat recovery and solar preheating system to supply a part of the hot water requirements. It was estimated that the natural gas demand for hot water heating could be reduced by 56 percent (44 percent heat reclamation and 12 percent solar). The system consists of a 16,500 gallon tube-and-shell wastewater heat recovery subsystem combined with a pass-through 6,528 square foot flat plate Ying Manufacturing Company Model SP4120 solar collector subsystem, a 12,500 gallon fiber glass water storage tank subsystem, pumps, heat exchangers, controls, and associated plumbing. The design output of the solar subsystem is approximately 2.6 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/year. Auxiliary energy is provided by a gas fired low pressure boiler servicing a 4,000 gallon service tank. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with DOE sharing $184,841 of the $260,693 construction cost. The system was turned on in July 1977, and acceptance tests completed in September 1977. The demonstration period for this project ends September 2, 1982.

None

1980-07-01

394

Increased demand spurs gas compression industry  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas in the last five years has led to dynamic development in the gas compression industry as producers and transmission companies expand operations to supply gas. To handle the increase, for example, transmission companies have been steadily adding new lines to the pipeline infrastructure--3,437 miles in 1995 and an estimated 4,088 miles in 1997. New compression for pipelines has also increased from 212,637 horsepower added in 1989 to an estimated 311,685 horsepower to be added in 1997. Four key trends which influence the gas compression business have developed since the mid 1980s: first, a steady resurgence of demand for natural gas each year; second, a phenomenal number of mergers and buyouts among gas compression companies; third, an alarming drop in average daily gas production per well since 1972; and fourth, high drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico.

Honea, M. [Weatherford Enterra, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-01

395

The three-dimensional geologic model used for the 2003 National Oil and Gas Assessment of the San Joaquin Basin Province, California: Chapter 7 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the San Joaquin Basin Province, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We present a three-dimensional geologic model of the San Joaquin Basin (SJB) that may be the first compilation of subsurface data spanning the entire basin. The model volume spans 200 × 90 miles, oriented along the basin axis, and extends to ~11 miles depth, for a total of more than 1 million grid nodes. This model supported the 2003 U.S. Geological Survey assessment of future additions to reserves of oil and gas in the SJB. Data sources include well-top picks from more than 3,200 wildcat and production wells, published cross sections, regional seismic grids, and fault maps. The model consists of 15 chronostratigraphic horizons ranging from the Mesozoic crystalline basement to the topographic surface. Many of the model units are hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and three—the Cretaceous Moreno Formation, the Eocene Kreyenhagen Formation, and the Miocene Monterey Formation—are hydrocarbon source rocks. The White Wolf Fault near the southern end of the basin divides the map volume into 2 separate fault blocks. The construction of a three-dimensional model of the entire SJB encountered many challenges, including complex and inconsistent stratigraphic nomenclature, significant facies changes across and along the basin axis, time-transgressive formation tops, uncertain correlation of outcrops with their subsurface equivalents, and contradictory formation top data. Although some areas of the model are better resolved than others, the model facilitated the 2003 resource assessment in several ways, including forming the basis of a petroleum system model and allowing a precise definition of assessment unit volumes.

Hosford Scheirer, Allegra

2013-01-01

396

University of California Bulletin PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

K #12;University of California Bulletin PUBLISHED AT BERKELEY , CALIFORNIA Volume XLIV · August Io r, 1911, at the Post Office at Berkeley, California, as second-classmatter under the Act through October. 0 0 0 GENERAL INFORMATION Letters of inquiry concerning the University of California, Los

Grether, Gregory

397

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption For Eligible California High School Graduates  

E-print Network

California Nonresident Tuition Exemption For Eligible California High School Graduates (The law colleges and universities in California). · Requirements: o The student must have attended a high school a California high school or attained the equivalent prior to the start of the term (for example, passing

de Lijser, Peter

398

Three inner-neritic recent foraminifers from southern California  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 1, 1969 Paper 45 THREE INNER-NERITIC RECENT FORAMINIFERS FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WILLIAM V. SLITER Esso Production Research Company, Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Three new benthonic... IA and 10 to 12 chambers. This species somewhat resembles B. doniezi CUSHMAN & WICKENDEN but is more robust and flaring, with a thicker test and has coarser perforations. Bolivina lepida differs from juvenile specimens of the larger, coarsely...

Sliter, W. V.

1969-10-01

399

A western thalweg of the Princeton Valley submarine canyon system as a reservoir and a trap near Willows, California  

SciTech Connect

The Princeton Valley submarine canyon system has long been an important reservoir and trapping mechanism in the northern Sacramento Valley, California. Recently a western thalweg of the system, identified north of Willows, California, has proven to be a significant trapping mechanism for gas in truncated Kione Formation sandstones. Both Upper Cretaceous Kione Formation and Paleocene Princeton Valley sandstones are exploratory objectives in the area and are productive in existing wells. The Kione Formation, a sand-rich deltaic sequence approximately 2,000 ft thick, has been truncated to the west by the Princeton Valley submarine canyon system. The canyon (gorge) has been subsequently filed with primarily impermeable shales, providing a trap for migrating gases in the truncated sands. The trend was discovered in 1977 by Shell Oil Company based on seismic and was the first substantiated evidence of a western thalweg of the Princeton Gorge in the Willows area. To date, four wells have been completed along the trend and current exploratory efforts are attempting to follow the gorge trend.

Blake, R.G. (Fleet Oil Co., Irvine, CA (USA)); Bainer, R.W.

1990-05-01

400

78 FR 37215 - Tallgrass Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Availability of the Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...continue service to existing natural gas firm transportation customers...transportation arrangements with four natural gas transmission companies in order...Abandonment and removal of three natural gas mainline compressor stations, four meter...

2013-06-20

401

Exploration potential of offshore northern California basins  

SciTech Connect

A series of exploratory wells was drilled in the northern California offshore basins in the 1960s following leasing of federal tracts off northern California, Oregon, and Washington. The drilling, although encountering numerous oil shows, was considered at the time to indicate low prospectivity in an area that extended as far south as the offshore Santa Maria basin. However, subsequent major discoveries in this decade in the offshore Santa Maria basin, such as the Point Arguello field, indicate that these offshore basins may be highly prospective exploration targets. Many of the key features of Monterey production in central and southern California are also present in the offshore basins of northern California. A new 5-year leasing plan has scheduled leasing in the northern California OCS starting in early 1989. The first basins on the schedule, the Point Arena and Eel River basins, differ in some respects. The Point Arena basin is more typical of a Monterey basin, with the potential for fractured chert reservoirs and organic-rich sections, deep burial of basinal sections to enhance the generation of higher gravity oils, and complex folding and faulting. The Eel River basin is more clastic-rich in its gas-producing, onshore extension. Key questions in the Eel River basin include whether the offshore, more distal stratigraphy will include Monterey-like biogenic sediments, and whether the basin has oil potential in addition to its proven gas potential. The Outer Santa Cruz basin shares a similar stratigraphy, structure, and hydrocarbon potential with the Point Arena basin. The Santa Cruz-Bodega basin, also with a similar stratigraphy, may have less exploration potential because erosion has thinned the Monterey section in parts of the basin.

Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K.

1988-01-01

402

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contamination—zircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

W.C. Adams

2011-04-01

403

California History Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Historical Society's Website presents accessible, interesting, and well-designed scholarly and educational materials relating to California history. One interesting section, The California History Online Timeline, allows users to click on a timeline of images to access material on key events and time periods in California history. These include European exploration, the Spanish Colonial frontier, Mexican California, the Gold Rush, the impact of the railroad, economic growth at the turn of the century, and the Great Depression. Each section features a sidebar outline where visitors can break the exhibit down into its sub-sections to view text and images. For scholars and amateur historians of the state, the Society also offers the complete tables of contents for all the issues of California History from 1922 to 1998. The Society has begun to post full texts of the issues from 1950 to 1993, though this process seems to be in the earliest stages. Finally, the Website features a quarterly newsletter giving information about archived and upcoming exhibits, events around the state celebrating California history, and news about the Society's programs and acquisitions.

2001-01-01

404

UCDavis University of California A California Energy  

E-print Network

-in Prius Battery kWh: Charge Time: Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 All Electric Range: Price: 3hrs/110v (15A) 1% of USA, California new car buyers have a stable parking spot 25 feet from electricity each night 0% 10 · Market Segments · Fleet Operation · Energy Savings Battery studies · Benchmark Testing · 2nd use · End

California at Davis, University of

405

Shadow Communications Inc. Virtual Education Company  

E-print Network

. Through the use of Virtual Human Agents (VHAs), the company facilitates natural language dialogue between SE Hawthorne Rd # 103 Gainesville, FL 32641-7560 For more information abou this UF startup company, the company has two products that are required curricula at four U.S. medical schools. The company

Jawitz, James W.

406

Company Information on the World Wide Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Used in conjunction with more traditional business reference resources, the World Wide Web can help fill out a company' s picture. Corporate Web presences may range from single-page company descriptions to multi-layered sites that take fuller advantage of the Web' s immense capacity and interactive nature. Maintained primarily to promote and advertise a company' s products and services, company sites

Joseph A. Larose

1997-01-01

407

STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor April 25, 2011  

E-print Network

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor Addendum 3 April 25, 2011 PON-10-604 GRANT SOLICITATION APPLICATION PACKAGE Buy Down Incentives for Natural Gas and Propane in Section 8 of this PON. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 NINTH STREET SACRAMENTO, CA 95814-5512 www

408

Notice of Decision by the California Energy Commission To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission  

E-print Network

Notice of Decision by the California Energy Commission To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission 1416 9th Street, Room 1311 1516 9th Street MS-2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 21080.5 and Title 20, California Code of Regulations, Section 1768 Project Name: 1 Energy Commission

409

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission  

E-print Network

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission 1416 9th Street, Room 1311 1516 9th Street, MS-2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 21080.5 and Title 20, California Code of Regulations, Section 1768 Project Name: Crockett Cogeneration

410

The development of a natural gas transportation logistics management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efficient management of the natural gas business chain – based on pipeline transmission networks and taking into consideration the interaction among the main players (e.g., shippers, suppliers, transmission companies and local distribution companies) – requires the use of decision-making support systems. These support systems maximise resources and mitigate contingencies due to gas supply shortfalls, operational contingencies from scheduled and non-scheduled

Sidney Pereira dos Santos; José Eugenio Leal; Fabrício Oliveira

2011-01-01

411

Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL  

E-print Network

is owned by 9 major railroads. · Manage various national railcar pools · Goal: Provide safe, reliable cars 11 © Copyright 2008 TTX Company : : CONFIDENTIAL 11 Railroads efficiently move freight Transportation, equipment tended to derail. (Wheelbase limit ~10m) · Some genius invented a very short, small "car" called

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

412

Limited Liability Companies in Kansas  

E-print Network

provisions of the Act as they relate to the creation, ment Editor of the Wayne Law Review, arzd an LL.M,~~~~ Haward operation and dissolution of an LLC in Kansas. 1 shall Lalo School (1970) Prior to entering not attempt to discuss the taxation of LLCs...Limited Liability Companies in Kansas* by Edwin W. Hecker Jr. About the Author T he Kansas Limited Liability Company Act (the Act)' EDWN W. HECKER-[R. is a professor at the Unitlersi(y of Kansas School of is now over three years old and has...

Hecker, Edwin W. Jr.

1994-01-01

413

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Project Brochures  

E-print Network

: Donald Aumann, Contract Manager Nancy Jenkins, PIER Buildings Program Manager Terry Surles, PIER Program Aumann and Nancy Jenkins, California Energy Commission. Cathy Higgins, New Buildings Institute. Lead & Electric Co. Jeff Harris, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. John Hogan, Consultant. Daryl Hosler

414

The Oxbow School, California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the design of the Oxbow School, an art- and design-oriented high school in Napa, California, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, as well as floor plans and photographs. (EV)

Pearson, Clifford A.

2003-01-01

415

CALIFORNIA ENERGY GRANT SOLICITATION  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GRANT SOLICITATION Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program Solicitation Number PON-11-602 Subject Area: Alternative Fuels Infrastructure: Electric:.........................................................................................................22 #12;2 GRANT SOLICITATION AND APPLICATION PACKAGE Alternative and Renewable Fuels and Vehicle

416

California Dust and Ash  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Airborne Dust and Ash over Southern California     ... left-hand view, which was constructed with near-infrared, green and blue band data from MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. The ...

2014-05-15

417

California Native Plant Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website presents the California Native Plant Society, a national leader in biological diversity conservation science and advocacy. Established in 1965, the CNPS "is a statewide non-profit organization of amateurs and professionals with a common interest in California's native plants." The site provides a variety of information and resources useful to botanists and native plant enthusiasts alike. One notable feature is the site's Photo Gallery which contains many beautiful annotated photos from different parts of California. The site links to the Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants presenting "the most recent Inventory data from CNPS, plus thumbnail illustrations, maps, a variety of search tools, and links to additional information." The site also links to information about the Native Plant Conservation Campaign, the Manual of California Vegetation (reported on in the Scout Report for Science & Engineering on December 9, 1998), and to online discussion opportunities.

418

Nevada of California:  

E-print Network

state of knowledge Raymond D. RatliffThe Author: RAYMOND D. RATLIFF, a range scientist, is assigned to the Station's range management research in California unit, headquartered at the Forestry Sciences Laboratory,

United States; Forest Service; Henry A. Doddridge; Ray Marxmiller; Claude L. Brown; Club Gordon; C. Ashcraft; Ronald C. Bertram; Raymond D. Ratliff

419

California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Ventura, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Ventura map area lies within the Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the Ventura Basin, in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The city of Ventura is the major cultural center in the map area. The Ventura River cuts through Ventura, draining the Santa Ynez Mountains and the coastal hills north of Ventura. Northwest of Ventura, the coastal zone is a narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors and a few small residential clusters. Rincon Island, an island constructed for oil and gas production, lies offshore of Punta Gorda. Southeast of Ventura, the coastal zone consists of the mouth and broad, alluvial plains of the Santa Clara River, and the region is characterized by urban and agricultural development. Ventura Harbor sits just north of the mouth of the Santa Clara River, in an area formerly occupied by lagoons and marshes. The Offshore of Ventura map area lies in the eastern part of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, whose littoral drift is to the east-southeast. Drift rates of about 700,000 to 1,150,000 tons/yr have been reported at Ventura Harbor. At the east end of the littoral cell, eastward-moving sediment is trapped by Hueneme and Mugu Canyons and then transported into the deep-water Santa Monica Basin. The largest sediment source to this littoral cell (and the largest in all of southern California) is the Santa Clara River, which has an estimated annual sediment flux of 3.1 million tons. In addition, the Ventura River yields about 270,000 tons of sediment annually. Despite the large local sediment supply, coastal erosion problems are ongoing in the map area. Riprap, revetments, and seawalls variably protect the coast within and north of Ventura. The offshore part of the map area mainly consists of relatively flat, shallow continental shelf, which dips so gently (about 0.2° to 0.4°) that water depths at the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters are just 20 to 40 m. This part of the Santa Barbara Channel is relatively well protected from large Pacific swells from the north and west by Point Conception and the Channel Islands; long-period swells affecting the area are mainly from the south-southwest. Fair-weather wave base is typically shallower than 20-m water depth, but winter storms are capable of resuspending fine-grained sediments in 30 m of water, and so shelf sediments in the map area probably are remobilized on an annual basis. The shelf is underlain by tens of meters of interbedded upper Quaternary shelf, estuarine, and fluvial sediments deposited as sea level fluctuated up and down in the last several hundred thousand years. Seafloor habitats in the broad Santa Barbara Channel region consist of significant amounts of soft sediment and isolated areas of rocky

Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.

2013-01-01

420

Consistency in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimation for Oil and Gas Industry Operations - A NonTrivial Pursuit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil and gas industry operations span the globe, encountering unique operational and business climates in a variety of regions. This reality presents many challenges for companies that are characterizing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and developing GHG management strategies for diverse multinational facilities. For these companies, the consistency, reliability, and credibility of the methodology to derive GHG emission estimates are

Karin Ritter; Susann Nordrum; Theresa Shires; Miriam Lev-On

421

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Water Supply and Prospects in Baja California  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS Water Supply and Prospects in Baja California THESIS Submitted ................................... 11 Baja California Human Geography .......................... 11 Baja California Physical Geography ................................................................ 45 #12;3 Water Supply and Prospects in Baja California ABSTRACT The water supply infrastructure

Lund, Jay R.

422

Baja California, Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An interesting view down the axis of Baja California, Mexico (26.5N, 113.0W). At the center of the Scene is Laguna Ojo de Liebre (Bay of Whales) which is a breeding area for the Pacific Grey Whale. The Sea of Cortez, also known as the Gulf of California, is to the left and the Pacific Ocean is to the right.

1981-01-01

423

California Energy Commission  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website features information on policy, energy use, research, and special initiatives from California. Topics linked from the site include the Bioenergy Action Plan, the California Solar Initiative, climate change reports, the 2005 Integrated Energy Policy Report, and energy statistics. Also available here is Energy Quest, an opportunity for kids to learn about energy, plus the Consumer Energy Center, a source for consumer information on energy efficiency, energy rebates, transportation and renewable energy.

Commission, California E.; California, State O.

424

California Wetlands Information System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Comprehensive wetlands information to the general public, the educational community, and government agencies. Though much of the information is California-specific, there is an abundance of location-independent information available. Topics covered include restoration and mitigation, wetlands policy, vernal pools, and the role the state agencies play in wetlands conservation. Site features many links to external resources. The "What's new" section features all the latest California wetlands news and research.

425

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16

426

California four cities program, 1971 - 1973. [aerospace-to-urban technology application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A pilot project in aerospace-to-urban technology application is reported. Companies assigned senior engineering professionals to serve as Science and Technology Advisors to participating city governments. Technical support was provided by the companies and JPL. The cities, Anaheim, Fresno, Pasadena, and San Hose, California, provided the working environment and general service support. Each city/company team developed and carried out one or more technical or management pilot projects together with a number of less formalized technology efforts and studies. An account and evaluation is provided of the initial two-year phase of the program.

Macomber, H. L.; Wilson, J. H.

1974-01-01

427

CORE CONCERT DANCE COMPANY SUMMER  

E-print Network

CORE CONCERT DANCE COMPANY SUMMER INTENSIVE 2005 What: A week long day camp taught by current CORE registration form along with $25 non-refundable deposit to: UGA Department of Dance Attn: CORE Summer Intensive Earmarked: CORE Summer Dance Intensive Balance of tuition ($200) is due by May 30th . Name

Arnold, Jonathan

428

Speed Dating Listing Company Name  

E-print Network

Management Inc. Road Construction Southwest, Inc. Rock Gap Engineering LLC Royal Consulting Inc. Sanbros, Inc. Alpha Restoration & Construction Services, LLC AmeriCom Automation Services, Inc. ATI Security Inc. Avisco, Inc. B&D Industries, Inc. Ballew Construction Company, Inc. Blue Skies Consulting LLC

429

75 FR 41524 - Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, MA; Cranston Print Works Company...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...TA-W-64,198A] Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, MA; Cranston Print Works Company, Corporate Offices...applicable to workers of Cranston Print Works Company, Webster Division, Webster, Massachusetts. The...

2010-07-16

430

77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service...Certificate of Authority issued by the Treasury to Western Bonding Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to...

2012-01-05

431

California Energy Commission STAFF DRAFT REPORT  

E-print Network

California Energy Commission STAFF DRAFT REPORT INCLUDING BRITISH COLUMBIA RUNOFRIVER FACILITIES IN THE CALIFORNIA RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD OCTOBER 2013 CEC3002013011SD Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Brian Mc

432

California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Carpinteria, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Carpinteria map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. The small city of Carpinteria is the most significant onshore cultural center in the map area; the smaller town of Summerland lies west of Carpinteria. These communities rest on a relatively flat coastal piedmont that is surrounded on the north, east, and west by hilly relief on the flanks of the Santa Ynez Mountains. El Estero, a salt marsh on the coast west of Carpinteria, is an ecologically important coastal estuary. Southeast of Carpinteria, the coastal zone is narrow strip containing highway and railway transportation corridors and a few small residential clusters. Rincon Point is a well-known world-class surf break, and Rincon Island, constructed for oil and gas production, lies offshore of Punta Gorda. The steep bluffs backing the coastal strip are geologically unstable, and coastal erosion problems are ongoing in the map area; most notably, landslides in 2005 struck the small coastal community of La Conchita, engulfing houses and killing ten people. The Offshore of Carpinteria map area lies in the central part of the Santa Barbara littoral cell, whose littoral drift is to the east-southeast. Drift rates have been estimated to be about 400,000 tons/yr at Santa Barbara Harbor (about 15 km west of Carpinteria). At the east end of the littoral cell, eastward-moving sediment is trapped by Hueneme and Mugu Canyons and then transported to the deep-water Santa Monica Basin. Sediment supply to the western and central part of the littoral cell is largely from relatively small transverse coastal watersheds, which have an estimated cumulative annual sediment flux of 640,000 tons/yr. The much larger Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, the mouths of which are about 25 to 30 km southeast of Carpinteria, yield an estimated 3.4 million tons of sediment annually, the coarser sediment load generally moving southeast, down the coast, and the finer sediment load moving both upcoast and offshore. The offshore part of the map area consists of a relatively flat and shallow continental shelf, which dips so gently (about 0.4° to 0.5°) that water depths at the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters are 40 to 45 m. This part of the Santa Barbara Channel is relatively well protected from large Pacific swells from the north and northwest by Point Conception and from the south and southwest by offshore islands and banks. Fair-weather wave base is typically shallower than 20-m water depth, but winter storms are capable of resuspending fine-grained sediments in 30 m of water, and so shelf sediments in the map area probably are remobilized on an annual basis. The shelf is underlain by variable amounts o

Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Wong, Florence L.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.

2013-01-01

433

Selling green power in California: Product, industry, and market trends  

SciTech Connect

As one of the first US stages to open its doors to retail electric competition, California offers an important opportunity to assess the effectiveness of green power marketing as a mechanism for supporting renewable energy. This report is an interim assessment of key green power product, industry, and market trends in California. The report identifies and analyzes: the potential size of the green power market in California; the companies participating in the green power market; the green power products being offered and their prices; the impact of the green market on renewable generators and the environment; and the influence of several public policies and non-governmental programs on the market for green power. Data used in this paper have been collected, in large part, from surveys and interviews with green power marketers that took place between December 1997 and April 1998. There remain legitimate concerns over the viability of green power marketing to support significant quantities of renewable energy and provide large environmental gains, and it is far too early to assess the overall strength of customer demand for renewable energy. A critical finding of this report is that, because of the high cost of acquiring and servicing residential customers and the low utility default service price, green power marketing affords new energy service providers one of the only viable entrees to California`s residential marketplace.

Wiser, R.H.; Pickle, S.J.

1998-05-01

434

75 FR 6791 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Trinity Universal Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination: Trinity Universal Insurance Company AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department of the Treasury....

2010-02-10

435

21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1903) EXTERIOR, SOUTH FRONT & WEST SIDE OF MISSION IN RUINOUS STATE BEFORE RESTORATION, C. 1903 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

436

23. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, C. 1909) EXTERIOR, VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT OF CONVENTO IN RUINS, C. 1909 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

437

17. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1890) EXTERIOR, REAR VIEW OF MISSION, C. 1890 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

438

4. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Sacramento, California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Sacramento, California Photo Taken: 1860 Re-photo: March 1940 EAST FRONT - CENTRAL SECTION - Custom House, Custom House Plaza, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

439

2. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Collection California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Collection California Section Photo of Thompson & West Engraving of 1880 COMBINED FRONTAGE OF THE THREE BUILDINGS - Big Four Building, 220-226 K Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

440

Alberta producers' gas export prices slip  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Alberta gas producers have approved a new contract with California buyers that includes slightly lower wellhead prices and more flexible pricing terms. The 1 year agreement, will apply a flexible price formula to gas sales. A basic volume of 212 MMcfd will receive $1.52 (U.S.)/Mcf. A and S also will buy 200 MMcfd at prices paid for other Alberta gas in the California market. It will have the right to buy added volumes at prices indexed to gas sold into California from the U.S. Southwest. Ballots cast by producers were to be verified by regulatory agencies in Alberta and British Columbia. The more flexible price terms in the new contract are seen as a positive development for negotiations in a dispute over long term contracts.

Not Available

1992-08-10

441

Electricity Regulation in California and Input Market Distortions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We provide an analysis of the soft price cap regulation that occurred in California's electricity market between December 2000 and June 2001. We demonstrate the incentive it created to distort the prices of electricity inputs. After introducing a theoretical model of the incentive, we present empirical data from two important input markets: pollution emissions permits and natural gas. We find

Mark R. Jacobsen; Azeem M. Shaikh

442

California Smart Grid Attributes: California Public Utility Commission Metrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

California regulatory agencies such as the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and state energy policy and planning agencies such as the California Energy Commission (CEC) are continuing to launch a broad range of smart grid initiatives. Smart Grid refers to a nationwide modernization of the electric grid with design features meant to enhance security of U.S. energy infrastructure and help

Kunjal Yaknik; Suresh Vadhva; Russ Tatro; Mohammad Vaziri

2011-01-01

443

The Story of California = La Historia de California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"The Story of California" is a history and geography of the state of California, intended for classroom use by limited-English-proficient, native Spanish-speaking students in California's urban middle schools. The book is designed with the left page in English and the right page in Spanish to facilitate student transition into comfortable use of…

Bartel, Nick

444

Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

1981-12-23

445

NCI: SBIR & STTR - Investor Forum - Presenting Companies  

Cancer.gov

The 14 chosen companies were pre-screened by an independent panel of experts from venture capital firms, bio-pharmaceutical, and medical device companies, based on their strength of research, impact on cancer, product development and market potential.

446

Ancillary services market in California  

SciTech Connect

This report includes sections on the following topics: (1) California restructured electricity system overview; (2) Reliability criteria; (3) Design of the California ISO ancillary services market; (4) Operation of ancillary services markets; (5) Ancillary services markets redesign; and (6) Conclusions.

Gomez, T.; Marnay, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Liew, L.; Khavkin, M.

1999-07-01

447

California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT  

E-print Network

contractor and allows visual monitoring of the system's performance. When a Charge Indicator Display Holes for the Building Energy Efficiency Standards. California Energy Commission, High PerformanceCalifornia Energy Commission STAFF REPORT FINAL EVALUATION REPORT 2008 Building Energy

448

California Civil Rights Initiative (CCRI)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

California Civil Rights Initiative (CCRI) is the proposed California ballot initiative which will eliminate government programs commonly known as affirmative action. The Web page offers a view of what CCRI is about and what it hopes to accomplish.

1997-01-01

449

Frontline: A Company of Soldiers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A number of documentaries have paid close to attention to various aspects of the current military conflict in Iraq, but this recent documentary by the people at Frontline warrants special notice. In November 2004, a production team documented the day-to-day realities of the soldiers of the 1-8 Cavalary's Dog Company in South Baghdad. The actual filming began three days after the Falljuah campaign was launched, and as such the production acquired a rather intense and moving aspect heightened by these encounters and incidents. On this site, visitors can watch the entire program as it appeared on PBS, read a list of FAQ's about the production, and read four fascinating interviews with those in Dog Company. Visitors can also read the notebook of producer Edward Jarvis and offer their own reactions to the program.

450

Gas company dividend policy during the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

Ask most investors how to get rich in the stock market and the overwhelming response will be to buy low, sell high, or some similar bit of conventional wisdom. To most observers, the reason to buy common stocks is the capital gains, which come from rising stock prices. Evidence illustrates, however, that this simply isn't the case. For long-term investors, with utilities and nonutilities alike, the real reward comes from the stream of dividends one obtains when buying a stock.

Burkhardt, D.A.; Mosbacher, M.L.

1990-10-25

451

77 FR 48509 - Trunkline Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Application  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No...facilities and 15,850 horsepower of compression facilities by sale to a designated affiliate of Energy Transfer Equity, L.P. Upon...

2012-08-14

452

76 FR 24465 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...2011. Ready for Environmental Analysis. Filing of recommendations, August 2011. preliminary terms and conditions, and fishway prescriptions. Commission issues Draft EIS........ February 2012. Comments on Draft...

2011-05-02

453

California Department of Transportation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) manages over 50,000 miles of California's highway and freeway lanes, provides inter-city rail services, and also works on a host of other transportation initiatives. Visitors can dive right in via the Highlights section, which offers an overview of the California State Rail Plan, information about webinars, and links to long-term transit feasibility studies. Other sections of the site cover Travel, Business, Engineering, News, and Maps. This last area contains the QuickMap, which offers a real-time map of current traffic conditions, along with maps designed for truckers and motor home owners. The Engineering section contains information about ongoing projects, along with financial information and planning documents. Finally, the site includes a separate page about the Bay Bridge and links to press releases and video clips.

2013-08-12

454

California Sheet Music Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With oversight provided by Professor Mary Kay Duggan of the University of California at Berkeley, the California Sheet Music Project provides online access to some 2000 pieces of sheet music published in California between 1852 and 1900. The project was funded by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, and also contains interesting ephemera ranging from a music publisher's catalog from 1872, advertisements, and photographs. The entire database may be searched or browsed by image subject (from the frontispiece of each composition) or by the subject addressed by each piece of music. Some of the songs included in the archive deal with beggars ("Just One Penny to Buy Bread," babies ("Baby's Asleep"), and politicians ("Horace Greeley's Grand March"). Finally the site also has several musical performances of pieces from the collection for the listening pleasure of those compelled to visit this interesting tribute to the sheet music of the Golden State.

Duggan, Mary Kay

455

California's potential volcanic hazards  

SciTech Connect

Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

Jorgenson, P. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-01-01

456

California's Future Carbon Flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The diversity of the climate and vegetation systems in the state of California provides a unique opportunity to study carton dioxide exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. In order to accurately calculate the carbon flux, this study couples the sophisticated analytical surface layer model ACASA (Advance Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm, developed in the University of California, Davis) with the newest version of mesoscale model WRF (the Weather Research & Forecasting Model, developed by NCAR and several other agencies). As a multilayer, steady state model, ACASA incorporates higher-order representations of vertical temperature variations, CO2 concentration, radiation, wind speed, turbulent statistics, and plant physiology. The WRF-ACASA coupling is designed to identify how multiple environmental factors, in particularly climate variability, population density, and vegetation distribution, impact on future carbon cycle prediction across a wide geographical range such as in California.

Xu, L.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K.; Gertz, M.

2008-12-01

457

California State Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Those persons with an interest in the history and government of the Golden State will love the California State Archives, which were originally chartered to receive "�all public records, registered maps, books, papers, rolls, documents and other writings�which appertain to or are in any way connected with the political history and past administration of the government of California." On the site, visitors can learn about the local government records program, look over state government oral histories, or consider the particulars of the graduate internship program. In the Collections area, visitors can examine past iterations of California's constitution, take a look at select pieces of legislation, and browse Spanish and Mexican land grants. Finally, visitors can look through the fascinating working papers of the 1878-1879 Constitutional Convention, the site's first formal digitized collection.

2012-01-01

458

2013 Business Career Fair Participating Companies  

E-print Network

. Alaska National Insurance Company 5. Altria 6. Amazon 7. AT&T 8. Avalara 9. B/E Aerospace 10. Boeing 11. Progressive 74. Prudential 75. QBSI-A Xerox Company 76. Regus 77. Ross Stores 78. Salesforce 79. Seattle City2013 Business Career Fair Participating Companies 1. Abercrombie & Fitch 2. Accenture 3. ADP 4

Kaminsky, Werner

459

Beyond reengineering: Transformation seen as next step for companies  

SciTech Connect

The future of the oil and gas industry is perpetually clouded, and the authors believe its chief executive officers (CEOs) have a special need to take the time to understand where they are going to be able to meet the business transformation needs of their customers in the years ahead. The challenges facing the oil and gas business today are largely external, and even magnificently run companies that are inwardly focused will fail in a business climate that is dominated by environmental and political concerns on the one hand, and supply and demand pressures on the other. What does transformation mean First, companies need to establish clearly how to reframe their corporate responses to the issues they face. Where are they competitive Will they focus on upstream midstream, or downstream activities for new alliances, new products, new businesses Second, corporations must establish how to restructure their efforts in terms of their future customers and markets, not in terms of their current products. Third, companies must develop strategies to revitalize their business through leveraging their core competencies to create new products, markets, and industries. And finally, corporations need to prepare their employees constantly to renew themselves in an industry that will be redefined at an ever-increasing rate in the future.

Aldrich, S.; Tey, M. (Gemini Consulting, Morristown, NJ (United States))

1994-11-07

460

Teacher Retirement Trends in California  

E-print Network

Teacher Retirement Trends in California: 2006/07­2011/12 The Center for the Future of Teaching in the pursuit of its mission to ensure that every student in California's elementary and secondary schools has). Teacher Retirement Trends in California: 2006/07­ 2011/12. A report by the Center for the Future

Su, Xiao

461

California's Continuation Schools. Research Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than 10% of California's public high school students attend some kind of alternative program. This brief summarizes the initial research study from the California Alternative Education Research Project, which examines continuation schools specifically. It summarizes "Alternative Education Options: A Descriptive Study of California

EdSource, 2008

2008-01-01

462

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Santa Barbara  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Santa Barbara Nonlinear Media as Interactive Narrative A dissertation with an Emphasis in Music Composition, University of California, Santa Barbara, June 1999 Master of Music in Music Interdisciplinary Doctor of Philosophy in Media Arts and Technology, University of California, Santa Barbara, June

California at Santa Barbara, University of

463

California's Proposition 7: An Analysis  

E-print Network

California's Proposition 7: An Analysis October 2008 #12;#12;The research and authorship for this analysis was contributed by Steven Weiss- man, Associate Director for Energy Law & Policy in the California Center for Environmental Law and Policy at School of Law, University of California, Berke- ley October

Kammen, Daniel M.

464

California's Proposition 7: An Analysis  

E-print Network

California's Proposition 7: An Analysis October 2008 #12;#12;The majority of research in the Cali- fornia Center for Environmental Law and Policy at School of Law, University of California@law.berkeley.edu; (510) 642-7235. #12;Background and Summary California has one of the most ambitious renewable energy

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

465

California County Data Book, 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This data book examines statewide trends in the well-being of California's children. California is the only state where the majority of the children (56%) come from African-American, Latino, Asian, and Native American families. The report begins with summary tables of general state facts, including: (1) California's children under 18; (2)…

Children Now, Oakland, CA.

466

California Indian Food and Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

2001

467

CALIFORNIA ALTERNATIVE FUELS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA ALTERNATIVE FUELS MARKET ASSESSMENT 2006 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Yee #12;#12;v ABSTRACT Since 2001, the California Alternative Fuels Market Assessment (formerly's alternative fuels programs. It has been designed to provide a dynamic process for periodic reviews and updates

468

California Climate Data Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The California Climate Data Archive website, a project of the Western Regional Climate Center, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and the California Energy Commission, offers a variety of climate data, products, and forecasts. Users can view climate data by station locations or by data type. Researchers can find links and scientific articles of numerous climate research groups including the Climate Diagnostics Center (CDC), the Mountain Research Center, and the Livermore Lab Heat Island Group. The website offers archives of monthly climate articles and a series of climate maps.

469

Gas geochemistry of a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent associated with the El Requeso??n fault zone, Bahi??a Concepcio??n, Baja California Sur, Me??xico  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We investigated hydrothermal gas venting associated with a coastal fault zone along the western margin of Bahi??a Concepcio??n, B.C.S., Me??xico. Copious discharge of geothermal liquid (??? 90 ??C) and gas is occurring in the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones (to a depth of 13 m) through soft sediments and fractures in rocks along a ???750 m linear trend generally sub-parallel to an onshore fault near Punta Santa Barbara. Hydrothermal activity shows negative correlation with tidal height; temperatures in the area of hydrothermal activity were up to 11.3 ??C higher at low tide than at high tide (measured tidal range ??? 120 cm). Gas samples were collected using SCUBA and analyzed for chemical composition and stable isotope values. The main components of the gas are N2 (??? 53%; 534 mmol/mol), CO2 (??? 43%; 435 mmol/mol), and CH4 (??? 2.2%; 22 mmol/mol). The ??13C values of the CH4 (mean = - 34.3%), and the ratios of CH4 to C2H6 (mean = 89), indicate that the gas is thermogenic in origin. The carbon stable isotopes and the ??15N of the N2 in the gas (mean = 1.7%) suggest it may be partially derived from the thermal alteration of algal material in immature sedimentary organic matter. The He isotope ratios (3He/4He = 1.32 RA) indicate a significant mantle component (16.3%) in the gas. Here, we suggest the name El Requeso??n fault zone for the faults that likely formed as a result of extension in the region during the late Miocene, and are currently serving as conduits for the observed hydrothermal activity. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Forrest, M.J.; Ledesma-Vazquez, J.; Ussler, W., III; Kulongoski, J.T.; Hilton, D.R.; Greene, H. Gary

2005-01-01

470

Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from recurring. The report gives complete details on the sequence of events surrounding the accident and identifies 27 facts related to accident itself. Four technical deficiencies in the electrical systems which require further investigation were identified. The Team believes that the root cause of this accident was related to the absence of a proactive organizational entity responsible for overall health and safety on the site. Two contributing factors were identified. First, the prototype nature and associated operational difficulties of the electrical inverter resulted in large maintenance demands. Second, several of the injured employee`s co-workers noted that he occasionally failed to use appropriate personal protective equipment, but they never reported this practice to management. The direct cause of this accident was the failure of the injured employee to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., rubber gloves). Based on the review of the facts established in this investigation, five recommendations are presented to the funding agencies to reduce the possibility of future accidents at the PVUSA site.

Jacobson, L.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Garrett, J.O.; Tyler, R.

1992-02-01

471

Columbia Gas upgraded SCADA system links control centers  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Gas Transmission Corp. (Columbia) recently completed the initial phase of an upgrade of a SCADA system used in the daily operation of the company's 19,000 miles of pipe lines and related facilities. The SCADA system monitors and controls the company's pipeline facilities and has 5,000 database points to accommodate telemetry equipment at approximately 240 locations. Columbia sells gas to more than 70 gas distribution utility companies and more than 1,500 end users and distribution companies. Prior to the upgrade, each of the company's three gas control centers - Charleston, W. Va.; Columbus, Ohio, and Pittsburgh, Pa. - was made up of a pair of DEC PDP-11/34 minicomputers and associated displays, loggers and related peripheral equipment. Each center was an independent operation with little data shared between them and no ability to control one facility from another facility.

Courts, S.A. (Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., St. Albans, WV (US)); Wallace, J.C. (Teledyne Control Applications, Garland, TX (US))

1991-05-01

472

77 FR 25349 - Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...3064-AD89 Mutual Insurance Holding Company Treated as Insurance Company...Regulations and Policies on Families The FDIC has determined that the Final Rule will not affect family well-being within the meaning...in 12 CFR Part 380 Holding companies, Insurance companies,...

2012-04-30

473

76 FR 55413 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-legged Frog, California Tiger Salamander, Smith...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Harbor Agreement for California Red-legged Frog, California Tiger Salamander, Smith's...federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii) and California tiger...conservation of the California red-legged frog, California tiger salamander,...

2011-09-07

474

Southern California Smart Grid Symposium California Institute of TechnologyCalifornia Institute of Technology  

E-print Network

Southern California Smart Grid Symposium California Institute of TechnologyCalifornia Institute Service in a Smart Grid World Hung po ChaoHung-po Chao Director, Market Strategy and Analysis October 13 of Technology Competitive Electricity Markets with Consumer Subscription Service in a SmartConsumer Subscription

475

Water segregation in the course of gas hydrate formation and accumulation in submarine gas-seepage fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas hydrate accumulations associated with submarine gas-seepage fields have been detected in the Okhotsk Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. It is possible that gas hydrates known from the continental margin offshore northern California, Oregon and Nigeria are also connected with gas-seepage fields. Gas-hydrated sediments in the accumulations (1) occur at very low subbottom depths, sometimes directly at the sea

V. A. Soloviev; G. D. Ginsburg

1997-01-01

476

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA METALLURGICAL SECTION  

E-print Network

:40 "Brave New World of VLSI" Professor Carver A. Mmmd California Institute of Technology Pasadena Laboratories Murray Hill, New Jersey HOSTED COCK'PA0L PARTY Cabana Hyatt House (Circus Maximus North( VENDORS Perspectives". 5. A feature of this symposium will be a vendor's exhibit. Information displays on new materials

Wu, Junqiao

477

California's Perfect Storm  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

Bacon, David

2010-01-01

478

Workforce Brief: California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In California, the nation's most populous state, the demand for well-educated employees will only increase over the next several years. In the decade leading up to 2012, healthcare occupations will see growth of 28 percent; over 157,000 new practitioners and technicians will be needed. Teachers will be in high demand: over a quarter million new…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

2006-01-01

479

Sabotaging the California Dream  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher education, the California dream for well over 2 million undergraduate students, is turning into a nightmare. The Golden State's promise of unparalleled access to community colleges and universities is fast becoming a tarnished relic of the past. And this state of affairs is occurring at a time when the demand for higher education has never…

Piland, William E.

2004-01-01

480

POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited PROOF OF CONCEPT INTEGRATION OF A SINGLE- LEVEL SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE INTO A MULTI Integration of a Single-Level Service-Oriented Architecture into a Multi-Domain Secure Environment 6. AUTHOR

481

POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

E-print Network

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited IMPLEMENTING AN INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEM IN THE MYSEA ARCHITECTURE by Thomas Tenhunen June 2008 Architecture 6. AUTHOR(S) Thomas Tenhunen 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS

482

California Sun Glint  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Sun Glint from Solar Electric Generating Stations   ... View Larger Image Depending upon the position of the Sun, the solar power stations in California's Mohave Desert can reflect solar ... discernible in this set of natural-color images as the Sun's rays are reflected differently from the solar power fields at different ...

2014-05-15

483

Projecting California's Fiscal Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents findings of a study that analyzed the trends that will shape the California budget over the next decade. The study assumed that current demographic and economic trends, tax policies, and mandated spending programs will continue through the next decade, and projects their implications for state general-fund revenues and spending…

Carroll, Stephen; And Others

484

California Project Talent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A compilation of presentations on programs for the gifted includes the following: increasing opportunities for education, notes on Project Talent, talent development and national goals, talent identification in California, problems and recommendations in the area of the talented, innovations in talent development, issues and problems in modern…

Plowman, Paul D., Comp.; Rice, Joseph P., Comp.

485

California Library Laws, 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

California Library Laws 2009 is a selective guide to state laws and related materials that most directly affect the everyday operations of public libraries and organizations that work with public libraries. It is intended as a convenient reference, not as a replacement for the annotated codes or for legal advice. The guide is organized as follows.…

Smith, Paul G., Ed.

2009-01-01

486

Curriculum Reform in California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a high school pilot program to meet California's science curriculum guidelines to adopt a Scope, Sequence and Coordination (SS&C) approach. The SS&C curriculum offers four science subjects for each year of high school. Concrete, phenomenological, and descriptive topics are covered during the early years and theoretical and abstract…

Atchley, Debra

1993-01-01

487

California Nitrogen Index  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The California N Index User Manual is designed to help you become accustomed to the software environment in which the N Index runs. This manual will use an example scenario to demonstrate how to use the N Index to assess nitrogen losses. The objective of this theoretical example is to guide you towa...

488

167 Prospectus California Margin  

E-print Network

. Each of the three transects across the California Current will compare deep-water sites near the core), for those sites that require it, can be obtained from the following World Wide Web site: http margin, Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 63, occurred immediately before the first deployment

489

California Energy Commission GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

guidelines for solar energy system incentive programs in California. The Senate Bill 1-funded incentives: High-quality solar energy systems with maximum system performance to promote and commercial structures where solar energy systems are installed. Keywords: Senate Bill 1, SB 1

490

California Energy Commission GUIDELINES  

E-print Network

Bill 1, this document presents guidelines for solar energy system incentive programs in California to qualify for ratepayerfunded incentives: · Highquality solar energy systems with maximum system and commercial structures where solar energy systems are installed. Keywords: Senate Bill 1, SB 1, Million Solar

491

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, MANAGEMENT/  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON RISK MANAGEMENT/ ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY ANNUAL REPORT June & INSTRUCTIONAL SAFETY T-1400 714-278-SAFE #12;2007 ­ 2008 Risk Management Annual Report Page 2 I. Executive management costs against the System average. In 2008-09, the University's risk pool contributions for CSURMA

de Lijser, Peter

492

California Library Laws, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"California Library Laws 2008" is a selective guide to state laws and related materials that most directly affect the everyday operations of public libraries and organizations that work with public libraries. It is intended as a convenient reference, not as a replacement for the annotated codes or for legal advice. The guide is organized as…

Smith, Paul G., Ed.

2008-01-01

493

California Geological Survey - Landslides  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page from the CA Geological Survey (CGS) presents information on landslides as well as maps and products of various past and present CGS programs to map and respond to landslides in the state of California, including the Forest and Watershed Geology Program, the Seismic Hazards Zonation Program, the Caltrans Highway Corridor Mapping project, and the Landslide Map Index.

Survey, California G.

494

Computerevolution in California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The introduction of the microcomputer is producing complex changes in the cosmopolitan culture of Californians, including the way people live and learn at home, in school, and at the office. Recently, many bills have been proposed in California to introduce computer science and technology into the public education system; in addition, tax credits…

Kobryn, Nancy M.

495

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

SciTech Connect

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01

496

Panel reports of the first session of the workshop on coal for California  

SciTech Connect

The panel reports are the result of a five-day workshop held at the Pajaro Dunes Conference Center, Watsonville, California, October 1-6, 1978. The workshop was conducted by JPL, under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission. The purpose of the exercise was to assay the opinions of a broad range of groups in order to identify what people perceive to be the problems associated with increased coal use in California. Representatives from utilities, industry, mining companies, citizens groups, and the academic community were divided into seven panels, each of which prepared a report. Representatives of government agencies attended as observers. The panels examined end-uses of coal in California, mine-mouth conversion, advanced concepts and use of Alaskan coal, environmental effects, public acceptance, finance, and legislation and regulation.

Not Available

1980-05-01

497

Deere & Company Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

home. We conducted such an audit at each one of our factories at 'the outset of our program. We ended up with an analysis of yearly energy consumption by fuel type for each factory and this then also permitted a composite profile for the whole... as the company's. We strive ito develop an energy "ethic". The energy management and conservation program at Deere has been instrumental in increasing our energy awareness level. Energy efficiency is now a fu~da? mental element of our management decision...

Darby, D. F.

1981-01-01

498

Distinguishing between Natural Crude Oil Seepage and Anthropogenic Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soils at a Crude Oil Processing Facility, Coastal California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude oil from offshore deposits in the Miocene Monterey Formation is commonly processed at facilities along the California coast. This formation is known for natural crude oil seepage (NCS), manifested at a California oil and gas processing facility (the site) as small pools on the ground surface, discharge from an adjacent bluff, and as free product in a hand-dug well.

Susan J. McCaffery; Andy Davis; David Craig

2009-01-01

499

POWER PLANT COOLING WATER CHLORINATION IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

A survey was conducted of chlorination practices at five power plants owned and operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Frequency and duration of chlorination varied significantly from plant to plant and was controlled analytically by the orthotolidine and/or amperometr...

500

Project SAGE: solar assisted gas energy. Final report and executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The Phase III basic objective was establishment of a technical and economic baseline for proper assessment of the practical potential of solar water heating for apartments. Plans can then be formulated to improve SAGE technical design and performance; reduce SAGE costs; refine SAGE market assessment; and identify policies to encourage the use of SAGE. Two SAGE water heating systems were installed and tested. One system was retrofit onto an existing apartment building; the other was installed in a new apartment building. Each installation required approximately 1000 square feet of collector area tilted to an angle of 37/sup 0/ from the horizontal, and each was designed to supply about 70 percent of the energy for heating water for approximately 32 to 40 units of a typical two-story apartment complex in Southern California. Actual contruction costs were carefully compiled, and both installations were equipped with performance monitoring equipment. In addition, the operating and maintenance requirements of each installation was evaluated by gas company maintenance engineers. Upon completion of the installation analysis, the SAGE installation cost was further refined by obtaining firm SAGE construction bids from two plumbing contractors in Southern California. Market penetration was assessed by developing a computer simulation program using the technical and economic analysis from the installation experience. Also, the project examined the public policies required to encourage SAGE and other solar energy options. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-03-01